Science.gov

Sample records for clinical nurse specialist

  1. Productivity measurement for clinical nurse specialists.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E L; McCartney, E S; Schreiber, J A; Thompson, E A

    1989-01-01

    The clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) at an 814-bed tertiary care center have collaborated to develop a method for measuring and evaluating productivity of the CNS role. This method, which uses the CIPP Evaluation Model as a framework, parallels the nursing process and is outcome oriented. The applicability of this method to other fixed positions may be of interest to nursing managers and administrators.

  2. 42 CFR 410.76 - Clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clinical nurse specialists' services. 410.76... § 410.76 Clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term...) Qualifications. For Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a clinical nurse specialist must— (1) Be...

  3. 42 CFR 410.76 - Clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Clinical nurse specialists' services. 410.76... § 410.76 Clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term...) Qualifications. For Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a clinical nurse specialist must— (1) Be...

  4. 42 CFR 410.76 - Clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Clinical nurse specialists' services. 410.76... § 410.76 Clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term...) Qualifications. For Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a clinical nurse specialist must— (1) Be...

  5. 42 CFR 410.76 - Clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Clinical nurse specialists' services. 410.76... § 410.76 Clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term...) Qualifications. For Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a clinical nurse specialist must— (1) Be a...

  6. Differentiating between a consultant nurse and a clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Maylor, Miles

    With the introduction of nurse consultants, and regulation of the use of the designation 'specialist nurse', experienced practitioners such as clinical nurse specialists have seen their position eroded. Nurse consultants are a new NHS-employment category, and are expected to be at the top rank of the profession both in status and in salary. However, this article argues that nurses at various levels have the same core functions, and that these do not differ for nurse consultants. Distinguishing between practitioners that might have the same job description could be better done by measuring outcomes. More care needs to be taken over the use of words such as 'expert', which is used differently in different contexts, and it is suggested that competencies be developed by which to measure the effects of expertise. Although nurse consultant appointments are often driven by various political directives and they are employed to meet local and national priorities, difficult issues need to be faced. First, if nurse consultant jobs are the top of the clinical career ladder, will clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) need to accept a lower rung on it? Further, perhaps the title CNS should become obsolete or be regulated? Can CNSs claim parity of pay using the 'Agenda for Change' framework?

  7. 42 CFR 410.76 - Clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... registered nurse who is currently licensed to practice in the State where he or she practices and be... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Clinical nurse specialists' services. 410.76... § 410.76 Clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the...

  8. Clinical nurse specialist assessment of nurses' knowledge of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mahramus, Tara L; Penoyer, Daleen Aragon; Sole, Mary Lou; Wilson, Debra; Chamberlain, Lyne; Warrington, William

    2013-01-01

    Patients' self-management of heart failure (HF) is associated with improved adherence and reduced readmissions. Nurses' knowledge about self-management of HF may influence their ability to adequately perform discharge education. Inadequate nurse knowledge may lead to insufficient patient education, and insufficient education may decrease patients' ability to perform self-management. Prior to developing interventions to improve patient education, clinical nurse specialists should assess nurses' knowledge of HF. The purpose of this study was to determine nurses' knowledge of HF self-management principles. This was a prospective, exploratory, and descriptive online test. There were 3 patient care settings: tertiary care teaching hospital, community hospital, and home healthcare division. The sample was composed of 90 registered nurses who worked directly with patients with HF. Nurses completed an online test of knowledge using the Nurses' Knowledge of Heart Failure Education Principles instrument. Registered nurses (n = 90) completed the knowledge test instrument; their average score was 71% (SD, 10.8%) (range, 20%-90%). The percentage of correct items on each subscale ranged from 63.9% (SD, 30.0) for medications to 83.3% (SD, 25.0) for exercise. Only 8.9% of respondents achieved a passing score of greater than 85%, and a passing score was not associated with any demographic characteristics. Overall, nursing knowledge of HF self-management principles was low. Scores from our nurses were similar to those found in other studies. There is a need to develop interventions to improve nursing knowledge of HF self-management principles. Clinical nurse specialists can be instrumental in developing knowledge interventions for nurses.

  9. Clinical nurse specialists: essential resource for an effective NHS.

    PubMed

    Vidall, Cheryl; Barlow, Helen; Crowe, Maggie; Harrison, Isabel; Young, Annie

    Despite emerging evidence for the clinical and financial efficacy of the clinical nurse specialist (CNS), the provision of this role is patchy across the country. There is also a risk that incumbent CNS' may be redirected to less specialist work in trusts that do not appreciate the full value of the service that these nurses provide. Optimal and equitable patient access to CNS care will require the development of a strong evidence base showing that specialist nurses not only deliver patient-focused care, but that they can also help to meet healthcare managers' objectives of streamlined, cost-effective clinical services.

  10. Comparing Clinical Nurse Specialist Students' Socialization Based on Magnet Employment.

    PubMed

    Ares, Terri L

    The purpose of this study is to ascertain if clinical nurse specialist students differed on measures of professional socialization based on employment in a Magnet-oriented hospital. A secondary analysis of data from a previous national study of the socialization of clinical nurse specialist students was used. Anticipatory socialization variables (nursing leadership, workplace exposure to the role, and preconceived impression of the role), mentorship by a clinical nurse specialist, and socialization outcomes (self-concept, perceived preparedness for practice, and nursing specialty certification) were explored. Data were divided into 2 groups: Magnet (n = 106) and non-Magnet (n = 119). Comparisons between the groups on researcher-designed items and the Professionalism and Work Ethic subscales of the Nurses Self-Description Form were analyzed. The Magnet group was more likely to be exposed to the clinical nurse specialist role in the workplace. Overall, there were no group differences in socialization outcome measures; but in the subset of students with workplace exposure to the role, those with Magnet experience had higher professionalism self-concept scores. Magnet employment was not a significant socializing factor for nurses pursuing clinical nurse specialist education. The graduate program is likely the primary socializing agent for these students.

  11. Perioperative Clinical Nurse Specialist Role Delineation: A Systematic Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Educational innovations. Development and testing of a clinical self -time table for acute care graduate CNS students. Journal of Nursing Education 35...1996). Development and testing of a clinical self -time table for acute care graduate CNS students. Journal of Nursing Education, 35, 419-422...development of the CNS role in adolescent health promotion self - care . Clinical Nurse Specialist 1993 May; 7(3): 111-5 (16 re f). Fader, W. A new role for

  12. Orienting and Onboarding Clinical Nurse Specialists: A Process Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mayra G; Watt, Jennifer L; Falder-Saeed, Karie; Lewis, Brennan; Patton, Lindsey

    Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) have a unique advanced practice role. This article describes a process useful in establishing a comprehensive orientation and onboarding program for a newly hired CNS. The project team used the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists core competencies as a guide to construct a process for effectively onboarding and orienting newly hired CNSs. Standardized documents were created for the orientation process including a competency checklist, needs assessment template, and professional evaluation goals. In addition, other documents were revised to streamline the orientation process. Standardizing the onboarding and orientation process has demonstrated favorable results. As of 2016, 3 CNSs have successfully been oriented and onboarded using the new process. Unique healthcare roles require special focus when onboarding and orienting into a healthcare system. The use of the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists core competencies guided the project in establishing a successful orientation and onboarding process for newly hired CNSs.

  13. Translating social justice into clinical nurse specialist practice.

    PubMed

    Bell, Sue Ellen; Hulbert, James R

    2008-01-01

    Translating social justice into clinical nurse specialist (CNS) practice involves not only facilitating equitable access to healthcare resources but also changing the definition of health from individual centric to population based. Clinical nurse specialists working within hospitals or healthcare systems generally have not explored the ethical conflicts between demand and available healthcare resources. Application of social justice to CNS practice requires microallocation decisions in direct patient care and macroallocation decisions in the distribution of all societal goods that alleviate health disparities. This article reviews the meaning, history, and current basis for the application of the principle of social justice to CNS practice.

  14. Clinical Nurse Specialists Guide Staff Nurses to Promote Practice Accountability Through Peer Review.

    PubMed

    Semper, Julie; Halvorson, Betty; Hersh, Mary; Torres, Clare; Lillington, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the clinical nurse specialist role in developing and implementing a staff nurse education program to promote practice accountability using peer review principles. Peer review is essential for professional nursing practice demanding a significant culture change. Clinical nurse specialists in a Magnet-designated community hospital were charged with developing a staff nurse peer review education program. Peer review is a recognized mechanism of professional self-regulation to ensure delivery of quality care. The American Nurses Association strongly urges incorporating peer review in professional nursing practice models. Clinical nurse specialists play a critical role in educating staff nurses about practice accountability. Clinical nurse specialists developed an education program guided by the American Nurses Association's principles of peer review. A baseline needs assessment identified potential barriers and learning needs. Content incorporated tools and strategies to build communication skills, collaboration, practice change, and peer accountability. The education program resulted in increased staff nurse knowledge about peer review and application of peer review principles in practice. Clinical nurse specialists played a critical role in helping staff nurses understand peer review and its application to practice. The clinical nurse specialist role will continue to be important in sustaining the application of peer review principles in practice.

  15. Qualitative Distinctions and Similarities in the Practice of Clinical Nurse Specialists and Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Mary V.; Brykczynski, Karen A.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison of results of two studies regarding the actual practice of clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners revealed a shared core of advanced practice competencies as well as distinct differences between practice roles. (JOW)

  16. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Rural areas. For services furnished beginning January...

  17. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Rural areas. For services furnished beginning January...

  18. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Rural areas. For services furnished beginning January 1, 1992 and...

  19. Clinical nurse specialist prescriber characteristics and challenges in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess role characteristics of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) with prescriptive authority in Oregon 10 years after passage of Senate Bill 460. Factors examined included role preparation and mentorship, use and maintenance of authority, prescribing benefits and barriers, and types of drugs/nondrugs prescribed. This study was a descriptive survey using both quantitative and qualitative analysis. The sample was obtained from a list provided on June 13, 2014, by the Oregon State Board of Nursing of all CNSs in Oregon who had ever been granted prescriptive authority (n = 40). Twenty-nine with active authority, 7 with expired authority, and 4 with inactive status were sampled. E-mail distribution with Qualtrics software was released on June 27, 2014. Reminder e-mails were sent at 1 and 2 weeks. Of the 38 e-mails successfully delivered, 23 responses were received for a total response rate of 60%. Clinical nurse specialists successfully maintained their authority in Oregon and felt well prepared for their role. Their prescribing mentorship included nurse and nonnurse prescribers. They were most likely to have ever prescribed psychiatric, noncontrolled analgesics and durable medical equipment. They most frequently prescribed nutrition/electrolytes/fluids, durable medical equipment, and controlled analgesics. Lapse in authority was attributed to constraints regarding certification or credentialing in the role. Clinical nurse specialists uniformly expressed benefits from prescriptive authority. There were no differences in perceptions of preparation based on type of mentorship or educational modality for completion of prescribing requirements. There were systems barriers including lack of employer and colleague support to use of authority. Durable medical equipment authority is important to the CNS role. Clinical nurse specialists valued and maintained their prescriptive authority despite barriers. Further research is recommended to support

  20. Implementing a night-shift clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Becker, Dawn Marie

    2013-01-01

    Night-shift nurses receive fewer educational opportunities and less administrative support than do day-shift staff, tend to be newer, with less experience and fewer resources, and experience greater turnover rates, stress, and procedural errors. In an attempt to bridge the gap between day- and night-shift nursing, a night-shift clinical nurse specialist (CNS) position was created in a midsized, community teaching hospital. The goal was to provide an advanced practice presence to improve patient outcomes, communication, education, and cost-effectiveness. The night-shift CNS participated in nursing education and skill certifications, communicated new procedures and information, and created a communication committee specifically for night-shift nurses. Through regular rounding and on-call notification, the CNS was available to every area of the hospital for consultation and clinical assistance and assisted with rapid responses, codes, and traumas. Providing education during night shift reduced overtime costs and increased morale, positively affecting turnover rates. The night-shift CNS position has improved morale and equalized support for night-shift nurses. More research, most notably in specific night-shift metrics, is necessary, and with the implementation of the role in additional facilities, more can be understood about improving patient care and nursing staff satisfaction during night shift.

  1. Economic evaluation of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles: A methodological review.

    PubMed

    Lopatina, Elena; Donald, Faith; DiCenso, Alba; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Carter, Nancy; Reid, Kim; Marshall, Deborah A

    2017-07-01

    Advanced practice nurses (e.g., nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists) have been introduced internationally to increase access to high quality care and to tackle increasing health care expenditures. While randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have demonstrated the effectiveness of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles, their cost-effectiveness has been challenged. The poor quality of economic evaluations of these roles to date raises the question of whether current economic evaluation guidelines are adequate when examining their cost-effectiveness. To examine whether current guidelines for economic evaluation are appropriate for economic evaluations of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles. Our methodological review was informed by a qualitative synthesis of four sources of information: 1) narrative review of literature reviews and discussion papers on economic evaluation of advanced practice nursing roles; 2) quality assessment of economic evaluations of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles alongside randomised controlled trials; 3) review of guidelines for economic evaluation; and, 4) input from an expert panel. The narrative literature review revealed several challenges in economic evaluations of advanced practice nursing roles (e.g., complexity of the roles, variability in models and practice settings where the roles are implemented, and impact on outcomes that are difficult to measure). The quality assessment of economic evaluations of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles alongside randomised controlled trials identified methodological limitations of these studies. When we applied the Guidelines for the Economic Evaluation of Health Technologies: Canada to the identified challenges and limitations, discussed those with experts and qualitatively synthesized all findings, we concluded that standard guidelines for economic evaluation are appropriate for economic

  2. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  3. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  4. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  5. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  6. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's...

  7. Enhancing patient education through clinical nurse specialist collaboration.

    PubMed

    Chick, Katherine; Negley, Kristin; Sievers, Beth; Tammel, Karyl

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a collaborative clinical nurse specialist (CNS) project to enhance the patient education provided by registered nurses across 7 medical nursing units in an acute care hospital. Electronic data reviews assisted the medical CNSs with identifying a deficit in using appropriate education plans and documentation of patient education. The interventions implemented included the creation of new patient education brochures, updating the electronic system to enhance nurses' ability to provide patient education materials and to simplify documentation, creating a video-on-demand education channel, and ensuring that patient education materials were easily accessible. Postassessment results showed that nurses' reported use of disease-specific education plan increased 33%. The staff's perception of the importance of documenting patient education provided also increased 9%. This project demonstrates CNSs' ability to design, develop, and implement a systematic and structured process to promote a consistent way for medical nurses to utilize the best disease-specific patient education resources. : With hospital stays being shorter and patients more acutely ill, partnering with the patients in learning how to manage their care as they transition from the hospital to home is key to help prevent hospital readmissions.

  8. What are the roles of clinical nurses and midwife specialists?

    PubMed

    Wickham, Sheelagh

    Research shows the increasing part the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) plays in healthcare today. But what does a CNS actually do in their day-to day-work? This study, set in the Republic of Ireland, aimed to explore the CNS and clinical midwife specialist (CMS) roles in practice. Quantitative methodology was used to explore the roles and activities of the CNS and CMS. Following ethics approval, a valid and reliable questionnaire was circulated to the total population of CNS/CMS in Ireland. The data were analysed using SPSS. This study articulates the individual role elements and activity level. The findings show the CNS/CMS to be active in the roles of researcher, educator, communicator, change agent, leader and clinical specialist, but the level of activity varies between different roles and individual role elements. The CNS/CMS is seen as a valuable resource in health care today and has potential to have a positive effect on patient care. The majority of CNS/CMSs are active in varying roles but the analysis shows lesser activity in some areas, such as research. The findings merit further study on role activity and possible variables that influence role activity.

  9. The future of the clinical nurse specialist role in Finland.

    PubMed

    Jokiniemi, Krista; Haatainen, Kaisa; Meretoja, Riitta; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

    2015-01-01

    To identify and examine the expert panelists' visions on the future implementation of the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role in Finland. A policy Delphi design was conducted in 2013. A purposive sampling method was used to recognize expert panelists in the areas of advanced practice nursing (APN), healthcare management, and advanced practice nurse education. Three iterative Web-based survey rounds were conducted (n = 25, n = 22, n = 19). Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to analyze the data. The expert panelists envisioned the future of the CNS role in Finland. This study portrayed the CNS role in Finland as generally consistent with the international role. CNS have comprehensive skills and knowledge that they use to guide and develop nursing practice; however, several threats may affect their role achievement. The existing national consensus, contradiction, and ambivalence related to CNS roles were revealed through the examination of the results, thus pointing out the areas for consideration when further developing these roles and role policies. This is the first national study to examine the implementation of the CNS role in Finland. Expert panelists' views regarding the CNS role will be valuable in the forthcoming national policy formulation process. Although the policy Delphi design is not often utilized, this study reveals that it is very well suited to guide and inform national and international APN policy development. This study contributes to CNS role development and describes the methods facilitating the essential policy formulation process. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  10. The consultation component of the clinical nurse specialist role.

    PubMed

    Dias, Maria-Helena; Chambers-Evans, Jane; Reidy, Mary

    2010-06-01

    The clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role in Canada has 5 key components: clinical practice, consultation, education, research, and leadership. This study focuses on the consultation component: how it is described by CNSs and the facilitators and barriers to its implementation. A qualitative descriptive design was used to interview 8 CNSs who worked with adult populations in a university hospital setting.The findings indicate that managing crisis situations, ensuring continuity of care, and supporting other health professionals and health-care teams are key areas of consultation. Role ambiguity perceived by other professionals and constant demands and expectations due to a changing environment constitute the major challenges of CNS practice, requiring CNSs to continuously clarify their role in accordance with changes in time and place.

  11. Nursing Morbidity and Mortality: The Clinical Nurse Specialist Role in Improving Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zavotsky, Kathleen Evanovich; Ciccarelli, Melissa; Pontieri-Lewis, Vicky; Royal, Sandia; Russer, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the development and implementation of a nursing morbidity and mortality (M&M) monthly conference at an academic medical center. Nursing M&M was developed as a peer review process in which cases where clinical errors or misjudgments that have occurred are reviewed in a nonpunitive setting. The cases are selected based on the National Database for Nursing Quality Indicators and the implications they have for the quality of nursing practice. Morbidity and mortality conferences are well documented in the physician arena as an avenue to review and discuss adverse events. There is little published in the literature related to nursing using this peer review format and what impact this forum can have on clinical outcomes. Clinical nurse specialists and clinical nurse educators are oftentimes positioned to help implement this type of forum and evaluate the impact that it has for the staff and patients that they work with. The clinical nurse specialists/clinical nurse educators at this fourth-time designated Magnet® academic medical center facilitate the monthly M&M and select 4 to 5 cases to present. At the end of each brief presentation, the outcome is determined to be either preventable or unpreventable. Action items for educational needs are also identified. Nursing M&M has been well attended over the past year. Since its inception, multiple practice changes have been implemented. Based on the positive feedback from the evaluations, this monthly conference has become standing practice in the institution.

  12. The clinical nurse specialist as resuscitation process manager.

    PubMed

    Schneiderhahn, Mary Elizabeth; Fish, Anne Folta

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the history and leadership dimensions of the role of resuscitation process manager and provide specific examples of how this role is implemented at a Midwest medical center. In 1992, a medical center in the Midwest needed a nurse to manage resuscitation care. This role designation meant that this nurse became central to all quality improvement efforts in resuscitation care. The role expanded as clinical resuscitation guidelines were updated and as the medical center grew. The role became known as the critical care clinical nurse specialist as resuscitation process manager. This clinical care nurse specialist was called a manager, but she had no direct line authority, so she accomplished her objectives by forming a multitude of collaborative networks. Based on a framework by Finkelman, the manager role incorporated specific leadership abilities in quality improvement: (1) coordination of medical center-wide resuscitation, (2) use of interprofessional teams, (3) integration of evidence into practice, and (4) staff coaching to develop leadership. The manager coordinates resuscitation care with the goals of prevention of arrests if possible, efficient and effective implementation of resuscitation protocols, high quality of patient and family support during and after the resuscitation event, and creation or revision of resuscitation policies for in-hospital and for ambulatory care areas. The manager designs a comprehensive set of meaningful and measurable process and outcome indicators with input from interprofessional teams. The manager engages staff in learning, reflecting on care given, and using the evidence base for resuscitation care. Finally, the manager role is a balance between leading quality improvement efforts and coaching staff to implement and sustain these quality improvement initiatives. Revisions to clinical guidelines for resuscitation care since the 1990s have resulted in medical centers developing improved

  13. The Path to Advanced Practice Licensure for Clinical Nurse Specialists in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Schoonover, Heather

    The aim of this study was to provide a review of the history and process to obtaining advanced practice licensure for clinical nurse specialists in Washington State. Before 2016, Washington State licensed certified nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and certified nurse anesthetists under the designation of an advanced registered nurse practitioner; however, the state did not recognize clinical nurse specialists as advanced practice nurses. The work to drive the rule change began in 2007. The Washington Affiliate of the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists used the Power Elite Theory to guide advocacy activities, building coalitions and support for the desired rule changes. On January 8, 2016, the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission voted to amend the state's advanced practice rules, including clinical nurse specialists in the designation of an advanced practice nurse. Since the rule revision, clinical nurse specialists in Washington State have been granted advanced registered nurse practitioner licenses. Driving changes in state regulatory rules requires diligent advocacy, partnership, and a deep understanding of the state's rule-making processes. To be successful in changing rules, clinical nurse specialists must build strong partnerships with key influencers and understand the steps in practice required to make the desired changes.

  14. Advance directives: the clinical nurse specialist as a change agent.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Karen Anne

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the impact the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) has on the advance directive process within the cardiac surgery patient population. As a change agent, the CNS needs to be able to increase the number of advance directives obtained and increase the provision of dignified, self-directed, quality patient care. With requirements from The Joint Commission and the Patient Self-determination Act, the change in process must take place to ensure that healthcare professionals are doing all they can do to carry out a patient's wishes. The 6-Source Influencer Model is applied to a case study to illustrate the role of the CNS as a change agent. Following this model, the CNS can facilitate lasting institutional change in the advance directive process. Based on the example, it is possible that a CNS can act as a change agent for other patient populations within the healthcare setting.

  15. National validation of the NACNS clinical nurse specialist core competencies.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen M; Clark, Angela P; Fulton, Janet; Mayo, Ann

    2009-01-01

    To validate the 75 core National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists' (NACNS) clinical nurse specialist (CNS) competencies among practicing CNSs. Specific aims were to (a) determine the extent to which 75 core CNS competencies were used in current CNS practice, (b) determine the importance of those competencies to practicing CNSs, and (c) identify gaps between CNS core competencies and role expectations in current practice. A survey design was used with both paper-and-pencil and online instruments. The survey included 150 items and three open-ended questions. A convenience sampling method was used, which targeted practicing CNSs. Respondents (N=505) were practicing CNSs who entered the field as RNs between 1956 and 2006. The survey had a high degree of internal consistency reliability (0.967%) between the subscales. The 75 NACNS core competencies were found to be useful and important for CNSs. A few gaps were identified between CNS core competencies and CNS role expectations in current practice. No one method for validating competencies will be satisfactory for all situations; however, the processes and methods used in this study were well suited to accomplish the goal of validating CNS core competencies. The process described here may be instructive to leaders of other national and international professional organizations interested in developing and evaluating competencies. Core competencies are useful and important to currently practicing CNSs. The CNS role is growing internationally. Core CNS competencies can be a framework for CNS role development, education, and practice. As described here, a competency validation survey is one way to assure that CNSs are meeting healthcare needs.

  16. A diabetes management mentor program: outcomes of a clinical nurse specialist initiative to empower staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Modic, Mary Beth; Canfield, Christina; Kaser, Nancy; Sauvey, Rebecca; Kukla, Aniko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to enhance the knowledge of the bedside nurse in diabetes management. A forum for ongoing support and exploration of clinical problems, along with the distribution of educational tools were the components of this program. Diabetes accounts for 30% of patients admitted to the hospital. It has become more challenging to manage as the treatment choices have increased. There are a number of researchers who have identified nurse and physician knowledge of diabetes management principles as suboptimal. DESCRIPTION OF THE INNOVATION: Staff nurses are educated for a role as a Diabetes Management Mentor and are expected to educate/dialogue with peers monthly, model advocacy and diabetes patient education skills, facilitate referrals for diabetes education, and direct staff to resources for diabetes management. Diabetes Management Mentors feel more confident in their knowledge of diabetes and their ability to resolve clinical issues as they arise. The Diabetes Management Mentor role is another avenue for nurses to refine their clinical knowledge base and acquire skills to share with colleagues while remaining at the bedside. The clinical nurse specialist is expertly prepared to foster the professional development of bedside nurses while simultaneously making a positive impact on disease management. Opportunity for future investigation includes efficacy of teaching tools on diabetes mastery, the effect of clinical nurse specialist mentoring on a select group of bedside nurses, and the Diabetes Management Mentor's impact on prevention of near-miss events.

  17. Families' perceptions of the contribution of intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Doody, Owen; Slevin, Eamonn; Taggart, Laurence

    2017-05-11

    To explore families' perceptions of the contribution of clinical nurse specialists in intellectual disability nursing in Ireland. Clinical nurse specialists roles have developed over the years and are seen as complex and multifaceted, causing confusion, frustration and controversy. 2001 saw the formal introduction of clinical nurse specialists roles in Ireland across nursing including intellectual disability. A exploratory qualitative approach using semistructured one-to-one interviews with 10 family members regarding their perceptions of the clinical nurse specialists in intellectual disability. Data were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using Burnard's framework. Ethical approval was gained and access granted by service providers. The study highlights that intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists contribute and support care deliver across a range of areas, including personal caring, supporting and empowering families, liaison, education and leadership. Clinical nurse specialists have an important role and contribution in supporting families and clients, and Ireland is in a unique position to develop knowledge regarding specialist care for people with intellectual disability that can be shared nationally and internationally. Ireland is in a unique position to develop knowledge regarding specialist care for people with intellectual disability that can be shared and adapted by other healthcare professionals in other countries that do not have a specialised intellectual disability nurses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Clinical Nurse Specialist Perceptions' of Spiritual Care: Nurses Need Support, Care Falls Short.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Mitzi M; Harris, Karen; Hale, Deborah L

    The clinical nurse specialist (CNS) is positioned to influence spiritual care at three levels of practice: patient, nurse, and system. This study, the first to explore CNS spiritual care, reports on CNSs' perceptions in providing spiritual care. Four themes were extracted from interview data: 1) Providing direct spiritual support for patients, 2) Nurses need support in providing spiritual care, 3) Using existing resources, and 4) Spiritual care falls short. Not one CNS mentioned barriers to their direct provision of spiritual care. Results support that CNSs can improve spiritual care delivery.

  19. Clinical nurse specialists' perceptions of work patterns, outcomes, desires, and emerging trends.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Mitzi M

    2015-04-01

    This study explored clinical nurse specialists' (CNSs') perceptions of work patterns, outcomes, desires, and emerging trends in practice. Clinical nurse specialists transform patient care toward high-quality, cost-effective outcomes, but the role includes multiple dimensions contributing to role confusion. Using qualitative methods, 12 CNSs were interviewed for perceptions of their role in healthcare today. Data reduction and confirmability strategies were used in data analysis. Work patterns included office activities, patient rounds, working with nurses, attending meetings, and supporting quality improvement initiatives. Outcomes included safer patient care, getting patients the resources they need, transforming nurses, and meeting the quality metrics. An emerging trend was increased involvement in research. Clinical nurse specialists perceive the role to be important in driving change and transforming nursing care towards high-quality clinical outcomes.

  20. Illuminating the clinical nurse specialist role of advanced practice nursing: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Canam, Connie

    2005-12-01

    As the advanced practice nursing initiative in Canada gains momentum, effort is being directed towards clarifying and defining advanced practice roles. A qualitative study was undertaken to increase understanding of the clinical nurse specialist role of advanced practice. Sixteen nurses who worked in advanced practice roles, organizing and providing healthcare for children with complex health needs and their families across the continuum of care, participated in in-depth conversations about the nature of their practice, the knowledge that informs it and the factors that influence it. Findings suggest that clinical nurse specialists have a unique role in the organization and delivery of healthcare for specialized populations with complex health needs in their dual focus on the system level of healthcare and on population health needs. Initiatives directed to children and families within the study participants' specialties included program development, consultation and educational outreach and the development of clinical guidelines and policies. Although the nurses described their practice as focusing both on individual children and families and on the population of children and families within their specialty, it is at the population level that they see their greatest potential for contributing to the delivery of high-quality, cost-effective healthcare.

  1. Rural nurse specialists: clinical practice and the politics of care.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    2008-01-01

    Doctor flight from rural areas is an international phenomenon that places great pressure on primary health care delivery. In New Zealand, the response to these empty doctors' surgeries has been the introduction of nurse-led rural health clinics that have attracted controversy both in the media and from urban-based doctors over whether such nurse-led care is a direct substitution of medical care. This article analyzes the reflections of nurses working in some of these clinics who suggest that their situation is more complex than a direct substitution of labor. Although the nurses indicate some significant pressures moving them closer to the work of doctoring, they actively police this cross-boundary work and labor simultaneously to shore up their nursing identities. My own conclusions support their assertions. I argue that it is the maintenance of a holistic professional habitus that best secures their professional identity as nurses while they undertake the cross-boundary tasks of primary rural health care. There are clear professional benefits and disadvantages for the nurses in these situations, which make the positions highly politicized. These recurring divisions of labor within medical care giving and the elaboration of new types of care worker form an appropriate although neglected topic of study for anthropologists. The study of the social organization of clinical medicine is much enriched by paying closer attention to its interaction with allied health professions and their associated understandings of "good" care.

  2. [Differences and similarities between the competencies of a nursing supervisor and an advanced clinical nurse specialist].

    PubMed

    del Barrio-Linares, M; Pumar-Méndez, M J

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of contributing to the development of a more specific professional regulation, the present study was to identify differences and similarities between the competencies of the nursing supervisor and clinical nurse specialist in an intensive care unit. A critical analysis of the literature published between 2003 and 2013 was conducted, identified through systematic searches in electronic databases, health management and practitioner journals and reference lists of the 17 items included. «Management and administration» and «direct clinical practice» were identified as specific competencies of nursing supervisor and clinical nurse specialist respectively. «Collaboration», «leadership» and «research» emerged as competencies shared by both profiles, but with different a operationalization way of conducting it. These findings imply that regulation, education and implementation of these profiles must address their specific skills as the distinctive approach taken in operationalizing shared. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  3. Improving Heart Failure Outcomes: The Role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist.

    PubMed

    Coen, Jennifer; Curry, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    This article identifies and explains barriers to optimal outcomes of heart failure and the role of the clinical nurse specialist in overcoming these obstacles, improving patient outcomes and quality of life. In recent years, advances in heart failure management have increased survival rates, and as a result, the number of patients requiring services to manage disease progression and the complex array of symptoms associated with end-stage heart disease. Management of the heart failure patient is dependent on the severity of the disease and wide range of available treatment regimens. Disease progression can be unpredictable and treatment regimens increasingly complex. The authors present a typical case of a patient with heart failure, identify the barriers to optimal outcomes in managing heart failure, as well as describe the roles of the clinical nurse specialist in overcoming these barriers within 3 spheres of clinical nurse specialist influence: patient, health care provider, and health care systems. The clinical nurse specialist role is ideally suited to positively affect heart failure outcomes. These positive effects are drawn from the dynamic and unique nature of the clinical nurse specialist role and are perpetrated through the 3 spheres of clinical nurse specialist practice: patient, health care provider, and heath care system.

  4. Practice patterns and perceived impact of clinical nurse specialist roles in Canada: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; DiCenso, Alba; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Ritchie, Judith A; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Carter, Nancy

    2013-11-01

    Clinical nurse specialists are recognized internationally for providing an advanced level of practice. They positively impact the delivery of healthcare services by using specialty-specific expert knowledge and skills, and integrating competencies as clinicians, educators, researchers, consultants and leaders. Graduate-level education is recommended for the role but many countries do not have formal credentialing mechanisms for clinical nurse specialists. Previous studies have found that clinical nurse specialist roles are poorly understood by stakeholders. Few national studies have examined the utilization of clinical nurse specialists. To identify the practice patterns of clinical nurse specialists in Canada. A descriptive cross-sectional survey. Self-identified clinical nurse specialists in Canada. A 50-item self-report questionnaire was developed, pilot-tested in English and French, and administered to self-identified clinical nurse specialists from April 2011 to August 2011. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics and content analysis. The actual number of clinical nurse specialists in Canada remains unknown. The response rate using the number of registry-identified clinical nurse specialists was 33% (804/2431). Of this number, 608 reported working as a clinical nurse specialist. The response rate for graduate-prepared clinical nurse specialists was 60% (471/782). The practice patterns of clinical nurse specialists varied across clinical specialties. Graduate-level education influenced their practice patterns. Few administrative structures and resources were in place to support clinical nurse specialist role development. The lack of title protection resulted in confusion around who identifies themselves as a clinical nurse specialist and consequently made it difficult to determine the number of clinical nurse specialists in Canada. This is the first national survey of clinical nurse specialists in Canada. A clearer understanding of

  5. Breaking significant news: The experience of clinical nurse specialists in cancer and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Mishelmovich, Nina; Arber, Anne; Odelius, Anki

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the research was to explore specialist cancer and palliative care nurses experience of delivering significant news to patients with advanced cancer. A qualitative phenomenological research study was conducted to capture nurses' experiences with the aim of understanding how cancer and palliative care clinical nurse specialists work towards disclosure of advanced and terminal cancer. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 10 clinical nurse specialists working in one acute NHS trust. Clinical nurse specialists were recruited from the following specialities: lung cancer, breast cancer, gynaecological cancer, upper and lower gastrointestinal cancer and palliative care. Four themes emerged from the data: importance of relationships; perspective taking; ways to break significant news; feeling prepared and putting yourself forward. The findings revealed that highly experienced clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) felt confident in their skills in delivering significant news and they report using patient centred communication to build a trusting relationship so significant news was easier to share with patients. CNSs were aware of guidelines and protocols for breaking significant and bad news but reported that they used guidelines flexibly and it was their years of clinical experience that enabled them to be effective in disclosing significant news. Some areas of disclosure were found to be challenging in particular news of a terminal prognosis to patients who were of a younger age. CNSs have become more directly involved in breaking significant news to those with advanced cancer by putting themselves forward and feeling confident in their skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploring the leadership role of the clinical nurse specialist on an inpatient palliative care consulting team.

    PubMed

    Stilos, Kalli; Daines, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Demand for palliative care services in Canada will increase owing to an aging population and the evolving role of palliative care in non-malignant illness. Increasing healthcare demands continue to shape the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role, especially in the area of palliative care. Clinical nurse specialists bring specialized knowledge, skills and leadership to the clinical setting to enhance patient and family care. This paper highlights the clinical leadership role of the CNS as triage leader for a hospital-based palliative care consulting team. Changes to the team's referral and triage processes are emphasized as key improvements to team efficiency and timely access to care for patients and families.

  7. Bridging the gap: interprofessional collaboration between nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Shannon; Lepage, Karine; Boileau, Johanne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the collaborative model established between the specialized nurse practitioner (SNP) and the clinical nurse specialist (CNS), within the cardiac surgery population. The literature has shown a trend that SNPs and CNSs work in parallel or even in competition. Little has been written about a collaborative model and the advantages to working together toward a mutual goal. It was felt that a collaborative model between advance practice nurses could demonstrate the advantages of using their unique perspectives to achieve improvement in the quality of care given to the patients. The Structuration Model of Interprofessional Collaboration was used as a guide to our interventions and elaboration of our project. The team set out to establish, promote, and nurture a collaborative approach to care for the cardiac surgery population from admission to 3 months after discharge. A collaborative relationship was achieved between the SNP and the CNS, to the benefit of the patient population. Collaboration between these 2 advanced practice nurses is realistic and attainable. The advantages to this relationship outweigh the negative feelings harbored toward each professional title. By working in collaboration instead of in parallel, resources are pooled together to achieve greater services and care for the patients. A change in attitude between professionals has a positive impact on working relationships, partnerships, and communication. Ultimately, it is an advantage for the advanced practice nurse, the multidisciplinary team, and the patient.

  8. Role of the clinical nurse specialist in the journey to magnet recognition.

    PubMed

    Hanson, M Dave

    2015-01-01

    Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) work with and through other nurses as well as interprofessional team members to advance nursing practice, improve outcomes, and provide clinical expertise to effect system-wide changes to improve programs of care. They practice across the continuum and through 3 spheres of influence, encompassing the patient, nurse, and system. Clinical nurse specialists possess expertise in developing and refining structures, strategies, and processes to optimize outcomes at both the unit (micro) level and the organization or system (macro) level. This unique vantage point positions CNSs as ideal individuals to assume several key roles when a health care organization makes the decision to embark on the Magnet journey and to maintain Magnet recognition. The competence and competencies of CNSs and a health care organization's desire to achieve and/or maintain Magnet recognition represent a synergistic match.

  9. The unique contribution of community clinical nurse specialists in rural Wales.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Debbie; Hibberd, Pat; Lewis, Christopher Alan; Turley, Joanne

    2014-12-01

    To date, quality indicators that have been developed for nursing tend to focus on acute, secondary care settings. It remains unclear whether such quality indicators are applicable to community settings, particularly in rural environments. This research aims to identify the consensus view among specialist nurses regarding their unique nursing contribution within their rural community. Identifying agreed aspects of the unique role within the rural community area will enable quality care metrics to be developed, allowing specialist nurses to measure their unique contribution to rural health care in the future. The research used the Delphi technique to identify a consensus view among a population of specialist community nurses working in a designated rural area in Wales. The strongest area of consensus related to clinical and teaching expertise, where participants perceive educational expertise as being at the forefront of their role. In terms of care for individuals, consensus was focused on four main areas: developing appropriate criteria for referral in to the service, collaborative working, education, and advocacy roles. The findings highlight similarities to models of care provision elsewhere. Specific quality indicators are required for clinical nurse specialists working in rural areas. Current quality indicators may not be applicable across all clinical settings. Further work is required to explore the nature of rural nursing practice.

  10. Integrating Geropsychiatric Nursing and Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Competencies Into Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist Education.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Ann M; Harris, Melodee; Buron, Bill

    Specific changes to the national clinical nurse specialist (CNS) certification are necessitating a move away the psychiatric/mental health (P/MH) CNS population focus. However, a rapidly increasing older adult population with P/MH comorbidities such as depression and anxiety means that the adult-gerontology CNS (AGCNS) will likely be coordinating much of the complex care needs of this vulnerable population. Therefore, strategies are needed to ensure AGCNSs are competent in advanced practice P/MH nursing. In addition, at this critical time in the redesign of healthcare, the Institute of Medicine has made interprofessional practice center stage for healthcare professional education. Therefore, the purpose of this manuscript is to propose aligning the current AGCNS population-focused competencies with the CNS geropsychiatric nursing competency enhancements and interprofessional collaborative practice education competencies. Examples of the proposed alignment and educational application strategies are presented. When AGCNS educational curricula encompass P/MH nursing at an advanced level from an interprofessional perspective, future AGCNSs will continue to be positioned to make significant contributions to the design of care systems and monitor and trend important outcomes, while ensuring safe and efficient, high-quality healthcare for older adults with P/MH comorbidities.

  11. The clinical nurse specialist and essential genomic competencies: charting the course.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Forging new frontiers is one description for the completion of the Human Genome Project (HGP) in 2003. This project produced a human DNA blueprint that is revolutionalizing society, changing healthcare, and producing new practice standards. With the genome map, scientists are identifying DNA variations that transform traditional models of health promotion, disease prevention, disease classification, treatment, and symptom management. The HGP is shifting emphasis from traditional genetics to an expanded genomic message. Nursing has responded to the HGP completion by establishing genomic nursing competencies. In 2005, the American Nurses Association (ANA), along with 48 nursing organizations, including the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS), endorsed minimum essential genetic/genomic nursing competencies for all registered nurses, regardless of education or specialty area. How does the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) explore the HGP frontier and integrate essential genomic nursing competencies into practice? This article discusses the HGP, the development of essential genetic/genomic nursing competencies, and the genomic role of the advanced practice CNS. A 1-day genomics program is described as a pilot project for integrating competencies in practice and education.

  12. The Clinical Nurse Specialist in the School Setting: Case Management of Migrant Children with Dental Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Mary Ellen

    This paper presents strategies for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) in the school setting to use in case management of migrant children with dental disease. Although dental disease is the major health problem of all school-age children in the nation, the problem is even more severe for children of migrant farmworkers. Leininger's transcultural…

  13. The Clinical Nurse Specialist in the School Setting: Case Management of Migrant Children with Dental Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Mary Ellen

    This paper presents strategies for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) in the school setting to use in case management of migrant children with dental disease. Although dental disease is the major health problem of all school-age children in the nation, the problem is even more severe for children of migrant farmworkers. Leininger's transcultural…

  14. Preparation of Clinical Nurse Specialists for Family-Centered Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Patricia A.; Magyary, Diane L.

    1989-01-01

    Nursing specialists are prepared at the master's level to function as members of interdisciplinary and family-centered early intervention teams for disabled children. A specialty program of study emphasizes advanced and specialized clinical practice; education of clients, families, staff, and professionals; consultation; research use; evaluation…

  15. Strategies to improve nurse knowledge of delirium: a call to the adult-gerontology clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Middle, Beverly; Miklancie, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of the adult-gerontology clinical nurse specialist in addressing the problem of delirium in hospitalized older adults through strategies to improve nurse knowledge. Delirium is a significant issue in hospitalized older adults. This acute confusional state can adversely impact older adults in various ways. Delirium has been implicated in (1) poor physical, cognitive, and psychological outcomes, (2) prolonged hospitalizations, (3) increased costs of care, (4) need for continued postacute care, and (5) patient and provider stress. To prevent delirium, nurses must possess the knowledge to identify risk factors and institute preventive strategies. Once a change in mental status occurs, it is critical that nurses recognize delirium and the steps necessary to provide safe, effective care. Nurses are the major providers of bedside care; however, multiple studies have identified a lack of nurse knowledge regarding delirium. The adult-gerontology clinical nurse specialist can be instrumental in fostering knowledge on this important issue. Multiple interventions can be conducted by the adult-gerontology clinical nurse specialist with acute care nurses to increase delirium knowledge. A review of the literature revealed strategies that might be used in the hospital setting. Before educational endeavors, it is crucial to assess baseline nurse knowledge of delirium. Educational strategies can then include use of standardized delirium assessment tools, implementation of the Geriatric Resource Nurse model, fostering geriatric case studies and simulations, conducting geriatric grand rounds, and development of structured delirium educational programs. Exploring the patient experience, post delirium, can provide an invaluable, first-hand account of the acute confusional state. This information can impact nurse knowledge as well as patient safety and well-being. Geriatric certification and professional organizational involvement can be

  16. Perceived knowledge, skills, attitude and contextual factors affecting evidence-based practice among nurse educators, clinical coaches and nurse specialists.

    PubMed

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Plummer, Virginia

    2015-05-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) in the clinical setting is recognized as an approach that leads to improved patient outcomes. Nurse educators (NEs), clinical coaches (CCs) and nurse specialists are in key positions to promote and facilitate EBP within clinical settings and have opportunities to advance practice. Therefore, it is important to understand their perceptions of factors promoting EBP and perceived barriers in facilitating EBP in clinical settings, before developing educational programmes. This paper reports findings from a study that aimed to explore NEs' , CCs' and nurse specialists' knowledge, skills and attitudes associated with EBP. This study used a questionnaire containing quantitative and a small number of qualitative questions to capture data collected from NEs, CCs and nurse specialists working at a tertiary health-care facility in Victoria, Australia. The questionnaire was distributed to a total of 435 people, of whom 135 responded (31%). Findings revealed that the three senior nurse groups relied heavily on personal experience, organizational policies and protocols as formal sources of knowledge. Furthermore, they had positive attitudes towards EBP. However, participants demonstrated lack of knowledge and skills in appraising and utilizing evidence into practice. They indicated a desire to seek educational opportunities to upskill themselves in the process of EBP. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Clinical nurse specialists lead teams to impact glycemic control after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Klinkner, Gwen; Murray, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this evidence-based practice improvement project was to improve patients' blood glucose control after cardiac surgery, specifically aiming to keep blood glucose levels less than 200 mg/dL. Glycemic control is essential for wound healing and infection prevention. Multiple factors including the use of corticosteroids and the stress of critical illness put cardiac surgery patients at greater risk for elevated blood glucose levels postoperatively. A Surgical Care Improvement Project measure related to infection prevention calls for the morning blood glucose level (closest to 6:00 AM) to be less than 200 mg/dL on postoperative days 0 to 2. Patients on our cardiothoracic surgery unit were experiencing blood glucose levels greater than benchmark goals. A practice improvement effort was designed to decrease the number of blood glucose results greater than 200 mg/dL after cardiac surgery. The clinical nurse specialists for diabetes and cardiac surgery worked with nursing staff and the interdisciplinary team to implement a 4-pronged approach to improve efficiency in care processes: (1) increase frequency of glucose monitoring, (2) improve accessibility of insulin orders, (3) develop delegation protocol to facilitate nurse-initiated insulin infusion, and (4) implement revised insulin infusion protocol. Hyperglycemia was identified more quickly, and a nurse-initiated protocol prompted more timely use of revised insulin infusion orders and involvement of the diabetes specialty team. Clinically significant improvement in postoperative glycemic control was achieved. Empowering nurses to initiate hyperglycemia treatment and consultation by diabetes specialists may greatly improve efficiency in care processes and clinical outcomes for cardiac surgery patients. Clinical nurse specialists are well positioned to plan and implement interventions that facilitate an evidence-based approach to glycemic management after cardiac surgery.

  18. Community palliative care clinical nurse specialists: a descriptive study of nurse-patient interactions.

    PubMed

    Howell, Debra; Hardy, Beth; Boyd, Caroline; Ward, Chris; Roman, Eve; Johnson, Miriam

    2014-05-01

    With an ageing population and changes to the UK process of commissioning health-care services, it is important that the role of the community palliative care clinical nurse specialist (CPC-CNS) is better understood. This study aimed to describe CPC-CNS activities during interactions with patients. Four CPC-CNSs were observed and audio-recorded during interactions with 34 patients. The data was assessed qualitatively using thematic analysis. An enormous breadth of activities were observed, within a framework of assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation. Cross-cutting themes were real-time decision making, leadership, ability to respond to and coordinate complex and varied situations, and communication techniques. Data saturation was not achieved. CPC-CNSs provide multifaceted care, requiring wide-ranging knowledge to enable them to act as liaison points in a complex health service, respond independently to the fluctuating needs of patients, and provide effective advance care planning, particularly to those with advanced disease, multi-morbidity, and frailty.

  19. The work of clinical nurse specialists (HIV/AIDS) in areas with a low prevalence of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Irwin, R

    1998-03-01

    The role of the clinical nurse specialists (HIV/AIDS) who work in areas with a low known prevalence of HIV is considered and their contribution to patient care, either directly or indirectly through the education and support of other health care workers, is discussed. Attention is given to the implications for nursing practice and the role of the clinical nurse specialist associated with the relative infrequency of contact with patients who have HIV disease; and some of the issues for people living with HIV/AIDS in rural areas are alluded to. Finally, some of the limitations of the clinical nurse specialist role are delineated and some consideration is given to the future role of clinical nurse specialists for HIV and AIDS.

  20. Finding the right fit: implementation of a structured interviewing process for clinical nurse specialists.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Julie S; Geddie, Patricia I; Aguirre, Lillian; Sole, Mary Lou

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) in one organization developed a structured interviewing process for CNS candidates. The process has evolved in relation to implementation of national CNS competencies, growth of the role in the organization, and changes to reporting structure. The CNS interview process includes panel interviews with various organizational leaders, CNSs, and team members. A behavioral-based tool relevant to the CNS role is used. Involving CNS peers in the interview ensures the successful hiring and retaining of suitable candidates. Clinical nurse specialists who were interviewed using the current peer interview procedure have reported satisfaction with the experience. Peer interviews for CNSs provide a forum for meaningful dialogue about the CNS role, competencies, and fit with the organization. This process can be used for other advanced practice disciplines.

  1. An exploration of the services provided by the clinical nurse specialist within one NHS trust.

    PubMed

    Martin, P J

    1999-05-01

    This study examines the services provided by clinical nurse specialists within one acute and community NHS Trust. The title 'clinical nurse specialist' (CNS) is used widely within health care services and describes a multitude of roles and service provision. Lack of role clarity impacts upon human resources, service delivery and the post holder. Patients, carers and health care professionals were invited to participate in focus groups. Groups sought information about the services provided by the CNS. The research adopted a grounded theory approach in order to generate a locally recognizable description of the services. From the data analysis eight technical services carried out by the CNSs emerged. Analysis also identified three areas where the CNS provided added value. The findings are discussed in relation to relevant literature. Recommendations are made concerning effective and efficient use of this important staff resource.

  2. Information retrieval - Swedish specialist student nurses` strategies for finding clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Madsen-Rihlert, Cathrin; Nilsson, Kerstin; Stomber, Margareta Warrèn

    2012-01-01

    The care that intra-operative nurses perform has to be based on scientific knowledge. It is therefore vitally important that they have access to different databases and the Internet, as well as knowledge of the search procedure to find evidence for best practice. This means that specialist nurses should be proficient in the search procedure, interpretation of data, and implementation of available knowledge.The aim of this study was therefore to highlight the search strategies of specialist student nurses for finding scientific knowledge with regard to specific clinical issues. An additional aim was to assess their ability to critically evaluate scientific articles. The participants, n 16, all students enrolled in a university programme for specialist nursing in anaesthesia care, were required to find support for six questions, by using scientific knowledge databases. The tasks that required support are related to their future profession and were divided into three main areas: pre-, intra-, and post-operative care. Two distinct questions for each main area had to be answered. The data was analysed quantitatively using manifest content analysis as a basis. This study reveals that the student nurses mostly used the CINAHL and PubMed databases to search for answers related to the areas in focus. The keywords the participants used differed between the individuals and were applied more frequently than MESH terms. In addition, the critical evaluation of articles of scientific value that were found was not optimal. The study demonstrated that most of the participants were unable to complete all the required tasks. With regard to the initial questions, all 16 participants provided answers, while only eight student nurses completed the final questions. The specialist student nurses in this study used the databases Chinal and PubMed to find scientific knowledge with the help of MESH-terms and keywords. Further research is needed to understand how education of the specialist

  3. Specialist nurses' perceptions of inviting patients to participate in clinical research studies: a qualitative descriptive study of barriers and facilitators.

    PubMed

    French, Caroline; Stavropoulou, Charitini

    2016-08-11

    Increasing the number of patients participating in research studies is a current priority in the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom. The role of specialist nurses in inviting patients to participate is important, yet little is known about their experiences of doing so. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of barriers and facilitators held by specialist nurses with experience of inviting adult NHS patients to a wide variety of research studies. A cross-sectional qualitative descriptive study was conducted between March and July 2015. Participants were 12 specialist nurses representing 7 different clinical specialties and 7 different NHS Trusts. We collected data using individual semi-structured interviews, and analysed transcripts using the Framework method to inductively gain a descriptive overview of barriers and facilitators. Barriers and facilitators were complex and interdependent. Perceptions varied among individuals, however barriers and facilitators centred on five main themes: i) assessing patient suitability, ii) teamwork, iii) valuing research, iv) the invitation process and v) understanding the study. Facilitators to inviting patients to participate in research often stemmed from specialist nurses' attitudes, skills and experience. Positive research cultures, effective teamwork and strong relationships between research and clinical teams at the local clinical team level were similarly important. Barriers were reported when specialist nurses felt they were providing patients with insufficient information during the invitation process, and when specialist nurses felt they did not understand studies to their satisfaction. Our study offers several new insights regarding the role of specialist nurses in recruiting patients for research. It shows that strong local research culture and teamwork overcome some wider organisational and workload barriers reported in previous studies. In addition, and in contrast to common practice

  4. Nurse specialist: an evolving need.

    PubMed

    Keith, J M

    1987-11-01

    For too long, to advance their careers and earn higher salaries, nurses have had to veer away from clinical experience, which they knew best, into managerial and other fields. To curb this trend and respond to the need for high-quality care, St. Edward Mercy Medical Center, Fort Smith, AR, instituted the nurse specialist program, in which nurses can develop competency in multiple clinical areas with accompanying financial incentives. In developing the program, which provides a cadre of nurses to augment the regular staff wherever needed, job descriptions and the requirements for selection, recruitment, and training were developed, as was some method to evaluate the program. Requirements for participation included at least one year of hands-on experience at the medical center, good clinical skills, and adherence to the Mercy philosophy of care. Those selected were trained in five specialized clinical areas: intensive care, labor and delivery, emergency services, post-anesthesia recovery, and nursery. The program at first met resistance from other nurses and abuse from nursing supervisors. But this has been replaced by acceptance and appreciation. The nurse specialists are seen as an elite group, meeting patient and staff needs as extra pairs of caring and competent hands, with the potential to calm a stressful clinical environment.

  5. A Multifaceted Model to Evaluate Interprofessional Education in Clinical Nurse Specialist Programs.

    PubMed

    Becker, Heather; Timmerman, Gayle M; Delville, Carole; Seo, EunJin

    Preparing students to engage in team-based healthcare is a major focus of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) education programs. A robust evaluation plan is needed to monitor achievement of key outcomes in this complex undertaking. Informed by the work of Kirkpatrick and Stufflebeam, an evaluation model that incorporates multiple information sources about process and outcomes related to interprofessional (IP) education is proposed. Improvements in scores on attitude and competency measures suggest that the program had the desired effects on students' attitudes and self-efficacy for IP collaboration and was validated by faculty clinical observations of IP communication and teamwork. Moreover, students indicated at both graduation and at 1-year follow-up surveys that they were prepared to function on IP teams, providing further evidence that the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) program prepared them in this key area of nursing practice. The evaluation plan guided the collection of quantitative and qualitative information that faculty could use to refine the CNS program. Congruent with the CNS role as change agents, future model refinements should incorporate systems change activities.

  6. A Guideline for Parkinson's Disease Nurse Specialists, with Recommendations for Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Lennaerts, Herma; Groot, Marieke; Rood, Berna; Gilissen, Koen; Tulp, Hella; van Wensen, Erik; Munneke, Marten; van Laar, Teus; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2017-08-11

    Parkinson's Disease Nurse Specialists (PDNS) play an important role in the care for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and their caregivers. Until now, there were no nursing guidelines in PD, and interventions were based solely on daily clinical practice because there is no evidence to support the merits of nursing interventions. Consequently, there is little uniformity in current care delivery. Developing a guideline for PDNS. We developed a guideline based on a questionnaire among PDNS and a literature review, supplemented with expert opinion plus the input of patients and caregivers. The questionnaire was filled in by 97 PDNS and 51 generic nurses with knowledge of PD to identify barriers in PD nursing care. Subsequently, we did a systematic literature search and transformed these sources of information into practice recommendations, which were developed according to international standards for guideline development. Based on the results of the questionnaire we identified seven specific core areas: defining the role of PDNS in terms of caseload, education, competences and care coordination; medication adherence; provision of information and education; coping; caregiver support; urogenital function; and orthostatic hypotension. The systematic literature search identified 186 studies, of which 33 studies were finally analyzed. Furthermore, we developed practice recommendations based on good clinical practice for the following areas: self-care, mental functioning, mobility, nutrition, sexuality, work, sleep, palliative care and complementary (integrative) care. These guidelines provide ground to harmonize care delivery by PDNS in clinical practice, and offer a foundation for future research.

  7. Therapeutic hypothermia post-cardiac arrest: a clinical nurse specialist initiative in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Manasia, Roshan Jan Muhammad; Husain, Shahid Javed; Hooda, Khairunnissa; Imran, Mehrunnissa; Bailey, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to assess the feasibility of an evidence-based therapeutic hypothermia protocol in adult post-cardiac arrest (CA) patients in a university hospital in Pakistan. Cardiac arrest has a deleterious effect on neurological function, and survival is associated with significant morbidity. The International Liaison Committee of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and the American Heart Association recommend the use of mild hypothermia in post-CA victims to mitigate brain injury caused by anoxia. In Pakistan, the survival rate in CA victims is poor. At present, there are no hospitals in the country that use the evidence-based hypothermia intervention in adult post-CA victims. This pilot project of therapeutic hypothermia in adult post-CA patients was implemented in a university hospital in Pakistan by a clinical nurse specialist in collaboration with the cardiopulmonary resuscitation committee and the nursing leadership of the hospital. Various clinical nurse specialist competencies and roles were used to address the 3 spheres of influence: patient, nurses, and system, while executing an evidence-based hypothermia protocol. Process and outcome indicators were monitored to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of hypothermia intervention in this setting. The hypothermia protocol was successfully implemented in 3 adult post-CA patients using cost-effective measures. All 3 patients were extubated within 72 hours after CA, and 2 patients were discharged home with good neurological outcome. Adoption of an evidence-based hypothermia protocol for adult CA patients is feasible in the intensive care setting of a university hospital in Pakistan. The process used in the project can serve as a road map to other hospitals in resource-limited countries such as Pakistan that are motivated to improve post-CA outcomes. This experience reveals that advanced practice nurses can be instrumental in translation of evidence into practice in a healthcare system in

  8. Improving Accuracy of Cardiac Electrode Placement: Outcomes of Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice.

