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Sample records for clinical nurse specialist

  1. Clinical nurse specialist regulation: the Maryland experience.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    High-quality care will continue to be a driver in the evolution of today's health care environment. Ensuring effective, cost-conscious, quality care is the core of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) practice. The CNS practice varies by state, depending on each state's Nurse Practice Act. Some states have separate scopes of practice for CNSs, including prescriptive authority, whereas some states do not recognize CNS practice as different from the practice of the registered nurse. The journey to state recognition and title protection for the CNS role in the state of Maryland is described. PMID:25594481

  2. 42 CFR 410.76 - Clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Clinical nurse specialists' services. 410.76... § 410.76 Clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term...) Qualifications. For Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a clinical nurse specialist must— (1) Be...

  3. Clinical nurse specialists gain title protection in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) in Pennsylvania will long remember the bright, sunny day of July 20, 2007. That was the day Governor Edward G. Rendell signed House Bill 1254 into law. Clinical nurse specialists in Pennsylvania finally gained title protection! What does this mean? How did it all come about? What are the implications for practice? PMID:18091127

  4. 42 CFR 410.76 - Clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 410.76 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...) Qualifications. For Medicare Part B coverage of his or her services, a clinical nurse specialist must— (1) Be a... a national certifying body that has established standards for clinical nurse specialists and that...

  5. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's... services. (a) General rule. A physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse...

  6. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's... services. (a) General rule. A physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse...

  7. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's... services. (a) General rule. A physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse...

  8. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's... services. (a) General rule. A physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse...

  9. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's... services. (a) General rule. A physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse...

  10. Developing an empirical base for clinical nurse specialist education.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Arleen M; Nardi, Deena; Lewandowski, Margaret A

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the design of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) education program using National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) CNS competencies to guide CNS program clinical competency expectations and curriculum outcomes. The purpose is to contribute to the development of an empirical base for education and credentialing of CNSs. The NACNS CNS core competencies and practice competencies in all 3 spheres of influence guided the creation of clinical competency grids for this university's practicum courses. This project describes the development, testing, and application of these clinical competency grids that link the program's CNS clinical courses with the NACNS CNS competencies. These documents guide identification, tracking, measurement, and evaluation of the competencies throughout the clinical practice portion of the CNS program. This ongoing project will continue to provide data necessary to the benchmarking of CNS practice competencies, which is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of direct practice performance and the currency of graduate nursing education. PMID:18438164

  11. Translating social justice into clinical nurse specialist practice.

    PubMed

    Bell, Sue Ellen; Hulbert, James R

    2008-01-01

    Translating social justice into clinical nurse specialist (CNS) practice involves not only facilitating equitable access to healthcare resources but also changing the definition of health from individual centric to population based. Clinical nurse specialists working within hospitals or healthcare systems generally have not explored the ethical conflicts between demand and available healthcare resources. Application of social justice to CNS practice requires microallocation decisions in direct patient care and macroallocation decisions in the distribution of all societal goods that alleviate health disparities. This article reviews the meaning, history, and current basis for the application of the principle of social justice to CNS practice.

  12. Clinical nurse specialists driving research and practice through Research Roundtables.

    PubMed

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Schafer, Deborah J

    2009-01-01

    Providing patient care based on the best evidence is a priority for healthcare institutions across the country to improve practice and patient outcomes. Creating a culture of evidence-based practice (EBP) within an organization can be a challenging task. Literature has identified numerous barriers to EBP including negative attitudes and perceptions among nurses and lack of organizational support, time, resources, and confidence with these skills. Creating programs that help nurses appreciate the value and importance of nursing research for practice can be an effective approach in changing the culture. Research Roundtable is a collaborative partnership between a healthcare system and a baccalaureate nursing program to promote EBP and research skills in nurses and nursing students. Initial goals of the program focused on increasing the nurses' knowledge base of the research process and applying research to actual clinical problems. Over the course of 3 years, Roundtable evolved from development and implementation of research projects to concentrating on the identification of clinical problems that could be analyzed and solved through the use of EBP processes. The program has resulted in the completion of research studies, implementation of practice changes based on evidence uncovered in group work, and the approval of research projects in data collection phases. The positive impacts of Roundtable have been identified at the level of the staff nurse and the organization as a whole. This article describes the role of the clinical nurse specialist in the development and implementation of the Research Roundtable. PMID:19858901

  13. Changing roles for psychiatric clinical nurse specialists: prescriptive privileges.

    PubMed

    Rufli, G M

    1996-01-01

    Interest was expressed at the mental health center in expanding the role of psychiatric clinical nurse specialists to include prescribing medications. There is a definite need for this expanded prescriptive role. The goals of improving patient access to care, offering quality service and cost effectiveness can be met by the psychiatric clinical nurse specialist certified by ANA. The functions of a CNS in a collaborative role with psychiatrists would involve promotion and health maintenance, evaluation, intake screening, health teaching, community action, and advanced psychobiological interventions including the prescribing of pharmacological agents. The ARNP, CS could alleviate the case load for pharmacological evaluation for the psychiatrists and enhance access to pharmacological management. The change in the Kentucky law giving prescriptive privileges to ARNPs makes this role feasible. PMID:9416059

  14. Core Practice Outcomes for Clinical Nurse Specialists: A Revalidation Study.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Janet S; Mayo, Ann M; Walker, Jane A; Urden, Linda D

    2016-01-01

    Measuring outcomes of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) practice is essential for demonstrating accountability. Literature is limited with respect to the scope of reported CNS outcomes. The National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists' (NACNS) published listing of CNS outcomes could serve as an outcome measurement framework. Revalidation of these outcomes is an important step in creating a structured outcome measurement approach. The purpose of this descriptive study was to assess CNSs' perceptions of the ongoing validity of NACNS published outcomes. A Web-based survey asked participants to describe, for each of 42 outcomes, the frequency of outcome accountability, importance to practice, and frequency of monitoring. Of the 427 surveys returned, 347 (81%) were included in analysis. Findings demonstrated concordance between identified outcomes and actual CNS practice. When job descriptions included the CNS outcomes, more CNSs reported using the outcomes in practice. Both accountability and importance predicted the monitoring of outcomes (p < .001). This study demonstrated the ongoing validity of NACNS outcomes. Nurse educators must ensure that CNS program curricula are based on the NACNS framework and that successful achievement of program outcomes are congruent with the framework. These outcomes have potential for use as a conceptual framework for guiding future CNS outcome investigations and ongoing monitoring systems. Finally, the findings of this study give voice to CNS practice and provide knowledge about expectations for practice outcomes. PMID:27424927

  15. Professional socialization of students in clinical nurse specialist programs.

    PubMed

    Ares, Terri L

    2014-11-01

    Graduate nursing programs facilitate the transition of RNs to advanced roles through a complex process of professional socialization. The purpose of this study was to explore the professional socialization of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) students. Two hundred twenty-five students, representing 73 CNS programs, responded to an online survey. Both preprogram variables and educational experiences contributed to an adequate level of CNS socialization. Students' self-concept was strong, and they felt prepared to practice in the role, which was highly correlated with their perceptions of how well the program prepared them academically and experientially. Having a CNS mentor was positively associated with readiness to practice. Outcomes did not vary with cohort status, and online instruction did not impede socialization. These findings provide implications for CNS program advisement and design.

  16. The clinical nurse specialist role in the Army Medical Department.

    PubMed

    Frelin, A J; Oda, D S; Staggers, N

    1990-01-01

    Although clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) have been in the Army Medical Department for more than 10 years, there are no reports in the literature regarding role implementation for them. In this study, a survey of all practicing CNSs in the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) and their supervisors was conducted with the purpose of defining their perceived role and the value placed on it by their supervisors. The results showed that the study population (n = 52) has implemented the role with all components (practice, education, consultation, administration, and research) considered important by them. Further, 85% of the CNSs report positive job satisfaction, and 67% believe they have reached role maturation. Their supervisors were equally or more positive about the importance of the role, and all (n = 26) felt it must be maintained despite budget constraints and nursing shortages. Findings were that CNSs experience role satisfaction, have achieved role maturation, and are valued by their supervisors within the AMEDD. PMID:2207973

  17. Caring--the work of the clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, K M; Lucke, K T

    1990-01-01

    Understanding the contribution of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) to quality patient care is important for educators and administrators as they plan for the care of patients in an increasingly complex health care system. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical practice of CNSs as reported by practicing CNSs. Grounded theory methodology was used in collecting and analyzing the data. The subjects consisted of a theoretical sample of 17 Master's prepared CNSs who had functioned in the role of the CNS for a minimum of 1 year, and three recorded case studies from the literature. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted by the principle investigator. Using the constant comparative method, the data were line-coded and clustered to form groups of data that could be labeled as constructs. When theoretical saturation was reached, no further interviews were conducted. The investigators proposed that caring was the basic social psychological process (BSP), which was validated in a literature review. Scientific caring included investigating and teaching. Humanistic caring included creating-the-new, showing-the-way, working-with-others, and taking-care-of-the-environment. CNSs took care of the caretakers as well as the patients and their families.

  18. A phenomenological investigation into the role of the clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Bousfield, C

    1997-02-01

    This research study adopts a phenomenological approach to investigate how a group of clinical nurse specialists think and experience their role. It reviews the literature on the clinical nurse specialist from 1943, when Frances Reiter first coined the phrase "nurse clinician', to the present time, when individuals are committed to a range of initiatives aimed at improving the quality of the British National Health Service and patient care. The study investigates and analyses their views and conveys the personal meaning of clinical nurse specialists' "lived experience' in the role. Findings of the study suggest that clinical nurse specialists are experienced practitioners who strive to be in positions in which they influence patient care and utilize advanced knowledge, expertise and leadership skills in a multidisciplinary environment. The literature proposes that for the role to be recognized and accepted individuals need to be educated at an advanced level, demonstrate practice based in research and have a firm base as a specialist in nursing. The findings clearly suggest that while the role of the clinical nurse specialist can be influenced in a positive manner by the organization and guided by the individual, it is important to acknowledge that the role is in a transitional phase. Finally, the research suggests the importance of establishing a clear role definition in a creative and supportive environment allowing for autonomy, professional growth and the development of individuals as clinically competent nurse specialists.

  19. An example of a successful collaboration effort between a nurse educator and a hospice clinical nurse specialist/director.

    PubMed

    Lehna, C; Byrne, A

    1995-01-01

    Collaboration between nursing education and nursing service recognizes the expertise of both the educator and the clinician. Nurses share information, ideas, and skills to promote quality nursing care, improve nursing practice, and reduce costs. One example of an effective nursing collaboration involved a child-rearing nurse educator and a children's hospice clinical nurse specialist/director. The methods of promoting collaboration between the educator and clinician will be examined. The advantages and disadvantages of collaboration between the two nursing divisions will be explored. Lastly, mutual nursing practice benefits for the two clinicians are explained.

  20. Rural nurse specialists: clinical practice and the politics of care.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    2008-01-01

    Doctor flight from rural areas is an international phenomenon that places great pressure on primary health care delivery. In New Zealand, the response to these empty doctors' surgeries has been the introduction of nurse-led rural health clinics that have attracted controversy both in the media and from urban-based doctors over whether such nurse-led care is a direct substitution of medical care. This article analyzes the reflections of nurses working in some of these clinics who suggest that their situation is more complex than a direct substitution of labor. Although the nurses indicate some significant pressures moving them closer to the work of doctoring, they actively police this cross-boundary work and labor simultaneously to shore up their nursing identities. My own conclusions support their assertions. I argue that it is the maintenance of a holistic professional habitus that best secures their professional identity as nurses while they undertake the cross-boundary tasks of primary rural health care. There are clear professional benefits and disadvantages for the nurses in these situations, which make the positions highly politicized. These recurring divisions of labor within medical care giving and the elaboration of new types of care worker form an appropriate although neglected topic of study for anthropologists. The study of the social organization of clinical medicine is much enriched by paying closer attention to its interaction with allied health professions and their associated understandings of "good" care.

  1. Improving Heart Failure Outcomes: The Role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist.

    PubMed

    Coen, Jennifer; Curry, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    This article identifies and explains barriers to optimal outcomes of heart failure and the role of the clinical nurse specialist in overcoming these obstacles, improving patient outcomes and quality of life. In recent years, advances in heart failure management have increased survival rates, and as a result, the number of patients requiring services to manage disease progression and the complex array of symptoms associated with end-stage heart disease. Management of the heart failure patient is dependent on the severity of the disease and wide range of available treatment regimens. Disease progression can be unpredictable and treatment regimens increasingly complex. The authors present a typical case of a patient with heart failure, identify the barriers to optimal outcomes in managing heart failure, as well as describe the roles of the clinical nurse specialist in overcoming these barriers within 3 spheres of clinical nurse specialist influence: patient, health care provider, and health care systems. The clinical nurse specialist role is ideally suited to positively affect heart failure outcomes. These positive effects are drawn from the dynamic and unique nature of the clinical nurse specialist role and are perpetrated through the 3 spheres of clinical nurse specialist practice: patient, health care provider, and heath care system. PMID:27575796

  2. Exploring the leadership role of the clinical nurse specialist on an inpatient palliative care consulting team.

    PubMed

    Stilos, Kalli; Daines, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Demand for palliative care services in Canada will increase owing to an aging population and the evolving role of palliative care in non-malignant illness. Increasing healthcare demands continue to shape the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role, especially in the area of palliative care. Clinical nurse specialists bring specialized knowledge, skills and leadership to the clinical setting to enhance patient and family care. This paper highlights the clinical leadership role of the CNS as triage leader for a hospital-based palliative care consulting team. Changes to the team's referral and triage processes are emphasized as key improvements to team efficiency and timely access to care for patients and families.

  3. Difficult Hypertension Clinic Utilizing a Nurse Specialist: A Cost-Efficient Model for the Modern Era?

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Walter; van der Merwe, Veronica

    2015-09-01

    In the modern era in New Zealand, there has been a lack of specialist hypertension clinics where family practitioners might refer patients with difficult-to-treat or resistant hypertension. A new specialist referral hypertension clinic was established in 2009 at North Shore Hospital, Auckland, employing a model of care where much of the follow-up work is done by a nurse specialist. The authors review data from the first 1000 patients discharged from the clinic. Mean (treated) blood pressure improved by -26/12 mm Hg over an average of three visits, two thirds of which were to nurse specialist clinics. The authors propose this as a cost-efficient model that could easily be duplicated in other centers.

  4. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical... ending December 31, 1997, allowed amounts for the services of a nurse practitioner or a clinical...

  5. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners..., 1992 and ending December 31, 1997, allowed amounts for the services of a nurse practitioner or...

  6. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners..., 1992 and ending December 31, 1997, allowed amounts for the services of a nurse practitioner or...

  7. Creating our future: challenges and opportunities for the clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Hamric, A B

    1992-01-01

    Rapid change, increasing technology, and cost-containment pressures present both challenges and opportunities for clinical nurse specialists (CNSs). Challenges stem from outside forces as well as from within the nursing profession, threatening the CNS role. At the same time, opportunities exist to expand advanced practice roles. To maximize these opportunities, consensus on the standards and qualifications for advanced practice is necessary. Certification and reimbursement for CNSs, clarification of advanced practice roles in new practice models, and strengthening of collaborative practice are some strategies to respond to these challenges and opportunities. Increased CNS accountability for defined institutional priorities also is crucial to the future of the CNS.

  8. Role of the clinical nurse specialist in improving patient outcomes after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Soltis, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Health care reform continues to focus on improving patient outcomes while reducing costs. Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) should facilitate this process to ensure that best practice standards are used and patient safety is enhanced. One example of ensuring best practices and patient safety is early extubation after open heart surgery, which is a critical component of fast track protocols that reduces may reduce the development of pulmonary complications in the postoperative period while decreasing overall length of stay in the hospital. This project was an interdisciplinary endeavor, led by the CNS and nurse manager, which combined early extubation protocols with enhanced rounding initiatives to help decrease overall length of ventilation time as well as reduce pulmonary complications in patients in the cardiac surgery intensive care unit. The project resulted in a significant decrease in length of stay and a decrease in pulmonary complications in the postoperative period.

  9. The role of the clinical nurse specialist in MS: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Corry, Margarita; McKenna, Martina; Duggan, Marguerite

    The purpose of this review was to determine the role of nurse specialists in multiple sclerosis (NSMS) in providing care for carers of people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). The databases searched from inception to April 2010 include: CINAHL, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, PubMed, AMED, Nursing and Allied Health Source, Academic Search Complete, Cochrane Library Database, Web of Knowledge, Ovid Nursing Database, Social Science Index, and Joanna Briggs Institute. Eighteen articles were included in the review. However, only three research-based articles were found that evaluated the role of the NSMS. The remaining articles were discussion-based and provided insight into the contribution of the NSMS to service provision. The review highlights the continuing lack of research evaluating the impact of the role of the nurse specialist in multiple sclerosis and in particular, the lack of recognition of the support role that nurse specialists provide for carers of PwMS. PMID:21278655

  10. Taking care of the caretakers: a partial explanation of clinical nurse specialist practice.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, K M

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical practice of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs). Data were collected from three recorded case studies and interviews from a theoretical sample of 17 masters-prepared CNSs who had functioned in the CNS role for a minimum of 1 year. Using the constant comparative method, transcribed interviews were line-coded and clustered to form groups of data that could be labelled as constructs. Caring was validated as the basic psychological process. Scientific caring included investigating and teaching; humanistic caring included creating the new, showing the way, working with others, and taking care of the environment. It was found that CNSs took care of the caretakers as well as the patients and their families.

  11. Outcomes of clinical nurse specialist-initiated system-level standardized glucose management.

    PubMed

    Custer, Marvis L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this quality improvement project was to determine if the use of standardized insulin orders versus the use of nonstandardized insulin orders improved glucose results in a hospital's critical care unit. A clinical nurse specialist-led interdisciplinary team developed standardized insulin orders with the goal of improving glucose control. Of the 570 patients admitted from July to September 2006, 124 met glucose criteria to use standardized insulin orders. A total of 331 individual glucose results from 16 patients reviewed demonstrated a difference in mean and median when standardized orders were used versus when they were not used to control glucose. A mean glucose of 175 mg/dL and median glucose of 149 mg/dL were the outcomes when standardized insulin orders were used versus a mean glucose of 206 mg/dL and median glucose of 190 mg/dL when standardized orders were not used. System change efforts to improve glucose control resulted in improved staff nurse empowerment, improved provider knowledge of glucose control methods, and improved patient glucose control in this Midwestern hospital.

  12. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... exceed the following limits: (1) For services furnished in a hospital (including assistant-at-surgery...-at-surgery services) furnished beginning January 1, 1998, allowed amounts for the services of a nurse... the service. For assistant-at-surgery services, allowed amounts for the services of a...

  13. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... following limits: (1) For services furnished in a hospital (including assistant-at-surgery services), 75...-at-surgery services) furnished beginning January 1, 1998, allowed amounts for the services of a nurse... the service. For assistant-at-surgery services, allowed amounts for the services of a...

  14. The role of a clinical nurse consultant dementia specialist: A qualitative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Duane, Fleur M; Goeman, Dianne P; Beanland, Chris J; Koch, Susan H

    2015-07-01

    Delay in diagnosis and difficulties in accessing appropriate health care services plague dementia care delivery in the community setting, potentiating the risk for misdiagnosis, inappropriate management, poor psychological adjustment and reduced coping capacity and ability to forward plan. We evaluated a clinical nurse consultant role with a speciality in dementia to provide person-centred pre-diagnosis support in the community. Clients, with a six-month history of cognitive and functional decline in the absence of delirium but no formal diagnosis of dementia, were recruited from a Home Care Nursing Service and an Aged Care Assessment Service located in the Western Suburbs of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The role of a clinical nurse consultant was highly regarded by clients and other health professionals. This paper discussing the CNC role and the outcomes of the role suggests it was successful in providing timely assistance and support for consumers and support for other health professionals.

  15. The role of nursing leadership in integrating clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners in healthcare delivery in Canada.

    PubMed

    Carter, Nancy; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Donald, Faith; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Harbman, Patricia; Bourgeault, Ivy; DiCenso, Alba

    2010-12-01

    Supportive nursing leadership is important for the successful introduction and implementation of advanced practice nursing roles in Canadian healthcare settings. For this paper, we drew on pertinent sections of a scoping review of the literature and key informant interviews conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing to describe and explore organizational leadership in planning and implementing advanced practice nursing roles. Leadership strategies that optimize successful role integration include initiating systematic planning to develop the roles based on patient and community needs, engaging stakeholders, using established Canadian role implementation toolkits, ensuring utilization of all dimensions of the role, communicating clear messages to increase awareness about the roles in the organization, creating networks and facilitating mentorship for those in the role, and negotiating role expectations with physicians and other members of the healthcare team. Leaders face challenges in creating and securing sustainable funding for the roles and providing adequate infrastructure support. PMID:21478692

  16. Federal Support for the Preparation of the Clinical Nurse Specialist Workforce through Title VIII. Report to the Secretary of Health and Human Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Rockville, MD.

    This document presents the findings of the National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice regarding the role, education, and supply of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs). The first section of the report examines the following eight background issues: (1) early development of the CNS; (2) current CNS supply; (3) roles and impact of the…

  17. Help wanted. A quality needs assessment creates a position for a psychiatric clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Efinger, J

    1995-10-01

    1. A survey needs assessment demonstrated that nurses in hospital practice need and want a PCNS for support with conflict resolution, difficult personnel and families, stress reduction, education, death and dying, and support groups. 2. Nurses (69%) who were considering leaving their positions wanted a PCNS to talk with them about their decisions. They felt a PCNS could provide insights they had overlooked. Nurses felt that they needed a PCNS on site or on call to be there for them to improve their practice. 3. Creating a position for a PCNS to be a consultant and liaison for nurses is a cost effective way to increase retention of excellent nurses, improve quality of care, job satisfaction, increased productivity, and reduced costs. PMID:8847670

  18. [The psychosocial challenges of epilepsy and the role of the clinical nurse specialist].

    PubMed

    Chartrand, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy in children is a complex disease with significant psychosocial consequences for the child and their family. The intervention of a multidisciplinary team enables the care to be adapted and provides support for the families. At Sainte-Justine Hospital in Montreal, Canada, the nurse clinician specialised in epilepsy plays a key role in this team.

  19. A Clinical Nurse Specialist-Directed Initiative to Reduce Postoperative Urinary Retention in Spinal Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Nicole; Bradway, Christine

    2016-08-01

    : Postoperative urinary retention (POUR) is the inability to void when the bladder is full after surgery. It is a common complication in postoperative patients, especially in patients undergoing spinal surgery. At our institution, patients who were discharged from the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) to the inpatient surgical unit typically had bladder distention and a bladder volume of more than 450 mL. In an effort to address this situation, an interprofessional group of advanced practice RNs and physicians formed a team, reviewed the existing literature, examined the PACU nursing practice guideline for evaluating and managing POUR, and devised a quality improvement (QI) project to raise the PACU nursing staff's awareness of the potential for POUR among postoperative patients and to develop an updated nursing practice algorithm for the evaluation and management of POUR in spinal surgery patients. A description of the QI process, including the revised algorithm and pre- and postintervention results, is reported here. In the preintervention group (n = 42), 19 indwelling urinary catheterizations were documented in patient records; no use of intermittent catheterization was documented. In the postintervention group (n = 43), seven indwelling urinary catheterizations were documented in patient records; the use of intermittent catheterization was documented in 11. As a result of our intervention, we decreased the number of indwelling urinary catheters inserted in the PACU, and supported the PACU nursing staff in more frequent and appropriate use of intermittent catheterization in patients undergoing spinal surgery.

  20. A Clinical Nurse Specialist-Directed Initiative to Reduce Postoperative Urinary Retention in Spinal Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Nicole; Bradway, Christine

    2016-08-01

    : Postoperative urinary retention (POUR) is the inability to void when the bladder is full after surgery. It is a common complication in postoperative patients, especially in patients undergoing spinal surgery. At our institution, patients who were discharged from the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) to the inpatient surgical unit typically had bladder distention and a bladder volume of more than 450 mL. In an effort to address this situation, an interprofessional group of advanced practice RNs and physicians formed a team, reviewed the existing literature, examined the PACU nursing practice guideline for evaluating and managing POUR, and devised a quality improvement (QI) project to raise the PACU nursing staff's awareness of the potential for POUR among postoperative patients and to develop an updated nursing practice algorithm for the evaluation and management of POUR in spinal surgery patients. A description of the QI process, including the revised algorithm and pre- and postintervention results, is reported here. In the preintervention group (n = 42), 19 indwelling urinary catheterizations were documented in patient records; no use of intermittent catheterization was documented. In the postintervention group (n = 43), seven indwelling urinary catheterizations were documented in patient records; the use of intermittent catheterization was documented in 11. As a result of our intervention, we decreased the number of indwelling urinary catheters inserted in the PACU, and supported the PACU nursing staff in more frequent and appropriate use of intermittent catheterization in patients undergoing spinal surgery. PMID:27466926

  1. Medical specialist attendance in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Balzer, Katrin; Butz, Stefanie; Bentzel, Jenny; Boulkhemair, Dalila; Lühmann, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    The care in nursing homes was examined based on scientific studies. The analysis focuses on dementia and type II diabetes. There is evidence for deficits in the supply of medical specialist attendance to nursing home residents with these diseases in Germany. Compared with corresponding guidelines the medical care for nursing home residents may be too low or inadequate.

  2. Medical specialist attendance in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Balzer, Katrin; Butz, Stefanie; Bentzel, Jenny; Boulkhemair, Dalila; Lühmann, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    The care in nursing homes was examined based on scientific studies. The analysis focuses on dementia and type II diabetes. There is evidence for deficits in the supply of medical specialist attendance to nursing home residents with these diseases in Germany. Compared with corresponding guidelines the medical care for nursing home residents may be too low or inadequate. PMID:23755088

  3. Enhancing assertiveness in district nurse specialist practice.

    PubMed

    Green, Julie

    2016-08-01

    District nurse (DN) care delivery has undergone substantial change in recent years due to changing demographics and service delivery demands that have called for a move of care delivery from secondary to primary care. The title District Nurse is recorded with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) on completion of the Specialist Practice Qualification in District Nursing (SPQ DN), which purports to be a 'transformational' course that prepares future caseload holders to manage their team and prioritise care delivery effectively. This article explores the need for assertiveness skills in this role in response to Australian research, and outlines the pedagogic interventions implemented during the SPQ DN course to enhance this skill. Assertiveness scores were monitored for the duration of the course and demonstrated a significant increase-a topic that is now the subject of a future, funded study. PMID:27479854

  4. A comprehensive review of clinical nurse specialist-led peripherally inserted central catheter placement in Korea: 4101 cases in a tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Yun; Kim, Hyun Lim

    2015-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are expected to be convenient and reliable venous access devices. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical nurse specialist (CNS)-led PICC placement and to describe its growth in a tertiary hospital. A computerized database identified 3508 patients who had PICCs placed between November 2001 and June 2010. One thousand, eight hundred ninety-eight of the 4101 PICCs were available for complete follow-up, and 791 of 1898 PICCs were still in place. The mean dwell time of 1898 PICCs was 27.4 days (1∼422 days). Most PICCs were removed after the completion of infusion therapy; the remainder were removed following death, occlusion, suspected infection, or phlebitis, or were removed by the patient. The study found that CNS-led PICC placement for infusion therapies was effective and safe with relatively low complication rates and that CNSs played important roles in the increased use of PICCs.

  5. Academic learning for specialist nurses: a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Millberg, Lena German; Berg, Linda; Brämberg, Elisabeth Björk; Nordström, Gun; Ohlén, Joakim

    2014-11-01

    The aim was to explore the major concerns of specialist nurses pertaining to academic learning during their education and initial professional career. Specialist nursing education changed in tandem with the European educational reform in 2007. At the same time, greater demands were made on the healthcare services to provide evidence-based and safe patient-care. These changes have influenced specialist nursing programmes and consequently the profession. Grounded Theory guided the study. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire with open-ended questions distributed at the end of specialist nursing programmes in 2009 and 2010. Five universities were included. Further, individual, pair and group interviews were used to collect data from 12 specialist nurses, 5-14 months after graduation. A major concern for specialist nurses was that academic learning should be "meaningful" for their professional future. The specialist nurses' "meaningful academic learning process" was characterised by an ambivalence of partly believing in and partly being hesitant about the significance of academic learning and partly receiving but also lacking support. Specialist nurses were influenced by factors in two areas: curriculum and healthcare context. They felt that the outcome of contribution to professional confidence was critical in making academic learning meaningful.

  6. Trained clinical nurse specialists proficiently obtain bone marrow aspirates and trephine biopsies in a nearly painless procedure--a prospective evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Naegele, M; Leppla, L; Kiote-Schmidt, C; Ihorst, G; Rebafka, A; Koller, A; May, A M; Hasemann, M; Duyster, J; Wäsch, R; Engelhardt, M

    2015-09-01

    Patients often experience bone marrow examinations (BMEs) as frightening and painful. Varying operators and uncertainty about who will perform the BME worsen their anxiety. In our study, clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) were trained to perform BMEs to ensure continuity and to test the feasibility, patient satisfaction, and biopsy quality. This exploratory evaluation assessed 574 BMEs at our tertiary center between January 2012 and February 2013, 398 BMEs performed by CNS and 176 by physicians. Our aims were to determine whether BMEs by CNS yield results similar to those of physicians, analyzing (1) patient satisfaction with the BME (a) consent and (b) performance, (2) induced pain, and (3) quality of aspirates and length of trephine biopsies. When performed by CNS, 100 % of the patients were satisfied with the consent procedure and 99 % with the BME performance (physicians 99 and 91 %, respectively). The median pain score was low when both CNS and physicians performed the BME, with no or only mild pain in 92 and 76 % of patients, respectively. Bone marrow (BM) aspirates by CNS and physicians were assessed as technically evaluable in ~70 %; moreover, the median length of trephine biopsies was similar when performed by CNS or physicians with 12 and 13 mm, respectively. In conclusion, BMEs conducted by motivated CNS and within a structured training program are feasible and yield equal outcomes compared to physicians. The use of adequate pain management during BMEs by trained and experienced operators results in an extremely rare use of sedatives, low pain scores, and high patient satisfaction.

  7. Think Stoma Nurse: a tool to trigger referral to specialist care.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Judy; Adams, Jane

    This article describes the initial development and subsequent evolution of a simple referral assessment tool for stoma care. The first author's personal experience identified that there was widespread inconsistency in perceptions of local multidisciplinary teams as to when it was appropriate to refer to specific specialist nursing teams. This resulted in both inappropriate and delayed referrals. A 'Think Specialist Nurse' initiative was developed across the author's trust, building on the traffic light template from the 'ThinkGlucose' tool, to facilitate referrals to clinical nurse specialists. The stoma-care specific tool, 'Think Stoma Nurse', has subsequently evolved beyond its initial audience, and has been adapted into materials aimed at patients and carers. PMID:26419813

  8. The Health Systems Nurse Specialist Curriculum: Collaborating across Specialties To Prepare Nurse Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmoreland, Donna; Hays, Bevely J.

    2002-01-01

    The Health Systems Nurse specialist program is an innovative master's curriculum in community health nursing, nursing administration, and nursing informatics. Students learn to work collaboratively to determine health priorities, develop and implement interventions, and monitor and improve patient outcomes. (Contains 11 references.) (JOW)

  9. The case for a specialist multidisciplinary valve clinic.

    PubMed

    Chambers, John B; Lloyd, Guy; Rimington, Helen M; Parkin, Denise; Hayes, Anna M; Baldrock-Apps, Gemma; Topham, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Valve disease is common and is increasing in prevalence as the population ages. The delivery of appropriate management is not always straightforward, and better ways of organizing care are required. Here, the argument is made for a specialist multidisciplinary valve clinic, while a description is provided of the authors' model clinic, which incorporates a specialist cardiologist in addition to sonographers and a nurse who carry out the surveillance services. The clinic is based at a cardiothoracic center and one district hospital, but could be generalized. Previous audits have shown that this model can reduce the number of patients seen by a cardiologist, thus improving the safety and quality of treatment compared to conventional clinics.

  10. Role of the specialist nurse in caring for patients with myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lobban, Lois; Perkins, Sue

    Myeloma is a rare, heterogeneous cancer of the bone marrow. It is characterised by a range of comorbidities and clinical complications, including bone fractures, anaemia and kidney damage. Myeloma is an individual cancer both in terms of the symptoms and complications patients can experience and in their response to treatment. This means that patients require individual management and care from specialist nurses who provide information, education, and social and psychological support, as well as direct patient care. The different combinations of treatment include complicated chemotherapy and anti-myeloma regimens. These treatments result in an accumulation of toxicities in patients, which specialist nurses play a vital role in monitoring and managing. The support and care given by specialist nurses have an effect both on the patient experience and patient outcomes. PMID:24093415

  11. Australian clinicians and educators identify gaps in specialist cardiac nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, D; Duffield, C; Adams, A; Mitten-Lewis, S; Crisp, J; Nagy, S

    2000-01-01

    Change is endemic in both the health care and higher education sectors in Australia. Consequently professional roles and educational pathways must also evolve and adapt, often catalysed by those in leadership positions. Two national Delphi panels, one of cardiac nurse educators and the other of cardiac nurses, were convened to answer the question 'What knowledge, skills and attitudes are required for an expert nurse practising in the highly technological cardiac care environment?' Respondents indicated on a Likert scale the importance of 107 items to the nurse's role in both the 'real' and 'ideal' worlds of practice. Overall there was very strong agreement between the two panels with results indicating that Australian nurses perform close to their ideal in many areas of practice. For 31 of the items, both panels identified that the reality of practice is quite far from their ideal. Both panels agree that 10 of the behaviours are carried out or valued very little in practice. Reasons why nurses are not carrying out these elements of the role to their satisfaction are discussed and remediation strategies suggested. The findings can inform both curriculum development and clinical practice. In the dynamic health care arena, the nursing profession continues to respond to community and professional needs, seeking to establish sound research-based practice and maintain a high quality of clinical care and nursing management. The development of competencies by the Confederation of Critical Care Nurses (1996) is a good example of professional groups taking the initiative both in defining the practice role and providing tools that assist educational bodies to develop programs appropriate for a practice based discipline. Specialty nursing practice is 'under the microscope' in Australia as the profession seeks the best methods to weight nursing activities, measure nursing outcomes and recruit, retain and justify the use of specialist practitioners.

  12. Personal view: randomized controlled trials in epilepsy specialist nursing: the seduction of content by form.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen

    2002-04-01

    Research into the effectiveness of epilepsy specialist nursing needs to take into account a number of factors, which have not been adequately addressed in previous studies. Nursing outcome measures are different to medical ones and it is inappropriate to confuse these. Specialist nurses affect the whole culture of a service, and their impact on service quality may go beyond that of their individual patient contacts. Thus randomized studies within a service that already has specialist nurses may not give valid results. Some service users will benefit more from direct contact with a specialist nurse than others, and people who give informed consent to take part in randomized controlled trials might not be representative of those who would benefit most from specialist nurse access. The stampede for level one evidence risks failing to address the issues properly by overvaluing research process (form) against its appropriateness (content), yet there remain great opportunities for good quality research in this area.

  13. Personal view: Randomized controlled trials in epilepsy specialist nursing: the seduction of content by form.

    PubMed

    Brown, S

    2001-12-01

    Research into the effectiveness of epilepsy specialist nursing needs to take into account a number of factors, which have not been adequately addressed in previous studies. Nursing outcome measures are different to medical ones and it is inappropriate to confuse these. Specialist nurses affect the whole culture of a service, and their impact on service quality may go beyond that of their individual patient contacts. Thus randomized studies within a service that already has specialist nurses may not give valid results. Some service users will benefit more from direct contact with a specialist nurse than others, and people who give informed consent to take part in randomized controlled trials might not be representative of those who would benefit most from specialist nurse access. The stampede for level one evidence risks failing to address the issues properly by overvaluing research process (form) against its appropriateness (content), yet there remain great opportunities for good quality research in this area.

  14. Geriatric oncology in the Netherlands: a survey of medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists.

    PubMed

    Jonker, J M; Smorenburg, C H; Schiphorst, A H; van Rixtel, B; Portielje, J E A; Hamaker, M E

    2014-11-01

    To identify ways to improve cancer care for older patients, we set out to examine how older patients in the Netherlands are currently being evaluated prior to oncological treatment and to explore the potential obstacles in the incorporation of a geriatric evaluation, using a web-based survey sent to Dutch medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists. The response rate was 34% (183 out of 544). Two-thirds of respondents reported that a geriatric evaluation was being used, although primarily on an ad hoc basis only. Most respondents expressed a desire for a routine evaluation or more intensive collaboration with the geriatrician and 86% of respondents who were not using a geriatric evaluation expressed their interest to do so. The most important obstacles were a lack of time or personnel and insufficient availability of a geriatrician to perform the assessment. Thus, over 30% of oncology professionals in the Netherlands express an interest in geriatric oncology. Important obstacles to a routine implementation of a geriatric evaluation are a lack of time, or insufficient availability of geriatricians; this could be overcome with policies that acknowledge that quality cancer care for older patients requires the investment of time and personnel.

  15. Examination of the teaching styles of nursing professional development specialists, part I: best practices in adult learning theory, curriculum development, and knowledge transfer.

    PubMed

    Curran, Mary K

    2014-05-01

    The American Nurses Association advocates for nursing professional development (NPD) specialists to have an earned graduate degree, as well as educational and clinical expertise. However, many NPD specialists have limited exposure to adult learning theory. Limited exposure to adult learning theory may affect NPD educational practices, learning outcomes, organizational knowledge transfer, and subsequently, the professional development of the nurses they serve and quality of nursing care. An examination of current teaching practices may reveal opportunities for NPD specialists to enhance educational methods to promote learning, learning transfer, and organizational knowledge and excellence. This article, the first in a two-part series, examines best practices of adult learning theories, nursing professional development, curriculum design, and knowledge transfer. Part II details the results of a correlational study that examined the effects of four variables on the use of adult learning theory to guide curriculum development for NPD specialists in hospitals.

  16. The Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric as a Framework to Enhance Clinical Judgment in Novice and Experienced Nurses.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Robbin; Asselin, Marilyn E

    2015-01-01

    Clinical judgment has been identified as a critical component of professional nursing practice and enables nurses to deliver safe patient care with optimal outcomes. Nurses, particularly those transitioning into clinical practice, may require assistance to enhance their clinical judgment skills. This article presents the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric, which has primarily been used in the academic setting, as a framework for nursing professional development specialists to enhance the clinical judgment skills of novice and experienced nurses. PMID:26381339

  17. New graduate nurses, new graduate nurse transition programs, and clinical leadership skill: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Kathy B; Richards, Kathy C

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review evaluated the relationship between new graduate nurses and clinical leadership skill, and between new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs have been cited as one strategy to improve clinical leadership skill, but to our knowledge, no one has synthesized the evidence on new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. Results of this review showed that new graduate nurse transition programs that were at least 24 weeks in length had a positive impact on clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs using the University HealthSystem Consortium/American Association of Colleges of Nursing Nurse Residency curriculum had the greatest impact, followed by curriculum developed by the Versant New Graduate RN Residency, an important finding for nursing professional development specialists.

  18. Novel role for specialist nurses in managing diabetes in the community.

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, M.; Wilson, R. M.; Hardisty, C. A.; Ward, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    To develop care of diabetes further a specialist nurse established contact with general practices in Sheffield Health District and identified difficulties in providing a service for diabetics. One hundred and thirty practices were visited, and full data were collected from 104. Each practice agreed to establish a register of diabetics, and information and support were subsequently provided to help in developing services. In collecting information from each practice the nurse covered specific points on staff, facilities, and organisation. Over two years the service offered in 60 practices considerably improved, allowing a minimum standard of diabetic care to be achieved. This allowed coordinated and effective referral of certain patients from hospital diabetic clinics and improved services to those not attending any clinics. PMID:2507068

  19. [Practice guideline 'Influenza prevention in nursing homes and care homes', issued by the Dutch Society of Nursing Home Specialists; division of tasks between nursing home specialist, general practitioner and company doctor].

    PubMed

    Cools, H J M; van Essen, G A

    2005-01-15

    The Dutch Society of Nursing Home Specialists has formulated a guideline for the prevention of influenza in nursing homes and care homes in The Netherlands. The guideline recommends the realisation of the highest possible degree of vaccination of both patients and health care workers. At the start of the flu season, the manager of the chronic care institute should organize a scheme for vaccination against influenza and a plan in case of an outbreak of influenza. The division of tasks between the nursing home specialist, the general practitioner and the company doctor should be recorded in both the vaccination scheme and the outbreak plan. In order to decrease the incidence of non-response to the vaccine a double dose of influenza vaccine for nursing home patients should be considered. The outbreak plan should raise the state of alertness for influenza and ensure that virological confirmation of clinical influenza is obtained quickly. Immediately after virological confirmation of clinical influenza, patients with influenza should be treated with oseltamivir and both patients and health care workers in the unit should receive prophylaxis with oseltamivir. Non-vaccinated patients should also be offered vaccination to restrict re-introduction of the virus. During an influenza outbreak, only patients with influenza or those who have had prophylactic treatment may be admitted to the facility. In the case of an influenza pandemic, national guidelines should be followed. PMID:15693586

  20. Valuing research in clinical practice: a basis for developing a strategic plan for nursing research.

    PubMed

    Butler, L

    1995-01-01

    With a view to developing a strategic plan for nursing research in a clinical practice setting, a survey was conducted to examine nurses' attitudes towards research as a part of their work. The 348 nurse respondents represented various nursing roles: staff nurses, head nurses, clinical nurse specialists, nurse educators, hospice nurses, expanded-role nurses, and an enterostomal therapist. They were classified into two groups, staff nurses and leadership nurses. The subjects reported that they valued research highly and that they believed the nursing division was supportive of research activities. Few were actually involved in conducting research; the nurses reported a lack of confidence in their ability to participate in designing and conducting studies. Most staff nurses were not using research in their work, while the majority of leadership nurses were. Factors that explain both research use by nurses and their participation in designing and conducting research differed for the two groups.

  1. A national evaluation of specialists' clinics in primary care settings.

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, A; Bond, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Encouraged by the increased purchasing power of general practitioners (GPs), specialist-run clinics in general practice and community health care settings (known as specialist outreach clinics) have increased rapidly across England. The activities of local commissioning schemes within primary care groups are likely to accelerate this trend. AIM: To evaluate the costs, processes, and benefits of specialists' outreach clinics held in GPs' surgeries, compared with hospital outpatient clinics. DESIGN OF STUDY: A case-referent (comparative) study comparing the characteristics of outreach clinics (cases) with matched outpatient control clinics. SETTING: Thirty-eight outreach clinics, compared with 38 matched outpatient clinics as controls, covering 14 hospital trust areas across England. METHOD: Self-administered questionnaires were given to patients in both clinic settings. These covered processes, satisfaction, personal costs, and health status, with postal follow-up at six months to assess health outcomes. Self-administered questionnaires were also given to the specialists and GPs whose clinics were included in the study (individual patient clinical sheet and an attitude questionnaire), practice managers, and trust accountants (process and costs questionnaire). Evaluation of the costs, processes, and benefits of specialist outreach clinics versus hospital outpatient clinics was carried out by comparing questionnaire responses. RESULTS: In comparison with outpatients, outreach clinic patients spent less time on the waiting lists for appointments to see the specialist, they had shorter waiting times in clinics, fewer follow-up appointments, and were more likely to be completely discharged after the sampled attendance. Outreach patients were more satisfied than outpatients with the range of clinic process items asked about. Most doctors felt that the outreach clinic was 'worthwhile'. While patients' personal costs were lower in outreach than in outpatients

  2. Specialist nursing framework for New Zealand: a missing link in workforce planning.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Kathy; Baker, Jacqueline; Lumby, Judy

    2009-11-01

    The current global nursing shortage challenges the provision of a well qualified and sustainable health workforce to meet future population health needs. An identified area of concern for New Zealand reaching health policy targets in chronic conditions management and primary health care is an adequate specialist nurse workforce supply. This article explores the New Zealand context underpinning this concern and contends that effective workforce planning would be supported by the development of a single unified framework for specialist nursing practice in New Zealand. A consistent national framework has the potential to support accurate data collection and enable service providers to identify and plan transparent and transferable pathways for specialist nursing service provision and development. Advanced practice nursing frameworks assist in increasing productivity through building an evidence base about advanced practice, enhancing consistency and equity of expertise; supporting a reduction in role duplication; and enabling succession planning and sustainability.

  3. Tensions related to implementation of postgraduate degree projects in specialist nursing education.

    PubMed

    German Millberg, Lena; Berg, Linda; Lindström, Irma; Petzäll, Kerstin; Öhlén, Joakim

    2011-04-01

    In conjunction with the introduction of the Bologna process in Sweden, specialist nursing education programmes were moved up to the second cycle of higher education with the opportunity to take a one-year master's degree, which also meant that students would undertake a degree project carrying 15 ECTS. The purpose of this study was to examine the introduction of postgraduate degree projects on the second-cycle level into Swedish specialist nursing programmes in accordance with the Bologna process. Five universities were involved and the study design took the form of action research. Problem formulation, planning, evaluation and follow-up with reflection led to new actions over a period of 2 1/2 years. Through a review of local curriculum documents, the implementation of a postgraduate degree project was monitored and these reviews, together with field notes, were analysed by means of constant comparative analysis. The results revealed a variety of tensions that arose when postgraduate degree projects were introduced, taking the form of differing views on the relationship between research, clinical development, specific professional objectives and academic objectives. These tensions were reflected in six areas of change. In summary, it can be noted that implementation of the postgraduate degree projects highlighted tensions related to basic views of learning.

  4. [Support for the psychiatric nurse specialist and the psychiatric community nurse in their interactions with the psychiatric patient. Part II].

    PubMed

    van Wyk, S; Poggenpoel, M; Gmeiner, A C

    1998-09-01

    In this article the research is described that had as goal to generate a supportive approach for the psychiatric nurse specialist to the psychiatric community nurse in interaction with the psychiatric patient, to promote, maintain and restore their mental health as an integral part of health. Guidelines for operationalisation of this supportive approach by the psychiatric nurse specialist, are also described. The research design utilised a qualitative, descriptive and contextual design. The exploratory field work was done in phase one of this research (as described in part I of these articles) and consisted of phenomenological interviews and focus groups. Trustworthiness was ensured by utilising Guba's model for trustworthiness.

  5. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  6. [The Role Development of Informatics Nurse Specialists in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Feng, Rung-Chuang; Lee, Ying-Li; Lee, Tso-Ying

    2015-06-01

    The development of information technology has changed the world and allowed the innovation of nursing-care services. In recent years, the development of nursing informatics in Taiwan has been catching up with international trends and has been regarded positively by the international medical informatics community. The integration of information technology into medical care system has created the new nursing role of "informatics nurse." Although the certification system and job descriptions for these nurses have become increasingly comprehensive in many nations, Taiwan remains in the early development stage in these regards. Taiwan informatics nurses continue to face unclear and inadequately stated role responsibilities and job titles, undefined training requirements, and a lack of a clear qualification / certification system. This paper introduces the role functions and professional growth of informatics nurses and introduces the framework for a certification system in order to give to various medical and paramedical staffs a better understanding of informatics nursing and to recognize the important role played by informatics nurses in the process of healthcare informatics development.

  7. The role and organisation of community palliative specialist nursing teams in rural England.

    PubMed

    Leadbeater, Maria; Staton, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    This article describes a study that used a qualitative approach, purposive sampling and semi-structured telephone interviews conducted with specialist palliative care nurses from six rural community teams in England. The study investigated how services were organised and the issues of delivering specialist palliative nursing care in a rural area. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. The findings showed many similarities in that the majority of patients in rural areas were not accessing hospice services and there was a greater reliance on care at home. However, the challenges in delivering care ranged from managing patient expectations, geographical distance, lack of technology to support remote working and education for the specialist palliative care teams. The study makes specific recommendations for rural community specialist palliative care teams.

  8. Advanced nurse practitioner-led referral for specialist care and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Mashlan, Wendy; Hayes, Julie; Thomas, Ceri

    2016-02-01

    In response to the need for appropriate and timely care of frail older patients admitted to hospital, a dedicated advanced nurse practitioner (ANP)-led referral service was developed. The service has continued to evolve over the 13 years since its implementation in accordance with changing service demands. This article describes the role of the ANP in care of the elderly/rehabilitation medicine and focuses on one area of clinical practice developed by the team: an ANP-led referral service. The aim of developing the service was to ensure that patients who required specialist care and rehabilitation could be identified and assessed as soon as possible after admission, with the premise that they could be transferred to a bed in care of the elderly medical wards. This was perceived by the ANPs to be advantageous for patients, who would receive care from a specialist team, and for care of the elderly staff who could use their knowledge and skills appropriately and safely.

  9. DOD Health Care. Issues Involving Military Nurse Specialists. Report to the Honorable Daniel K. Inouye, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    Selected Department of Defense (DOD) policies were examined concerning nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners, particularly in regard to the extent to which these nurse specialists are allowed an independent scope of practice in military hospitals and the degree of physician supervision they require. Discussions were held with…

  10. [Smoking among patients of selected specialist clinics of Miedzylesie Specialist Hospital in Warsaw].