    PubMed

    DiLibero, Justin; DeSanto-Madyea, Susan; O'Dongohue, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this quality improvement project was to facilitate a sustainable improvement in the accuracy of cardiac electrode placement for continuous bedside monitoring in intensive care unit patients. Continuous cardiac electrocardiograph monitoring is a standard of practice in critical care areas and is essential to accurate interpretation of cardiac dysrhythmias and early detection of myocardial ischemia. Accurate assessment of electrocardiographs depends on precise placement of electrodes; however, electrodes are often placed inaccurately. Evaluation of baseline practice revealed that cardiac electrodes were placed correctly in only 12.5% of patients. The most frequently misplaced electrode was the V lead, followed by lower limb leads. This project was conducted between July 1, 2013, and October 31, 2013, and involved a multifaceted education program for registered nurse and patient care technician staff on the physiologic basis and technical procedures for cardiac electrode placement. The clinical nurse specialist served as an informal leader, role model, and mentor by developing and empowering unit champions to perform real-time auditing and provide real-time feedback to colleagues. At 3 months after intervention, the accuracy of cardiac electrode placement was sustained at greater than 85%, representing a 6-fold improvement above the preintervention baseline. Sustainable improvement in quality requires creation of a culture that supports quality improvement initiatives. As experts in clinical practice, evidence-based practice, and leadership, clinical nurse specialists are optimally positioned to function as change agents whose initiatives measurably improve outcomes. This quality improvement project serves as a model for improving accuracy of cardiac electrode placement at the nursing staff level. Future research is necessary to improve outcomes related to accuracy of cardiac electrode placement on the patient and systems levels.

  9. Role of the clinical nurse specialist in improving patient outcomes after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Soltis, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Health care reform continues to focus on improving patient outcomes while reducing costs. Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) should facilitate this process to ensure that best practice standards are used and patient safety is enhanced. One example of ensuring best practices and patient safety is early extubation after open heart surgery, which is a critical component of fast track protocols that reduces may reduce the development of pulmonary complications in the postoperative period while decreasing overall length of stay in the hospital. This project was an interdisciplinary endeavor, led by the CNS and nurse manager, which combined early extubation protocols with enhanced rounding initiatives to help decrease overall length of ventilation time as well as reduce pulmonary complications in patients in the cardiac surgery intensive care unit. The project resulted in a significant decrease in length of stay and a decrease in pulmonary complications in the postoperative period.

  10. The role of the clinical nurse specialist in facilitating evidence-based practice within a university setting.

    PubMed

    Tuite, Patricia K; George, Elisabeth L

    2010-01-01

    There are many changes occurring within the healthcare system today, bringing forth multiple challenges for nurses. Changes in reimbursement for hospitals and staffing shortages are impacting the ways that nurses are delivering care. During these changing times, it is essential that healthcare providers strive to maintain high-quality care and patient safety. Utilizing evidence-based practice (EBP) to guide the delivery of care is one way to ensure that high-quality outcomes are achieved. EBP is one of the driving forces to improve clinical practice and ensure patient safety within the healthcare system. The clinical nurse specialist is very instrumental in facilitating quality care and implementing EBP within the healthcare setting. Through the development of a multidisciplinary committee, the clinical nurse specialist can lead professional nurses in the implementation of EBP and facilitate practice changes to improve patient outcomes.

  11. Capture of knowledge work of clinical nurse specialists using a role tracking tool.

    PubMed

    Colwill, Jennifer P; O'Rourke, Colin; Booher, Lydia; Soat, Marian; Solomon, Deborah; Albert, Nancy M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify clinical nurse specialist (CNS) work and determine if competencies are associated with personal characteristics, priorities, and quality outcomes. The work of a CNS is difficult to quantify. Nurse leaders need quantifiable data to understand the impact of CNS work. A prospective, single-center, correlational study with a convenience sample was conducted. The study was conducted in a 1200-bed quaternary care medical center in Northeast Ohio, using CNSs. The investigator-developed Role Tracker Tool (software) and a CNS questionnaire were used to collect baseline and monthly data for 5 months. Characteristics of the CNSs were summarized using descriptive statistics. Correlational statistics were used to measure associations. After mutually exclusive groups were created, tests for differences were completed using a Welch 2-sample t test and analysis of variance. Regression models were used to determine if relationships existed over time between competencies, priority ranking of competencies, and nursing characteristics. Among 14 CNSs, mean (SD) age was 45 (10.11) years; mean (SD) CNS experience was 5.57 (7.87) years. Of 6 competencies, CNSs ranked quality as most important, followed by clinical work. Research ranked low. Mean (SD) time spent in hours/8.5-hour workday over 5 months was highest for clinical work, at 1.9 (1) hours, and lowest for professional self-development, at 0.4 (0.4) hours. Time spent on specific competencies varied by specialty, years as a CNS and at current employer, and comfort in competencies and spheres after controlling for nurse characteristics and monthly trends. Of 9 quality initiative focuses, mean (SD) time in hours/8.5-hour workday was highest for heart failure, with 0.7(0.8) hours. Time spent on quality initiatives was not associated with changes in quality improvement outcomes. Clinical nurse specialist competency priorities, quality initiative focuses, and quality outcomes varied over time. The

  12. Training oncology and palliative care clinical nurse specialists in psychological skills: evaluation of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jane E; Aitken, Susan; Watson, Nina; McVey, Joanne; Helbert, Jan; Wraith, Anita; Taylor, Vanessa; Catesby, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    National guidelines in the United Kingdom recommend training Clinical Nurse Specialists in psychological skills to improve the assessment and intervention with psychological problems experienced by people with a cancer diagnosis (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, 2004). This pilot study evaluated a three-day training program combined with supervision sessions from Clinical Psychologists that focused on developing skills in psychological assessment and intervention for common problems experienced by people with cancer. Questionnaires were developed to measure participants' levels of confidence in 15 competencies of psychological skills. Participants completed these prior to the program and on completion of the program. Summative evaluation was undertaken and results were compared. In addition, a focus group interview provided qualitative data of participants' experiences of the structure, process, and outcomes of the program. Following the program, participants rated their confidence in psychological assessment and skills associated with providing psychological support as having increased in all areas. This included improved knowledge of psychological theories, skills in assessment and intervention and accessing and using supervision appropriately. The largest increase was in providing psycho-education to support the coping strategies of patients and carers. Thematic analysis of interview data identified two main themes including learning experiences and program enhancements. The significance of the clinical supervision sessions as key learning opportunities, achieved through the development of a community of practice, emerged. Although this pilot study has limitations, the results suggest that a combined teaching and supervision program is effective in improving Clinical Nurse Specialists' confidence level in specific psychological skills. Participants' experiences highlighted suggestions for refinement and development of the program

  13. Clinical Nurse Specialist Collaboration to Recognize, Prevent, and Treat Pediatric Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer; Adlard, Kathleen; Walti, Beverly Inge; Hayakawa, Jennifer; McClean, Elyse; Feidner, Susan Carroll

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this quality improvement project was to reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers in a 232-bed, freestanding children's hospital in Western United States. Pressure ulcers have been an underappreciated hospital-acquired condition in children. Children have distinct anatomic, physiologic, and developmental factors that alter how pressure ulcers occur, but nurses may not recognize the pediatric patient as at risk because of lack of knowledge and tools to assess skin, identify risk factors, and recognize or stage pressure ulcers. Our initial efforts to develop organizational tools to reduce pediatric pressure ulcers were not sufficient, despite improvements in care. Interprofessional and intraprofessional collaboration, led by clinical nurse specialists, focused on documentation, tracheostomies, respiratory devices, and hemodynamically unstable or extracorporeal life support patients. Stage 3 and 4 and unstageable pressure ulcers are also "never events" in children. The unique factors involved with infant and pediatric pressure ulcers demand unique solutions. Our collaborative efforts led to a significant and sustained reduction in pressure ulcer incidence, from 3.3 per 1000 patient days in the first quarter of 2010 to 1.7 per 1000 patient days in the second quarter of 2014. Reportable pressure ulcers were reduced by 60%. Improved awareness and prevention strategies also led to significant reductions in extracorporeal life support patient pressure ulcers and respiratory device-related pressure ulcers. Through intraprofessional and interprofessional collaboration, the clinical nurse specialists were able to implement sustained organizational change and improve care for infants and children. Reduction in pressure ulcers is achievable but requires collaboration and creative solutions that involve multiple disciplines.

  14. A Business Case Framework for Planning Clinical Nurse Specialist-Led Interventions.

    PubMed

    Bartlett Ellis, Rebecca J; Embree, Jennifer L; Ellis, Kurt G

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a business case framework that can guide clinical nurse specialists (CNS) in clinical intervention development. Increased emphasis on cost-effective interventions in healthcare requires skills in analyzing the need to make the business case, especially for resource-intensive interventions. This framework assists the CNS to anticipate resource use and then consider if the intervention makes good business sense. We describe a business case framework that can assist the CNS to fully explore the problem and determine if developing an intervention is a good investment. We describe several analyses that facilitate making the business case to include the following: problem identification and alignment with strategic priorities, needs assessment, stakeholder analysis, market analysis, intervention implementation planning, financial analysis, and outcome evaluation. The findings from these analyses can be used to develop a formal proposal to present to hospital leaders in a position to make decisions. By aligning intervention planning with organizational priorities and engaging patients in the process, interventions will be more likely to be implemented in practice and produce robust outcomes. The business case framework can be used to justify to organization decision makers the need to invest resources in new interventions that will make a difference for quality outcomes as well as the financial bottom line. This framework can be used to plan interventions that align with organizational strategic priorities, plan for associated costs and benefits, and outcome evaluation. Clinical nurse specialists are well positioned to lead clinical intervention projects that will improve the quality of patient care and be cost-effective. To do so requires skill development in making the business case.

  15. Positioning clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners as change champions to implement a pain protocol in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Kaasalainen, Sharon; Ploeg, Jenny; Donald, Faith; Coker, Esther; Brazil, Kevin; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Dicenso, Alba; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Pain management for older adults in long-term care (LTC) has been recognized as a problem internationally. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and nurse practitioner (NP) as change champions during the implementation of an evidence-based pain protocol in LTC. In this exploratory, multiple-case design study, we collected data from two LTC homes in Ontario, Canada. Three data sources were used: participant observation of an NP and a CNS for 18 hours each over a 3-week period; CNS and NP diaries recording strategies, barriers, and facilitators to the implementation process; and interviews with members of the interdisciplinary team to explore perceptions about the NP and CNS role in implementing the pain protocol. Data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. The NP and CNS used a variety of effective strategies to promote pain management changes in practice including educational outreach with team members, reminders to nursing staff to highlight the pain protocol and educate about practice changes, chart audits and feedback to the nursing staff, interdisciplinary working group meetings, ad hoc meetings with nursing staff, and resident assessment using advanced skills. The CNS and NP are ideal champions to implement pain management protocols and likely other quality improvement initiatives.

  16. Clinical nurse specialists in palliative care. Part 2. Explaining diversity in the organization and costs of Macmillan nursing services.

    PubMed

    Clark, David; Seymour, Jane; Douglas, Hannah-Rose; Bath, Peter; Beech, Nicola; Corner, Jessica; Halliday, Deborah; Hughes, Philippa; Haviland, Jo; Normand, Charles; Marples, Rachael; Skilbeck, Julie; Webb, Tom

    2002-09-01

    In the UK, the work of Macmillan clinical nurse specialists in palliative care is now well established. There has been little research, however, into the organizational context in which these nurses operate and the implications for the services they deliver. We report on a major evaluation of the service delivery, costs, and outcomes of Macmillan nursing services in hospital and community settings. The study was based on eight weeks of fieldwork in each of 12 selected services. Data are presented from semi-structured interviews, clinical records, and cost analysis. We demonstrate wide variation across several dimensions: location and context of the services; activity levels; management patterns; work organization and content; links with other colleagues; and resource use. We suggest that such variation is likely to indicate the existence of both excellent practice and suboptimal practice. In particular, our study highlights problems in how teamwork is conceptualized and delivered. We draw on recent organizational theories to make sense of the heterogeneous nature of Macmillan nursing services.

  17. Enhancing a Culture of Inquiry: The Role of a Clinical Nurse Specialist in Supporting the Adoption of Evidence.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Amy E; Mason, Tina M; Duncan, Pamela

    2017-03-01

    This article describes a Magnet®-designated, national cancer institute comprehensive cancer center's quest to restructure the organization's evidence-based practice (EBP)/performance improvement (PI) framework leveraging the role of the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) as a coach to support staff nurses in EBP/PI initiatives. The support of the CNS is essential in developing effective projects, minimizing barriers, and maintaining a level of engagement in the EBP process from problem identification through dissemination and sustainment of practice changes.

  18. Structural and Process Factors That Influence Clinical Nurse Specialist Role Implementation.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Tchouaket, Eric; Carter, Nancy; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; DiCenso, Alba

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of structure and process on clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role implementation. We conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional survey data. The study was performed in Canada. The authors included 445 of 471 questionnaires (94.5%) of graduate-prepared CNSs. Based on Donabedian's framework, we conducted a secondary analysis of CNS responses using hierarchical regression. The internal consistency of the 6 CNS role dimensions and team dynamics subscales was excellent. The use of a framework to guide CNS role implementation influences all the role dimensions. Employer understanding of the CNS role, working in an urban catchment area, specialty certification, and more years in a CNS role had a direct positive influence on team dynamics. Full-time employment exerted a direct negative influence on this dimension. Furthermore, team dynamics (as a mediator variable), seeing patients in practice, and having an office in the clinical unit exerted a direct positive influence on the clinical dimension. Having an annual performance appraisal and a job description exerted a direct negative influence on the clinical dimension. Employer understanding, working in an urban area, full-time employment, and specialty certification had an indirect effect on the clinical dimension. Accountability to a nonnurse manager exerted a direct negative influence on the education dimension. The research and scholarly/professional development dimensions were influenced by more years in a CNS role. Accountability to a nurse manager exerted a direct positive influence on the organizational leadership dimension; unionization and seeing patients in practice had a direct negative influence on this dimension. Seeing patients in practice and full-time employment exerted a direct positive influence on the consultation dimension. The identification of structures and processes that influence CNS role implementation may inform strategies used by

  19. A unique collaborative nursing evidence-based practice initiative using the Iowa model: a clinical nurse specialist, a health science librarian, and a staff nurse's success story.

    PubMed

    Krom, Zachary R; Batten, Janene; Bautista, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to share how the collaboration of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS), a health science librarian, and a staff nurse can heighten staff nurses' awareness of the evidence-based practice (EBP) process. The staff nurse is expected to incorporate EBP into daily patient care. This expectation is fueled by the guidelines established by professional, accrediting, and regulatory bodies. Barriers to incorporating EBP into practice have been well documented in the literature. A CNS, a health science librarian, and a staff nurse collaborated to develop an EBP educational program for staff nurses. The staff nurse provides the real-time practice issues, the CNS gives extensive knowledge of translating research into practice, and the health science librarian is an expert at retrieving the information from the literature. The resulting collaboration at this academic medical center has increased staff nurse exposure to and knowledge about EBP principles and techniques. The collaborative relationship among the CNS, health science librarian, and staff nurse effectively addresses a variety of barriers to EBP. This successful collaborative approach can be utilized by other medical centers seeking to educate staff nurses about the EBP process.

  20. Developing a rural transitional care community case management program using clinical nurse specialists.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen M; Black, Denice; Hammond, Sheri

    2014-01-01

    This quality improvement project developed a community nursing case management program to decrease preventable readmissions to the hospital and emergency department by providing telephonic case management and, if needed, onsite assessment and treatment by a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) with prescriptive authority. As more people reach Medicare age, the number of individuals with worsening chronic diseases with dramatically increases unless appropriate disease management programs are developed. Care transitions can result in breakdown in continuity of care, resulting in increased preventable readmissions, particularly for indigent patients. The CNS is uniquely educated to managing care transitions and coordination of community resources to prevent readmissions. After a thorough SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis, we developed and implemented a cost-avoidance model to prevent readmissions in our uninsured and underinsured patients. The project CNS used a wide array of interventions to decrease readmissions. In the last 2 years, there have been a total of 22 less than 30-day readmissions to the emergency department or hospital in 13 patients, a significant decrease from readmissions in these patients prior to the program. Three of them required transfer to a larger hospital for a higher level of care. Using advanced practice nurses in transitional care can prevent readmissions, resulting in cost avoidance. The coordination of community resources during transition from hospital to home is a job best suited to CNSs, because they are educated to work within organizations/systems. The money we saved with this project more than justified the cost of hiring a CNS to lead it. More research is needed into this technology. Guidelines for this intervention need to be developed. Replicating our cost-avoidance transitional care model can help other facilities limit that loss.

  1. The impact of clinical nurse specialists on clinical pathways in the application of evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Gurzick, Martha; Kesten, Karen S

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to address the call for evidence-based practice through the development of clinical pathways and to assert the role of the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) as a champion in clinical pathway implementation. In the current health care system, providing quality of care while maintaining cost-effectiveness is an ever-growing battle that institutions face. The CNS's role is central to meeting these demands. An extensive literature review has been conducted to validate the use of clinical pathways as a means of improving patient outcomes. This literature also suggests that clinical pathways must be developed, implemented, and evaluated utilizing validated methods including the use of best practice standards. Execution of clinical pathways should include a clinical expert, who has the ability to look at the system as a whole and can facilitate learning and change by employing a multitude of competencies while maintaining a sphere of influence over patient and families, nurses, and the system. The CNS plays a pivotal role in influencing effective clinical pathway development, implementation, utilization, and ongoing evaluation to ensure improved patient outcomes and reduced costs. This article expands upon the call for evidence-based practice through the utilization of clinical pathways to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs and stresses the importance of the CNS as a primary figure for ensuring proper pathway development, implementation, and ongoing evaluation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An exploration of clinical practice in sites with and without clinical nurse or midwife specialists or advanced nurse practitioners, in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Imelda; Comiskey, Catherine M; Lalor, Joan G; Higgins, Agnes; Elliott, Naomi; Begley, Cecily

    2016-04-26

    Clinical specialist (CS) and advanced practitioner (AP) roles have increased in nursing and midwifery internationally. This study explored clinical practice in sites with and without clinical nurse or midwife specialists or advanced nurse practitioners in Ireland. Using a case study design, interview, observational and documentary data from postholding sites (CSs or APs employed) were compared with data from non-postholding sites (no CSs or APs employed). Interviews and observations were conducted with postholders (n = 23), and compared with data from healthcare professionals (nurses or midwives, doctors) (n = 23) in matched services. Interviews were held with Directors of Nursing and Midwifery (n = 23), healthcare professionals (n = 41), service users (n = 41) with experience of receiving care or working with postholders, and non-postholders in matched services. The data were analysed using Nvivo (Version 8). The findings suggest that postholders' practice appeared to differ from non-postholders' in relation to case management and service provision. Postholders were seen as having an impact on readmission rates, waiting lists/times, collaborative decision-making, continuity of care and workload management. Postholders' autonomy to manage caseloads was perceived to lead to smoother transition of patients/clients through the healthcare system. Service-users' self-reports appeared to appreciate the individualised holistic care provided by postholders. Postholders' role in facilitating person-centred care and promoting interprofessional team working, are essential elements in quality care provision and in global healthcare workforce planning. To meet changing healthcare demands, promote person-centred care, and improve service delivery, more specialist and advanced practice posts in nursing and midwifery should be developed and supported within healthcare.

  3. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... following limits: (1) For services furnished in a hospital (including assistant-at-surgery services), 75...-at-surgery services) furnished beginning January 1, 1998, allowed amounts for the services of a nurse... the service. For assistant-at-surgery services, allowed amounts for the services of a...

  4. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... exceed the following limits: (1) For services furnished in a hospital (including assistant-at-surgery...-at-surgery services) furnished beginning January 1, 1998, allowed amounts for the services of a nurse... the service. For assistant-at-surgery services, allowed amounts for the services of a...

  5. Clinical nurse specialist as change agent: delirium prevention and assessment project.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Mallory; Miller, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to address the role of the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) as a change agent in the implementation of a quality improvement program designed to prevent and assess delirium in ventilated patients at a community hospital. Delirium is both a common condition that is not well recognized among patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting and a challenging problem to manage. Patients remain ventilated in ICU settings longer, and often, physical/occupational therapy is not started until after the patient is extubated; thus, the risk for delirium is high. The quality improvement program was implemented to recognize and decrease delirium in the critically ill patient. An understanding of the role of the CNS as the change agent provides a reference for other CNSs. The CNS's roles of communication, collaboration, and education in fulfilling the core competencies across the spheres of patient, nurse, and system are crucial when implementing lasting change. A review of the literature supports the use of the ABCDE Bundle to better manage pain, sedation, and delirium. The CNS uses Kurt Lewin's 3-step model of change to implement the quality improvement program. A CNS successfully implemented the ABCDE Bundle in a community hospital to improve the prevention and assessment of delirium in the ICU patient. This project demonstrates the CNS's ability to implement a program to aid in the prevention and assessment of delirium in critically ill patients in the ICU. The CNS's involvement as the change agent to implement the ABCDE Bundle is effective in the prevention and assessment of delirium in ventilated patients. The goal of the ABCDE Bundle is to extubate patients sooner and transfer them out of the ICU faster.

  6. A multi-centre study of interactional style in nurse specialist- and physician-led Rheumatology clinics in the UK.

    PubMed

    Vinall-Collier, Karen; Madill, Anna; Firth, Jill

    2016-07-01

    Nurse-led care is well established in Rheumatology in the UK and provides follow-up care to people with inflammatory arthritis including treatment, monitoring, patient education and psychosocial support. The aim of this study is to compare and contrast interactional style with patients in physician-led and nurse-led Rheumatology clinics. A multi-centre mixed methods approach was adopted. Nine UK Rheumatology out-patient clinics were observed and audio-recorded May 2009-April 2010. Eighteen practitioners agreed to participate in clinic audio-recordings, researcher observations, and note-taking. Of 9 nurse specialists, 8 were female and 5 of 9 physicians were female. Eight practitioners in each group took part in audio-recorded post-clinic interviews. All patients on the clinic list for those practitioners were invited to participate and 107 were consented and observed. In the nurse specialist cohort 46% were female; 71% had a diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). The physician cohort comprised 31% female; 40% with RA and 16% unconfirmed diagnosis. Nineteen (18%) of the patients observed were approached for an audio-recorded telephone interview and 15 participated (4 male, 11 female). Forty-four nurse specialist and 63 physician consultations with patients were recorded. Roter's Interactional Analysis System (RIAS) was used to code this data. Thirty-one semi-structured interviews were conducted (16 practitioner, 15 patients) within 24h of observed consultations and were analyzed using thematic analysis. RIAS results illuminated differences between practitioners that can be classified as 'socio-emotional' versus 'task-focussed'. Specifically, nurse specialists and their patients engaged significantly more in the socio-emotional activity of 'building a relationship'. Across practitioners, the greatest proportion of 'patient initiations' were in 'giving medical information' and reflected what patients wanted the practitioner to know rather than giving insight into

  7. An intrepreneurial innovative role: integration of the clinical nurse specialist and infection prevention professional.

    PubMed

    Pintar, Paula A

    2013-01-01

    Hospital quality and financial sustainability rely on reducing healthcare-associated events/infections, length of stay, and readmissions. This project focused on designing an integrated role for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and the infection prevention professional (IPP) to proactively manage the delivery of evidence-based practice to high-risk surgical patients. The healthcare industry is in the midst of a paradigm shift driven by changing health policy focusing on quality indicators, patient satisfaction, and lowering costs. Coupled with these indicators is the expectation and responsibility to provide evidence-based practice at all levels of the healthcare continuum. This paradigm shift places healthcare facilities in a very competitive atmosphere as they rally for the revenue of a fixed payer mix. A literature search using CINHAL, PubMed, and the CNS national listserve databases was completed to identify if there was any previously written information available on an integrated role of the CNS/IPP. An online business plan template was used to communicate the significance, implications, and return on organizational investment to practice with establishing this role. Chronic health conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, and colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms can place patients at an increased risk for developing a surgical site infection or complications. The CNS/IPP will proactively manage these risk factors, including the patient and family in a preventive care model to manage the acute inpatient high-risk surgical patient. Care management will include coordinated, collaborative, and consultative follow-up by the CNS/IPP in the acute care, long-term care facilities, and home settings. The infection prevention skill set brings a level of clinical expertise that makes a unique CNS. The IPP is immersed in using epidemiological principles that examine the impact of comorbidities and the added risk that can

  8. A Systematic Review of the Cost-Effectiveness of Clinical Nurse Specialists and Nurse Practitioners in Inpatient Roles.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Reid, Kim; Carter, Nancy; Donald, Faith; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Harbman, Patricia; Marshall, Deborah; Charbonneau-Smith, Renee; DiCenso, Alba

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to synthesize the evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) working in alternative or complementary roles in inpatient settings. Those in alternative roles substitute for another provider and deliver similar services. Those in complementary roles deliver additional services to meet patient health needs. We searched 10 electronic databases, reference lists, pertinent journals and websites from 1980 to July 2012 with no language, publication or geographical restrictions. Study identification and assessment were completed independently by two-member teams. Internal validity was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. The quality of the economic analysis was evaluated using the Quality of Health Economic Studies (QHES) instrument. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used to assess outcome-specific quality of evidence. Three dated trials evaluated CNS and NP inpatient roles; they were conducted in North America and included 488 adults and 821 neonates. In one study, CNSs in complementary provider roles, when compared with usual care, were equally effective with equal resource use (very low-quality evidence). In two studies, NPs in alternative roles, when compared with physicians, were equally effective with equal-to-more resource use and equal costs (low- to moderate-quality evidence). The quality of the economic analyses was poor. Only three dated studies were identified. More research is needed to determine cost-effectiveness and inform policies and decisions related to the implementation of CNSs and NPs working exclusively in inpatient roles. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  9. Federal Support for the Preparation of the Clinical Nurse Specialist Workforce through Title VIII. Report to the Secretary of Health and Human Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Rockville, MD.

    This document presents the findings of the National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice regarding the role, education, and supply of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs). The first section of the report examines the following eight background issues: (1) early development of the CNS; (2) current CNS supply; (3) roles and impact of the…

  10. Specialist healthcare law for nurses: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Tingle, John; McHale, Jean

    Nurses are increasingly concerned with legal and ethical dilemmas in clinical decision-making. The law impacts across a wide range of issues in nursing practice. It is important for healthcare professionals to be aware of the way in which the law regulates their professional practice. In this article John Tingle and Jean McHale introduce a new series of articles on law for nurses. The series will feature contributions by legal academics who are specialists in the area of healthcare law. The series will outline basic issues such as the English legal system. It will then consider a wide range of issues, including nursing negligence, legal issues of expanded role, patient safety, consent to treatment, adults lacking mental capacity, mental health law, end-of-life decision-making, law and nursing research, resource allocation law and human rights.

  11. Role Expectations for United States Air Force Psychiatric Clinical Nurse Specialists.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    appeared in the nursing literature in 1938 ( Peplau , 1973). In 1943 the National League for Nursing Education, a forerunner of today’s National League for...of nursing, including psychiatric nursing (Crabtree, 1979; Garrison, 1953; Peplau , 1982a). The 1946 National Mental Health Act defined psychiatric...health literatures reflecting current expectations for this role will be reviewed. Historical Overview Peplau (1982a) traced the evolution of education

  12. Role of rheumatology clinical nurse specialists in optimizing management of hand osteoarthritis during daily practice in secondary care: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Wing-Yee; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Beaart-van de Voorde, Liesbeth JJ; Huizinga, Tom WJ; Vliet Vlieland, Thea PM

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to describe the effectiveness of a single one-hour consultation by a clinical nurse specialist in patients with hand osteoarthritis during daily rheumatology practice in secondary care. Methods Consecutive patients diagnosed by rheumatologists to have primary hand osteoarthritis and referred to the clinical nurse specialist were eligible for entry into this study. The standardized 1-hour consultation consisted of assessments and education on hand osteoarthritis by a clinical nurse specialist. Before and 3 months after the consultation, assessments were done to evaluate treatment (use of assistive devices, acetaminophen), health-related quality of life (physical component summary [PCS] score of Short-Form 36), and hand pain/function (Australian/ Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index [AUSCAN]). Paired t-tests and McNemar tests were used to analyze differences between baseline and follow-up. Satisfaction was measured after consultation at follow-up using a multidimensional questionnaire comprising 13 items (rated on a four-point scale). Results A total of 439 patients were referred, with follow-up data available for 195 patients, comprising 177 (87%) females, and of mean age 59 ± 9.0 years. After consultation, the proportions of patients using assistive devices and/or acetaminophen increased significantly from 30% to 39% and from 35% to 49%, respectively. PCS improved significantly (P = 0.03) whereas AUSCAN hand pain/function showed no significant differences compared with baseline (P values 0.52 and 0.92, respectively). The proportions of patients reporting to be satisfied or fully satisfied ranged from 78% to 99% per item. Conclusion A single, comprehensive, standardized assessment and education by a clinical nurse specialist improved the physical dimension of health-related quality of life in hand osteoarthritis. Most patients were satisfied with the consultation. Further controlled trials are needed to determine the added

  13. [The psychosocial challenges of epilepsy and the role of the clinical nurse specialist].

    PubMed

    Chartrand, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy in children is a complex disease with significant psychosocial consequences for the child and their family. The intervention of a multidisciplinary team enables the care to be adapted and provides support for the families. At Sainte-Justine Hospital in Montreal, Canada, the nurse clinician specialised in epilepsy plays a key role in this team.

  14. Biological nurse specialist: goodwill to good practice.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Deborah; El Miedany, Yasser

    The extensive use of biological agents in recent years for the treatment of rheumatological diseases has required a steep learning curve for the specialist nurses who manage and work in this specialty. Safe prescribing of biological therapies requires good infrastructure and specialist nursing personnel. With additional training, the specialist nurse may take responsibility for a number of tasks in the patient pathway including screening, treatment administration, patient education, prescription coordination for home drug delivery, patient support, monitoring and data collection. Biological treatment is becoming more widely used in several specialities, in particular gastroenterology, dermatology and ophthalmology. Since 2002, rheumatology specialist nurses have taken the lead in assessment and providing biologic therapy, not only for patients suffering from rheumatic diseases but also for those with immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. The unique nature and variable safety profiles of these agents led to the development of immune-mediated inflammatory disease infusion (IMID) centres and highlighted the importance of having biological specialist nurses. This article will discuss the evolution of the IMID/biologic specialist nurse role and how IMID services started with goodwill from the rheumatology nurse specialists to develop into a main component of the holistic approach to care.

  15. Medical specialist attendance in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Balzer, Katrin; Butz, Stefanie; Bentzel, Jenny; Boulkhemair, Dalila; Lühmann, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    The care in nursing homes was examined based on scientific studies. The analysis focuses on dementia and type II diabetes. There is evidence for deficits in the supply of medical specialist attendance to nursing home residents with these diseases in Germany. Compared with corresponding guidelines the medical care for nursing home residents may be too low or inadequate. PMID:23755088

  16. A Systematic Review of the Cost-Effectiveness of Nurse Practitioners and Clinical Nurse Specialists: What Is the Quality of the Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Misener, Ruth; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Marshall, Deborah A.; Donald, Erin E.; Yost, Jennifer; Hubley, Pamela; Laflamme, Célyne; Campbell–Yeo, Marsha; Price, Sheri; Boyko, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background. Improved quality of care and control of healthcare costs are important factors influencing decisions to implement nurse practitioner (NP) and clinical nurse specialist (CNS) roles. Objective. To assess the quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating NP and CNS cost-effectiveness (defined broadly to also include studies measuring health resource utilization). Design. Systematic review of RCTs of NP and CNS cost-effectiveness reported between 1980 and July 2012. Results. 4,397 unique records were reviewed. We included 43 RCTs in six groupings, NP-outpatient (n = 11), NP-transition (n = 5), NP-inpatient (n = 2), CNS-outpatient (n = 11), CNS-transition (n = 13), and CNS-inpatient (n = 1). Internal validity was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool; 18 (42%) studies were at low, 17 (39%) were at moderate, and eight (19%) at high risk of bias. Few studies included detailed descriptions of the education, experience, or role of the NPs or CNSs, affecting external validity. Conclusions. We identified 43 RCTs evaluating the cost-effectiveness of NPs and CNSs using criteria that meet current definitions of the roles. Almost half the RCTs were at low risk of bias. Incomplete reporting of study methods and lack of details about NP or CNS education, experience, and role create challenges in consolidating the evidence of the cost-effectiveness of these roles. PMID:25258683

  17. Comparison between cancer specialists and general physicians regarding the education of nurse practitioners in Japan: a postal survey of the Japanese Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yasushi; Hatao, Masahiko; Fukushima, Osamu; Mori, Michiko; Isozaki, Fumiko; Okuyama, Asako

    2013-10-01

    Japanese physicians' attitudes regarding the education of nurse practitioners (NPs) are not well described. A survey was mailed to 1,094 board members of the Japanese Society of Clinical Oncology (JSCO) and the Japanese Primary Care Association (JPCA), and the directors of the clinical training program for physicians. The physicians of JSCO were classified as the cancer specialist group, and both the board members of JPCA and the directors of the clinical training program for physicians constituted the general physician group. We compared the responses of cancer specialists and general physicians. The survey response rate was 25.9% (69 of 266) in the cancer specialist group and 19.4% (161 of 828) in the general physician group. The median age of respondents was 53 and 55 years, respectively, of which 84 and 79%, respectively, were men. We found that the percentages of respondents who considered NP education necessary were almost identical in the 2 groups (r = 0.898, p < 0.0001). Education items considered necessary for NPs by >80% respondents in both groups included many symptoms, emergency management, basic procedures, general screening, palliative care including management against adverse effects, health education, and communication. More cancer specialists than general physicians (p < 0.01) expected NPs to be educated in multidisciplinary practice and palliative care, including management against adverse effects. Our study suggests that cancer specialists expect NPs to provide symptom management and psychosocial support, clarify information, provide education, and work as a member of a multidisciplinary team.

  18. Defining the unique role of the specialist district nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Anne; Latham, Dinah; Levermore, Joy

    2007-10-01

    Due to the reorganization of primary care trusts across the country, certain trusts proposed a reduction in the specialist district nurse practitioner numbers in favour of less qualified community nurses and health care assistants. Such proposals in one PCT were blocked, partly in response to documentation compiled by practitioners at the sharp end of nursing practice. With the new agenda of practice based commissioning, it is imperative that commissioners and management alike are aware of the scope of specialist district nurse practitioners. This is the first of a series of articles looking at specific case histories where the role of the district nurse is highlighted. It is the intention to stress the importance of the clinical expertise and confidence required by the district nurse to care for patients with complex needs in the community.

  19. Heart-smart home care with cardiac clinical specialists.

    PubMed

    Carney, K L

    1994-02-01

    Cardiac care is an expanding sector of home care. As with other specialty fields in the industry, clinical nurse specialists who have extensive knowledge of this particular arena can greatly benefit both their patients and their agencies.

  20. Using specialist nurse mentors to boost placement capacity.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Bill; Bailey, Elaine

    Mentors play a pivotal role in assessing and supporting nursing students. This can be rewarding but stressful. With increasing numbers of students requiring clinical placements, ward mentors are becoming overloaded. This article examines a new method of supporting senior nursing students in placement while alleviating the pressures on overworked mentors. It recommends the use of specialist nurses to support pre-registration students through a structured learning pathway. The scheme also opens up new areas for clinical allocations. This is a summary: the full paper can be accessed at nursingtimes.net.

  1. [Curriculum for "Rheumatology health professionals DGRh-BDRh" as a way of qualification for clinical nursing specialists : Concept and results of an evaluation].

    PubMed

    Schuch, F; Kern, P; Kreher, G; Krüger, K; Wendler, J; Fiehn, C

    2011-10-01

    Rheumatological care in Germany is influenced by limited resources and education and qualification of health professionals is a way to optimize utilization of these resources.The curriculum for rheumatology health professionals of the Academy of the German Association of Rheumatologists (DGRh) was developed to qualify clinical nursing specialists of rheumatology clinics as well as specialized rheumatology hospitals on a systematic basis.Since 2006 499 participants have each been trained over 4 weekends and certification was achieved by examinations. The topics cover the principles of anatomy and the pathology of diseases up to modern diagnostic methods and treatment, including practical skills. Additional specialized courses for nurses of rheumatology hospitals and refresher courses give the participants the opportunity to increase their depth of knowledge.After 8 of the basic courses questionnaires were sent to all participants for evaluation and 143 (51%) out of 277 participants responded. Of the responders 95% found that their knowledge of understanding rheumatic diseases improved considerably or very considerably, 90% found that their ability to determine urgent cases and 86% to correctly judge emergency situations had improved and 50% agreed with the statement that their field of work and their tasks had changed after the training courses. Increased responsibilities, documentations of patient history, involvement in clinical trials and infusions and information of the patients about their disease or the treatment were listed as new tasks of the participants. In conclusion the evaluation shows that the curriculum for rheumatology health professionals is an effective step towards qualification for clinical nursing specialists. We believe that this will support the work of medical doctors in rheumatology and will improve the quality of care for patients with rheumatic diseases.

  2. Enhancing assertiveness in district nurse specialist practice.

    PubMed

    Green, Julie

    2016-08-02

    District nurse (DN) care delivery has undergone substantial change in recent years due to changing demographics and service delivery demands that have called for a move of care delivery from secondary to primary care. The title District Nurse is recorded with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) on completion of the Specialist Practice Qualification in District Nursing (SPQ DN), which purports to be a 'transformational' course that prepares future caseload holders to manage their team and prioritise care delivery effectively. This article explores the need for assertiveness skills in this role in response to Australian research, and outlines the pedagogic interventions implemented during the SPQ DN course to enhance this skill. Assertiveness scores were monitored for the duration of the course and demonstrated a significant increase-a topic that is now the subject of a future, funded study.

  3. A multidisciplinary team approach for nutritional interventions conducted by specialist nurses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer undergoing chemotherapy: A clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jin-Xiang; Chen, Xiang-Wei; Chen, Zhan-Hong; Huang, Xiu-Yan; Yang, Jin-Jie; Xing, Yan-Fang; Yin, Liang-Hong; Li, Xing; Wu, Xiang-Yuan

    2017-06-01

    Nutritional interventions for malnutrition in cancer patients can be helpful. However, concise intervention recommendations remain controversial. Thus, the aim of this study was to report on a nutrition intervention conducted by a multidisciplinary team of specialist nurses and to explore the effect of nutritional intervention on cancer patients. This prospective clinical trial study enrolled 110 colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The patients were evaluated upon admission using the 2002 Nutritional Risk Screening system (NRS-2002). The patients were randomly divided into intervention and control groups including 55 patients each. Patients in the control group were administered a normal diet, while those in the intervention group received individual recipes developed by a team of professional nurses, clinical doctors, dietitian, family caregivers, and the patients themselves. Patient weight and serum albumin and prealbumin levels were compared between the 2 groups at different time points. There was a significant difference in patient weight and serum albumin and prealbumin levels before and after nutrition intervention in the intervention group (P < .05). In the control group, weight did not change during ordinary diet guidance. Serum albumin level was slightly improved after 12 cycles of chemotherapy, similar to the prealbumin results. There were statistically significant differences in serum albumin and prealbumin levels between the intervention and control groups after nutrition intervention (P < .05). However, there was no statistically significant difference in weight between the groups after nutrition intervention (P > .05). A multidisciplinary team approach for nutrition intervention conducted by specialist nurses improved prealbumin levels in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, with no weight change.

  4. A comprehensive review of clinical nurse specialist-led peripherally inserted central catheter placement in Korea: 4101 cases in a tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Yun; Kim, Hyun Lim

    2015-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are expected to be convenient and reliable venous access devices. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical nurse specialist (CNS)-led PICC placement and to describe its growth in a tertiary hospital. A computerized database identified 3508 patients who had PICCs placed between November 2001 and June 2010. One thousand, eight hundred ninety-eight of the 4101 PICCs were available for complete follow-up, and 791 of 1898 PICCs were still in place. The mean dwell time of 1898 PICCs was 27.4 days (1∼422 days). Most PICCs were removed after the completion of infusion therapy; the remainder were removed following death, occlusion, suspected infection, or phlebitis, or were removed by the patient. The study found that CNS-led PICC placement for infusion therapies was effective and safe with relatively low complication rates and that CNSs played important roles in the increased use of PICCs.

  5. The Enigma of Graduate Nursing Education: Advanced Generalist? Specialist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Suellen B.; Hoffman, Sharon E.

    1986-01-01

    To pin down the appropriate parameters for graduate nursing education, the authors say we must explore the meanings of advanced generalist and specialist. They discuss the focus, scope, and depth of the community health major, psychiatric mental health nursing, nursing care of children, maternity nursing, medical-surgical nursing, and nursing…

  6. A descriptive study of employment patterns and work environment outcomes of specialist nurses in Canada.

    PubMed

    Doran, Diane; Duffield, Christine; Rizk, Paul; Nahm, Sang; Chu, Charlene H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose was to describe the number, demographic characteristics, work patterns, exit rates, and work perceptions of nurses in Ontario, Canada, in 4 specialty classifications: advanced practice nurse (APN)-clinical nurse specialist (CNS), APN-other, primary healthcare nurse practitioner [RN(extended class [EC])], and registered nurse (RN) with specialty certification. The objectives were to (1) describe how many qualified nurses are available by specialty class; (2) create a demographic profile of specialist nurses; (3) determine the proportions of specialist and nonspecialist nurses who leave (a) direct patient care and (b) nursing practice annually; (4) determine whether specialist and nonspecialist nurses differ in their self-ratings of work environment, job satisfaction, and intention to remain in nursing. Employment patterns refer to nurses' employment status (eg, full-time, part-time, casual), work duration (ie, length of employment in nurses and in current role), and work transitions (ie, movement in and out of the nursing workforce, and movement out of current role). A longitudinal analysis of the Ontario nurses' registration database from 2005 to 2010 and a survey of specialist nurses in Canada was conducted. The setting was Canada. The database sample consisted of 3 specialist groups, consisting of RN(EC), CNS, and APN-other, as well as 1 nonspecialist RN staff nurse group. The survey sample involved 359 nurses who were classified into groups based on self-reported job title and RN specialty-certification status. Data sources included College of Nurses of Ontario registration database and survey data. The study measures were the Nursing Work Index, a 4-item measure of job satisfaction, and 1-item measure of intent to leave current job. Nurses registered with the College of Nurses of Ontario were tracked over the study period to identify changes in their employment status with comparisons made between nurses employed in specialist roles and those

  7. Think Stoma Nurse: a tool to trigger referral to specialist care.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Judy; Adams, Jane

    This article describes the initial development and subsequent evolution of a simple referral assessment tool for stoma care. The first author's personal experience identified that there was widespread inconsistency in perceptions of local multidisciplinary teams as to when it was appropriate to refer to specific specialist nursing teams. This resulted in both inappropriate and delayed referrals. A 'Think Specialist Nurse' initiative was developed across the author's trust, building on the traffic light template from the 'ThinkGlucose' tool, to facilitate referrals to clinical nurse specialists. The stoma-care specific tool, 'Think Stoma Nurse', has subsequently evolved beyond its initial audience, and has been adapted into materials aimed at patients and carers.

  8. Academic learning for specialist nurses: a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Millberg, Lena German; Berg, Linda; Brämberg, Elisabeth Björk; Nordström, Gun; Ohlén, Joakim

    2014-11-01

    The aim was to explore the major concerns of specialist nurses pertaining to academic learning during their education and initial professional career. Specialist nursing education changed in tandem with the European educational reform in 2007. At the same time, greater demands were made on the healthcare services to provide evidence-based and safe patient-care. These changes have influenced specialist nursing programmes and consequently the profession. Grounded Theory guided the study. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire with open-ended questions distributed at the end of specialist nursing programmes in 2009 and 2010. Five universities were included. Further, individual, pair and group interviews were used to collect data from 12 specialist nurses, 5-14 months after graduation. A major concern for specialist nurses was that academic learning should be "meaningful" for their professional future. The specialist nurses' "meaningful academic learning process" was characterised by an ambivalence of partly believing in and partly being hesitant about the significance of academic learning and partly receiving but also lacking support. Specialist nurses were influenced by factors in two areas: curriculum and healthcare context. They felt that the outcome of contribution to professional confidence was critical in making academic learning meaningful.

  9. Becoming a Specialist Nurse in Psychiatric Mental Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Södergren, Ulrika; Benjaminson, Carin; Mattsson, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Background: Specialist nurse students are upon graduation certified to have increased their professional competence to an advanced level. But how do specialist nurse students themselves experience and understand their professional competence and its development upon graduation? This is what this study aims at describing. Method: This study has a…

  10. Specialization in nursing: the need for nurses to be sexuality specialists.

    PubMed

    Martin, N

    1991-01-01

    Sexuality specialists in Alberta, Canada have been mandated since January, 1990 to place their Career and Life Management Curricula in the high schools, with a sexuality component. The author recommends the use of sexuality specialists who educate, counsel, and provide clinical care. The emphasis for a nurse sexuality specialist is on relationships, not on sex education per se, in order to reduce teen pregnancies, abortions, and sexually transmitted disease (STD). The Canadian Nurses Association supports family planning and nursing education, which includes reproductive anatomy and physiology and psychology but does not promote sexuality education. The author believes nurse know that identity equals sexuality and a good self-concept, and adolescent development means egocentricism or the imaginary audience (THEY are watching us), and Personal Fable (we are protected from danger and will not grow old and die). Passage through adolescence involves 1) physical development and change in body image, 2) intellectual development, 3) mastery over drive 4) a sense of identity, 5) capacity for intimacy, 6) the ability to make commitments, 7) ego development, 8) a shift from family to peer group and other adult figures. Current sexuality programs for all Edmonton Public Schools are reactive, or at the request for services at the Edmonton Birth Control (EBCC), Planned Parenthood and the STD Clinic, the Edmonton Board of Health (EBH), and a pilot program emphasizing opening up channels of communication. None of Edmonton's public health nurses are sexuality specialists except for the 15 hour training of training of the nurse in the EBH pilot program. Calgary which has sexuality clinics scattered throughout the area has 1/2 the teen pregnancies and STD's of Edmonton. The only Edmonton resources are the out of way EBCC, Planned Parenthood with a broader philosophy but not specific to adolescents, and an STD clinic. Resources are insufficient and the author encourages nurses to

  11. Open carpal tunnel decompression by specialist versus nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nimesh; Roberton, Andy; Batten, Timothy; Millyard, Cathy; Birdsall, Paul

    2015-12-01

    To compare the outcome after open carpal tunnel decompression by specialists versus a nurse practitioner. Of 1361 cases of open carpel tunnel decompression under local anaesthesia from 1996 to 2008, 807 were performed by specialists (consultant, specialist registrar, or specialty and associate specialist) and 554 by a nurse practitioner (since May 2006). The 2 groups were compared in terms of surgical time, total theatre time, postoperative pain, and patient satisfaction with the service. The mean surgical time was shorter in cases performed by specialists (13 vs. 18 minutes, p<0.0001), as was the mean total theatre time (26 vs. 29 minutes, p=0.0154). The rate of postoperative pain was higher in cases performed by specialists (31.5% vs. 24.5%, p=0.0125), as was the rate of patient dissatisfaction (1.6% vs. 0.18%, 0.0113). Nonetheless, since May 2006, outcome was comparable for specialists and the nurse practitioner. This could be due to the change from short-acting to long-acting/mixed local anaesthetic, and the technique for infiltration. The waiting time for surgery reduced from a mean of 16 to 3 weeks. Specialists and the nurse practitioner achieved comparable outcome after open carpal tunnel decompression.

  12. Program consultation by a clinical specialist.

    PubMed

    Anders, R L

    1978-11-01

    Discussion focuses on the utilization of program consultation by a nurse clinical specialist on 1 unit of a large military hospital. The system dysfunction concerned a lack of total nursing care for abortion patients. The program consultation process carried out to assist the nursing staff in dealing with problems in providing care and emotional support for these patients is described. Program consultation is the process whereby an individual with expert clinical skills provides assistance in resolving a system dysfunction. At a meeting on the gynecology unit with the head nurse, several unit staff nurses, the section social worker, and 2 physician residents, several issues were raised. The staff noted that it was not uncommon for the patients to be hysterical both during and after the procedure. The group identified a pressing need to improve nursing care for these patients, particularly in the area of offering emotional support. The staff indicated that patients received little counseling or health education. Additionally, both the medical and nursing staff experienced personal conflicts about the care of these patients. Since comprehensive staff involvement throughout the abortion process was missing, it appeared the dysfunction involved the total system of care. The consultation process is generally comprised of 3 main phases: involvement of the consultant; problem solving; and a closing or culmination. The 1st step in the involvement phase was agreement to assist the consultees in the development of an abortion counseling program. The next step was to obtain approval for the plan. This was followed by negotiating the consultation objectives with the staff. 2 primary objectives were identified: to provide emotional support to abortion patients; and to assist the staff in developing an abortion counseling program. Trust building begins as the consultees start to share limited information about their system's dysfunction. When the consultees started talking in

  13. Trained clinical nurse specialists proficiently obtain bone marrow aspirates and trephine biopsies in a nearly painless procedure--a prospective evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Naegele, M; Leppla, L; Kiote-Schmidt, C; Ihorst, G; Rebafka, A; Koller, A; May, A M; Hasemann, M; Duyster, J; Wäsch, R; Engelhardt, M

    2015-09-01

    Patients often experience bone marrow examinations (BMEs) as frightening and painful. Varying operators and uncertainty about who will perform the BME worsen their anxiety. In our study, clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) were trained to perform BMEs to ensure continuity and to test the feasibility, patient satisfaction, and biopsy quality. This exploratory evaluation assessed 574 BMEs at our tertiary center between January 2012 and February 2013, 398 BMEs performed by CNS and 176 by physicians. Our aims were to determine whether BMEs by CNS yield results similar to those of physicians, analyzing (1) patient satisfaction with the BME (a) consent and (b) performance, (2) induced pain, and (3) quality of aspirates and length of trephine biopsies. When performed by CNS, 100 % of the patients were satisfied with the consent procedure and 99 % with the BME performance (physicians 99 and 91 %, respectively). The median pain score was low when both CNS and physicians performed the BME, with no or only mild pain in 92 and 76 % of patients, respectively. Bone marrow (BM) aspirates by CNS and physicians were assessed as technically evaluable in ~70 %; moreover, the median length of trephine biopsies was similar when performed by CNS or physicians with 12 and 13 mm, respectively. In conclusion, BMEs conducted by motivated CNS and within a structured training program are feasible and yield equal outcomes compared to physicians. The use of adequate pain management during BMEs by trained and experienced operators results in an extremely rare use of sedatives, low pain scores, and high patient satisfaction.

  14. Exploring haematology nurses' perceptions of specialist education's contribution to care delivery and the development of expertise.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Joanne; Tawse, Stephen

    2007-08-01

    The role that educational preparation may play in the delivery of care and the development of expertise is a point of some debate [Manley, K., Garbett, R., 2000. Paying Peter and Paul reconciling concepts of expertise with competency for a clinical career structure. Journal of Clinical Nursing 9 (3), 347; King, L., Macleod Clark, J., 2002. Intuition and the development of expertise in surgical ward and intensive care nurses. Journal of Advanced Nursing 37(4), 322-329; Bonner, A., 2003. Recognition of expertise: an important concept in the acquisition of nephrology nursing expertise. Nursing & Health Sciences Journal 5, 123-131; Dunphy, B.C., Williamson, S.L., 2004. In pursuit of expertise. Advances in Health Sciences Education 9, 107-127]. Though education is a concept that may be universally valued, it may be more difficult to clearly discern the significance it has for practitioners who are developing their expertise. This research project employed an interpretive phenomenological design to explore the perceptions of specialist haematology nursing staff on the extent to which specialist education contributes to care delivery and the development of expert practice. A non-representative purposive sample of qualified nurses who had undertaken specialist education in haemopoiesis and work in specialist haematology participated in a focus group and semi-structured interviews. The report concludes that, for these specialist practitioners, specialist educational input had a beneficial impact on their levels of knowledge and confidence. Further to this, involvement in higher education had enabled them to become more active in the learning process. Perhaps the key finding of the study was the assertion by respondents that specialist educational input had enabled them to develop their specialist practice to a level that experience alone could not achieve.

  15. A typology of specialists' clinical roles.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Christopher B

    2009-06-08

    High use of specialist physicians and specialized procedures coupled with low exposure to primary care are distinguishing traits of the US health care system. Although the tasks of the primary care medical home are well established, consensus on the normative clinical roles of specialist physicians has not been achieved, which makes it unlikely that the specialist workforce is being used most effectively and efficiently. This article describes a typology of specialists' clinical roles that is based on the conceptual basis for health care specialism and empirical evaluations of the specialty referral process. The report concludes with a discussion on the implications of the typology for improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the primary-specialty care interface.

  16. The Health Systems Nurse Specialist Curriculum: Collaborating across Specialties To Prepare Nurse Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmoreland, Donna; Hays, Bevely J.

    2002-01-01

    The Health Systems Nurse specialist program is an innovative master's curriculum in community health nursing, nursing administration, and nursing informatics. Students learn to work collaboratively to determine health priorities, develop and implement interventions, and monitor and improve patient outcomes. (Contains 11 references.) (JOW)

  17. Differences between clinical specialist and advanced practitioner clinical practice, leadership, and research roles, responsibilities, and perceived outcomes (the SCAPE study).

    PubMed

    Begley, Cecily; Elliott, Naomi; Lalor, Joan; Coyne, Imelda; Higgins, Agnes; Comiskey, Catherine M

    2013-06-01

    To report a study designed comparing the roles, responsibilities, and perceived outcomes of Clinical Nurse Specialists, Clinical Midwife Specialists, and Advanced Nurse Practitioners in Ireland. A clinical career pathway that encompasses progression from staff nurse or midwife through clinical specialist to advanced practitioner level was introduced in Ireland in 2000. Such roles are common internationally, but little evaluation has been conducted and few comparisons have been made between roles. A mixed-method case-study design was used. Following Research Ethics Committee Approval, data were collected in 2009-2010, using non-participant observation (92 hours) of 23 Clinical Specialists and Advanced Practitioners, interviews with 21 clinicians and 13 Directors of Nursing or Midwifery. A survey was completed by 154 service-users. A clear difference was seen between Clinical Specialist and Advanced Practitioners, with advanced practice roles providing improved service delivery, greater clinical and professional leadership, increased research, and a clear governance and accreditation structure. Clinical Midwife Specialists were rated at a similar level to Advanced Nurse Practitioners for certain aspects and rated more highly for 'continuity of care and carer'. Advanced Practitioners do give a higher level of care, particularly at a strategic level. Existing Clinical Specialists should therefore be encouraged to develop their skills and education to achieve advanced practice level and more specialist and advanced practice posts should be instituted. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. The case for a specialist multidisciplinary valve clinic.

    PubMed

    Chambers, John B; Lloyd, Guy; Rimington, Helen M; Parkin, Denise; Hayes, Anna M; Baldrock-Apps, Gemma; Topham, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Valve disease is common and is increasing in prevalence as the population ages. The delivery of appropriate management is not always straightforward, and better ways of organizing care are required. Here, the argument is made for a specialist multidisciplinary valve clinic, while a description is provided of the authors' model clinic, which incorporates a specialist cardiologist in addition to sonographers and a nurse who carry out the surveillance services. The clinic is based at a cardiothoracic center and one district hospital, but could be generalized. Previous audits have shown that this model can reduce the number of patients seen by a cardiologist, thus improving the safety and quality of treatment compared to conventional clinics.

  19. Community nurses and their collaboration with clinical nurse consultants.

    PubMed

    Jannings, W; Maynard, C

    A survey was undertaken of 129 community nurses who had chosen to utilise a clinical nurse consultant for education and/or patient care at home. Accessibility, efficiency, usefulness of the consultation and the educative role of the clinical nurse consultant were examined. The responses indicated that the community nurses had positive perceptions regarding their collaboration with the clinical nurse consultants. It is recommended that an objective tool be developed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the collaboration, for data collection purposes, when measuring patient outcomes and evaluating specialist resources.

  20. Supporting staff nurses to train as community specialist district nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Lorraine

    The removal of district nurses from the Nursing and Midwifery Council's recognised specialist practitioner list has resulted in many employers not commissioning district nurse courses and a lack of clarity about the skills required to be a team leader. This article discusses a practice development initiative to support learning through a practice based competency programme, to develop skills of local staff members.

  1. The informatics nurse specialist role in electronic health record usability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Crystal L; Seckman, Charlotte A

    2014-05-01

    Health information technology is revolutionizing the way we interact with health-related data. One example of this can be seen in the rising adoption rates of electronic health records by healthcare providers. Nursing plays a vital role in electronic health record adoption, not only because of their numbers but also their intimate understanding of workflow. The success of an electronic health record also relies on how usable the software is for clinicians, and a thorough usability evaluation is needed before implementing a system within an organization. Not all nurses have the knowledge and skills to perform extensive usability testing; therefore, the informatics nurse specialist plays a critical role in the process. This article will discuss core usability principles, provide a framework for applying these concepts, and explore the role of the informatics nurse specialist in electronic health record evaluation. Health information technology is fundamentally changing the clinical practice environment, and many nurses are seeking leadership positions in the field of informatics. As technology and software become more sophisticated, usability principles must be used under theguidance of the informatics nurse specialist to provide a relevant, robust, and well-designed electronic health record to address the needs of the busy clinician.

  2. The role of nurse specialists in the delivery of integrated diabetes care: a cross-sectional survey of diabetes nurse specialist services.