    PubMed

    Pytka, Dorota; Doboszyńska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine the issue of smoking among patients of selected clinics of the Miedzylesie Specialist Hospital in Warsaw, assessment of nicotine addiction of smokers and motivation to give up smoking. The survey was carried out in June and July 2009 after obtaining the consent of the Director of Miedzylesie Specialist Hospital in Warsaw. The survey was participated in by 100 patients of selected specialist clinics. The survey was carried out on the basis of a questionnaire consisting of 7 questions. Furthermore, the "Test of motivation to give up smoking" (Schneider's test) and the "Assessment of nicotine addiction level" (Fagerström's test), published in the "Consensus regarding recognition and treatment of nicotine addiction", were used. When processing data, the descriptive statistics were applied. Those surveyed included 53 former cigarette smokers 47 active smokers and. In the group of former smokers, 19 people still were exposed to passive smoking. In the past, the problem regarded 41 people. Thirty former smokers smoked cigarettes among non-smokers, including young children (18 people) and when pregnant and breastfeeding (2 people). Also 30 respondents smoked despite medical contraindications and bad conscience. For 27 people, expenditures on cigarettes constituted a considerable burden of their respective household budgets, and 20 said that it was a significant item in their expenditures. Smokers have been smoking cigarettes for 30 years, on average 20 cigarettes a day. Those patients began to smoke at the age of 20. Thirty one active smokers exposed other people to passive smoking and 38 respondents smoked cigarettes despite medical contraindications and with bad conscience. For 22 people, expenditures related to smoking are a considerable burden of the household budget and for 21 people, it is a significant expenditure. Almost one half of the patients smoke cigarettes although they should brake off smoking for medical reasons. Most

  11. Impact of a nurse managed clinic in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wahlquist, G I

    1984-08-01

    This article indicates the importance of evaluation in the practice of professional nursing. In the chronically ill neurological population both process (what the nurse actually does) and outcome measures need to be considered when formulating the objectives and scope of service to be provided by the clinical nurse specialist. For this population, morbidity was a natural evaluative measure for the nurse to employ as an index of intervention effectiveness. This does not mean to imply that nurses are the sole persons who can manage this type of outpatient clinic, but rather that nursing can play a pivotal part in the promotion of health for this particular group of neurologically disabled individuals. For this population, a consistent caregiver is important in implementing a rehabilitative approach to manage the interdisciplinary effort needed to help these individuals and their families maintain or improve health. PMID:6565749

  12. Growing practice specialists in mental health: addressing stigma and recruitment with a nursing residency program.

    PubMed

    Ng, San; Kessler, Linda; Srivastava, Rani; Dusek, Janice; Duncan, Deborah; Tansey, Margaret; Jeffs, Lianne

    2010-05-01

    Despite the growing prevalence and healthcare needs of people living with mental illness, the stigma associated with mental health nursing continues to present challenges to recruiting new nurses to this sector. As a key recruitment strategy, five mental health hospitals and three educational institutions collaborated to develop and pilot an innovative nursing residency program. The purpose of the Mental Health Nursing Residency Program was to dispel myths associated with practising in the sector by promoting mental health as a vibrant specialty and offering a unique opportunity to gain specialized competencies. The program curriculum combines protected clinical time, collaborative learning and mentored clinical practice. Evaluation results show significant benefits to clinical practice and an improved ability to recruit and retain nurses. Nursing leadership was crucial at multiple levels for success. In this paper, we describe our journey in designing and implementing a nursing residency program for other nurse leaders interested in providing a similar program to build on our experience.

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease nurse specialists for patients on biological therapies: a nationwide Italian survey

    PubMed Central

    Guarini, Alessandra; Marinis, Francesca De; Kohn, Anna; Orzes, Nicoletta; D’Incà, Renata; Iannone, Teresa; Giaquinto, Antonella; Rivara, Cinzia; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Zullo, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Background Management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients requires a multidisciplinary approach. Among the working team, the role of IBD nurse is expected to be particularly relevant when managing patients receiving biological therapies. We performed a survey to assess the presence of IBD nurse in centers where patients were receiving biologics. Methods For this Italian nationwide survey a specific questionnaire was prepared. IBD nurse was defined as a nurse directly involved in all phases of biological therapy, from pre-therapy screening, administration and monitoring during therapy, to follow up performed by a dedicated helpline, completed a specific training on biological therapy therapy, and observed international guidelines. Results A total of 53 Italian IBD centers participated in the survey, and 91 valid questionnaires were collected. Overall, 34 (37.4%) nurses could be classified as IBD specialists. IBD nurses had a significantly higher educational level than other nurses, they were more frequently operating in Central or Southern than in Northern Italy, they were working in an Academic center rather than in a General hospital, and in IBD centers with >25 patients on biological therapy. On the contrary, mean age, gender distribution, years of nursing, and years working in the IBD unit did not significantly differ between IBD and other nurses. Conclusions Our nationwide survey showed that the presence of an IBD nurse is still lacking in the majority of Italian IBD centers where patients receive biological therapies, suggesting a prompt implementation. PMID:27708516

  14. The case for renewed investment in the district nursing specialist practitioner qualification.

    PubMed

    Longstaff, Fiona

    2013-09-01

    District nursing as a profession has been under significant threat over the last few years due to a lack of foresight and funding, resulting in an undervalued and underinvested workforce. The once-heralded specialist practitioner programme was slowly decommissioned in all but a handful of universities, leaving no alternative but for community trusts to employ staff nurses in team leader roles without the development the added qualification gave them. In light of the renewed focus on the fundamental advancement of district nurses and recent Government publications clearly reinforcing the district nurse's role, this article argues for the need for educational commissioners and workforce planners to commit to continued investment in this vital profession.

  15. Lung cancer treatment rates and the role of the lung cancer nurse specialist: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Redman, Judy; McDonnell, Ann; Borthwick, Diana; White, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This qualitative study examines how the Lung Cancer Nurse Specialist (LCNS) role operates and why they may be able to increase access to treatment. Setting 4 Hospital NHS Foundation Trusts in England. Design A multiple case study design using semistructured interviews, observation and Framework Analysis techniques. Participants Four LCNSs, comprised the ‘cases’. Twenty four clinicians who worked with the LCNS participated in individual interviews. Six LCNSs took part in a group interview and 60 lung cancer multidisciplinary team (MDT) members and co-ordinators were observed in the MDT meeting. Results The LCNS is crucial within the MDT and can act as a catalyst to patient access to treatment. The study identified the clinical activity (assessment, managing symptoms, psychological support and information provision) and role characteristics that can facilitate treatment access. These characteristics are the LCNS's presence across the patient pathway, acting as the ‘hub’ of the MDT, maintaining a holistic patient focus and working to an advanced level of practice. The findings indicate how factors may have a cumulative impact on treatment access. Conclusions If UK patient with lung cancer survival rates are to improve in line with comparable countries, we need to employ every advantage. This study demonstrates how the LCNS role may open doors to positive patient outcomes, including treatment. Further research is required to explore patients’ experiences, decision-making and attitudes to treatment. PMID:26685023

  16. An evaluation of a specialist nursing service for adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hatchett, Richard; McLaren, Susan; Corrigan, Philomena; Filer, Lynda

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate grown-up congenital heart (GUCH) patients' experiences and satisfaction with the delivery of a nurse specialist service, including perceived priorities and recommendations for future service delivery. A service evaluation utilizing descriptive, cross-sectional survey principles was conducted over a 2 year period. Postal questionnaires were sent to three patient cohorts (general adult n = 747; pregnancy n = 202; learning disability n = 72). Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics. The majority of respondents were satisfied with the nursing care provided, including information provision, time made available to discuss needs, emotional support, well-being, self-management and symptom distress. Priority areas included timely information and advice; specialist knowledge and expertise; effective care coordination, monitoring and support. Accessibility, contact and responsiveness were dominant. A majority of patients agreed that their first, second and third-rated priorities had been met. Findings identified strong commitment, support and satisfaction with the GUCH nurse specialist service. PMID:25307531

  17. Computers in Hospital Clinical Nursing: Implications for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Thomas, Sister

    The use of computers in hospital clinical nursing and implications for the education of nurses were studied with a sample of 130 hospitals. Of concern was how computers were used, which hospital personnel used computers in health care, costs to educate staff nurses, and who teaches nurses about computers. Questionnaires completed by hospital data…

  18. Nursing Student Retention in Associate Degree Nursing Programs Utilizing a Retention Specialist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrum, Ronna A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine specific variables associated with nursing student retention in Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Programs. Jeffreys (2004) Nursing Undergraduate Retention and Success (NURS) conceptual model provided the framework for this descriptive correlational study. One hundred sixty eight pre-licensure associate degree…

  19. A Facility Specialist Model for Improving Retention of Nursing Home Staff: Results from a Randomized, Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillemer, Karl; Meador, Rhoda; Henderson, Charles, Jr.; Robison, Julie; Hegeman, Carol; Graham, Edwin; Schultz, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on a randomized, controlled intervention study designed to reduce employee turnover by creating a retention specialist position in nursing homes. Design and Methods: We collected data three times over a 1-year period in 30 nursing homes, sampled in stratified random manner from facilities in New York State and…

  20. Mistaken, misshapen and mythical images of nurse education: creating a shared identity for clinical nurse educator practice.

    PubMed

    Conway, Jane; Elwin, Carolyn

    2007-05-01

    The hospital-based clinical nurse educator is pivotal to the integration of formal learning and clinical practice. Clinical nurse educators are generally considered to be expert nurses within a particular clinical environment; however, many of those who are expert clinicians suffer some loss of identity when assuming clinical teaching roles. It is necessary to facilitate the expression of identity in order to foster collective agency and to empower individuals and groups. In a health care system that is awash with change, the importance of this may often be overlooked. This paper reports on the process and outcomes of a series of workshops with clinical nurse educators in a New South Wales area health service that sought to create a shared identity and role for clinical nurse educators within the health service. Challenges in role demarcation and delineation of the roles and functions of clinical nurse educators clinical nurse specialists, clinical nurse consultants, practice development facilitators and nurse educators have been reported. Each of these has overlapping and complementary roles to support learning, however, the primary focus and area of responsibility varies among each of these groups. PMID:17689443

  1. Clinical Nursing Instructor Perception of the Influence of Engagement in Bedside Nursing Practice on Clinical Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berndt, Jodi L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical experiences are an integral component of nursing education. Because the amount of time that a student spends in clinical experiences can be as many as twelve to sixteen hours per week, the clinical instructor plays a significant role in the nursing student's development of nursing knowledge. Many nurse educators attempt to balance dual…

  2. The nurse as rhetorician. Writing the clinically based article for professional publication.

    PubMed

    Stepanski, L M

    1999-01-01

    Effective communication skills are a critical component of quality nursing care. Nurses are modern-day rhetoricians who must rely on their powers of observation, interpretation, and persuasion as they provide care for patients and interact with family members and medical professionals. Clinicians have an obligation to use their rhetorical skills to communicate their knowledge to the wider medical community by publishing in nursing journals. Advice is provided to those intravenous nurse specialists who are interested in writing a clinically based article for a professional publication, such as the Journal of Intravenous Nursing.

  3. Clinical nursing research: you can do it!

    PubMed

    Zadinsky, J K; Broome, M E

    1989-01-01

    Nurses can use clinical nursing research to strengthen the knowledge base of their practice and to develop effective nursing interventions. When planning and implementing their studies, nurses must anticipate and deal with important issues concerning the realities of clinical nursing research. These issues include developing the research question, planning for an optimal sample size, passing the Institutional Review Committee, managing conflicts between clinical and research roles, selecting instruments to measure the variables, collecting data in a clinical setting, analyzing and interpreting the data, funding the proposed study, and ensuring administrative support.

  4. Using Computerized Clinical Nursing Data Bases for Nursing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nail, Lillian M.; Lange, Linda L.

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the recognition of differences between clinical and research data in using computerized clinical nursing databases and the issues of privacy and confidentiality for patients whose records are involved. Describes procedures for assessing the quality and usability of these data for nursing research. (SK)

  5. The nurse practitioner in Planned Parenthood clinics.

    PubMed

    Manisoff, M

    1981-01-01

    Nurse practitioners have become a major and virtually indispensable resource for women coming to clinics for family planning services. This new study of Planned Parenthood clinics shows that nurse practitioners serve more than 3/5 of all patients, at a cost considerably below that of physician care. (An estimated 3 million dollars a year is saved by using nurse practitioners.) These health workers insert IUDs and prescribe oral contraceptives and various other medications. Most have had between 12 and 18 weeks of formal training in family planning in addition to their nursing education. Salaries of nurse practitioners are only about 1/2 those of physicians in Planned Parenthood clinics.

  6. Obstetrical staff nurses experiences of clinical learning.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    The clinical learning experience is used in nursing programs of study worldwide to prepare nurses for professional practice. This study's purpose was to use Naturalistic Inquiry to understand the experiences of staff nurses in an obstetrical unit with undergraduate nursing students present for clinical learning. A convenience sample of 12 staff nurses, employed on a Family Birth Center, participated in semi-structured interviews. The constant comparative method as modified by Lincoln and Guba was used to analyze data. Five themes related to staff nurses experiences of clinical learning were identified: Giving and Receiving; Advancing Professionally and Personally; Balancing Act; Getting to Know and Working with You; and Past and Present. This research highlights staff nurses' experiences of clinical learning in undergraduate nursing education. Staff nurses exert a powerful, long lasting influence on students. A need exists to prepare and judiciously select nurses to work with students. Clinical agencies and universities can take joint responsibility providing tangible incentives, financial compensation, and recognition to all nurses working with nursing students.

  7. Partnering to Promote Evidence-Based Practice in a Community Hospital: Implications for Nursing Professional Development Specialists.

    PubMed

    Highfield, Martha E F; Collier, Andrea; Collins, Mara; Crowley, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Nursing professional development specialists working in community hospitals face significant barriers to evidence-based practice that academic medical centers do not. This article describes 7 years of a multifaceted, service academic partnership in a large, urban, community hospital. The partnership has strengthened the nursing professional development role in promoting evidence-based practice across the scope of practice and serves as a model for others. PMID:27187827

  8. Nursing home organizational change: the "Culture Change" movement as viewed by long-term care specialists.

    PubMed

    Miller, Susan C; Miller, Edward Alan; Jung, Hye-Young; Sterns, Samantha; Clark, Melissa; Mor, Vincent

    2010-08-01

    A decade-long grassroots movement aims to deinstitutionalize nursing home (NH) environments and individualize care. Coined "NH Culture Change" the movement is often described by its resident-centered/directed care focus. While empirical data of "culture change's" costs and benefits are limited, it is broadly viewed as beneficial and widely promoted. Still, debate abounds regarding barriers to its adoption. We used data from a Web-based survey of 1,147 long-term care specialists (including NH and other providers, consumers/advocates, state and federal government officials, university/academic, researchers/consultants, and others) to better understand factors associated with perceived barriers. Long-term care specialists view the number-one barrier to adoption differently depending on their employment, familiarity with culture change, and their underlying policy views. To promote adoption, research and broad-based educational efforts are needed to influence views and perceptions. Fundamental changes in the regulatory process together with targeted regulatory changes and payment incentives may also be needed.

  9. Nursing Education for College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavinsky, Ann T.; Diers, Donna

    1982-01-01

    Describes the masters programs for nonnurse college graduates at Yale School of Nursing which offers both basic and advanced nursing preparation in a single three-year curriculum sequence. The program prepares nurses who can function in advanced-practice specialty roles as nurse-midwives, nurse practitioners, or clinical nurse specialists. (CT)

  10. Prisons: Logical, Innovative Clinical Nursing Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Honore Culleton

    1991-01-01

    The nursing faculty at Mercy College (New York) affiliated with several prison facilities to provide clinical experiences for senior nursing students. An ideal setting for the clinical group leadership course, the prison affiliations also helped students develop social awareness and advocacy strategies for this at-risk population. (SK)

  11. Clinical violence in nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Aghajanloo, Ali; Nirumand-Zandi, Kianoosh; Safavi-Bayat, Zahra; Alavi-Majd, Hamid

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the significant issues in health studies is violence. Although violence against nurses has been recognized as a major occupational problem, its magnitude and extent is not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to determine the extent and types of violence during clinical training of nursing students. METHODS: In this descriptive and cross-sectional study, 180 sophomores, juniors and seniors of Shahid Beheshti, Tehran and Iran Medical Universities were selected by quota sampling method. A questionnaire was used for collecting data regarding violence over the past year. Content and test-retest methods were used for evaluating its validity and reliability, respectively. RESULTS: Findings showed that 6.7%, 8.3% and 39.4% of the students experienced physical assault, physical menace and insult, respectively, over the past year. Most cases of the assaults (66.7%) were done by patients, most menaces by staff as well as patients’ attendants (18.1%) and most insults by staff (33.7%) and patients (31%). No significant relation was found between the sex as well as the educational year of the students and the experience of insult. 41.6% of the assaults were due to the effects of disease in assailants. However, no specific reason was found for physical menace and insult in most cases. 66.65%, 26.6% and 39.4% of the students reported physical assault, menace and insult to their tutors, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing students are subject to more violence because of young age and inadequate experience. Therefore, devising educational programs regarding occupational violence as well as its prevention and providing necessary support and consultation following violence are essential. PMID:23449964

  12. Legal issues in clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Patton, Carla Wheeler; Lewallen, Lynne Porter

    2015-01-01

    Nurse educators are concerned about legal implications of teaching students in clinical settings. Although literature is available about legal issues in working with students in the classroom, there is little recent information on clinical nursing faculty's legal liability when working with students and ways to reduce the risk of becoming involved in a lawsuit. This article discusses the major issues in clinical settings that contribute to lawsuits against faculty and offers suggestions to reduce legal liability with students in clinical settings.

  13. [Clinical nursing manpower: development and future prospects].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Fen; Kao, Ching-Chiu

    2014-04-01

    The significant changes in nursing manpower utilization in Taiwan over the past two decades are due in large part to the implementation of the National Health Insurance program and the rising need for long-term care. The changes have impacted clinical nursing manpower utilization in two important ways. Firstly, there has been a substantial increase in overall demand for nursing manpower. In particular, the need for clinical nurses has nearly quadrupled during this time period. Secondly, the level of difficulty involved in patient care has risen dramatically, with factors including increased disease severity and increased care quality expectations, among others. These changes, coupled with demands on nursing manpower imposed from other sectors, underpin and further exacerbate the problem of nursing manpower shortages throughout the healthcare system. To raise the quality of the nursing work environment, the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MOHW) brought together Taiwan's key professional nursing organizations to promote 10 care-reform strategies, establish the nursing-aid manpower system, and create the nursing classification system as an approach to effectively attract nurses to take positions in the medical system.

  14. [The strategic impact of clinical practice guidelines in nursing on the managerial function of supervision].

    PubMed

    Romero, José Antonio Vinagre; Heredero, Carmen De Pablos

    2013-10-01

    Clinical practice guidelines in nursing (CPG-N) are tools that allow the necessary knowledge that frequently remains specialist-internalised to be made explicit. These tools are a complement to risk adjustment systems (RAS), reinforcing their effectiveness and permitting a rationalisation of healthcare costs. This theoretical study defends the importance of building and using CPG-Ns as instruments to support the figure of the nursing supervisor in order to optimise the implementation of R&D and hospital quality strategies, enabling clinical excellence in nursing processes and cost-efficient reallocation of economic resources through their linear integration with SARs.

  15. The Nephrology Clinical Research Nurse Role: Potential Role Conflicts.

    PubMed

    Micklos, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research nursing is becoming more visible to nephrology professionals. As more nephrology practices and units are participating in clinical trials, clinical research nursing is gaining interest as a career niche among nephrology nurses. This unique specialty requires that nephrology clinical nurse nurses (CRNs) reconcile the roles of nurse as caregiver and nurse as researcher, which may result in a role conflict. Nephrology nurses should be aware that they may experience this role conflict when transitioning from patient care to a position as a clinical research nurse. These nurses can rely on the American Nurses Association's Code of Ethics for Nurses and the Oncology Nursing Society's Oncology Clinical Trials Nurse Competencies to help reconcile the potential role conflict. PMID:27501633

  16. Exploring how nurse lecturers maintain clinical credibility.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Melanie T

    2005-01-01

    The role of the nurse lecturer is changing. There is growing pressure from the government and professionals alike to recruit nurse teachers who posses both practical and recent experience of nursing [Department of Health, 1999. Making a Difference: Strengthening the Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting Contribution to Health and Health Care. DOH, London; UKCC, 2000. Standards for the Preparation of Teachers of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting. UKCC, London]. Whilst much of the literature available suggests a growing concern amongst practitioners, students and nurse educationalists themselves about the importance of being ;clinically credible', what is not clear is how tangible it is to maintain currency and clinical credibility. In addition, the term ;clinical credibility' is in itself ill-defined. An exploratory study was undertaken within one higher education institution which sought to seek the views of nurse lecturers. The principles of ethnography were applied to this research. The sample included six of the most recently appointed nurse lecturers within one academic faculty who taught predominantly on pre-registration programmes. Data from individual and focus group interviews was analysed using a thematic content analysis approach. The findings are discussed which embrace the concepts of: working ;hands on' in the clinical area, clinical currency, transferability of skills, clinical visibility and role development. Recommendations for the development of professional practice are offered. PMID:19038175

  17. Educating nursing students in clinical leadership.

    PubMed

    Ailey, Sarah; Lamb, Karen; Friese, Tanya; Christopher, Beth-Anne

    2015-02-01

    One of the goals of nursing education is to develop caring and responsible nurses with clinical reasoning skills who are capable of improving outcomes in complex healthcare systems. Using the Model of Situated Learning in Nursing Leadership, generalist entry graduate nursing students at Rush University in Chicago, part of a large academic medical centre with Magnet recognition for excellence in nursing practice, are educated using a curriculum based on the clinical nurse leader (CNL) competencies. This article presents a case study that demonstrates how the model is used to provide experiences for learning the CNL role. The students learn leadership in practice through their involvement in ongoing efforts at the medical centre to improve the care of patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The case study provides lessons in teaching CNL leadership competencies through efforts to improve the quality of care for an at-risk group of patients. PMID:25629348

  18. Educating nursing students in clinical leadership.

    PubMed

    Ailey, Sarah; Lamb, Karen; Friese, Tanya; Christopher, Beth-Anne

    2015-02-01

    One of the goals of nursing education is to develop caring and responsible nurses with clinical reasoning skills who are capable of improving outcomes in complex healthcare systems. Using the Model of Situated Learning in Nursing Leadership, generalist entry graduate nursing students at Rush University in Chicago, part of a large academic medical centre with Magnet recognition for excellence in nursing practice, are educated using a curriculum based on the clinical nurse leader (CNL) competencies. This article presents a case study that demonstrates how the model is used to provide experiences for learning the CNL role. The students learn leadership in practice through their involvement in ongoing efforts at the medical centre to improve the care of patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The case study provides lessons in teaching CNL leadership competencies through efforts to improve the quality of care for an at-risk group of patients.

  19. Preceptor Handbook: Rural Clinical Nurse Placement Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart-Siddall, Sandra; Haberlin, Jean

    This handbook provides Rural Clinical Nurse Placement Program (RCNP) preceptors with a program overview and practical suggestions to apply during student placement. An introductory section describes how the program addresses the maldistribution of nurses by raising awareness about the rural experience, adding a needed perspective to the urban bias…

  20. Wireless Handhelds to Support Clinical Nursing Practicum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Cheng-Chih; Lai, Chin-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports our implementation and evaluation of a wireless handheld learning environment used to support a clinical nursing practicum course. The learning environment was designed so that nursing students could use handhelds for recording information, organizing ideas, assessing patients, and also for interaction and collaboration with…

  1. Responsive Assessment: Assessing Student Nurses' Clinical Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neary, Mary

    2001-01-01

    A study involving 300 nursing students, 155 nurse practitioners, and 80 assessors tested a model of responsive assessment that includes identification of learning needs and potential, assignment to suitable placements, continuous assessment of clinical practice and patient care, and alignment of teaching and assessment with patient needs and…

  2. Clinical Decision Making of Rural Novice Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seright, Teresa J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop substantive theory regarding decision making by the novice nurse in a rural hospital setting. Interviews were guided by the following research questions: What cues were used by novice rural registered nurses in order to make clinical decisions? What were the sources of feedback which influenced subsequent…

  3. Using computerized clinical nursing data bases for nursing research.

    PubMed

    Nail, L M; Lange, L L

    1996-01-01

    Computerized clinical nursing data bases (CCNDBs) have significant potential as sources of data for research on the processes and outcomes of nursing care. The emergence of nurse-managed practice sites, in which patient care is driven predominantly by nurses' decisions, has prompted renewed interest in using data from these practices to answer questions that are important to nurses. The purpose of this article is to articulate strategies for using CCNDBs for nursing research. Recognition of the differences between clinical and research data bases is essential. The steps involved in obtaining and using computerized clinical data can be grouped into three phases: (1) locating and accessing CCNDBs, (2) assessing the content and quality of the data, and (3) extracting and analyzing the data. Processes involved in phase 1 include determining the research question, identifying eligible CCNDBs, negotiating access to the CCNDB, and ensuring the privacy and confidentiality of subjects. In phase 2 the processes include determining the content of the candidate CCNDBs, assessing the quality of the data in candidate CCNDBs, and determining the technical usability of data in candidate CCNDBs. Phase 3 involves mapping CCNDB data elements to research variables; determining data and record selection criteria; writing and implementing a query to select the desired records; designing a data base and record structure for research variables; performing analytic procedures on the research data; and reporting results of the research. Phases and procedures are discussed in detail in the article.