    PubMed

    Riordan, Fiona; McHugh, Sheena M; Murphy, Katie; Barrett, Julie; Kearney, Patricia M

    2017-08-11

    International evidence suggests the diabetes nurse specialist (DNS) has a key role in supporting integrated management of diabetes. We examine whether hospital and community DNS currently support the integration of care, examine regional variation in aspects of the service relevant to the delivery of integrated care and identify barriers to service delivery and areas for improvement. A cross-sectional survey of hospital and community-based DNS in Ireland. Between September 2015 and April 2016, a 67-item online survey, comprising closed and open questions on their clinical role, diabetes clinics, multidisciplinary working, and barriers and facilitators to service delivery, was administered to all eligible DNS (n=152) in Ireland. DNS were excluded if they were retired or on maternity leave or extended leave. The response rate was 66.4% (n=101): 60.6% (n=74) and 89.3% (n=25) among hospital and community DNS, respectively. Most DNS had patients with stable (81.8%) and complicated type 2 diabetes mellitus (89.9%) attending their service. The majority were delivering nurse-led clinics (81.1%). Almost all DNS had a role liaising with (91%), and providing support and education to (95%), other professionals. However, only a third reported that there was local agreement on how their service should operate between the hospital and primary care. Barriers to service delivery that were experienced by DNS included deficits in the availability of specialist staff (allied health professionals, endocrinologists and DNS), insufficient space for clinics, structured education and issues with integration. Delivering integrated diabetes care through a nurse specialist-led approach requires that wider service issues, including regional disparities in access to specialist resources and formalising agreements and protocols on multidisciplinary working between settings, be explicitly addressed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article

  3. Experiences of gynecological cancer patients receiving care from specialist nurses: a qualitative systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cook, Olivia; McIntyre, Meredith; Recoche, Katrina; Lee, Susan

    2017-08-01

    The care needs of women with gynecological cancer are complex and change over the course of their cancer journey. Specialist nurses are well positioned to play a role in meeting the needs of women with gynecological cancer although their role and scope of practice have not been well defined. As patients are a key stakeholder, understanding their experience of care is an important step in better defining the role and scope of practice of specialist nurses in gynecological oncology in Australia and New Zealand. This review sought to consider gynecological cancer patients' experiences of specialist nursing care. Exploring the patient's experience of care by a specialist nurse is one step in the process of better defining the role and scope of practice of specialist gynecological-oncology nurses in Australia and New Zealand. This review included studies with a focus on women with gynecological cancer who had been cared for by a specialist nurse. Studies of women with gynecological cancer at any point on the continuum of care from pre-diagnosis to survivorship or end of life, including those with a recurrence of the disease, were included, with no limit to the duration of care received for inclusion in the review. Studies that explored how women with gynecological cancer experience the care and interventions of specialist nurses were included. Qualitative studies including, but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research were considered for review. This review also considered the qualitative components of mixed method studies. Research conducted in any country was considered for inclusion in this review providing that the study was reported in English. Studies conducted in any setting including, but not limited to, acute hospitals, outpatient/ambulatory clinics, chemotherapy or radiotherapy units, support groups, palliative care units or the patient's home were included. A three-step search strategy

  4. "Lighthouse in the dark": a qualitative study of the role of breast care nurse specialists in Israel.

    PubMed

    Admi, Hanna; Zohar, Hana; Rudner, Yael

    2011-12-01

    This study gains insight into the role of the breast care nurse specialist through an analysis of thank you letters written by women with breast cancer in a tertiary hospital in Israel. Descriptive content analysis was used to analyze 125 thank you letters. The findings revealed three aspects of the role of the breast care nurse specialist: instrumental, cognitive, and emotional. The women described these aspects as "paving the way through bureaucracy" (instrumental), being a "traffic light at a crossroad in life" (cognitive), and treating each one of them "as if I am your only patient" (emotional). This analysis highlighted the significance of the breast care nurse specialist in a holistic and integrative role that fills a gap within the biomedical healthcare system. Transferability of the findings to other nurse specialist roles in different clinical settings should be investigated.

  5. The evolving role of the community nurse specialist in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Husband, Jacqueline

    2008-01-01

    The community clinical nurse specialist in palliative care role has evolved in an uncoordinated manner resulting in a variety of grades of nurse with differing role expectations. In general the CNS role consists of a clinical, educational, strategic and managerial remit. The reality of working with such a diverse role creates tension and conflict for the CNS between personal, organization and practical expectations. Despite this the community palliative care CNS is central to the future development of palliative care services in the community generating a culture of sharing knowledge and expertise. This will however require further investigation into the impact these demands will have on the individual.

  6. Geriatric oncology in the Netherlands: a survey of medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists.

    PubMed

    Jonker, J M; Smorenburg, C H; Schiphorst, A H; van Rixtel, B; Portielje, J E A; Hamaker, M E

    2014-11-01

    To identify ways to improve cancer care for older patients, we set out to examine how older patients in the Netherlands are currently being evaluated prior to oncological treatment and to explore the potential obstacles in the incorporation of a geriatric evaluation, using a web-based survey sent to Dutch medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists. The response rate was 34% (183 out of 544). Two-thirds of respondents reported that a geriatric evaluation was being used, although primarily on an ad hoc basis only. Most respondents expressed a desire for a routine evaluation or more intensive collaboration with the geriatrician and 86% of respondents who were not using a geriatric evaluation expressed their interest to do so. The most important obstacles were a lack of time or personnel and insufficient availability of a geriatrician to perform the assessment. Thus, over 30% of oncology professionals in the Netherlands express an interest in geriatric oncology. Important obstacles to a routine implementation of a geriatric evaluation are a lack of time, or insufficient availability of geriatricians; this could be overcome with policies that acknowledge that quality cancer care for older patients requires the investment of time and personnel.

  7. Nurse-led delivery of specialist supportive care for bipolar disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Crowe, M; Inder, M; Carlyle, D; Wilson, L; Whitehead, L; Panckhurst, A; O'Brien, T; Frampton, C; Joyce, P

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study is (1) to assess the feasibility of delivering nurse-led specialist supportive care as an adjunct to usual care in the clinical setting; (2) to examine the relationship between the delivery of specialist supportive care and improved self-efficacy and functioning and reduced depressive symptoms. A randomized controlled trial of the clinical effectiveness of specialist supportive care as an adjunct to usual care was conducted in community mental health services at one site. Participants were randomized to either usual care or usual care and the adjunctive intervention. Self-report measures of depression, general functioning and self-efficacy were completed by participants in both groups at baseline and 9 months. The intervention was delivered parallel to usual treatment arrangements. While recruitment numbers were sufficient, a low rate of engagement meant we were unable to show significant differences in depressive symptoms or self-efficacy between the usual care group and the specialist supportive care plus usual care group. This study demonstrated that it was difficult to engage patients with bipolar disorder in specialist supportive care when they were currently in a mood episode and under the care of community mental health services.

  8. The work setting of diabetes nursing specialists in the Netherlands: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Tilja I J; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; Tummers, Gladys; Landeweerd, Jan A; van Merode, Godefridus G

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study is to explore whether the work organisation of diabetes specialist nurses (DSNs) differs significantly from nurses working in hospital and nursing home and if so, does this difference result in positive or negative consequences regarding work and health. In traditional health care settings, nurses exhibit a high level of environmental uncertainty and low decision-making authority, which has a negative effect on psychological reactions towards work. In professional nursing, specialisation, e.g. diabetic nursing, is a current trend in many countries. Therefore, insight into the determinants of the work situation of nursing specialists is becoming increasingly relevant. Comparisons were made between 3 different samples: 1204 nurses employed by 15 hospitals, 1058 nurses employed by 14 nursing homes, and 350 diabetes nurses working in other health care settings throughout the Netherlands. Data concerning organisation, work aspects, and psychological reactions were measured via questionnaires. Variances between the groups were analysed with ANCOVA, besides hierarchical multiple regression analysis was applied. Environmental uncertainty scored lower amongst diabetes nurses when compared to nurses working in the other two types of health care settings. Social support and role conflict scored low for diabetes nursing specialists who simultaneously perceived autonomy and role ambiguity highest. Diabetes nursing specialists also scored highest on intrinsic work motivation and job satisfaction and lowest for psychosomatic health. Except for social support and role ambiguity, diabetic nurses rate their [work] organisation, [work] aspects and psychological [work] reactions more positively than nurses employed in other health care settings.

  9. The psychiatric nurse specialist: a valuable asset in the general hospital.

    PubMed

    Fife, B; Lemler, S

    1983-04-01

    In summary, what are the ways in which the psychiatric/mental clinical specialist contributes to cost-effectiveness, the professional growth of nursing staff, and quality patient care in the general hospital setting? All services of the psychiatric/mental health clinical specialist are ultimately directed toward increasing the effectiveness with which staff can deliver care. This goal is accomplished by helping staff nurses maximize their knowledge, by providing needed educational opportunities, by promoting the use of a holistic model of care, and by helping staff cope with their own stress. In our experience, high quality care that meets the physiological, psychological, and sociological needs of patients decreases the length of the hospital stay, prevents repeated hospitalizations, and minimizes the development of psychosocial problems secondary to the illness. With the necessary support and cooperation from administration, this clinical specialist role reduces health care costs, promotes a higher level of functioning in patients and their families, and increases the level of job satisfaction for the staff who provide direct bedside care.

  10. The need for PGY2-trained clinical pharmacy specialists.

    PubMed

    Ragucci, Kelly R; O'Bryant, Cindy L; Campbell, Kristin Bova; Buck, Marcia L; Dager, William E; Donovan, Jennifer L; Emerson, Kayleigh; Gubbins, Paul O; Haight, Robert J; Jackevicius, Cynthia; Murphy, John E; Prohaska, Emily

    2014-06-01

    The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and other stakeholder organizations seek to advance clinical pharmacist practitioners, educators, and researchers. Unfortunately, there remains an inadequate supply of residency-trained clinical specialists to meet the needs of our health care system, and nonspecialists often are called on to fill open specialist positions. The impact of clinical pharmacy specialists on pharmacotherapy outcomes in both acute care and primary care settings demonstrates the value of these specialists. This commentary articulates the need for postgraduate year two (PGY2)-trained clinical specialists within the health care system by discussing various clinical and policy rationales, interprofessional support, economic justifications, and their impact on quality of care and drug safety. The integrated practice model that has grown out of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) could threaten the growth and development of future clinical specialists. Therefore, the ways in which PGY2-trained clinical pharmacist specialists are deployed in the PPMI require further consideration. PGY2 residencies provide education and training opportunities that cannot be achieved in traditional professional degree programs or postgraduate year one residencies. These specialists are needed to provide direct patient care to complex patient populations and to educate and train pharmacy students and postgraduate residents. Limitations to training and hiring PGY2-trained clinical pharmacy specialists include site capacity limitations and lack of funding. A gap analysis is needed to define the extent of the mismatch between the demand for specialists by health care systems and educational institutions versus the capacity to train clinical pharmacists at the specialty level. © 2014 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  11. Examination of the teaching styles of nursing professional development specialists, part I: best practices in adult learning theory, curriculum development, and knowledge transfer.

    PubMed

    Curran, Mary K

    2014-05-01

    The American Nurses Association advocates for nursing professional development (NPD) specialists to have an earned graduate degree, as well as educational and clinical expertise. However, many NPD specialists have limited exposure to adult learning theory. Limited exposure to adult learning theory may affect NPD educational practices, learning outcomes, organizational knowledge transfer, and subsequently, the professional development of the nurses they serve and quality of nursing care. An examination of current teaching practices may reveal opportunities for NPD specialists to enhance educational methods to promote learning, learning transfer, and organizational knowledge and excellence. This article, the first in a two-part series, examines best practices of adult learning theories, nursing professional development, curriculum design, and knowledge transfer. Part II details the results of a correlational study that examined the effects of four variables on the use of adult learning theory to guide curriculum development for NPD specialists in hospitals. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Embracing technology: patients', family members' and nurse specialists' experience of communicating using e-mail.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, Amanda; Moore, Sally; Plant, Hilary

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports on a study exploring the usefulness of e-mail as a means of communication between nurse specialists and patients with lung cancer and their families. The study involved two lung cancer nurse specialists and 16 patients and family members who used e-mail with them during the 6-month study period. Data were collected from three sources: (1) e-mail contact between the nurse specialists and patients/family members, (2) patient/family member questionnaire and (3) a focus group/reflective session with the nurse specialists. Quantitative data collected from the e-mails and the questionnaires were analysed descriptively and are presented as summary statistics. Text data from the questionnaires and e-mails were analysed using content analysis. Findings suggest that e-mail can be an effective and convenient means of communication between nurse specialists, and patients and family members. Patients and family members reported high levels of satisfaction with this method of communication. It was found to be quick and easy, and patients and family members were satisfied with both the response and the speed of response from the nurse specialists. Nurse specialists were also positive about e-mail use and found that the benefits of using e-mail with patients/family members outweighed any disadvantages. Further investigation is recommended involving other health care professionals and different patient groups to ensure the safe and appropriate use of e-mail within health care.

  13. Valuing teamwork: Insights from newly-registered nurses working in specialist mental health services.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; Mannix, Judy; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; Jackson, Debra

    2011-12-01

    In this qualitative study, the experiences of a small cohort of registered nurses (RN) during the first 2 years of mental health employment were documented. A total of 13 semistructured interviews were completed from within a specialist mental health setting. Eleven issues were identified: (i) teamwork; (ii) experiential learning; (iii) self-development; (iv) confidence; (v) listening; (vi) rapport; (vii) keen observation; (viii) patience; (ix) empathy; (x) learning from colleagues; and (xi) maintaining a positive approach towards patients. The nurses focused on the here-and-now circumstances, rather than on future plans, or past preparation, and were able to elucidate the qualities and skills that they brought to their clinical work. Participants were most proud of achievements that bridged the personal and professional, such as self-development, working closely with patients to develop rapport, experiential learning, and teamwork. Findings highlight the importance of teamwork to newly-graduated RN entering the mental health environment. It is known that teamwork can convey a sense of belonging and help create an environment in which applied experiential clinical learning can occur. Therefore, it is important that efforts are made to facilitate team building and opportunities for teamwork when new graduates are transitioning into the mental health clinical practice environment. © 2011 The Authors; International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  14. Role clarity and role conflict among Swedish diabetes specialist nurses.

    PubMed

    Boström, Eva; Hörnsten, Asa; Lundman, Berit; Stenlund, Hans; Isaksson, Ulf

    2013-10-01

    To explore diabetes specialist nurses (DSNs)' perceptions of their role in terms of clarity, conflict and other psychosocial work aspects. A cross-sectional study was conducted among DSNs in a county in northern Sweden. The DSNs answered the Nordic Questionnaire of Psychological and Social Factors at Work (QPS Nordic) about psychosocial aspects of their work. Statistical analysis compared DSNs with a reference group of different health professionals. Correlations between role clarity, role conflict, and other variables were analysed. The DSNs perceived more, and higher, job demands, including quantitative, decision-making and learning demands, but also more positive challenges at work compared with the reference group. Role clarity correlated with experiences of health promotion, perception of mastery, co-worker support, and empowering leadership, while role conflict correlated with quantitative and learning demands. The DSNs perceived high demands but also positive challenges in their work. Their role expectations correlated with several psychosocial work aspects. It is important that DSNs should be presented with positive challenges as meaningful incentives for further role development and enhanced mastery of their work. Copyright © 2013 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New graduate nurses, new graduate nurse transition programs, and clinical leadership skill: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Kathy B; Richards, Kathy C

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review evaluated the relationship between new graduate nurses and clinical leadership skill, and between new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs have been cited as one strategy to improve clinical leadership skill, but to our knowledge, no one has synthesized the evidence on new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. Results of this review showed that new graduate nurse transition programs that were at least 24 weeks in length had a positive impact on clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs using the University HealthSystem Consortium/American Association of Colleges of Nursing Nurse Residency curriculum had the greatest impact, followed by curriculum developed by the Versant New Graduate RN Residency, an important finding for nursing professional development specialists.

  16. A national evaluation of specialists' clinics in primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Bowling, A; Bond, M

    2001-04-01

    Encouraged by the increased purchasing power of general practitioners (GPs), specialist-run clinics in general practice and community health care settings (known as specialist outreach clinics) have increased rapidly across England. The activities of local commissioning schemes within primary care groups are likely to accelerate this trend. To evaluate the costs, processes, and benefits of specialists' outreach clinics held in GPs' surgeries, compared with hospital outpatient clinics. A case-referent (comparative) study comparing the characteristics of outreach clinics (cases) with matched outpatient control clinics. Thirty-eight outreach clinics, compared with 38 matched outpatient clinics as controls, covering 14 hospital trust areas across England. Self-administered questionnaires were given to patients in both clinic settings. These covered processes, satisfaction, personal costs, and health status, with postal follow-up at six months to assess health outcomes. Self-administered questionnaires were also given to the specialists and GPs whose clinics were included in the study (individual patient clinical sheet and an attitude questionnaire), practice managers, and trust accountants (process and costs questionnaire). Evaluation of the costs, processes, and benefits of specialist outreach clinics versus hospital outpatient clinics was carried out by comparing questionnaire responses. In comparison with outpatients, outreach clinic patients spent less time on the waiting lists for appointments to see the specialist, they had shorter waiting times in clinics, fewer follow-up appointments, and were more likely to be completely discharged after the sampled attendance. Outreach patients were more satisfied than outpatients with the range of clinic process items asked about. Most doctors felt that the outreach clinic was 'worthwhile'. While patients' personal costs were lower in outreach than in outpatients clinics, NHS costs were more expensive per patient in outreach

  17. A national evaluation of specialists' clinics in primary care settings.

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, A; Bond, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Encouraged by the increased purchasing power of general practitioners (GPs), specialist-run clinics in general practice and community health care settings (known as specialist outreach clinics) have increased rapidly across England. The activities of local commissioning schemes within primary care groups are likely to accelerate this trend. AIM: To evaluate the costs, processes, and benefits of specialists' outreach clinics held in GPs' surgeries, compared with hospital outpatient clinics. DESIGN OF STUDY: A case-referent (comparative) study comparing the characteristics of outreach clinics (cases) with matched outpatient control clinics. SETTING: Thirty-eight outreach clinics, compared with 38 matched outpatient clinics as controls, covering 14 hospital trust areas across England. METHOD: Self-administered questionnaires were given to patients in both clinic settings. These covered processes, satisfaction, personal costs, and health status, with postal follow-up at six months to assess health outcomes. Self-administered questionnaires were also given to the specialists and GPs whose clinics were included in the study (individual patient clinical sheet and an attitude questionnaire), practice managers, and trust accountants (process and costs questionnaire). Evaluation of the costs, processes, and benefits of specialist outreach clinics versus hospital outpatient clinics was carried out by comparing questionnaire responses. RESULTS: In comparison with outpatients, outreach clinic patients spent less time on the waiting lists for appointments to see the specialist, they had shorter waiting times in clinics, fewer follow-up appointments, and were more likely to be completely discharged after the sampled attendance. Outreach patients were more satisfied than outpatients with the range of clinic process items asked about. Most doctors felt that the outreach clinic was 'worthwhile'. While patients' personal costs were lower in outreach than in outpatients

  18. How do nurses assess and manage breakthrough pain in specialist palliative care inpatient units? A multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Soden, Katie; Ali, Simone; Alloway, Lara; Barclay, David; Perkins, Paul; Barker, Stephanie

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to gain a better understanding of how nurses working on inpatient specialist palliative care units assess and manage breakthrough pain. Thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with fifteen nurses from five different specialist palliative care units in the UK was undertaken. Themes identified have been broadly categorized into four main areas: defining breakthrough pain, assessing breakthrough pain, managing breakthrough pain, and attitudes/teamwork. Nurses had difficulty defining breakthrough pain as a distinct pain subtype and were often unable to differentiate it from poorly controlled background pain. This study highlights significant training needs and suggests that the theoretical work and recently published consensus recommendations around breakthrough pain now need to be translated into day-to-day clinical practice.

  19. Tensions related to implementation of postgraduate degree projects in specialist nursing education.

    PubMed

    German Millberg, Lena; Berg, Linda; Lindström, Irma; Petzäll, Kerstin; Öhlén, Joakim

    2011-04-01

    In conjunction with the introduction of the Bologna process in Sweden, specialist nursing education programmes were moved up to the second cycle of higher education with the opportunity to take a one-year master's degree, which also meant that students would undertake a degree project carrying 15 ECTS. The purpose of this study was to examine the introduction of postgraduate degree projects on the second-cycle level into Swedish specialist nursing programmes in accordance with the Bologna process. Five universities were involved and the study design took the form of action research. Problem formulation, planning, evaluation and follow-up with reflection led to new actions over a period of 2 1/2 years. Through a review of local curriculum documents, the implementation of a postgraduate degree project was monitored and these reviews, together with field notes, were analysed by means of constant comparative analysis. The results revealed a variety of tensions that arose when postgraduate degree projects were introduced, taking the form of differing views on the relationship between research, clinical development, specific professional objectives and academic objectives. These tensions were reflected in six areas of change. In summary, it can be noted that implementation of the postgraduate degree projects highlighted tensions related to basic views of learning.

  20. Preceptoring nursing students: registered nurses' perceptions of nursing students' preparation and study approaches in clinical education.

    PubMed

    Hallin, Karin; Danielson, Ella

    2010-05-01

    Preceptorship influences Registered Nurses' (RNs) daily work to different degrees depending on nursing students' knowledge, and willingness to learn. Consequently, it is of the utmost importance to investigate how RNs assess nursing students in clinical education. The aim of this study was to describe RNs' perceptions of nursing students' preparation and study approaches at hospital workplaces, and to explore relationships between RNs' perceptions and their personal/clinical characteristics. A cross-sectional design was used. In 2006, 142 of 196 RNs at a Swedish hospital answered a questionnaire (response rate 72.5%). The majority of RNs (63-84%) rated students' study approaches highly and thought students comprehended the outcomes of learning. Fewer (45-49%), rated students as having adequate theoretical knowledge highly and were of the opinion that they had acquired knowledge about the unit. Statistically, non specialist nurses rated significantly higher compared with specialist nurses. Significant positive correlations were found between the RNs' perceptions of nursing students and their interest in preceptoring. The extent to which preparation programmes, established in collaboration between a university and a hospital, had improved preceptors and nursing students was not graded. Further descriptive and intervention studies are therefore needed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Educational clinical supervision: meeting the needs of specialist community practitioner students and professional practice.

    PubMed

    Canham, J

    1998-07-01

    In light of the possible demise of the community practice teacher, this paper proposes that a specific system of educationally led clinical supervision would benefit learning, teaching and assessing in the practice elements of specialist community practitioner education. Such a system would be additional to models of clinical supervision currently utilized in practice. An educative supervisory relationship would foster those skills and attributes essential for specialist community practice, enabling students to move toward mature responsible practice. It would provide experience of supportive frameworks that could be later utilized in professional practice. Clinical supervision specifically tailored for specialist community practitioner education would enable equity across branches and could be delivered in a variety of settings without a supervisor having to be 'on-site', thus benefiting comparatively isolated students in practice nursing and occupational health. To work successfully, educationally led clinical supervision necessitates a joint response by educational institutions and those practices where specialist community students undertake assessed placements. Without such a system in place to support specialist community practitioner courses, the standard of education and future practice cannot be assured.

  2. Impact of the Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative on Clinical Pharmacy Specialist Practice.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Judith; Ray, Shaunta'; Danelich, Ilya; Dodds Ashley, Elizabeth; Eckel, Stephen; Guharoy, Roy; Militello, Michael; O'Donnell, Paul; Sam, Teena; Crist, Stephanie M; Smidt, Danielle

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the goals of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists' Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) and its recommendations for health-system pharmacy practice transformation to meet future patient care needs and elevate the role of pharmacists as patient care providers. PPMI envisions a future in which pharmacists have greater responsibility for medication-related outcomes and technicians assume greater responsibility for product-related activities. Although the PPMI recommendations have elevated the level of practice in many settings, they also potentially affect existing clinical pharmacists, in general, and clinical pharmacy specialists, in particular. Moreover, although more consistent patient care can be achieved with an expanded team of pharmacist providers, the role of clinical pharmacy specialists must not be diminished, especially in the care of complex patients and populations. Specialist practitioners with advanced training and credentials must be available to model and train pharmacists in generalist positions, residents, and students. Indeed, specialist practitioners are often the innovators and practice leaders. Negotiation between hospitals and pharmacy schools is needed to ensure a continuing role for academic clinical pharmacists and their contributions as educators and researchers. Lessons can be applied from disciplines such as nursing and medicine, which have developed new models of care involving effective collaboration between generalists and specialists. Several different pharmacy practice models have been described to meet the PPMI goals, based on available personnel and local goals. Studies measuring the impact of these new practice models are needed. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  3. Preservice Interdisciplinary Preparation of Early Intervention Specialists in a College of Nursing: Faculty Reflections and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Athleen B.

    1995-01-01

    This article relates experiences and insights gained by a nurse educator directing the University of Utah College of Nursing's Utah Early Intervention Personnel Preparation project, a graduate-level interdisciplinary program to prepare early intervention specialists. Recommendations are offered for development of preservice or inservice…

  4. Simulation-Based Assessment of ECMO Clinical Specialists.

    PubMed

    Fehr, James J; Shepard, Mark; McBride, Mary E; Mehegan, Mary; Reddy, Kavya; Murray, David J; Boulet, John R

    2016-06-01

    The aims of the study were (1) to create multiple scenarios that simulate a range of urgent and emergent extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) events and (2) to determine whether these scenarios can provide reliable and valid measures of a specialist's advanced skill in managing ECMO emergencies. Multiscenario simulation-based performance assessment was performed. The study was conducted in the Saigh Pediatric Simulation Center at St. Louis Children's Hospital. ECMO clinical specialists participated in the study. Twenty-five ECMO specialists completed 8 scenarios presenting acute events in simulated ECMO patients. Participants were evaluated by 2 separate reviewers for completion of key actions and for global performance. The scores were highest for the hemodilution scenario, whereas the air entrainment scenario had the lowest scores. Psychometric analysis demonstrated that ECMO specialists with more than 1 year of experience outperformed the specialists with less than 1 year of experience. Participants endorsed these sessions as important and representative of events that might be encountered in practice. The scenarios could serve as a component of an ECMO education curriculum and be used to assess clinical specialists' readiness to manage ECMO emergencies.

  5. Evolution of robotics in surgery and implementing a perioperative robotics nurse specialist role.

    PubMed

    Francis, Paula

    2006-03-01

    Use of robotics is expanding rapidly in the medical arena. Not only are a growing number of facilities purchasing robotic systems, but the number of surgeons using them also is increasing, which creates many challenges (eg, cost, training, safety). The evolution of robotics in surgery is presented within the context of virtual reality, telepresence, telemanipulation, and passive (ie, master-slave) robotic surgical systems. A new perioperative nursing role, the robotics nurse specialist, was developed and implemented at one facility. The need for a robotics nurse specialist and how this role can help the entire surgical team promote positive patient and facility outcomes also is discussed.

  6. Addressing cultural diversity: the hepatitis B clinical specialist perspective.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jack; Smith, Elizabeth; Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Richmond, Jacqueline; Lucke, Jayne

    2017-08-31

    Hepatitis B is a viral infection primarily affecting people from culturally diverse communities in Australia. While vaccination prevents infection, there is increasing mortality resulting from liver damage associated with chronic infection. Deficits in the national policy and clinical response to hepatitis B result in a low diagnosis rate, inadequate testing and diagnosis processes, and poor access to hepatitis B treatment services. While research identifies inadequate hepatitis B knowledge among people with the virus and primary health care workers, this project sought to identify how specialist clinicians in Australia negotiate cultural diversity, and provide often complex clinical information to people with hepatitis B. A vignette was developed and presented to thirteen viral hepatitis specialist clinicians prior to an electronically recorded interview. Recruitment continued until saturation of themes was reached. Data were thematically coded into themes outlined in the interview schedule. Ethical approval for the research was provided by the La Trobe University Human Research Ethics Committee. Key messages provided to patients with hepatitis B by clinical specialists were identified. These messages were not consistently provided to all patients with hepatitis B, but were determined on perceptions of patient knowledge, age and highest educational level. While the vignette stated that English was not an issue for the patient, most specialists identified the need for an interpreter. Combating stigma related to hepatitis B was seen as important by the specialists and this was done through normalising the virus. Having an awareness of different cultural understandings about hepatitis B specifically, and health and well-being generally, was noted as a communication strategy. Key core competencies need to be developed to deliver educational messages to people with hepatitis B within clinical encounters. The provision of adequate resources to specialist clinics will

  7. Specialist nurse: an investigation of common and distinct aspects of practice.

    PubMed

    Fairweather, C; Gardner, G

    2000-04-01

    Over the past decade the discipline of nursing has been reviewing its practice, especially in relation to specialty areas. There has been an appreciation by nursing leaders that specialisation brings with it concerns related to a disuniting effect on the discipline and a fragmentation of nursing's traditional generalist practice. Accompanying these concerns is a debate over what is a specialty and how to define a specialist. This qualitative study drew upon a constructivist methodology, to explore how nurses, working in specialty areas, define and give meaning to their practice. Three groups of nurses (n=20) from the specialty of critical care were interviewed using a focus group technique. The data were analysed to build constructions of specialty practice. A distinct and qualitative difference was recognised in the practice behaviours of nurses working in the specialty area. The qualitatively different practice behaviours have been identified as 'nursing-in-a-specialty' and 'specialist nurse'. Two constructions emerged to differentiate the skill behaviours, these were 'practice' and 'knowledge'. The specialist nurse practices were based on two distinct types of practice, that of 'discretion' and 'incorporation'. 'Knowledge' was constructed as a synthesis of propositional and practice knowledge. By Carrie Fairweather and Glenn Gardner.

  8. [The Role Development of Informatics Nurse Specialists in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Feng, Rung-Chuang; Lee, Ying-Li; Lee, Tso-Ying

    2015-06-01

    The development of information technology has changed the world and allowed the innovation of nursing-care services. In recent years, the development of nursing informatics in Taiwan has been catching up with international trends and has been regarded positively by the international medical informatics community. The integration of information technology into medical care system has created the new nursing role of "informatics nurse." Although the certification system and job descriptions for these nurses have become increasingly comprehensive in many nations, Taiwan remains in the early development stage in these regards. Taiwan informatics nurses continue to face unclear and inadequately stated role responsibilities and job titles, undefined training requirements, and a lack of a clear qualification / certification system. This paper introduces the role functions and professional growth of informatics nurses and introduces the framework for a certification system in order to give to various medical and paramedical staffs a better understanding of informatics nursing and to recognize the important role played by informatics nurses in the process of healthcare informatics development.

  9. Neutral to positive views on the consequences of nurse prescribing: Results of a national survey among registered nurses, nurse specialists and physicians.

    PubMed

    Kroezen, Marieke; van Dijk, Liset; Groenewegen, Peter P; de Rond, Marlies; de Veer, Anke J E; Francke, Anneke L

    2014-04-01

    Over the last two decades, the number of countries where nurses are legally permitted to prescribe medication has grown considerably. A lack of peer support and/or objections by physicians can act as factors hampering nurse prescribing. Earlier research suggests that physicians are generally less supportive and more concerned about nurse prescribing than nurses are. However, direct comparisons between doctors' and nurses' views are scarce and are often based on small sample sizes. To gain insight into the views of Dutch registered nurses (RNs), nurse specialists (with a master's in Advanced Nursing Practice) and physicians on the consequences of nurse prescribing. Survey study. Survey questionnaires were sent to national samples of RNs, nurse specialists and physicians. The questionnaire addressed, among others, respondents' general views on the consequences of nurse prescribing for the quality of care, the nursing and medical professions, and the relationship between the medical and nursing professions. The net response rate was 66.0% for RNs (n=617), 28.3% for nurse specialists (n=375) and 33.7% for physicians (n=265). It was found that all groups agreed that nurse prescribing benefits nurses' daily practice and the nursing profession. There were few concerns about negative consequences for physicians' practice and the medical profession. Nurse specialists gave significantly (P<0.05) more positive scores on most items than RNs and physicians. We found relatively little difference in views between RNs and physicians. It was only on issues surrounding the quality of care and patient safety that doctors showed more concerns, albeit mild, than RNs and nurse specialists. RNs, nurse specialists and physicians generally hold neutral to moderately positive views on nurse prescribing. This is beneficial for the implementation and potential success of nurse prescribing in practice, as a lack of peer support and/or objections from physicians can be a hampering factor

  10. Specialist nursing and community support for the carers of people with dementia living at home: an evidence synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bunn, Frances; Goodman, Claire; Pinkney, Emma; Drennan, Vari M

    2016-01-01

    Specialist nurses are one way of providing support for family carers of people with dementia, but relatively little is known about what these roles achieve, or if they are more effective than roles that do not require a clinical qualification. The aim of this review was to synthesise the literature on the scope and effectiveness of specialist nurses, known as Admiral Nurses, and set this evidence in the context of other community-based initiatives to support family carers of people with dementia. We undertook a systematic review of the literature relating to the scope and effectiveness of Admiral Nurses and a review of reviews of interventions to support the family carers of people with dementia. To identify studies, we searched electronic databases, undertook lateral searches and contacted experts. Searches were undertaken in November 2012. Results are reported narratively with key themes relating to Admiral Nurses identified using thematic synthesis. We included 33 items relating to Admiral Nurses (10 classified as research) and 11 reviews evaluating community-based support for carers of people with dementia. There has been little work to evaluate specific interventions provided by Admiral Nurses, but three overarching thematic categories were identified: (i) relational support, (ii) co-ordinating and personalising support and (iii) challenges and threats to the provision of services by Admiral Nurses. There was an absence of clearly articulated goals and service delivery was subject to needs of the host organisation and the local area. The reviews of community-based support for carers of people with dementia included 155 studies but, in general, evidence that interventions reduced caregiver depression or burden was weak, although psychosocial and educational interventions may reduce depression in carers. Community support for carers of people with dementia, such as that provided by Admiral Nurses, is valued by family carers, but the impact of such initiatives is

  11. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  12. Specialists without spirit: crisis in the nursing profession.

    PubMed Central

    Hewa, S; Hetherington, R W

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the crisis in the nursing profession in Western industrial societies in the light of Max Weber's theory of rationalisation. The domination of instrumental rational action in modern industrial societies in evident in the field of modern medicine. The burgeoning mechanistic approach to the human body and health makes modern health care services increasingly devoid of human values. Although the nursing profession has been influenced by various changes that took place in health care during the last few decades (for example greater reliance on technology), the underlying values of the nursing profession still emphasise a broad definition of the well-being of patients. Hence, in recent years the irrational consequences of growing technological medicine in North America has resulted in a serious crisis in the nursing profession. To resolve this crisis the authors propose a reorganisation of modern health care services on the basis of a new paradigm which is compatible with both the health care needs of the people and the main emphasis in education and training of the nursing profession. PMID:2287012

  13. DOD Health Care. Issues Involving Military Nurse Specialists. Report to the Honorable Daniel K. Inouye, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    Selected Department of Defense (DOD) policies were examined concerning nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners, particularly in regard to the extent to which these nurse specialists are allowed an independent scope of practice in military hospitals and the degree of physician supervision they require. Discussions were held with…

  14. DOD Health Care. Issues Involving Military Nurse Specialists. Report to the Honorable Daniel K. Inouye, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    Selected Department of Defense (DOD) policies were examined concerning nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners, particularly in regard to the extent to which these nurse specialists are allowed an independent scope of practice in military hospitals and the degree of physician supervision they require. Discussions were held with…

  15. The perceptions of key stakeholders of the roles of specialist and advanced nursing and midwifery practitioners.

    PubMed

    Casey, Mary; O'Connor, Laserina; Nicholson, Emma; Smith, Rita; O'Brien, Denise; O'Leary, Denise; Fealy, Gerard M; Mcnamara, Martin S; Stokes, Diarmuid; Egan, Claire

    2017-06-15

    To explore the perceptions of key stakeholders of the roles of specialist and advanced nursing and midwifery practitioners. There is evidence that the contribution of these roles to patient care is poorly understood. This research took place over 2 months in 2015 and is part of a larger study involving a rapid review to inform policy development on the specialist and advanced nursing and midwifery practice in Ireland. As an added value, a qualitative element involving thematic analysis was undertaken with key stakeholders. A phenomenological qualitative study was conducted incorporating semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders (n = 15). Purposive sampling with maximum diversity was used to recruit a wide range of perspectives. Participant's perspectives led to seven themes: Impact of these roles; role preparation, experience and organizational support; specialist and advanced practice roles in an interdisciplinary context; different folks but not such different roles; impact of specialist and advanced practice roles on patient outcomes; barriers and facilitators to enacting specialist and advanced practice roles; future development of these roles. There is acknowledgement of the positive impact of specialist and advanced practitioners; however, the evidence is currently not conclusive. Preparation for these roles needs to reflect changes in the calibre of today's professional applicants, and organizational support is paramount to their successful execution. The contribution of their activity to patient outcome needs to be made visible to enhance these roles and to justify the development of new roles across a variety of healthcare areas. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Case study: factors in defining the nurse informatics specialist role.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare organizations, consultant groups, vendor companies, and academic institutions feel the challenge to enhance user experiences with information systems. To meet this challenge, organizations and companies are looking to better understand and utilize a variety of informatics roles to further marketing, business, or healthcare goals. Nursing is one practice area that can support the successful integration of information systems development, implementation, support, and user experience. However, the definition and development of such a role or position has met with mixed success. This article explores some of the issues and influences related to the role's development. The issues, impacts, and influences have been identified based on healthcare business assessment, job description analysis, employment and project evaluations, and professional standards set by the American Nurses Association.

  17. End of life care: a discursive analysis of specialist palliative care nursing.

    PubMed

    Skilbeck, Julie K; Payne, Sheila

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to consider alternative approaches to service delivery for patients with chronic life-limiting illnesses other than cancer. It will also discuss the issues that arise when considering specialist palliative care services within a broader public health context in the United Kingdom. Contemporary specialist palliative care in the United Kingdom can be said to have two main client groups: the majority are people with a diagnosis of cancer, and a minority are those with a number of other chronic illnesses. From the evidence to date, patients dying from chronic, non-malignant disease experience a considerable number of unmet needs in terms of symptom control and psychosocial support. Although debates in the literature over the last decade have challenged the focus of specialist palliative care services on patients with a cancer diagnosis, only a minority of those with other chronic illnesses receive specialist palliative care services. Current models of specialist palliative care may not be the most appropriate for addressing the complex problems experienced by the many patients with a non-cancer diagnosis. We suggest that care should be structured around patient problems, viewing specialist palliative care as a service for those with complex end of life symptoms or problems. A role for innovative nurse-led care is proposed. Reframing the approach to specialist palliative care in the United Kingdom will require great effort on the part of all health and social care professionals, not least nurses. Critical and creative thinking are prerequisites to the development of new models of working. We suggest that a more coherent approach to research and education is required, in particular strategies that explore how patients and nurses can work together in exploring experiences of illness in order to develop more proactive approaches to care.

  18. Confidence and clinical judgement in community nurses managing venous leg ulceration - A judgement analysis.

    PubMed

    Adderley, Una J; Thompson, Carl

    2017-07-19

    The variation in the management of venous leg ulceration in the UK is partly attributable to an uncertain clinical environment but the quality of judgements is influenced by the how well nurses' confidence and accuracy are aligned. To assess UK community nurses' confidence in the accuracy of their diagnostic judgements and treatment choices when managing venous leg ulceration. Judgement Analysis. UK community and primary care nursing services. 18 community non-specialist nurses working in district (home) nursing teams and general practitioner services and 18 community tissue viability specialist nurses. Using judgement analysis methods, 18 community non-specialist nurses and 18 community tissue viability specialist nurses made diagnoses and treatment judgements about compression therapy for 110 clinical scenarios and indicated their confidence for each judgement. An expert panel made consensus judgements for the same scenarios and these judgements were used as a standard against which to compare the participants. Confidence analysis was used to assess the nurses' confidence about their diagnostic judgements and treatment choices. Despite being very experienced, both non-specialist nurses' and specialist tissue viability nurses' levels of confidence were not well calibrated with their levels of accuracy. The results of this study are important as errors resulting from both over and under-confidence at the diagnostic phase of management may influence treatment choices, and thus increase the chances of treatment error. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Caring for patients with cancer in non-specialist wards: the nurse experience.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S; Wilkes, L M; Ogunsiji, O; Walker, A

    2005-07-01

    This study aims to describe the experiences of nurses caring for cancer patients in non-specialist wards. The study was conducted in a large (420 beds) and small (32 beds) hospital in an area health service with urban and rural populations in the west of Sydney. A qualitative descriptive approach was utilized to collect data from the nurses. Data were collected using a survey and in-depth interviews of nurses working in non-specialist cancer wards. Transcribed data were managed with Nudist Vivo software and analysed for common themes using process of constant comparison and contrast. Twenty-five surveys were returned and five nurses volunteered to be interviewed. The six major themes that emerged from analysis of data were: emotional nature of care, lack of time, lack of knowledge of cancer treatment, family support, environment not conducive to proper care and dealing with patient's non-acceptance of cancer diagnosis. The nurses in this study wished to provide quality supportive care for cancer patients and their families but the inconducive environment and inadequate relevant training hindered the nurses' efforts. This then presents further need of relevant training for nurses in cancer care and time management, to meet up with these challenges.

  20. Exploring the role of community palliative care nurse specialists as educators.

    PubMed

    Husband, Jacqueline; Kennedy, Catriona

    2006-06-01

    In the UK the clinical nurse specialist role (CNS) has evolved in an uncoordinated manner resulting in a broad job remit, with clinical, managerial, research and educational elements. CNSs working in specialist palliative care are expected to contribute to the delivery of education but many have received no formal training to support them in this aspect of their role. There has been limited research exploring the role the community palliative care CNS in providing education, making this study timely. The aim of this study was to explore the role of the community palliative care CNS as educator. Hermeneutic phenomenology, using semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of eight community palliative care CNSs was the approach used. Formal ethical approval was obtained and all participants provided written informed consent. Colaizzi's framework for analysis provided a structured and transparent approach to data analysis. A summary of the findings were verified by the participants to enhance the credibility of interpretation presented here. Data analysis identified three main themes; conflict of expectations, credibility as a teacher and making the education role work. This study highlighted a team approach may address the conflict of expectations between the role specifications and practice reality. The CNS has a role in education. However for some CNSs, providing informal education rather than formal education may be appropriate. If the community palliative care CNS provides formal education, they require the knowledge and skills to deliver it effectively. The role of the CNS in palliative care education in the community should respond to personal, professional and local needs.

  1. The creation of a Dementia Nurse Specialist role in an acute general hospital.

    PubMed

    Elliot, R; Adams, J

    2011-09-01

    Older people form the largest group occupying acute hospital beds and many of them will have undiagnosed mental health problems. The creation of a Dementia Nurse Specialist role in a district general hospital provided the opportunity to assess the extent of the previously unmet need among patients, carers and nursing staff. Over 30 patients were seen each month, while around 6 to 12 were diagnosed as having dementia. Other activities undertaken as part of the role included providing information and support for carers, and advice on management of behaviours and support for ward staff. The role also involved policy writing, pathway and local strategy planning, care plan development, and formal and informal teaching on dementia. It is argued that this fixed-term post demonstrated that a Dementia Nurse Specialist could provide significant input in an acute hospital setting, by improving the experience of hospitalization for vulnerable older people and their carers. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing.

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease nurse specialists for patients on biological therapies: a nationwide Italian survey

    PubMed Central

    Guarini, Alessandra; Marinis, Francesca De; Kohn, Anna; Orzes, Nicoletta; D’Incà, Renata; Iannone, Teresa; Giaquinto, Antonella; Rivara, Cinzia; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Zullo, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Background Management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients requires a multidisciplinary approach. Among the working team, the role of IBD nurse is expected to be particularly relevant when managing patients receiving biological therapies. We performed a survey to assess the presence of IBD nurse in centers where patients were receiving biologics. Methods For this Italian nationwide survey a specific questionnaire was prepared. IBD nurse was defined as a nurse directly involved in all phases of biological therapy, from pre-therapy screening, administration and monitoring during therapy, to follow up performed by a dedicated helpline, completed a specific training on biological therapy therapy, and observed international guidelines. Results A total of 53 Italian IBD centers participated in the survey, and 91 valid questionnaires were collected. Overall, 34 (37.4%) nurses could be classified as IBD specialists. IBD nurses had a significantly higher educational level than other nurses, they were more frequently operating in Central or Southern than in Northern Italy, they were working in an Academic center rather than in a General hospital, and in IBD centers with >25 patients on biological therapy. On the contrary, mean age, gender distribution, years of nursing, and years working in the IBD unit did not significantly differ between IBD and other nurses. Conclusions Our nationwide survey showed that the presence of an IBD nurse is still lacking in the majority of Italian IBD centers where patients receive biological therapies, suggesting a prompt implementation. PMID:27708516

  3. Inflammatory bowel disease nurse specialists for patients on biological therapies: a nationwide Italian survey.

    PubMed

    Guarini, Alessandra; Marinis, Francesca De; Kohn, Anna; Orzes, Nicoletta; D'Incà, Renata; Iannone, Teresa; Giaquinto, Antonella; Rivara, Cinzia; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Zullo, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients requires a multidisciplinary approach. Among the working team, the role of IBD nurse is expected to be particularly relevant when managing patients receiving biological therapies. We performed a survey to assess the presence of IBD nurse in centers where patients were receiving biologics. For this Italian nationwide survey a specific questionnaire was prepared. IBD nurse was defined as a nurse directly involved in all phases of biological therapy, from pre-therapy screening, administration and monitoring during therapy, to follow up performed by a dedicated helpline, completed a specific training on biological therapy therapy, and observed international guidelines. A total of 53 Italian IBD centers participated in the survey, and 91 valid questionnaires were collected. Overall, 34 (37.4%) nurses could be classified as IBD specialists. IBD nurses had a significantly higher educational level than other nurses, they were more frequently operating in Central or Southern than in Northern Italy, they were working in an Academic center rather than in a General hospital, and in IBD centers with >25 patients on biological therapy. On the contrary, mean age, gender distribution, years of nursing, and years working in the IBD unit did not significantly differ between IBD and other nurses. Our nationwide survey showed that the presence of an IBD nurse is still lacking in the majority of Italian IBD centers where patients receive biological therapies, suggesting a prompt implementation.

  4. Nursing home physician specialists: a response to the workforce crisis in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Katz, Paul R; Karuza, Jurgis; Intrator, Orna; Mor, Vincent

    2009-03-17

    Marginalization of physicians in the nursing home threatens the overall care of increasingly frail nursing home residents who have medically complex illnesses. The authors propose that creating a nursing home medicine specialty, which recognizes the nursing home as a unique practice site, would go a long way toward remedying existing problems with care in skilled nursing facilities and would best serve the needs of the 1.6 million nursing home residents in the United States. Reviewing what is known about physician practice in nursing homes and hospitals, and taking a lead from the hospitalist movement, the specialty would be characterized in 3 dimensions: the degree of physicians' commitment, physicians' practice competencies, and the structure of the medical staff organization in which they practice. Challenges to the adoption of a nursing home specialist model include mainstream medicine's failure to recognize the nursing home as a legitimate medical practice, the need for the nursing home industry and policymakers to appreciate the links between physician practice and quality, and assurance of financial viability. Implications for quality of care, health policy, and research needs are discussed in this article.

  5. Nursing Home Physician Specialists: A Response to the Workforce Crisis in Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Paul R.; Karuza, Jurgis; Intrator, Orna; Mor, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Marginalization of physicians in the nursing home threatens the overall care of increasingly frail nursing home residents who have medically complex illnesses. The authors propose that creating a nursing home medicine specialty, which recognizes the nursing home as a unique practice site, would go a long way toward remedying existing problems with care in skilled nursing facilities and would best serve the needs of the 1.6 million nursing home residents in the United States. Reviewing what is known about physician practice in nursing homes and hospitals, and taking a lead from the hospitalist movement, the specialty would be characterized in 3 dimensions: the degree of physicians’ commitment, physicians’ practice competencies, and the structure of the medical staff organization in which they practice. Challenges to the adoption of a nursing home specialist model include mainstream medicine’s failure to recognize the nursing home as a legitimate medical practice, the need for the nursing home industry and policymakers to appreciate the links between physician practice and quality, and assurance of financial viability. Implications for quality of care, health policy, and research needs are discussed in this article. PMID:19293074

  6. Training the trainer: An educational course for training pain nursing specialists supported by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP).

    PubMed

    Cui, Jing; Zhou, Lingjun; Zhang, Lingjuan; Li, Li; Zhao, Jijun

    2013-12-01

    To train pain nursing specialists through a pain education program, 20 nurses from six hospitals in Shanghai Province and seven in six provinces of China received the training of 2-month pain education and 4-month clinical practice. This nonrandomized pilot study examined the results of tests before and after the program, case report evaluations, future plan evaluations, clinical practice, and satisfaction questionnaire. After the program, the score of the test increased significantly compared with that before the program (44.1 ± 3.19; paired-sample t = 10.363; p < .0001). All of the participants thought that the program had broadened their vision, 19 (95%) thought that the program had raised the level of their theoretical knowledge in pain management, 17 (85%) thought that the program had improved their skills in clinical practice, and 15 (75%) thought that the program had played a role in enhancing their research abilities. Considering the whole program, most students (n = 17; 85%) were quite satisfied, and 3 (15%) were simply satisfied. By content analysis of the opening questions, we found that the participants had deeper and broader ideas about nurses' role and pain nursing specialists' responsibilities in pain management. The program improved nurses' attitudes, knowledge, and skills in pain management. The participants recognized pain nursing specialists' responsibilities in pain management more clearly.

  7. Growing practice specialists in mental health: addressing stigma and recruitment with a nursing residency program.

    PubMed

    Ng, San; Kessler, Linda; Srivastava, Rani; Dusek, Janice; Duncan, Deborah; Tansey, Margaret; Jeffs, Lianne

    2010-05-01

    Despite the growing prevalence and healthcare needs of people living with mental illness, the stigma associated with mental health nursing continues to present challenges to recruiting new nurses to this sector. As a key recruitment strategy, five mental health hospitals and three educational institutions collaborated to develop and pilot an innovative nursing residency program. The purpose of the Mental Health Nursing Residency Program was to dispel myths associated with practising in the sector by promoting mental health as a vibrant specialty and offering a unique opportunity to gain specialized competencies. The program curriculum combines protected clinical time, collaborative learning and mentored clinical practice. Evaluation results show significant benefits to clinical practice and an improved ability to recruit and retain nurses. Nursing leadership was crucial at multiple levels for success. In this paper, we describe our journey in designing and implementing a nursing residency program for other nurse leaders interested in providing a similar program to build on our experience.

  8. Acute mental health nurses: comprehensive practitioners or specialist therapists?

    PubMed

    Mathers, B

    2012-02-01

    This paper examines the aids and barriers to implementing the psychosocial interventions (PSI) which trainees learned on two teaching modules. The main purpose of the modules is to teach trainees PSI to help them be more effective in their care of patients with severe mental illness. The trainees were qualified nurses working in acute mental health wards in various London hospitals. PSI has been found to be helpful for patients with psychotic symptoms in community contexts. In this study, the implementation of PSI specific to acute inpatient mental health settings is explored. This was achieved by conducting semi-structured audiotaped interviews with all 20 trainees from a single cohort. The data were analysed by categories and themes to elicit not only the problems but also helpful strategies which can be used when working with PSI in acute inpatient mental health settings. The paper concludes by offering recommendations for future good practice for this area of mental health service.

  9. Clinical supervision for nurse lecturers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, D

    This article builds on a previous one which discussed the use of de Bono's thinking tool, 'six thinking hats' in the clinical, managerial, educational and research areas of nursing (Lewis 1995). This article explores clinical supervision and describes how the six thinking hats may be used as a reflective tool in the supervision of nurse lecturers who teach counselling skills.

  10. Clinical molecular testing: subspecialty, entry-level or specialist certification?

    PubMed

    Lennon, Alan; Hu, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Some clinical laboratories require workers who have basic knowledge in molecular techniques (such as fluorescent in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction). Exclusively molecular diagnostic laboratories need workers to be competent in a variety of cutting edge molecular technologies, such as DNA sequencing, array-based comparative genomic hybridization, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and many other techniques. Having only one certification for molecular biology at the entry level, as newly prescribed by the Board of Certification, doesn't accurately define the two very differently trained types of people these differing types of laboratories require. Creating a second molecular certification, at the specialist level, would address this issue positively.

  11. Undergraduate nursing students' placement in speciality clinical areas: understanding the concerns of the student and registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Elisabeth; Needham, Judith

    2012-08-01

    Student nurses in Australia are regularly placed in acute clinical areas providing them with clinical experience to link theory with real patient situations. Specialist clinical areas such as day oncology and renal dialysis often exclude students on the basis that their clinical area may not be able to meet normal clinical expectations, including holistic care of four to six patients with minimal direction from the registered nurse. However, specialist clinical areas provide students with unique learning experiences. This paper reports on an evaluation of speciality clinical placements for student nurses with an aim to increase our understanding of this type of placement. Semi-structured audiotaped interviews were undertaken with 7 third year final semester students and 13 registered nurses working with the third year students. All interviews were transcribed and a thematic analysis conducted. Key themes from the students and registered nurses were knowledge and preparedness for specialist placement, team work and being included and customising learning needs. Speciality placements provide a valuable experience for the undergraduate nurse including opportunities to see excellence in team work, communication and assessment as well as identifying future intention to become an oncology or renal specialist nurse.

  12. Lung cancer treatment rates and the role of the lung cancer nurse specialist: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tod, Angela Mary; Redman, Judy; McDonnell, Ann; Borthwick, Diana; White, John

    2015-12-18

    This qualitative study examines how the Lung Cancer Nurse Specialist (LCNS) role operates and why they may be able to increase access to treatment. 4 Hospital NHS Foundation Trusts in England. A multiple case study design using semistructured interviews, observation and Framework Analysis techniques. Four LCNSs, comprised the 'cases'. Twenty four clinicians who worked with the LCNS participated in individual interviews. Six LCNSs took part in a group interview and 60 lung cancer multidisciplinary team (MDT) members and coordinators were observed in the MDT meeting. The LCNS is crucial within the MDT and can act as a catalyst to patient access to treatment. The study identified the clinical activity (assessment, managing symptoms, psychological support and information provision) and role characteristics that can facilitate treatment access. These characteristics are the LCNS's presence across the patient pathway, acting as the 'hub' of the MDT, maintaining a holistic patient focus and working to an advanced level of practice. The findings indicate how factors may have a cumulative impact on treatment access. If UK patient with lung cancer survival rates are to improve in line with comparable countries, we need to employ every advantage. This study demonstrates how the LCNS role may open doors to positive patient outcomes, including treatment. Further research is required to explore patients' experiences, decision-making and attitudes to treatment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Lung cancer treatment rates and the role of the lung cancer nurse specialist: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Redman, Judy; McDonnell, Ann; Borthwick, Diana; White, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This qualitative study examines how the Lung Cancer Nurse Specialist (LCNS) role operates and why they may be able to increase access to treatment. Setting 4 Hospital NHS Foundation Trusts in England. Design A multiple case study design using semistructured interviews, observation and Framework Analysis techniques. Participants Four LCNSs, comprised the ‘cases’. Twenty four clinicians who worked with the LCNS participated in individual interviews. Six LCNSs took part in a group interview and 60 lung cancer multidisciplinary team (MDT) members and co-ordinators were observed in the MDT meeting. Results The LCNS is crucial within the MDT and can act as a catalyst to patient access to treatment. The study identified the clinical activity (assessment, managing symptoms, psychological support and information provision) and role characteristics that can facilitate treatment access. These characteristics are the LCNS's presence across the patient pathway, acting as the ‘hub’ of the MDT, maintaining a holistic patient focus and working to an advanced level of practice. The findings indicate how factors may have a cumulative impact on treatment access. Conclusions If UK patient with lung cancer survival rates are to improve in line with comparable countries, we need to employ every advantage. This study demonstrates how the LCNS role may open doors to positive patient outcomes, including treatment. Further research is required to explore patients’ experiences, decision-making and attitudes to treatment. PMID:26685023

  14. [Clinical activity in nursing education].

    PubMed

    Brignon, Béatrice

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to enlight the actual nursing act of the student in order to search for what makes sense in his (her) self nursing becoming and to reinterpret what is said regarding what is done. Up till, researchs were focused on declarative intentions; instead here, we go beyond using an innovative approach based on the clinical activity research method applied to the nursing education field.

  15. Development of a questionnaire to measure the key attributes of the community palliative care specialist nurse role.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Dee; Johnston, Bridget

    2015-02-01

    Recent worldwide economic events have forced an examination of the nurse's contribution to high-quality, effective, person-centred care. Since the role of specialist nurses is considered one of the least understood or valued developments in nursing, specialist nurses must demonstrate their contribution to quality, person-centred health care. To develop a questionnaire which aims to measure the quality of care provided by palliative care specialist nurses from the patients' perspective and to undertake initial validation. The process of questionnaire development involved six phases including systematic literature reviews, patient advisory groups and expert panel reviews, each of which contributed to the questionnaire face and content validity. Johnston's Expert Palliative Care Nurse Model (2002; 2005) provided an evidence-based framework for the development of the questionnaire, and enabled the identification of the key attributes of the palliative care specialist nurse role, thereby providing the themes on which to base the questionnaire. The Quality Measure for Palliative Nursing, a questionnaire, was developed. The themes identified in the questionnaire--personal characteristics, communication skills, knowledge, relationship with patient and providing comfort--aim to facilitate measurement of the quality of care provided by palliative care specialist nurses. Designed for use by palliative patients the Quality Measure for Palliative Nursing is a one-page questionnaire comprising of 15 questions. The Quality Measure for Palliative Nursing is unique since it aims to measure the quality of care provided by community palliative care specialist nurses, and could also be used to measure patient satisfaction with the quality of care provided. Further testing is recommended to ensure that this questionnaire can provide reliable and valid results.

  16. Compared with specialist registrars, experienced staff nurses shorten the duration of weaning neonates from mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Luyt, Karen; Boyle, Breidge; Wright, Dave E; Petros, Andy J

    2002-10-01

    To compare the overall performance of specially trained neonatal nurses acting autonomously, unsupervised, and without a protocol with specialist registrars when weaning neonates from mechanical ventilation. Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. A single neonatal intensive care unit. Neonates requiring conventional mechanical ventilation (n = 50). Infants on conventional ventilation were randomly assigned to receive either nurse-led (n = 25) or registrar-led (n = 23) weaning. A total of 48 infants completed the study (two infants in the registrar group were excluded when their parents withdrew consent). The main outcome measure, median weaning time, was 1200 mins (95% confidence interval [CI], 621-1779 mins) in the nurse group and 3015 mins (95% CI, 2650-3380 mins) in the registrar group (p = .0458). The median time from treatment assignment to the first ventilator change was 60 mins (95% CI, 52-68 mins) in the nurse group and 120 mins (95% CI, 103-137 mins) in the registrar group (p = .35). On average, the nurses made ventilator changes every 4.5 hrs (95% CI, 2.9-6 hrs) and the registrars every 7.2 hrs (95% CI, 5.4-9 hrs; p = .003). The median number (range) of backward steps taken per infant was 0 (0-5 steps) in the nurse group and 1 (0-5 steps) in the registrar group (p = .019). The findings of this study suggest that additional domains of neonatal critical care could be reviewed for their potential transfer to appropriately prepared nurses.

  17. Associations between Stroke Mortality and Weekend Working by Stroke Specialist Physicians and Registered Nurses: Prospective Multicentre Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Benjamin D.; Ayis, Salma; Campbell, James; Cloud, Geoffrey C.; James, Martin; Hoffman, Alex; Tyrrell, Pippa J.; Wolfe, Charles D. A.; Rudd, Anthony G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational studies have reported higher mortality for patients admitted on weekends. It is not known whether this “weekend effect” is modified by clinical staffing levels on weekends. We aimed to test the hypotheses that rounds by stroke specialist physicians 7 d per week and the ratio of registered nurses to beds on weekends are associated with mortality after stroke. Methods and Findings We conducted a prospective cohort study of 103 stroke units (SUs) in England. Data of 56,666 patients with stroke admitted between 1 June 2011 and 1 December 2012 were extracted from a national register of stroke care in England. SU characteristics and staffing levels were derived from cross-sectional survey. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of 30-d post-admission mortality, adjusting for case mix, organisational, staffing, and care quality variables. After adjusting for confounders, there was no significant difference in mortality risk for patients admitted to a stroke service with stroke specialist physician rounds fewer than 7 d per week (adjusted HR [aHR] 1.04, 95% CI 0.91–1.18) compared to patients admitted to a service with rounds 7 d per week. There was a dose–response relationship between weekend nurse/bed ratios and mortality risk, with the highest risk of death observed in stroke services with the lowest nurse/bed ratios. In multivariable analysis, patients admitted on a weekend to a SU with 1.5 nurses/ten beds had an estimated adjusted 30-d mortality risk of 15.2% (aHR 1.18, 95% CI 1.07–1.29) compared to 11.2% for patients admitted to a unit with 3.0 nurses/ten beds (aHR 0.85, 95% CI 0.77–0.93), equivalent to one excess death per 25 admissions. The main limitation is the risk of confounding from unmeasured characteristics of stroke services. Conclusions Mortality outcomes after stroke are associated with the intensity of weekend staffing by registered nurses but not 7-d/wk ward rounds by stroke

  18. Clinical forensics for perioperative nurses.

    PubMed

    Muro, G A; Easter, C R

    1994-10-01

    Perioperative nurses frequently care for victims and suspected perpetrators of violent crimes. Nurses often are the first health care providers to assess the trauma patient and collect crucial evidence for future legal action. Informational evidence includes observations about patients' behavior and appearance and documentation of their comments. Nurses also must protect the chain of evidence so that evidence can be admissible in court. To function in this role, perioperative nurses must understand the concepts of clinical forensics, which is the application of the principles and practices of forensic science to questions of law in the investigation of violent crime.

  19. Nursing Student Retention in Associate Degree Nursing Programs Utilizing a Retention Specialist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrum, Ronna A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine specific variables associated with nursing student retention in Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Programs. Jeffreys (2004) Nursing Undergraduate Retention and Success (NURS) conceptual model provided the framework for this descriptive correlational study. One hundred sixty eight pre-licensure associate degree…

  20. Nursing Student Retention in Associate Degree Nursing Programs Utilizing a Retention Specialist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrum, Ronna A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine specific variables associated with nursing student retention in Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Programs. Jeffreys (2004) Nursing Undergraduate Retention and Success (NURS) conceptual model provided the framework for this descriptive correlational study. One hundred sixty eight pre-licensure associate degree…

  1. Clinical supervision of nurses working with patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Bland, Ann R; Rossen, Eileen K

    2005-06-01

    Some nurses describe individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD) as among the most challenging and difficult patients encountered in their practice. As a result, the argument has been made for nursing staff to receive clinical supervision to enhance therapeutic effectiveness and treatment outcomes for individuals with BPD. Formal clinical supervision can focus on the stresses of working in a demanding environment within the work place and enable nurses to accept accountability for their own practice and development (Pesut & Herman, 1999). A psychiatric-mental health clinical nurse specialist can provide individual and/or group supervision for the nursing staff, including education about patient dynamics, staff responses, and treatment team decisions. A clinical nurse specialist also can provide emotional support to nursing staff, which enhances job satisfaction, as they struggle to maintain professional therapeutic behavior with these individuals.

  2. Analysis of scientific production of mental health researcher and psychiatric nursing specialist meetings.

    PubMed

    Munari, Denize Bouttelet; Oliveira, Nunila Ferreira de; Saeki, Toyoko; Souza, Maria Conceição Bernardo Demello E

    2008-01-01

    This literature review was organized on the basis of the Annals of Mental Health Researcher and Psychiatric Nursing Specialists Meetings promoted by the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing. It aimed to describe the history of these events, investigating the scenario and trends through the reading of texts published in these documents. All annals available from 1990 to 2004 were analyzed and read, based on an analysis protocol. The results showed that the published texts reflect the historical momentum of each national mental health policy movement in Brazil, indicating contradictions and advances. The conclusion is that the events provided a privileged forum to discuss and exchange experiences about the future of psychiatric nursing and mental health care, teaching and research in Brazil.

  3. Specialist palliative care nursing and the philosophy of palliative care: a critical discussion.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jackie; Gott, Merryn; Gardiner, Clare; Ingleton, Christine

    2017-07-02

    Nursing is the largest regulated health professional workforce providing palliative care across a range of clinical settings. Historically, palliative care nursing has been informed by a strong philosophy of care which is soundly articulated in palliative care policy, research and practice. Indeed, palliative care is now considered to be an integral component of nursing practice regardless of the specialty or clinical setting. However, there has been a change in the way palliative care is provided. Upstreaming and mainstreaming of palliative care and the dominance of a biomedical model with increasing medicalisation and specialisation are key factors in the evolution of contemporary palliative care and are likely to impact on nursing practice. Using a critical reflection of the authors own experiences and supported by literature and theory from seminal texts and contemporary academic, policy and clinical literature, this discussion paper will explore the influence of philosophy on nursing knowledge and theory in the context of an evolving model of palliative care.

  4. A Facility Specialist Model for Improving Retention of Nursing Home Staff: Results from a Randomized, Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillemer, Karl; Meador, Rhoda; Henderson, Charles, Jr.; Robison, Julie; Hegeman, Carol; Graham, Edwin; Schultz, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on a randomized, controlled intervention study designed to reduce employee turnover by creating a retention specialist position in nursing homes. Design and Methods: We collected data three times over a 1-year period in 30 nursing homes, sampled in stratified random manner from facilities in New York State and…

  5. A Facility Specialist Model for Improving Retention of Nursing Home Staff: Results from a Randomized, Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillemer, Karl; Meador, Rhoda; Henderson, Charles, Jr.; Robison, Julie; Hegeman, Carol; Graham, Edwin; Schultz, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on a randomized, controlled intervention study designed to reduce employee turnover by creating a retention specialist position in nursing homes. Design and Methods: We collected data three times over a 1-year period in 30 nursing homes, sampled in stratified random manner from facilities in New York State and…

  6. An Integrative Review of Engaging Clinical Nurses in Nursing Research.

    PubMed

    Scala, Elizabeth; Price, Carrie; Day, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    To review the literature for best practices for engaging clinical nurses in nursing research. Review of the research and nonresearch papers published between 2005 and 2015 that answered the evidence-based practice (EBP) question: what are the best practices for engaging clinical nursing staff in nursing research? PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Joanna Briggs Institute, and Cochrane were searched using a combination of controlled vocabulary and key words. Nineteen papers that answered the EBP question were selected for review. It can be difficult to involve clinical nurses in research. There are multiple factors to consider when nursing leadership looks to engage clinical nurses in nursing research. Nurse leaders can take many approaches to engage clinical nurses in research. Each organization must perform its own assessment to identify areas of opportunity. Nursing leadership can take these areas of opportunity to structure a multifaceted approach to support clinical staff in the conduct and dissemination of nursing research. The evidence from this review offers EBP recommendations as well as reports on the gaps in the literature related to best practices for engaging clinical nurses in nursing research. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  7. Identifying Core Competencies of Infection Control Nurse Specialists in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wai Fong; Bond, Trevor G; Adamson, Bob; Chow, Meyrick

    2016-01-01

    To confirm a core competency scale for Hong Kong infection control nurses at the advanced nursing practice level from the core competency items proposed in a previous phase of this study. This would serve as the foundation of competency assurance in Hong Kong hospitals. A cross-sectional survey design was used. All public and private hospitals in Hong Kong. All infection control nurses in hospitals of Hong Kong. The 83-item proposed core competency list established in an earlier study was transformed into a questionnaire and sent to 112 infection control nurses in 48 hospitals in Hong Kong. They were asked to rate the importance of each infection prevention and control item using Likert-style response categories. Data were analyzed using the Rasch model. The response rate of 81.25% was achieved. Seven items were removed from the proposed core competency list, leaving a scale of 76 items that fit the measurement requirements of the unidimensional Rasch model. Essential core competency items of advanced practice for infection control nurses in Hong Kong were identified based on the measurement criteria of the Rasch model. Several items of the scale that reflect local Hong Kong contextual characteristics are distinguished from the overseas standards. This local-specific competency list could serve as the foundation for education and for certification of infection control nurse specialists in Hong Kong. Rasch measurement is an appropriate analytical tool for identifying core competencies of advanced practice nurses in other specialties and in other locations in a manner that incorporates practitioner judgment and expertise.

  8. Bullying in undergraduate clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Colette M; Kane, Deborah J; Rajacich, Dale L; Lafreniere, Kathryn D

    2012-05-01

    Although a limited number of studies have focused on bullying in nursing education to date, all of those studies demonstrate the existence of bullying in clinical settings, where nursing students undertake a significant amount of their nursing education. The purpose of this study was to examine the state of bullying in clinical nursing education among Canadian undergraduate nursing students (N = 674) in all 4 years of their nursing program. Results suggest that nursing students experience and witness bullying behaviors at various frequencies, most notably by clinical instructors and staff nurses. Third-year and fourth-year students experience more bullying behaviors than first-year and second-year students. Implications for practice include ensuring that clinical instructors are well prepared for their role as educators. Policies must be developed that address the issue of bullying within nursing programs and within health care facilities where nursing students undertake their clinical nursing education.

  9. Nurse leaders' responsibilities in supporting nurses experiencing difficult situations in clinical nursing.

    PubMed

    Honkavuo, Leena; Lindström, Unni Å

    2014-01-01

    To make nurse leaders aware of different kinds of difficult situations in clinical nursing that may cause suffering to nurses and to discuss how nurse leaders can approach and alleviate this suffering. Difficult situations are a part of clinical nursing. Nurses are repeatedly exposed to situations that may cause them suffering and reduce their ability to serve the patients. Data collection was based on a sample of semi-structured face-to-face deep interviews with eight nurses who were encouraged to narrate their lived experiences of difficult situations in clinical nursing. Nurses want to discuss issues connected to nursing and caring science that emerge in clinical nursing with their nurse leaders. Painful memories and thoughts are often related to patients struggling between life and death, the despair of families and friends, and their hovering between hope and hopelessness. The results do not support the notion that nurses would request other kinds of support or debriefing. The mission of nursing is to serve, console and alleviate human suffering. Nurse leaders carry a responsibility to create such evidence-based caring cultures that support the mission of nursing. Nurse leaders' understanding, sympathetic attitude, ethical value basis, personality and ability to discuss are important aspects for nurses. Through the support from nurse leaders, it seems possible to alleviate the nurse's suffering in clinical nursing. Implications for Nursing Management Nurse leaders' support creates a foundation for the nurses' professional development. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Guidelines on the role of the specialist nurse in supporting patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sally

    2004-09-01

    Recently, there has been a significant increase in the number of nurse specialist posts working with patients with lung cancer in the UK. This has been in response to a recognized need to improve lung cancer services. However, there is concern that these posts have been developed quickly with little strategic planning or evaluation. This paper is a collaborative project by the members of The London and South East Lung Cancer Forum for Nurses and aims to offer guidelines to managers and practitioners on areas where improvements may be made in the care of patients with lung cancer. Recommendations are based on Government guidelines, evidence from recent research studies and the experience of the members of the Forum.

  11. The Prehospital assessment of severe trauma patients` performed by the specialist ambulance nurse in Sweden – a phenomenographic study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A common feature of prehospital emergency care is the short and fragmentary patient encounters with increased demands for efficient and rapid treatment. Crucial decisions are often made and the premise is the specialist ambulance nurse’s ability to capture the situation instantaneously. The assessment is therefore a pre-requisite for decisions about appropriate actions. However, the low exposure to severe trauma cases in Sweden leads to vulnerability for the specialist ambulance nurse, which makes the assessment more difficult. Our objective was to describe specialist ambulance nurses’ perceptions of assessing patients exposed to severe trauma. Methods This study had a phenomenographic approach and was performed in 2011 as an interview study. 15 specialist ambulance nurses with a minimum of 2.5 years of experience from praxis were included. The analysis of data was performed using phenomenography according to Marton. Results The perceptions of assessing patients exposed to severe trauma were divided into: To be prepared for emergency situations, Confidence in one’s own leadership and Developing professional knowledge. Conclusions This study reveals that the specialist ambulance nurse, on the scene of accident, finds the task of assessment of severe trauma patients difficult and complicated. In some cases, even exceeding what they feel competent to accomplish. The specialist ambulance nurses feel that no trauma scenarios are alike and that more practical skills, more training, exercise and feedback are needed. PMID:22985478

  12. First year undergraduate nursing students and nursing mentors: An evaluation of their experience of specialist areas as their hub practice learning environment.

    PubMed

    McCallum, Jacqueline; Lamont, David; Kerr, Emma-Louise

    2016-01-01

    Specialist environments have traditionally not been considered as practice learning environments for year one nursing students. Through implementation of the hub and spoke model of practice learning this was implemented across one health board and Higher Education Institution in Scotland. Sixty nine students from specialist and 147 from general areas out of a total population of 467 students (46.2%) and thirteen mentors from specialist and 26 from general areas out of a total 577 mentors (6.7%) completed a questionnaire. The findings support this initiative and suggest in some cases student experiences are more positive in specialist environments.

  13. Criteria for critiquing clinical nursing research reports.

    PubMed

    Grant, J S; Davis, L L; Kinney, M R

    1993-06-01

    The primary goal of nursing research is to develop a scientific knowledge base for practice. Postanesthesia nurses are expected to critique nursing research before applying findings to clinical practice. As consumers of research, postanesthesia nurses must be able to employ critical evaluation skills to judge the merit and relevance of research to their clinical practice. This article presents criteria for critiquing clinical nursing research reports to determine their relevance to practice.

  14. Determinants of intention to work abroad of college and specialist nursing graduates in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Santric-Milicevic, M; Matejic, B; Terzic-Supic, Z; Vasic, V; Babic, U; Vukovic, V

    2015-04-01

    In a country with a poor economy and limited job opportunities, the outmigration of students is not commonly perceived as a problem but rather is perceived as a solution to the high unemployment facing young health professionals. Study objectives were to identify the prevalence of intention to work abroad of nursing graduates to point to the predictors of intention to work abroad and predictors of having a firm plan to work in a foreign country. Descriptive study, a survey. College and specialist nursing schools, Serbia. 719 nursing graduates from the 2012/2013 school year. Voluntarily completed a questionnaire that was designed with regard to similar surveys administered in EU-candidate countries during the pre-accession period. Data were analysed with descriptive and multivariate regression analyses. Almost 70% (501) of respondents indicated an intention to work abroad. Of the nurses, 13% already had established a firm plan to work abroad. Single graduates and those with a friend or relative living abroad were more likely to consider working abroad than were their counterparts (odds ratios were 2.3 and 1.7, respectively). The likelihood of considering working abroad decreased by 29% when the individuals' financial situation was improved. Factors associated with having a firm plan were previous professional experience in a foreign country, having someone abroad and financial improvement (5.4 times, 4.8 times and 2 times greater likelihood, respectively). The high prevalence of intention to work abroad suggests the need to place the issue of the out-migration of nursing graduates on the policy agenda. College and specialty nursing graduates and health technicians are prepared to work abroad in search of a better quality of life, better working conditions and higher salaries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Developing a nurse led hospice outpatient clinic to improve palliative care services.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Catherine

    A team of palliative care clinical nurse specialists at the Phyllis Tuckwell Hospice in Farnham, Surrey, set up a hospice based outpatient clinic to improve services for patients with cancer. This article examines how the team used clinical audit, a staff questionnaire and patient feedback to evaluate the service and make recommendations for the future development of the clinic.

  16. Domestic violence and abuse: an exploration and evaluation of a domestic abuse nurse specialist role in acute health care services.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Julie

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of clinical staff in responding to disclosure of domestic violence and abuse, and to evaluate the effectiveness of training and support provided by a dedicated Domestic Abuse Nurse Specialist across one acute National Health Service Trust in the UK. The impact of domestic violence and abuse is well documented and is far reaching. Health care professionals have a key role to play in the effective identification and management of abuse across a range of settings. However, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the constituents of effective support for practitioners within wider nonemergency hospital-based services. A qualitative approach semi-structured interviews (n = 11) with clinical staff based in one acute care Trust in the UK. Interviews were informed by an interview guide and analysed using the Framework approach. The organisation of the nurse specialist role facilitated a more cohesive approach to management at an organisational level with training and ongoing support identified as key facets of the role by practitioners. Time constraints were apparent in terms of staff training and this raises questions with regard to the status continuing professional development around domestic violence and abuse. Domestic violence and abuse continues to exert a significant and detrimental impact on the lives and health of those who encounter abuse. Health care services in the UK and globally are increasingly on the frontline in terms of identification and management of domestic violence and abuse. This is coupled with the growing recognition of the need for adequate support structures to be in place to facilitate practitioners in providing effective care for survivors of domestic violence and abuse. This study provides an approach to the expansion of existing models and one which has the potential for further exploration and application in similar settings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Finding the voice of clinical experience: participatory action research with registered nurses in developing a child critical care nursing curriculum.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Minette; Britton, Margretta; Clow, Sheila E

    2005-04-01

    The voice of clinical nurses is important to find and hear in the design of curricula. A participative action research project proposed to add this voice to the design of a new Critical Care Child Nursing programme at the University of Cape Town (UCT). Nurses' experiences of nursing critically ill children and their perceived learning needs in this context, were the central focus of the study. Participants were registered nurses working in the paediatric intensive care unit at the Red Cross Children's Hospital (a specialist hospital), which offers secondary and tertiary care in the Cape Town region and beyond. Data were gathered in five focussed group discussions. Findings indicate that the Critical Care Child Nurse needs not only a specialised knowledge base and acutely developed assessment skills, but also astute interpersonal skills. The nurse's professional identity and integration into the multidisciplinary team need exploring. Together with the development of interpersonal skills, the nurse needs to engage the child and family.

  18. Do epilepsy specialist nurses use a similar history-taking process as consultant neurologists in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with a first seizure?

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Mel

    2011-12-01

    The development of specialist nursing practice has blurred the boundaries between medicine and nursing. This mainly qualitative study compares the structure of epilepsy specialist nurse (ESN) and consultant neurologist (CN) clinical interviews at first seizure presentation and opinion on diagnosis. Twenty patients with a suspected first seizure were randomly allocated for clinical review with an ESN and then a CN, or vice versa. Clinical interviews were unstructured and audio-recorded. The ESN and CN reached an independent diagnosis for each patient. Audiotapes were transcribed verbatim. Emergent themes were identified, catalogued and grouped into major thematic areas. Annotated audio recordings, medical notes and dictated clinic letters were used to validate findings. Statistical analysis of inter-rater agreement of diagnosis was evaluated using Kappa. The clinical interviews of CN and ESN were similar in structure. Differences demonstrated CNs concentrated on the prodrome to events and expressed less diagnostic uncertainty. ESNs concentrated on post-ictal recovery and used more investigations. Complete disagreement on diagnosis occurred in 5 (25%) patients. Kappa score=0.510, demonstrating a moderate level of inter rater agreement on diagnosis between the CN and ESN. 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Hypnoanalgesia and clinical nursing reasoning].

    PubMed

    Soudan, Corinne

    2017-05-01

    Hypnoanalgesia is practised in accordance with care ethics and as a complement to other medical and/or psychological therapies. It is aimed at people with acute, chronic or treatment-related pain. Its practice is founded on clinical nursing reasoning, which targets the health problem and the therapeutic objectives guiding the hypnosis session. A clinical assessment finalises the interactional process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. [Breast care nurse. A new specialist in the multidisciplinary care of breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Tóth, László; Sávolt, Akos; Péley, Gábor; Tínusz, Anikó; Palla, Eva; Bartal, Alexandra; Horti, Ildikó; Kásler, Miklós

    2012-09-01

    The uniform European structure and professional standards for high quality breast cancer care were established in conjunction with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment, the European Society of Mastology and the European Breast Cancer Coalition with the support of the European Parliament. Well-prepared professional teams including a new member called the breast care nurse serve as ground for special breast cancer centers with international accreditation that provide modern, evidence based, patient centered multidisciplinary oncological care. The responsibilities of the new qualified professional staff member include the psycho-social support of the patient and carers from the moment of diagnosis throughout the whole oncological treatment, the fostering of delivering information and communication between patients and specialists. As a result of the curriculum founded by the European Oncology Nursing Society, breast care nurses have become key members of the practice of holistic breast cancer care in countries where the European recommendations have already been implemented. Considering the expected rearrangement of national oncological care, the new sub-specialty is outlined for the first time in the light of the experiences gained at the National Institute of Oncology, Budapest, a comprehensive cancer center.

  1. Attitudes Toward Collaboration Among Practitioners in Newly Established Medical Homes: A Survey of Nurses, General Practitioners, and Specialists.

    PubMed

    Alcusky, Matthew; Ferrari, Luciano; Rossi, Giuseppina; Liu, Mengdan; Hojat, Mohammadreza; Maio, Vittorio

    2016-11-01

    The objective was to evaluate the attitudes toward collaboration of nurses, general practitioners (GPs), and specialists practicing in newly established Medical Homes (MHs) in Parma Local Health Authority (LHA), Emilia-Romagna region, Italy. The 15-item Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration was administered electronically to 172 physicians (66 GPs, 106 specialists) and 113 nurses practicing in 12 MHs. In all, 191 surveys (45 GPs, 59 specialists, 87 nurses) were completed (67% response rate). The mean total score among nurses (51.5, standard deviation [SD] = 3.7) reflected a significantly (P < .01) more positive attitude toward collaboration compared with GPs (47.8, SD = 4.6) and specialists (45.3, SD = 7.7). Discrepancies in attitudes are concerning because conflicting perceptions of professional roles may impede a successful transition to integrated care within MHs in Parma LHA. Internationally, further research into understanding interprofessional relationships within MHs is needed to inform policy and build a necessary culture of team-based care. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Clinical Nursing Knowledge Research; Implications for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diekelmann, Nancy L.; And Others

    A new way to view the nursing curriculum is presented based on Heideggerian phenomenology and clinical nursing knowledge research. A restructuring of the nursing curriculum based on this approach allows researchers to generate new research questions and has implications for alternative curricular and instructional practices. In addition, this…

  3. District nurse clinics: accountability and practice.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2013-02-01

    The numbers of district nurse clinics are continuing to grow in primary care and they provide timely and more cost effective intervention for patients. The clinics provide exciting opportunities for district nurses but also carry an increased risk of exposure to liability. This article discusses some of the key areas of accountability underpinning the duty of care of district nurses working in nurse-led clinics.

  4. Exploring clinical nursing experiences: listening to student nurses.

    PubMed

    Pearcey, Patricia; Draper, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Student nurses spend one half of their educational programme in the clinical area. The success of an educationally sound clinical placement is crucial to forming a professional nursing identity that will encompass the seen and 'unseen' aspects of the nurses' role. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical nursing environment through the perceptions of first year student nurses. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data from 12 student nurses who each had four weeks clinical experience, representing 21 wards and five hospitals. Results suggest that these student nurses were disillusioned with the reality of clinical nursing and that their expectations of nursing were not realised. They perceived that paperwork, completing tasks and meeting targets were dominant features of nursing work at the expense of patient contact and communication. A majority indicated that nursing was not as caring as they expected and vowed to hold on to their personal values of caring about patients and forming communicative, interpersonal relationships with them.

  5. Nursing home organizational change: the "Culture Change" movement as viewed by long-term care specialists.

    PubMed

    Miller, Susan C; Miller, Edward Alan; Jung, Hye-Young; Sterns, Samantha; Clark, Melissa; Mor, Vincent

    2010-08-01

    A decade-long grassroots movement aims to deinstitutionalize nursing home (NH) environments and individualize care. Coined "NH Culture Change" the movement is often described by its resident-centered/directed care focus. While empirical data of "culture change's" costs and benefits are limited, it is broadly viewed as beneficial and widely promoted. Still, debate abounds regarding barriers to its adoption. We used data from a Web-based survey of 1,147 long-term care specialists (including NH and other providers, consumers/advocates, state and federal government officials, university/academic, researchers/consultants, and others) to better understand factors associated with perceived barriers. Long-term care specialists view the number-one barrier to adoption differently depending on their employment, familiarity with culture change, and their underlying policy views. To promote adoption, research and broad-based educational efforts are needed to influence views and perceptions. Fundamental changes in the regulatory process together with targeted regulatory changes and payment incentives may also be needed.

  6. Clinical Nursing Instructor Perception of the Influence of Engagement in Bedside Nursing Practice on Clinical Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berndt, Jodi L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical experiences are an integral component of nursing education. Because the amount of time that a student spends in clinical experiences can be as many as twelve to sixteen hours per week, the clinical instructor plays a significant role in the nursing student's development of nursing knowledge. Many nurse educators attempt to balance dual…

  7. A facility specialist model for improving retention of nursing home staff: results from a randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Pillemer, Karl; Meador, Rhoda; Henderson, Charles; Robison, Julie; Hegeman, Carol; Graham, Edwin; Schultz, Leslie

    2008-07-01

    This article reports on a randomized, controlled intervention study designed to reduce employee turnover by creating a retention specialist position in nursing homes. We collected data three times over a 1-year period in 30 nursing homes, sampled in stratified random manner from facilities in New York State and Connecticut and randomly assigned to treatment and control conditions. Staff outcomes were measured through certified nursing assistant interviews, and turnover rates were measured over the course of the year. In the intervention condition, a staff member was selected to be the facility retention specialist, who would advocate for and implement programs to improve staff retention and commitment throughout the facility. Retention specialists received an intensive 3-day training in retention leadership and in a number of evidence-based retention programs. Ongoing support was provided throughout the project. Treatment facilities experienced significant declines in turnover rates compared to control facilities. As predicted, we found positive effects on certified nursing assistant assessments of the quality of retention efforts and of care provided in the facility; we did not find effects for job satisfaction or stress. The study provides evidence for the effectiveness of the retention specialist model. Findings from a detailed process evaluation suggest modifications of the program that may increase program effects.

  8. Telehealth for nursing homes: the utilization of specialist services for residential care.

    PubMed

    Gray, Leonard C; Edirippulige, Sisira; Smith, Anthony C; Beattie, Elizabeth; Theodoros, Deborah; Russell, Trevor; Martin-Khan, Melinda

    2012-04-01

    Specialist care consultations were identified by two research nurses using documentation in patient records, appointment diaries, electronic billing services and on-site observations at a 441-bed long term care facility. Over a six-month period there were 3333 consultations (a rate of 1511 consultations per year per 100 beds). Most consultations were for general practice (n = 2589, 78%); these consultations were mainly on site (99%), with only 27 taking place off site. There were 744 consultations for specialities other than general practice. A total of 146 events related to an emergency or unplanned hospital admission. The remaining medical consultations (n = 598, 18%) related to 23 medical specialities. The largest number of consultations were for surgery (n = 106), podiatry (n = 100), nursing services including wound care (n = 74), imaging (n = 41) and ophthalmology (n = 40). Many services which are currently being provided on site to metropolitan long-term care facilities could be provided by telehealth in both urban and rural facilities.

  9. Impact of a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in an Emergency Department for Seniors.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Paul B; Delate, Thomas; Lyman, Alfred; Adams, Jody; Kreutz, Heather; Sanchez, Julia K; Dowd, Mary Beth; Gozansky, Wendolyn

    2016-02-01

    This study assesses outcomes associated with the implementation of an emergency department (ED) for seniors in which a clinical pharmacy specialist, with specialized geriatric training that included medication management training, is a key member of the ED care team. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of patients aged 65 years or older who presented at an ED between November 1, 2012, and May 31, 2013. Three groups of seniors were assessed: treated by the clinical pharmacy specialist in the ED for seniors, treated in the ED for seniors but not by the clinical pharmacy specialist, and not treated in the ED for seniors. Outcomes included rates of an ED return visit, mortality and hospital admissions, and follow-up total health care costs. Multivariable regression modeling was used to adjust for any potential confounders in the associations between groups and outcomes. A total of 4,103 patients were included, with 872 (21%) treated in the ED for seniors and 342 (39%) of these treated by the clinical pharmacy specialist. Groups were well matched overall in patient characteristics. Patients who received medication review and management by the clinical pharmacy specialist did not experience a reduction in ED return visits, mortality, cost of follow-up care, or hospital admissions compared with the other groups. Of the patients treated by the clinical pharmacy specialist, 154 (45.0%) were identified as having at least 1 medication-related problem. Although at least 1 medication-related problem was identified in almost half of patients treated by the clinical pharmacy specialist in the ED for seniors, incorporation of a clinical pharmacy specialist into the ED staff did not improve clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Clinical stages of patients with Alzheimer disease treated in specialist clinics in Spain. The EACE study].

    PubMed

    Alom Poveda, J; Baquero, M; González-Adalid Guerreiro, M

    2013-10-01

    The diagnostic paradigm of Alzheimer disease (AD) is changing; there is a trend toward diagnosing the disease in its early stages, even before the complete syndrome of dementia is apparent. The clinical stage at which AD is usually diagnosed in our area is unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to describe the clinical stages of AD patients at time of diagnosis. Multicentre, observational and cross-sectional study. Patients with probable AD according to NINCDS-ARDRA criteria, attended in specialist clinics in Spain, were included in the study. We recorded the symptom onset to evaluation and symptom onset to diagnosis intervals and clinical status of AD (based on MMSE, NPI questionnaire, and CDR scale). Participants in this study included 437 specialists representing all of Spain's autonomous communities and a total of 1,707 patients, of whom 1,694 were included in the analysis. Mean MMSE score was 17.6±4.8 (95% CI:17.4-17.9). Moderate cognitive impairment (MMSE between 10 and 20) was detected in 64% of the patients, and severe cognitive impairment (MMSE<10) in 6%. The mean interval between symptom onset and the initial primary care visit was 10.9±17.2 months (95% CI:9.9-11.8), and the interval between symptom onset and diagnosis with AD was 28.4±21.3 months. Results from the EACE show that most AD patients in our area have reached a moderate clinical stage by the time they are evaluated in a specialist clinic. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Using Computerized Clinical Nursing Data Bases for Nursing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nail, Lillian M.; Lange, Linda L.

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the recognition of differences between clinical and research data in using computerized clinical nursing databases and the issues of privacy and confidentiality for patients whose records are involved. Describes procedures for assessing the quality and usability of these data for nursing research. (SK)

  12. Obstetrical staff nurses experiences of clinical learning.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    The clinical learning experience is used in nursing programs of study worldwide to prepare nurses for professional practice. This study's purpose was to use Naturalistic Inquiry to understand the experiences of staff nurses in an obstetrical unit with undergraduate nursing students present for clinical learning. A convenience sample of 12 staff nurses, employed on a Family Birth Center, participated in semi-structured interviews. The constant comparative method as modified by Lincoln and Guba was used to analyze data. Five themes related to staff nurses experiences of clinical learning were identified: Giving and Receiving; Advancing Professionally and Personally; Balancing Act; Getting to Know and Working with You; and Past and Present. This research highlights staff nurses' experiences of clinical learning in undergraduate nursing education. Staff nurses exert a powerful, long lasting influence on students. A need exists to prepare and judiciously select nurses to work with students. Clinical agencies and universities can take joint responsibility providing tangible incentives, financial compensation, and recognition to all nurses working with nursing students.

  13. Using case study within a sequential explanatory design to evaluate the impact of specialist and advanced practice roles on clinical outcomes: the SCAPE study.

    PubMed

    Lalor, Joan G; Casey, Dympna; Elliott, Naomi; Coyne, Imelda; Comiskey, Catherine; Higgins, Agnes; Murphy, Kathy; Devane, Declan; Begley, Cecily

    2013-04-08

    The role of the clinical nurse/midwife specialist and advanced nurse/midwife practitioner is complex not least because of the diversity in how the roles are operationalised across health settings and within multidisciplinary teams. This aim of this paper is to use The SCAPE Study: Specialist Clinical and Advanced Practitioner Evaluation in Ireland to illustrate how case study was used to strengthen a Sequential Explanatory Design. In Phase 1, clinicians identified indicators of specialist and advanced practice which were then used to guide the instrumental case study design which formed the second phase of the larger study. Phase 2 used matched case studies to evaluate the effectiveness of specialist and advanced practitioners on clinical outcomes for service users. Data were collected through observation, documentary analysis, and interviews. Observations were made of 23 Clinical Specialists or Advanced Practitioners, and 23 matched clinicians in similar matched non-postholding sites, while they delivered care. Forty-one service users, 41 clinicians, and 23 Directors of Nursing or Midwifery were interviewed, and 279 service users completed a survey based on the components of CS and AP practice identified in Phase 1. A coding framework, and the generation of cross tabulation matrices in NVivo, was used to make explicit how the outcome measures were confirmed and validated from multiple sources. This strengthened the potential to examine single cases that seemed 'different', and allowed for cases to be redefined. Phase 3 involved interviews with policy-makers to set the findings in context. Case study is a powerful research strategy to use within sequential explanatory mixed method designs, and adds completeness to the exploration of complex issues in clinical practice. The design is flexible, allowing the use of multiple data collection methods from both qualitative and quantitative paradigms. Multiple approaches to data collection are needed to evaluate the impact

  14. Supporting women with postpartum anxiety: exploring views and experiences of specialist community public health nurses in the UK.

    PubMed

    Ashford, Miriam T; Ayers, Susan; Olander, Ellinor K

    2017-05-01

    Anxiety is common among postpartum women and can have adverse effects on mother's and child's somatic and psychological health if left untreated. In the UK, nurses or midwifes with a specialisation in community public health nursing, also called health visitors (HVs), work with families who have children younger than 5 years of age and are therefore in a key position to identify and support women with postpartum mental health issues. Until recently, postpartum mental health support provided by HVs mainly focused on identifying and managing depression, but the updated clinical guidance by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence also includes guidance regarding screening and psychological interventions for perinatal anxiety. This study therefore aimed to explore HVs' experiences of supporting women with postpartum anxiety and their views on currently available care. Using a qualitative approach, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 HVs from the UK between May and October 2015. Participants were interviewed in person at their workplace or on the phone/Skype. Using thematic analysis, four main themes emerged: identification and screening issues; importance of training; service usage; and status of current service provision. Women with postpartum anxiety were commonly encountered by HVs in their clinical practice and described as often heavily using their or other related healthcare services, which puts additional strain on HVs' already heavy workload. Issues with identifying and screening for postpartum anxiety were raised and the current lack of perinatal mental health training for HVs was highlighted. In addition, HVs described a current lack of good perinatal mental health services in general and specifically for anxiety. The study highlights the need for HV perinatal mental health training in general and postpartum anxiety specifically, as well as better coverage of specialist mental health services and the need for development

  15. The effect of nurse-to-patient ratios on nurse-sensitive patient outcomes in acute specialist units: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Andrea; Grant, Maria J; Carroll, Diane; Dalton, Sally; Deaton, Christi; Jones, Ian; Lehwaldt, Daniela; McKee, Gabrielle; Munyombwe, Theresa; Astin, Felicity

    2017-07-01

    Nurses are pivotal in the provision of high quality care in acute hospitals. However, the optimal dosing of the number of nurses caring for patients remains elusive. In light of this, an updated review of the evidence on the effect of nurse staffing levels on patient outcomes is required. To undertake a systematic review and meta-analysis examining the association between nurse staffing levels and nurse-sensitive patient outcomes in acute specialist units. Nine electronic databases were searched for English articles published between 2006 and 2017. The primary outcomes were nurse-sensitive patient outcomes. Of 3429 unique articles identified, 35 met the inclusion criteria. All were cross-sectional and the majority utilised large administrative databases. Higher staffing levels were associated with reduced mortality, medication errors, ulcers, restraint use, infections, pneumonia, higher aspirin use and a greater number of patients receiving percutaneous coronary intervention within 90 minutes. A meta-analysis involving 175,755 patients, from six studies, admitted to the intensive care unit and/or cardiac/cardiothoracic units showed that a higher nurse staffing level decreased the risk of inhospital mortality by 14% (0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.79-0.94). However, the meta-analysis also showed high heterogeneity (I(2)=86%). Nurse-to-patient ratios influence many patient outcomes, most markedly inhospital mortality. More studies need to be conducted on the association of nurse-to-patient ratios with nurse-sensitive patient outcomes to offset the paucity and weaknesses of research in this area. This would provide further evidence for recommendations of optimal nurse-to-patient ratios in acute specialist units.

  16. Inter-tester Reliability in Classifying Acute and Subacute Low Back Pain Patients into Clinical Subgroups: A Comparison of Specialists and Non-Specialists. A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Paatelma, Markku; Karvqnen, Eira; Heinqnen, Ari

    2009-01-01

    Many systems have been suggested for classifying low back pain (LBP); the most commonly used among physiotherapists involves a pathoanatomical/pathophysiological tissue classification system. Few studies have examined whether this form of classification of LBP disorders can be performed in a reliable manner between specialists with advanced training, or between specialists with advanced training and non-specialists who lack advanced training. The purpose of this paper was to examine the inter-tester reliability of two specialists, and the ability of a specialist and non-specialist to independently classify patients with LBP, utilizing clinical tests and history-based classification methods after a short educational course on the classification system. Subjects were acute or sub-acute patients with LBP who visited their occupational healthcare or municipal healthcare center. Inter-tester reliability between the specialist and non-specialists was at almost the same level: overall Kappa 0.60 (95%CI; 0.40 to 0.85), overall agreement 70%, as between the two specialists: overall Kappa 0.65 (95%CI; 0.33-0.86), overall agreement 77%. The findings suggest that a short educational course can provide rather reliable examination tools to allow non-specialized physiotherapists to classify patients according to tissue origination.

  17. Common nursing terminology for clinical information systems.

    PubMed

    Kol, Yardena; Zimmerman, Patricia; Sadeh, Zipora

    2005-01-01

    The lack of professional agreement upon chosen terminology in nursing detracts from the role of Clinical Information Systems (CIS) as central repositories of patient health records. The purposes of this paper are: (1) Identification of common terminology for clinical nursing information in CHS according to the following stages: patient history of health and illnesses; nursing assessment; nursing interventions and outcomes. (2) Implementation of the common terminology into computerized applications in several nursing settings. The sample included 224 nurses divided into four groups. Each group was asked to identify the common initial data for patient history and nursing interventions, based on professional experience, expertise, clinical standards and organizational / legal policy. The identification of nursing assessments and outcomes was done according to evidenced-based Clinical Guide-Lines (CGL) for each nursing setting. The CGL were chosen as a source for assessment and outcome classification for two main reasons. First, the CGL include criteria of the clinical state by the degree of severity base, which are acceptable and comprehensible to other disciplines within the healthcare system. Second, the lack of evidence-based researches related to clinical nursing outcomes. Standard patient history of health and illnesses (admission and discharge) was developed for all departments in the hospital with flexibility to add any specific clinical data upon requirement. A total of 62 nursing assessments / outcomes were identified from the CGL in the four chosen nursing settings. 43 (70%) nursing assessments / outcomes were common both for nursing practice in hospitals and community clinics. 30 (40%) were implemented in the community clinics CIS application, 19 (31%) in the oncology CIS application, and 16 (26%) in the delivery CIS application. The groups identified a total of 70 nursing interventions. 49 (70%) nursing interventions were common both for nursing practice

  18. Prosthodontic treatment of patients with disabilities at dental specialist clinics in the County of Västra Götaland.

    PubMed

    Brahm, Carl-Otto; Klingberg, Gunilla; Ekfeldt, Anders

    2009-01-01

    In 1998 the Swedish Parliament decided about increased financing of dental support and service given to persons with disabilities who were dependent on nursing personnel or others in their activities of daily life including oral hygiene procedures. One part of the legislation called "Necessary dental care, group 3" (NDC3) includes persons with intellectual disabilities and disabilities due to brain damage, autism and autism-like disorders, and persons with lasting mental and physical disabilities not related to normal ageing. The objectives where to investigate persons affected by this legislation; how many and what patients covered by NDC3 in Västra Götaland County received prosthodontic therapy from 2001 through 2004, at hospital dental clinics or dental specialist clinics. Patients treated with prosthodontic restorations covered financially by the county council under the terms of NDC3 were identified through the county council's registers. The application forms for NDC3 were retrieved and information about patient characteristics and type of treatments were compiled. It was shown that 57 patients covered by NDC3 in Västra Götaland County received prosthodontic therapy at dental specialist clinics and 50 were treated at the hospital dental clinics for extensive prosthodontic treatment needs. The mean age for the patients rehabilitated with removable dentures was higher (56.2 years) compared with patients treated with single tooth implants (39.7 years). About 30 patients, representing 1 to 2% of the NDC3 population in Västra Götaland County were rehabilitated with more advanced prosthodontic restorations in hospital dental clinics or dental specialist clinics each year. In conclusion and with respect to the probably large need for prosthodontic therapy among persons with disabilities, the use of NDC3 has not been properly utilized.

  19. Provision and practice of specialist preterm labour clinics: a UK survey of practice.

    PubMed

    Sharp, A N; Alfirevic, Z

    2014-03-01

    To identify the current status of specialist preterm labour (PTL) clinic provision and management within the UK. Postal survey of clinical practice. All consultant-led obstetric units within the UK. A questionnaire was sent by post to all 210 NHS consultant-led obstetric units within the UK. Units that had a specialist PTL clinic were asked to complete a further 20 questions defining their protocol for risk stratification and management. Current practice in specialist preterm labour clinics. We have identified 23 specialist clinics; the most common indications for attendance were previous PTL (100%), preterm prelabour rupture of membranes (95%), two large loop excisions of the transformation zone (95%) or cone biopsy (95%). There was significant heterogeneity in the indications for and method of primary treatment for short cervix, with cervical cerclage used in 45% of units, progesterone in 18% of units and Arabin cervical pessary in 5%. A further 23% used multiple treatment modalities in combination. A significant heterogeneity in all topics surveyed suggests an urgent need for networking, more evidence-based guidelines and prospective comparative audits to ascertain the real impact of specialist PTL clinics on the reduction in preterm birth and its sequelae. © 2013 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  20. Nursing Education for College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavinsky, Ann T.; Diers, Donna

    1982-01-01

    Describes the masters programs for nonnurse college graduates at Yale School of Nursing which offers both basic and advanced nursing preparation in a single three-year curriculum sequence. The program prepares nurses who can function in advanced-practice specialty roles as nurse-midwives, nurse practitioners, or clinical nurse specialists. (CT)

  1. The experience of care at nurse-led rheumatology clinics.

    PubMed

    Bala, Sidona-Valentina; Samuelson, Karin; Hagell, Peter; Svensson, Björn; Fridlund, Bengt; Hesselgard, Karin

    2012-12-01

    To describe how people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience the care provided by Swedish nurse-led rheumatology outpatient clinics. Eighteen adult people with a diagnosis of RA who had had at least three documented contact sessions with a nurse-led clinic were interviewed. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Care was expressed in three categories: social environment, professional approach and value-adding measures. A social environment including a warm encounter, a familial atmosphere and pleasant premises was desired and contributed to a positive experience of care. The nurses' professional approach was experienced as empathy, knowledge and skill, as well as support. The care was described as person centred and competent, as it was based on the individual's unique experience of his/her disease and needs. The nurses' specialist knowledge of rheumatology and rheumatology care was highly valued. The offered care represented added value for the participants, instilling security, trust, hope and confidence. It was perceived as facilitating daily life and creating positive emotions. The nurse-led clinics were reported to be easily accessible and provided continuity of the care. These features were presented as fundamental guarantees for health care safety. The experiences emphasized the need for a holistic approach to care. In this process, the organization of care and the role and skills of the nurse should be focused on the individual's needs and perspectives. The social environment, professional approach and value-adding measures are particularly relevant for optimal care at nurse-led rheumatology outpatient clinics. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The role of a community palliative care specialist nurse team in caring for people with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Leadbeater, Maria

    2013-02-01

    An audit was undertaken of people with a diagnosis of breast cancer who were referred to a community palliative care specialist nursing team over a 12-month period, to explore the reasons for referral to the service and the duration of involvement with the service. Breast cancer patients accounted for 10% of the total referrals to the specialist service, with symptom management (including pain control) and emotional support being the main reasons for referral. The majority of people referred with breast cancer had metastatic breast cancer (87%); interestingly, 13% had primary breast cancer. The mean duration of intervention was 3 months and 1 week. Referrals seemed to occur late in patients' disease trajectories, and total numbers were lower than might be expected. It may be concluded that there is scope for the specialist palliative care team to be a more integral part of care for patients with metastatic breast cancer.

  3. Clinical violence in nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Aghajanloo, Ali; Nirumand-Zandi, Kianoosh; Safavi-Bayat, Zahra; Alavi-Majd, Hamid

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the significant issues in health studies is violence. Although violence against nurses has been recognized as a major occupational problem, its magnitude and extent is not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to determine the extent and types of violence during clinical training of nursing students. METHODS: In this descriptive and cross-sectional study, 180 sophomores, juniors and seniors of Shahid Beheshti, Tehran and Iran Medical Universities were selected by quota sampling method. A questionnaire was used for collecting data regarding violence over the past year. Content and test-retest methods were used for evaluating its validity and reliability, respectively. RESULTS: Findings showed that 6.7%, 8.3% and 39.4% of the students experienced physical assault, physical menace and insult, respectively, over the past year. Most cases of the assaults (66.7%) were done by patients, most menaces by staff as well as patients’ attendants (18.1%) and most insults by staff (33.7%) and patients (31%). No significant relation was found between the sex as well as the educational year of the students and the experience of insult. 41.6% of the assaults were due to the effects of disease in assailants. However, no specific reason was found for physical menace and insult in most cases. 66.65%, 26.6% and 39.4% of the students reported physical assault, menace and insult to their tutors, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing students are subject to more violence because of young age and inadequate experience. Therefore, devising educational programs regarding occupational violence as well as its prevention and providing necessary support and consultation following violence are essential. PMID:23449964

  4. Nurses' unique roles in randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sadler, G R; Lantz, J M; Fullerton, J T; Dault, Y

    1999-01-01

    Nurses are in an ideal position to promote patients' awareness of the role played by clinical trials in the advancement of health science and the subsequent improvement of patient care. The history of clinical trials and the four phases of clinical trials are described. Nurses' professional roles in clinical trial participation, such as helping the patient to identify open clinical trials and acting as clinical interpreter and patient advocate during the patient's participation in a trial, are detailed. Professional considerations that must be addressed by the nurse are reviewed and include ensuring that the trial has received approval from an Institutional Review Board for the participation of human subjects; that the responsibilities of participation are congruent with the nurse's personal values and workplace obligations; and that once engaged, the nurse can make the commitment to sustain participation in the trial. Most important, the nurse must keep the patient's needs and values uppermost in mind during the evaluation of potential clinical trials. Nurses have a critical role to play in the promotion of clinical trials, the recruitment of patients for clinical trial participation, the education of the patient and family, and the clinical care and support of patients throughout their participation in clinical trials.

  5. Prisons: Logical, Innovative Clinical Nursing Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Honore Culleton

    1991-01-01

    The nursing faculty at Mercy College (New York) affiliated with several prison facilities to provide clinical experiences for senior nursing students. An ideal setting for the clinical group leadership course, the prison affiliations also helped students develop social awareness and advocacy strategies for this at-risk population. (SK)

  6. Nurse practitioner-based models of specialist palliative care at home: sustainability and evaluation of feasibility.

    PubMed

    Bookbinder, Marilyn; Glajchen, Myra; McHugh, Marlene; Higgins, Phil; Budis, James; Solomon, Neva; Homel, Peter; Cassin, Carolyn; Portenoy, Russell K

    2011-01-01

    Patients with serious medical problems who live at home may not be able to access specialist-level palliative care when the need develops. Nurse practitioner (NP)-based models may be able to increase the availability of specialist care in the community. The aim of this study was to evaluate the financial sustainability and feasibility of two NP-based models in an urban setting. In one model, an NP was linked with a social worker (SW) to create a new palliative home care team (PHCT-NP-SW), which would provide consultation and direct care to referred homebound elderly patients with advanced illnesses. In a second model, an NP was assigned to a hospice program (Hospice-NP) for the purpose of enhancing the reach and impact of a home care team. The revenue generated by each model was compared with direct costs; the PHCT-NP-SW model also was evaluated for its feasibility and impact on patient-level outcomes. Over a two-year period, the NP in the PHCT-NP-SW model made 350 visits and followed 114 patients at home. Annualized revenue through reimbursement from patient billing offset less than 50% of the NP's salary costs. In contrast, the Hospice-NP model led to a 360% increment in hospice referrals, yielding sufficient new revenue to support this position indefinitely after only seven months. The PHCT-NP-SW model provided numerous interventions that yielded a significant decline in symptom distress during the initial two weeks after referral (P=0.003), 100% compliance with advance care planning, 21% admission rate to hospice, access to other community services, and crisis management. Nonetheless, lack of funding led to closure of this model after the two years. This experience suggests that a PHCT-NP-SW model is not sustainable in this urban environment through reimbursement-based revenue, whereas a Hospice-NP model for hospice can be sustainable based on the growth of hospice census. The PHCT-NP-SW model appears to offer benefits, and additional efforts are needed to

  7. Paediatric Low-Vision Assessment and Management in a Specialist Clinic in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Julie; Harper, Robert; Biswas, Sus; Lloyd, Chris

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a survey of the demographical, educational and visual functional characteristics of children attending a specialist paediatric low-vision assessment clinic at Manchester Royal Eye Hospital. Comprehensive data were collected retrospectively from children attending the paediatric low-vision clinic between January 2003 and…

  8. Paediatric Low-Vision Assessment and Management in a Specialist Clinic in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Julie; Harper, Robert; Biswas, Sus; Lloyd, Chris

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a survey of the demographical, educational and visual functional characteristics of children attending a specialist paediatric low-vision assessment clinic at Manchester Royal Eye Hospital. Comprehensive data were collected retrospectively from children attending the paediatric low-vision clinic between January 2003 and…

  9. Specialist practice for UK community mental health nurses: the 1998--99 survey of course leaders.

    PubMed

    Hannigan, B; Burnard, P; Edwards, D; Turnbull, J

    2001-08-01

    Surveys of the leaders of the UK's post-qualifying education courses for community mental health nurses have taken place, on an annual basis, for over 10 years. In this paper, findings from the survey undertaken in the 1998--99 academic year are reported. These findings include: that most course leaders do not personally engage in clinical practice; that interprofessional education takes place at a minority of course centres, and that course philosophies and aims are characterised by an emphasis on both outcomes (in terms of, for example, skills acquisition, knowledge development and the ability to engage in reflective practice), and process (adult learning).

  10. Patients and nursing staff views of using the education needs assessment tool in rheumatology clinics: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Hardware, Bernadette; Johnson, Dawn; Hale, Claire; Ndosi, Mwidimi; Adebajo, Adewale

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the usability of the educational needs assessment tool in clinical practice, from a practitioner and patient perspective and to establish whether patients perceive that they are getting an equally good or equally inadequate education service for their needs. The educational needs assessment tool was developed to enable patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis to assess their education needs prior to a consultation with a health professional. The educational needs assessment tool has been translated into nine languages and measurement properties have been established, however, its usability in clinical practice has not been studied. A qualitative study embedded into a multicentre RCT in which patients had been randomised into either educational needs assessment tool-focused education (Experimental Group) or usual care (control group). Both groups were seen by a clinical nurse specialist. Sixteen patients and four clinical nurse specialists were recruited from the Rheumatology Outpatient Departments of three Acute Hospitals within the U K. Data were collected by interviews with patients and clinical nurse specialist. Analysis followed the Framework approach. Patients and clinical nurse specialist found completion of the educational needs assessment tool straightforward, comprehensive and easy to use. Completing the educational needs assessment tool helped patients to focus on what they needed to know from the clinical nurse specialist. Patients in both the control group and the experimental group felt supported and reassured by their clinical nurse specialist and perceived that they received a good and adequate education provision. This study provides useful insights into the ability of the educational needs assessment tool to assess the educational needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in routine clinical practice. The educational needs assessment tool would be useful as a structured guide for nurses when assessing and meeting individual patient

  11. Legal issues in clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Patton, Carla Wheeler; Lewallen, Lynne Porter

    2015-01-01

    Nurse educators are concerned about legal implications of teaching students in clinical settings. Although literature is available about legal issues in working with students in the classroom, there is little recent information on clinical nursing faculty's legal liability when working with students and ways to reduce the risk of becoming involved in a lawsuit. This article discusses the major issues in clinical settings that contribute to lawsuits against faculty and offers suggestions to reduce legal liability with students in clinical settings.

  12. [Exploring moral distress among clinical nurses].

    PubMed

    Lovato, Sabrina; Lovato, Liliana; Cunico, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Moral distress in nursing practice is described as a suffering situation that arises when the nurse is unable to act her/his ethical choices, when institutional constraints interfere with acting in the way she/he believes to be right. The aim is to describe nursing practice situations causing moral distress resulting from the recognition of the ethical appropriate actions combined with the impossibility to pursue it; to describe how nurses manage moral distress situations and the strategies to cope with them. A focus group was conducted in three wards of a large teaching-hospital in the north of Italy. In another ward the nurses were asked to write a moral distress experience. A total of 40 nurses were involved and 50 experiences collected. The experiences' analysis has shown 5 source areas of moral distress: 1) clinical decision; 2) nursing competences; 3) nurse-physician collaboration; 4) organization of care; 5) safe care. For each area the most frequent themes were highlighted.Areas of clinical decision, nursing competences, nurse-physician collaboration involve nurse leaders in identification and implementation of strategies for managing moral distress.

  13. [Clinical nursing manpower: development and future prospects].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Fen; Kao, Ching-Chiu

    2014-04-01

    The significant changes in nursing manpower utilization in Taiwan over the past two decades are due in large part to the implementation of the National Health Insurance program and the rising need for long-term care. The changes have impacted clinical nursing manpower utilization in two important ways. Firstly, there has been a substantial increase in overall demand for nursing manpower. In particular, the need for clinical nurses has nearly quadrupled during this time period. Secondly, the level of difficulty involved in patient care has risen dramatically, with factors including increased disease severity and increased care quality expectations, among others. These changes, coupled with demands on nursing manpower imposed from other sectors, underpin and further exacerbate the problem of nursing manpower shortages throughout the healthcare system. To raise the quality of the nursing work environment, the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MOHW) brought together Taiwan's key professional nursing organizations to promote 10 care-reform strategies, establish the nursing-aid manpower system, and create the nursing classification system as an approach to effectively attract nurses to take positions in the medical system.

  14. Partnering for the Clinical Preparation of Education Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Suzanne; Cote, Debra

    2016-01-01

    NCATE's (2010) "Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel" calls for a shift toward clinical preparation and partnerships as a means of adequately preparing new teachers for the 21st century classroom. Looking at special education teacher preparation, there exist few model programs that have paved the road for others in implementing new clinical…

  15. Partnering for the Clinical Preparation of Education Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Suzanne; Cote, Debra

    2016-01-01

    NCATE's (2010) "Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel" calls for a shift toward clinical preparation and partnerships as a means of adequately preparing new teachers for the 21st century classroom. Looking at special education teacher preparation, there exist few model programs that have paved the road for others in implementing new clinical…

  16. [The strategic impact of clinical practice guidelines in nursing on the managerial function of supervision].

    PubMed

    Romero, José Antonio Vinagre; Heredero, Carmen De Pablos

    2013-10-01

    Clinical practice guidelines in nursing (CPG-N) are tools that allow the necessary knowledge that frequently remains specialist-internalised to be made explicit. These tools are a complement to risk adjustment systems (RAS), reinforcing their effectiveness and permitting a rationalisation of healthcare costs. This theoretical study defends the importance of building and using CPG-Ns as instruments to support the figure of the nursing supervisor in order to optimise the implementation of R&D and hospital quality strategies, enabling clinical excellence in nursing processes and cost-efficient reallocation of economic resources through their linear integration with SARs.

  17. From Passive to Active Learners: The "Lived Experience" of Nurses in a Specialist Nephrology Nursing Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridger, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore the lived experience of learning for a group of staff nurses in the Middle East, who undertook a post-registration nursing education programme in the speciality of nephrology nursing (the NNP) between 2001 and 2002. The broad-based curriculum seeks to develop the staff nurses into active learners, able to…

  18. From Passive to Active Learners: The "Lived Experience" of Nurses in a Specialist Nephrology Nursing Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridger, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore the lived experience of learning for a group of staff nurses in the Middle East, who undertook a post-registration nursing education programme in the speciality of nephrology nursing (the NNP) between 2001 and 2002. The broad-based curriculum seeks to develop the staff nurses into active learners, able to…

  19. Neurofibromatosis Specialists

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Specialty Other Specialists About the NF Clinic Network (NFCN) For more information or questions about the ... ctf.org 646-738-8574 The Neurofibromatosis Clinic Network (NFCN) was established by the Children’s Tumor Foundation ( ...