  4. Paediatric Low-Vision Assessment and Management in a Specialist Clinic in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Julie; Harper, Robert; Biswas, Sus; Lloyd, Chris

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a survey of the demographical, educational and visual functional characteristics of children attending a specialist paediatric low-vision assessment clinic at Manchester Royal Eye Hospital. Comprehensive data were collected retrospectively from children attending the paediatric low-vision clinic between January 2003 and…

  5. Integration of Early Specialist Palliative Care in Cancer Care: Survey of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Naveen; Patra, Lipika; Usha Rani, MR; Lohitashva, SO; Rao, Raghavendra; Ramanjulu, Raghavendra; Vallath, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Palliative care is usually delivered late in the course of illness trajectory. This precludes patients on active disease modifying treatment from receiving the benefit of palliative care intervention. A survey was conducted to know the opinion of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients about the role of early specialist palliative care in cancer. Methods: A nonrandomized descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at a tertiary cancer care center in India. Thirty oncologists, sixty oncology nurses, and sixty patients were surveyed. Results: Improvement in symptom control was appreciated by oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients with respect to pain (Z = −4.10, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.84, P = 0.001), (Z = −6.20, P = 0.001); nausea and vomiting (Z = −3.75, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.3, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.1, P = 0.001); constipation (Z = −3.29, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.96, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.49, P = 0.001); breathlessness (Z = −3.57, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.03, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.99, P = 0.001); and restlessness (Z = −3.68, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.23, P = 0.001), (Z = −3.22, P = 0.001). Improvement in end-of-life care management was appreciated by oncologists and oncology nurses with respect to communication of prognosis (Z = −4.04, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.20, P = 0.001); discussion on limitation of life-sustaining treatment (Z = −3.68, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.53, P = 0.001); end-of-life symptom management (Z = −4.17, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.59, P = 0.001); perimortem care (Z = −3.86, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.80, P = 0.001); and bereavement support (Z = −3-80, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.95, P = 0.001). Improvement in health-related communication was appreciated by oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients with respect to communicating health related information in a sensitive manner (Z = −3.74, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.47, P = 0.001), (Z = −6.12, P = 0.001); conducting family meeting (Z = −3.12, P = 0.002), (Z = −4.60, P = 0

  6. Scholarly productivity for nursing clinical track faculty.

    PubMed

    Tschannen, Dana; Anderson, Christine; Strobbe, Stephen; Bay, Esther; Bigelow, April; Dahlem, Chin Hwa Gina Y; Gosselin, Ann K; Pollard, Jennifer; Seng, Julia S

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have yielded substantial advancement by clinical track faculty in cohort expansion and collective contributions to the discipline of nursing. As a result, standards for progression and promotion for clinical faculty need to be more fully developed, articulated, and disseminated. Our school formed a task force to examine benchmarks for the progression and promotion of clinical faculty across schools of nursing, with the goal of guiding faculty, reviewers, and decision makers about what constitutes excellence in scholarly productivity. Results from analyses of curriculum vitae of clinical professors or associate professors at six universities with high research activity revealed a variety of productivity among clinical track members, which included notable diversity in the types of scholarly products. Findings from this project help quantify types of scholarship for clinical faculty at the time of promotion. This work provides a springboard for greater understanding of the contributions of clinical track faculty to nursing practice.

  7. From Passive to Active Learners: The "Lived Experience" of Nurses in a Specialist Nephrology Nursing Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridger, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore the lived experience of learning for a group of staff nurses in the Middle East, who undertook a post-registration nursing education programme in the speciality of nephrology nursing (the NNP) between 2001 and 2002. The broad-based curriculum seeks to develop the staff nurses into active learners, able to…

  8. Partnering for the Clinical Preparation of Education Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Suzanne; Cote, Debra

    2016-01-01

    NCATE's (2010) "Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel" calls for a shift toward clinical preparation and partnerships as a means of adequately preparing new teachers for the 21st century classroom. Looking at special education teacher preparation, there exist few model programs that have paved the road for others in implementing new clinical…

  9. A study on specialist or special disease clinics based on big data.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhuyuan; Fan, Xiaowei; Chen, Gong

    2014-09-01

    Correlation analysis and processing of massive medical information can be implemented through big data technology to find the relevance of different factors in the life cycle of a disease and to provide the basis for scientific research and clinical practice. This paper explores the concept of constructing a big medical data platform and introduces the clinical model construction. Medical data can be collected and consolidated by distributed computing technology. Through analysis technology, such as artificial neural network and grey model, a medical model can be built. Big data analysis, such as Hadoop, can be used to construct early prediction and intervention models as well as clinical decision-making model for specialist and special disease clinics. It establishes a new model for common clinical research for specialist and special disease clinics.

  10. A study on specialist or special disease clinics based on big data.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhuyuan; Fan, Xiaowei; Chen, Gong

    2014-09-01

    Correlation analysis and processing of massive medical information can be implemented through big data technology to find the relevance of different factors in the life cycle of a disease and to provide the basis for scientific research and clinical practice. This paper explores the concept of constructing a big medical data platform and introduces the clinical model construction. Medical data can be collected and consolidated by distributed computing technology. Through analysis technology, such as artificial neural network and grey model, a medical model can be built. Big data analysis, such as Hadoop, can be used to construct early prediction and intervention models as well as clinical decision-making model for specialist and special disease clinics. It establishes a new model for common clinical research for specialist and special disease clinics. PMID:25186249

  11. Core ethical issues of clinical nursing supervision.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Ingela; Barbosa da Silva, António; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2005-03-01

    Clinical nursing supervision enables supervisees to reflect on ethically difficult caring situations, thereby strengthening their professional identity, integrating nursing theory and practice, and leading to the development of ethical competence. The aim of this study was to develop an understanding of the core ethical issues of clinical nursing supervision, using previous research as well as philosophical analysis of the theories of three moral philosophers: Harald Ofstad, Richard Hare and Carol Gilligan. The ultimate aim of this study was to develop a general model for ethical decision-making and to establish its relevance for clinical nursing supervision. The findings highlight four important values for the development of a basis for ethical decision-making. These values are caring, dignity, responsibility and virtue.

  12. Course strategies for clinical nurse leader development.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Sally; Grossman, Sheila; Godfrey, Marjorie

    2012-01-01

    The scope of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) is evolving in practice across the country. The preparation of this pivotal role in a complex healthcare environment has prompted the collaboration of nurse academics, nurse administrators, and clinicians to design unique educational experiences to maximize best practice. Knowledge attained regarding healthcare improvement and patient safety must not only be theoretical, but personal and application focused. Utilizing the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's CNL white paper and published resources faculty developed a clinical leadership course focused on active learning and reflection. Students explore concepts of improvement and quality related to business models of high functioning organizations including healthcare. Three key components of the course are described in detail; "quality is personal", executive interviews and the "5P" clinical microsystems assessment. Evaluation outcomes are discussed. Course content and innovative teaching/learning strategies for CNL are shared which may support the growth of CNL program development nationally.

  13. Clinical misconduct among South Korean nursing students.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jun; Park, Seungmi; Jang, In-Sun

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the extent and predictors of unethical clinical behaviors among nursing students in South Korea. From survey data of 345 undergraduate nursing students, unethical clinical behaviors were examined with respect to 11 individual characteristics, frequency and perceived seriousness of classroom cheating, two factors of individual attitude, and four contextual factors. Qualitative data from two focus group interviews were analyzed to explore reasons for and contexts of unethical clinical behaviors. About sixty-six percent of the participants engaged in one or more unethical clinical behaviors over a one-semester period. The prevalence of such behaviors varied widely from 1.7% to 40.9% and was related to the type of nursing program, the number of clinical practicum semesters completed, ethical attitudes toward cheating behaviors, the frequency of cheating on assignments, the frequency of cheating on exams, the perceived prevalence of cheating by peers, and prior knowledge of academic integrity. According to the regression analysis, the last four variables explained 29.4% of the variance in the prevalence of unethical clinical behaviors. In addition, multiple reasons and possible interventions for clinical misconduct were reported during the focus group interviews. Unlike cheating in the classroom, clinical misconduct was strongly induced by clinical nurses and poor clinical practice environments. In sum, unethical clinical behaviors were widespread among the participants and need to be corrected. PMID:24837816

  14. Multi-institutional Collaboration to Promote Undergraduate Clinical Research Nursing.

    PubMed

    Garner, Shelby L; Spencer, Becky; Beal, Claudia C

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research nursing is distinct from nursing research and includes the coordination and delivery of care for patients enrolled in clinical research trials. An innovative elective in clinical research nursing was developed collaboratively by stakeholders at a university, research institute, and national organization to provide experiential learning for undergraduate nursing students. The multi-institutional collaborative process, course overview, and precepted experience are described.

  15. Nurses' opinions about a web-based distance course in a specialist education programme for the care of older people: a questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Häggström, Elisabeth; Hofsten, Anna; Wadensten, Barbro

    2009-09-01

    Aim.  The aim of the present study was to investigate students' opinions about a web-based distance learning course that was part of a specialist education programme. Background.  Most registered nurses (RNs) who work with older people in Sweden do not have a specialist education in caring for older people. Design.  Survey. Method.  The study was a descriptive survey with both qualitative and quantitative questions. Results.  The students found the web-based course very useful for their theoretical and professional development. New perspectives on ageing, increased knowledge about analysing and describing theories as well as practising interviews and qualitative analysis as methods were appreciated by the students. Conclusions.  One way for RNs in Sweden to get a university specialist education in the care of older people is to have a distance web-based course, as it allows flexibility and improves the students' theoretical and professional knowledge and communication skills. Relevance for clinical practice.  Managers working in care for older people settings and educators will be interested in this study's finding that distance learning is a useful strategy for providing education for RNs who work with older people.

  16. Nurses' experiences of clinical commissioning group boards.

    PubMed

    Allan, Helen; O'Driscoll, Mike; Savage, Jan; Lee, Gay; Dixon, Roz

    2016-06-15

    Aim To explore the experience of governing body nurses appointed to clinical commissioning group (CCG) boards; how they perform their responsibilities; and their perceived effectiveness in ensuring safe, patient-centred care and the factors that influence their effectiveness. Method This was a small pilot study using a mixed methods approach. There were four phases of the study: literature review, qualitative data collection (interviews), quantitative data collection (survey), and final data analysis. Findings In the early stages of the formation of CCGs, few governing body nurses had relevant experience to meet the needs of a strategic role, and many of these nurses had no proper job description, too little time to carry out their responsibilities, little management support, and unequal access to training, development, formal support or supervision compared to GP colleagues. Two working patterns or models of work of governing body nurses emerged: the full-time integrated executive statutory role and the part-time non-executive statutory role. Quality and quality assurance were the most frequently cited roles or responsibilities of governing body nurses in CCGs, and their highest priority was to improve the population's health. Conclusion The role of governing body nurse has emerged at a time of organisational change, and following extensive criticism of nursing and nurses in the media. Nurses' roles and experiences are affected by these contextual events and by the emerging structures and diversity of CCGs. Further research is required into the leadership role of governing body nurses, succession planning, and the effectiveness of their relationships with other senior nurses. PMID:27305258

  17. Preparing Nurses To Care for the Elderly: Clinical Placements in Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portnoy, Frances L.; Tanner, Fredericka

    This paper offers documents from and descriptions of a collaborative project in clinical placements of student nurses in nursing homes as part of a nursing education program. The original project participants were the College of Nursing at the University of Massachusetts/Boston (UMass/Boston); the division of Nursing at the University of…

  18. Survey of US chiropractors' perceptions about their clinical role as specialist or generalist

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Monica; Carber, Lynne A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to provide new information that describes chiropractors' professional identity relative to their perceived clinical role as specialist or generalist. Methods A pragmatic, descriptive, cross-sectional survey was performed of randomly sampled state-board licensed chiropractors in the United States during the period 2002–2003 to assess the chiropractors' perceptions of how their chiropractic patients see them, and how they see themselves, as specialist or generalist. For this exploratory study, we anchored the terms “back pain specialist,” “musculoskeletal specialist,” and “primary care generalist” to brief generic reference definitions in our survey instrument. Results Of our 2598 valid survey contacts, 1343 chiropractors returned their surveys either partially or fully completed, and a total of 720 chiropractor surveys were used in this study. Most of these chiropractors perceived that their new patients viewed them as “back pain specialists.” Chiropractors believed that their established patients (80%), more so than their new patients (58%), were likely to view them as a primary care generalist. Chiropractors described themselves as both specialist and generalist, and they expressed a greater capability to diagnose, rather than to treat, health disorders that were not musculoskeletal. Conclusion Chiropractic physician perceptions as reported in this study suggest that the nature of certain chiropractor-patient relationships may evolve profoundly over time, particularly as patients transition from new to established patients within the chiropractic practice. Understanding the complex nature of chiropractic health care provision may carry implications for advancing evidence-based chiropractic practice and clinical training, enhancing successful and comprehensive management of the complex health concerns of chiropractic patients, fostering beneficial sustained partnerships between chiropractors and their

  19. Advanced practice role characteristics of the community/public health nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Julie Fisher; Baldwin, Karen Brandt

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the advanced practice role of nurses with master's degrees in community/public health nursing using their experiences and perspectives. The purposive sample consisted of 10 nurses who had master's degrees in community/public health nursing and were working in a variety of community health settings. Data were collected using audiotaped interviews and 1-day observations of study participants in their workplaces. An editing analysis technique was used to analyze the data. Findings indicated that role characteristics included advocacy and policy setting at the organizational, community, and state levels; a leadership style centered on empowerment; a broad sphere of influence; and high-level skills in large-scale program planning, project management, and building partnerships. Results provide important descriptive data about significant aspects of the advanced practice role of nurses with master's degrees in community/public health nursing.

  20. Recognizing and defining clinical nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Stanley, David

    This article addresses the issue of clinical leadership and how it is defined. The concepts and definitions of clinical leadership are considered as well as the results of new research that suggests that clinical leaders can be seen as experts in their field, and because they are approachable and are effective communicators, are empowered to act as a role model, motivating others by matching their values and beliefs about nursing and care to their practice. This is supported by a new leadership theory, congruent leadership, proposed as the most appropriate leadership theory to support an understanding of clinical leadership. Congruent leaders (clinical nurse leaders) are followed because there is a match between the leader's values and beliefs and their actions.

  1. Engaging Clinical Nurses in Quality Improvement Projects.

    PubMed

    Moore, Susan; Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2015-10-01

    Clinical nurses have the knowledge and expertise required to provide efficient and proficient patient care. Time and knowledge deficits can prevent nurses from developing and implementing quality improvement or evidence-based practice projects. This article reviews a process for professional development of clinical nurses that helped them to define, implement, and analyze quality improvement or evidence-based practice projects. The purpose of this project was to educate advanced clinical nurses to manage a change project from inception to completion, using the Six Sigma DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) Change Acceleration Process as a framework. One-to-one mentoring and didactic in-services advanced the knowledge, appreciation, and practice of advanced practice clinicians who completed multiple change projects. The projects facilitated clinical practice changes, with improved patient outcomes; a unit cultural shift, with appreciation of quality improvement and evidence-based projects; and engagement with colleagues. Project outcomes were displayed in poster presentations at a hospital exposition for knowledge dissemination. PMID:26430867

  2. Information-seeking behavior of nursing students and clinical nurses: implications for health sciences librarians*

    PubMed Central

    Dee, Cheryl; Stanley, Ellen E.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This research was conducted to provide new insights on clinical nurses' and nursing students' current use of health resources and libraries and deterrents to their retrieval of electronic clinical information, exploring implications from these findings for health sciences librarians. Methods: Questionnaires, interviews, and observations were used to collect data from twenty-five nursing students and twenty-five clinical nurses. Results: Nursing students and clinical nurses were most likely to rely on colleagues and books for medical information, while other resources they frequently cited included personal digital assistants, electronic journals and books, and drug representatives. Significantly more nursing students than clinical nurses used online databases, including CINAHL and PubMed, to locate health information, and nursing students were more likely than clinical nurses to report performing a database search at least one to five times a week. Conclusions and Recommendations: Nursing students made more use of all available resources and were better trained than clinical nurses, but both groups lacked database-searching skills. Participants were eager for more patient care information, more database training, and better computer skills; therefore, health sciences librarians have the opportunity to meet the nurses' information needs and improve nurses' clinical information-seeking behavior. PMID:15858624

  3. Studies on nursing risks and measures of clinical medication.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Bai, Jie; Huang, Jie

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the cause analysis of clinical medication nursing risks and propose relevant nursing measures, so as to control and reduce the clinical nursing risks and reach the physical and mental safety of patients and nurses. Clinical nursing risk events with 30 cases in TCM Hospital of Zhengzhou City from June 2010 to April 2012 were underwent statistical analyses. The risk of medication error ranked the first in the direct reasons of nursing risks, accounting for a higher ratio. Moreover, the reasons of nursing risks were also involved in nonstandard operation, disease observation and other relative factors. Nurses must fully understand the relative factors of medication nursing risks, regarding the patients as their own family and always permeating the consciousness of nursing risks into the working process. PMID:26525028

  4. [A nurse consultation in victimology for minors].

    PubMed

    Soudan, Corinne

    2014-10-01

    The nurse consultation is an integral part of the treatment of children and adolescents experiencing psychological distress following traumatic events. Specific support is therefore offered to young patients, in particular through the intervention of a clinical nurse specialist.

  5. Cost analysis of Periodontitis management in public sector specialist dental clinics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this paper is to quantify the cost of periodontitis management at public sector specialist periodontal clinic settings and analyse the distribution of cost components. Methods Five specialist periodontal clinics in the Ministry of Health represented the public sector in providing clinical and cost data for this study. Newly-diagnosed periodontitis patients (N = 165) were recruited and followed up for one year of specialist periodontal care. Direct and indirect costs from the societal viewpoint were included in the cost analysis. They were measured in 2012 Ringgit Malaysia (MYR) and estimated from the societal perspective using activity-based and step-down costing methods, and substantiated by clinical pathways. Cost of dental equipment, consumables and labour (average treatment time) for each procedure was measured using activity-based costing method. Meanwhile, unit cost calculations for clinic administration, utilities and maintenance used step-down approach. Patient expenditures and absence from work were recorded via diary entries. The conversion from MYR to Euro was based on the 2012 rate (1€ = MYR4). Results A total of 2900 procedures were provided, with an average cost of MYR 2820 (€705) per patient for the study year, and MYR 376 (€94) per outpatient visit. Out of this, 90% was contributed by provider cost and 10% by patient cost; 94% for direct cost and 4% for lost productivity. Treatment of aggressive periodontitis was significantly higher than for chronic periodontitis (t-test, P = 0.003). Higher costs were expended as disease severity increased (ANOVA, P = 0.022) and for patients requiring surgeries (ANOVA, P < 0.001). Providers generally spent most on consumables while patients spent most on transportation. Conclusions Cost of providing dental treatment for periodontitis patients at public sector specialist settings were substantial and comparable with some non-communicable diseases. These findings

  6. Second Year Associate Degree Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty Attitudes towards Clinical Educational Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFauci, Frances F.

    2009-01-01

    Professional registered nursing is an essential part of the health care system and student nurses need experimental learning with actual patients to learn to practice as a nurse. The health care system has changed dramatically and nursing schools have decreasing access to the health care agencies. The clinical educational experience develops…

  7. The Breast Cancer Distance Education Program: development and evaluation of a course for specialist breast care nurses.

    PubMed

    Dixon, H; Hordern, A; Borland, R

    2001-02-01

    The Breast Cancer Distance Education Program is the first tertiary-based education program for specialist breast care nurses in Australia. The program covers current treatment options, psychosocial issues, and professional development issues relating to breast cancer nursing. For the first two student intakes (n = 53), precourse, postcourse, and 3-month follow-up surveys were conducted to assess the perceived value of the course, identify any limitations, and note changes in practice that arose. Before taking the course, most of the students had experience in breast cancer nursing, but lacked confidence and hoped to learn more about responding effectively to psychosocial issues through communication, counseling, and provision of support to patients and their carers. After taking the course, the students were very positive about the course content, resources, and teaching support. They reported learning new skills for addressing psychosocial issues and symptom management arising from a diagnosis of breast cancer, stating a desire to implement these new skills. Comparison between results from the three surveys indicated that students' confidence in providing breast cancer support increased significantly in most areas of practice, and was maintained at 3-month follow-up survey. Results suggest that students met the course objectives successfully, and in most cases subsequently translated their knowledge into improved practice.

  8. Nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Ella; Tabak, Nili

    2012-12-01

    Using Ajzen and Madden's Theory of Planned Behavior, this study investigates factors which influence nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines in their daily ward work. A convenience sample of 91 nurses in internal medicine wards in three Israeli hospitals answered four questionnaires. Data were processed by Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate regression. The main findings were that burnout was negatively correlated with the intention to work according to guidelines and that professionalism (in the sense of a tendency to follow taught procedure rather than personal judgment) was positively correlated with it. Furthermore, nurses who perceive their behavioral control and subjective norms to be positive will be the most determined to work according to guidelines, provided they personally command the necessary resources to do so. PMID:23447906

  9. Multi-institutional Collaboration to Promote Undergraduate Clinical Research Nursing.

    PubMed

    Garner, Shelby L; Spencer, Becky; Beal, Claudia C

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research nursing is distinct from nursing research and includes the coordination and delivery of care for patients enrolled in clinical research trials. An innovative elective in clinical research nursing was developed collaboratively by stakeholders at a university, research institute, and national organization to provide experiential learning for undergraduate nursing students. The multi-institutional collaborative process, course overview, and precepted experience are described. PMID:26164323

  10. Strategies for Improving Nursing Students' Mental Health Clinical Rotation.

    PubMed

    Kroning, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Mental illness is a huge problem many people face in the U.S. and around the world. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association indicates there is a shortage of nurses in every level and role in psychiatric-mental health nursing. Raising up a generation of nurses who want to work with the mentally ill is a challenge for nurse educators. The use of role playing and simulation in the learning lab prior to entering the clinical setting and reflective journaling in the clinical rotation can improve undergraduate nursing students' mental health clinical experience. PMID:27295244

  11. Strategies for Improving Nursing Students' Mental Health Clinical Rotation.

    PubMed

    Kroning, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Mental illness is a huge problem many people face in the U.S. and around the world. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association indicates there is a shortage of nurses in every level and role in psychiatric-mental health nursing. Raising up a generation of nurses who want to work with the mentally ill is a challenge for nurse educators. The use of role playing and simulation in the learning lab prior to entering the clinical setting and reflective journaling in the clinical rotation can improve undergraduate nursing students' mental health clinical experience.

  12. Clinical characteristics of patients with epilepsy in a specialist neuropsychiatry service.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adam; Seri, Stefano; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-05-01

    Neuropsychiatry services provide specialist input into the assessment and management of behavioral symptoms associated with a range of neurological conditions, including epilepsy. Despite the centrality of epilepsy to neuropsychiatry and the recent expansion of neuropsychiatry service provision, little is known about the clinical characteristics of patients with epilepsy who are routinely seen by a specialist neuropsychiatry service. This retrospective study filled this gap by retrospectively evaluating a naturalistic series of 60 consecutive patients with epilepsy referred to and assessed within a neuropsychiatry setting. Fifty-two patients (86.7%) had active epilepsy and were under the ongoing care of the referring neurologist for seizure management. The majority of patients (N=42; 70.0%) had a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy, with temporal lobe epilepsy as the most common epilepsy type (N=37; 61.7%). Following clinical assessment, 39 patients (65.0%) fulfilled formal diagnostic criteria for at least one psychiatric disorder; nonepileptic attack disorder (N=37; 61.7%), major depression (N=23; 38.3%), and generalized anxiety disorder (N=16; 26.7%) were the most commonly diagnosed comorbidities. The clinical characteristics of patients seen in specialist neuropsychiatry settings are in line with the results from previous studies in neurology clinics in terms of both epilepsy and psychiatric comorbidity. Our findings confirm the need for the development and implementation of structured care pathways for the neuropsychiatric aspects of epilepsy, with focus on comorbid nonepileptic attacks and affective and anxiety symptoms. This is of particular importance in consideration of the impact of behavioral symptoms on patients' health-related quality of life. PMID:27057744

  13. Developing ambulatory care clinics: nurse practitioners as primary providers.

    PubMed

    Lamper-Linden, C; Goetz-Kulas, J; Lake, R

    1983-12-01

    While hospitals evaluate ambulatory clinics as a revenue-generating service alternative, nursing executives develop new areas for nursing practice in nurse-managed clinics. The authors describe the five-year growth of a nurse-managed ambulatory clinic providing primary health care to those aged 55 and older. The discussion explains nurse practitioner leadership and practice, and accountability between professions. The concept and structure of services and marketing strategies are elated to the people served. Financial feasibility, cost containment, and other factors demonstrate the clinic's contribution to its sponsoring hospital.