  20. Factors influencing nurses' participation in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Ann F; Warner, Andrea M; Fleming, Eileen; Schmidt, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Clinical research is necessary for developing nursing's body of knowledge and improving the quality of gastroenterology nursing care. The support and participation of nursing staff are crucial to conducting interventional research. Identification of characteristics of nurses and their work settings that facilitate or impede participation in research is needed. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine the effect of personal and professional characteristics and attitudes about nursing research on staff nurses' participation in a clinical nursing research project. A questionnaire measuring nurses' attitudes, perceptions of availability of support, and research use was distributed to staff nurses working on an endoscopy lab and two same-day surgery units where a nursing research study had recently been conducted. Investigator-developed items measured nurses' attitudes about the utility and feasibility of the interventions tested in the original study. A total of 36 usable questionnaires comprised the sample. Factor analysis of the two questionnaires resulted in three-factor (Importance of Research, Interest in Research, and Environment Support of Research) and two-factor (Value of Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions [CBIs] and Participation in Study) solutions, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in mean scores for the five factors between nurses who did (n = 19) and those who did not (n = 17) participate in the original study. The Participation in Research Factor was significantly negatively correlated with years in nursing (r = -.336, p < .05) and positively correlated with the importance of research factor (r = .501, p < .01). Importance of research was negatively correlated with years in nursing (r = -.435, p < .01) and positively correlated with value of CBI (r = .439, p < .01) and participation in study (r = .501, p < .01). Findings from the study will contribute to the body of knowledge about factors that

  1. Changing trend in referral to secondary care specialist thyroid eye disease clinic following the Amsterdam declaration.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Annika S; Dujardin, Leticia R; Knight, Bridget; Benzimra, James; Quinn, Anthony G; Vaidya, Bijay

    2017-02-08

    Early diagnosis and treatment of thyroid eye disease (TED) improves outcomes. Previous studies have highlighted delays in diagnosis and referral to specialist centres. The Amsterdam declaration (2009) aimed to halve the time from presentation to diagnosis and from diagnosis to referral to a specialist centre in five years. A recent study from the European group on Graves' orbitopathy tertiary centres showed a trend for earlier referral of patients to the centres. It is unknown whether similar improvements are occurring in secondary care hospitals in the UK. To study the trend in referral to a UK secondary care specialist TED clinic since the Amsterdam declaration. We carried out a prospective audit of patients who attended the specialist TED clinic after the Amsterdam declaration (2010-2015). We compared their clinical characteristics, including duration of symptoms, disease activity and severity, with those of the patients (n = 114) from an earlier audit attending the clinic during 2004-2008. During 2010-2015, 126 patients with TED (97 females, median age 55 years, 39 current smokers) attended the clinic. The median time from onset of symptoms to being seen in the clinic was 5 months, reduced from 12 months in 2004-2008 (p < 0.001). As compared to the 2004-2008 cohort, significantly more patients in the current cohort presented with mild disease (72 vs. 52%, p = 0.002). Twenty-seven per cent patients had active TED (clinical activity score ≥3/7) compared to 18% in 2004-2008 (p = 0.1). The trend in referral to secondary care specialist TED clinic is changing in line with the Amsterdam declaration aims.

  2. A study on specialist or special disease clinics based on big data.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhuyuan; Fan, Xiaowei; Chen, Gong

    2014-09-01

    Correlation analysis and processing of massive medical information can be implemented through big data technology to find the relevance of different factors in the life cycle of a disease and to provide the basis for scientific research and clinical practice. This paper explores the concept of constructing a big medical data platform and introduces the clinical model construction. Medical data can be collected and consolidated by distributed computing technology. Through analysis technology, such as artificial neural network and grey model, a medical model can be built. Big data analysis, such as Hadoop, can be used to construct early prediction and intervention models as well as clinical decision-making model for specialist and special disease clinics. It establishes a new model for common clinical research for specialist and special disease clinics.

  3. Beyond empathy: clinical intimacy in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Timothy W

    2007-10-01

    Understanding, shared meaning, and mutual trust lie at the heart of the therapeutic nurse-patient relationship. This article introduces the concept of clinical intimacy by applying the interpersonal process model of intimacy to the nurse-patient relationship. The distinction between complementary and reciprocal behaviours, and between intimate interactions and intimate relationships, addresses background concerns about the appropriateness of intimacy in nursing relationships. The mutual construction of meaning in the interactive process between nurses and patients is seen to lie at the heart of clinical intimacy as a hermeneutic enterprise. Intimacy is distinguished from empathy based on intentionality and the status and location of meaning. Reasons for continued investigation into clinical intimacy as an explanatory model for nursing as a hermeneutic practice are presented.

  4. Computer-assisted learning (CAL) for general and specialist nursing education.

    PubMed

    Nerlich, S

    1995-09-01

    Computer-assisted learning (CAL) may be defined as any learning that is mediated by a computer and which requires no direct interaction between the user and a human instructor in order to run. Instead, CAL presents the user with an interface (constructed by an educator skilled in the field of study) which allows the user to follow a lesson plan or may allow self-directed access to particular information of interest. CAL has been claimed to improve knowledge retention and achievement scores, enhance clinical judgement skills and reduce required instruction time; performing as well (if not better) when compared to other more traditional education techniques. The advantages of the utilisation of CAL in nursing education can be made clear by consideration of adult education theory and curriculum design, as well as the particular learning needs of nurses themselves. Research and development into a theoretical framework for CAL design and implementation has allowed the identification of beneficial aspects of CAL resources. Although the cost of commercial software may be prohibitive to some institutions, possibilities exist for educators to create their own CAL packages relatively simply.

  5. Clinical Decision Making of Rural Novice Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seright, Teresa J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop substantive theory regarding decision making by the novice nurse in a rural hospital setting. Interviews were guided by the following research questions: What cues were used by novice rural registered nurses in order to make clinical decisions? What were the sources of feedback which influenced subsequent…

  6. Roles and Responsibilities of Clinical Nurse Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirchhoff, Karin T.; Mateo, Magdelena A.

    1996-01-01

    A follow-up survey of 142 nurse researchers employed in clinical settings (75% response) found that fewer than half have a budget, 52% have secretarial support, 82% have a research committee, and 71% report to the chief nurse executive. Although their positions were primarily research, the average time spent on research was 50%. (JOW)

  7. Wireless Handhelds to Support Clinical Nursing Practicum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Cheng-Chih; Lai, Chin-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports our implementation and evaluation of a wireless handheld learning environment used to support a clinical nursing practicum course. The learning environment was designed so that nursing students could use handhelds for recording information, organizing ideas, assessing patients, and also for interaction and collaboration with…

  8. Responsive Assessment: Assessing Student Nurses' Clinical Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neary, Mary

    2001-01-01

    A study involving 300 nursing students, 155 nurse practitioners, and 80 assessors tested a model of responsive assessment that includes identification of learning needs and potential, assignment to suitable placements, continuous assessment of clinical practice and patient care, and alignment of teaching and assessment with patient needs and…

  9. Preceptor Handbook: Rural Clinical Nurse Placement Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart-Siddall, Sandra; Haberlin, Jean

    This handbook provides Rural Clinical Nurse Placement Program (RCNP) preceptors with a program overview and practical suggestions to apply during student placement. An introductory section describes how the program addresses the maldistribution of nurses by raising awareness about the rural experience, adding a needed perspective to the urban bias…

  10. Clinical Decision Making of Rural Novice Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seright, Teresa J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop substantive theory regarding decision making by the novice nurse in a rural hospital setting. Interviews were guided by the following research questions: What cues were used by novice rural registered nurses in order to make clinical decisions? What were the sources of feedback which influenced subsequent…

  11. Qualitative Analysis of the Interdisciplinary Interaction between Data Analysis Specialists and Novice Clinical Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Zammar, Guilherme Roberto; Shah, Jatin; Bonilauri Ferreira, Ana Paula; Cofiel, Luciana; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Background The inherent complexity of statistical methods and clinical phenomena compel researchers with diverse domains of expertise to work in interdisciplinary teams, where none of them have a complete knowledge in their counterpart's field. As a result, knowledge exchange may often be characterized by miscommunication leading to misinterpretation, ultimately resulting in errors in research and even clinical practice. Though communication has a central role in interdisciplinary collaboration and since miscommunication can have a negative impact on research processes, to the best of our knowledge, no study has yet explored how data analysis specialists and clinical researchers communicate over time. Methods/Principal Findings We conducted qualitative analysis of encounters between clinical researchers and data analysis specialists (epidemiologist, clinical epidemiologist, and data mining specialist). These encounters were recorded and systematically analyzed using a grounded theory methodology for extraction of emerging themes, followed by data triangulation and analysis of negative cases for validation. A policy analysis was then performed using a system dynamics methodology looking for potential interventions to improve this process. Four major emerging themes were found. Definitions using lay language were frequently employed as a way to bridge the language gap between the specialties. Thought experiments presented a series of “what if” situations that helped clarify how the method or information from the other field would behave, if exposed to alternative situations, ultimately aiding in explaining their main objective. Metaphors and analogies were used to translate concepts across fields, from the unfamiliar to the familiar. Prolepsis was used to anticipate study outcomes, thus helping specialists understand the current context based on an understanding of their final goal. Conclusion/Significance The communication between clinical researchers and data

  12. Qualitative analysis of the interdisciplinary interaction between data analysis specialists and novice clinical researchers.

    PubMed

    Zammar, Guilherme Roberto; Shah, Jatin; Ferreira, Ana Paula Bonilauri; Cofiel, Luciana; Lyles, Kenneth W; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2010-02-24

    The inherent complexity of statistical methods and clinical phenomena compel researchers with diverse domains of expertise to work in interdisciplinary teams, where none of them have a complete knowledge in their counterpart's field. As a result, knowledge exchange may often be characterized by miscommunication leading to misinterpretation, ultimately resulting in errors in research and even clinical practice. Though communication has a central role in interdisciplinary collaboration and since miscommunication can have a negative impact on research processes, to the best of our knowledge, no study has yet explored how data analysis specialists and clinical researchers communicate over time. We conducted qualitative analysis of encounters between clinical researchers and data analysis specialists (epidemiologist, clinical epidemiologist, and data mining specialist). These encounters were recorded and systematically analyzed using a grounded theory methodology for extraction of emerging themes, followed by data triangulation and analysis of negative cases for validation. A policy analysis was then performed using a system dynamics methodology looking for potential interventions to improve this process. Four major emerging themes were found. Definitions using lay language were frequently employed as a way to bridge the language gap between the specialties. Thought experiments presented a series of "what if" situations that helped clarify how the method or information from the other field would behave, if exposed to alternative situations, ultimately aiding in explaining their main objective. Metaphors and analogies were used to translate concepts across fields, from the unfamiliar to the familiar. Prolepsis was used to anticipate study outcomes, thus helping specialists understand the current context based on an understanding of their final goal. The communication between clinical researchers and data analysis specialists presents multiple challenges that can lead to

  13. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Clinical Specialist, 10-17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    These lesson plans and student materials--handouts and workbook--for a secondary-postsecondary-level course for clinical specialists are one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. Purpose stated for the 105-hour course is to provide…

  14. Evaluation of outreach clinics held by specialists in general practice in England.

    PubMed

    Bond, M; Bowling, A; Abery, A; McClay, M; Dickinson, E

    2000-02-01

    To measure the processes of care, health benefits and costs of outreach clinics held by hospital specialists in primary care settings. The study was designed as a case-referent (comparative) study in which the features of 19 outreach clinics (cases) were compared with matched outpatient clinics (controls). The measuring instruments were self administered questionnaires. Patients were followed up at six months to reassess health status. The specialties included in the study were cardiology, ENT, general medicine, general surgery, gynaecology and rheumatology. Specialist outreach clinics in general practice in England, with matched outpatient clinic controls. Consecutive patient attenders in the outreach and outpatient clinics, their specialists, the outreach patients' general practitioners, practice managers and trust accountants. Patients' response rate at baseline: 78% (1420). Patient satisfaction, doctors' attitudes, processes and health outcomes, costs. Outreach patients were more satisfied with the processes of their care than outpatients, their access to specialist care was better than that for outpatients and they were more likely to be discharged. Doctors reported that the main advantages of the outreach clinic were improved patient access to specialists and convenience for patients, in comparison with outpatients, and most GPs and specialists felt the outreach clinic was "worthwhile". At six month follow up, the health status of the outreach sample had significantly improved more than that of the outpatients on all eight sub-scales of the HSQ-12, but this was probably because of their better starting point at baseline. The impact of outreach on health outcomes was small. The NHS costs of outreach were significantly higher than outpatients. An increase in outreach clinic size would reduce cost per patient, but would lead to the loss of most of the clinics' benefits. While the process of care was of higher quality in outreach than in outpatients, and the

  15. Specialist perioperative allergy clinic services in the UK 2016: Results from the Royal College of Anaesthetists Sixth National Audit Project.

    PubMed

    Egner, W; Cook, T; Harper, N; Garcez, T; Marinho, S; Kong, K L; Nasser, S; Thomas, M; Warner, A; Hitchman, J; Floss, K

    2017-10-01

    Guidelines for investigation of perioperative drug allergy exist, but the quality of services is unknown. Specialist perioperative anaphylaxis services were surveyed through the Royal College of Anaesthetists 6(th) National Audit Project. We compare self-declared UK practice in specialist perioperative allergy services with national recommendations. A SurveyMonkey™ questionnaire was distributed to providers of allergy services in the UK. Responses were assessed for adherence to the best practice recommendations of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology (BSACI), the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Guidance on Drug Allergy-CG183. Over 1200 patients were evaluated in 44 centres annually. Variation in workload, waiting times, access, staffing and diagnostic approach was noted. Paediatric centres had the longest routine waiting times (most wait >13 weeks) in contrast to adult centres (most wait <12 weeks). Service leads are allergists/immunologists (91%) or anaesthetists (7%). Potentially important differences were seen in: testing repertoire [10/44 (23%) lacked BSACI compliant neuromuscular blocking agent (NMBA) panels and 17/44 (39%) lacked a NAP6-defined extended panel; many failed to screen all cases for chlorhexidine 19/44 (43%) or latex 21/44 (48%)], staffing [only 26/44 (59%) had specialist nurses and 18/44 (41%) an anaesthetist] and provision of information [18/44 (41%) gave immediate information in clinic and 5/44 (11%) sign-posted support groups]. Most centres were able to provide diagnostic challenges to antibiotics [40/44 (91%]) and local anaesthetics [41/44 (93%)]. Diagnostic testing is not harmonized, with marked variability in the NMBA panels used to identify safe alternatives. Chlorhexidine and latex are not part of routine testing in many centres. Poor access to services and patient information provision require attention. Harmonization of

  16. The Experiences of Specialist Nurses Working Within the Uro-oncology Multidisciplinary Team in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Punshon, Geoffrey; Endacott, Ruth; Aslett, Phillippa; Brocksom, Jane; Fleure, Louisa; Howdle, Felicity; Masterton, Morven; O'Connor, Anita; Swift, Adrian; Trevatt, Paul; Leary, Alison

    United Kingdom prostate cancer nursing care is provided by a variety of urology and uro-oncology nurses. The experience of working in multidisciplinary teams (MDT) was investigated in a national study. The study consisted of a national survey with descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. A secondary analysis of a data subset from a UK whole population survey was undertaken (n = 285) of the specialist nursing workforce and the services they provide. Data were collected on the experience of working in the MDT. Forty-five percent of the respondents felt that they worked in a functional MDT, 12% felt that they worked in a dysfunctional MDT, and 3.5% found the MDT meeting intimidating. Furthermore, 34% of the nurses felt that they could constructively challenge all members of the MDT in meetings. Themes emerging from open-ended questions were lack of interest in nonmedical concerns by other team members, ability to constructively challenge decisions or views within the meeting, and little opportunity for patients' wishes to be expressed. Despite expertise and experience, nurses had a variable, often negative, experience of the MDT. It is necessary to ensure that all participants can contribute and are heard and valued. More emphasis should be given to patients' nonmedical needs.

  17. The Experiences of Specialist Nurses Working Within the Uro-oncology Multidisciplinary Team in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Punshon, Geoffrey; Endacott, Ruth; Aslett, Phillippa; Brocksom, Jane; Fleure, Louisa; Howdle, Felicity; Masterton, Morven; O’Connor, Anita; Swift, Adrian; Trevatt, Paul; Leary, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: United Kingdom prostate cancer nursing care is provided by a variety of urology and uro-oncology nurses. The experience of working in multidisciplinary teams (MDT) was investigated in a national study. Design: The study consisted of a national survey with descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Methods: A secondary analysis of a data subset from a UK whole population survey was undertaken (n = 285) of the specialist nursing workforce and the services they provide. Data were collected on the experience of working in the MDT. Results: Forty-five percent of the respondents felt that they worked in a functional MDT, 12% felt that they worked in a dysfunctional MDT, and 3.5% found the MDT meeting intimidating. Furthermore, 34% of the nurses felt that they could constructively challenge all members of the MDT in meetings. Themes emerging from open-ended questions were lack of interest in nonmedical concerns by other team members, ability to constructively challenge decisions or views within the meeting, and little opportunity for patients’ wishes to be expressed. Conclusions: Despite expertise and experience, nurses had a variable, often negative, experience of the MDT. It is necessary to ensure that all participants can contribute and are heard and valued. More emphasis should be given to patients’ nonmedical needs. PMID:28594672

  18. Providing support to nursing students in the clinical environment: a nursing standard requirement.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Carina; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2016-10-01

    This discussion paper poses the question 'What enables or deters Registered Nurses to take up their professional responsibility to support undergraduate nursing students through the provision of clinical education?'. Embedded within many nursing standards are expectations that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to undergraduate nursing students undertaking clinical placements. Expectations within nursing standards that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to nursing students are important because nursing students depend on Registered Nurses to help them to become competent practitioners. Contributing factors that enable and deter Registered Nurses from fulfilling this expectation to support nursing students in their clinical learning include; workloads, preparedness for the teaching role, confidence in teaching and awareness of the competency requirement to support students. Factors exist which can enable or deter Registered Nurses from carrying out the licence requirement to provide clinical education and support to nursing students.

  19. The role of clinical specialist physiotherapists in the management of low back pain in a spinal triage clinic.

    PubMed

    Murphy, S; Blake, C; Power, C K; Fullen, B M

    2013-12-01

    Traditional care pathways for patients with low back pain (LBP) where general practitioners (GPs) refer to consultant specialists can lead to excessive waiting times for patients and questionable use of health care resources. The evaluation of more cost effective pathways is a priority. The study aims to determine if clinical specialist physiotherapists can allocate patients into the three distinct diagnostic triage categories in line with international guidelines. A secondary aim is to examine the utility of baseline domains to inform clinical decision making. A review of LBP patients (n = 1,532) consecutively referred between 2008 and 2010 to a physiotherapy led spinal triage clinic was undertaken. Baseline demographics, pain severity (Visual Analogue Scale), disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire), distress (Distress and Risk Assessment Method), mobility and function were assessed. Relationships between these factors were analysed. Eighty-five percent of the population were deemed suitable for conservative management and were referred for either group exercise intervention (n = 1,125, 73 %) or individual treatment (n = 178, 12 %), in line with clinical guidelines. Fourteen percent were discharged and only 1 % required a specialist opinion. Patients allocated to the three management streams could be clearly discriminated by baseline measures of pain, distress, disability and function (p < 0.01). Clinical Specialist physiotherapists are effective in assessing and selecting appropriate care pathways for LBP patients in line with international LBP clinical guidelines. The utility of the physical and psychological measures to differentiate between groups of varying clinical severity has important implications for treatment selection and management.

  20. Clinical update on nursing home medicine: 2013.

    PubMed

    Messinger-Rapport, Barbara J; Gammack, Julie K; Thomas, David R; Morley, John E

    2013-12-01

    This is the seventh article in the series of Clinical Updates on Nursing Home Care. The topics covered are antiresorptive drugs, hip fracture, hypertension, orthostatic hypotension, depression, undernutrition, anorexia, cachexia, sarcopenia, exercise, pain, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

  1. Eating disorders in the context of preconception care: fertility specialists' knowledge, attitudes, and clinical practices.

    PubMed

    Rodino, Iolanda S; Byrne, Susan M; Sanders, Katherine A

    2017-02-01

    To gauge fertility specialists' knowledge, clinical practices, and training needs in regard to eating disorders. Cross-sectional study. Fertility clinics. Eighty Australian and New Zealand fertility specialists who were members of the Fertility Society of Australia. None. Responses to an anonymously completed online questionnaire. Approximately 54% of doctors correctly identified the body mass index relevant to anorexia nervosa, and 30% identified menstrual disturbances for anorexia, while 63.8% of doctors incorrectly nominated maladaptive weight control behaviors as a characteristic of binge eating disorder. While clinicians (83.7%) agreed it was important to screen for eating disorders during preconception assessments, 35% routinely screened for eating disorders and 8.8% indicated that their clinics had clinical practice guidelines for management of eating disorders. A minority of participants (13.8%) felt satisfied with their level of university training in eating disorders, 37.5% of doctors felt confident in their ability to recognize symptoms of an eating disorder, and 96.2% indicated a need for further education and clinical guidelines. On most items examined, knowledge and clinical practices regarding eating disorders did not differ according to doctor gender or years of clinical experience working as a fertility specialist. Knowledge about eating disorders in the context of fertility treatment is important. This study highlights the uncertainty among fertility specialists in detecting features of eating disorders. The findings point to the importance of further education and training, including the development of clinical guidelines specific to fertility health care providers. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Clinical Component in Education for Nursing Admininstration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotkovitch, Rachel

    1979-01-01

    Presents reasons for objecting to a clinical component in the graduate nursing administration curriculum and suggests some curriculum content, while stating that only a nurse with clinical experience should be a nursing administrator. Describes how a nurse manager administers the program while staff nurses provide the patient care. (MF)

  3. [The historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare and clinical nursing].

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jung-Mei

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based healthcare (EBHC) emphasizes the integration of the best research evidence with patient values, specialist suggestions, and clinical circumstances during the process of clinical decision-making. EBHC is a recognized core competency in modern healthcare. Nursing is a professional discipline of empirical science that thrives in an environment marked by advances in knowledge and technology in medicine as well as in nursing. Clinical nurses must elevate their skills and professional qualifications, provide efficient and quality health services, and promote their proficiency in EBHC. The Institute of Medicine in the United States indicates that evidence-based research results often fail to disseminate efficiently to clinical decision makers. This problem highlights the importance of better promoting the evidence-based healthcare fundamentals and competencies to frontline clinical nurses. This article describes the historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare from the perspective of modern clinical nursing in light of the importance of evidence-based healthcare in clinical nursing; describes the factors associated with evidence-based healthcare promotion; and suggests strategies and policies that may improve the promotion and application of EBHC in clinical settings. The authors hope that this paper provides a reference for efforts to improve clinical nursing in the realms of EBHC training, promotion, and application.

  4. Course strategies for clinical nurse leader development.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Sally; Grossman, Sheila; Godfrey, Marjorie

    2012-01-01

    The scope of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) is evolving in practice across the country. The preparation of this pivotal role in a complex healthcare environment has prompted the collaboration of nurse academics, nurse administrators, and clinicians to design unique educational experiences to maximize best practice. Knowledge attained regarding healthcare improvement and patient safety must not only be theoretical, but personal and application focused. Utilizing the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's CNL white paper and published resources faculty developed a clinical leadership course focused on active learning and reflection. Students explore concepts of improvement and quality related to business models of high functioning organizations including healthcare. Three key components of the course are described in detail; "quality is personal", executive interviews and the "5P" clinical microsystems assessment. Evaluation outcomes are discussed. Course content and innovative teaching/learning strategies for CNL are shared which may support the growth of CNL program development nationally.

  5. Advanced practice role characteristics of the community/public health nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Julie Fisher; Baldwin, Karen Brandt

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the advanced practice role of nurses with master's degrees in community/public health nursing using their experiences and perspectives. The purposive sample consisted of 10 nurses who had master's degrees in community/public health nursing and were working in a variety of community health settings. Data were collected using audiotaped interviews and 1-day observations of study participants in their workplaces. An editing analysis technique was used to analyze the data. Findings indicated that role characteristics included advocacy and policy setting at the organizational, community, and state levels; a leadership style centered on empowerment; a broad sphere of influence; and high-level skills in large-scale program planning, project management, and building partnerships. Results provide important descriptive data about significant aspects of the advanced practice role of nurses with master's degrees in community/public health nursing.

  6. Clinical misconduct among South Korean nursing students.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jun; Park, Seungmi; Jang, In-Sun

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the extent and predictors of unethical clinical behaviors among nursing students in South Korea. From survey data of 345 undergraduate nursing students, unethical clinical behaviors were examined with respect to 11 individual characteristics, frequency and perceived seriousness of classroom cheating, two factors of individual attitude, and four contextual factors. Qualitative data from two focus group interviews were analyzed to explore reasons for and contexts of unethical clinical behaviors. About sixty-six percent of the participants engaged in one or more unethical clinical behaviors over a one-semester period. The prevalence of such behaviors varied widely from 1.7% to 40.9% and was related to the type of nursing program, the number of clinical practicum semesters completed, ethical attitudes toward cheating behaviors, the frequency of cheating on assignments, the frequency of cheating on exams, the perceived prevalence of cheating by peers, and prior knowledge of academic integrity. According to the regression analysis, the last four variables explained 29.4% of the variance in the prevalence of unethical clinical behaviors. In addition, multiple reasons and possible interventions for clinical misconduct were reported during the focus group interviews. Unlike cheating in the classroom, clinical misconduct was strongly induced by clinical nurses and poor clinical practice environments. In sum, unethical clinical behaviors were widespread among the participants and need to be corrected.

  7. Nursing clinical faculty revisited: the benefits of developing staff nurses as clinical scholars.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Karren; Homer, Marianne; Carroll, Kimberly; Center, Deborah; Foss, Katherine; Jarrett, Sara; Kane, Lee Ann

    2007-01-01

    One of the major contributing factors to the nursing shortage in Colorado and nationally is a scarcity of clinical faculty required to prepare new nurses. This article describes an innovative, collaborative project that purposefully prepares staff nurses to assume the role of clinical scholar. Although there are several models that have sought to make clinically expert nurses available as teaching faculty, the breadth and scope of the described project with its multiple partners is unique. In the first year of this grant, the identified goals were achieved. In addition, there have been significant serendipitous outcomes.

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of clinical specialist outreach as compared to referral system in Ethiopia: an economic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In countries with scarce specialized Human resource for health, patients are usually referred. The other alternative has been mobilizing specialists, clinical specialist outreach. This study examines whether clinical specialist outreach is a cost effective way of using scarce health expertise to provide specialist care as compared to provision of such services through referral system in Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study on four purposively selected regional hospitals and three central referral hospitals was conducted from Feb 4-24, 2009. The perspective of analysis was societal covering analytic horizon and time frame from 1 April 2007 to 31 Dec 2008. Data were collected using interview of specialists, project focal persons, patients and review of records. To ensure the propriety standards of evaluation, Ethical clearance was obtained from Jimma University. Results It was found that 532 patients were operated at outreach hospitals in 125 specialist days. The unit cost of surgical procedures was found to be ETB 4,499.43. On the other hand, if the 125 clinical specialist days were spent to serve patients referred from zonal and regional hospitals at central referral hospitals, 438 patients could have been served. And the unit cost of surgical procedures through referral would have been ETB 6,523.27 per patient. This makes clinical specialist outreach 1.45 times more cost effective way of using scarce clinical specialists' time as compared to referral system. Conclusion Clinical specialist outreach is a cost effective and cost saving way of spending clinical specialists' time as compared to provision of similar services through referral system. PMID:20540766

  9. Using case study within a sequential explanatory design to evaluate the impact of specialist and advanced practice roles on clinical outcomes: the SCAPE study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of the clinical nurse/midwife specialist and advanced nurse/midwife practitioner is complex not least because of the diversity in how the roles are operationalised across health settings and within multidisciplinary teams. This aim of this paper is to use The SCAPE Study: Specialist Clinical and Advanced Practitioner Evaluation in Ireland to illustrate how case study was used to strengthen a Sequential Explanatory Design. Methods In Phase 1, clinicians identified indicators of specialist and advanced practice which were then used to guide the instrumental case study design which formed the second phase of the larger study. Phase 2 used matched case studies to evaluate the effectiveness of specialist and advanced practitioners on clinical outcomes for service users. Data were collected through observation, documentary analysis, and interviews. Observations were made of 23 Clinical Specialists or Advanced Practitioners, and 23 matched clinicians in similar matched non-postholding sites, while they delivered care. Forty-one service users, 41 clinicians, and 23 Directors of Nursing or Midwifery were interviewed, and 279 service users completed a survey based on the components of CS and AP practice identified in Phase 1. A coding framework, and the generation of cross tabulation matrices in NVivo, was used to make explicit how the outcome measures were confirmed and validated from multiple sources. This strengthened the potential to examine single cases that seemed ‘different’, and allowed for cases to be redefined. Phase 3 involved interviews with policy-makers to set the findings in context. Results Case study is a powerful research strategy to use within sequential explanatory mixed method designs, and adds completeness to the exploration of complex issues in clinical practice. The design is flexible, allowing the use of multiple data collection methods from both qualitative and quantitative paradigms. Conclusions Multiple approaches to data

  10. Nursing faculty preparedness for clinical teaching.

    PubMed

    Suplee, Patricia Dunphy; Gardner, Marcia; Jerome-D'Emilia, Bonnie

    2014-03-01

    Nursing faculty who teach in clinical settings face complex situations requiring evidence-based educational and evaluative strategies, yet many have had limited preparation for these tasks. A convenience sample of 74 nursing faculty participated in a survey about clinical teaching in prelicensure nursing programs. Most faculty developed teaching skills through conferences (57%), orientation at their educational institution (53%), or exposure in graduate school (38%). Thirty-one percent reported having no preparation for clinical teaching. Faculty felt least prepared to manage students with learning, physical, or emotional disabilities and incivility. Twenty-six percent had no preparation for evaluating students in the clinical setting, and only 17% had worked with a faculty mentor. Few evidence-based teaching strategies were used by the faculty. These findings indicate gaps exist in the preparation of clinical faculty. Graduate education, comprehensive orientation programs, and continuing professional development may help to ensure faculty are effective in managing and evaluating student learning.

  11. The teaching of clinical skills in the context of children's nursing: a UK survey.

    PubMed

    McNee, Peter; Clarke, Dave; Davies, Jane

    2005-09-01

    The teaching of clinical skills within nursing is currently enjoying a resurgence following the implementation of the 'Fitness for Practice Curriculum'. However, the teaching of clinical skills specifically within children's nursing has received little attention within the research arena. This article presents the data of a national postal survey sent to United Kingdom institutions providing pre-registration child branch studies, to ascertain the current provision of clinical skills teaching. The findings conclude that very few institutions have invested in specific skills laboratories to teach children's nursing students. It was also identified that a wide range of clinical skills are taught to child branch students; however, the resources and realism to clinical practice is limited by the lack of specialist children's skills laboratories or equipment. In conclusion the authors recommend the development of child specific skills laboratories, to augment child branch skills teaching, in order to enhance the realistic simulation of clinical practice.

  12. One nurse informatics specialist views the future: technology in the crystal ball.

    PubMed

    Parker, Pamela J

    2005-01-01

    Nursing is a low-technology field moving into high technology. Understanding that technology of the future is a tool to improve patient care will help caregivers embrace this change. With nurse leaders at the table as systems are planned we can ensure that care survives.

  13. Peri-implantitis in a specialist clinic of periodontology. Clinical features and risk indicators.

    PubMed

    Carcuac, Olivier; Jansson, Leif

    2010-01-01

    Implant therapy has become a widely recognized treatment alternative for replacing missing teeth. Several long term follow-up studies have shown that the survival rate is high. However, complications may appear and risk indcators associated with early and late failures have been identified. The purpose of the present retrospective clinical study was to describe some clinical features of patients with clinical signs of peri-implantitis and to identify risk indicators of peri-implantitis in a population at a specialist clinic of Periodontology. In total,the material consisted of 377 implants in 111 patients with the diagnosis peri-implantitis. The mean age at the examination was found to be 56.3 years (range 22-83) for females and 64.1 years (range 27-85) for males. The mean number of remaining teeth was found to be 10.5 (S.D. 8.89) and the mean number of implants was 5.85 (S.D. 3.42). For a majority of the subjects, more than 50% of the remaining teeth had a marginal bone loss of more than 1/3 of the root length. Forty-sex percent of the patients visited regularly dental hygienists for supportive treatment. The percentage of implants with peri-implantitis was significantly increased for smokers compared to non-smokers (p = 0.04). In the group of non-smokers, 64% of the implants had the diagnosis peri-implantitis, while the corresponding relative frequency for smokers was 78%. A majority of the individuals had a Plaque index and Bleeding on probing index >50%. The median of the follow-up time after implant placement was 7.4 years and the observation period was not significantly correlated to the degree of bone loss around the implants. Among the subjects with a mean bone loss >6 mm at implants with peri-implantitis, more than 70% had a mean marginal bone loss > 1/3 of the root length of the remaining teeth. A positive and significant correlation was found between the degree of marginal bone loss in remaining teeth and the degree of bone loss around implants with peri

  14. DOES MORE SPECIALIST PHARMACIST TIME IN A CLINICAL AREA EQUAL MORE ACTIVITY?

    PubMed

    Isaac, Rhian; Gerrard, Astrid; Bazaz, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Following a medication safety initiative proposed by the PICU Safety Strategy group a pilot was set up to extend the presence of a PICU trained pharmacist in the clinical area.One of the main safety initiatives was to assess whether increased pharmacist exposure decreased drug omission of time critical medicines, which was highlighted from incident reporting patterns on PICU. To assess what impact extending a pharmacist with specific PICU training would have on the medicines management of the PICU patients. The pilot involved attendance on the afternoon ward round, review of all new admissions and follow up of priority patients as highlighted by the "day" PICU pharmacists. The pilot "late" PICU pharmacist was resident in the hospital, on PICU, for an hour longer than the pharmacy opening hours. A rota ofA basic data collection form was set up on Microsoft Excel. Data collected included start and finish times of the ward round, time leaving PICU, clinical interventions made, queries by staff on PICU and outside of PICU, supplies made, drug omissions prevented, number of times the presence on the unit prevented need to call in the on call pharmacist and interpretation of drug assays reported after pharmacy hours. Follow up of specific medicines management issues highlighted by the "day" pharmacists as requiring action prior to following day pharmacy visit were recorded. During the 74 days data were collected there was 395 drug related queries by PICU staff (252 by nursing staff, 143 by prescribers). The "late" PICU pharmacist was contacted for advice regarding non-PICU patients by the on call or dispensary pharmacist on 7 occasions and 11 times from clinical staff outside of PICU.The "late" pharmacist intervened on 412 prescriptions, some of the interventions arose from the 260 follow up reviews requested by the "day" pharmacists. Of the 236 drug assays reported after pharmacy hours, 126 required intervention by pharmacist.Omission of time critical medicines was

  15. Exploring clinical wisdom in nursing education.

    PubMed

    McKie, Andrew; Baguley, Fiona; Guthrie, Caitrian; Jackson, Carol; Kirkpatrick, Pamela; Laing, Adele; O'Brien, Stephen; Taylor, Ruth; Wimpenny, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The recent interest in wisdom in professional health care practice is explored in this article. Key features of wisdom are identified via consideration of certain classical, ancient and modern sources. Common themes are discussed in terms of their contribution to 'clinical wisdom' itself and this is reviewed against the nature of contemporary nursing education. The distinctive features of wisdom (recognition of contextual factors, the place of the person and timeliness) may enable their significance for practice to be promoted in more coherent ways in nursing education. Wisdom as practical knowledge (phronesis) is offered as a complementary perspective within the educational preparation and practice of students of nursing. Certain limitations within contemporary UK nursing education are identified that may inhibit development of clinical wisdom. These are: the modularization of programmes in higher education institutions, the division of pastoral and academic support and the relationship between theory and practice.

  16. The uniqueness of elderly care: registered nurses' experience as preceptors during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Elisabeth; Bengtsson, Mariette

    2014-04-01

    The expected shortage of registered nurses with an advanced degree as specialists in geriatric care or gerontology is imminent. Previous studies report that clinical practice where student nurses are supervised by registered nurses has a direct impact on how students perceive nursing as a profession and future career choice. Considering the anticipated need for well-educated and specialised nurses it is therefore, relevant as well as necessary to describe clinical learning with a focus on preceptorship in geriatric nursing care. This paper is a report of a study describing registered nurses' experience of precepting undergraduate student nurses during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care. A qualitative design, based on seven focus group interviews, was employed with 30 registered nurses with preceptor experience from nursing homes and home-based care for the elderly. Our findings present three precepting strategies that are unique to elderly care: preparing students for end of life care, facilitating a respectful approach to the older person and promoting creativity and independent work. The findings are discussed using a socio-cultural perspective and illustrate how communities of elderly practice can be valuable learning environments. © 2013.

  17. Periodontal maintenance in a specialist periodontal clinic and in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Preshaw, Philip M; Heasman, Peter A

    2005-03-01

    To monitor the efficacy of periodontal maintenance whether conducted in a specialist periodontology clinic or in the practice of the referring general dentist. Thirty-five subjects with a diagnosis of moderate-severe chronic periodontitis who were referred to the specialist clinic received periodontal non-surgical therapy. Following a 6-month healing phase, subjects were randomly allocated to one of two groups: A (n=18, periodontal maintenance provided within the specialist clinic) or B (n=17, periodontal maintenance provided by the referring general dentist in accordance with written instructions provided by the specialist). All subjects were examined at months 0 (corresponding to 6 months post-completion of non-surgical therapy), 6 and 12. Full-mouth plaque index (PI), % bleeding on probing (%BOP) and probing depth (PD) measurements were recorded. PDs were also recorded at eight test sites which, prior to non-surgical therapy, exhibited PD 5-8 mm, BOP and radiographic alveolar bone loss. Standardized radiographs were exposed at test sites at months 0 and 12, and bone changes assessed using digital subtraction radiography (DSR). As a result of the non-surgical therapy, statistically significant improvements in all clinical parameters were recorded. In the maintenance period, mean PI increased significantly from months 0 to 12 (p<0.05), but this increase did not differ significantly between groups A and B (p>0.05). No other clinical parameters changed significantly in the maintenance phase of the study. Reductions in %BOP, mouth mean PD and mean test sites PD achieved by the non-surgical therapy were maintained and did not differ significantly whether subjects were allocated to group A or group B (p>0.05). Current smokers had significantly deeper PD than non-smokers and former smokers at all time points (p<0.05), although otherwise, smoking status did not affect the outcomes of the study. DSR analysis identified statistically non-significant, slight, alveolar bone

  18. PA30 Why specialist community public health nurses should work in end of life care.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Sandy

    2015-04-01

    Overview of roots of public health nursing in UK. Specialist Community Public Health Nurses, formerly known as Health Visitors, have been responding to key health priorities in the United Kingdom for the past 150 years. The profession emerged in response to the appalling poverty and high infant mortality rates which characterised nineteenth century Victorian slums, and transformed itself in the twentieth century to provide family welfare "from the cradle to the grave", including social and mental health. Acheson's 1998 definition of public health as "the organised application of resources to achieve the greatest health for the greatest number", dominated practice and preceded The New NHS: Modern and Dependable (1997) which put public health at the top of the agenda. The new approach meant crossing traditional boundaries and putting the 'community' at the centre of healthcare through empowerment. Throughout these changes, the underpinning principles have remained the same, including the search for health needs, stimulation of awareness of health needs, influence on policies affecting health and facilitation of health-enhancing activities. To learn from other public health professionals. Literature review. Specialist Community Public Health Nurses with an interest and experience in end of life care, can apply these same principles to the new public health approach to death and dying, searching for death and dying needs whilst stimulating an awareness. This would lead to exerting influence on policies affecting death and dying and facilitating health-enhancing activities. The public health approach is new to palliative and end of life care so it makes sense to learn from those professionals who have a long history of successfully responding, adapting to change, rising to contemporary challenges and harnessing opportunities. Understanding of how and when the public health agenda emerged. Other professionals have skills we need. © 2015, Published by the BMJ Publishing

  19. Reduction of client waiting time using task shifting in an anti-retroviral clinic at Specialist Hospital Bauchi, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Nisser Ali; Hajara, Moses John; Khalifa, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    Aiming to assess the impact of the intervention in reducing the patients' waiting time in the clinic, two surveys were conducted before and after task shifting intervention in an anti-retroviral (ARV) clinic at the Specialist Hospital, Bauchi, Nigeria in November 2008 and April 2009, respectively. Before the task shifting, six nurses from the clinic were trained on integrated management of adolescent and adult illness, as well as on the principle and guidelines for the anti-retroviral therapy, after which their schedule in the clinic was broadened to include seeing HIV patients presenting for routine refill and follow-up visits. In this study, fifty-six and sixty patients, respectively out of 186 and 202 who attended the clinic on the days of the pre- and post-intervention surveys, were randomly sampled. Data on patients' sex, age and marital status, whether patient a first timer or follow up visitor and the time spent in the clinic on that day as well as the number and composition of staff and equipment in the clinic was collected. The difference in waiting time spent between the first group before task shifting and second group after task shifting was statistically analyzed and significance tested using unpaired t-test. There was a reduction in the average waiting time for patients attending the clinic from 6.48 h before task shifting to 4.35 h after task shifting. The difference of mean was -2.13 h, with 95% CI: -2.44:-1.82 hours and the test of significance by unpaired t-test P<0.0001. PMID:28299042

  20. Reduction of client waiting time using task shifting in an anti-retroviral clinic at Specialist Hospital Bauchi, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Nisser Ali; Hajara, Moses John; Khalifa, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Aiming to assess the impact of the intervention in reducing the patients' waiting time in the clinic, two surveys were conducted before and after task shifting intervention in an anti-retroviral (ARV) clinic at the Specialist Hospital, Bauchi, Nigeria in November 2008 and April 2009, respectively. Before the task shifting, six nurses from the clinic were trained on integrated management of adolescent and adult illness, as well as on the principle and guidelines for the anti-retroviral therapy, after which their schedule in the clinic was broadened to include seeing HIV patients presenting for routine refill and follow-up visits. In this study, fifty-six and sixty patients, respectively out of 186 and 202 who attended the clinic on the days of the pre- and post-intervention surveys, were randomly sampled. Data on patients' sex, age and marital status, whether patient a first timer or follow up visitor and the time spent in the clinic on that day as well as the number and composition of staff and equipment in the clinic was collected. The difference in waiting time spent between the first group before task shifting and second group after task shifting was statistically analyzed and significance tested using unpaired t-test. There was a reduction in the average waiting time for patients attending the clinic from 6.48 h before task shifting to 4.35 h after task shifting. The difference of mean was −2.13 h, with 95% CI: −2.44:−1.82 hours and the test of significance by unpaired t-test P<0.0001. PMID:28299044

  1. Evaluation of outreach clinics held by specialists in general practice in England

    PubMed Central

    Bond, M.; Bowling, A.; Abery, A.; McClay, M.; Dickinson, E.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To measure the processes of care, health benefits and costs of outreach clinics held by hospital specialists in primary care settings.
DESIGN—The study was designed as a case-referent (comparative) study in which the features of 19 outreach clinics (cases) were compared with matched outpatient clinics (controls). The measuring instruments were self administered questionnaires. Patients were followed up at six months to reassess health status. The specialties included in the study were cardiology, ENT, general medicine, general surgery, gynaecology and rheumatology.
SETTING—Specialist outreach clinics in general practice in England, with matched outpatient clinic controls.
SUBJECTS—Consecutive patient attenders in the outreach and outpatient clinics, their specialists, the outreach patients' general practitioners, practice managers and trust accountants. Patients' response rate at baseline: 78% (1420).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Patient satisfaction, doctors' attitudes, processes and health outcomes, costs.
RESULTS—Outreach patients were more satisfied with the processes of their care than outpatients, their access to specialist care was better than that for outpatients and they were more likely to be discharged. Doctors reported that the main advantages of the outreach clinic were improved patient access to specialists and convenience for patients, in comparison with outpatients, and most GPs and specialists felt the outreach clinic was "worthwhile". At six month follow up, the health status of the outreach sample had significantly improved more than that of the outpatients on all eight sub-scales of the HSQ-12, but this was probably because of their better starting point at baseline. The impact of outreach on health outcomes was small. The NHS costs of outreach were significantly higher than outpatients. An increase in outreach clinic size would reduce cost per patient, but would lead to the loss of most of the clinics' benefits

  2. Translating research findings to clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kate; Fry, Margaret; Shaban, Ramon Z; Considine, Julie

    2017-03-01

    To describe the importance of, and methods for, successfully conducting and translating research into clinical practice. There is universal acknowledgement that the clinical care provided to individuals should be informed on the best available evidence. Knowledge and evidence derived from robust scholarly methods should drive our clinical practice, decisions and change to improve the way we deliver care. Translating research evidence to clinical practice is essential to safe, transparent, effective and efficient healthcare provision and meeting the expectations of patients, families and society. Despite its importance, translating research into clinical practice is challenging. There are more nurses in the frontline of health care than any other healthcare profession. As such, nurse-led research is increasingly recognised as a critical pathway to practical and effective ways of improving patient outcomes. However, there are well-established barriers to the conduct and translation of research evidence into practice. This clinical practice discussion paper interprets the knowledge translation literature for clinicians interested in translating research into practice. This paper is informed by the scientific literature around knowledge translation, implementation science and clinician behaviour change, and presented from the nurse clinician perspective. We provide practical, evidence-informed suggestions to overcome the barriers and facilitate enablers of knowledge translation. Examples of nurse-led research incorporating the principles of knowledge translation in their study design that have resulted in improvements in patient outcomes are presented in conjunction with supporting evidence. Translation should be considered in research design, including the end users and an evaluation of the research implementation. The success of research implementation in health care is dependent on clinician/consumer behaviour change and it is critical that implementation strategy

  3. Cost analysis of Periodontitis management in public sector specialist dental clinics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this paper is to quantify the cost of periodontitis management at public sector specialist periodontal clinic settings and analyse the distribution of cost components. Methods Five specialist periodontal clinics in the Ministry of Health represented the public sector in providing clinical and cost data for this study. Newly-diagnosed periodontitis patients (N = 165) were recruited and followed up for one year of specialist periodontal care. Direct and indirect costs from the societal viewpoint were included in the cost analysis. They were measured in 2012 Ringgit Malaysia (MYR) and estimated from the societal perspective using activity-based and step-down costing methods, and substantiated by clinical pathways. Cost of dental equipment, consumables and labour (average treatment time) for each procedure was measured using activity-based costing method. Meanwhile, unit cost calculations for clinic administration, utilities and maintenance used step-down approach. Patient expenditures and absence from work were recorded via diary entries. The conversion from MYR to Euro was based on the 2012 rate (1€ = MYR4). Results A total of 2900 procedures were provided, with an average cost of MYR 2820 (€705) per patient for the study year, and MYR 376 (€94) per outpatient visit. Out of this, 90% was contributed by provider cost and 10% by patient cost; 94% for direct cost and 4% for lost productivity. Treatment of aggressive periodontitis was significantly higher than for chronic periodontitis (t-test, P = 0.003). Higher costs were expended as disease severity increased (ANOVA, P = 0.022) and for patients requiring surgeries (ANOVA, P < 0.001). Providers generally spent most on consumables while patients spent most on transportation. Conclusions Cost of providing dental treatment for periodontitis patients at public sector specialist settings were substantial and comparable with some non-communicable diseases. These findings

  4. Cost analysis of periodontitis management in public sector specialist dental clinics.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Dom, Tuti; Ayob, Rasidah; Mohd-Nur, Amrizal; Abdul-Manaf, Mohd R; Ishak, Noorlin; Abdul-Muttalib, Khairiyah; Aljunid, Syed M; Ahmad-Yaziz, Yuhaniz; Abdul-Aziz, Hanizah; Kasan, Noordin; Mohd-Asari, Ahmad S

    2014-05-20

    The objective of this paper is to quantify the cost of periodontitis management at public sector specialist periodontal clinic settings and analyse the distribution of cost components. Five specialist periodontal clinics in the Ministry of Health represented the public sector in providing clinical and cost data for this study. Newly-diagnosed periodontitis patients (N = 165) were recruited and followed up for one year of specialist periodontal care. Direct and indirect costs from the societal viewpoint were included in the cost analysis. They were measured in 2012 Ringgit Malaysia (MYR) and estimated from the societal perspective using activity-based and step-down costing methods, and substantiated by clinical pathways. Cost of dental equipment, consumables and labour (average treatment time) for each procedure was measured using activity-based costing method. Meanwhile, unit cost calculations for clinic administration, utilities and maintenance used step-down approach. Patient expenditures and absence from work were recorded via diary entries. The conversion from MYR to Euro was based on the 2012 rate (1€ = MYR4). A total of 2900 procedures were provided, with an average cost of MYR 2820 (€705) per patient for the study year, and MYR 376 (€94) per outpatient visit. Out of this, 90% was contributed by provider cost and 10% by patient cost; 94% for direct cost and 4% for lost productivity. Treatment of aggressive periodontitis was significantly higher than for chronic periodontitis (t-test, P = 0.003). Higher costs were expended as disease severity increased (ANOVA, P = 0.022) and for patients requiring surgeries (ANOVA, P < 0.001). Providers generally spent most on consumables while patients spent most on transportation. Cost of providing dental treatment for periodontitis patients at public sector specialist settings were substantial and comparable with some non-communicable diseases. These findings provide basis for identifying potential

  5. Clinical management of DIC: early nursing interventions.

    PubMed

    Epstein, C; Bakanauskas, A

    1991-01-01

    Achievement of successful patient outcomes depends on the availability of a primary nurse responsible for all aspects of nursing care. A consistent caregiver not only has a grasp of phenomena at hand but possesses an overall perspective of recovery. Care can be evaluated and readjusted on a timely basis. Identification of signs of progress as well as deterioration may be facilitated through continuity of care. The primary nurse can provide meaningful, ongoing information to the patient and significant others as a means of optimizing their coping behaviors. Effective nursing care of the patient with DIC is enhanced by a thorough understanding of its pathophysiology and its clinical manifestations. When the critical care nurse has a comprehensive knowledge base and uses purposeful assessment skills, potential complications become much clearer and are avoided. The primary nurse who knows how to prioritize care is capable of anticipating the patient's needs. By integrating theory with practice, the critical care nurse functions from a position of strength in promoting quality patient care.

  6. The training of specialists in Family and Community Health Nursing according to the supervisors of the teaching units.

    PubMed

    Oltra-Rodríguez, Enrique; Martínez-Riera, José Ramón; Mármol-López, María Isabel; Pastor-Gallardo, Francisco Javier; Gras-Nieto, Elvira; Holgado-Fernández, Ana

    To analyze the current situation of the training of specialists in family and community nursing from the perspective of nurses responsible for teaching units. Exploratory analysis using nominal group technique of the contributions made by representatives of 19 multidisciplinary teaching units in family and community care from 11 Spanish autonomous communities. They categorized and weighted those contributions. The emerging categories on the strengths and difficulties encountered related to the tutors, the environment where the training took place, the structure of the teaching unit, the organization of the teaching and the official programme of the speciality, the external supports and the theoretical training. Training in Family and Community Nursing is an opportunity to improve primary health care to train in news and necessary but complex skills. Support is required for training to be effective and the specialty and training should be made known. Tutors are a key part of this process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Clinical Teaching Associate Model on Nursing Students' Clinical Skills and Nurses' Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Rahnavard, Zahra; Eybpoosh, Sana; Alianmoghaddam, Narges

    2013-10-02

    Abstract Background and Objectives: The credit of the practice nurses in developing countries, due to gap between theory and practice in nursing education and health care delivery has been questioned by nursing professionals. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of the application of the CTA model in nursing students' clinical skills and to assess the participants' (faculty members, staff nurses, and nursing students) level of satisfaction with the CTA model and with achieving the educational goals in Iran, as a developing country. Methods and Materials: In this experimental study, random sampling was used to assess 104 nursing students' clinical skills, and assess 6 faculty members and 6 staff nurses. After obtaining informed consent, the level of satisfaction was evaluated by a questionnaire and clinical skills were evaluated by standard checklists. Data were assessed and analyzed with SPSS version 15. Results: The results showed that the mean scores of all clinical skills of the students were significantly higher after intervention (p<0.01). Moreover, the mean scores of instructors' satisfaction with applying the CTA model was significantly higher (p = 0.004), but their satisfaction with achieving clinical education outcomes did not show a significant difference (p = 0.109). Similarly, students' satisfaction with achieving educational outcomes did not show any significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.058). Conclusion: According to this study, the CTA model is an effective method for developing clinical skills in nursing students in Iran as a developing country. Therefore, application of the method is recommended in clinical nursing education systems of such counties.

  8. Nursing students' viewpoints toward two methods of clinical conference and clinical nursing round.

    PubMed

    Gheidanzadeh, Maryam; Baghersad, Zahra; Abazari, Parvaneh

    2017-01-01

    Clinical education provides a chance to combine theoretical knowledge and clinical skills. Students are the key elements in the evaluation of clinical education efficacy. The present study was aimed to define nursing students' viewpoints concerning conformity to the characteristics of clinical conference and clinical round. This descriptive analytical study was conducted on the bachelor's students of the 4(th)-6(th) semester of nursing. Sampling was conducted using census sampling method during the 2(nd) semester of 2014-2015 school year. Data collection tool was a three-section researcher-made questionnaire containing demographic, nursing round, and clinical conference characteristics. Descriptive and inferential statistical tests (independent t-test, ANOVA, and Spearman and Pearson correlation coefficients) were used for data analysis. Participants were 134 bachelor's students of the 4(th)-6(th) semester of nursing. According to half of the participants, conformity to the characteristics of clinical conference (45.5%, 53%) and clinical round (44%, 51.5%) were poor and medium, respectively. Paired t-test showed a significant difference between students' viewpoints toward the planning of clinical conference and clinical nursing round (P = 0.006, t = 2.77). According to the results of the present study on students' viewpoints, clinical education faces a serious challenge with regard to clinical education methods. Considering the necessity and importance of clinical education, more investigation should be conducted to detect its relevant factors and plan for its improvement.

  9. [Clinical processes in a high resolution clinic of specialist outpatient clinics].

    PubMed

    Zambrana-García, J L; Torres-Jiménez, M; Rubio-Sánchez, J M; Montijano-Cabrera, A; Peña-Ojeda, J A; Velasco-Malagón, M J

    The high resolution clinic (HRC) is an outpatient care process by which treatment and diagnosis are established, recorded, and completed in a single day. The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which patients with medical conditions may benefit from a single consultation system. A descriptive study of 795 first visit events, randomly selected as high-resolution consultations in cardiology, gastroenterology, internal medicine, and chest diseases. A discussion is presented on the percentage of patients who benefited from HRC and the complementary tests performed. A total of 559 (70%, 95% CI: 67-73%) of all first visits became HRCs, and 483 (61%, 95% CI: 57%-64%) required a diagnostic test that was reviewed on the same day. There were differences between medical consultations (86% in cardiology versus 44% in gastroenterology consultations, P<.001). Performing a test on the same day significantly increased the percentage of HRCs (49 versus 22%, P<.001). Ischaemic heart disease, dyspepsia, headache, and asthma were the conditions most commonly leading to HRC. The most common tests were cranial tomography, blood analysis, and ultrasound. Medical consultations may largely benefit from an HRC system, only requiring some organisational changes and no additional costs. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigating the productivity model for clinical nurses.

    PubMed

    Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Hooshmand Bahabadi, Abbas; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2014-01-01

    One of the main objectives of quantitative researches is assessment of models developed by qualitative studies. Models validation through their testing implies that the designed model is representative of the existed facts. Hence, this study was conducted to assess the clinical nurses' productivity model presented for Iranian nurses' productivity. The sample of the study consisted of 360 nurses of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The research tool was a questionnaire for measuring the components of clinical nurses' productivity. After completing all steps of instrument psychometric and getting answers from the participants, the factors introduced in the questionnaire were named and then Lisrel Path Analysis tests were performed to analyze the components of the model. The results of the model test revealed there is an internal relationship among different components of the model. Regression Analysis showed that each increasing unit in components of the model was to be added to central variable of productivity model -human resource. Model components altogether explained 20 % of clinical nurses' productivity variance. This study found that the important component of productivity is human resources that are reciprocally related to other components of the model. Therefore, it can be stated that the managers can promote the productivity by using efficient strategies to correct human resource patterns.

  11. Recognizing and defining clinical nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Stanley, David

    This article addresses the issue of clinical leadership and how it is defined. The concepts and definitions of clinical leadership are considered as well as the results of new research that suggests that clinical leaders can be seen as experts in their field, and because they are approachable and are effective communicators, are empowered to act as a role model, motivating others by matching their values and beliefs about nursing and care to their practice. This is supported by a new leadership theory, congruent leadership, proposed as the most appropriate leadership theory to support an understanding of clinical leadership. Congruent leaders (clinical nurse leaders) are followed because there is a match between the leader's values and beliefs and their actions.

  12. Clinical characteristics of patients with epilepsy in a specialist neuropsychiatry service.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adam; Seri, Stefano; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-05-01

    Neuropsychiatry services provide specialist input into the assessment and management of behavioral symptoms associated with a range of neurological conditions, including epilepsy. Despite the centrality of epilepsy to neuropsychiatry and the recent expansion of neuropsychiatry service provision, little is known about the clinical characteristics of patients with epilepsy who are routinely seen by a specialist neuropsychiatry service. This retrospective study filled this gap by retrospectively evaluating a naturalistic series of 60 consecutive patients with epilepsy referred to and assessed within a neuropsychiatry setting. Fifty-two patients (86.7%) had active epilepsy and were under the ongoing care of the referring neurologist for seizure management. The majority of patients (N=42; 70.0%) had a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy, with temporal lobe epilepsy as the most common epilepsy type (N=37; 61.7%). Following clinical assessment, 39 patients (65.0%) fulfilled formal diagnostic criteria for at least one psychiatric disorder; nonepileptic attack disorder (N=37; 61.7%), major depression (N=23; 38.3%), and generalized anxiety disorder (N=16; 26.7%) were the most commonly diagnosed comorbidities. The clinical characteristics of patients seen in specialist neuropsychiatry settings are in line with the results from previous studies in neurology clinics in terms of both epilepsy and psychiatric comorbidity. Our findings confirm the need for the development and implementation of structured care pathways for the neuropsychiatric aspects of epilepsy, with focus on comorbid nonepileptic attacks and affective and anxiety symptoms. This is of particular importance in consideration of the impact of behavioral symptoms on patients' health-related quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Engaging Clinical Nurses in Quality Improvement Projects.

    PubMed

    Moore, Susan; Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2015-10-01

    Clinical nurses have the knowledge and expertise required to provide efficient and proficient patient care. Time and knowledge deficits can prevent nurses from developing and implementing quality improvement or evidence-based practice projects. This article reviews a process for professional development of clinical nurses that helped them to define, implement, and analyze quality improvement or evidence-based practice projects. The purpose of this project was to educate advanced clinical nurses to manage a change project from inception to completion, using the Six Sigma DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) Change Acceleration Process as a framework. One-to-one mentoring and didactic in-services advanced the knowledge, appreciation, and practice of advanced practice clinicians who completed multiple change projects. The projects facilitated clinical practice changes, with improved patient outcomes; a unit cultural shift, with appreciation of quality improvement and evidence-based projects; and engagement with colleagues. Project outcomes were displayed in poster presentations at a hospital exposition for knowledge dissemination. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Clinical update on nursing home medicine: 2012.

    PubMed

    Messinger-Rapport, Barbara J; Cruz-Oliver, Dulce M; Thomas, David R; Morley, John E

    2012-09-01

    This article is the sixth in the series of clinical updates on nursing home care. The topics covered are management of hypertension, antidepressant medications in people with dementia, peripheral arterial disease, probiotics in prevention, and treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, frailty, and falls.

  15. Work Load Issues in Clinical Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Pamela; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 22 nurse education programs found that 70% allocate less than 1 teaching credit hour to 1 clinical contact hour; 50% of programs had 10 or more students in classes, despite the fact that faculty were concerned about learning and supervision in courses with more than 8 students. (SK)

  16. The good clinical nursing educator and the baccalaureate nursing clinical experience: attributes and praxis.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Karla J; Stenvig, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    Clinical education accounts for a significant portion of baccalaureate nursing (BSN) education. This study examined recent BSN program graduates' views about clinical nursing educator attributes that enhance the ability of the graduates to provide safe, effective patient care. In this descriptive study, 6 participants were interviewed using grounded theory techniques. The study framework blended the elements of cognitive field theory, the humanistic philosophy of teaching and learning, the gestalt theory of learning, and Hergenhahn's behavioral change model. Participants identified three attributes of a good clinical nursing educator: knowledge, interpersonal presentation, and teaching strategies. Analysis revealed that educator attributes and phases of the clinical experience process together form the foundation for clinical experience praxis. Educators can improve the clinical education experience by developing teaching strategies and evaluation tools that build on the positive attributes and phases of the clinical experience identified in this study.

  17. Impact of managed clinical networks on NHS specialist neonatal services in England: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Gale, C; Santhakumaran, S; Nagarajan, S; Statnikov, Y

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of reorganisation of neonatal specialist care services in England after a UK Department of Health report in 2003. Design A population-wide observational comparison of outcomes over two epochs, before and after the establishment of managed clinical neonatal networks. Setting Epoch one: 294 maternity and neonatal units in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, 1 September 1998 to 31 August 2000, as reported by the Confidential Enquiry into Stillbirths and Sudden Deaths in Infancy Project 27/28. Epoch two: 146 neonatal units in England contributing data to the National Neonatal Research Database at the Neonatal Data Analysis Unit, 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010. Participants Babies born at a gestational age of 27+0-28+6 (weeks+days): 3522 live births in epoch one; 2919 babies admitted to a neonatal unit within 28 days of birth in epoch two. Intervention The national reorganisation of neonatal services into managed clinical networks. Main outcome measures The proportion of babies born at hospitals providing the highest volume of neonatal specialist care (≥2000 neonatal intensive care days annually), having an acute transfer (within the first 24 hours after birth) and/or a late transfer (between 24 hours and 28 days after birth) to another hospital, assessed by change in distribution of transfer category (“none,” “acute,” “late”), and babies from multiple births separated by transfer. For acute transfers in epoch two, the level of specialist neonatal care provided at the destination hospital (British Association of Perinatal Medicine criteria). Results After reorganisation, there were increases in the proportions of babies born at 27-28 weeks’ gestation in hospitals providing the highest volume of neonatal specialist care (18% (631/3495) v 49% (1325/2724); odds ratio 4.30, 95% confidence interval 3.83 to 4.82; P<0.001) and in acute and late postnatal transfers (7% (235) v 12% (360) and 18% (579) v 22% (640), respectively

  18. Information-seeking behavior of nursing students and clinical nurses: implications for health sciences librarians*

    PubMed Central

    Dee, Cheryl; Stanley, Ellen E.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This research was conducted to provide new insights on clinical nurses' and nursing students' current use of health resources and libraries and deterrents to their retrieval of electronic clinical information, exploring implications from these findings for health sciences librarians. Methods: Questionnaires, interviews, and observations were used to collect data from twenty-five nursing students and twenty-five clinical nurses. Results: Nursing students and clinical nurses were most likely to rely on colleagues and books for medical information, while other resources they frequently cited included personal digital assistants, electronic journals and books, and drug representatives. Significantly more nursing students than clinical nurses used online databases, including CINAHL and PubMed, to locate health information, and nursing students were more likely than clinical nurses to report performing a database search at least one to five times a week. Conclusions and Recommendations: Nursing students made more use of all available resources and were better trained than clinical nurses, but both groups lacked database-searching skills. Participants were eager for more patient care information, more database training, and better computer skills; therefore, health sciences librarians have the opportunity to meet the nurses' information needs and improve nurses' clinical information-seeking behavior. PMID:15858624

  19. Studies on nursing risks and measures of clinical medication.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Bai, Jie; Huang, Jie

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the cause analysis of clinical medication nursing risks and propose relevant nursing measures, so as to control and reduce the clinical nursing risks and reach the physical and mental safety of patients and nurses. Clinical nursing risk events with 30 cases in TCM Hospital of Zhengzhou City from June 2010 to April 2012 were underwent statistical analyses. The risk of medication error ranked the first in the direct reasons of nursing risks, accounting for a higher ratio. Moreover, the reasons of nursing risks were also involved in nonstandard operation, disease observation and other relative factors. Nurses must fully understand the relative factors of medication nursing risks, regarding the patients as their own family and always permeating the consciousness of nursing risks into the working process.

  20. Science without meritocracy. Discrimination among European specialists in infectious diseases and clinical microbiology: a questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Tacconelli, Evelina; Poljak, Mario; Cacace, Marina; Caiati, Giovanni; Benzonana, Nur; Nagy, Elisabeth; Kortbeek, Titia

    2012-01-01

    Objective In 2009, in a European survey, around a quarter of Europeans reported witnessing discrimination or harassment at their workplace. The parity committee from the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) designed a questionnaire survey to investigate forms of discrimination with respect to country, gender and ethnicity among medical professionals in hospitals and universities carrying out activities in the clinical microbiology (CM) and infectious diseases (ID) fields. Design The survey consisted of 61 questions divided into five areas (sociodemographic, professional census and environment, leadership and generic) and ran anonymously for nearly 3 months on the ESCMID website. Subjects European specialists in CM/ID. Results Overall, we included 1274 professionals. The majority of respondents (68%) stated that discrimination is present in medical science. A quarter of them reported personal experience with discrimination, mainly associated with gender and geographic region. Specialists from South-Western Europe experienced events at a much higher rate (37%) than other European regions. The proportion of women among full professor was on average 46% in CM and 26% in ID. Participation in high-level decision-making committees was significantly (>10 percentage points) different by gender and geographic origin. Yearly gross salary among CM/ID professionals was significantly different among European countries and by gender, within the same country. More than one-third of respondents (38%) stated that international societies in CM/ID have an imbalance as for committee member distribution and speakers at international conferences. Conclusions A quarter of CM/ID specialists experienced career and research discrimination in European hospitals and universities, mainly related to gender and geographic origin. Implementing proactive policies to tackle discrimination and improve representativeness and balance in career among CM

  1. Clinical nurse research consultant: a clinical and academic role to advance practice and the discipline of nursing.

    PubMed

    Currey, Judy; Considine, Julie; Khaw, Damien

    2011-10-01

    This article presents a proposal for the Clinical Nurse Research Consultant, a new nursing role. Although healthcare delivery continues to evolve, nursing has lacked highly specialized clinical and research leadership that, as a primary responsibility, drives evidence-based practice change in collaboration with bedside clinicians. International literature published over the last 25 years in the databases of CINAHL, OVID, Medline Pubmed, Science Direct, Expanded Academic, ESBSCOhost, Scopus and Proquest is cited to create a case for the Clinical Nurse Research Consultant. The Clinical Nurse Research Consultant will address the research/practice gap and assist in facilitating evidence-based clinical practice. To fulfil the responsibilities of this proposed role, the Clinical Nurse Research Consultant must be a doctorally prepared recognized clinical expert, have educational expertise, and possess advanced interpersonal, teamwork and communication skills. This role will enable clinical nurses to maintain and share their clinical expertise, advance practice through research and role model the clinical/research nexus. Critically, the Clinical Nurse Research Consultant must be appointed in a clinical and academic partnership to provide for career progression and role support. The creation of the Clinical Nurse Research Consultant will advance nursing practice and the discipline of nursing. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Improving neuro-oncological patients care: basic and practical concepts for nurse specialist in neuro-rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Bartolo, Michelangelo; Zucchella, Chiara; Pace, Andrea; De Nunzio, Alessandro Marco; Serrao, Mariano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Pierelli, Francesco

    2012-10-02

    Neuro-oncological population well expresses the complexity of neurological disability due to the multiple neurological deficits that affect these patients. Moreover, due to the therapeutical opportunities survival times for patients with brain tumor have increased and more of these patients require rehabilitation care. The figure of nurse in the interdisciplinary specialty of neurorehabilitation is not clearly defined, even if their role in this setting is recognized as being critical and is expanding.The purpose of the study is to identify the standard competencies for neurorehabilitation nurses that could be taught by means of a specialization course. A literature review was conducted with preference given to works published between January 2000 and December 2008 in English. The search strategy identified 523 non-duplicated references of which 271 titles were considered relevant. After reviewing the abstracts, 147 papers were selected and made available to a group of healthcare professionals who were requested to classify them in few conceptual main areas defining the relative topics. The following five main areas were identified: clinical aspects of nursing; nursing techniques; nursing methodology; relational and organisational models; legal aspects of nursing. The relative topics were included within each area. As educational method a structured course based on lectures and practical sessions was designed. Also multi-choices questions were developed in order to evaluate the participants' level of knowledge, while a semi-structured interview was prepared to investigate students' satisfaction. Literature shows that the development of rehabilitation depends on the improvement of scientific and practical knowledge of health care professionals. This structured training course could be incorporated into undergraduate nursing education programmes and also be inserted into continuing education programmes for graduate nurses. Developing expertise in neuro

  3. Improving neuro-oncological patients care: basic and practical concepts for nurse specialist in neuro-rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuro-oncological population well expresses the complexity of neurological disability due to the multiple neurological deficits that affect these patients. Moreover, due to the therapeutical opportunities survival times for patients with brain tumor have increased and more of these patients require rehabilitation care. The figure of nurse in the interdisciplinary specialty of neurorehabilitation is not clearly defined, even if their role in this setting is recognized as being critical and is expanding. The purpose of the study is to identify the standard competencies for neurorehabilitation nurses that could be taught by means of a specialization course. Methods A literature review was conducted with preference given to works published between January 2000 and December 2008 in English. The search strategy identified 523 non-duplicated references of which 271 titles were considered relevant. After reviewing the abstracts, 147 papers were selected and made available to a group of healthcare professionals who were requested to classify them in few conceptual main areas defining the relative topics. Results The following five main areas were identified: clinical aspects of nursing; nursing techniques; nursing methodology; relational and organisational models; legal aspects of nursing. The relative topics were included within each area. As educational method a structured course based on lectures and practical sessions was designed. Also multi-choices questions were developed in order to evaluate the participants’ level of knowledge, while a semi-structured interview was prepared to investigate students’ satisfaction. Conclusions Literature shows that the development of rehabilitation depends on the improvement of scientific and practical knowledge of health care professionals. This structured training course could be incorporated into undergraduate nursing education programmes and also be inserted into continuing education programmes for graduate nurses

  4. Nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Ella; Tabak, Nili

    2012-12-01

    Using Ajzen and Madden's Theory of Planned Behavior, this study investigates factors which influence nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines in their daily ward work. A convenience sample of 91 nurses in internal medicine wards in three Israeli hospitals answered four questionnaires. Data were processed by Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate regression. The main findings were that burnout was negatively correlated with the intention to work according to guidelines and that professionalism (in the sense of a tendency to follow taught procedure rather than personal judgment) was positively correlated with it. Furthermore, nurses who perceive their behavioral control and subjective norms to be positive will be the most determined to work according to guidelines, provided they personally command the necessary resources to do so.

  5. Clinical Nursing Records Study (Executive Summary)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    assessments received praise for those records completed during testing, issues surrounding identification and prioritizing nursing care problems and...of inpatient treatment and the patient’s responses. Nursing documentation reflects nursing practice patterns based on planned nursing care , which, in...Nursing History/Nursing Assessment/ Nursing Care Plans); the necessity of transcribing all orders appearing on physician order sheets to allow for

  6. Second Year Associate Degree Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty Attitudes towards Clinical Educational Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFauci, Frances F.

    2009-01-01

    Professional registered nursing is an essential part of the health care system and student nurses need experimental learning with actual patients to learn to practice as a nurse. The health care system has changed dramatically and nursing schools have decreasing access to the health care agencies. The clinical educational experience develops…

  7. Second Year Associate Degree Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty Attitudes towards Clinical Educational Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFauci, Frances F.

    2009-01-01

    Professional registered nursing is an essential part of the health care system and student nurses need experimental learning with actual patients to learn to practice as a nurse. The health care system has changed dramatically and nursing schools have decreasing access to the health care agencies. The clinical educational experience develops…

  8. Nursing home care: part II. Clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Unwin, Brian K; Porvaznik, Mary; Spoelhof, Gerard David

    2010-05-15

    Understanding the distinctions between the management of clinical problems in nursing homes compared with the community setting helps improve the overall care of nursing home residents. Liberalizing diets helps avoid unintentional weight loss in nursing home residents, although the use of feeding tubes usually does not improve nutrition or decrease aspiration risk. Medical assessment, treatment of comorbidities, and appropriate use of rehabilitation therapies minimize the frequency of falls. Toileting programs may be used to treat incontinence and retention in cooperative patients. Adverse effects and drug interactions should be considered when initiating pharmacologic treatment of overactive bladder. Urinary tract infection and pneumonia are the most common bacterial infections in nursing home residents. Signs and symptoms of infection include fever or hypothermia, and functional decline. Virus identification is recommended for influenza-like illnesses. Nonpharmacologic behavioral management strategies are the preferred treatment for dementia-related problem behaviors. The Beers criteria, which outline potentially inappropriate medication use in older persons, provide guidance for medication use in the nursing home.

  9. Clinical Nursing Faculty Competence Inventory - development and psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaojing; Zhu, Dan; Zheng, Minhua

    2011-05-01

    This paper is a report of the development and psychometric testing of the Clinical Nursing Faculty Competence Inventory. Clinical faculty plays a vital role in nursing education. Highly competent clinical faculty is a prerequisite for graduating competent future nurses. Many studies have examined the effectiveness of clinical nursing teaching. Yet, translating this body of knowledge into accurate and comprehensive assessment tools for measuring the competence of nursing faculty remains a challenge. Thirty-one indicators of core competence of clinical nursing faculty were identified thorough literature review, expert consultation and a small sample pilot test. A total of 237 nursing faculty members, students and administrators from six advanced medical colleges in China were surveyed during 2007-2008. Using a five-point Likert-type scale, the respondents identified their level of agreement with statements addressing the components of clinical nursing faculty competence. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine the factor structure of the inventory. Students and faculty members valued aspects of clinical nursing faculty competence differently. Exploratory factor analysis using varimax rotation determined construct validity of the inventory and 26 items were retained. Five important categories of clinical nursing faculty competence were revealed: leadership ability, problem solving ability, educational intelligence, general teaching ability and clinical nursing skills. The Cronbach's alpha level of the inventory was 0·91, with each domain ranging from 0·61 to 0·85. The inventory has good psychometric properties and can be used in training and evaluation of clinical nursing faculty. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. An overview of the outcomes and impact of specialist and advanced nursing and midwifery practice, on quality of care, cost and access to services: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Casey, Mary; O'Connor, Laserina; Cashin, Andrew; Smith, Rita; O'Brien, Denise; Nicholson, Emma; O'Leary, Denise; Fealy, Gerard; McNamara, Martin; Glasgow, Mary Ellen; Stokes, Diarmuid; Egan, Claire

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a systematic rapid review and narrative synthesis of the literature of the outcomes and impact of specialist and advanced nursing and midwifery practice regarding quality of care, cost and access to services. A rapid review was undertaken of the relevant national and international literature, regulatory and policy documents relating to the establishment and definition of nurses' and midwives' specialist and advanced practice roles. A search of the Cumulative Index to the Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed (MEDLINE) was undertaken from 2012 to 2015. The study also included primary data collection on the perceived impact of specialist and advanced practice nursing and midwifery roles and enablers and barriers to these roles using semi-structured interviews. These are not included in this paper. To facilitate a systematic approach to searching the literature, the PICO framework, was adapted. The database search yielded 437 articles relevant to the analysis of specialist and advanced practice in relation to quality care, cost and access to services with additional articles added in a manual review of reference lists. In the final review a total of 86 articles were included as they fulfilled the eligibility criteria. The evidence presented in the 86 articles indicates that nursing and midwifery practitioners continue to be under-utilised despite the evidence that greater reliance on advanced nurse practitioners could improve accessibility of primary care services while also saving on cost. Results point to continued difficulties associated with accurate measurement of the impact of these roles on patient outcomes. This review demonstrates that there is a need for robust measurement of the impact of these roles on patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Strategies for Improving Nursing Students' Mental Health Clinical Rotation.

    PubMed

    Kroning, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Mental illness is a huge problem many people face in the U.S. and around the world. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association indicates there is a shortage of nurses in every level and role in psychiatric-mental health nursing. Raising up a generation of nurses who want to work with the mentally ill is a challenge for nurse educators. The use of role playing and simulation in the learning lab prior to entering the clinical setting and reflective journaling in the clinical rotation can improve undergraduate nursing students' mental health clinical experience.

  12. Clinical librarians as facilitators of nurses' evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Sylvia; Wallmyr, Gudrun

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nurses' and ward-based clinical librarians' reflections on ward-based clinical librarians as facilitators for nurses' use of evidences-based practice. Nurses' use of evidence-based practice is reported to be weak. Studies have suggested that clinical librarians may promote evidence-based practice. To date, little is known about clinical librarians participating nurses in the wards. A descriptive, qualitative design was adopted for the study. In 2007, 16 nurses who had been attended by a clinical librarian in the wards were interviewed in focus groups. Two clinical librarians were interviewed by individual interviews. In the analysis, a content analysis was used. Three themes were generated from the interviews with nurses: 'The grip of everyday work', 'To articulate clinical nursing issues' and 'The clinical librarians at a catalyst'. The nurses experienced the grip of everyday work as a hindrance and had difficulties to articulate and formulate relevant nursing issues. In such a state, the nurses found the clinical librarian presence in the ward as enhancing the awareness of and the use of evidence-based practice. Three themes emerged from the analysis with the librarians. They felt as outsiders, had new knowledge and acquired a new role as ward-based clinical librarians. Facilitation is needed if nurses' evidence-based practice is going to increase. The combined use of nurses and clinical librarians' knowledge and skills can be optimised. To achieve this, nurses' skills in consuming and implementing evidence ought to be strengthened. The fusion of the information and knowledge management skill of the ward-based clinical librarian and the clinical expertise of the nurses can be of value. With such a collaborative model, nurse and ward-based clinical librarian might join forces to increase the use of evidence-based practice. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Taking kangaroo mother care forward in South Africa: The role of district clinical specialist teams.

    PubMed

    Feucht, Ute Dagmar; van Rooyen, Elise; Skhosana, Rinah; Bergh, Anne-Marie

    2015-11-20

    The global agenda for improved neonatal care includes the scale-up of kangaroo mother care (KMC) services. The establishment of district clinical specialist teams (DCSTs) in South Africa (SA) provides an excellent opportunity to enhance neonatal care at district level and ensure translation of policies, including the requirement for KMC implementation, into everyday clinical practice. Tshwane District in Gauteng Province, SA, has been experiencing an increasing strain on obstetric and neonatal services at central, tertiary and regional hospitals in recent years as a result of growing population numbers and rapid up-referral of patients, with limited down-referral of low-risk patients to district-level services. We describe a successful multidisciplinary quality improvement initiative under the leadership of the Tshwane DCST, in conjunction with experienced local KMC implementers, aimed at expanding the district's KMC services. The project subsequently served as a platform for improvement of other areas of neonatal care by means of a systematic approach.

  14. Relationships between critical thinking ability and nursing competence in clinical nurses.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mei Jen; Chang, Ying-Ju; Kuo, Shih-Hsien; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Chou, Fan-Hao

    2011-11-01

    To examine the relationships between critical thinking ability and nursing competence in clinical nurses. There are few evidance-based data related to the relationship between critical thinking ability and nursing competence of clinical nurses. A cross-sectional and correlation research design was used. A total of 570 clinical nurses at a medical centre in southern Taiwan were recruited into this study. Two self-report questionnaires, the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal (WGCTA) and the Nursing Competence Scale (NCS), were used to collect data. The critical thinking ability of clinical nurses was at the middle level. The highest score for the subscales of the WGCTA was 'interpretation ability' and the lowest was 'inference ability'. The nursing competence of clinical nurses was at the middle level and above. The highest score for the subscales was 'caring ability' and the lowest was 'research ability'. Critical thinking ability had a significantly positive correlation with nursing competence. Critical thinking, working years, educational levels and position/title were the significant predictors of nursing competence, accounting for 32·9% of the variance. Critical thinking ability had a significantly positive correlation with nursing competence. The critical thinking ability of clinical nurses with a master's degree was significantly better than those with a bachelor's degree or a diploma and nurses with over five working years was significantly better than those with under five years. The findings of this study can further serve as a reference for nursing education to improve nursing curricula and teaching strategies for nurse preparation. It could also be a guideline for nursing administration personnel in on-the-job training and orientation programs for nursing staff. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Examination of the teaching styles of nursing professional development specialists, part II: correlational study on teaching styles and use of adult learning theory.

    PubMed

    Curran, Mary K

    2014-08-01

    This article, the second in a two-part series, details a correlational study that examined the effects of four variables (graduate degrees in nursing education, professional development training in adult learning theory, nursing professional development [NPD] certification, and NPD specialist experience) on the use of adult learning theory to guide curriculum development. Using the Principles of Adult Learning Scale, 114 NPD specialists tested the hypothesis that NPD specialists with graduate degrees in nursing education, professional development training in adult learning theory, NPD certification, and NPD experience would use higher levels of adult learning theory in their teaching practices to guide curriculum development than those without these attributes. This hypothesis was rejected as regression analysis revealed only one statistically significant predictor variable, NPD certification, influenced the use of adult learning theory. In addition, analysis revealed NPD specialists tended to support a teacher-centered rather than a learner-centered teaching style, indicating NPD educators are not using adult learning theory to guide teaching practices and curriculum development.

  16. Examination of the Teaching Styles of Nursing Professional Development Specialists, Part II: Correlational Study on Teaching Styles and Use of Adult Learning Theory.

    PubMed

    Curran, Mary K

    2014-07-16

    This article, the second in a two-part series, details a correlational study that examined the effects of four variables (graduate degrees in nursing education, professional development training in adult learning theory, nursing professional development [NPD] certification, and NPD specialist experience) on the use of adult learning theory to guide curriculum development. Using the Principles of Adult Learning Scale, 114 NPD specialists tested the hypothesis that NPD specialists with graduate degrees in nursing education, professional development training in adult learning theory, NPD certification, and NPD experience would use higher levels of adult learning theory in their teaching practices to guide curriculum development than those without these attributes. This hypothesis was rejected as regression analysis revealed only one statistically significant predictor variable, NPD certification, influenced the use of adult learning theory. In addition, analysis revealed NPD specialists tended to support a teacher-centered rather than a learner-centered teaching style, indicating NPD educators are not using adult learning theory to guide teaching practices and curriculum development. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2014;45(8):xxx-xxx. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Unanswered clinical questions: a survey of specialists and primary care providers*

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Bridget; Shenoy, Anant M.; Blanchard, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Objective With the myriad of cases presented to clinicians every day at our integrated academic health system, clinical questions are bound to arise. Clinicians need to recognize these knowledge gaps and act on them. However, for many reasons, clinicians might not seek answers to these questions. Our goal was to investigate the rationale and process behind these unanswered clinical questions. Subsequently, we explored the use of biomedical information resources among specialists and primary care providers and identified ways to promote more informed clinical decision making. Methods We conducted a survey to assess how practitioners identify and respond to information gaps, their background knowledge of search tools and strategies, and their usage of and comfort level with technology. Results Most of the 292 respondents encountered clinical questions at least a few times per week. While the vast majority often or always pursued answers, time was the biggest barrier for not following through on questions. Most respondents did not have any formal training in searching databases, were unaware of many digital resources, and indicated a need for resources and services that could be provided at the point of care. Conclusions While the reasons for unanswered clinical questions varied, thoughtful review of the responses suggested that a combination of educational strategies, embedded librarian services, and technology applications could help providers pursue answers to their clinical questions, enhance patient safety, and contribute to patient-based, self-directed learning. PMID:28096740

  18. Delivery of a brief motivational intervention to patients with alcohol-related facial injuries: role for a specialist nurse.

    PubMed

    Oakey, F; Ayoub, A F; Goodall, C A; Crawford, A; Smith, I; Russell, A; Holland, I S

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we focus on providing an alcohol screening and intervention service within maxillofacial surgery. Two trained nurses screened patients with alcohol-related facial injuries who attended maxillofacial outpatient clinics, and gave brief motivational interventions to those who had been drinking to a hazardous level. Patients were followed up at 3 and 12 months after the intervention. 195/249 patients (78%) drank to a hazardous level. One hundred and ninety-five patients received an intervention. Duration of intervention was between 5 and 65 minutes. Reasons for refusal to participate included lack of interest or time, and the main reason for exclusion was length of time since injury. The follow up rate was 103 (53%) at 3 months and 134 (69%) at 12 months. The high level of hazardous drinking among people with facial trauma suggests a clear need for alcohol screening and intervention. It is feasible for nursing staff to deliver brief interventions in a busy maxillofacial trauma clinic.

  19. Role of the clinical research nurse in tissue viability.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Beverley; Storey, Carron

    Opportunities for nurses to be involved in clinical research have increased with the growing emphasis on research in the NHS. This article examines the experiences of two registered nurses adapting to the role of clinical research nurse in a pressure ulcer programme of research. The challenges, rewards and strategies involved are discussed.

  20. Thinking processes used by nurses in clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Kathryn A Smith; Donald, Janet G

    2002-04-01

    Clinical decision making forms the basis of expert clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to investigate and document the thinking processes used by nurses in clinical decision making situations so the processes could guide educational practice. Clinical data was analyzed to reveal that clinical decision making is complex and requires a variety of thinking processes. Medical and surgical nurses used different thinking processes, showing the importance of context in clinical decision making. The nursing exemplars and working vocabulary developed in this study to describe the thinking processes used in clinical decision making can be used in nursing education.

  1. Design of a nursing clinical decision support system applying nursing diagnosis and nursing evaluation model based data mining.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungyung; Kim, Insook; Chae, Yougmoon

    2006-01-01

    This study a methodological study; to acquire knowledge on the nursing process by steps of knowledge definition, collection, and representation; then, to design a data warehouse and nursing process clinical decision support system.

  2. Evaluating a specialist nurse's role in a general paediatric surgical team.

    PubMed

    Quick, Julie

    2014-10-01

    A surgical care practitioner (SCP) is a registered nurse or allied health professional who, following specific education and competency training, carries out pre- and post-operative treatment and some surgical interventions under the supervision of a consultant surgeon, contributing to the maintenance of surgical services and the enhancement of patient care. With a cohesive approach, the SCP can do much to ensure continuity of care and mutual understanding and concordance between staff, child and family. Costs can be reduced and the surgical training of junior doctors supported. The results of this audit show that, with the inclusion of an SCP, higher quality general children's surgery can be provided at a medium-sized district general hospital, so that patients can be seen locally.

  3. Assessing registered nurses' clinical skills in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Sonya; McDonald, Sinead; Rainey, Debbie

    The aim of this article is to explore the views of registered nurses undertaking the new Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), incorporating an integrated preparatory skills workshop. The workshop and the OSCE were audited with particular regard to the student experience. This article describes the audit process and the results of three questionnaires: one carried out before the OSCE assessment, a second immediately after the workshop and a third four days after the assessment. The results provide an insight into the student experience.

  4. Faculty Practice and Roles of Staff Nurses and Clinical Faculty in Nursing Student Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langan, Joanne C.

    2003-01-01

    Focus groups and interviews were conducted with 15 clinical faculty, 4 nursing education administrators, 22 nurses, and 4 hospital administrators involved in clinical placements. When nurses worked with practicing faculty, they experienced less role overload, conflict, and ambiguity. Lack of communication of expectations among administrators,…

  5. An innovative care model coordinated by a physical therapist and nurse practitioner for osteoarthritis of the hip and knee in specialist care: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Voorn, Veronique M A; Vermeulen, Henricus M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Huizinga, Tom W J; Leijerzapf, Nicolette A C; Kroon, Herman M; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van der Linden, Henrica M J

    2013-07-01

    The subject of the study is to investigate whether health-related quality of life (HRQoL), pain and function of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) improves after a specialist care intervention coordinated by a physical therapist and a nurse practitioner (NP) and to assess satisfaction with this care at 12 weeks. This observational study included all consecutive patients with hip or knee OA referred to an outpatient orthopaedics clinic. The intervention consisted of a single, standardized visit (assessment and individually tailored management advice, to be executed in primary care) and a telephone follow-up, coordinated by a physical therapist and a NP, in cooperation with an orthopaedic surgeon. Assessments at baseline and 10 weeks thereafter included the short form-36 (SF-36), EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), hip or knee disability and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS or KOOS), the intermittent and constant osteoarthritis pain questionnaire (ICOAP) for hip or knee and a multidimensional satisfaction questionnaire (23 items; 4 point scale). Eighty-seven patients (57 female), mean age 68 years (SD 10.9) were included, with follow-up data available in 63 patients (72 %). Statistically significant improvements were seen regarding the SF-36 physical summary component score, the EQ-5D, the ICOAP scores for hip and knee, the HOOS subscale sports and the KOOS subscales pain, symptoms and activities of daily living. The proportions of patients reporting to be satisfied ranged from 79 to 98 % per item. In patients with hip and knee OA pain, function and HRQoL improved significantly after a single-visit multidisciplinary OA management intervention in specialist care, with high patient satisfaction.

  6. Developing ambulatory care clinics: nurse practitioners as primary providers.

    PubMed

    Lamper-Linden, C; Goetz-Kulas, J; Lake, R

    1983-12-01

    While hospitals evaluate ambulatory clinics as a revenue-generating service alternative, nursing executives develop new areas for nursing practice in nurse-managed clinics. The authors describe the five-year growth of a nurse-managed ambulatory clinic providing primary health care to those aged 55 and older. The discussion explains nurse practitioner leadership and practice, and accountability between professions. The concept and structure of services and marketing strategies are elated to the people served. Financial feasibility, cost containment, and other factors demonstrate the clinic's contribution to its sponsoring hospital.

  7. Clinical practice pattern in management of diabetic macular edema in Japan: survey results of Japanese retinal specialists.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yuichiro; Shiraga, Fumio; Terasaki, Hiroko; Ohji, Masahito; Ishida, Susumu; Sakamoto, Taiji; Hirakata, Akito; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate the current clinical practice patterns of diabetic macular edema (DME) management by retinal specialists in Japan in the era of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy. Forty-six retinal specialists were administered a survey regarding the pathology and clinical practice of DME. Nearly, half of the specialists (45.2 %) think that the main biochemical factor involved in DME development is the vascular permeability-potentiating action of VEGF-A. Most specialists (70.6 %) use three modalities for detecting DME: optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, and fundus examination. For focal macular edema, focal laser is used as first-line therapy by 70.3 % of specialists, whereas 21.6 % use medical treatment in combination with focal/grid laser. For diffuse macular edema, anti-VEGF therapy is the first choice (72.5 %), irrespective of visual acuity, whereas 17.5 % select off-label sub-Tenon's steroid injections. Vitrectomy is often performed for vitreomacular traction (86.5 %) or when anti-VEGF agent/laser therapy is ineffective (73.2 %). For persistent DME after vitrectomy, anti-VEGF agents (46.3 %) or steroids (intravitreal injections, 14.6 %; sub-Tenon's injections, 36.6 %) are selected. When applying anti-VEGF treatment regimen, most specialists continue loading injections until central retinal thickness stabilized (51.4 %) or both visual acuity and central retinal thickness stabilized (24.3 %). In the maintenance phase, many specialists provide injections with pro re nata (76.3 %), whereas 50.0 % responded that the treat-and-extend regimen is ideal. Our survey presents the current views about the DME management and practice patterns of anti-VEGF therapy by one part of the retinal specialists in Japan, and highlights the differences or gaps between evidence and actual clinical practice.

  8. Discharge outcomes of patients referred to specialist eye clinic from diabetic retinopathy screening in Northland (2014-15).

    PubMed

    Jagadish, Pragnya; Dalziel, David

    2017-02-17

    To determine the discharge outcomes of patients seen in specialist eye clinic after referral from diabetic retinopathy screening (DRS). Retrospective analysis of outcomes of a sample of 98 patients referred from DRS to specialist eye clinic. A sample of 98 patients were analysed following referral by DRS to specialist eye clinic from 16/4/14 to 16/4/15. Age at screening ranged from 13-88 years, with the main ethnic groups being Māori (57.1%), European (39.79%) and Indian (3.06%). A majority of the patients were referred to specialist eye clinic for diabetic retinopathy (60%) or cataracts (35%). After being seen in specialist eye clinic, 45% of the patients were enrolled back into DRS and 49.1% stayed under care of ophthalmology service for further treatment, and a further 5.9% were discharged to care of GP or optometrist without re-enrolment back to DRS. Of those referred back to DRS, 30% were re-enrolled after further imaging with optical coherence tomography (OCT), and 24% of patients were referred back to DRS due to non-attendance. Non-attendence at clinic appointments was high among the Māori population. Our study identified that 94% of patients referred to specialist eye clinic were either referred back to DRS or kept under care with only five patients not re-enrolled back into DRS. Despite good service delivery, Northland remains a high-risk population for diabetes, where non-attendance at clinic appointments remained an issue with the Māori patient population. In addition, a significant proportion of patients were re-referred back to DRS after OCT, and a consideration is to include OCT in the screening pathway.

  9. Research nurse manager perceptions about research activities performed by non-nurse clinical research coordinators.

    PubMed

    Jones, Carolynn Thomas; Hastings, Clare; Wilson, Lynda Law

    2015-01-01

    There has been limited research to document differences in roles between nurses and non-nurses who assume clinical research coordination and management roles. Several authors have suggested that there is no acknowledged guidance for the licensure requirements for research study coordinators and that some non-nurse research coordinators may be assuming roles that are outside of their legal scopes of practice. There is a need for further research on issues related to the delegation of clinical research activities to non-nurses. This study used nominal group process focus groups to identify perceptions of experienced research nurse managers at an academic health science center in the Southern United States about the clinical research activities that are being performed by non-nurse clinical research coordinators without supervision that they believed should only be performed by a nurse or under the supervision of a nurse. A total of 13 research nurse managers volunteered to be contacted about the study. Of those, 8 participated in two separate nominal group process focus group sessions. The group members initially identified 22 activities that they felt should only be performed by a nurse or under the direct supervision of a nurse. After discussion and clarification of results, activities were combined into 12 categories of clinical research activities that participants believed should only be performed by a nurse or under the direct supervision of a nurse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nurses' Use of Race in Clinical Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Sherrill L; Moss, Melissa E; Calzone, Kathleen; Abdallah, Khadijah E; Jenkins, Jean F; Bonham, Vence L

    2016-11-01

    To examine nurses' self-reported use of race in clinical evaluation. This cross-sectional study analyzed data collected from three separate studies using the Genetics and Genomics in Nursing Practice Survey, which includes items about use of race and genomic information in nursing practice. The Racial Attributes in Clinical Evaluation (RACE) scale was used to measure explicit clinical use of race among nurses from across the United States. Multivariate regression analysis was used to examine associations between RACE score and individual-level characteristics and beliefs in 5,733 registered nurses. Analysis revealed significant relationships between RACE score and nurses' race and ethnicity, educational level, and views on the clinical importance of patient demographic characteristics. Asian nurses reported RACE scores 1.41 points higher than White nurses (p < .001), and Black nurses reported RACE scores 0.55 points higher than White nurses (p < .05). Compared to diploma-level nurses, the baccalaureate-level nurses reported 0.69 points higher RACE scores (p < .05), master's-level nurses reported 1.63 points higher RACE scores (p < .001), and doctorate-level nurses reported 1.77 points higher RACE scores (p < .01). In terms of clinical importance of patient characteristics, patient race and ethnicity corresponded to a 0.54-point increase in RACE score (p < .001), patient genes to a 0.21-point increase in RACE score (p < .001), patient family history to a 0.15-point increase in RACE score (p < .01), and patient age to a 0.19-point increase in RACE score (p < .001). Higher reported use of race among minority nurses may be due, in part, to differential levels of racial self-awareness. A relatively linear positive relationship between level of nursing degree nursing education and use of race suggests that a stronger foundation of knowledge about genetic ancestry, population genetics and the concept "race" and genetic ancestry may increase in clinical decision making

  11. Leadership experiences for baccalaureate nursing students: improving quality in a nurse-managed rural health clinic.

    PubMed

    Sherrod, Roy Ann; Morrison, Ruby Shaw

    2008-01-01

    Nurse educators need practical, effective methods to help nursing students understand the importance of quality improvement activities and their relationship to the financial viability of organizations. This article describes a project designed to provide students with an opportunity to apply quality improvement principles in a rural, nurse-managed clinic with the ultimate goal of improving potential reimbursement for services through improved documentation. Implications for students, nurse educators, and rural clinics are provided.

  12. Clinical teaching models for nursing practice: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Elsa

    2014-01-01

    Clinical placements provide opportunities for student nurses to learn experientially, thanks to clinical - practical teaching models. For this purpose this review wanted to better investigate the latest methods developed in nursing education to ameliorate the theory practice model in nursing education teaching model. The review of the literature was performed through a search of nursing specific data bases, including Cinahl, Capsur, Ovid, Cockrane Library, PubMed from January 2010 to September 2012. It included key words, such as: Clinical Model; Nursing Education Model; Nursing Practical Teaching Model; Theory-Practice Model. A total of 8 articles were found. Of these, only 4 articles were considered for this review because they better analyzed one clinical teaching model in nursing practice. Each article was structured analyzed, by considering the "PICOS" method, with reference to participants, interventions, comparisons, outcomes, and study design. Four innovative clinical teaching models for nursing practice were considered: the first one was the Problem-Based Leaning method in nursing education; the second one was the Self-Regulated Learning strategy; the third one was the developing nursing students' reflective skills associated as a key component in the perceived coherence between theory and practice; the fourth one was the computer-based clinical simulation. Each work performed an innovative clinical teaching model for nursing student. Some limitations were highlight, but all the literature revised emphasized the evaluation and feedback from students and the perceptions of their clinical activities is essential.

  13. Management of medically unexplained symptoms: outcomes of a specialist liaison clinic.

    PubMed

    Röhricht, Frank; Elanjithara, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Aims and method Service utilisation and clinical outcomes of a newly developed specialist primary-secondary care liaison clinic for patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) were evaluated in a cross-sectional and feasibility pilot study. The impact of body-oriented psychological therapy (BOPT) was explored in a small cohort of patients with an identified somatoform disorder. Results Of 147 consecutive referrals, 113 patients engaged with the assessment process. Of patients with MUS, 42% (n = 45) had a primary diagnosis of somatoform disorder, 36% (n = 38) depressive disorder, and depressive symptoms (even subsyndromal) mediated the effect of somatic symptoms. A marked variation of presenting complaints and service utilisation across ethnic groups was noted. A significant reduction in somatic symptom levels and service utilisation was achieved for patients undergoing BOPT. Clinical implications A high proportion of patients with MUS have undiagnosed and therefore untreated mental disorders. New and locally derived collaborative care models of active engagement in primary care settings are required. Patients with somatoform disorder may benefit from BOPT; this requires further evaluation in adequately powered clinical trials.

  14. Factors affecting Korean nursing student empowerment in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yang-Heui; Choi, Jihea

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the phenomenon of nursing student empowerment in clinical practice is important. Investigating the cognition of empowerment and identifying predictors are necessary to enhance nursing student empowerment in clinical practice. To identify empowerment predictors for Korean nursing students in clinical practice based on studies by Bradbury-Jones et al. and Spreitzer. A cross-sectional design was used for this study. This study was performed in three nursing colleges in Korea, all of which had similar baccalaureate nursing curricula. Three hundred seven junior or senior nursing students completed a survey designed to measure factors that were hypothesized to influence nursing student empowerment in clinical practice. Data were collected from November to December 2011. Study variables included self-esteem, clinical decision making, being valued as a learner, satisfaction regarding practice with a team member, perception on professor/instructor/clinical preceptor attitude, and total number of clinical practice fields. Data were analyzed using stepwise multiple regression analyses. All of the hypothesized study variables were significantly correlated to nursing student empowerment. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that clinical decision making in nursing (t=7.59, p<0.001), being valued as a learner (t=6.24, p<0.001), self-esteem (t=3.62, p<0.001), and total number of clinical practice fields (t=2.06, p=0.040). The explanatory power of these predictors was 35% (F=40.71, p<0.001). Enhancing nursing student empowerment in clinical practice will be possible by using educational strategies to improve nursing student clinical decision making. Simultaneously, attitudes of nurse educators are also important to ensure that nursing students are treated as valued learners and to increase student self-esteem in clinical practice. Finally, diverse clinical practice field environments should be considered to enhance experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd

  15. Nursing Challenges in Motivating Nursing Students through Clinical Education: A Grounded Theory Study.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, Hanifi; Soroor, Parvizy; Soodabeh, Joolaee

    2012-01-01

    Nurses are the first role models for students in clinical settings. They can have a significant role on students' motivation. The purpose of this study was to explore the understanding of nursing students and instructors concerning the role of nurses in motivating nursing students through clinical education. The sampling was first started purposefully and continued with theoretical sampling. The study collected qualitative data through semistructured and interactive interviews with 16 nursing students and 4 nursing instructors. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using grounded theory approach. One important pattern emerged in this study was the "concerns of becoming a nurse," which itself consisted of three categories: "nurses clinical competency," "nurses as full-scale mirror of the future," and "Monitoring and modeling through clinical education" (as the core variable). The findings showed that the nurses' manners of performance as well as the profession's prospect have a fundamental role in the process of formation of motivation through clinical education. Students find an insight into the nursing profession by substituting themselves in the place of a nurse, and as result, are or are not motivated towards the clinical education.

  16. Nursing Challenges in Motivating Nursing Students through Clinical Education: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Nasrin, Hanifi; Soroor, Parvizy; Soodabeh, Joolaee

    2012-01-01

    Nurses are the first role models for students in clinical settings. They can have a significant role on students' motivation. The purpose of this study was to explore the understanding of nursing students and instructors concerning the role of nurses in motivating nursing students through clinical education. The sampling was first started purposefully and continued with theoretical sampling. The study collected qualitative data through semistructured and interactive interviews with 16 nursing students and 4 nursing instructors. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using grounded theory approach. One important pattern emerged in this study was the “concerns of becoming a nurse,” which itself consisted of three categories: “nurses clinical competency,” “nurses as full-scale mirror of the future,” and “Monitoring and modeling through clinical education” (as the core variable). The findings showed that the nurses' manners of performance as well as the profession's prospect have a fundamental role in the process of formation of motivation through clinical education. Students find an insight into the nursing profession by substituting themselves in the place of a nurse, and as result, are or are not motivated towards the clinical education. PMID:22830005

  17. Loss of clinical nursing expertise: a discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Jane Marie

    2012-10-01

    There is evidence to suggest that there is a general decline in clinical expertise in nursing as a result of experienced clinicians leaving the profession. The expertise of clinical nursing practice is an important resource and needs to be captured and made available to others as loss of this knowledge and expertise has implications for clinical outcomes. This paper aims to discuss the current nursing workforce, loss of clinical expertise, the nature of expertise and the way it can be captured. Clarification and articulation of clinical knowledge of nursing experts provides the means for knowledge to be transferred to a less experienced workforce and be available in an accessible form in the workplace. Leverage of nursing expertise in this manner has the potential to benefit less experienced staff, hold clinical nursing expertise in the workplace and improve clinical outcomes and satisfaction with performance.

  18. 'Nursing research culture' in the context of clinical nursing practice: addressing a conceptual problem.

    PubMed

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-05-01

    To report an analysis of the concept of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice. Nursing research culture should be valued for its contribution to improving patient care and should be considered as a routine hospital activity. However, the demand for efficiency, nurses' barriers to research use and the lack of definition of the concept of nursing research culture make it difficult to establish. Concept analysis. Data were collected through a literature review in PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO during March 2016. Walker and Avant's eight-step framework for concept analysis. Five defining attributes of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice were identified: strong monodisciplinary nursing professionalism, academic thinking and socialization, research use as a part of daily nursing practice, acceptance by colleagues and management and facilitation of resources from management and organization. Although the method of concept analysis has been criticized and heavily debated, the development of nursing research cultures based on the defining attributes and antecedents of the concept will be important to emphasize evidence-based clinical nursing care. Further research should support the development and the implementation of nursing research culture in clinical nursing practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Conceptualizing clinical nurse leader practice: an interpretive synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bender, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's Future of Nursing report identifies the clinical nurse leader as an innovative new role for meeting higher health-care quality standards. However, specific clinical nurse leader practices influencing documented quality outcomes remain unclear. Lack of practice clarity limits the ability to articulate, implement and measure clinical nurse leader-specific practice and quality outcomes. Interpretive synthesis design and grounded theory analysis were used to develop a theoretical understanding of clinical nurse leader practice that can facilitate systematic and replicable implementation across health-care settings. The core phenomenon of clinical nurse leader practice is continuous clinical leadership, which involves four fundamental activities: facilitating effective ongoing communication; strengthening intra and interprofessional relationships; building and sustaining teams; and supporting staff engagement. Clinical nurse leaders continuously communicate and develop relationships within and across professions to promote and sustain information exchange, engagement, teamwork and effective care processes at the microsystem level. Clinical nurse leader-integrated care delivery systems highlight the benefits of nurse-led models of care for transforming health-care quality. Managers can use this study's findings to frame an implementation strategy that addresses theoretical domains of clinical nurse leader practice to help ensure practice success. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Perceptions of Novice Clinical Adjunct Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmelberg, Layna

    2011-01-01

    The anticipated nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and continues to be a topic of discussion. A nationwide solution has been for nursing programs to increase their enrollment of nursing students. This could be difficult for many nursing schools; as many have a shortage of qualified nursing faculty with which to instruct…

  1. Perceptions of Novice Clinical Adjunct Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmelberg, Layna

    2011-01-01

    The anticipated nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and continues to be a topic of discussion. A nationwide solution has been for nursing programs to increase their enrollment of nursing students. This could be difficult for many nursing schools; as many have a shortage of qualified nursing faculty with which to instruct…

  2. Strengthening Preceptors' Competency in Thai Clinical Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingpun, Renu; Srisa-ard, Boonchom; Jumpamool, Apinya

    2015-01-01

    The problem of lack of nurses can be solved by employing student nurses. Obviously, nurse instructors and preceptors have to work extremely hard to train student nurses to meet the standard of nursing. The preceptorship model is yet to be explored as to what it means to have an effective program or the requisite skills to be an effective…

  3. [Analysis of RN-BSN students' clinical nursing competency].

    PubMed

    Son, Jung Tae; Park, Myonghwa; Kim, Hye Ryoung; Lee, Woo-Sook; Oh, Kasil

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate RN-BSN students' clinical nursing competency in order to establish baseline data for developing nursing competency based clinical education for RN-BSN students. A survey of 1,453 RN-BSN students from 21 nursing schools was conducted using a self administered questionnaire. The mean score of the clinical nursing competency was 2.93. The scores for competency were shown as 2.91 for nursing management, 2.94 for developing professionalism & legal implementation, 2.95 for critical thinking, 2.96 for teaching & leadership, and data collection, basic nursing care, and communication were above 3.00. The items perceived as insufficient competency were physical examination and observation & monitoring in data collection, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, psycho-social care, spiritual care, hospice in basic nursing care, application of knowledge and theory, formulating nursing diagnosis, nursing care planning in critical thinking, education material development, leadership, delegation in teaching and leadership, analysis of organization, planning, infection control, role & job description, evaluation of nursing activities in nursing management, quality improvement, and research in developing professionalism and legal implementation. This study will contribute to developing a nursing competency based on clinical education for RN-BSN students who have various education needs and clinical backgrounds.

  4. Vaccination uptake by vaccine-hesitant parents attending a specialist immunization clinic in Australia.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas A; McMinn, Alissa; Crawford, Nigel; Leask, Julie; Danchin, Margie

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine hesitancy (VH) is an issue of global concern. The quality of communication between healthcare providers and parents can influence parental immunization acceptance. We aimed to describe immunization uptake following specialist immunization clinic (SIC) consultation for Australian children of VH parents as a cohort, and according to pre-clinic parental position on immunization. At a single tertiary pediatric SIC (RCH, Melbourne) a retrospective descriptive study classified VH families according to 3 proposed parental positions on immunization at initial clinic attendance. Immunization status at follow up was ascertained via the Australian Children's Immunization Register and National HPV Program Register and compared between groups. Of the VH cohort, 13/38 (34%) families were classified as hesitant, 21 (55%) as late/selective vaccinators and 4 (11%) as vaccine refusers. Mean follow up post-SIC attendance was 14.5 months. For the overall VH cohort, the majority chose selective immunization (42%) following SIC consultation. When analyzed by pre-clinic parental position on immunization, there was a trend for hesitant families to proceed with full immunization, selective families to continue selective immunization and refusing families to remain unimmunised (p < 0.0001). The most commonly omitted vaccines were hepatitis B (66%) and Haemophilus influenzae type B (55%), followed by the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine (53%) and measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (53%). Immunization outcome appears to correlate with pre-clinic parental position on immunization for the majority of families attending a SIC in Australia, with selective immunization the most common outcome. Tailored communication approaches based on parental position on immunization may optimise clinic resources and engagement of families, but require prospective research evaluation.

  5. Vaccination uptake by vaccine-hesitant parents attending a specialist immunization clinic in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Thomas A; McMinn, Alissa; Crawford, Nigel; Leask, Julie; Danchin, Margie

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine hesitancy (VH) is an issue of global concern. The quality of communication between healthcare providers and parents can influence parental immunization acceptance. We aimed to describe immunization uptake following specialist immunization clinic (SIC) consultation for Australian children of VH parents as a cohort, and according to pre-clinic parental position on immunization. At a single tertiary pediatric SIC (RCH, Melbourne) a retrospective descriptive study classified VH families according to 3 proposed parental positions on immunization at initial clinic attendance. Immunization status at follow up was ascertained via the Australian Children's Immunization Register and National HPV Program Register and compared between groups. Of the VH cohort, 13/38 (34%) families were classified as hesitant, 21 (55%) as late/selective vaccinators and 4 (11%) as vaccine refusers. Mean follow up post-SIC attendance was 14.5 months. For the overall VH cohort, the majority chose selective immunization (42%) following SIC consultation. When analyzed by pre-clinic parental position on immunization, there was a trend for hesitant families to proceed with full immunization, selective families to continue selective immunization and refusing families to remain unimmunised (p < 0.0001). The most commonly omitted vaccines were hepatitis B (66%) and Haemophilus influenzae type B (55%), followed by the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine (53%) and measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (53%). Immunization outcome appears to correlate with pre-clinic parental position on immunization for the majority of families attending a SIC in Australia, with selective immunization the most common outcome. Tailored communication approaches based on parental position on immunization may optimise clinic resources and engagement of families, but require prospective research evaluation. PMID:26366978

  6. Clinical reasoning of nursing students on clinical placement: Clinical educators' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Sharyn; Arthur, Carol

    2016-05-01

    Graduate nurses may have knowledge and adequate clinical psychomotor skills however they have been identified as lacking the clinical reasoning skills to deliver safe, effective care suggesting contemporary educational approaches do not always facilitate the development of nursing students' clinical reasoning. While nursing literature explicates the concept of clinical reasoning and develops models that demonstrate clinical reasoning, there is very little published about nursing students and clinical reasoning during clinical placements. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten clinical educators to gain an understanding of how they recognised, developed and appraised nursing students' clinical reasoning while on clinical placement. This study found variability in the clinical educators' conceptualisation, recognition, and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. Although most of the clinical educators conceptualised clinical reasoning as a process those who did not demonstrated the greatest variability in the recognition and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. The clinical educators in this study also described being unable to adequately appraise a student's clinical reasoning during clinical placement with the use of the current performance assessment tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical practice of dual-certified music therapists/child life specialists: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Ghetti, Claire M

    2011-01-01

    The discipline of child life enjoys a strong presence in many medical settings within the current pediatric healthcare environment. Due to the widespread establishment of child life programs, music therapists often find themselves negotiating their role and contributions to pediatric healthcare in relation to the field of child life. There is increasing interest among music therapy interns and clinicians in pursuing certification in child life to increase clinical knowledge and enhance marketability. A small, but strong, cohort of dual-certified music therapists/child life specialists is currently practicing in the field, but the nuances of their clinical practice have not been systematically examined. The current study used an interpretative phenomenological approach to explore the lived experiences of eight dual-certified clinicians, and to interpret how clinicians make sense of those lived experiences. Two overarching themes of identity and flexibility arose from the analysis: issues relating to establishing, challenging, and modifying professional identity; and flexibility manifested within areas of theoretical orientation, professional role, and clinical approach. Dual-certified clinicians vary in the degree to which they integrate the fields of music therapy and child life in practice, from complete and seamless integration of the two, to exclusive practice of only one field, depending upon the bounds of their positions. Participants reported that child life training is beneficial, but not necessary for achieving advanced practice in pediatric medical music therapy. Implications for the continuing advancement of music therapy in pediatric healthcare are discussed.

  8. Clinical Audit of Gastrointestinal Conditions Occurring among Adults with Down Syndrome Attending a Specialist Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Robyn A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Adults with Down syndrome (DS) are predisposed to syndromic and environmental gastrointestinal conditions. Method: In a hospital-based clinic for adults with DS, a chart audit was conducted to assess the range and frequency of gastrointestinal conditions. Results: From January 2003 to March 2005, 57 patients attended the clinic,…

  9. Clinical Audit of Gastrointestinal Conditions Occurring among Adults with Down Syndrome Attending a Specialist Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Robyn A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Adults with Down syndrome (DS) are predisposed to syndromic and environmental gastrointestinal conditions. Method: In a hospital-based clinic for adults with DS, a chart audit was conducted to assess the range and frequency of gastrointestinal conditions. Results: From January 2003 to March 2005, 57 patients attended the clinic,…

  10. Involvement in shared decision-making for patients in public specialist outpatient clinics in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Richard H; Wong, Eliza LY

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study is a preliminary exploration of the association between patient involvement in decision-making and patient socioeconomic characteristics and experience in specialist outpatient clinics (SOPCs) in Hong Kong. Methods Cross-sectional telephone interviews were conducted using the Specialist Outpatient Experience Questionnaire (SOPEQ) in 26 Hospital Authority public SOPCs in Hong Kong. The SOPEQ was designed by The School of Public Health and Primary Care at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, fully taking into account both literature review and the local context of the public specialist outpatient system in Hong Kong. A total of 22,525 eligible participants were recruited for the study. Results There were 13,966 valid responses. The results indicated that the patients who had more involvement in decision-making were younger (odds ratio [OR] =2.10; 95% CI 1.75, 2.53), more highly educated (OR =1.67; 95% CI 1.45, 1.93), less likely to be receiving a government allowance (OR =0.61; 95% CI 0.57, 0.65), and less likely to be in the new case group (OR =0.84; 95% CI 0.78, 0.92). Participants living with their families (OR =3.38; 95% CI 2.03, 5.63) or who were unemployed (OR =1.10; 95% CI 1.01, 1.21) had a more decisive role in the decision- making process. Those participants who had been more involved in decision-making and wanted to continue being more involved had greater levels of satisfaction (mean =7.94; P<0.001) and a better health status (OR =0.49; 95% CI 0.41, 0.58). Conclusion Engaging patients in their health care management remains a challenge in improving patient-centered care. Our results suggest that patient engagement is associated with perceived health status and the experience of using a health service. Understanding patients’ characteristics and roles facilitates the development of preferred styles in the decision-making model. PMID:28331297

  11. New Brunswick nurses' views on nursing research, and factors influencing their research activities in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Robichaud-Ekstrand, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    New Brunswick became the first province in Canada to require a baccalaureate degree in nursing as the entry to practice, yet nursing research in hospital settings remains quite low. This study examined clinical nurses' views on nursing research, and identified some contributing factors to the research-practice gap. This descriptive, cross-sectional multicenter study involved 1081 nurses working in the Francophone Regional Health Authority in New Brunswick, Canada. Nurses were eager to identify nursing-care problems to improve patient care (92.9%), and to be involved in collecting data for nursing research studies (95.2%). However, without research supervision, few had engaged in basic research activities, such as formulating or refining research questions (24.5%), presenting at research conferences (6.9%), or changing their practice based on research findings (27.2%). Younger, more educated nurses, nurse managers, and educators participated more readily in research. Sharing research and clinical expertise, as well as infrastructures between academic and clinical institutions is the key to enduring successful patient-centered nursing research in clinical settings. Concrete actions are proposed to build clinical nursing research. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Opportunities for multidisciplinary ASH clinical hypertension specialists in an era of population health and accountable care: ASH leadership message.