  14. Determinants of the use of specialist mental health services by nursing home residents.

    PubMed Central

    Shea, D G; Streit, A; Smyer, M A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study examines the effects of resident and facility characteristics on the probability of nursing home residents receiving treatment by mental health professionals. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. The study uses data from the Institutional Population Component of the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey, a secondary data source containing data on 3,350 nursing home residents living in 810 nursing homes as of January 1, 1987. STUDY DESIGN. Andersen's health services use model (1968) is used to estimate a multivariate logistic equation for the effects of independent variables on the probability that a resident has received services from mental health professionals. Important variables include resident race, sex, and age; presence of several behaviors and reported mental illnesses; and facility ownership, facility size, and facility certification. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Data on 188 residents were excluded from the sample because information was missing on several important variables. For some additional variables residents who had missing information were coded as negative responses. This left 3,162 observations for analysis in the logistic regressions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Older residents and residents with more ADL limitations are much less likely than other residents to have received treatment from a mental health professional. Residents with reported depression, schizophrenia, or psychoses, and residents who are agitated or hallucinating are more likely to have received treatment. Residents in government nursing homes, homes run by chains, and homes with low levels of certification are less likely to have received treatment. CONCLUSIONS. Few residents receive treatment from mental health professionals despite need. Older, physically disabled residents need special attention. Care in certain types of facilities requires further study. New regulations mandating treatment for mentally ill residents will demand increased attention from

  15. Organizational climate, communication, and role strain in clinical nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Piscopo, B

    1994-01-01

    This study examined factors contributing to role strain experienced by clinical nursing faculty while they oversaw the clinical experiences of nursing students. Specifically, the study focused on differences between clinical nursing faculty's perceptions of organizational climate and communication within affiliating agencies and perceptions of these factors held by their respective nursing unit managers in the affiliating agencies. Perceptions of organizational climate and communication were related to role strain reported by clinical nursing faculty, and predictors of role strain in clinical nursing faculty were identified. The instruments used for data collection were the Organizational Climate Questionnaire, Communication Within Organizations Questionnaire, and Role Strain Questionnaire. Data were analyzed using independent Student's t Tests, Pearson Product-Moment Correlation Coefficients, and stepwise multiple regression analysis. Significant differences in perceptions of organizational climate were not found; however, clinical nursing faculty and nursing unit managers differed significantly in their perception of communication. There was a significant positive correlation between organizational climate, communication, and reported role strain in clinical nursing faculty, and a linear relationship was demonstrated between reported role strain in clinical nursing faculty, perceptions of communication, and length of time on the nursing unit in the affiliating agency.

  16. Building an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program: Cooperative Roles for Pharmacists, Infectious Diseases Specialists, and Clinical Microbiologists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihye; Craft, David W; Katzman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to optimize the use of antimicrobial agents, referred to as antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs), are increasingly becoming part of the clinical enterprise at big and small hospitals. Such programs aim to achieve the synergistic goals of improving patient outcomes, limiting the unintended consequences of drug resistance and superinfections, and reducing health care expenditures. This article will review the need for antimicrobial stewardship and the key components of setting up a program; then, it will describe the ASP at one medical center to underscore how attention to acceptance by the clinical staff is crucial to changing the culture of antimicrobial use. Although the details may differ for each institution, the foundation of a successful stewardship program is support from hospital leadership and the cooperative interaction among the pharmacy, infectious diseases specialists, and clinical microbiologists.

  17. Building an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program: Cooperative Roles for Pharmacists, Infectious Diseases Specialists, and Clinical Microbiologists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihye; Craft, David W; Katzman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to optimize the use of antimicrobial agents, referred to as antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs), are increasingly becoming part of the clinical enterprise at big and small hospitals. Such programs aim to achieve the synergistic goals of improving patient outcomes, limiting the unintended consequences of drug resistance and superinfections, and reducing health care expenditures. This article will review the need for antimicrobial stewardship and the key components of setting up a program; then, it will describe the ASP at one medical center to underscore how attention to acceptance by the clinical staff is crucial to changing the culture of antimicrobial use. Although the details may differ for each institution, the foundation of a successful stewardship program is support from hospital leadership and the cooperative interaction among the pharmacy, infectious diseases specialists, and clinical microbiologists. PMID:26283698

  18. Competencies within a professional clinical ladder: differences in understanding between nurse managers and staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Erin L; Meucci, Joanne H

    2015-01-01

    Clinical ladders provide a framework for professional nursing development and have shown increased personal and professional satisfaction. This article describes a standardized approach for clinical ladder implementation. Managers' and staff nurses' knowledge of the model must align for important stakeholders to perceive the clinical ladder as valuable. Understanding differences and perspectives can be useful as the basis for education and further clinical ladder refinement augmenting the potential for increased nursing satisfaction and professional development. PMID:25790360

  19. Impact of managed clinical networks on NHS specialist neonatal services in England: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Gale, C; Santhakumaran, S; Nagarajan, S; Statnikov, Y

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of reorganisation of neonatal specialist care services in England after a UK Department of Health report in 2003. Design A population-wide observational comparison of outcomes over two epochs, before and after the establishment of managed clinical neonatal networks. Setting Epoch one: 294 maternity and neonatal units in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, 1 September 1998 to 31 August 2000, as reported by the Confidential Enquiry into Stillbirths and Sudden Deaths in Infancy Project 27/28. Epoch two: 146 neonatal units in England contributing data to the National Neonatal Research Database at the Neonatal Data Analysis Unit, 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010. Participants Babies born at a gestational age of 27+0-28+6 (weeks+days): 3522 live births in epoch one; 2919 babies admitted to a neonatal unit within 28 days of birth in epoch two. Intervention The national reorganisation of neonatal services into managed clinical networks. Main outcome measures The proportion of babies born at hospitals providing the highest volume of neonatal specialist care (≥2000 neonatal intensive care days annually), having an acute transfer (within the first 24 hours after birth) and/or a late transfer (between 24 hours and 28 days after birth) to another hospital, assessed by change in distribution of transfer category (“none,” “acute,” “late”), and babies from multiple births separated by transfer. For acute transfers in epoch two, the level of specialist neonatal care provided at the destination hospital (British Association of Perinatal Medicine criteria). Results After reorganisation, there were increases in the proportions of babies born at 27-28 weeks’ gestation in hospitals providing the highest volume of neonatal specialist care (18% (631/3495) v 49% (1325/2724); odds ratio 4.30, 95% confidence interval 3.83 to 4.82; P<0.001) and in acute and late postnatal transfers (7% (235) v 12% (360) and 18% (579) v 22% (640), respectively

  20. Nursing Challenges in Motivating Nursing Students through Clinical Education: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Nasrin, Hanifi; Soroor, Parvizy; Soodabeh, Joolaee

    2012-01-01

    Nurses are the first role models for students in clinical settings. They can have a significant role on students' motivation. The purpose of this study was to explore the understanding of nursing students and instructors concerning the role of nurses in motivating nursing students through clinical education. The sampling was first started purposefully and continued with theoretical sampling. The study collected qualitative data through semistructured and interactive interviews with 16 nursing students and 4 nursing instructors. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using grounded theory approach. One important pattern emerged in this study was the “concerns of becoming a nurse,” which itself consisted of three categories: “nurses clinical competency,” “nurses as full-scale mirror of the future,” and “Monitoring and modeling through clinical education” (as the core variable). The findings showed that the nurses' manners of performance as well as the profession's prospect have a fundamental role in the process of formation of motivation through clinical education. Students find an insight into the nursing profession by substituting themselves in the place of a nurse, and as result, are or are not motivated towards the clinical education. PMID:22830005

  1. Student nurses' experiences of anxiety in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Melincavage, Sharon M

    2011-11-01

    It is known that some student nurses who experience anxiety during clinical experiences leave nursing education programs. If nurse educators can better understand the anxiety of student nurses during clinical experience, they will be able to develop educational interventions to minimize students' anxiety. Decreasing anxiety has a two-fold effect. First, when anxiety is decreased, learning may be increased. Second, decreasing anxiety may help alleviate the nursing shortage because more students complete their nursing education. This qualitative phenomenological study examines student nurses' perception of anxiety in the clinical setting. Situated cognition learning theory is the theoretical framework. The main method of data collection is unstructured face-to-face interviews with 7 student nurses. The data was analyzed using a thematic analysis. The themes are reported in the rich descriptive words of the subjects. Implications for practice are discussed.

  2. [A nurse, a historian, a writer, a teaching specialist, a care designer, and ... a woman].

    PubMed

    Vigil-Ripoche, Marie-André

    2011-12-01

    Marie-Françoise Collière (1930-2005) was a great lady of the nursing profession recognized worldwide for her expertise. As a historian, a pioneer and an activist of the cause of the female nurses and health care, she devoted her life to giving the profession the first meaning of care, ie: accompanying the patient through his life, from the birth to the death, through disease, accident and ageing. Thus, for Marie-Françoise Collière, "Caring means health-care through the satisfaction of a series of needs which are indispensable for life but which have diverse manifestations". Here is the story of her life and her trajectory.

  3. Science without meritocracy. Discrimination among European specialists in infectious diseases and clinical microbiology: a questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Tacconelli, Evelina; Poljak, Mario; Cacace, Marina; Caiati, Giovanni; Benzonana, Nur; Nagy, Elisabeth; Kortbeek, Titia

    2012-01-01

    Objective In 2009, in a European survey, around a quarter of Europeans reported witnessing discrimination or harassment at their workplace. The parity committee from the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) designed a questionnaire survey to investigate forms of discrimination with respect to country, gender and ethnicity among medical professionals in hospitals and universities carrying out activities in the clinical microbiology (CM) and infectious diseases (ID) fields. Design The survey consisted of 61 questions divided into five areas (sociodemographic, professional census and environment, leadership and generic) and ran anonymously for nearly 3 months on the ESCMID website. Subjects European specialists in CM/ID. Results Overall, we included 1274 professionals. The majority of respondents (68%) stated that discrimination is present in medical science. A quarter of them reported personal experience with discrimination, mainly associated with gender and geographic region. Specialists from South-Western Europe experienced events at a much higher rate (37%) than other European regions. The proportion of women among full professor was on average 46% in CM and 26% in ID. Participation in high-level decision-making committees was significantly (>10 percentage points) different by gender and geographic origin. Yearly gross salary among CM/ID professionals was significantly different among European countries and by gender, within the same country. More than one-third of respondents (38%) stated that international societies in CM/ID have an imbalance as for committee member distribution and speakers at international conferences. Conclusions A quarter of CM/ID specialists experienced career and research discrimination in European hospitals and universities, mainly related to gender and geographic origin. Implementing proactive policies to tackle discrimination and improve representativeness and balance in career among CM

  4. Efficient utilization of the limited number of emergency medicine specialists and statistics related to clinical outcomes in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jae Hyun; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Lee, Jae Ho; Oh, Bum Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The supply of emergency medicine (EM) specialists has not been able to meet demand in the past decade. This study comparatively analyzed clinical findings to provide fundamental data to inform efficient utilization of a limited number of EM specialists. Methods This retrospective study included 54,204 patients who visited the emergency department of a tertiary care medical center from March 1 to December 31, 2012. The experimental specialist-supervised (SS) group included patients supervised by an EM specialist, while the control specialist-on-call (SOC) group included patients attended by a senior resident of EM with an EM specialist on call. Results The mean length of stay in the emergency department was longer in the SS group than in the SOC group for all levels of severe-to-moderate (levels 1 to 3) and mild (levels 4 and 5) patient conditions (P<0.05). The mortality rate of severe-to-moderate patients in the SOC group was 1.63 times higher than that in patient in the SS group. Conclusion Supervision by EM specialists significantly decreased mortality in patients with severe-to-moderate condition. Therefore, EM specialists should focus on this patient group, while training residents should concentrate on patients with relatively mild conditions.

  5. Clinical reasoning of nursing students on clinical placement: Clinical educators' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Sharyn; Arthur, Carol

    2016-05-01

    Graduate nurses may have knowledge and adequate clinical psychomotor skills however they have been identified as lacking the clinical reasoning skills to deliver safe, effective care suggesting contemporary educational approaches do not always facilitate the development of nursing students' clinical reasoning. While nursing literature explicates the concept of clinical reasoning and develops models that demonstrate clinical reasoning, there is very little published about nursing students and clinical reasoning during clinical placements. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten clinical educators to gain an understanding of how they recognised, developed and appraised nursing students' clinical reasoning while on clinical placement. This study found variability in the clinical educators' conceptualisation, recognition, and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. Although most of the clinical educators conceptualised clinical reasoning as a process those who did not demonstrated the greatest variability in the recognition and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. The clinical educators in this study also described being unable to adequately appraise a student's clinical reasoning during clinical placement with the use of the current performance assessment tool.

  6. Clinical reasoning of nursing students on clinical placement: Clinical educators' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Sharyn; Arthur, Carol

    2016-05-01

    Graduate nurses may have knowledge and adequate clinical psychomotor skills however they have been identified as lacking the clinical reasoning skills to deliver safe, effective care suggesting contemporary educational approaches do not always facilitate the development of nursing students' clinical reasoning. While nursing literature explicates the concept of clinical reasoning and develops models that demonstrate clinical reasoning, there is very little published about nursing students and clinical reasoning during clinical placements. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten clinical educators to gain an understanding of how they recognised, developed and appraised nursing students' clinical reasoning while on clinical placement. This study found variability in the clinical educators' conceptualisation, recognition, and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. Although most of the clinical educators conceptualised clinical reasoning as a process those who did not demonstrated the greatest variability in the recognition and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. The clinical educators in this study also described being unable to adequately appraise a student's clinical reasoning during clinical placement with the use of the current performance assessment tool. PMID:27235568

  7. Defining risk from the perspective of nurses in clinical roles.

    PubMed

    Dobos, C

    1992-11-01

    Although the nursing literature suggests that nurses generally avoid risk, their willingness and ability to take risk are fundamental to their professional advancement, job satisfaction and patient advocacy. The definition of risk as it pertains in clinical practice, however, may not be synonymous with risk as defined in other fields. This study defines risk in nursing from the perspective of three registered nurses in clinical roles. Grounded theory methodology indicated that 11 risk categories comprised six core concepts. The latter formed the basis for the following: risk in clinical nursing practice is defined by uncomfortable and typically unavoidable role-related situations characterized by high unpredictability and negative or hostile overtones, dependency on others, exceedingly high performance expectations from self and others, unpleasant emotions, and health threats that extend beyond working hours. Findings of this study refute the notion that nurses avoid risks. Risk, ever present in the nurse's clinical practice and environment, requires strategies to minimize its negative impact. PMID:1430636

  8. Enhancing Patient Safety Using Clinical Nursing Data: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeeyae; Choi, Jeungok E

    2016-01-01

    To enhance patient safety from falls, many hospital information systems have been implemented to collect clinical data from the bedside and have used the information to improve fall prevention care. However, most of them use administrative data not clinical nursing data. This necessitated the development of a web-based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System (NPRIMS) that processes clinical nursing data to measure nurses' delivery of fall prevention care and its impact on patient outcomes. This pilot study developed computer algorithms based on a falls prevention protocol and programmed the prototype NPRIMS. It successfully measured the performance of nursing care delivered and its impact on patient outcomes using clinical nursing data from the study site. Results of the study revealed that NPRIMS has the potential to pinpoint components of nursing processes that are in need of improvement for preventing patient from falls. PMID:27332171

  9. Nursing staff perceptions of student contributions in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Slaughter-Smith, Cheryl; Helms, Jennifer E; Burris, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Because nursing is a practice discipline, students are placed in clinical settings to collaborate with professional nurses in caring for patients. This descriptive study aimed to explore the benefits and limitations of undergraduate nursing students in the clinical setting. A 54-item instrument, Nursing Students' Contributions to Clinical Agencies, was used to collect data from staff nurses (N = 84) at three hospitals. The instrument also provided space for participants to share qualitative data, which revealed perceptions with which staff nurses were likely to agree and three key themes: Eager to Learn, Willing to Help, and Serving Their Time. The major implication for students is that they are often judged on their assertiveness skills and should offer assistance so they appear eager to learn. Faculty must ascertain that students understand their objectives for the clinical rotation and share those objectives with the staff nurses to enhance their learning experience.

  10. Italian clinical guides' perceptions of their role in student nurses' clinical practicum.

    PubMed

    Quattrin, Rosanna; Zanini, Antonietta; Bulfone, Giampiera; Medves, Antonella; Panariti, Mateo; Brusaferro, Silvio

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this article is an examination of the clinical guides' views and their role in student nurses' learning. The descriptive survey was conducted in July-September 2006. The sample was composed of 120 clinical guides who answered a questionnaire regarding the last student nurses' clinical practice experience during 2006. Clinical guides are nurses working in the wards who are available to supervise the clinical practice of nursing students, similar to preceptors in the United States. Clinical guides used different teaching strategies to stimulate students in various activities. The study revealed that the role of clinical guide is very important for the students as they develop into professional nurses.

  11. Strengthening Preceptors' Competency in Thai Clinical Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingpun, Renu; Srisa-ard, Boonchom; Jumpamool, Apinya

    2015-01-01

    The problem of lack of nurses can be solved by employing student nurses. Obviously, nurse instructors and preceptors have to work extremely hard to train student nurses to meet the standard of nursing. The preceptorship model is yet to be explored as to what it means to have an effective program or the requisite skills to be an effective…

  12. Perceptions of Novice Clinical Adjunct Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmelberg, Layna

    2011-01-01

    The anticipated nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and continues to be a topic of discussion. A nationwide solution has been for nursing programs to increase their enrollment of nursing students. This could be difficult for many nursing schools; as many have a shortage of qualified nursing faculty with which to instruct…

  13. Clinical reasoning in nursing, a think-aloud study using virtual patients - a base for an innovative assessment.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Elenita; Ziegert, Kristina; Hult, Håkan; Fors, Uno

    2014-04-01

    In health-care education, it is important to assess the competencies that are essential for the professional role. To develop clinical reasoning skills is crucial for nursing practice and therefore an important learning outcome in nursing education programmes. Virtual patients (VPs) are interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios and have been suggested for use not only for learning, but also for assessment of clinical reasoning. The aim of this study was to investigate how experienced paediatric nurses reason regarding complex VP cases and how they make clinical decisions. The study was also aimed to give information about possible issues that should be assessed in clinical reasoning exams for post-graduate students in diploma specialist paediatric nursing education. The information from this study is believed to be of high value when developing scoring and grading models for a VP-based examination for the specialist diploma in paediatric nursing education. Using the think-aloud method, data were collected from 30 RNs working in Swedish paediatric departments, and child or school health-care centres. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. The results indicate that experienced nurses try to consolidate their hypotheses by seeing a pattern and judging the value of signs, symptoms, physical examinations, laboratory tests and radiology. They show high specific competence but earlier experience of similar cases was also of importance for the decision making. The nurses thought it was an innovative assessment focusing on clinical reasoning and clinical decision making. They thought it was an enjoyable way to be assessed and that all three main issues could be assessed using VPs. In conclusion, VPs seem to be a possible model for assessing the clinical reasoning process and clinical decision making, but how to score and grade such exams needs further research.

  14. Structural empowerment and professional nursing practice behaviors of baccalaureate nursing students in clinical learning environments.

    PubMed

    Livsey, Kae R

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the associations between professional behaviors of baccalaureate nursing students and student perceptions of select factors within the clinical learning environment, including the role of clinical faculty leadership. Participants (n=243) were recruited from a randomly selected list of 1000 members of the National Student Nurses Association (NSNA) among sixteen states within the Southern region of the United States. Results revealed a direct relationship exists between student perceptions of structural empowerment in their clinical learning environment and professional nursing practice behaviors among students. Also found was that relationships between variables in the model are significantly strengthened by student perceptions of strong leadership behaviors of clinical faculty. Findings from this study may assist nurse educators by contributing knowledge relevant to support/facilitate the transition of individuals from student nurses to professional registered nurses and, thus enhance the impact of professional nurses' contributions in healthcare delivery.

  15. Taking kangaroo mother care forward in South Africa: The role of district clinical specialist teams.

    PubMed

    Feucht, Ute Dagmar; van Rooyen, Elise; Skhosana, Rinah; Bergh, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The global agenda for improved neonatal care includes the scale-up of kangaroo mother care (KMC) services. The establishment of district clinical specialist teams (DCSTs) in South Africa (SA) provides an excellent opportunity to enhance neonatal care at district level and ensure translation of policies, including the requirement for KMC implementation, into everyday clinical practice. Tshwane District in Gauteng Province, SA, has been experiencing an increasing strain on obstetric and neonatal services at central, tertiary and regional hospitals in recent years as a result of growing population numbers and rapid up-referral of patients, with limited down-referral of low-risk patients to district-level services. We describe a successful multidisciplinary quality improvement initiative under the leadership of the Tshwane DCST, in conjunction with experienced local KMC implementers, aimed at expanding the district's KMC services. The project subsequently served as a platform for improvement of other areas of neonatal care by means of a systematic approach.

  16. Taking kangaroo mother care forward in South Africa: The role of district clinical specialist teams.

    PubMed

    Feucht, Ute Dagmar; van Rooyen, Elise; Skhosana, Rinah; Bergh, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The global agenda for improved neonatal care includes the scale-up of kangaroo mother care (KMC) services. The establishment of district clinical specialist teams (DCSTs) in South Africa (SA) provides an excellent opportunity to enhance neonatal care at district level and ensure translation of policies, including the requirement for KMC implementation, into everyday clinical practice. Tshwane District in Gauteng Province, SA, has been experiencing an increasing strain on obstetric and neonatal services at central, tertiary and regional hospitals in recent years as a result of growing population numbers and rapid up-referral of patients, with limited down-referral of low-risk patients to district-level services. We describe a successful multidisciplinary quality improvement initiative under the leadership of the Tshwane DCST, in conjunction with experienced local KMC implementers, aimed at expanding the district's KMC services. The project subsequently served as a platform for improvement of other areas of neonatal care by means of a systematic approach. PMID:26792305

  17. Nursing students' perceptions toward the nursing profession from clinical practicum in a baccalaureate nursing program-a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hui-Chen; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Weng, Wei-Che

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore senior nursing students' perceptions toward the nursing profession and their experiences in clinical practicum in Taiwan. This study used semistructured interview guides and unstructured face-to-face dialogue with the participants based on a qualitative method. A purposive sample with a snowball method from a baccalaureate nursing program in Southern Taiwan was used to recruit participants. A total of 30 senior nursing students participated in this study. Data were collected from February to May 2011. The interviews were transcribed verbatim, and data were analyzed based on the phenomenological approach of qualitative methodology. Data were categorized into three major themes: in-depth recognition of nursing, recognition of the meaning and value of life, and decision conflicts for being a nurse. The findings of the study not only help nursing educators further understand the educational effects of clinical practicum, but also provide information for managers of medical organizations to recruit and train newly graduated nurses.

  18. Royal Rehabilitation Centre Sydney: towards Clinical Development Units (Nursing).

    PubMed

    Parsons, Myra; Mott, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    Clinical Development Units (Nursing), also known as Practice Development Units and Nursing Development Units, are nursing units that continually strive for excellence in nursing practice. Nursing units endeavouring to attain, or having achieved, the standards required of a Clinical Development Unit (Nursing)--CDU(N)--provide a very motivating and stimulating environment for nursing professional development. This paper provides readers with an understanding of the underpinnings of a CDU(N) along with why and how a nursing unit would strive for this status. A priority of senior nurse management at a rehabilitation facility in Sydney, the Royal Rehabilitation Centre, has been working towards the upgrading of every nursing unit in their facility to the level of a CDU(N) over the past three years. By way of an innovative course, the Clinical Development and Leadership course developed by Professor Jennifer Greenwood in 1997, senior nurses are being provided with the knowledge and skills to enable them to work towards their goal of becoming part of a Clinical Development Unit (Nursing).

  19. [Construction of terminology subsets: contributions to clinical nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Clares, Jorge Wilker Bezerra; de Freitas, Maria Célia; Guedes, Maria Vilaní Cavalcante; da Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima

    2013-08-01

    The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®) is a classification system that unifies the elements of nursing practice (diagnoses, interventions and outcomes), enabling elucidation of elements of a specific nursing language through the construction of terminology subsets. In this reflective essay, aspects relevant to the construction of ICNP® terminology subsets are highlighted, as well as their contributions to clinical nursing practice. The development of subsets as a tool that contributes to making nursing language universal, facilitates the communication process, as well as the scientific and technological advancement of the profession, is discussed. Therefore, its use by nurses worldwide is encouraged.