    PubMed

    Egan, Brent M

    2014-07-01

    The ASH hypertension specialists and ASH clinical and comprehensive hypertension centers represent a continuum of expertise and capacity positioned to play a major role in advancing the Triple Aim, which includes improving the patient care experience, population health, and value in cardiovascular health promotion and disease prevention. The ASH hypertension specialists board is dedicated to testing and designating a broad range of qualified health care professionals as clinical hypertension specialists. A continuing partnership with ASH, recognizing the need for an appropriate firewall between education and testing, is essential in providing the education and training programs required to grow and sustain the specialized workforce required to translate current evidence and future advances in personalized medicine into better care for individuals, better health for populations, and better value for payers. Moreover, growth of the ASH hypertension registry has the potential to accelerate advances in education and patient care as noted previously. The ASH hypertension specialists board is excited about the opportunities available to a well-trained and collaborative multidisciplinary group of clinical hypertension specialists in an era of ACOs pursuing the Triple Aim.

  13. Chiropractic management of episodic tension-type headache: a survey of clinical specialists

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Howard; McDermaid, Cameron

    1998-01-01

    Tension-type headache (TTH) is a highly prevalent condition experienced annually by 30-70% of the population. As a chief complaint, it occupies 5-8% of chiropractors’ caseloads, but is probably more prevalent in multiple complaint cases. While numerous clinical descriptions exist in the literature of the management of TTH by chiropractors, and while there is a small body of clinical trials of the treatment of non-migrainous headache by spinal manipulation, there is no systematic survey of the approaches to its treatment by chiropractors. The goals of this study were to determine the test-retest reliability of a questionnaire designed to identify the most commonly used treatments for TTH and to report on any consistent findings as a potential profile of typical practice approach. The respondents consisted of a group of Canadian chiropractic clinical specialists. Respondents were asked to complete a survey which consisted of a comprehensive list of chiropractic treatment procedures including standard manual manipulations and mobilisations, soft tissue therapies, modalities, exercises, behavioral therapies, acupuncture, nutrition and four “systems” techniques. The respondents were asked to rate their frequency of use of these procedures on a 4-point scale ranging from “always” to “never”. The surveys were completed twice within a two day interval. The response rate was 18/25 (72%). Eighty-seven percent (87%) of the items were rated identically on both surveys. All but one of the items achieved a statistically significant reliability coefficient. The highest rated items were “upper cervical manipulations”, “upper cervical soft tissue therapy” and “neck stretching exercises”. The items which received the lowest endorsement were: chiropractic procedures to the dorso-lumbo-pelvic spine, most therapy modalities and the “systems” techniques which were included in the survey. Years in practice appeared to have very little effect on the use of

  14. Enhancing Patient Safety Using Clinical Nursing Data: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeeyae; Choi, Jeungok E

    2016-01-01

    To enhance patient safety from falls, many hospital information systems have been implemented to collect clinical data from the bedside and have used the information to improve fall prevention care. However, most of them use administrative data not clinical nursing data. This necessitated the development of a web-based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System (NPRIMS) that processes clinical nursing data to measure nurses' delivery of fall prevention care and its impact on patient outcomes. This pilot study developed computer algorithms based on a falls prevention protocol and programmed the prototype NPRIMS. It successfully measured the performance of nursing care delivered and its impact on patient outcomes using clinical nursing data from the study site. Results of the study revealed that NPRIMS has the potential to pinpoint components of nursing processes that are in need of improvement for preventing patient from falls.

  15. Nursing staff perceptions of student contributions in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Slaughter-Smith, Cheryl; Helms, Jennifer E; Burris, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Because nursing is a practice discipline, students are placed in clinical settings to collaborate with professional nurses in caring for patients. This descriptive study aimed to explore the benefits and limitations of undergraduate nursing students in the clinical setting. A 54-item instrument, Nursing Students' Contributions to Clinical Agencies, was used to collect data from staff nurses (N = 84) at three hospitals. The instrument also provided space for participants to share qualitative data, which revealed perceptions with which staff nurses were likely to agree and three key themes: Eager to Learn, Willing to Help, and Serving Their Time. The major implication for students is that they are often judged on their assertiveness skills and should offer assistance so they appear eager to learn. Faculty must ascertain that students understand their objectives for the clinical rotation and share those objectives with the staff nurses to enhance their learning experience. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Advancing the educational and career pathway for clinical trials nurses.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kathleen; White, Kathryn; Roydhouse, Jessica K

    2013-04-01

    Clinical trials nurses play a pivotal role in the conduct of clinical research, but the educational and career pathway for these nurses remains unclear. This article reports findings from a survey of nurses working in cancer clinical trials research in Australia. Most participants held postgraduate qualifications (42 of 61); however, clinical trials education was primarily attained through short professional development courses. Interest in pursuing trial-specific postgraduate education was high, but barriers were identified, including cost, time, and unclear benefit for career advancement. Job titles varied substantially, which is indicative of an unclear employment pathway. These findings suggest that initiatives to improve the educational and career pathway for clinical trials nurses are needed and should include the following: formal educational preparation, greater consistency in employment status, and clearer career progression. These strategies should be underpinned by broad professional recognition of the clinical trials nurse as a specialized nursing role.

  17. Specialist clinics in remote Australian Aboriginal communities: where rock art meets rocket science.

    PubMed

    Gruen, Russell; Bailie, Ross

    2004-10-01

    People in remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory have greater morbidity and mortality than other Australians, but face considerable barriers when accessing hospital-based specialist services. The Specialist Outreach Service, which began in 1997, was a novel policy initiative to improve access by providing a regular multidisciplinary visiting specialist services to remote communities. It led to two interesting juxtapositions: that of 'state of the art' specialist services alongside under-resourced primary care in remote and relatively traditional Aboriginal communities; and that of attempts to develop an evidence base for the effectiveness of outreach, while meeting the short-term evaluative requirements of policy-makers. In this essay, first we describe the development of the service in the Northern Territory and its initial process evaluation. Through a Cochrane systematic review we then summarise the published research on the effectiveness of specialist outreach in improving access to tertiary and hospital-based care. Finally we describe the findings of an observational population-based study of the use of specialist services and the impact of outreach to three remote communities over 11 years. Specialist outreach improves access to specialist care and may lessen the demand for both outpatient and inpatient hospital care. Specialist outreach is, however, dependent on well-functioning primary care. According to the way in which outreach is conducted and the service is organised, it can either support primary care or it can hinder primary care and, as a result, reduce its own effectiveness.

  18. Validating nursing competencies using a fair format.

    PubMed

    Carney, Diane M; Bistline, Betty

    2008-01-01

    Across the healthcare system, staff development specialists and nurse leaders have been challenged with the development, implementation, and evaluation of processes by which clinical nursing staff demonstrate competence in an efficient and effective manner. The purpose of this article is to describe one approach used in an acute care setting. Staff development specialists and nurse leaders played key roles in assessing, developing, and evaluating a nursing competency validation fair.

  19. Structural empowerment and professional nursing practice behaviors of baccalaureate nursing students in clinical learning environments.

    PubMed

    Livsey, Kae R

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the associations between professional behaviors of baccalaureate nursing students and student perceptions of select factors within the clinical learning environment, including the role of clinical faculty leadership. Participants (n=243) were recruited from a randomly selected list of 1000 members of the National Student Nurses Association (NSNA) among sixteen states within the Southern region of the United States. Results revealed a direct relationship exists between student perceptions of structural empowerment in their clinical learning environment and professional nursing practice behaviors among students. Also found was that relationships between variables in the model are significantly strengthened by student perceptions of strong leadership behaviors of clinical faculty. Findings from this study may assist nurse educators by contributing knowledge relevant to support/facilitate the transition of individuals from student nurses to professional registered nurses and, thus enhance the impact of professional nurses' contributions in healthcare delivery.

  20. Reshaping Clinical Nursing Education: An Academic-Service Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartz, Claudia; Dean-Baar, Susan

    2003-01-01

    A nursing school-clinic partnership was designed to teach nursing students community health practice skills. A longitudinal evaluation is being conducted to ensure that it meets the goals of baccalaureate education and urban health nursing and that it follows a multilevel process model of organizational socialization. (Contains 37 references.) (SK)

  1. Nursing students' views of clinical competence assessment.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Carmel; O'Connor, Maureen; Egan, Geraldine; Tierney, Katie; Butler, Mary Pat; Fahy, Anne; Tuohy, Dympna; Cassidy, Irene; Quillinan, Bernie; McNamara, Mary C

    This paper reports on some outcomes of a research study evaluating a new assessment framework of clinical competence used in undergraduate nursing programmes in the Mid West Region of Ireland. First, this paper presents both the strengths and weaknesses of the present model, as articulated by student nurses. Second, it generates a broader critical debate around the concept of competency assessment. The model of competence in question was developed by the Irish Nursing Board then elaborated on by the University of Limerick in partnership with local health service providers in 2002. Methodology involved a triangulated approach, comprising a series of focus group interviews with students (n=13) and preceptors (n=16) followed by a survey of students (n=232) and preceptors (n=837). Findings from the student focus groups are reported here. Themes identified using Burnard's (1991) framework for analysis are preparation for competency assessment, competency documentation, supporting assessment in practice, organisational and resource factors and the competency assessment structure and process. Results from this research have implications for refinement and revision of the present competency assessment framework, for student and staff preparation and for collaboration between stakeholders.

  2. Clinical Scholar Model: providing excellence in clinical supervision of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Preheim, Gayle; Casey, Kathy; Krugman, Mary

    2006-01-01

    The Clinical Scholar Model (CSM) is a practice-education partnership focused on improving the outcomes of clinical nursing education by bridging the academic and service settings. An expert clinical nurse serves as a clinical scholar (CS) to coordinate, supervise, and evaluate the clinical education of nursing students in collaboration with school of nursing faculty. This article describes the model's evolution, how the model is differentiated from traditional clinical instruction roles and responsibilities, and the benefits to the collaborating clinical agency and school of nursing.

  3. [Implementing the "last mile" program in new nurse clinical education].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Hsin; Jane, Sui-Whi; Fan, Jun-Yu; Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2013-06-01

    The shortage of working nurses has made Taiwan's low nursing retention rate a critical issue in domestic healthcare. Main reasons for new nurses leaving their jobs include high pressure, overtime work, heavy workload, interpersonal relationship problems with colleagues, and inadequate support from administrators. In response, nursing educators designed the "last mile" program to improve the hands-on competence of nursing students with the goal of increasing post-graduation retention rates. This article introduces the last mile program in its present form and discusses the challenges faced in transitioning the program from the classroom into the clinical training environment. The authors suggest establishing a challenge test prior to implementing the last mile program, recruiting role-model preceptors, adjusting training program / project budgets, and developing partnerships between nursing educators and clinicians to enhance the clinical competence of new nurses and ultimately increase professional nurse retention rates, competence, and accountability.

  4. Use of Clinical Health Information Technology in Nursing Homes: Nursing Home Characteristics and Quality Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinelli-Moraski, Carla

    2014-01-01

    This study compares quality measures among nursing homes that have adopted different levels of clinical health information technology (HIT) and examines the perceived barriers and benefits of the adoption of electronic health records as reported by Nursing Home Administrators and Directors of Nursing. A cross-sectional survey distributed online to…

  5. Diploma Nursing Students' Attitudes toward Psychiatric Nursing, Role Models, and Clinical Placement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holder, Elizabeth; Mark, Tony

    A study was conducted at Humber College to investigate the attitudes of college-prepared diploma nursing students towards psychiatric nursing. Specifically, the study sought to determine the effect of psychiatric nursing role models on student attitudes, and whether a relationship existed between clinical placement and student attitudes. The study…

  6. Clinical practice models in nursing education: implication for students' mobility.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolska, B; McGonagle, I; Jackson, C; Kane, R; Cabrera, E; Cooney-Miner, D; Di Cara, V; Pajnkihar, M; Prlić, N; Sigurdardottir, A K; Kekuš, D; Wells, J; Palese, A

    2015-03-01

    In accordance with the process of nursing globalization, issues related to the increasing national and international mobility of student and qualified nurses are currently being debated. Identifying international differences and comparing similarities for mutual understanding, development and better harmonization of clinical training of undergraduate nursing students is recommended. The aim of the study was to describe and compare the nature of the nursing clinical practice education models adopted in different countries. A qualitative approach involving an expert panel of nurses was adopted. The Nominal Group Technique was employed to develop the initial research instrument for data collection. Eleven members of the UDINE-C network, representing institutions engaged in the process of professional nursing education and research (universities, high schools and clinical institutes), participated. Three data collection rounds were implemented. An analysis of the findings was performed, assuring rigour. Differences and homogeneity are reported and discussed regarding: (a) the clinical learning requirements across countries; (b) the prerequisites and clinical learning process patterns; and (c) the progress and final evaluation of the competencies achieved. A wider discussion is needed regarding nursing student exchange and internalization of clinical education in placements across European and non-European countries. A clear strategy for nursing education accreditation and harmonization of patterns of organization of clinical training at placements, as well as strategies of student assessment during this training, are recommended. There is also a need to develop international ethical guidelines for undergraduate nursing students gaining international experience. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  7. Clinical Education In psychiatric mental health nursing: Overcoming current challenges.

    PubMed

    Choi, Heeseung; Hwang, Boyoung; Kim, Sungjae; Ko, Heesung; Kim, Sumi; Kim, Chanhee

    2016-04-01

    In response to current challenges in psychiatric mental health nursing education, nursing schools have implemented new strategies in teaching undergraduate nursing students. The objectives of the study were to evaluate learning outcomes of a mental health nursing clinical practicum and to explore students' perceptions of the clinical practicum. This was a mixed-method study. Sixty-three undergraduate nursing students, who were undertaking their first mental health clinical practicum, completed a set of structured questionnaires and answered open-ended questions about the clinical practicum. Answers to open-ended questions were analyzed qualitatively, and learning outcomes (i.e., empathy, mental illness prejudice, simulation-related efficacy, and satisfaction) were measured at three time points: pre-clinical, post-simulation, and post-clinical. Students reported improvement in empathy and simulation-related self-efficacy after the clinical practicum, but no change was found in mental illness prejudice. Students' expectations for and evaluation of the clinical practicum are summarized. The observed improvement in learning outcomes of the clinical practicum may be attributed to the unique contribution of each component of the clinical practicum and the synergic effect of these diverse components. To manage emerging challenges in clinical settings and nursing education, it is critical to develop systematic and comprehensive mental health nursing clinical practicums for undergraduate nursing students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Prevalence and factors associated with clinical counselling on drug use among internal specialists residents of Andalusia (Spain)].

    PubMed

    Juárez-Jiménez, María de la Villa; Pérez-Milena, Alejandro; Valverde-Bolívar, Francisco Javier; Rosa-Garrido, Carmen

    2015-12-01

    To determine the frequency of offering clinical counseling against the consumption of alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs by internal specialist residents (EIR) of Andalusia, and the factors related to such advice. Multicenter cross-sectional study by self-administered questionnaire sent by mail. EIR of Andalusia. The questionnaire collected the frequency of counseling against the use of alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs (dependent variable). age/gender, specialty, drug consumption and Fagerström test. Out of a total of 4245 participants, 66% responded, 29% did not respond, and 5% poorly completed questionnaires. The mean age was 29.1(±SD 5.1) years, 69% female, 89% Spanish nationality, 84% in medical training (73% hospital, 27% family medicine). The frequency of counseling against tobacco (85%) and alcohol (82%) is higher than illegal drugs (56%, p<.001, χ(2) test). Counseling against alcohol consumption is related to family medicine (OR=2.8; 95% CI [1.4-4.6]) and nursing (OR=2.5 [1.7-4.4]), and the age of first alcohol consumption (OR=1.07 [1.03-1.1]). Counseling against smoking is related to family medicine (OR=12.9;[7.6-21.9]) and nursing (OR=8.4;[4.3-16.5]), personal consumption of tobacco (OR=1.5 [1.2-2.0]), and wine (OR=1.1 [1.04-1.3]), and age of first alcohol consumption (OR=1.06 [1.01-1.1]). Counseling against illegal drugs is related to the age of first alcohol consumption (OR=1.09 [1.05-1.1]) and smoking (OR=.58 [.4-.7]). There is a high frequency of counseling against consumption of tobacco and alcohol by EIR, although remarkably smaller for illegal drugs. The influencing factors are both formative elements of their own specialty such as personal consumption of alcohol and tobacco, which should be considered for improvement of this preventive activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. The nurse teacher's clinical role now and in the future.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, A P

    1999-04-01

    The role of the nurse teacher in relation to the clinical setting has been debated for 20 years, yet it has been the subject of relatively few large studies. Recent studies led to inconclusive results, hence the nurse lecturer's clinical role remains an area of long-standing dispute. Changes in nurse education United Kingdom Central Council (UKCC) and the amalgamation of nurse education into higher education as part of the Strategy for Nursing, as well as the expansion of supernumerary status for student nurses, gave impetus to the search for a new clinical role for nurse lecturers. Research suggests that nurse teachers wish to maintain clinical contact, but the nature of this contact is vigorously debated at present. Lee, in reviewing the literature, concluded that this topic is highly contentious in terms of its nature, extent and purpose. She goes as far as to suggest that there is a need for empirical research to address the question as to whether there is a role for nurse lecturers in the clinical area. This paper examines some of the factors which influence the development of the clinical aspect of the role of nurse lecturers, explains how the author performed this role and the perceived benefits to students, mentors and the lecturer. It proposes a clinical role model based on the literature and the author's own personal experience as a 'clinical liaison lecturer' since the integration of nursing education into higher education. Key points The clinical role of the nurse teacher remains an area of long standing dispute Nurse lecturers wish to maintain clinical contact and maintain clinical competence, but in reality no consensus exists as to its meaning The mentor's role can be complemented by a clinically competent nurse lecturer who arguably should be able to teach in the classroom and the practice settings Using a triangular approach to reviewing student's experience, lecturers can update their clinical knowledge, demonstrate credibility, promote education

  10. Quality of clinical supervision as perceived by specialist registrars in a university and district teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Bruijn, M; Busari, J O; Wolf, B H M

    2006-10-01

    Clinical supervision promotes the professional development of specialist registrars (SpRs). Our objective was to investigate and compare the perceived quality of supervision (PQS) in a university teaching hospital (UTH) and a district teaching hospital (DTH) and to identify aspects of supervision that could be improved. The Cleveland Clinic's teaching effectiveness instrument (CCTEI) was used to measure the quality of supervision of attending doctors. Fifteen items reflecting good teaching ability were rated on a 5-point Likert-scale (1-5 = poor-excellent). SpRs rated 47 attending doctors using the CCTEI. A total of 416 ratings were obtained. Overall, the mean PQS was 3.85 (SD = 0.29) in the DTH and 3.56 (SD = 0.44) in the UTH (P = 0.02). A significant difference in PQS was found in 6 items. The supervisors in the DTH scored better on all these items. The best predictor of PQS was the item 'Organises time to allow for both teaching and care giving'. Overall, PQS was better in the DTH compared to the UTH. In both settings, generating a good learning environment and respecting the autonomy of the SpRs scored favourably. Supervisory roles focusing on improving cost-effective practice and communicative skills need more emphasis.

  11. Clinical supervision for nurse teachers: the pertinent issues.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, P; Goorapah, D

    The emergence of clinical supervision in nursing is viewed with both enthusiasm and reservation. Professional growth of the nurse practitioner is envisaged through adopting this support framework, although concerns exist particularly in relation to the role of management in monitoring performance and standards. Most authors have attempted to reassure nurses by stressing the positive elements. Potential benefits include the development of self-learning and clinical skills through reflection using a supervisor. It is anticipated that the supervisee will retain ultimate control of the process. Implementation of clinical supervision in nurse education is being considered. The need for a formal method of support has not been identified by teachers. It is debatable whether a format similar to that for clinical practice would be appropriate when the role of the nurse teacher focuses mainly on academic rather than clinical issues. Supervision in nurse education may be accepted or rejected, but a decision cannot be reached until role and cost issues have been adequately addressed.

  12. Nursing students' experiences with incivility in clinical education.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Maureen; Yastik, Joanne

    2011-03-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore the experiences of nursing students as targets of incivility in clinical settings, to describe their perceptions of specific uncivil and favorable behaviors by nurses, and to examine how nursing students think schools of nursing should address incivility in clinical settings. Four focus groups were conducted comprising 21 prelicensure nursing students. Data were collected with semi-structured interviews. Uncivil behaviors fell into three themes: exclusionary, hostile or rude, and dismissive. Positive experiences occurred when students felt included by the staff nurses in patient care. Schools of nursing should prepare students through discussion. Our research suggests that incivility occurs in clinical education. Further research on a larger scale is needed to provide qualitative and generalizable findings. All health care team members, including students, should be educated about the organization's code of conduct.

  13. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients’ health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy. PMID:27471588

  14. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients' health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy.

  15. The socialization process of newly graduated nurses into a clinical setting: role of the clinical nurse educator.

    PubMed

    Schipper, Lindsay M; Schipper, Linda M

    2011-01-01

    This article is a review and synthesis of the literature related to the socialization of newly graduated nurses. Personal experience and standards frame the clinical nurse educator role in facilitating learner development and socialization. Successful strategies to improve the socialization process of newly graduated nurses from the literature and recommendations for the future are presented.

  16. Nursing students' perceptions of the clinical learning environment in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, Karin; Bjørk, Ida Torunn

    2010-01-01

    Clinical placements are important in the learning processes of nursing students. In Norway, clinical placement in nursing homes is obligatory for nursing students, and this is a demanding and complex setting for learning. This study aimed to assess how first-year nursing students perceived their learning environment in nursing homes and to explore which factors in the clinical learning environment had the greatest influence on students' overall satisfaction with their clinical placement. Students rated their perceptions of the psychosocial learning environment using the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory. Students perceived the learning environment as moderately positive. Mean scores were the highest on the Personalization subscale and the lowest on the Innovation subscale. Students who highly valued Innovation, Involvement, and Personalization had higher scores on the Satisfaction sub-scale. The results of this study indicate that major work is needed to develop the learning context for students in nursing homes.

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of Including a Nurse Specialist in the Treatment of Urinary Incontinence in Primary Care in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Holtzer-Goor, K. M.; Gaultney, J. G.; van Houten, P.; Wagg, A. S.; Huygens, S. A.; Nielen, M. M. J.; Albers-Heitner, C. P.; Redekop, W. K.; Rutten-van Mölken, M. P.; Al, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Incontinence is an important health problem. Effectively treating incontinence could lead to important health gains in patients and caregivers. Management of incontinence is currently suboptimal, especially in elderly patients. To optimise the provision of incontinence care a global optimum continence service specification (OCSS) was developed. The current study evaluates the costs and effects of implementing this OCSS for community-dwelling patients older than 65 years with four or more chronic diseases in the Netherlands. Method A decision analytic model was developed comparing the current care pathway for urinary incontinence in the Netherlands with the pathway as described in the OCSS. The new care strategy was operationalised as the appointment of a continence nurse specialist (NS) located with the general practitioner (GP). This was assumed to increase case detection and to include initial assessment and treatment by the NS. The analysis used a societal perspective, including medical costs, containment products (out-of-pocket and paid by insurer), home care, informal care, and implementation costs. Results With the new care strategy a QALY gain of 0.005 per patient is achieved while saving €402 per patient over a 3 year period from a societal perspective. In interpreting these findings it is important to realise that many patients are undetected, even in the new care situation (36%), or receive care for containment only. In both of these groups no health gains were achieved. Conclusion Implementing the OCSS in the Netherlands by locating a NS in the GP practice is likely to reduce incontinence, improve quality of life, and reduce costs. Furthermore, the study also highlighted that various areas of the continence care process lack data, which would be valuable to collect through the introduction of the NS in a study setting. PMID:26426124

  18. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: Code of Conduct, Version 2--2008.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Janet; Zerah, Simone; Hallworth, Michael; Koeller, Ursula; Blaton, Victor; Tzatchev, Kamen; Charilaou, Charis; Racek, Jaroslav; Johnsen, Anders; Tomberg, Karel; Harmoinen, Aimo; Baum, Hannsjörg; Rizos, Demetrios; Kappelmayer, Janos; O'Mullane, John; Nubile, Giuseppe; Pupure, Silvija; Kucinskiene, Zita; Opp, Matthias; Huisman, Wim; Solnica, Bogdan; Reguengo, Henrique; Grigore, Camelia; Spanár, Július; Strakl, Greta; Queralto, Josep; Wallinder, Hans; Schuff-Werner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 10 years, more than 2000 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Federation of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). A Code of Conduct was adopted in 2003 and a revised and updated version, taking account particularly of the guidelines of the Conseil Européen des Professions Libérales (CEPLIS) of which EFCC is a member, is presented in this article. The revised version was approved by the EC4 Register Commission and by the EFCC Executive Board in Paris on 6 November, 2008.

  19. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Janet; Zérah, Simone; Hallworth, Michael; Schuff-Werner, Peter; Haushofer, Alexander; Szekeres, Thomas; Wallemacq, Pierre; Tzatchev, Kamen; Charilaou, Charis; Racek, Jaroslav; Johnsen, Anders; Tomberg, Karel; Harmoinen, Aimo; Baum, Hannsjörg; Rizos, Demetrios; Kappelmayer, Janos; O'Mullane, John; Nubile, Giuseppe; Pupure, Silvija; Kucinskiene, Zita; Opp, Matthias; Jansen, Rob; Solnica, Bogdan; Reguengo, Henrique; Grigore, Camelia; Spanár, Július; Strakl, Greta; Queralto, Josep; Wallinder, Hans; Wieringa, Gijsbert

    2010-07-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, more than 2200 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Forum of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). Two previous Guides to the Register have been published, one in 1997 and another in 2003. The third version of the Guide is presented in this article and is based on the experience gained and development of the profession since the last revision. Registration is valid for 5 years and the procedure and criteria for re-registration are presented as an Appendix at the end of the article.

  20. Practicing nurses perspectives of clinical scholarship: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of research published on clinical scholarship. Much of the conceptualisation has been conducted in the academy. Nurse academics espouse that the practice of nursing must be built within a framework of clinical scholarship. A key concept of clinical scholarship emerging from discussions in the literature is that it is an essential component of enabling evidence–based nursing and the development of best practice standards to provide for the needs of patients/clients. However, there is no comprehensive definition of clinical scholarship from the practicing nurses. The aim of this study was to contribute to this definitional discussion on the nature of clinical scholarship in nursing. Methods Naturalistic inquiry informed the method. Using an interpretative approach 18 practicing nurses from Australia, Canada and England were interviewed using a semi-structured format. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories and the components of clinical scholarship described by the participants compared to the scholarship framework of Boyer [JHEOE 7:5-18, 2010]. Results Clinical scholarship is difficult to conceptualise. Two of the essential elements of clinical scholarship are vision and passion. The other components of clinical scholarship were building and disseminating nursing knowledge, sharing knowledge, linking academic research to practice and doing practice-based research. Conclusion Academic scholarship dominated the discourse in nursing. However, in order for nursing to develop and to impact on health care, clinical scholarship needs to be explored and theorised. Nurse educators, hospital-based researchers and health organisations need to work together with academics to achieve this goal. Frameworks of scholarship conceptualised by nurse academics are reflected in the findings of this study with their emphasis on reading and doing research and translating it

  1. Nursing students' clinical competencies: a survey on clinical education objectives.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, C; Grugnetti, A M; Caruso, R; Gallotti, M L; Borrelli, P; Puci, M

    2017-01-01

    Developing clearly defined competencies and identifying strategies for their measurement remain unfortunately a critical aspect of nursing training. In the current international context, which continues to be characterised by deep economic crisis, universities have a fundamental role to play in redefining the educational goals to respond to the expectations of certain geographical areas of interest, as underscored in the Bologna Process (Joint Declaration of the European Ministers of Education Convened in Bologna 19 June 1999). The aim of this observational study was to examine the clinical learning context of nursing students using a tool developed by a team of teachers for the analysis of clinical learning. Redefinition of the clinical learning objectives with reference to the competencies set out in the questionnaire validated by Venturini et al. (2012) and the subsequent use of the tool created by the team of teachers for students in the first, second and third-year courses of the 2013/14 academic year, covering all the internships called for in those years. All nursing students enrolled in the first, second and third year of the nursing undergraduate degree program at the University of Pavia (no. 471) participated in this survey. A total of 1,758 clinical internships were carried out: 461 for the first year, 471 for the second year and 826 for the third year. Setting objectives, beginning with the educational offerings in the several clinical contexts, represents a strong point for this process. The results highlight a level of heterogeneity and complexity intrinsic to the University of Pavia educational system, characterized by clinical settings with different clinical levels (Research hospital and other traditional hospitals) that offering different levels of training. The use of the self-evaluation form for clinical learning made it possible to perform real-time observations of the training activities of the entire student body. An educational model

  2. Aesthetic Leadership: Its Place in the Clinical Nursing World.

    PubMed

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Daly, John

    2015-05-01

    Clinical leadership has been identified as crucial to positive patient/client outcomes, across all clinical settings. In the new millennium, transformational leadership has been the dominant leadership style and in more recent times, congruent leadership theory has emerged to explain clinical leadership in nursing. This article discusses these two leadership models and identifies some of the shortcomings of them as models for clinical leadership in nursing. As a way of overcoming some of these limitations, aesthetic leadership is proposed as a style of leadership that is not antithetical to either model and reflects nursing's recognition of the validity of art and aesthetics to nursing generally. Aesthetic leadership is also proposed as a way to identify an expert clinical leader from a less experienced clinical leader, taking a similar approach to the way Benner (1984) has theorised in her staging of novice to expert clinical nurse.

  3. Use of a pharmacy technician to facilitate postfracture care provided by clinical pharmacy specialists.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Adriane N; Heilmann, Rachel M F; Gerrity, Theresa M; Kroner, Beverly A; Olson, Kari L

    2014-12-01

    The ability of a pharmacy technician to support the patient screening and documentation-related functions of a pharmacist-driven osteoporosis management service was evaluated. A two-phase prospective study was conducted within a large integrated health system to assess a pharmacy technician's performance in supporting a multisite team of clinical pharmacy specialists providing postfracture care. In phase I of the study, a specially trained pharmacy technician provided support to pharmacists at five participating medical offices, helping to identify patients requiring pharmacist intervention and, when applicable, collecting patient-specific clinical information from the electronic health record. In phase II of the study, the amount of pharmacist time saved through the use of technician support versus usual care was evaluated. The records of 127 patient cases were reviewed by the pharmacy technician during phase I of the study, and a pharmacist agreed with the technician's determination of the need for intervention in the majority of instances (92.9%). An additional 91 patient cases were reviewed by the technician in phase II of the research. With technician support, pharmacists spent less time reviewing cases subsequently determined as not requiring intervention (mean ± S.D., 5.0 ± 3.8 minutes per case compared with 5.2 ± 4.5 minutes under the usual care model; p = 0.78). In cases requiring intervention, technician support was associated with a reduction in the average pharmacist time spent on care plan development (13.5 ± 7.1 minutes versus 18.2 ± 16.6 minutes with usual care, p = 0.34). The study results suggest that a pharmacy technician can accurately determine if a patient is a candidate for pharmacist intervention and collect clinical information to facilitate care plan development. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nurses' clinical decision-making for preserving nursing home residents' remaining abilities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Jung Eun; Kim, Mi So; Kim, Su Jin; Chang, Sung Ok

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to clarify and conceptualise nurses' clinical decision-making for preserving the remaining abilities of nursing home residents suffering from physical-cognitive functional decline. Older adults experience physical, psychological and social changes, but their remaining abilities differ across individuals. This study used a qualitative research to gain a deeper understanding of nursing homes nurses' clinical decision-making. In-depth interviews with 32 experienced nurses were undertaken. The data were analysed using conventional content analysis. Six categories and 58 subcategories of nursing practice related to managing the remaining abilities of residents with physical-cognitive functional decline were generated. The results of this study revealed five themes: (1) seeing residents' potential, (2) physical, emotional and psychosocial care in daily routines, (3) keeping personalised charts, (4) encouraging, promoting and physical and emotional support and (5) preparing residents for more independent living. The results were categorised into nurses' personal strategies based on their experience, practical nursing knowledge, nursing interventions and nursing evaluation criteria. The themes reflected positive views on the residents' functional abilities and the nursing homes nurses' perception that their goal was to help residents achieve their highest level of independence. Preserving nursing home residents' remaining abilities represents nurses' optimistic view of residents' functional status. Routine care tailored for preserving the remaining abilities of individual nursing home residents with physical-cognitive functional decline is needed. Preserving the remaining abilities of nursing home resident is supported by therapeutic interactions including close contact as well as physical and emotional support. Nurses' main goal in working with residents with remaining abilities is improving their independence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Qualified nurses' rate new nursing graduates as lacking skills in key clinical areas.

    PubMed

    Missen, Karen; McKenna, Lisa; Beauchamp, Alison; Larkins, Jo-Ann

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of qualified nurses on the abilities of newly registered nursing graduates to perform a variety of clinical skills. Evidence from the literature suggests that undergraduate nursing programmes do not adequately prepare nursing students to be practice-ready on completion of their nursing courses. A descriptive quantitative design was used. Participants were recruited through the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation, Victorian branch. A brief explanation of the study and a link to the survey were promoted in their monthly e-newsletter. A total of 245 qualified nurses in the state of Victoria, Australia participated in this study. A survey tool of 51 clinical skills and open-ended questions was used, whereby participants were asked to rate new nursing graduates' abilities using a 5-point Likert scale. Overall participants rated new nursing graduates' abilities for undertaking clinical skills as good or very good in 35·3% of skills, 33·3% were rated as adequate and 31·4% rated as being performed poorly or very poorly. Of concern, essential clinical skills, such as critical thinking and problem solving, working independently and assessment procedures, were found to be poorly executed and affecting new registered nurses graduates' competence. The findings from this study can further serve as a reference for nursing education providers to enhance nursing curricula and work collaboratively with healthcare settings in preparing nurses to be competent, safe practitioners on completion of their studies. Identifying key areas in which new nursing graduates are not yet competent means that educational providers and educators from healthcare settings can focus on these skills in better preparing our nurses to be work ready. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Clinical nurse educators as agents for change: increasing research utilization.

    PubMed

    Milner, F Margaret; Estabrooks, C A; Humphrey, C

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of research utilization among clinical nurse educators. The primary goal for clinical nurse educators is the facilitation of professional development of practicing nurses. Responsibilities include promoting best practice by mentoring others, acting as an information source, and assisting in the development of policies and procedures based on available research evidence. Using Rogers' (Diffusion of Innovations, 4th edn., The Free Press, New York) diffusion of innovations theory as a theoretical foundation, we conducted a secondary analysis to test a predictive model of research utilization using linear regression. Results show that educators report significantly higher research use than staff nurses and managers. Predictors of research utilization include attitude toward research, awareness of information based on research, and involvement in research activities. Localite communication predicted conceptual research use and mass media predicted symbolic use, lending support to the idea that overall, instrumental, conceptual, and symbolic research utilization are conceptually different from one another. Our findings show that the research utilization behaviors of clinical nurse educators position them to facilitate evidence-based nursing practice in organizations. We discuss the theoretical, conceptual, and nursing role implications of our findings for nursing practice, education, and research. Suggestions for future research includes studying actual use of research findings of clinical nurse educators and designing intervention studies that assesses the effectiveness of clinical nurse educators as facilitators of research utilization in organizations.

  7. Shifting the clinical teaching paradigm in undergraduate nursing education to address the nursing faculty shortage.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Hila; Gilmartin, Mattia J; Fulmer, Terry

    2012-04-01

    To address the faculty shortage problem, schools of nursing are reexamining how they provide clinical education to undergraduate students to find ways to use faculty resources more efficiently and to maintain student enrollment. We describe a unique clinical teaching model implemented at the New York University College of Nursing. The new model currently being evaluated shifts from the traditional clinical education model, in which all clinical education is in a hospital or agency setting, to a model that substitutes high-fidelity human patient simulation for up to half of the clinical education experience. This article describes the clinical teaching model and its effects on nurse faculty capacity.

  8. Factors Influencing Support for National Health Insurance among Patients Attending Specialist Clinics in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Almualm, Yasmin; Alkaff, Sharifa Ezat; Aljunid, Syed; Alsagoff, Syed Sagoff

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the level of support towards the proposed National Health Insurance scheme among Malaysian patients attending specialist clinics at the National University of Malaysia Medical centre and its influencing factors. The cross sectional study was carried out from July-October 2012. 260 patients were selected using multistage sampling method. 71.2% of respondents supported the proposed National Health insurance scheme. 61.4% of respondents are willing to pay up to RM240 per year to join the National Health Insurance and 76.6% of respondents are of the view that enrolment in NHI should be made compulsory. Knowledge had a positive influence on respondent's support towards National Health Insurance. National Health Insurance when implemented in Malaysia can be used to raise funds for health care financing, increase access to health services and achieve the desired health status. More efforts should be taken to promote the scheme and educate the public in order to achieve higher support towards the proposed National Health Insurance. The cost to enroll in NHI as well as services to be included under the scheme should be duly considered. PMID:23985101

  9. Nursing Students' Clinical Experience With Death: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Heise, Barbara A; Gilpin, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Although debriefing in simulation settings is routine in nursing education, debriefing does not routinely take place in clinical settings with nursing students after a patient has died. This pilot study sought to explore nursing students' perceptions of their first experience with the death of a patient. Students reported emotional distress and feelings of inadequacy with regard to communicating with and supporting the family of the dying patient. Only half the students sampled reported debriefing by their clinical instructor or staff. Nurse educators must include debriefing and student support following a patient death in the clinical setting.

  10. Chronic pain and psychiatric morbidity: a comparison between patients attending specialist orthopedics clinic and multidisciplinary pain clinic.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wing S; Chen, Phoon P; Yap, Jackequaline; Mak, Kan Hing; Tam, Barry Ka H; Fielding, Richard

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the associations between chronic pain and psychiatric morbidity using interview-based assessments of psychiatric symptomatology. We compared the prevalence of common mental disorder (CMD; consistent with neurotic and somatic symptoms, fatigue, and negative affect), depression, and anxiety disorder(s), and associated factors with these psychiatric illnesses among Chinese patients with chronic pain attending specialist orthopedics clinic and multidisciplinary pain clinic. A total of 370 patients with chronic pain were recruited from an Orthopedics Clinic (N=185) and a Pain Clinic (N=185) in Hong Kong. Psychiatric morbidity was assessed using the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule. Individual scores for neurotic symptoms and neurotic disorders (including depression and four types of anxiety disorders) were also calculated. The reported lifetime prevalence rates of CMD were 35.3% and 75.3% for the Orthopedics and Pain Clinic samples, respectively. Rates of depression and anxiety disorders in the Pain Clinic (57.1% and 23.2%, respectively) were significantly higher than those in the Orthopedics sample (20.2% and 5.9%, respectively) (all P<0.001). Pain characteristics including number of pain sites, pain duration, pain intensity, and pain interference were all significantly associated with psychiatric morbidity after controlling for sociodemographic factors. Pain duration and litigation/compensation status consistently predicted concurrent pain intensity and disability. Chronic pain is associated with psychiatric morbidity. The higher rate of depression than anxiety disorder(s) among patients with chronic pain is consistent with previous studies that have found depression to be highly prevalent in chronic pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Teaching Nursing Leadership: Comparison of Simulation versus Traditional Inpatient Clinical.

    PubMed

    Gore, Teresa N; Johnson, Tanya Looney; Wang, Chih-hsuan

    2015-04-30

    Nurse educators claim accountability to ensure their students are prepared to assume leadership responsibilities upon graduation. Although front-line nurse leaders and nurse executives feel new graduates are not adequately prepared to take on basic leadership roles, professional nursing organizations such as the American Nurses Association (ANA) and the Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) deem leadership skills are core competencies of new graduate nurses. This study includes comparison of a leadership-focused multi-patient simulation and the traditional leadership clinical experiences in a baccalaureate nursing leadership course. The results of this research show both environments contribute to student learning. There was no statistical difference in the overall score. Students perceived a statistically significant difference in communication with patients in the traditional inpatient environment. However, the students perceived a statistical significant difference in teaching-learning dyad toward simulation.

  12. A Nurse Practitioner Clinic: A Novel Approach to Supporting Patients Following Heart Valve Surgery.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Andrew; Sutton, Tim; Ding, Patricia; Kerr, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Valvular heart disease is an important healthcare issue and its impacts are increasing. Following valve surgery, traditional models of care involve medical personnel, however, significant gaps in guideline adherence and delays in follow-up have been reported. Internationally, there is increasing evidence that specialist nurses can function in a variety of clinical settings and improve patient management. In 2009, a nurse practitioner clinic to support patients following valve surgery was established. We used a retrospective clinical audit and clinical review with descriptive statistics to describe the development of the clinic and to provide guidance for other services for model of care development. Over four years, 462 patients have been reviewed at least once, with over half having multiple assessments, 37% had rheumatic heart disease. These patients were 20 years younger and more likely to be women, non-European, current smokers and have atrial fibrillation. All patients received a focussed lifestyle, rheumatic, thromboembolic and endocarditis risk and symptom review with tailored support, advice and referral where appropriate. Four percent were referred back to a cardiologist for early evidence of valve dysfunction and a further 1.5% required urgent admission for unstable symptoms. The nurse practitioner clinic offers a systematic approach to promoting guideline adherence post valvular surgery. Important clinical symptoms and differences in health needs were identified and were actioned appropriately. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nurse-managed wound clinic. A case study in success.

    PubMed

    Crumbley, D R; Ice, R C; Cassidy, R

    1999-01-01

    The wound Care Clinic at Naval Hospital Charleston is a nurse-managed ambulatory clinic that has demonstrated the successful application of nursing case management in caring for patients with chronic and complex wounds. Nursing case management is an outcomes-based system of assessment, planning, provision of nursing services, coordination of interdisciplinary efforts, education, and referral. Nursing case management has been shown, in the literature and at Naval Hospital Charleston, to be an extension of role of professional nursing practice and results in decreased costs, improved quality of care, faster wound healing times, decreased complications, and greater coordination of care between specialty disciplines. These positive results are illustrated in several case studies. Nursing case management has many implications for the successful implementation of any healthcare delivery system where decreased costs and improved quality of care are valued, and it has special benefit in the complex management of chronically ill patients.

  14. Academic training and clinical placement problems to achieve nursing competency

    PubMed Central

    RAHMATI SHARGHI, NARJES; ALAMI, ALI; KHOSRAVAN, SHAHLA; MANSOORIAN, MOHAMMAD REZA; EKRAMI, ALI

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: High quality of care is one of the requirements of nursing which depends on the nursing competency. In this connection, the aim of this research was to determine the problems related to the academic training (nursing' educational program) and clinical practice to achieve competency from the viewpoint of nurses, faculty members, and nursing students. Methods: the study was an analytical cross-sectional one. The sample consisted of the academic staff, the third and the fourth year nursing students and nurses in practice. The instrument of the study was a two-part researcher-made questionnaire with 22 questions in the theoretical- clinical realm to assess  problems related to the theoretical and clinical teaching in nursing, and 23 questions to assess the clinical functions. The questionnaire was validated in terms of both face and content validity. Its reliability, using Cronbach's Alpha coefficient, was 0.72 in the theoretical-clinical and 0.73 in the clinical realm. Both descriptive and analytical statistics were used to analyze the data, using SPSS software. Results: The results of this study indicated that from the participants’ viewpoints, the most important problems in the academic education for nursea to acquire competency were as follows: lack of academic research the clinical period (88.9%), no application of theoretical aspects of the nursing process in practice (85.6%), insufficient knowledgeable and professional educators (81.1%), the use of traditional routine-oriented methods on the wards (75.6%); also insufficient time for performance based on knowledge in relation to  the nurse's workload (86.5%), weakness and usefulness of scientific function encouragement systems in clinic (85.2%), and learnt theoretical subjects not coming into practice in clinical fields after graduation (75.6%). Conclusion: Efforts to reduce the gap between the theoretical and practical (clinical function) knowledge in educational and work environment are

  15. Advanced practice nurses' scope of practice: a qualitative study of advanced clinical competencies.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Anna-Lena; Mannevaara, Bodil; Fagerström, Lisbeth

    2011-12-01

    To describe and explore Advanced Practice Nurses' clinical competencies and how these are expressed in clinical practice. Discussion concerning advanced clinical practice has been ongoing in the USA since the 1960s and in the UK since the late 1980s. Approximately 24 countries, excluding the USA, have implemented the role of Advance Practice Nurse (APN). In the Nordic countries, especially Sweden and Finland, APNs have been introduced in some organizations but their competency domains have not yet been clearly defined. The study's theoretical framework emanates from Aristotle's three-dimensional view of knowledge that is epistêmê, technê, and phronesis. Between October 2005 and January 2006, focus group interviews of Clinical Nurse Specialists who provide expert functions in pediatric, internal medicine, and surgical units (n = 26) and APN students (n = 8) were conducted. The data material was analyzed using inductive content analysis. Grouped into five main themes, the study results indicate that APNs possess advanced level clinical competencies in: (A) assessment of patients' caring needs and nursing care activities, (B) the caring relationship, (C) multi-professional teamwork, (D) development of competence and nursing care, and (E) leadership in a learning and caring culture. Clinical competencies consist of advanced skills, which typify an expanding role that offers new possibilities for holistic patient care practice. APNs' scope of practice is characterized by responsibility and competence in making autonomous judgments based on expanded clinical competence. On an advanced level, clinical competence consists not merely of advanced skills for assessing and meeting the needs of patients but also the creation of safe and trustful relationships with patients and collaboration with colleagues. APNs can realize advanced skills in their actions through their manner of knowing, doing, and being. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2011

  16. Preparing Tomorrow’s Nursing Home Nurses: The Wisconsin-Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program

    PubMed Central

    Nolet, Kim; Roberts, Tonya; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Roiland, Rachel; Gullickson, Colleen; Ryther, Brenda; Bowers, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to care for the growing population of older adults has become a national priority. The demand for long term care services is expected to double between 2000 and 2040, yet the field remains stigmatized as an undesirable place for highly-skilled nurses to work. Recent efforts to increase student preparation in geriatrics have been shown to improve student attitudes toward working with older adults and increase knowledge, but long term care settings remain unattractive to students. This paper reports on development, implementation and evaluation of The Wisconsin Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program, a nursing home internship for baccalaureate nursing students. The program couples a paid nursing home work experience with an evidence-based long term care nursing curriculum. The program increased student preparation and interest in working with older adults and in nursing homes, while concurrently increasing the capacity of nursing homes to provide a positive student experience. PMID:25162659

  17. Automation in clinical biochemistry: core, peripheral, STAT, and specialist laboratories in Australia.

    PubMed

    Streitberg, George S; Angel, Lyndall; Sikaris, Kenneth A; Bwititi, Phillip T

    2012-10-01

    Pathology has developed substantially since the 1990s with the introduction of total laboratory automation (TLA), in response to workloads and the need to improve quality. TLA has enhanced core laboratories, which evolved from discipline-based laboratories. Work practices have changed, with central reception now loading samples onto the Inlet module of the TLA. It is important to continually appraise technology. This study looked at the impact of technology using a self-administered survey to seniors in clinical biochemistry in NATA GX/GY-classified laboratories in Australia. The responses were yes, no, or not applicable and are expressed as percentages of responses. Some of the questions sourced for descriptive answers. Eighty-one laboratories responded, and the locations were 63%, 33%, and 4% in capital cities, regional cities, and country towns, respectively. Forty-two percent were public and 58% private. Clinical biochemistry was in all core laboratories of various sizes, and most performed up to 20 tests per sample. Thirty percent of the 121 surveyed laboratories had plans to install an automated line. Fifty-eight percent had hematology and biochemistry instrumentations in their peripheral laboratory, and 16% had a STAT laboratory on the same site as the core laboratory. There were varied instruments in specialist laboratories, and analyzers with embedded computers were in all laboratories. Medium and large laboratories had workstations with integrated instruments, and some large laboratories had TLA. Technology evolution and rising demand for pathology services make it imperative for laboratories to embrace such changes and reorganize the laboratories to take into account point-of-care testing and the efficiencies of core laboratories and TLA.

  18. Characteristics and associations of pain intensity in patients referred to a specialist cancer pain clinic

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Paulo; Sabri, Elham; Lawlor, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uncontrolled cancer pain (CP) may impair quality of life. Given the multidimensional nature of CP, its poor control is often attributed to poor assessment and classification. OBJECTIVES: To determine the characteristics and associations of pain intensity in a specialist CP clinic. METHODS: Consecutive patients referred to the CP clinic of the Portuguese Cancer Institute (Lisbon, Portugal) had standardized initial assessments and status documentation of the following: Brief Pain Inventory ratings for ‘pain now’ as the outcome variable; initial pain intensity (iPI) on a 0 to 10 scale; pain mechanism (using the Douleur Neuropathique 4 tool to assess neuropathic pain); episodic pain; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group rating; oral morphine equivalent daily dose (MEDD); Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale and Emotional Thermometer scores; and cancer diagnosis, metastases, treatment and pain duration. Univariable analyses were conducted to test the association of independent variables with iPI. Variables with P<0.1 were entered into a multivariable regression model, using backward elimination and a cut-point of P=0.2 for final model selection. RESULTS: Of 371 participants, 285 (77%) had moderate (4 to 6) or severe (7 to 10) iPI. The initial median MEDD was relatively low (30 mg [range 20 mg to 60 mg]). In the multivariable model, higher income, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group rating 3 to 4, cancer diagnosis (head and neck, genitourinary and gastrointestinal), adjuvant use and initial MEDD were associated with iPI (P<0.05). The model’s R2 was 18.6, which explained only 19% of iPI variance. CONCLUSIONS: The diversity of factors associated with pain intensity and their limited explanation of its variance underscore the biopsychosocial complexity of CP. Adequacy of CP management warrants further exploration. PMID:26291125

  19. Nurse Educators' Preceptions of Preparedness to Guide Clinical Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins-Cameron, Stella L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine nurse educators' (NEs) perceptions of their level of preparedness to guide learning in clinical rotations of associate degree pre-licensure nursing programs of a South Atlantic state. The study also sought to determine the relationship between clinical experience, formal education, and teaching experience to…

  20. Nurse Educators' Preceptions of Preparedness to Guide Clinical Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins-Cameron, Stella L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine nurse educators' (NEs) perceptions of their level of preparedness to guide learning in clinical rotations of associate degree pre-licensure nursing programs of a South Atlantic state. The study also sought to determine the relationship between clinical experience, formal education, and teaching experience to…

  1. The Impact of Human Patient Simulation on Nursing Clinical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinnick, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Public health relies on well trained nurses and clinical experience is an important component of that training. However, clinical experience training for student nurses also has significant challenges, as it can place patients at risk. Also it is difficult to schedule/predict patient conditions and procedures. Human patient simulation (HPS) can…

  2. The Impact of Human Patient Simulation on Nursing Clinical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinnick, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Public health relies on well trained nurses and clinical experience is an important component of that training. However, clinical experience training for student nurses also has significant challenges, as it can place patients at risk. Also it is difficult to schedule/predict patient conditions and procedures. Human patient simulation (HPS) can…

  3. Clinical wisdom: the essential foundation of "good" nursing care.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Lois A; Grace, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    Clinical wisdom, an essential foundation of nursing care that provides for the "good" of individual patients while taking into account the common good, is a concept that is difficult to define and comprehend. However, understanding what constitutes clinical wisdom is essential for the education of the types of nurses who are most likely to provide leadership that is consistent with the goals of nursing as outlined in the 2005 Code of Ethics for Nurses of the International Council of Nurses and the 2001 Code of Ethics for Nurses With Interpretive Statements of the American Nurses Association. The three key elements of wisdom, derived from the psychology and philosophy literature, are (1) balancing and providing for the good of another and the common good, (2) the use of intellect and affect in problem solving, and (3) the demonstration of experience-based tacit knowing in problematic situations. We conceptualized clinical wisdom as a more specific variant of general wisdom by examining how the core elements described can be linked to wisdom for nursing practice. In doing so, the nature of clinical wisdom is clarified and strategies are suggested to assist nurse educators in developing wise nurses.

  4. Reimagining Nursing's Place in the History of Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fairman, Julie; D'Antonio, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    This work posits how medical history might be conceptualized if nurses and nursing history was used as the analytical lens. Nursing is seen not as a separate part or subsection of medical history, but rather one that is deeply embedded in the relationships and social order of clinical practice. Nursing is an analytical category in and of itself. By approaching nursing as such a category, we enlarge “new notions of historical significance” to encompass personal, political, public, and private activities that constitute medical experiences. PMID:18375461

  5. Structural empowerment of clinical nurse managers.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Beth; Gallo, Kathleen; Griffin, Mary Quinn; White, Maureen; Fitzpatrick, Joyce

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe perceptions of structural empowerment of clinical nurse managers (CNMs) in 1 large healthcare system. The recruitment and retention of CNMs are crucial to the future of healthcare institutions. Understanding the extent to which CNMs feel supported in the work environment and have access to resources, information, support, and opportunities to learn and develop will be beneficial to organizational effectiveness. The sample included 140 CNMs from 1 large healthcare system in the northeastern United States. Consistent with previous research, CNMs in the present study had moderate levels of empowerment. They had lower than expected subscale scores on the resources subscale and acceptable scores on the subscales of support, formal power, and informal power. In the current changing healthcare environment, it is important to gain more understanding of the role of CNMs who are crucial to quality care and patient and nurse satisfaction. This study provides important baseline information about perceptions of structural empowerment among CNMs. Interventions that can be initiated to enhance the CNM empowerment are presented.

  6. Nurse-led clinic: effective and efficient delivery of assessment and review of patients with hepatitis B and C.

    PubMed

    Biddle, M L; Adler, N R; Heath, M; Streat, S; Wardrop, M; Watson, J P

    2014-06-01

    Hepatology and gastroenterology services are increasingly utilising the skills and experience of nurse practitioners and nurse specialists to help meet the increasing demand for healthcare. A new nurse-led assessment clinic has been established in the liver clinic at Geelong Hospital to utilise the expertise of nurses to assess and triage new patients and streamline their pathway through the healthcare system. The aim of this study is to assess quantitatively the first 2 years of operation of the nurse assessment clinic at Geelong Hospital, and to assess advantages and disadvantages of the nurse-led clinic. Data were extracted retrospectively from clinical records of new patients at the liver clinic. Quarterly 1-month periods were recorded over 2 years. Patients were categorised according to the path through which they saw a physician, including missed and rescheduled appointments. The number of appointments, the waiting time from referral to appointments and the number of 'did-not-attend' occasions were analysed before and after the institution of the nurse-led assessment clinic. The Mann-Whitney rank sum test of ordinal data was used to generate median wait times. There was shown to be a statistically significant longer waiting time for physician appointment if seen by the nurse first. The difference in waiting time was 10 days. However, there was also a reduction in the number of missed appointments at the subsequent physician clinic. Other advantages have also been identified, including effective triage of patients and organisation of appropriate investigations from the initial nurse assessment. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  7. Development of clinical assessment criteria for postgraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Tolhurst, B G; Bonner, A

    2000-04-01

    This paper explores the development and implementation of specific criteria to determine the level of clinical performance of postgraduate nursing students during the first year of a Master of Nursing course. The authors describe two commonly used clinical skill assessment tools and identify limitations of these tools for postgraduate nursing students. As a result of these limitations, Clinical Assessment Criteria (CAC) utilising the framework of Benner (1984) was developed. Inherent within the CAC is four levels of clinical nursing performance, which enable the nurse teacher and student to monitor the progression from novice to proficient levels of practice within a specialty area. Following a successful pilot study, the CAC was incorporated into clinical assessments in nine specialty postgraduate courses. Furthermore, the framework developed for the CAC can also be integrated into a variety of professional development domains.

  8. [Clinical nursing research. New standards for quality assurance for nursing and patient].

    PubMed

    Evers, G C

    2000-06-01

    Nursing as a health-service has a long tradition, nursing research however, a relatively short history. Florence Nightingale was the first to publish about nursing research in the year 1858. Since Nightingale, the need to study and improve the efficacy and efficiency of nursing has steadily increased. More than ever before, society needs nursing based on scientific knowledge and not just on unchallenged rituals and traditions. This scientific knowledge base can be acquired by clinical research. Within multidisciplinary clinical research it is necessary to focus on nursing's unique function. Virginia Henderson (1955) and Dorothea Orem (1959) have clearly explicated this function. Designs for clinical nursing research can be (quasi-) experimental, correlational or descriptive. Descriptive research can be qualitative or quantitative. Effects of nursing interventions on decrease of self-care problems and improvement of self-care capability and behaviors, should be investigated by experimental or quasi-experimental studies. Some examples of clinical nursing research are given. The first example demonstrates the effect of quantity and quality of nursing staff on patient's capabilities for hygiene self-care. The second example explicates the relation between self-care and quality of life with breast-cancer patients under chemotherapy treatment. The last example shows the effect of diabetes education on self-care behaviour and metabolic control. The examples given demonstrate the importance of clinical research focused on nursing's unique function. In order to accomplish this, programs of research are needed as well as close co-operation with nursing services, physicians and hospitals. Only when research findings are discussed and implemented in multidisciplinary teams, nursing will become more evidence-based.

  9. Clinical application analysis of continuing nursing in nursing service for diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiaohong; You, Liming; Huang, Jiewei; Chen, Qingling; Li, Miaona; Wong, Frances KamYuet

    2016-11-01

    The research is to establish a Continuing Nursing Project after discharge which conforming to the actual conditions of our country and explore whether such Continuing Nursing Project could effectively improve therapy compliance and blood glucose control of diabetic patients. mainly analyzing pathological mechanisms of diabetic patients and exploring the clinical effect and the complication after implementing Continuing Nursing to patients. after implementing Continuing Nursing, the diabetic patients could be better at controlling their diet, the drug usage rate and exercise rate have been improved significantly, complication rate have been decreased and the clinical effect is remarkable. the application of Continuing Nursing in the nursing service for diabetic patients, which could effectively improve living quality and clinical symptoms of patients, deserves to be popularized.