  20. Examination of the Teaching Styles of Nursing Professional Development Specialists, Part II: Correlational Study on Teaching Styles and Use of Adult Learning Theory.

    PubMed

    Curran, Mary K

    2014-07-16

    This article, the second in a two-part series, details a correlational study that examined the effects of four variables (graduate degrees in nursing education, professional development training in adult learning theory, nursing professional development [NPD] certification, and NPD specialist experience) on the use of adult learning theory to guide curriculum development. Using the Principles of Adult Learning Scale, 114 NPD specialists tested the hypothesis that NPD specialists with graduate degrees in nursing education, professional development training in adult learning theory, NPD certification, and NPD experience would use higher levels of adult learning theory in their teaching practices to guide curriculum development than those without these attributes. This hypothesis was rejected as regression analysis revealed only one statistically significant predictor variable, NPD certification, influenced the use of adult learning theory. In addition, analysis revealed NPD specialists tended to support a teacher-centered rather than a learner-centered teaching style, indicating NPD educators are not using adult learning theory to guide teaching practices and curriculum development. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2014;45(8):xxx-xxx.

  1. Examination of the teaching styles of nursing professional development specialists, part II: correlational study on teaching styles and use of adult learning theory.

    PubMed

    Curran, Mary K

    2014-08-01

    This article, the second in a two-part series, details a correlational study that examined the effects of four variables (graduate degrees in nursing education, professional development training in adult learning theory, nursing professional development [NPD] certification, and NPD specialist experience) on the use of adult learning theory to guide curriculum development. Using the Principles of Adult Learning Scale, 114 NPD specialists tested the hypothesis that NPD specialists with graduate degrees in nursing education, professional development training in adult learning theory, NPD certification, and NPD experience would use higher levels of adult learning theory in their teaching practices to guide curriculum development than those without these attributes. This hypothesis was rejected as regression analysis revealed only one statistically significant predictor variable, NPD certification, influenced the use of adult learning theory. In addition, analysis revealed NPD specialists tended to support a teacher-centered rather than a learner-centered teaching style, indicating NPD educators are not using adult learning theory to guide teaching practices and curriculum development.

  2. An innovative care model coordinated by a physical therapist and nurse practitioner for osteoarthritis of the hip and knee in specialist care: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Voorn, Veronique M A; Vermeulen, Henricus M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Huizinga, Tom W J; Leijerzapf, Nicolette A C; Kroon, Herman M; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van der Linden, Henrica M J

    2013-07-01

    The subject of the study is to investigate whether health-related quality of life (HRQoL), pain and function of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) improves after a specialist care intervention coordinated by a physical therapist and a nurse practitioner (NP) and to assess satisfaction with this care at 12 weeks. This observational study included all consecutive patients with hip or knee OA referred to an outpatient orthopaedics clinic. The intervention consisted of a single, standardized visit (assessment and individually tailored management advice, to be executed in primary care) and a telephone follow-up, coordinated by a physical therapist and a NP, in cooperation with an orthopaedic surgeon. Assessments at baseline and 10 weeks thereafter included the short form-36 (SF-36), EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), hip or knee disability and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS or KOOS), the intermittent and constant osteoarthritis pain questionnaire (ICOAP) for hip or knee and a multidimensional satisfaction questionnaire (23 items; 4 point scale). Eighty-seven patients (57 female), mean age 68 years (SD 10.9) were included, with follow-up data available in 63 patients (72 %). Statistically significant improvements were seen regarding the SF-36 physical summary component score, the EQ-5D, the ICOAP scores for hip and knee, the HOOS subscale sports and the KOOS subscales pain, symptoms and activities of daily living. The proportions of patients reporting to be satisfied ranged from 79 to 98 % per item. In patients with hip and knee OA pain, function and HRQoL improved significantly after a single-visit multidisciplinary OA management intervention in specialist care, with high patient satisfaction.

  3. [Analysis of clinical nurses' publications in national journals].

    PubMed

    Dyniewicz, Ana Maria

    2010-01-01

    This research study identified clinical nurses' publications. A literature review was carried out in three national periodicals between 2000 and 2007, totalizing 1918 articles. Data demonstrated that clinical nurses' authorship or co-authorship of 162 articles (8.5%); titling was not identified in 75 publications; doctors published the most along with nurses; areas with the highest number of articles were health and nursing education, adult and elderly health. It was concluded that nurses have easier access to publish in research groups; resuming practice, even after post-graduation, they do not keep up scientific production. This entire professional category must double efforts to broaden their participation in periodicals.

  4. Comparing written and oral approaches to clinical reporting in nursing.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Diana; Johnson, Maree; Nicholls, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Patient safety is compromised if vital clinical information is not available to all members of the healthcare team. Therefore, it is important to understand the differences between patient information found in nursing documentation and information presented at clinical nursing handover. Content and textual analyses of two data sets were undertaken: one containing 67 examples of nursing documentation and the other containing 195 transcripts of clinical handover to understand the scope and construction of patient information found in each communication system. Clinical handover produced a comprehensive picture of the patient's condition and care whereas nursing documentation tended to present a series of descriptions of tasks performed by nurses. There is a need to investigate new systems of communication promoting congruence between clinical handover and nursing documentation to ensure that all patient information can be accessed by all interested parties. PMID:23050579

  5. Changing adherence-related beliefs about ICS maintenance treatment for asthma: feasibility study of an intervention delivered by asthma nurse specialists

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Sarah C E; Barnes, Neil; Barnes, Mari; Wilkinson, Andrea; Hartley, John; Piddock, Cher; Weinman, John; Horne, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Necessity-Concerns Framework (NCF) posits that non-adherence to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in asthma is influenced by doubts about the necessity for ICS and concerns about their potential adverse effects. This feasibility study examined whether these beliefs could be changed by briefing asthma nurse specialists on ways of addressing necessity beliefs and concerns within consultations. Design Pre-post intervention study. Setting Secondary care. Participants Patients with a diagnosis of moderate to severe asthma who were prescribed daily ICS were recruited to either a hospital care group (n=79; 71.0% female) or intervention group (n=57; 66.7% female). Intervention Asthma nurse specialists attended a 1.5-day NCF briefing. Primary and secondary outcome measures Beliefs about ICS (primary outcome) and self-reported adherence were measured preconsultation and 1 month postconsultation. Participants also rated their satisfaction with their consultations immediately after the consultation. Consultation recordings were coded to assess intervention delivery. Results After the NCF briefing, nurse specialists elicited and addressed beliefs about medicine more frequently. The frequency of using the NCF remained low, for example, open questions eliciting adherence were used in 0/59 hospital care versus 14/49 (28.6%) intervention consultations. Doubts about personal necessity for, and concerns about, ICS were reduced at 1 month postbriefing (p<0.05), but the intervention was not applied extensively enough to improve adherence. Conclusions The intervention changed nurse consultations, but not sufficiently enough to fully address non-adherence or adherence-related ICS beliefs (necessity and concerns). More effective techniques are needed to support nurse specialists and other practitioners to apply the intervention in hospital asthma review consultations. PMID:26048207

  6. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients' health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy.

  7. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients' health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy. PMID:27471588

  8. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients’ health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy. PMID:27471588

  9. Aesthetic Leadership: Its Place in the Clinical Nursing World.

    PubMed

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Daly, John

    2015-05-01

    Clinical leadership has been identified as crucial to positive patient/client outcomes, across all clinical settings. In the new millennium, transformational leadership has been the dominant leadership style and in more recent times, congruent leadership theory has emerged to explain clinical leadership in nursing. This article discusses these two leadership models and identifies some of the shortcomings of them as models for clinical leadership in nursing. As a way of overcoming some of these limitations, aesthetic leadership is proposed as a style of leadership that is not antithetical to either model and reflects nursing's recognition of the validity of art and aesthetics to nursing generally. Aesthetic leadership is also proposed as a way to identify an expert clinical leader from a less experienced clinical leader, taking a similar approach to the way Benner (1984) has theorised in her staging of novice to expert clinical nurse. PMID:26091400

  10. Building an innovation electronic nursing record pilot structure with nursing clinical pathway.

    PubMed

    Hao, Angelica Te-Hui; Huang, Li-Fang; Wu, Li-Bin; Kao, Ching-Chiu; Lu, Mei-Show; Jian, Wen-Shan; Chang, Her-Kung; Hsu, Chien-Yeh

    2006-01-01

    The nursing process consists of five interrelated steps: assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, and evaluation. In the nursing process, the nurse confronts a great deal of data and information. The amount of data and information may exceed the amount the nurse can process efficiently and correctly. Thus, the nurse needs assistance to become proficient in the planning of nursing care, due to the difficulty of simultaneously processing a large set of information. Thus, some form of assistance will be needed to help nurses to become more proficient in planning nursing care. Using computer technology to support clinicians' decision making may provide high-quality, patient-centered, and efficient healthcare. Although some existing nursing information systems aid in the nursing process, they only provide the most rudimentary decision support--i.e., standard care plans associated with common nursing diagnoses. Such a computerized decision support system helps the nurse develop a care plan step-by-step. But it does not assist the nurse in the decision-making process. The decision process about how to derive nursing diagnoses from data and how to individualize the care plans still remains in the mind of the nurse. The purpose of this study is to develop a pilot structure in an electronic nursing record system integrated with international nursing standards for improving the proficiency and accuracy of the plan of care in the clinical pathway process. The pilot system has shown promise in assisting both student nurses and beginner nurses. It also shows promise in helping experts who need to work in a practice area that is outside of their immediate domain.

  11. Extended scope practitioners and clinical specialists: a place in rural health?

    PubMed

    Ruston, Sally A

    2008-06-01

    This review identifies two models of allied health advanced practitioner practice that are currently in place in the National Health Service in the United Kingdom (UK). A review of the background to advanced practitioner status is given for UK allied health professionals and comments made on the outcomes of the UK roles. Description of the work of Clinical Specialist and Extended Scope Practitioner is given. Alignment with senior physiotherapy staff roles in Australia is commented upon. Some barriers or impediments to implementation of such a system in Australia are discussed with respect to registration, funding and support. The feasibility of such advanced practice roles for physiotherapy is discussed while benefits and cautions are identified. The potential for such a model of health service to be used in Australia, particularly in rural and remote areas, is identified for debate.

  12. Nursing Students' Clinical Experience With Death: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Heise, Barbara A; Gilpin, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Although debriefing in simulation settings is routine in nursing education, debriefing does not routinely take place in clinical settings with nursing students after a patient has died. This pilot study sought to explore nursing students' perceptions of their first experience with the death of a patient. Students reported emotional distress and feelings of inadequacy with regard to communicating with and supporting the family of the dying patient. Only half the students sampled reported debriefing by their clinical instructor or staff. Nurse educators must include debriefing and student support following a patient death in the clinical setting. PMID:27209870

  13. Teaching Nursing Leadership: Comparison of Simulation versus Traditional Inpatient Clinical.

    PubMed

    Gore, Teresa N; Johnson, Tanya Looney; Wang, Chih-hsuan

    2015-04-30

    Nurse educators claim accountability to ensure their students are prepared to assume leadership responsibilities upon graduation. Although front-line nurse leaders and nurse executives feel new graduates are not adequately prepared to take on basic leadership roles, professional nursing organizations such as the American Nurses Association (ANA) and the Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) deem leadership skills are core competencies of new graduate nurses. This study includes comparison of a leadership-focused multi-patient simulation and the traditional leadership clinical experiences in a baccalaureate nursing leadership course. The results of this research show both environments contribute to student learning. There was no statistical difference in the overall score. Students perceived a statistically significant difference in communication with patients in the traditional inpatient environment. However, the students perceived a statistical significant difference in teaching-learning dyad toward simulation.

  14. Teaching Nursing Leadership: Comparison of Simulation versus Traditional Inpatient Clinical.

    PubMed

    Gore, Teresa N; Johnson, Tanya Looney; Wang, Chih-hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Nurse educators claim accountability to ensure their students are prepared to assume leadership responsibilities upon graduation. Although front-line nurse leaders and nurse executives feel new graduates are not adequately prepared to take on basic leadership roles, professional nursing organizations such as the American Nurses Association (ANA) and the Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) deem leadership skills are core competencies of new graduate nurses. This study includes comparison of a leadership-focused multi-patient simulation and the traditional leadership clinical experiences in a baccalaureate nursing leadership course. The results of this research show both environments contribute to student learning. There was no statistical difference in the overall score. Students perceived a statistically significant difference in communication with patients in the traditional inpatient environment. However, the students perceived a statistical significant difference in teaching-learning dyad toward simulation. PMID:25928758

  15. Clinical decision making of nurses working in hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Bjørk, Ida Torunn; Hamilton, Glenys A

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM) in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with descriptive frequencies, t-tests, Chi-Square test, and linear regression. Nurses' decision making was categorized into analytic-systematic, intuitive-interpretive, and quasi-rational models of CDM. Most nurses reported the use of quasi-rational models during CDM thereby supporting the tenet that cognition most often includes properties of both analysis and intuition. Increased use of intuitive-interpretive models of CDM was associated with years in present job, further education, male gender, higher age, and working in predominantly surgical units.

  16. Evaluation of clinical teaching models for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Croxon, Lyn; Maginnis, Cathy

    2009-07-01

    Clinical placements provide opportunities for student nurses to learn experientially. To create a constructive learning environment staff need to be friendly, approachable, available and willing to teach. There must be adequate opportunities for students to develop confidence and competence in clinical skills with a focus on student learning needs rather than service needs of facilities. A popular model for clinical teaching of nursing students is the preceptor model. This model involves a student working under the supervision of individual registered nurses who are part of the clinical staff. This model was failing to meet students' needs in acute nursing practice areas, largely due to Registered Nurse staff shortages and demanding workloads. The students' evaluations led to the trial of a 'cluster' or group model of eight students, with a clinical facilitator who is paid by the university, in each acute nursing ward. Evaluation of twenty nursing students' perceptions of their acute nursing practice clinical placements was conducted using a mixed method approach to evaluate the two models of student supervision. Results indicate that the students prefer small groups with the clinical facilitator in one area. Thus evaluation and feedback from students and the perceptions of their clinical placement is essential. PMID:18722161

  17. The Impact of Human Patient Simulation on Nursing Clinical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinnick, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Public health relies on well trained nurses and clinical experience is an important component of that training. However, clinical experience training for student nurses also has significant challenges, as it can place patients at risk. Also it is difficult to schedule/predict patient conditions and procedures. Human patient simulation (HPS) can…

  18. Clinical Audit of Gastrointestinal Conditions Occurring among Adults with Down Syndrome Attending a Specialist Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Robyn A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Adults with Down syndrome (DS) are predisposed to syndromic and environmental gastrointestinal conditions. Method: In a hospital-based clinic for adults with DS, a chart audit was conducted to assess the range and frequency of gastrointestinal conditions. Results: From January 2003 to March 2005, 57 patients attended the clinic,…

  19. Vaccination uptake by vaccine-hesitant parents attending a specialist immunization clinic in Australia.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas A; McMinn, Alissa; Crawford, Nigel; Leask, Julie; Danchin, Margie

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine hesitancy (VH) is an issue of global concern. The quality of communication between healthcare providers and parents can influence parental immunization acceptance. We aimed to describe immunization uptake following specialist immunization clinic (SIC) consultation for Australian children of VH parents as a cohort, and according to pre-clinic parental position on immunization. At a single tertiary pediatric SIC (RCH, Melbourne) a retrospective descriptive study classified VH families according to 3 proposed parental positions on immunization at initial clinic attendance. Immunization status at follow up was ascertained via the Australian Children's Immunization Register and National HPV Program Register and compared between groups. Of the VH cohort, 13/38 (34%) families were classified as hesitant, 21 (55%) as late/selective vaccinators and 4 (11%) as vaccine refusers. Mean follow up post-SIC attendance was 14.5 months. For the overall VH cohort, the majority chose selective immunization (42%) following SIC consultation. When analyzed by pre-clinic parental position on immunization, there was a trend for hesitant families to proceed with full immunization, selective families to continue selective immunization and refusing families to remain unimmunised (p < 0.0001). The most commonly omitted vaccines were hepatitis B (66%) and Haemophilus influenzae type B (55%), followed by the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine (53%) and measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (53%). Immunization outcome appears to correlate with pre-clinic parental position on immunization for the majority of families attending a SIC in Australia, with selective immunization the most common outcome. Tailored communication approaches based on parental position on immunization may optimise clinic resources and engagement of families, but require prospective research evaluation. PMID:26366978

  20. Vaccination uptake by vaccine-hesitant parents attending a specialist immunization clinic in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Thomas A; McMinn, Alissa; Crawford, Nigel; Leask, Julie; Danchin, Margie

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine hesitancy (VH) is an issue of global concern. The quality of communication between healthcare providers and parents can influence parental immunization acceptance. We aimed to describe immunization uptake following specialist immunization clinic (SIC) consultation for Australian children of VH parents as a cohort, and according to pre-clinic parental position on immunization. At a single tertiary pediatric SIC (RCH, Melbourne) a retrospective descriptive study classified VH families according to 3 proposed parental positions on immunization at initial clinic attendance. Immunization status at follow up was ascertained via the Australian Children's Immunization Register and National HPV Program Register and compared between groups. Of the VH cohort, 13/38 (34%) families were classified as hesitant, 21 (55%) as late/selective vaccinators and 4 (11%) as vaccine refusers. Mean follow up post-SIC attendance was 14.5 months. For the overall VH cohort, the majority chose selective immunization (42%) following SIC consultation. When analyzed by pre-clinic parental position on immunization, there was a trend for hesitant families to proceed with full immunization, selective families to continue selective immunization and refusing families to remain unimmunised (p < 0.0001). The most commonly omitted vaccines were hepatitis B (66%) and Haemophilus influenzae type B (55%), followed by the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine (53%) and measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (53%). Immunization outcome appears to correlate with pre-clinic parental position on immunization for the majority of families attending a SIC in Australia, with selective immunization the most common outcome. Tailored communication approaches based on parental position on immunization may optimise clinic resources and engagement of families, but require prospective research evaluation. PMID:26366978

  1. Vaccination uptake by vaccine-hesitant parents attending a specialist immunization clinic in Australia.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas A; McMinn, Alissa; Crawford, Nigel; Leask, Julie; Danchin, Margie

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine hesitancy (VH) is an issue of global concern. The quality of communication between healthcare providers and parents can influence parental immunization acceptance. We aimed to describe immunization uptake following specialist immunization clinic (SIC) consultation for Australian children of VH parents as a cohort, and according to pre-clinic parental position on immunization. At a single tertiary pediatric SIC (RCH, Melbourne) a retrospective descriptive study classified VH families according to 3 proposed parental positions on immunization at initial clinic attendance. Immunization status at follow up was ascertained via the Australian Children's Immunization Register and National HPV Program Register and compared between groups. Of the VH cohort, 13/38 (34%) families were classified as hesitant, 21 (55%) as late/selective vaccinators and 4 (11%) as vaccine refusers. Mean follow up post-SIC attendance was 14.5 months. For the overall VH cohort, the majority chose selective immunization (42%) following SIC consultation. When analyzed by pre-clinic parental position on immunization, there was a trend for hesitant families to proceed with full immunization, selective families to continue selective immunization and refusing families to remain unimmunised (p < 0.0001). The most commonly omitted vaccines were hepatitis B (66%) and Haemophilus influenzae type B (55%), followed by the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine (53%) and measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (53%). Immunization outcome appears to correlate with pre-clinic parental position on immunization for the majority of families attending a SIC in Australia, with selective immunization the most common outcome. Tailored communication approaches based on parental position on immunization may optimise clinic resources and engagement of families, but require prospective research evaluation.

  2. Clinical practice of dual-certified music therapists/child life specialists: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Ghetti, Claire M

    2011-01-01

    The discipline of child life enjoys a strong presence in many medical settings within the current pediatric healthcare environment. Due to the widespread establishment of child life programs, music therapists often find themselves negotiating their role and contributions to pediatric healthcare in relation to the field of child life. There is increasing interest among music therapy interns and clinicians in pursuing certification in child life to increase clinical knowledge and enhance marketability. A small, but strong, cohort of dual-certified music therapists/child life specialists is currently practicing in the field, but the nuances of their clinical practice have not been systematically examined. The current study used an interpretative phenomenological approach to explore the lived experiences of eight dual-certified clinicians, and to interpret how clinicians make sense of those lived experiences. Two overarching themes of identity and flexibility arose from the analysis: issues relating to establishing, challenging, and modifying professional identity; and flexibility manifested within areas of theoretical orientation, professional role, and clinical approach. Dual-certified clinicians vary in the degree to which they integrate the fields of music therapy and child life in practice, from complete and seamless integration of the two, to exclusive practice of only one field, depending upon the bounds of their positions. Participants reported that child life training is beneficial, but not necessary for achieving advanced practice in pediatric medical music therapy. Implications for the continuing advancement of music therapy in pediatric healthcare are discussed.

  3. Opportunities for multidisciplinary ASH clinical hypertension specialists in an era of population health and accountable care: ASH leadership message.

    PubMed

    Egan, Brent M

    2014-07-01

    The ASH hypertension specialists and ASH clinical and comprehensive hypertension centers represent a continuum of expertise and capacity positioned to play a major role in advancing the Triple Aim, which includes improving the patient care experience, population health, and value in cardiovascular health promotion and disease prevention. The ASH hypertension specialists board is dedicated to testing and designating a broad range of qualified health care professionals as clinical hypertension specialists. A continuing partnership with ASH, recognizing the need for an appropriate firewall between education and testing, is essential in providing the education and training programs required to grow and sustain the specialized workforce required to translate current evidence and future advances in personalized medicine into better care for individuals, better health for populations, and better value for payers. Moreover, growth of the ASH hypertension registry has the potential to accelerate advances in education and patient care as noted previously. The ASH hypertension specialists board is excited about the opportunities available to a well-trained and collaborative multidisciplinary group of clinical hypertension specialists in an era of ACOs pursuing the Triple Aim. PMID:25064766

  4. Reimagining Nursing's Place in the History of Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fairman, Julie; D'Antonio, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    This work posits how medical history might be conceptualized if nurses and nursing history was used as the analytical lens. Nursing is seen not as a separate part or subsection of medical history, but rather one that is deeply embedded in the relationships and social order of clinical practice. Nursing is an analytical category in and of itself. By approaching nursing as such a category, we enlarge “new notions of historical significance” to encompass personal, political, public, and private activities that constitute medical experiences. PMID:18375461

  5. [Clinical nursing research. New standards for quality assurance for nursing and patient].

    PubMed

    Evers, G C

    2000-06-01

    Nursing as a health-service has a long tradition, nursing research however, a relatively short history. Florence Nightingale was the first to publish about nursing research in the year 1858. Since Nightingale, the need to study and improve the efficacy and efficiency of nursing has steadily increased. More than ever before, society needs nursing based on scientific knowledge and not just on unchallenged rituals and traditions. This scientific knowledge base can be acquired by clinical research. Within multidisciplinary clinical research it is necessary to focus on nursing's unique function. Virginia Henderson (1955) and Dorothea Orem (1959) have clearly explicated this function. Designs for clinical nursing research can be (quasi-) experimental, correlational or descriptive. Descriptive research can be qualitative or quantitative. Effects of nursing interventions on decrease of self-care problems and improvement of self-care capability and behaviors, should be investigated by experimental or quasi-experimental studies. Some examples of clinical nursing research are given. The first example demonstrates the effect of quantity and quality of nursing staff on patient's capabilities for hygiene self-care. The second example explicates the relation between self-care and quality of life with breast-cancer patients under chemotherapy treatment. The last example shows the effect of diabetes education on self-care behaviour and metabolic control. The examples given demonstrate the importance of clinical research focused on nursing's unique function. In order to accomplish this, programs of research are needed as well as close co-operation with nursing services, physicians and hospitals. Only when research findings are discussed and implemented in multidisciplinary teams, nursing will become more evidence-based. PMID:10969578

  6. A qualitative study of nursing student experiences of clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Farkhondeh; Masoumi, Sara

    2005-01-01

    Background Nursing student's experiences of their clinical practice provide greater insight to develop an effective clinical teaching strategy in nursing education. The main objective of this study was to investigate student nurses' experience about their clinical practice. Methods Focus groups were used to obtain students' opinion and experiences about their clinical practice. 90 baccalaureate nursing students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery) were selected randomly from two hundred students and were arranged in 9 groups of ten students. To analyze the data the method used to code and categories focus group data were adapted from approaches to qualitative data analysis. Results Four themes emerged from the focus group data. From the students' point of view," initial clinical anxiety", "theory-practice gap"," clinical supervision", professional role", were considered as important factors in clinical experience. Conclusion The result of this study showed that nursing students were not satisfied with the clinical component of their education. They experienced anxiety as a result of feeling incompetent and lack of professional nursing skills and knowledge to take care of various patients in the clinical setting. PMID:16280087

  7. Work-role transition: from staff nurse to clinical nurse educator.

    PubMed

    Manning, Liz; Neville, Stephen

    2009-07-01

    This article presents the findings of a study describing Clinical Nurse Educators' experiences, as they recall their transition from staff nurse to the Clinical Nurse Educator role, within a New Zealand District Health Board. Nurse Educator roles influence clinical practice and professional development of nurses, and although designated as a senior role nationally, the complexities and size of the role are poorly understood. A qualitative descriptive methodology utilising transition theory as a conceptual framework underpinned the study. A sample of eight Clinical Nurse Educators from a New Zealand District Health Board were interviewed about their transition from experienced staff nurse to inexperienced senior nurse. Data were analysed using a general inductive approach. Participants found the Clinical Nurse Educator role was more complex than anticipated, with no preparation for the role and sub-optimal orientation periods being provided by the District Health Board. As a result, signs of stress were evident as the enormity of the role became apparent. Consequently, employers need to ensure that appropriate orientation programmes and mentorship are inherent in health care organisations.