  10. Empowerment of nursing students in clinical practice: spheres of influence.

    PubMed

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Irvine, Fiona; Sambrook, Sally

    2010-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study exploring the empowerment of nursing students in clinical practice. There is a great deal of literature regarding empowerment in nursing but most focuses on the empowerment of patients and registered nurses. There is very little regarding the empowerment of nursing students. Of the limited available studies, most explore empowerment in an academic, rather than a clinical context. This longitudinal study was underpinned by hermeneutic phenomenology. Thirteen first-year nursing students were recruited using a purposive sampling strategy. Annual, in-depth interviews were conducted with the students on their trajectory from the first to third year of the undergraduate programme. Data were collected between 2007 and 2009. By the end of the study, most students felt more empowered than they had at the beginning. They attributed this to increased knowledge and confidence. Empowerment of nursing students in clinical practice can be represented in the form of 'spheres of influence'. Intrinsic, essential structures of having knowledge and confidence are at the core. External spheres influence the extent to which nursing students are likely to experience increased knowledge and confidence, and thus empowerment. However, nursing students use a number of strategies to promote their own empowerment in clinical practice. Efforts to promote the empowerment of nursing students in clinical practice need to be multi-layered and targeted at each of the spheres of influence.

  11. How the context of ambulance care influences learning to become a specialist ambulance nurse a Swedish perspective.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Christer; Herrera, Maria Jimenez; Bång, Angela

    2016-02-01

    Ambulance emergency care is multifaceted with extraordinary challenges to implement accurate assessment and care. A clinical learning environment providing opportunities for mastering these essential skills is a key component in ensuring that prehospital emergency nurse (PEN) students acquire the necessary clinical competence. The aim is to understand how PEN students experience their clinically based training, focusing on their learning process. We applied content analysis with its qualitative method to our material that consisted of three reflections each by 28 PEN students over their learning process during their 8 weeks of clinical ambulance practice. The research was carried out at the Center for Prehospital Care, University of Borås, Sweden. The broad spectrum of ambulance assignments seems to awaken great uncertainty and excessive respect in the students. Student vulnerability appears to decrease when the clinical supervisor behaves calmly, knowledgeably, confidently and reflectively. Early traumatic incidents on the other hand may increase the students' anxiety. Each student is offered a unique opportunity to learn how to approach patients and relatives in their own environments, and likewise an opportunity to gather information for assessment. Infrequency of missions seems to make PEN students less active in their student role, thereby preventing them from availing themselves of potential learning situations. Fatigue and hunger due to lack of breaks or long periods of transportation also inhibit learning mode. Our findings suggest the need for appraisal of the significance of the clinical supervisor, the ambulance environment, and student vulnerability. The broad spectrum of conditions in combination with infrequent assignments make simulation necessary. However, the unique possibilities provided for meeting patients and relatives in their own environments offer the PEN student excellent opportunities for learning how to make assessments. Copyright

  12. Work-role transition: from staff nurse to clinical nurse educator.

    PubMed

    Manning, Liz; Neville, Stephen

    2009-07-01

    This article presents the findings of a study describing Clinical Nurse Educators' experiences, as they recall their transition from staff nurse to the Clinical Nurse Educator role, within a New Zealand District Health Board. Nurse Educator roles influence clinical practice and professional development of nurses, and although designated as a senior role nationally, the complexities and size of the role are poorly understood. A qualitative descriptive methodology utilising transition theory as a conceptual framework underpinned the study. A sample of eight Clinical Nurse Educators from a New Zealand District Health Board were interviewed about their transition from experienced staff nurse to inexperienced senior nurse. Data were analysed using a general inductive approach. Participants found the Clinical Nurse Educator role was more complex than anticipated, with no preparation for the role and sub-optimal orientation periods being provided by the District Health Board. As a result, signs of stress were evident as the enormity of the role became apparent. Consequently, employers need to ensure that appropriate orientation programmes and mentorship are inherent in health care organisations.

  13. Making Connections: Linking Generalist and Specialist Essentials in Baccalaureate Community/Public Health Nursing Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Carter, Kimberly Ferren; O'Hare, Patricia A.; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2002-01-01

    Describes the work of a task force to revise public health nursing curriculum that combined the expertise of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and specialty organizations. Discusses the current state of community/public health nursing and the model used to identify core professional knowledge and values underpinning the curriculum.…

  14. Making Connections: Linking Generalist and Specialist Essentials in Baccalaureate Community/Public Health Nursing Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Carter, Kimberly Ferren; O'Hare, Patricia A.; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2002-01-01

    Describes the work of a task force to revise public health nursing curriculum that combined the expertise of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and specialty organizations. Discusses the current state of community/public health nursing and the model used to identify core professional knowledge and values underpinning the curriculum.…

  15. The role of clinical nurse educators in organ procurement organizations.

    PubMed

    Swain, Sharon

    2011-12-01

    Clinical nurse educators are advanced practice nurses with preparation at the master's level or higher. Such nurses play an important role in organ procurement organizations. As leaders and members of the team, they provide structure and design to the training process. These educators oversee orientation of new employees, serve as mentors to preceptors, assess the learning needs of the organization, and provide ongoing training to veteran staff. Clinical nurse educators also contribute to continuous quality improvement for the organization and help to comply with regulatory standards.

  16. Profile of Travelers With Preexisting Medical Conditions Attending a Specialist Travel Medicine Clinic in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Han, Calvin Teo Jia; Flaherty, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Patients with complex medical comorbidities travel for protracted periods to remote destinations, often with limited access to medical care. Few descriptions are available of their preexisting health burden. This study aimed to characterize preexisting medical conditions and medications of travelers seeking pre-travel health advice at a specialized travel medicine clinic. Records of travelers attending the Galway Tropical Medical Bureau clinic between 2008 and 2014 were examined and information relating to past medical history was entered into a database. Data were recorded only where the traveler had a documented medical history and/or was taking medications. Of the 4,817 records available, 56% had a documented medical history and 24% listed medications. The majority of travelers with preexisting conditions were female. The mean age of the cohort was 31.68 years. The mean period remaining before the planned trip was 40 days. Southeast Asia was the most popular single destination, and 17% of travelers with medical conditions were traveling alone. The most frequently reported conditions were allergies (20%), insect bite sensitivity (15%), asthma (11%), psychiatric conditions (4%), and hypertension (3%). Of the 30 diabetic travelers, 14 required insulin; 4.5% of travelers were taking immunosuppressant drugs, including corticosteroids. Half of the female travelers were taking the oral contraceptive pill while 11 travelers were pregnant at the time of their pre-travel consultation. This study provides an insight into the medical profile of travelers attending a travel health clinic. The diverse range of diseases reported highlights the importance of educating physicians and nurses about the specific travel health risks associated with particular conditions. Knowledge of the effects of travel on underlying medical conditions will inform the pre-travel health consultation. © 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  17. A nurse-run clinic for patients with incidentally discovered small abdominal aortic aneurysms is feasible and cost-effective.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J L; Clarke, G A; Roake, J A; Lewis, D R

    2015-04-01

    Patients with incidentally discovered small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) require assessment by a vascular surgery department for possible enrollment in a surveillance programme. Our unit implemented a vascular nurse-run AAA clinic in October 2010. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a specialist nurse-run small AAA clinic. Demographic and clinical data were collected prospectively for all patients seen in the new vascular nurse clinic between October 2010 and November 2012. A validated AAA operative mortality score was used to aid decision making by the vascular nurse. Some 250 patients were seen in the clinic. 198 (79.2%) patients were enrolled in surveillance, 40 (16%) declined enrollment and 12 (4.8%) were referred to a consultant clinic for further assessment. The majority of patients were male and the mean age was 73.7 years. Co-morbidities included hypertension, a history of cardiovascular disease, and hyperlipidaemia. The majority of referrals were considered to be low operative risk. No aneurysms ruptured whilst under surveillance. A nurse-run clinic that assesses patients with incidentally discovered small AAAs for inclusion in AAA surveillance is a feasible alternative to assessment of these patients in a consultant-run clinic. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. The Certified Clinical Nurse Leader in Critical Care.

    PubMed

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine M; Shatto, Bobbi J; Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Crecelius, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Challenges of the current health system in the United States call for collaboration of health care professionals, careful utilization of resources, and greater efficiency of system processes. Innovations to the delivery of care include the introduction of the clinical nurse leader role to provide leadership at the point of care, where it is needed most. Clinical nurse leaders have demonstrated their ability to address needed changes and implement improvements in processes that impact the efficiency and quality of patient care across the continuum and in a variety of settings, including critical care. This article describes the role of the certified clinical nurse leader, their education and skill set, and outlines outcomes that have been realized by their efforts. Specific examples of how clinical nurse leaders impact critical care nursing are discussed.

  19. Impact of a novel online learning module on specialist palliative care nurses' pain assessment competencies and patients' reports of pain: Results from a quasi-experimental pilot study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jane L; Heneka, Nicole; Hickman, Louise; Lam, Lawrence; Shaw, Tim

    2014-06-01

    Pain is a complex multidimensional phenomenon moderated by consumer, provider and health system factors. Effective pain management cuts across professional boundaries, with failure to screen and assess contributing to the burden of unrelieved pain. To test the impact of an online pain assessment learning module on specialist palliative care nurses' pain assessment competencies, and to determine whether this education impacted positively on palliative care patients' reported pain ratings. A quasi-experimental pain assessment education pilot study utilising 'Qstream(©)', an online methodology to deliver 11 case-based pain assessment learning scenarios, developed by an interdisciplinary expert panel and delivered to participants' work emails over a 28-day period in mid-2012. The 'Self-Perceived Pain Assessment Competencies' survey and chart audit data, including patient-reported pain intensity ratings, were collected pre-intervention (T1) and post-intervention (T2) and analysed using inferential statistics to determine key outcomes. Nurses working at two Australian inpatient specialist palliative care services in 2012. The results reported conform to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Guidelines. Participants who completed the education intervention ( n = 34) increased their pain assessment knowledge, assessment tool knowledge and confidence to undertake a pain assessment ( p < 0.001). Participants were more likely to document pain intensity scores in patients' medical records than non-participants (95% confidence interval = 7.3%-22.7%, p = 0.021). There was also a significant reduction in the mean patient-reported pain ratings between the admission and audit date at post-test of 1.5 (95% confidence interval = 0.7-2.3) units in pain score. This pilot confers confidence of the education interventions capacity to improve specialist palliative care nurses' pain assessment practices and to reduce patient-rated pain intensity

  20. A cognitive learning model of clinical nursing leadership.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Jacinthe; Dubois, Sylvie; Girard, Francine; Tardif, Jacques; Ha, Laurence

    2011-04-01

    Cognitive modeling of competencies is important to facilitate learning and evaluation. Clinical nursing leadership is considered a competency, as it is a "complex know-act" that students and nurses develop for the quality of care of patients and their families. Previous research on clinical leadership describes the attributes and characteristics of leaders and leadership, but, to our knowledge, a cognitive learning model (CLM) has yet to be developed. The purpose of our research was to develop a CLM of the clinical nursing leadership competency, from the beginning of a nursing program to expertise. An interpretative phenomenological study design was used 1) to document the experience of learning and practicing clinical leadership, and 2) to identify critical-learning turning points. Data was gathered from interviews with 32 baccalaureate students and 21 nurses from two clinical settings. An inductive analysis of data was conducted to determine the learning stages experienced: awareness of clinical leadership in nursing; integration of clinical leadership in actions; active leadership with patient/family; active leadership with the team; and, embedded clinical leadership extended to organizational level and beyond. The resulting CLM could have significant impact on both basic and continuing nursing education. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical profile, nursing diagnoses and nursing care for postoperative bariatric surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Steyer, Nathalia Helene; Oliveira, Magáli Costa; Gouvêa, Mara Regina Ferreira; Echer, Isabel Cristina; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2016-03-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical profile, nursing diagnoses, and nursing care established for postoperative bariatric surgery patients. Method Cross-sectional study carried out in a hospital in southern Brazil with a sample of 143 patients. Data were collected retrospectively from electronic medical records between 2011 and 2012 and analyzed statistically. Results We found a predominance of adult female patients (84%) with class III obesity (59.4%) and hypertension (72%). Thirty-five nursing diagnoses were reported, among which the most frequent were: Acute Pain (99.3%), Risk for perioperative positioning injury (98.6%), and Impaired tissue integrity (93%). The most frequently prescribed nursing care were: to use protection mechanisms in the surgical patient positioning, to record pain as 5th vital sign, and to take vital signs. There was an association between age and comorbidities. Conclusion The nursing diagnoses supported the nursing care prescription, which enables the qualification of nursing assistance.

  2. [Outpatient nursing consultation and nursing diagnoses related to demographic and clinical characteristics].

    PubMed

    Franzen, Elenara; Scain, Suzana Fiore; Záchia, Suzana A; Schmidt, Maria Luiza; Rabin, Eliane G; da Rosa, Ninon Girardon; Menegon, Dóris B; dos Santos, Luciana Batista dos; Heldt, Elizeth

    2012-09-01

    This study was aimed at verifyjing the relationship between demographic and clinicalfeatures and nursing diagnoses established during a nurse consultation in a general hospital. This is a cross-sectional study that assessed 237 nursing consultations of patients in two different programs Women's Health (46 in obstetrical nursing and 24 in mastology nursing) and 167 in diabetes mellitus education. A total of 49 nursing diagnoses were identified. The most frequent in the women's health program were: knowledge deficit, impaired comfort, impaired tissue, integrity and anxiety; in the program of diabetes education were: ineffective therapeutic regimen management, and imbalanced nutrition: more than body requirements. There was a significant association between the most common diagnoses with certain demographic and clinical features. The results confirmed that the identification of the nursing diagnoses during the consultation may provide accuracy in the focus of outpatient care.

  3. Advanced Nursing Directives: Integrating Validated Clinical Scoring Systems into Nursing Care in the Pediatric Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    deForest, Erin Kate; Thompson, Graham Cameron

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to improve the quality and flow of care provided to children presenting to the emergency department the implementation of nurse-initiated protocols is on the rise. We review the current literature on nurse-initiated protocols, validated emergency department clinical scoring systems, and the merging of the two to create Advanced Nursing Directives (ANDs). The process of developing a clinical pathway for children presenting to our pediatric emergency department (PED) with suspected appendicitis will be used to demonstrate the successful integration of validated clinical scoring systems into practice through the use of Advanced Nursing Directives. Finally, examples of 2 other Advanced Nursing Directives for common clinical PED presentations will be provided. PMID:22778944

  4. A case for collaborative networks for clinical nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Coates, Kate; Fraser, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Clinical Nurse Educators (CNEs) are a unique subspecialty of nurse educators whose primary purpose is to support the ongoing educational needs of clinical nurses. The role has been described as both isolating and overwhelming. In this paper, we first review the current context for CNEs, specifically, the lack of role clarity and explore some reasons for job dissatisfaction. We then propose collaborative networks as a strategy to address these concerns. The potential benefits of these networks include opportunities for: role clarity, decreased isolation, shared finite resources, reduced duplication of work, ongoing professional development, and mentorship. Additionally, we propose enhanced, intersectoral collaborations with Academic Nurse Educators, those nurses employed at academic institutions to educate nursing students. These networks could improve research capacity and knowledge translation to the frontlines of care delivery, professional growth, and responsible use of resources in both sectors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical productivity of primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ying; Tuttle, Jane

    Nurse practitioners are increasingly being integrated into primary care delivery to help meet the growing demand for primary care. It is therefore important to understand nurse practitioners' productivity in primary care practice. We examined nurse practitioners' clinical productivity in regard to number of patients seen per week, whether they had a patient panel, and patient panel size. We further investigated practice characteristics associated with their clinical productivity. We conducted cross-sectional analysis of the 2012 National Sample Survey of Nurse Practitioners. The sample included full-time primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings. Multivariable survey regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship between practice characteristics and nurse practitioners' clinical productivity. Primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings saw an average of 80 patients per week (95% confidence interval [CI]: 79-82), and 64% of them had their own patient panel. The average patient panel size was 567 (95% CI: 522-612). Nurse practitioners who had their own patient panel spent a similar percent of time on patient care and documentation as those who did not. However, those with a patient panel were more likely to provide a range of clinical services to most patients. Nurse practitioners' clinical productivity was associated with several modifiable practice characteristics such as practice autonomy and billing and payment policies. The estimated number of patients seen in a typical week by nurse practitioners is comparable to that by primary care physicians reported in the literature. However, they had a significantly smaller patient panel. Nurse practitioners' clinical productivity can be further improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. What an ambulance nurse needs to know: a content analysis of curricula in the specialist nursing programme in prehospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Sjölin, Helena; Lindström, Veronica; Hult, Håkan; Ringsted, Charlotte; Kurland, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    In Sweden, ambulances must be staffed by at least one registered nurse. Twelve universities offer education in ambulance nursing. There is no national curriculum for detailed course content and there is a lack of knowledge about the educational content that deals with the ambulance nurse practical professional work. The aim of this study was to describe the content in course curricula for ambulance nurses. A descriptive qualitative research design with summative content analysis was used. Data were generated from 49 courses in nursing and medical science. The result shows that the course content can be described as medical, nursing and contextual knowledge with a certain imbalance with largest focus on medical knowledge. There is least focus on nursing, the registered nurses' main profession. This study clarifies how the content in the education for ambulance nurses in Sweden looks today but there are reasons to discuss the content distribution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thinking like a nurse: a research-based model of clinical judgment in nursing.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Christine A

    2006-06-01

    This article reviews the growing body of research on clinical judgment in nursing and presents an alternative model of clinical judgment based on these studies. Based on a review of nearly 200 studies, five conclusions can be drawn: (1) Clinical judgments are more influenced by what nurses bring to the situation than the objective data about the situation at hand; (2) Sound clinical judgment rests to some degree on knowing the patient and his or her typical pattern of responses, as well as an engagement with the patient and his or her concerns; (3) Clinical judgments are influenced by the context in which the situation occurs and the culture of the nursing care unit; (4) Nurses use a variety of reasoning patterns alone or in combination; and (5) Reflection on practice is often triggered by a breakdown in clinical judgment and is critical for the development of clinical knowledge and improvement in clinical reasoning. A model based on these general conclusions emphasizes the role of nurses' background, the context of the situation, and nurses' relationship with their patients as central to what nurses notice and how they interpret findings, respond, and reflect on their response.

  8. Family Nursing Therapeutic Conversations in Heart Failure Outpatient Clinics in Denmark: Nurses' Experiences.

    PubMed

    Voltelen, Barbara; Konradsen, Hanne; Østergaard, Birte

    2016-05-01

    As part of the Heart Failure Family Trial presently being conducted in Denmark, this qualitative process evaluation explored the perceptions of seven practicing cardiac nurses who offered family nursing therapeutic conversations (FNTC) to families in three heart failure outpatient clinics. FNTC were guided by the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models. Data consisted of 34 case reports written by the nurses which documented the use of FNTC, including family responses to the FNTC. A focus group interview with the six of the nurses about their experience of offering FNTC was also conducted. Content analysis was performed using a combined deductive and inductive process. Nurses reported developing a distinct, closer, and more constructive relationship with the patients and their families and reported FNTC increased family bonding and strengthened family relationships. The nurses considered FNTC to be feasible interventions in the routine care provided in heart failure outpatient clinics.

  9. Attributes of clinical leadership in contemporary nursing: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Daly, John

    2013-08-01

    Effective clinical leadership is offered as the key to healthy, functional and supportive work environments for nurses and other health professionals. However, as a concept it lacks a standard definition and is poorly understood. This paper reports on an integrative review undertaken to uncover current understandings of defining attributes of contemporary clinical leadership in nursing. Data collection involved a search of relevant electronic databases for a 10-year period. Keywords for the search were 'clinical leadership' and 'nursing'. Ten research papers met the inclusion criteria for the integrative review. Analysis of these studies indicated clinical leadership attributes had a clinical focus, a follower/team focus or a personal qualities focus; attributes necessary to sustain supportive workplaces and build the capacity and resilience of nursing workforces. The small number of research-based studies yielded for the review indicates the need for further research in the area of clinical leadership.

  10. Experience of nursing students with dyslexia on clinical placement.

    PubMed

    McPheat, Christopher

    2014-06-17

    A review of the literature was conducted to explore the experience of nursing students with dyslexia while on clinical placement. Three main themes emerged, including risk to patient safety, disclosure of dyslexia and support for nursing students. The literature review highlights the lack of dyslexia awareness and understanding in the research and at the trusts at which nursing students are placed, and calls for further research in this area.

  11. Hospice clinical experiences for nursing students: living to the fullest.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Sherri; Heller, Rebecca; Troth, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to provide appropriate care for patients and their families at the end of life can be a formidable challenge for nurse educators. Most nursing schools thread end-of-life concepts throughout the curriculum. Grand Canyon University includes a 40-hour hospice clinical as a component of a home healthcare practicum. Students' weekly written reflections reveal the depth of affective learning that occurs during this experience. Article includes hospice materials and resources.

  12. Delays in referral of patients with social phobia, panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder attending a specialist anxiety clinic.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Renate; Silove, Derrick; Marnane, Claire; Rouen, David

    2006-01-01

    Individuals with anxiety disorders experience substantial delays in obtaining treatment, but little is known about whether people with specific anxiety subcategories are differentially affected. The present study used a modified Encounter Form to examine the cause and length of delays in reaching primary care and specialist services amongst patients with panic disorder (PD/PD-Ag), social phobia (SP), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Participants were 142 consecutive patients attending a specialist anxiety clinic in South Western Sydney. On average, participants with SP took much longer to consult a primary health care provider. Primary care assessments of those with SP often failed to detect anxiety as the key problem, and subsequently, those with SP reported longer delays in reaching specialist care (>9 years). It is not possible to extrapolate the findings to all individuals with SP, as the study was based on specialist service attenders. Nevertheless, the data supports previous findings in suggesting that SP may not be well-recognized as a disorder needing treatment, either by the patient or the primary health care provider. Appropriate educational programs seem warranted to ensure appropriate treatment for this condition.

  13. Specialist titles used in clinical correspondence: a UK survey of oral and maxillofacial surgery consultants.

    PubMed

    Islam, Shofiq; Taylor, Christopher; Ahmed, Siddiq; Walton, Gary M

    2014-03-01

    We explored how oral and maxillofacial (OMF) consultants describe themselves in their correspondence. We did a telephone survey of OMF surgeons' secretaries and compiled data on the specialist titles used. Data were available for 290 consultants and 19 different titles were identified. A total of 190 (66%) consultants used the title OMF surgeon alone and a further 22 (8%) combined it with the name of a subspecialty. The remaining 78 (27%) used 11 alternative titles. Of those surveyed, 212 (73%) continue to use the specialty title of OMF surgeon with or without the name of a subspecialty comprising a readily identifiable group of specialists.

  14. Testing a theoretical model of clinical nurses' intent to stay.

    PubMed

    Cowden, Tracy L; Cummings, Greta G

    2015-01-01

    Published theoretical models of nurses' intent to stay (ITS) report inconsistent outcomes, and not all hypothesized models have been adequately tested. Research has focused on cognitive rather than emotional determinants of nurses' ITS. The aim of this study was to empirically verify a complex theoretical model of nurses' ITS that includes both affective and cognitive determinants and to explore the influence of relational leadership on staff nurses' ITS. The study was a correlational, mixed-method, nonexperimental design. A subsample of the Quality Work Environment Study survey data 2009 (n = 415 nurses) was used to test our theoretical model of clinical nurses' ITS as a structural equation model. The model explained 63% of variance in ITS. Organizational commitment, empowerment, and desire to stay were the model concepts with the strongest effects on nurses' ITS. Leadership practices indirectly influenced ITS. How nurses evaluate and respond to their work environment is both an emotional and rational process. Health care organizations need to be cognizant of the influence that nurses' feelings and views of their work setting have on their intention decisions and integrate that knowledge into the development of retention strategies. Leadership practices play an important role in staff nurses' perceptions of the workplace. Identifying the mechanisms by which leadership influences staff nurses' intentions to stay presents additional focus areas for developing retention strategies.

  15. The clinical role of nurse lecturers: Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Barrett, David

    2007-07-01

    The clinical role of nurse lecturers has been the subject of much debate since the transfer of nurse education into Higher Education Institutions within the United Kingdom. This article provides a critical evaluation of the clinical role of nurse lecturers in terms of policy drivers and strategies for implementing national guidelines. Policies from the initiation of Project 2000, through to recent consultation documents on the support of students in practice, are evaluated. Formal aspects of the nurse lecturer remit, such as link tutor and personal supervisor roles, are discussed in terms of their impact on clinical practice. There is also a brief review of the development of the lecturer practitioner role as a bridge between education and practice. The fundamental arguments in support of nurse lecturers maintaining a clinical role in practice are analysed. This analysis includes consideration of the concept of 'clinical credibility' in terms of the impact on teaching and the closure of the theory-practice gap. The article concludes with suggestions for strategies to resolve the ongoing debate surrounding the clinical role of nurse lecturers. These recommendations include a review of staff:student ratios in nurse education, re-evaluation of the need for a clinical role, and the use of innovative recruitment and development strategies by higher education institutions.

  16. Development of Detailed Clinical Models for Nursing Assessments and Nursing Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Kim, Younglan; Lee, Myung Kyung; Lee, Youngji

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to develop and validate Detailed Clinical Models (DCMs) for nursing assessments and interventions. Methods First, we identified the nursing assessment and nursing intervention entities. Second, we identified the attributes and the attribute values in order to describe the entities in more detail. The data type and optionality of the attributes were then defined. Third, the entities, attributes and value sets in the DCMs were mapped to the International Classification for Nursing Practice Version 2 concepts. Finally, the DCMs were validated by domain experts and applied to case reports. Results In total 481 DCMs, 429 DCMs for nursing assessments and 52 DCMs for nursing interventions, were developed and validated. The DCMs developed in this study were found to be sufficiently comprehensive in representing the clinical concepts of nursing assessments and interventions. Conclusions The DCMs developed in this study can be used in electronic nursing records. These DCMs can be used to ensure the semantic interoperability of the nursing information documented in electronic nursing records. PMID:22259726

  17. Expanding the role of the nurse in clinical trials: the nursing summaries.

    PubMed

    Di Giulio, P; Arrigo, C; Gall, H; Molin, C; Nieweg, R; Strohbucker, B

    1996-10-01

    In order to improve the overall quality of clinical trials, the role of the nurse should be expanded. The minimum requirement to facilitate nurses' participation and the optimal implementation of a clinical research protocol is to provide access to the clinical protocol document itself. However, given the high workload in an oncology unit, there is often little time for the staff to read the entire document. In addition, clinical protocols do not often provide detailed practical instructions for delivering treatment, observing patients, managing toxicities, and treating complications. A nursing summary of the medical protocol is a document that provides a short and easy-to-read selection of protocol-relevant information. It enables nurses to safely and more easily implement the research protocol and improve the care of patients in clinical trials. Master nursing summaries can be prepared centrally by the group responsible for the research protocol, while the unit/wards involved in the research can customize or adapt it to local needs. The potential benefit of implementing nursing summaries is overall improvement of the quality of the study by (a) increasing the reliability of nursing care regarding patients' safety, (b) standardizing monitoring and care of patients, (c) standardizing preventive measures, (d) proposing similar management of complications related to experimental treatments. Moreover, discussing nursing summaries may help evaluate workload related to research, allowing for better planning and allocation of resources.

  18. Predictors of Successful Clinical Performance in Associate Degree Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Rice, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore self-efficacy and emotional intelligence (EI) as predictors for successful clinical performance in nursing students. Students (n = 56) from 5 associate degree in nursing (ADN) schools in 2 Northeastern states participated in the study. Findings demonstrated significant relationships among EI, self-efficacy, and student-rated clinical competence. The findings from this study support the importance of fostering clinical self-efficacy and building EI abilities in ADN students.

  19. Teaching and learning care--exploring nursing students' clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Heggen, Kristin M

    2010-01-01

    Care has always been a key element of nursing. This paper presents findings from research on the following issue: What opportunities and limitations do nursing students encounter when learning nursing care? The study has a qualitative design with field methodology and the study of documents. Six nursing students have been closely monitored during their clinical studies in hospitals, nursing homes and home-based nursing. The study shows that nursing students are likely to possess the potential to provide care for sick and unknown people. The motivation for their commitment to patients may contain an egoistical orientation and runs contrary to former ideals of the nurse's self-sacrificing altruism. Moreover the study shows that there is a potential in the clinical field and in the university college to reflective considerations on experience of care. While clinical practice often has focus on practical problem-solving and procedures, the college tends to focus on abstract theory. Both of these promote the privatisation and neglect of the students' experience of care. The paper concludes with a call for teaching and learning strategies targeting the use of nursing students' personal experience of care.

  20. [A Study of the Evidence-Based Nursing Practice Competence of Nurses and Its Clinical Applications].

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Huang, Ya-Hsuan

    2015-10-01

    Nurses must develop competence in evidence-based nursing in order to provide the best practice medical care to patients. Evidence-based nursing uses issue identification, data mining, and information consolidation from the related medical literature to help nurses find the best evidence. Therefore, for medical institutions to provide quality clinical care, it is necessary for nurses to develop competence in evidence-based nursing. This study aims to explore the effect of a fundamental evidence-based nursing course, as a form of educational intervention, on the development of evidence-based nursing knowledge, self-efficacy in evidence-based practice activities, and outcome expectations of evidence-based practice in nurse participants. Further the competence of these nurses in overcoming obstacles in evidence-based nursing practice. This quasi-experimental study used a pre-post test design with a single group of participants. A convenience sample of 34 nurses from a municipal hospital in northern Taiwan received 8 hours of a fundamental evidence-based nursing course over a two-week period. Participants were asked to complete four questionnaires before and after the intervention. The questionnaires measured the participants' basic demographics, experience in mining the medical literature, evidence-based nursing knowledge, self-efficacy in evidence-based practice activities, outcome expectations of evidence-based practice, competence in overcoming obstacles in evidence-based nursing practice, and learning satisfaction. Collected data was analyzed using paired t, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, and McNemar tests to measure the differences among participants' evidence-based nursing knowledge and practice activities before and after the workshop. The nurses demonstrated significantly higher scores from pre-test to post-test in evidence-based nursing knowledge II, self-efficacy in evidence-based nursing practice activities, and outcome expectations of evidence-based practice

  1. Implementing the new clinical nurse leader role while gleaning insights from the past.

    PubMed

    Moore, Linda Weaver; Leahy, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the experiences of clinical nurse leaders (CNLs) as they implemented this new role. Twenty-four CNLs participated. Data were collected via an e-mail-distributed questionnaire. Data from open-ended questions were used to conduct a qualitative content analysis. Data were categorized according to question, key thoughts and phrases were established, and themes were determined. Findings revealed that nonsystematic role introduction was common. Two challenges to role implementation included role confusion and being overworked. The most positive aspect of the role was remaining close to the point of care. Participants noted that the overall response of the health care team to the role was positive despite participants' belief that the greatest roadblock to role success was the lack of support by nurse administrators. The support of nurse administrators and clear role expectations were viewed as essential for role sustain-ability. Understanding the experiences of CNLs as they launch this new role can provide insights for educators, administrators, CNLs, and other health care providers regarding the success and sustainability of the role. In addition, understanding the similarities between the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role initiation in the past and the CNL role initiation today can foster the development of strategies for confronting the challenges of new role implementation.

  2. Mentoring Clinical Nurses to Write for Publication: Strategies for Success.

    PubMed

    Oman, Kathleen S; Mancuso, Mary P; Ceballos, Kirtley; Makic, MaryBeth Flynn; Fink, Regina M

    2016-05-01

    : Clinical nurses often find writing a challenge, but it's important to disseminate clinical practice initiatives that result in notable patient outcomes. Nurses have a responsibility to share what they do to improve patient care. The increased emphasis on the development and evaluation of evidence-based practice has made it necessary for nurses to share best practices that are associated with improved patient outcomes. We developed a six-month Writing for Publication workshop series designed to teach clinical nurses about the writing process and mentor them through the stages of preparing a manuscript to submit for publication. This successful program helped novice nurse authors become published professionals and had a great impact on our organization.

  3. Clinical academic careers: embracing the art and science of nursing.

    PubMed

    Masterson, Abigail; Robb, Liz

    2016-11-23

    Clinical academics make a unique contribution to health research and scholarship by undertaking practice-focused research that offers direct benefits to patient care. The Florence Nightingale Foundation supports the development of research skills in nursing and midwifery through its scholarships and by establishing a network of chairs in clinical nursing practice research. The Florence Nightingale Foundation also provides leadership scholarships to deans and aspiring deans of university faculties of health. It is from these perspectives that the case is made for investment in clinical academic roles and the development of career pathways that embrace the art and science of nursing.

  4. Assessment with Children Who Need Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC): Clinical Decisions of AAC Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Shelley K.; Quach, Wendy; Weissling, Kristy; McKelvey, Miechelle; Dietz, Aimee

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who are augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) specialists approach the assessment process for 2 case studies, 1 child with cerebral palsy and 1 with autism spectrum disorder. The aim of the study was to answer the following questions: (a) How do…

  5. Designing Nursing Simulation Clinical Experiences to Promote Critical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beattie, Bev; Koroll, Donna; Price, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The use of high fidelity simulation (HFS) learning opportunities in nursing education has received increased attention in the literature. This article describes the design of a systematic framework used to promote critical inquiry and provide meaningful simulation clinical experiences for second year nursing students. Critical inquiry, as defined…

  6. Results of an Oncology Clinical Trial Nurse Role Delineation Study.

    PubMed

    Purdom, Michelle A; Petersen, Sandra; Haas, Barbara K

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the relevance of a five-dimensional model of clinical trial nursing practice in an oncology clinical trial nurse population. 
. Web-based cross-sectional survey.
. Online via Qualtrics.
. 167 oncology nurses throughout the United States, including 41 study coordinators, 35 direct care providers, and 91 dual-role nurses who provide direct patient care and trial coordination.
. Principal components analysis was used to determine the dimensions of oncology clinical trial nursing practice.
. Self-reported frequency of 59 activities.
. The results did not support the original five-dimensional model of nursing care but revealed a more multidimensional model.
. An analysis of frequency data revealed an eight-dimensional model of oncology research nursing, including care, manage study, expert, lead, prepare, data, advance science, and ethics.
. This evidence-based model expands understanding of the multidimensional roles of oncology nurses caring for patients with cancer enrolled in clinical trials.

  7. Emotional intelligence and clinical performance/retention of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Marvos, Chelsea; Hale, Frankie B

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory, quantitative, descriptive study was undertaken to explore the relationship between clinical performance and anticipated retention in nursing students. After approval by the university's Human Subjects Committee, a sample of 104 nursing students were recruited for this study, which involved testing with a valid and reliable emotional intelligence (EI) instrument and a self-report survey of clinical competencies. Statistical analysis revealed that although the group average for total EI score and the 6 score subsets were in the average range, approximately 30% of the individual total EI scores and 30% of two branch scores, identifying emotions correctly and understanding emotions, fell in the less than average range. This data, as well as the analysis of correlation with clinical self-report scores, suggest recommendations applicable to educators of clinical nursing students. Registered nurses make-up the largest segment of the ever-growing healthcare workforce. Yet, retention of new graduates has historically been a challenge for the profession. Given the projected employment growth in nursing, it is important to identify factors which correlate with high levels of performance and job retention among nurses. There is preliminary evidence that EI a nontraditional intelligence measure relates positively not only with retention of clinical staff nurses, but with overall clinical performance as well.

  8. Emotional intelligence and clinical performance/retention of nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Marvos, Chelsea; Hale, Frankie B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This exploratory, quantitative, descriptive study was undertaken to explore the relationship between clinical performance and anticipated retention in nursing students. Methods: After approval by the university's Human Subjects Committee, a sample of 104 nursing students were recruited for this study, which involved testing with a valid and reliable emotional intelligence (EI) instrument and a self-report survey of clinical competencies. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that although the group average for total EI score and the 6 score subsets were in the average range, approximately 30% of the individual total EI scores and 30% of two branch scores, identifying emotions correctly and understanding emotions, fell in the less than average range. This data, as well as the analysis of correlation with clinical self-report scores, suggest recommendations applicable to educators of clinical nursing students. Conclusions: Registered nurses make-up the largest segment of the ever-growing healthcare workforce. Yet, retention of new graduates has historically been a challenge for the profession. Given the projected employment growth in nursing, it is important to identify factors which correlate with high levels of performance and job retention among nurses. There is preliminary evidence that EI a nontraditional intelligence measure relates positively not only with retention of clinical staff nurses, but with overall clinical performance as well. PMID:27981096

  9. Professional Quality of Life and Clinical Competencies among Korean Nurses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghee; Han, Yonghee; Kwak, Yeunhee; Kim, Ji-su

    2015-09-01

    Clinical competence among nurses is an essential requirement for the provision of safe and effective patient care. This study aims to classify types of professional quality of life experienced by Korean nurses, and examine the relationship between demographic and professional characteristics and clinical competence among nurses experiencing each type. A total of 335 nurses completed questionnaires assessing professional quality of life, clinical competence, and demographic and professional characteristics. Following identification of the underlying factors of professional quality of life, we classified participants into three clusters. There were significant differences in age, marital status, religion, educational status, and position between clusters. Results also revealed that nurses with high compassion satisfaction and low compassion fatigue (burnout, secondary traumatic stress) tended to have higher clinical competence. This study demonstrated that it is possible to directly examine the relationship between professional quality of life level and clinical competence among nurses. Thus, interventions to increase nurses' compassion satisfaction and relieve compassion fatigue are needed, as professional quality of life may affect clinical competence. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Exploring ward nurses' perceptions of continuing education in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Govranos, Melissa; Newton, Jennifer M

    2014-04-01

    Health care systems demand that nurses are flexible skilful workers who maintain currency and competency in order to deliver safe effective patient centered care. Nurses must continually build best practice into their care and acquire lifelong learning. Often this learning is acquired within the work environment and is facilitated by the clinical nurse educator. Understanding clinical nurses' values and needs of continuing education is necessary to ensure appropriate education service delivery and thus enhance patient care. To explore clinical ward-based nurses' values and perceptions towards continuing education and what factors impact on continuing education in the ward. A case study approach was utilized. A major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A range of clinical nursing staff (n=23). Four focus groups and six semi-structured individual interviews were undertaken. Focus group interviews explored participants' values and perceptions on continuing education through a values clarification tool. Thematic analysis of interviews was undertaken to identify themes and cluster data. Three central themes: 'culture and attitudes', 'what is learning?' and 'being there-being seen', emerged reflecting staffs' values and perceptions of education and learning in the workplace. Multiple factors influence ward nurses' ability and motivation to incorporate lifelong learning into their practice. Despite variance in nurses' values and perceptions of CE in clinical environments, CE was perceived as important. Nurses yearned for changes to facilitate lifelong learning and cultivate a learning culture. Clinical nurse educators need to be cognizant of adult learners' characteristics such as values, beliefs, needs and potential barriers, to effectively facilitate support in a challenging and complex learning environment. Organizational support is essential so ward managers in conjunction with educational departments can promote and sustain continuing education, lifelong

  11. Specialist antenatal clinics for women at high risk of preterm birth: a systematic review of qualitative and quantitative research.

    PubMed

    Malouf, Reem; Redshaw, Maggie

    2017-02-02

    Preterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Women with previous prenatal loss are at higher risk of preterm birth. A specialist antenatal clinic is considered as one approach to improve maternity and pregnancy outcomes. A systematic review of quantitative, qualitative and mixed method studies conducted on women at high risk of preterm birth (PTB). The review primary outcomes were to report on the specialist antenatal clinics effect in preventing or reducing preterm birth, perinatal mortality and morbidity and women's perceptions and experiences of a specialist clinic whether compared or not compared with standard antenatal care. Other secondary maternal, infant and economic outcomes were also determined. A comprehensive search strategy was carried out in English within electronic databases as far back as 1980. The reviewers selected studies, assessed the quality, and extracted data independently. Results were summarized and tabulated. Eleven studies fully met the review inclusion criteria, ten were quantitative design studies and only one was a qualitative design study. No mixed method design study was included in the review. All were published after 1989, seven were conducted in the USA and four in the UK. Results from five good to low quality randomised controlled trials (RCTs), all conducted before 1990, did not illustrate the efficacy of the clinic in reducing preterm birth. Whereas results from more recent low quality cohort studies showed some positive neonatal outcomes. Themes from one good quality qualitative study reflected on the emotional and psychological need to reduce anxiety and stress of women referred to such a clinic. Women expressed their negative emotional responses at being labelled as high risk and positive responses to being assessed and treated in the clinic. Women also reported that their partners were struggling to cope emotionally. Findings from this review were mixed. Evidence from cohort studies

  12. Clinical placements and nursing students' career planning: a qualitative exploration.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Lisa; McCall, Louise; Wray, Natalie

    2010-04-01

    Many nursing students enter undergraduate programmes with preconceived ideas about their future nursing careers, and intend to practice in particular areas such as midwifery or paediatrics. Through clinical placements, students are exposed to different clinical areas and professional socialization is facilitated. However, little is known about the influence of clinical placements on students' career intentions. This paper reports nursing findings drawn from a large qualitative study conducted in Victoria, Australia that sought to explore the influence of health professional students' clinical placements on their future career intentions. Participants were invited to be involved in either face-to-face or focus group interviews depending upon their own preference. Thematic data analysis revealed three main themes: 're-affirming career choice', 'working in a particular area' and 'work location'. Findings from the study add to our understanding of factors influencing nursing students' planning for their future careers including the impact of clinical placements.

  13. Nurses' clinical practice in primary care: a process under construction.

    PubMed

    Matumoto, Silvia; Fortuna, Cinira Magali; Kawata, Lauren Suemi; Mishima, Silvana Martins; Pereira, Maria José Bistafa

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to present the re-signification process of the meanings of nurses' clinical practice in primary care from the perspective of extended clinic and permanent education. An intervention research was carried out with the approval of an ethics committee. Nine nurses participated in reflection groups from September to December 2008 in Ribeirão Preto-SP-Brazil. The redefinition process of the meanings proposed by the institutional analysis was mapped. The results point out that the nurses perceive differences in clinical work, by acknowledging the sense of user-centered clinical practice; daily limits and tensions and the need for support from managers and the team to deal with users' problems and situations. They identify the necessity to open space in the schedule to do that. It was concluded that nurses' clinical practice is being consolidated, and that collective analysis processes permit learning and the reconstruction of practices.

  14. Marking out the clinical expert/clinical leader/clinical scholar: perspectives from nurses in the clinical arena

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical scholarship has been conceptualised and theorised in the nursing literature for over 30 years but no research has captured nurses’ clinicians’ views on how it differs or is the same as clinical expertise and clinical leadership. The aim of this study was to determine clinical nurses’ understanding of the differences and similarities between the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Methods A descriptive interpretative qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews with 18 practising nurses from Australia, Canada and England. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholarship as described by the participants. These themes were then compared and contrasted and the essential elements that characterise the nursing roles of the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar were identified. Results Clinical experts were seen as linking knowledge to practice with some displaying clinical leadership and scholarship. Clinical leadership is seen as a positional construct with a management emphasis. For the clinical scholar they linked theory and practice and encouraged research and dissemination of knowledge. Conclusion There are distinct markers for the roles of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Nurses working in one or more of these roles need to work together to improve patient care. An ‘ideal nurse’ may be a blending of all three constructs. As nursing is a practice discipline its scholarship should be predominantly based on clinical scholarship. Nurses need to be encouraged to go beyond their roles as clinical leaders and experts to use their position to challenge and change through the propagation of knowledge to their community. PMID:23587282

  15. Supporting self and others: from staff nurse to nurse consultant. Part 5: clinical supervision.

    PubMed

    Fowler, John

    This series of articles explores various ways of supporting staff who work in the fast-moving and ever-changing health service. In previous articles, John Fowler an experienced nursing lecturer, author and consultant examined the importance of developing a supportive working culture and the role of preceptorship and mentoring. This article examines the use of clinical supervision within nursing.

  16. Preparing clinical nurse leaders in a regional Australian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ann K; Parker, Vicki T; Milson-Hawke, Sally; Cairney, Karen; Peek, Carmel

    2009-12-01

    The need to develop nurses as managers and leaders is crucial to the retention of registered nurses at a time of work force shortages and an increasingly aging work force in most Western industrialized countries. This article describes a creative and collaborative educational initiative developed at a large regional teaching hospital in New South Wales, Australia, designed to address this need. Based on a competency assessment process designed around face-to-face education, resource materials, and individualized mentoring from nurse unit managers, the aim of this multifaceted educational program is to develop effective team leaders in the clinical setting as well as a new generation of nursing leaders.

  17. A wellness framework for pediatric nursing clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Spurr, Shelley; Bally, Jill; Ogenchuk, Marcella; Peternelj-Taylor, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a proposed holistic Framework for Exploring Adolescent Wellness specific to the discipline of nursing. Conceptualized as a practical adolescent wellness assessment tool, the framework attends to the physical, spiritual, psychological and social dimensions of adolescent health. Through the discussion of a reconstructed case study the framework's application to nursing practice is illustrated. Nurses are distinctly positioned to promote adolescent wellness. This approach facilitates the exploration of the multiple influences on the health of adolescents, across a variety of clinical practice specialties and settings, by nurses of varying experiences.

  18. Primary care nurse practitioner clinical education: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sroczynski, Maureen; Dunphy, Lynne M

    2012-12-01

    The Institute of Medicine report and the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act present significant opportunities for the nursing profession. As the largest group of primary care providers, nurse practitioners are the critical element in the provision of comprehensive primary care, and a critical element to the success of the redesigned health care system. Nurse practitioners can bridge the gap between coverage and access and provide the patient-centered innovative approaches needed. There are, however, significant barriers that need to be addressed. This article presents a framework for creating innovative approaches to the redesign of nurse practitioner clinical education. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Global and cultural perinatal nursing research: improving clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Callister, Lynn Clark

    2011-01-01

    High-quality perinatal nursing care should be based on the best evidence including research findings, clinical expertise, and the preferences of women and their families. Principles of perinatal research initiatives are defined, with suggested research priorities designed to close current gaps in the micro and macro environments of perinatal nursing throughout the world. Nearly a decade ago, the following question was asked, "Where is the 'E' (evidence) in maternal child health?" Improving the quality and safety of perinatal nursing care for culturally diverse women globally is the primary goal of nurse researchers leading the future of perinatal healthcare.

  20. Competence of novice nurses: role of clinical work during studying.

    PubMed

    Manoochehri, H; Imani, E; Atashzadeh-Shoorideh, F; Alavi-Majd, A

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Clinical competence is to carry out the tasks with excellent results in a different of adjustments. According to various studies, one of the factors influencing clinical competence is work experience. This experience affects the integrity of students' learning experience and their practical skills. Many nursing students practice clinical work during their full-time studying. The aim of this qualitative research was to clarify the role of clinical work during studying in novice nurses' clinical competence. Methods: This qualitative content analysis performed with the conventional approach. All teaching hospitals of Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences selected as the research environment. To collect data, deep and semi-structured interviews, presence in the scene and manuscripts used. To provide feedback for the next release and the capacity of the data, interviews were transcribed verbatim immediately. Results: 45 newly-graduated nurses and head nurses between 23 and 40 with 1 to 18 years of experience participated in the study. After coding all interviews, 1250 original codes were derived. The themes extracted included: task rearing, personality rearing, knowledge rearing, and profession rearing roles of clinical work during studying. Conclusion: Working during studying can affect performance, personality, knowledge, and professional perspectives of novice nurses. Given the differences that may exist in clinical competencies of novice nurses with and without clinical work experience, it is important to pay more attention to this issue and emphasize on their learning in this period.

  1. Competence of novice nurses: role of clinical work during studying

    PubMed Central

    Manoochehri, H; Imani, E; Atashzadeh-Shoorideh, F; Alavi-Majd, A

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Clinical competence is to carry out the tasks with excellent results in a different of adjustments. According to various studies, one of the factors influencing clinical competence is work experience. This experience affects the integrity of students' learning experience and their practical skills. Many nursing students practice clinical work during their full-time studying. The aim of this qualitative research was to clarify the role of clinical work during studying in novice nurses' clinical competence. Methods: This qualitative content analysis performed with the conventional approach. All teaching hospitals of Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences selected as the research environment. To collect data, deep and semi-structured interviews, presence in the scene and manuscripts used. To provide feedback for the next release and the capacity of the data, interviews were transcribed verbatim immediately. Results: 45 newly-graduated nurses and head nurses between 23 and 40 with 1 to 18 years of experience participated in the study. After coding all interviews, 1250 original codes were derived. The themes extracted included: task rearing, personality rearing, knowledge rearing, and profession rearing roles of clinical work during studying. Conclusion: Working during studying can affect performance, personality, knowledge, and professional perspectives of novice nurses. Given the differences that may exist in clinical competencies of novice nurses with and without clinical work experience, it is important to pay more attention to this issue and emphasize on their learning in this period. PMID:28316703

  2. Clinical nurse leaders' and academics' perspectives in clinical assessment of final-year nursing students: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi Vivien; Enskär, Karin; Pua, Lay Hoon; Heng, Doreen Gek Noi; Wang, Wenru

    2017-09-01

    The nature of nursing practice is diverse; therefore, clinical assessment is a complex process. This study explores the perceptions of clinical nurse leaders and academics on clinical assessment for undergraduate nursing education during transition to practice. An explorative qualitative approach was applied. Eight nurse managers, six clinical nurse educators, and eight academics from two tertiary hospitals and a university in Singapore participated in four focus group discussions. Thematic analysis was conducted. Four overriding themes were revealed: the need for a valid and reliable clinical assessment tool, preceptors' competency in clinical assessment, challenges encountered by the students in clinical assessment, and the need for close academic and clinical collaboration to support preceptors and students. Closer academic-clinical partnership is recommended to review the clinical education curriculum. Clinical and educational institutions need to work closely to design a learning program to enhance preceptors' competence in clinical pedagogy and assessment. Furthermore, a stress management program could build students' resiliency in coping with unfamiliar clinical environments. Ongoing support needs to be provided for both preceptors and students to enrich the preceptorship and learning experiences. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Clinical liaison nurse model in a community hospital: a unique academic-practice partnership that strengthens clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Lovecchio, Catherine P; DiMattio, Mary Jane K; Hudacek, Sharon

    2012-11-01

    The necessity to help baccalaureate nursing students transition to clinical practice in a health care environment governed by change has compelled nurse educators to investigate alternative clinical instruction models that nurture academic-practice partnerships and facilitate student clinical learning. This article describes an academic-practice partnership in a community hospital using the Clinical Liaison Nurse (CLN) model as a link between students and clinical faculty and reports results of a quasi-experimental study that compared perceptions of the clinical learning environment between students participating in the CLN model (experimental group) and those in a traditional, instructor-led clinical model (control group). Students assigned to the CLN model had statistically significantly higher individualization, satisfaction, and task orientation scores on the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory. The findings provide evidence that academic-practice partnerships can be successful in community hospital settings and enhance students' perceptions in the clinical learning environment.

  4. The process and outcomes of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, K; Dixon, L; Wakeman, C J; Robertson, G M; Eglinton, T W; Frizelle, F A

    2012-05-01

    Evidence suggests that follow-up after colorectal cancer improves survival. Colorectal cancer is so common that patient follow-up can overwhelm a service, affecting the ability to see new referrals and reassess patients seen previously who have new symptoms. In order to cope with this demand a nurse-led follow-up service was started in 2004. We aimed to review the results of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic. Between 1 December 2004 and 31 January 2011, patients who underwent resection for colorectal cancer were followed up by a nurse specialist according to a protocol determined by the colorectal surgeons in the unit. All patient details were recorded prospectively in a purpose designed database. Nine hundred and fifty patients were followed up over 7 years. Some 368 patients were discharged from the follow-up programme, 474 patients remain actively involved in the programme and 108 patients died. Of the patients discharged from the follow-up scheme 269 (73%) were discharged to their general practitioner free of disease after 5 years. Of the 108 who patients died, 98 were as a result of colorectal cancer. Twenty patients (2.1%) were identified with local (peri-anastomotic) disease recurrence and 93 patients (9.8%) were found to have developed distant metastatic disease. Of these, 65 patients (6.8%) were referred for palliative care and 28 (2.9%) had surgery for focal metastatic disease of whom 18 were still alive at the time of this analysis. This paper shows that a nurse-led clinic for colorectal cancer follow-up can achieve satisfactory results with detection rates of recurrent or metastatic disease comparable to consultant follow-up. A nurse-led clinic provides the benefits of follow-up without overwhelming the consultant colorectal surgical clinic practice. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Forensic psychiatric nursing: skills and competencies: II clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Mason, T; Coyle, D; Lovell, A

    2008-03-01

    This study reports on research undertaken to identify the skills and competencies of forensic psychiatric nurses working in secure psychiatric services in the UK. The rationale for this research is the lack of clarity in the role definition of nurses working in these environments and the specific content that may underscore the curriculum for training forensic nurses. Over 3300 questionnaires were distributed to forensic psychiatric nurses, non-forensic psychiatric nurses and other disciplines and information obtained on (1) the perceived clinical problems that give forensic nurses the most difficulty; (2) the skills best suited to overcome those problems; and (3) the priority aspects of clinical nursing care that needs to be developed. A 35% response rate was obtained with 1019 forensic psychiatric nurses, 110 non-forensic psychiatric nurses and 43 other disciplines. The results highlighted a 'top ten' list of main problems with possible solutions and main areas for development. The conclusions drawn include a focus on skills and competencies regarding the management of personality disorders and the management of violence and aggression.

  6. Understanding dyslexia and nurse education in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Sanderson-Mann, Jo; McCandless, Fiona

    2006-05-01

    Clinical practice and dyslexia is becoming an important topic with the introduction of disability legislation and changes in nursing school entrance requirements. This paper considers the issues surrounding nursing and dyslexia, drawing on the available evidence. Firstly, the strengths dyslexics can bring to nursing are considered, along with difficulties they can experience, although the evidence is limited, with papers being anecdotal or speculative at times. The attitudes of institutions and healthcare professionals towards dyslexia are also addressed, along with what they can do to support dyslexic nurses and student nurses. Strategies for individual students are also suggested, which nursing educators could encourage students to use. Finally, the issue of disclosure is discussed, and suggested reasons why some dyslexic students choose not to disclose.

  7. A strategy to address the nursing faculty shortage.

    PubMed

    Ganley, Barbara J; Sheets, Ingrid

    2009-07-01

    This article describes one university's experience in creating a master's geriatric clinical nurse specialist-nurse educator program to address the nursing faculty shortage and the need for geriatric clinical nurse specialists. The successes and challenges are outlined, and curricular ideas that may be beneficial to other nursing programs also are presented. This program has enhanced the university's pool of clinical instructors, increased its ability to provide services to older adults, and allowed faculty to instruct and focus undergraduates in the distinctions of geriatric nursing care. The biggest challenges faced were marketing and recruitment of nurses; these challenges were addressed, and possible solutions are offered. The most immediate benefit of this program was the generation of geriatric clinical nurse specialists.

  8. Experiences of Iranian Nurses that Intent to Leave the Clinical Nursing: a Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Habibzadeh, Hosein; Alilu, Leyla; Gillespie, Mark; Shakibi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the current shortage of nurses, it is important to know the reasons nurses want to leave the clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses who intend to leave clinical nursing. Methods: In a qualitative content analysis study, data obtained from 13 in-depth face-to-face semi-structured interviews with nurses working in hospitals affiliated to the Tabriz and Urmia University of Medical Sciences in Iran, selected through purposive sampling. A conventional content analysis was used for data analysis. Results: Four categories and eleven subcategories emerged during data analysis. The extracted categories and sub categories consisted of (I) Entry routes into nursing (implicitly entry, targeted entry), (II) Defects in dignity (lack of professional vision toward the nurses, social status of nurses), (III) Work in non-ideal working environment (lack of support, discrimination, conflict, lack of opportunities for advancement), and (IV) Dissatisfaction with working conditions (heavy workload, lack of power, unusual working hours). Conclusion: The findings of this qualitative study reflect professional turnover as a complex, ongoing, multidimensional process. By identifying the factors responsible, it could be possible to retain nurses in the field. PMID:27354981

  9. [Walk-in nursing clinic for earwax removal].

    PubMed

    Santullo, Antonella; Calabrese, Enzo; Canova, Giuliana; Curzi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    In the USL Rimini was set up in 2007 a nursing service for the cerumen removal and it was implemented during time. To demonstrate through recorded activities data that this service managed by nurses is able to provide a timely and appropriate response to the users. Activities data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The implementation of the nursing service in 2010 led to an increase (= 682) in performance compared to 2009, activities data of 2011 and 2012 show a more consistent pattern and consolidation of open days and in the number of services performed per session, all issues reported by users have been properly recognized by specialist nurse. All positive insights in terms of improved job satisfaction, high quality standards, minimum requirement of financial resources indicate that this service, may be replicated in other health care facilities. Future developments of the service should be aimed at the development of an informative brochure for users, an evaluation of users' satisfaction and an improvement of nursing notes.

  10. Orthopaedic nurses' attitudes towards clinical nursing research - A cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-05-01

    The call for evidence-based knowledge in clinical nursing practice has increased during recent decades and research in orthopaedic nursing is needed to improve patients' conditions, care and treatment. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the self-perceived theoretical knowledge and practical research competencies among orthopaedic nurses and their interest and motivation to increase these in everyday practice. A newly developed questionnaire was given to a convenience sample of 87 orthopaedic nurses. Forty three orthopaedic nurses (49.4%) completed the questionnaire. The results indicated that despite the majority of orthopaedic nurses having low self-perceived theoretical knowledge and practical research competencies, their interest and motivation to improve these were high, especially their inner motivation. However, the nurses' inner motivation was inhibited by a lack of acceptance from colleagues and section head nurses and a shortage of time. This study forms a baseline as a part of a larger study and contributes knowledge useful to other orthopaedic departments with an interest in optimizing nursing research to improve orthopaedic nursing care quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Student nur