  8. Specialist clinics in remote Australian Aboriginal communities: where rock art meets rocket science.

    PubMed

    Gruen, Russell; Bailie, Ross

    2004-10-01

    People in remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory have greater morbidity and mortality than other Australians, but face considerable barriers when accessing hospital-based specialist services. The Specialist Outreach Service, which began in 1997, was a novel policy initiative to improve access by providing a regular multidisciplinary visiting specialist services to remote communities. It led to two interesting juxtapositions: that of 'state of the art' specialist services alongside under-resourced primary care in remote and relatively traditional Aboriginal communities; and that of attempts to develop an evidence base for the effectiveness of outreach, while meeting the short-term evaluative requirements of policy-makers. In this essay, first we describe the development of the service in the Northern Territory and its initial process evaluation. Through a Cochrane systematic review we then summarise the published research on the effectiveness of specialist outreach in improving access to tertiary and hospital-based care. Finally we describe the findings of an observational population-based study of the use of specialist services and the impact of outreach to three remote communities over 11 years. Specialist outreach improves access to specialist care and may lessen the demand for both outpatient and inpatient hospital care. Specialist outreach is, however, dependent on well-functioning primary care. According to the way in which outreach is conducted and the service is organised, it can either support primary care or it can hinder primary care and, as a result, reduce its own effectiveness.

  9. Comparison of nursing students’ and clinical nurses’ attitude toward the nursing profession

    PubMed Central

    Koushali, Ali Noruzi; Hajiamini, Zahra; Ebadi, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Background: To develop nursing education and promote nursing strategies, there is a need for a staff with positive attitude. The present study was conducted to compare the attitudes among clinical nurses and nursing students toward the nursing profession. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive- analytical study 313 clinical nurses and 81 nursing students (total n = 394) of Tehran, Iran, were selected through a systematic sampling method and their viewpoints were investigated using a nursing professional attitude questionnaire. Results: The findings of this study showed that 72.6% of nurses and 65.4% of students had positive attitude toward their profession, and despite the high percentage of the clinical nurses’ positive outlook, the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The results showed that approximately one-third of the students and nursing practitioners had neutral or negative attitude toward their occupation. Due to the serious effect of one’s professional attitude and commitment of service, it is necessary to have further studies about the current situation to eliminate such negative factors. PMID:23853651

  10. The Certified Clinical Nurse Leader in Critical Care.

    PubMed

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine M; Shatto, Bobbi J; Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Crecelius, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Challenges of the current health system in the United States call for collaboration of health care professionals, careful utilization of resources, and greater efficiency of system processes. Innovations to the delivery of care include the introduction of the clinical nurse leader role to provide leadership at the point of care, where it is needed most. Clinical nurse leaders have demonstrated their ability to address needed changes and implement improvements in processes that impact the efficiency and quality of patient care across the continuum and in a variety of settings, including critical care. This article describes the role of the certified clinical nurse leader, their education and skill set, and outlines outcomes that have been realized by their efforts. Specific examples of how clinical nurse leaders impact critical care nursing are discussed.

  11. The Certified Clinical Nurse Leader in Critical Care.

    PubMed

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine M; Shatto, Bobbi J; Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Crecelius, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Challenges of the current health system in the United States call for collaboration of health care professionals, careful utilization of resources, and greater efficiency of system processes. Innovations to the delivery of care include the introduction of the clinical nurse leader role to provide leadership at the point of care, where it is needed most. Clinical nurse leaders have demonstrated their ability to address needed changes and implement improvements in processes that impact the efficiency and quality of patient care across the continuum and in a variety of settings, including critical care. This article describes the role of the certified clinical nurse leader, their education and skill set, and outlines outcomes that have been realized by their efforts. Specific examples of how clinical nurse leaders impact critical care nursing are discussed. PMID:27487750

  12. Experience inheritance from famous specialists based on real-world clinical research paradigm of traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Song, Guanli; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Runshun; Liu, Baoyan; Zhou, Xuezhong; Zhou, Xiaji; Zhang, Hong; Guo, Yufeng; Xue, Yanxing; Xu, Lili

    2014-09-01

    The current modes of experience inheritance from famous specialists in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) include master and disciple, literature review, clinical-epidemiology-based clinical research observation, and analysis and data mining via computer and database technologies. Each mode has its advantages and disadvantages. However, a scientific and instructive experience inheritance mode has not been developed. The advent of the big data era as well as the formation and practice accumulation of the TCM clinical research paradigm in the real world have provided new perspectives, techniques, and methods for inheriting experience from famous TCM specialists. Through continuous exploration and practice, the research group proposes the innovation research mode based on the real-world TCM clinical research paradigm, which involves the inheritance and innovation of the existing modes. This mode is formulated in line with its own development regularity of TCM and is expected to become the main mode of experience inheritance in the clinical field.

  13. Attributes of clinical leadership in contemporary nursing: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Daly, John

    2013-08-01

    Effective clinical leadership is offered as the key to healthy, functional and supportive work environments for nurses and other health professionals. However, as a concept it lacks a standard definition and is poorly understood. This paper reports on an integrative review undertaken to uncover current understandings of defining attributes of contemporary clinical leadership in nursing. Data collection involved a search of relevant electronic databases for a 10-year period. Keywords for the search were 'clinical leadership' and 'nursing'. Ten research papers met the inclusion criteria for the integrative review. Analysis of these studies indicated clinical leadership attributes had a clinical focus, a follower/team focus or a personal qualities focus; attributes necessary to sustain supportive workplaces and build the capacity and resilience of nursing workforces. The small number of research-based studies yielded for the review indicates the need for further research in the area of clinical leadership. PMID:24099222

  14. Hospice clinical experiences for nursing students: living to the fullest.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Sherri; Heller, Rebecca; Troth, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to provide appropriate care for patients and their families at the end of life can be a formidable challenge for nurse educators. Most nursing schools thread end-of-life concepts throughout the curriculum. Grand Canyon University includes a 40-hour hospice clinical as a component of a home healthcare practicum. Students' weekly written reflections reveal the depth of affective learning that occurs during this experience. Article includes hospice materials and resources.

  15. Hospice clinical experiences for nursing students: living to the fullest.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Sherri; Heller, Rebecca; Troth, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to provide appropriate care for patients and their families at the end of life can be a formidable challenge for nurse educators. Most nursing schools thread end-of-life concepts throughout the curriculum. Grand Canyon University includes a 40-hour hospice clinical as a component of a home healthcare practicum. Students' weekly written reflections reveal the depth of affective learning that occurs during this experience. Article includes hospice materials and resources. PMID:25585469

  16. Predictors of Successful Clinical Performance in Associate Degree Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Rice, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore self-efficacy and emotional intelligence (EI) as predictors for successful clinical performance in nursing students. Students (n = 56) from 5 associate degree in nursing (ADN) schools in 2 Northeastern states participated in the study. Findings demonstrated significant relationships among EI, self-efficacy, and student-rated clinical competence. The findings from this study support the importance of fostering clinical self-efficacy and building EI abilities in ADN students. PMID:25628244

  17. Teaching and learning care--exploring nursing students' clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Heggen, Kristin M

    2010-01-01

    Care has always been a key element of nursing. This paper presents findings from research on the following issue: What opportunities and limitations do nursing students encounter when learning nursing care? The study has a qualitative design with field methodology and the study of documents. Six nursing students have been closely monitored during their clinical studies in hospitals, nursing homes and home-based nursing. The study shows that nursing students are likely to possess the potential to provide care for sick and unknown people. The motivation for their commitment to patients may contain an egoistical orientation and runs contrary to former ideals of the nurse's self-sacrificing altruism. Moreover the study shows that there is a potential in the clinical field and in the university college to reflective considerations on experience of care. While clinical practice often has focus on practical problem-solving and procedures, the college tends to focus on abstract theory. Both of these promote the privatisation and neglect of the students' experience of care. The paper concludes with a call for teaching and learning strategies targeting the use of nursing students' personal experience of care.

  18. Integration of the clinical engineering specialist at a high complexity children's hospital. Our professional experience at a surgical center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Enríquez, M. J.; Chazarreta, B.; Emilio, D. G.; Fernández Sardá, E.

    2007-11-01

    This document aims to find relating points between the current and future Clinical Engineer professional in order to discuss about the hospital environment, its characteristics and its realities which lead to our professional development. The main aim is to depict our experience through a retrospective analysis based on the underwriting experience and consequently to arrive at conclusions that will support the inclusion and active interaction of the Clinic Engineer Specialist as part of a Hospital's Surgical Center.

  19. Factors influencing support for National Health Insurance among patients attending specialist clinics in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Almualm, Yasmin; Alkaff, Sharifa Ezat; Aljunid, Syed; Alsagoff, Syed Sagoff

    2013-05-14

    This study was carried out to determine the level of support towards the proposed National Health Insurance scheme among Malaysian patients attending specialist clinics at the National University of Malaysia Medical centre and its influencing factors. The cross sectional study was carried out from July-October 2012. 260 patients were selected using multistage sampling method. 71.2% of respondents supported the proposed National Health insurance scheme. 61.4% of respondents are willing to pay up to RM240 per year to join the National Health Insurance and 76.6% of respondents are of the view that enrollment in NHI should be made compulsory. Knowledge had a positive influence on respondent's support towards National Health Insurance. National Health Insurance when implemented in Malaysia can be used to raise funds for health care financing, increase access to health services and achieve the desired health status. More efforts should be taken to promote the scheme and educate the public in order to achieve higher support towards the proposed National Health Insurance. The cost to enroll in NHI as well as services to be included under the scheme should be duly considered.

  20. The role of nurses and nurse leaders on realizing the clinical, social, and economic return on investment of nursing care.

    PubMed

    Shamian, Judith; Ellen, Moriah E

    2016-05-01

    There is a limited understanding of the significance and the potential contribution that nursing can make through practice, policy, science, and profession to the global health agenda. In this article, we present some of the evidence to demonstrate the clinical, social, and economic returns on investment in nursing. We conclude by addressing the issues that nurse and system leaders need to address in order to achieve these returns on investments, and unless nurses get involved at the leadership level, these returns on investment will not be attained.

  1. Education of Advanced Practice Nurses Serving Vulnerable Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vezeau, Toni M.; Peterson, Jane W.; Nakao, Constance; Ersek, Mary

    1998-01-01

    The master's of science in nursing curriculum at Seattle University leads to the designation Community Health Clinical Nurse Specialist. The School of Nursing's goal is to educate leaders in nursing who advocate for those least able to speak for themselves and least able to access resources available to the majority of people. (Author/JOW)

  2. Nursing students' preconceptions of the community health clinical experience: implications for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Leh, Sandra Kundrik

    2011-11-01

    It is essential that nurse educators identify and attempt to understand students' preconceptions related to upcoming clinical experiences to develop strategies that are effective in preparing the students for entry into new and unique settings. This qualitative study described nursing students' preconceptions as they entered the community health clinical rotation. Six major themes emerged: feeling insecure and unprepared for the community health clinical experience; contemplating risks to personal and client safety in the community; anticipating a change of pace; sensing a loss of control; envisioning isolation; and interpreting the value of community health nursing. Findings from this study provide nurse educators and preceptors with insight into understanding students' needs as they enter the community setting. Facilitating a positive transition for students supports efforts to improve the image of and create favorable attitudes toward community health nursing practice. PMID:21790102

  3. Effectiveness of structured, hospital-based, nurse-led atrial fibrillation clinics: a comparison between a real-world population and a clinical trial population

    PubMed Central

    Qvist, Ina; Hendriks, Jeroen M L; Møller, Dorthe S; Albertsen, Andi E; Mogensen, Helle M; Oddershede, Gitte D; Odgaard, Annette; Mortensen, Leif Spange; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Frost, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objective A previous randomised trial showed that structured, nurse-led atrial fibrillation (AF) care is superior to conventional AF care, although further research is needed to determine the outcomes of such care in a real-world setting. We compared the outcomes of patients in real-world, nurse-led, structured hospital AF clinics with the outcomes of a randomised trial of the efficacy of a nurse-led AF clinic, with respect to a composite outcome of cardiovascular-related hospitalisation and death. Methods All patients were referred to the AF nurse specialist by cardiologists. The AF nurse specialist provided patient education, risk-factor control and stimulated empowerment and compliance. During follow-up, treatment was adjusted according to clinical guidelines. Patient education was repeated, and compliance with medical treatment was controlled. The study size was powered as a non-inferiority study. Outcome measures were adjudicated by the same principles in both cohorts. Results A total of 596 patients from the real world and 356 patients from a clinical trial were included in this study. No significant difference between groups with respect to age, type of AF or CHA2DS2VASc score was found. The composite primary end point occurred with an incidence rate of 8.0 (95% CI 6.1 to 10.4) per 100 person-years in the real-world population and 8.3 (95% CI 6.3 to 10.9) per 100 person-years in the clinical trial, with a crude HR of 0.83 (95% CI 0.56 to 1.23). Conclusions Structured, nurse-led, hospital-based AF care appears to be effective, and patient outcomes in an actual, hospital-based, structured AF care are as least as good as those in trial settings. PMID:26835143

  4. Global and cultural perinatal nursing research: improving clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Callister, Lynn Clark

    2011-01-01

    High-quality perinatal nursing care should be based on the best evidence including research findings, clinical expertise, and the preferences of women and their families. Principles of perinatal research initiatives are defined, with suggested research priorities designed to close current gaps in the micro and macro environments of perinatal nursing throughout the world. Nearly a decade ago, the following question was asked, "Where is the 'E' (evidence) in maternal child health?" Improving the quality and safety of perinatal nursing care for culturally diverse women globally is the primary goal of nurse researchers leading the future of perinatal healthcare.

  5. Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease among Patients Attending a Specialist Diabetes Clinic in Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, TS; Tulloch-Reid, MK; Younger-Coleman, NO; Wright-Pascoe, RA; Boyne, MS; Soyibo, AK; Wilks, RJ

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among patients attending the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic and to determine the proportion of patients at high risk for adverse outcomes. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among patients attending the UHWI Diabetes Clinic between 2009 and 2010. Trained nurses administered a questionnaire, reviewed dockets, and performed urinalyses. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Albuminuria was assessed using urine test strips for protein and microalbumin. Chronic kidney disease was defined as an eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73m2 or albuminuria ≥ 30 mg/g creatinine. Risk of adverse outcome (all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease and kidney failure) was determined using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcome (KDIGO) 2012 prognosis grid. Results: Participants included 100 women and 32 men (mean age, 55.4 ± 12.9 years, mean duration of diabetes, 16.7 ± 11.7 years). Twenty-two per cent of participants had eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73m2. Moderate albuminuria (30–300 mg/g) was present in 20.5% of participants and severe albuminuria (> 300 mg/g) in 62.1%. Overall prevalence of CKD was 86.3% (95% CI 80.4%, 92.2%). Based on KDIGO risk categories, 50.8% were at high risk and 17.4% at very high risk of adverse outcomes. Conclusion: Most patients at the UHWI Diabetes Clinic had CKD and were at high or very high risk of adverse outcomes. Further studies to determine the burden of CKD in other clinical settings and to identify the best strategies for preventing adverse outcomes in developing countries need to be conducted. PMID:26426170

  6. Do gerontology nurse specialists make a difference in hospitalization of long-term care residents? Results of a randomized comparison trial.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Michal; Armstrong, Delwyn; Parker, Janet; Pilcher, Carole; Zhou, Lifeng; McKenzie-Green, Barbara; Connolly, Martin J

    2014-10-01

    Residents of long-term care facilities have highly complex care needs and quality of care is of international concern. Maintaining resident wellness through proactive assessment and early intervention is key to decreasing the need for acute hospitalization. The Residential Aged Care Integration Program (RACIP) is a quality improvement intervention to support residential aged care staff and includes on-site support, education, clinical coaching, and care coordination provided by gerontology nurse specialists (GNSs) employed by a large district health board. The effect of the outreach program was evaluated through a randomized comparison of hospitalization 1 year before and after program implementation. The sample included 29 intervention facilities (1,425 residents) and 25 comparison facilities (1,128 residents) receiving usual care. Acute hospitalization rate unexpectedly increased for both groups after program implementation, although the rate of increase was significantly less for the intervention facilities. The hospitalization rate after the intervention increased 59% for the comparison group and 16% for the intervention group (rate ratio (RR) = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.61-0.86, P < .001). Subgroup analysis showed a significantly lower rate change for those admitted for medical reasons for the intervention group (13% increase) than the comparison group (69% increase) (RR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.56-0.82, P < .001). Conversely, there was no significant difference in the RR for surgical admissions between the intervention and comparison groups (RR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.68-1.46, P = .99). The integration of GNS expertise through the RACIP intervention may be one approach to support staff to provide optimal care and potentially improve resident health. PMID:25283552

  7. Experiences of Iranian Nurses that Intent to Leave the Clinical Nursing: a Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Habibzadeh, Hosein; Alilu, Leyla; Gillespie, Mark; Shakibi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the current shortage of nurses, it is important to know the reasons nurses want to leave the clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses who intend to leave clinical nursing. Methods: In a qualitative content analysis study, data obtained from 13 in-depth face-to-face semi-structured interviews with nurses working in hospitals affiliated to the Tabriz and Urmia University of Medical Sciences in Iran, selected through purposive sampling. A conventional content analysis was used for data analysis. Results: Four categories and eleven subcategories emerged during data analysis. The extracted categories and sub categories consisted of (I) Entry routes into nursing (implicitly entry, targeted entry), (II) Defects in dignity (lack of professional vision toward the nurses, social status of nurses), (III) Work in non-ideal working environment (lack of support, discrimination, conflict, lack of opportunities for advancement), and (IV) Dissatisfaction with working conditions (heavy workload, lack of power, unusual working hours). Conclusion: The findings of this qualitative study reflect professional turnover as a complex, ongoing, multidimensional process. By identifying the factors responsible, it could be possible to retain nurses in the field. PMID:27354981

  8. Involvement of Nursing Students in Unethical Classroom and Clinical Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbert, Gail A.

    1985-01-01

    A study to determine the incidence of unethical classroom and clinical behaviors among nursing students, to find out their opinions, and to investigate the relationships among demographic data, unethical behaviors and opinions about the behaviors is discussed. (Author/MLW)

  9. Science, technology, and innovation: nursing responsibilities in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Grady, Christine; Edgerly, Maureen

    2009-12-01

    Clinical research is a systematic investigation of human biology, health, or illness involving human beings. It builds on laboratory and animal studies and often involves clinical trials, which are specifically designed to test the safety and efficacy of interventions in humans. Nurses are critical to the conduct of ethical clinical research and face clinical, ethical, and regulatory challenges in research in many diverse roles. Understanding and addressing the ethical challenges that complicate clinical research is integral to upholding the moral commitment that nurses make to patients, including protecting their rights and ensuring their safety as patients and as research participants. PMID:19850183

  10. A clinical internship model for the nurse practitioner programme.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geraldine A; Fitzgerald, Les

    2008-11-01

    Nurse practitioners in Victoria, Australia must be prepared to Masters level before seeking nurse practitioner (NP) endorsement. The challenge from a university curriculum development perspective was to develop a programme that prepares the NP theoretically and clinically for their advanced practice role. The aim of this discussion paper is to outline how the internship model was developed and report the students' opinions on the model. The NP students complete the internship with a suitably qualified mentor which requires them to work together to develop and maintain a clinical learning plan, keep a log of the weekly meetings that shows how the objectives have been achieved. The internship includes advanced clinical assessment, prescribing, diagnostic and treatment skills and knowledge related to the nurse's specialty. The clinical assessment tool incorporates the National Competency Standards for the Nurse Practitioner and allows students and mentors to identify the level of practice and set clinical objectives. Students were asked to give feedback on the clinical internship and overall their comments were favourable, reporting benefits of a clinical mentor in their work and the clinical case presentations. The clinical internship allows the acquisition of knowledge and clinical skills in the clinical specialty with an expert clinical mentor in this innovative programme.

  11. Philosophic analysis of a theory of clinical nursing.

    PubMed

    Schafer, P J

    1987-01-01

    Knowledge in nursing requires development of theories that address both the science and art of the professional practice discipline. "A Theory of Clinical Nursing" was analyzed to explicate the epistemologic dimensions within an historic perspective. Epistemologic dimensions defined by the philosophy of science--approaches to theory development, sources of knowledge, and methodology--were characterized from two perspectives, scientific inquiry and historicism. The major perspectives in the scientific mode, namely, mechanism, empiricism, logical positivism, and logical empiricism, were analyzed along the three dimensions of theory development, sources of knowledge, and methodology. Trends in theoretical developments in nursing were related to the scientific and historic perspectives and to the epistemologic dimensions. Juxtaposing the diversity of knowledge required for nursing science and practice, and the values systems of the practitioners, revealed the inadequacy of the scientific model. Nursing knowledge explication required several modes of inquiry to articulate the scientific basis of the discipline and the art of delivery of the practice. The historicist approach framed scientific work with the prevailing World View. The Rubin theory was located within the matrix of approaches to inquiry and perspectives in nursing science. Labeled by the theorist as both a nursing research and a nursing care model, "A Theory of Clinical Nursing" represented a transition model of nursing, undergirded by the major conceptualizations and methodologies of field, psychoanalytic, and social behaviorist traditions, but implicitly coalescing the art with the science of nursing. The theory addressed core concepts of person, situation, and nursing care, as well as major process themes of change and interaction. Nursing theories of a more narrow range, such as maternal role attainment and maternal identity, nested within the theory, while subsequent theoretical clarifications and

  12. [Contribution of standardized languages for knowledge production, clinical reasoning and clinical nursing practice].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Emilia Campos; da Cruz, Dina de Almeida Lopes Monteiro; Herdman, T Heather

    2013-09-01

    The standardized language systems are important tools for dealing with the increasing complexity of nursing care. In this article the authors present the main benefits that the use of these systems provide for the required clinical reasoning in nursing care, the construction and organization of knowledge of the discipline, and for the clinical practice of nursing. The potential contributions of the standardized language systems in these fields stem from the fact that these systems provide a formal structure for supporting clinical reasoning, organizing knowledge and nursing experience.

  13. Caring in nursing education: reducing anxiety in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Audet, M C

    1995-01-01

    It has been well-documented that the clinical experience is one of the most anxiety-producing aspects of nursing education. When feelings of anxiety become severe, they present a clear threat to the student's success in the program. This article explores the role of "caring" in nursing education as a means of reducing student anxiety. Caring, described at length by Jean Watson, has become one of the most popular trends in the education of young nurses. When caring behaviors are demonstrated in a meaningful way by clinical instructors, the student may experience a sense of comfort and belonging, which may in turn be effective in reducing anxiety and enabling the student to successfully complete a clinical rotation. The aim of this article is to inspire nurses, not only those in the educational setting but in all settings and at all levels of their careers, to reconsider the effects and benefits of displaying a caring attitude.

  14. Helping novice nurses make effective clinical decisions: the situated clinical decision-making framework.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Mary; Peterson, Barbara L

    2009-01-01

    The nature of novice nurses' clinical decision-making has been well documented as linear, based on limited knowledge and experience in the profession, and frequently focused on single tasks or problems. Theorists suggest that, with sufficient experience in the clinical setting, novice nurses will move from reliance on abstract principles to the application of concrete experience and to view a clinical situation within its context and as a whole. In the current health care environment, novice nurses frequently work with few clinical supports and mentors while facing complex patient situations that demand skilled decision-making. The Situated Clinical Decision-Making Framework is presented for use by educators and novice nurses to support development of clinical decision-making. It provides novice nurses with a tool that a) assists them in making decisions; b) can be used to guide retrospective reflection on decision-making processes and outcomes; c) socializes them to an understanding of the nature of decision-making in nursing; and d) fosters the development of their knowledge, skill, and confidence as nurses. This article provides an overview of the framework, including its theoretical foundations and a schematic representation of its components. A case exemplar illustrates one application of the framework in assisting novice nurses in developing their decision-making skills. Future directions regarding the use and study of this framework in nursing education are considered.

  15. [Accompanying the apprenticeship of clinical reasoning in nurses].

    PubMed

    Belpaume, Claude

    2009-12-01

    The nurses' professionalisation is something difficult to situate between an historical model, the recognition of competences and the assertion of the health care service autonomy part. The requests and conditions sanitary needs evolutivity of the French population, the constant progresses of medicine, the economic context put nurses in the heart of tensions between the demand of quality and the continuity of the cares, the professional polyvalency and the health savings. The situations of cares, more and more complex, require a nearly permanent adaptation of the nurses. One of the stakes of the nursing college is to develop their health training model which integrates the development of competences in reference to prevailing professional situations. The clinical reasoning, a competence in the heart of the nurses' job, goes through all the situations of cares. It takes part of the cares adaptation processes. The professional didactic develops our understanding of professional situations and gives us training prospects linked to competences.

  16. Junior nursing students' experiences of vertical violence during clinical rotations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sandra P; Burk, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal violence is a form of workplace violence, a phenomenon that is prevalent in the nursing profession. Research has revealed a variety of negative peer-to-peer behaviors that lower morale and lead to turnover. However, little research has been conducted on "eating our young" (violence occurring between individuals with unequal power, such as staff nurse and student). We propose "vertical violence" as the appropriate term when abusive registered nurse (RN) behavior is directed towards students. We report a content analysis of stories written by junior nursing students about incidents of injustice perpetrated by staff RNs during their clinical experiences. Four levels of injustice were described. Nursing leadership, both in hospitals and educational institutions, must become engaged in efforts to eradicate vertical violence towards students.

  17. Becoming a professional: What is the influence of registered nurses on nursing students' learning in the clinical environment?

    PubMed

    Ó Lúanaigh, Padraig

    2015-11-01

    This research was undertaken to understand the influence of registered nurses on nursing students' learning in the clinical environment to inform strategies to enable registered nurses to provide effective support to learners while also assisting nursing students to adopt approaches to maximise their learning in the clinical environment. A case study approach was applied in this research to explore descriptions of clinical experience of five final year nursing students. The student participants identified the importance of the clinical environment to their learning and wanted to and had actively managed their learning in the clinical environment. The students did not passively acquire knowledge or simply replicate what they observed from others. There was evidence that the students had strong and established perceptions of what constituted 'good' nursing and described an ability to discriminate between differing levels of nursing practice. Nursing knowledge was gained from respected registered nurses who were best able to describe and demonstrate the 'tricks of the trade' and 'little things that matter' when providing 'good' nursing. The outcomes from this research indicate an important role for registered nurses in both shaping nursing students' professional nursing identity and access to clinical learning.

  18. Enacting a Vision for a Master's Entry Clinical Nurse Leader Program: Rethinking Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Frank D; Rosenberg, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The need to educate nurses at the graduate level and provide them with a different skill set that broadens their view of health and nursing is clearly articulated by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Consequently, the role of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) was born. Responding to the need for providing a highly educated and credentialed professional at the bedside, Rush University College of Nursing made the bold move to phase out baccalaureate education and enact a prelicensure, master's entry CNL program. Although there is a clear need for this type of graduate, there is little in the literature to provide guidance to institutions that wish to develop this type of program. This paper describes the factors that came into play in making that decision, the process of curriculum development and implementation, the challenges encountered in implementing this type of program, and the outcomes that the program has evidenced since its inception. PMID:26802590

  19. Enacting a Vision for a Master's Entry Clinical Nurse Leader Program: Rethinking Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Frank D; Rosenberg, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The need to educate nurses at the graduate level and provide them with a different skill set that broadens their view of health and nursing is clearly articulated by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Consequently, the role of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) was born. Responding to the need for providing a highly educated and credentialed professional at the bedside, Rush University College of Nursing made the bold move to phase out baccalaureate education and enact a prelicensure, master's entry CNL program. Although there is a clear need for this type of graduate, there is little in the literature to provide guidance to institutions that wish to develop this type of program. This paper describes the factors that came into play in making that decision, the process of curriculum development and implementation, the challenges encountered in implementing this type of program, and the outcomes that the program has evidenced since its inception.

  20. Performance of Clinical Nurse Educators in Teaching Pharmacology and Medication Management: Nursing Students’ Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Ghamari Zare, Zohre; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background Pharmacological knowledge and medication management skills of student nurses greatly depend on the clinical nurse educators’ performance in this critical issue. However, the Iranian nurse educators’ performance in teaching pharmacology and medication management are not adequately studied. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate the nursing students’ perceptions on the status of clinical pharmaceutical and medication management education. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on all 152 nursing students registered in the seventh and eighth semesters at the Qom and Naragh branches of Islamic Azad University, and Kashan University of Medical Sciences in 2013 - 2014 academic year. The students’ perceptions on the performance of clinical nurse educators in teaching pharmacology and medication management were assessed using a researcher made questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of 31 items regarding clinical educators’ performance in teaching pharmacology and medication management and two questions about students’ satisfaction with their level of knowledge and skills in pharmacology and medication management. Descriptive statistics was employed and analysis of variance was performed to compare the mean of scores of teaching pharmacology and medication management in the three universities. Results Among a total of 152 subjects, 82.9% were female and their mean age was 22.57 ± 1.55 years. According to the students, instructors had the weakest performance in the three items of teaching pharmacology and medication management based on the students’ learning needs, teaching medication management through a patient-centered method and teaching pharmacology and medication management based on the course plan. The students’ satisfaction regarding their own knowledge and skill of pharmacology and medication management was at medium level. Conclusions Nursing students gave a relatively low score in several aspects of

  1. Dissemination of behavioural activation for depression to mental health nurses: training evaluation and benchmarked clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ekers, D M; Dawson, M S; Bailey, E

    2013-03-01

    Depression causes significant distress, disability and cost within the UK. Behavioural activation (BA) is an effective single-strand psychological approach which may lend itself to brief training programmes for a wide range of clinical staff. No previous research has directly examined outcomes of such dissemination. A 5-day training course for 10 primary care mental health workers aiming to increase knowledge and clinical skills in BA was evaluated using the Training Acceptability Rating Scale. Depression symptom level data collected in a randomized controlled trial using trainees were then compared to results from meta-analysis of studies using experienced therapists. BA training was highly acceptable to trainees (94.4%, SD 6%). The combined effect size of BA was unchanged by the addition of the results of this evaluation to those of studies using specialist therapists. BA offers a promising psychological intervention for depression that appears suitable for delivery by mental health nurses following brief training.

  2. Best practice in clinical facilitation of undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Needham, Judith; McMurray, Anne; Shaban, Ramon Z

    2016-09-01

    Clinical facilitation is critical to successful student clinical experience. The research reported in this paper used an interpretive case study to explore perspectives of clinical facilitators on what constitutes best practice in clinical facilitation of undergraduate nursing students. Eleven clinical facilitators from South East Queensland, Australia, participated in focus groups, interviews and a concept mapping exercise to gather their perspectives on best practice. The data gathered information regarding their prior and current experiences as registered nurses and facilitators, considering reasons they became clinical facilitators, their educational background and self-perceived adequacy of their knowledge for clinical facilitation. Analysis was through constant comparison. Findings of the study provided in-depth insight into the role of clinical facilitators, with best practice conceptualised via three main themes; 'assessing', 'learning to facilitate' and 'facilitating effectively'. While they felt there was some autonomy in the role, the clinical facilitators sought a closer liaison with academic staff and feedback about their performance, in particular their assessment of the students. Key strategies identified for improving best practice included educational support for the clinical facilitators, networking, and mentoring from more experienced clinical facilitators. When implemented, these strategies will help develop the clinical facilitators' skills and ensure quality clinical experiences for undergraduate nursing students. PMID:27580169

  3. Nursing Instructor and Students’ Perspectives on Clinical Education Apprenticeship Problems

    PubMed Central

    Hasanpour-Dehkordi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Different problems might lead to reduction in the efficiency of nursing students’ apprenticeship education and solving those problems. Aim This study was conducted to determine nursing internship problems from the perspective of trainers and students. Materials and Methods In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 20 trainers and 43 senior students of nursing were selected using census method. A researcher-made questionnaire was used to collect data. Total internal consistency (α) of the questionnaire was 0.88 and had proper convergent validity. SPSS was used to analyse data with applying descriptive and inferential statistics. Results More than 50% considered their course relatively weak or weak in helping intern nurses to acquire comprehensive view of the nursing profession that takes a social perspective into account, skills required for the processes of nursing and instructing patients. Problems such as insufficient access to welfare and educational facilities, lack of co-operation among clinical team and scattering of internship sessions during a course were mentioned by nurses and their trainers. They believed that changes must take place in the way internship courses are carried out. Conclusion Although the internship courses seem to achieve their aim of improving students’ skills and independence in providing different nursing services to students and their trainers generally have a positive attitude towards such courses, there are still problems in effective exercise of the training. PMID:27790467

  4. [Teaching and learning in the clinical field: perspective of teachers, nurses and nursing students].

    PubMed

    Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Domingos, Selisvane Ribeiro da Fonseca; de Oliveira, Deíse Moura; Ito, Thaís Norika

    2014-01-01

    This is a qualitative research, which used the social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz approach. Its purpose was meeting and discussing the expectations of teachers, nurses and students about teaching in the clinical field. Nine teachers, eleven nurses and eleven students of the Nursing Graduation grade from a public university of São Paulo were included in this study. Data were collected in 2012. As the results showed, there are expectations about the link between theory and practice that clinical teaching can offer and also the desire that such instruction enable the learners to develop a pro-active and participatory attitude. The reciprocity of perspectives was evident and should be considered when academic projects focused on nursing education are developed.

  5. [Teaching and learning in the clinical field: perspective of teachers, nurses and nursing students].

    PubMed

    Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Domingos, Selisvane Ribeiro da Fonseca; de Oliveira, Deíse Moura; Ito, Thaís Norika

    2014-01-01

    This is a qualitative research, which used the social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz approach. Its purpose was meeting and discussing the expectations of teachers, nurses and students about teaching in the clinical field. Nine teachers, eleven nurses and eleven students of the Nursing Graduation grade from a public university of São Paulo were included in this study. Data were collected in 2012. As the results showed, there are expectations about the link between theory and practice that clinical teaching can offer and also the desire that such instruction enable the learners to develop a pro-active and participatory attitude. The reciprocity of perspectives was evident and should be considered when academic projects focused on nursing education are developed. PMID:25271572

  6. Understanding compassion literacy in nursing through a clinical compassion cafe.

    PubMed

    Winch, Sarah; Henderson, Amanda Jane; Kay, Margaret; Burridge, Letitia Helen; Livesay, Georgia Jane; Sinnott, Michael John

    2014-11-01

    This article presents a method of reconnecting and reaffirming with nurses the importance of compassion in health care by using a clinical compassion cafe, which describes nine steps that provide a forum to reaffirm clinicians' core values. This process has the potential to engage clinical staff in a different modality removed from the usual didactic approaches.

  7. Direct care registered nurses' and nursing leaders' review of the clinical competencies needed for the successful nurse of the future: a gap analysis.

    PubMed

    Strong, Margaret; Kane, Irene; Petras, Denise; Johnson-Joy, Cheryl; Weingarten, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Direct care nurses and nurse leaders were surveyed on their perceptions of the appropriateness, importance, and use in daily practice of 10 clinical nursing competencies needed for nurses to be successful in the future. Competencies needed in the 21st century are not based entirely on task-driven motor skills because comprehensive knowledge is essential to care for complex patients. Differences identified between direct care nurses, leaders, and educational levels provide educational opportunities for both groups.

  8. Clinically Speaking: ESP for Refugee Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Adele G.; Marston, John

    A program designed to provide instruction in specialized English for Southeast Asian and other refugees redeveloping their skills as licensed practical nurses (LPNs) contained two language proficiency tracks and provided language instruction incorporating high school equivalency test practice material in the specialized English course. Technical…

  9. Psychiatric nurses' self-rated competence.

    PubMed

    Ewalds-Kvist, Beatrice; Algotsson, Martina; Bergström, Annelie; Lützén, Kim

    2012-07-01

    This study explored the self-rated competence of 52 Swedish psychiatric nurses in three clinical environments: forensic psychiatry, general psychiatric inpatient care, and clinical non-residential psychiatric care. A questionnaire wtih 56 statements from nine areas of expertise was completed. Forensic nurses were more skilled in safety and quality and in dealing with violence and conflicts. Non-specialist nurses appreciated their skills more so than specialist nurses in health promotion and illness prevention and conduct, information, and education. Women were inclined to invite patients' relatives for education and information. Men attended to a patients' spiritual needs; they also coped with violence and managed conflicts. PMID:22757599

  10. Nursing Students' Perceptions of Satisfaction and Self-Confidence with Clinical Simulation Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omer, Tagwa

    2016-01-01

    Nursing and other health professionals are increasingly using simulation as a strategy and a tool for teaching and learning at all levels that need clinical training. Nursing education for decades used simulation as an integral part of nursing education. Recent studies indicated that simulation improves nursing knowledge, clinical practice,…

  11. Perceptions of Clinical Stress in Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Linda; Bourke, Mary P; Tormoehlen, Lucy J; Poe-Greskamp, Marlene V

    2015-07-16

    The Nursing Students' Clinical Stress Scale, a Likert-type survey by Whang (2002), translated from Korean into English, was used to identify perceptions of stress in baccalaureate nursing students. Data was collected from a convenience sample of baccalaureate nursing students at a Midwestern university. Students ranked their perceived stress level from clinical situations. One open-ended item asked students to describe their most stressful clinical experience. Rasch Model analysis/diagnostics were used to check the instrument for validity and reliability. Quantitative data were analyzed for descriptive statistics (means). Information from open-ended question was analyzed for themes. Qualitative themes were consistent with results from quantitative analysis and well-aligned with the literature. Students were stressed by incivility by healthcare staff and instructors, inconsistencies and time constraints. Research shows that stress can interfere with learning. It is imperative to determine causes of stress so educators can help decrease stress and improve student learning.

  12. Activities and interactions of baccalaureate nursing students in clinical practica.

    PubMed

    Polifroni, E C; Packard, S A; Shah, H S; MacAvoy, S

    1995-01-01

    Basic nursing education is governed by individual state rules and regulations lacking in uniformity across the United States and based on unstated and perhaps mistaken assumptions. At the same time, there is increasing evidence of problems and difficulties with the current traditional model of nursing education. Before proposing changes in said model, the authors chose to examine what it is that a nursing student does in a clinical area. The perspective of activities and interactions was chosen to illustrate, through a nonparticipant observation study, the patterns and utilization of time during a scheduled clinical experience for baccalaureate nursing students. The goal of the study was to determine who, other than the client/patient, influences the student learning at the clinical site and how learning time is spent. Two schools (one private and one public) and nine clinical sites with 37 observations were used to collect the data for this study. Findings are best summarized in four (overlapping) categories of school time, registered nurse (RN) staff time, hospital staff time, and supervised time. School time, or time spent interacting with the instructor, another student, and/or the student on his/her own in the practice setting (time exclusive of staff input) constituted 84 per cent of all time. RN staff time that was time spent with either the primary nurse or other RNs on the unit used 10 per cent of the student time, Fourteen per cent of student time was spent in hospital staff time, which includes interactions with any nursing staff or other hospital personnel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Integrative Nursing: Application of Principles Across Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2015-01-01

    While the essence of nursing has long been whole person (body, mind, and spirit) and whole system-focused, in reality the contemporary practice of nursing in many settings around the globe has become increasingly fragmented and de-stabilized. Nursing shortages in many parts of the world are significant, and hierarchies and bureaucracies often remove nurses from the point of care, be that the bedside, home, or clinic, replacing them with less skilled workers and filling their time with documentation and other administrative tasks. Integrative nursing is a framework for providing whole person/whole system care that is relationship-based and person-centered and focuses on improving the health and wellbeing of caregivers as well as those they serve. It is aligned with what is being called the “triple aim” in the United States—an effort focused on improving the patient experience (quality and satisfaction), improving the health of populations, and reducing the cost of care. The principles of integrative nursing offer clear and specific guidance that can shape and impact patient care in all clinical settings. PMID:25973268

  14. Developing a nurse-led clinic using transformational leadership.

    PubMed

    Gousy, Mamood; Green, Kim

    2015-03-25

    Nurses are at the forefront of implementing and managing change, given constantly changing healthcare services and the increase in demand for health care. Therefore, it is important to identify the best style of leadership to engage nurses in implementing service-led improvements. This article explores the effects of transformational leadership in bringing about service-led improvements in health care, using the example of setting up a nurse-led acupuncture clinic to optimise the care of patients with chronic pain. Transformational leadership was used throughout the project - from the initial local planning, training and development, through to liaising with the appropriate staff and deciding on an evaluation strategy. Transformational leadership proved to be an effective way to engage and empower nurses and other members of the chronic pain team to enable them to achieve the project aims. PMID:25804177

  15. [Anticoagulant therapy clinic: moving towards Advanced Nursing Practice].

    PubMed

    Romero Ruiz, Adolfo; Parrado Borrego, Gema; Rodríguez González, José; Caparrós Miranda, Isabel S; Vargas Lirio, M Isabel; Ortiz Fernández, Primitiva

    2014-01-01

    There is currently around one million people receiving oral anticoagulants in Spain. The drug most used is acenocoumarol, which requires coagulation monitoring to ensure that the patient is within its normal therapeutic range. Patients usually start this treatment in a hospital clinic and, when they are stabilised, they are referred to primary care, where they are followed-up by their community nurses. The usual practice is that nurses are responsible for changes in the dose when the patients are outside the range. This practice is not performed by hospital nurses, despite having sufficient experience and knowledge to adequately manage these types of patients. An Advanced Nursing Practice model has been introduced into the Haematology management unit of the Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga. This involves various aspects of attention and care of patients on anticoagulant therapy, and includes adjusting the doses of their treatment following a catalogue of therapeutic and diagnostic ranges.

  16. Developing a nurse-led clinic using transformational leadership.

    PubMed

    Gousy, Mamood; Green, Kim

    2015-03-25

    Nurses are at the forefront of implementing and managing change, given constantly changing healthcare services and the increase in demand for health care. Therefore, it is important to identify the best style of leadership to engage nurses in implementing service-led improvements. This article explores the effects of transformational leadership in bringing about service-led improvements in health care, using the example of setting up a nurse-led acupuncture clinic to optimise the care of patients with chronic pain. Transformational leadership was used throughout the project - from the initial local planning, training and development, through to liaising with the appropriate staff and deciding on an evaluation strategy. Transformational leadership proved to be an effective way to engage and empower nurses and other members of the chronic pain team to enable them to achieve the project aims.

  17. Current and future perspectives on lumbar degenerative disc disease: a UK survey exploring specialist multidisciplinary clinical opinion

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite lumbar degenerative disc disease (LDDD) being significantly associated with non-specific low back pain and effective treatment remaining elusive, specialist multidisciplinary clinical stakeholder opinion remains unexplored. The present study examines the views of such experts. Design A reliable and valid electronic survey was designed to establish trends using theoretical constructs relating to current assessment and management practices. Clinicians from the Society of Back Pain Research (SBPR) UK were invited to take part. Quantitative data were collated and coded using Bristol Online Surveys (BOS) software, and content analysis was used to systematically code and categorise qualitative data. Setting Specialist multidisciplinary spinal interest group in the UK. Participants 38/141 clinically active, multidisciplinary SBPR members with specialist spinal interest participated. Among them, 84% had >9 years postgraduate clinical experience. Interventions None. Outcome measures Frequency distributions were used to establish general trends in quantitative data. Qualitative responses were coded and categorised in relation to each theme and percentage responses were calculated. Results LDDD symptom recurrence, in the absence of psychosocial influence, was associated with physical signs of joint stiffness (26%), weakness (17%) and joint hypermobility (6%), while physical factors (21%) and the ability to adapt (11%) were postulated as reasons why some experience pain and others do not. No one management strategy was supported exclusively or with consensus. Regarding effective modalities, there was no significant difference between allied health professional and medic responses (p=0.1–0.8). The future of LDDD care was expressed in terms of improvements in patient communication (35%), patient education (38%) and treatment stratification (24%). Conclusions Results suggest that multidisciplinary expert spinal clinicians appear to follow UK

  18. An Interview and an Observation Study of Nurses and Student Nurses' Electronic Clinical Documentation Behaviors in a OB/GYN Nursing Ward.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yen-Chiao Angel; Lin, Yen-Ju

    2016-01-01

    This research was conducted to understand clinical nurses' and nursing students' current use of a clinical nursing information system to document their patient care activities in an OB/GYN nursing ward at a medical center in central Taiwan. A semi-structure interview and participant observation methods were used to gather the data. The results showed that the majority of participants regarded the clinical nursing information system as a useful system in terms of saving documentation time and improving communication among healthcare providers. This study provided some empirical evidence of the attitudes/behaviors of nurses and student nurses about electronic documentation. However, more studies were recommended to evaluate the impact of electronic nursing documentation on the quality of care delivered to patients.

  19. Using simulations to teach clinical nursing.

    PubMed

    Hanna, D R

    1991-01-01

    Incorporating play into formal teaching strategies was introduced in theory over 75 years ago by John Dewey and the Gestalt theorists. Play, in the form of simulations, has had a significant role in contemporary nursing education. Simulations can teach more than a skill or an idea, since they can be designed to teach the complexification of ideas. The author explores the theoretical and historical development, the advantages and disadvantages, and future uses of simulations.

  20. Exploration of Nursing Faculty Members' Lived Experiences of Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in Undergraduate Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obizoba, Cordelia O.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain an understanding of nursing faculty members' lived experiences of Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in undergraduate nursing education. As owners of their programs' curriculum, nursing faculties are charged with the responsibility of providing needed knowledge, skills, and…

  1. Online Clinical Post-Conference, Face-to-Face Clinical Postconference: Effects on Critical Thinking in Associate Degree Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebersole-Berkstresser, Kristie Anne

    2013-01-01

    Nurse educators, at every level of pre-licensure nursing education, are charged with developing critical thinking skills within their students. Post-clinical conference is one teaching strategy that nurse educators can employ to help promote the development of critical thinking skills in pre-licensure nursing students. However, traditional…

  2. Enhancing nurses' ethical practice: development of a clinical ethics program.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, C

    1998-06-01

    There is increasing attention paid to ethics under managed care; however, few clinical-based ethics programs are reported. This paper reports the assessment and outcomes of one such program. A quasi-experimental research design with t-tests is used to assess the outcome differences between participants and control groups. There are twenty nurses in each; they are assessed for comparability. Differences are predicted on two outcomes using reliable and valid measures: nurses' time with their patients in ethics discussions, and nurses' opinions regarding their clinical ethics environments. Results reveal a statistically significant difference (p <.05) between the two groups, with modest positive change in the participants. Additional exploratory analyses are reported on variables influential in health care services.

  3. Clarifying Clinical Nurse Consultant work in Australia: A phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Cashin, Andrew; Stasa, Helen; Gullick, Janice; Conway, Rae; Cunich, Michelle; Buckley, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The Clinical Nurse Consultant role in Australia is an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Role (APRN). This role has been conceptualized from the discrete pillars of research, education, practice, system support and leadership, articulated in the Strong Model of Advanced Practice. This conceptualization has been manifested in job descriptions, workforce. planning and course design. This paper explored whether there was a more refined way of conceptualizing the unique 'value add' of the role. A hermeneutic phenomenological approach was employed to explore the lived experience of the role. It was identified that the pillars of education, practice, leadership and research are interconnected and expressed in the system work of the Clinical Nurse Consultant. The findings have implications for education and workforce planning. PMID:26775527

  4. Clinical coaching--an innovative role to improve marginal nursing students' clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kelton, Moira F

    2014-11-01

    In order for undergraduate nursing students to demonstrate their ability to achieve the required level of competency with practice they must be able to integrate both the clinical skills and knowledge that are pivotal to safe and competent nursing practice. In response to ongoing concerns about students' level of competency expressed by the supervising clinical staff, one School of Nursing and Midwifery created a Clinical Coach (CC) role. The purpose of this paper is to present the data collected including outcomes achieved and the coaching strategies used when a CC role was implemented to support and develop nursing practice for the marginal performer or 'at risk' student. A literature review of the application of coaching to nursing, a detailed analysis and discussion of the outcomes identified from auditing of collected data and the specific coaching strategies that resulted in successful outcomes for students is presented. This model of Clinical Coaching for nursing students could readily be adopted by other Schools of Nursing and Midwifery. This account of the regime of coaching practices may also offer a transferable, adaptable and flexible approach for other health professions who require their undergraduate students to complete clinical placements in preparation for professional practice. PMID:25066808

  5. Nursing students in clinical practice--developing a model for clinical supervision.

    PubMed

    Häggman-Laitila, Arja; Elina, Eriksson; Riitta, Meretoja; Kirsi, Sillanpää; Leena, Rekola

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a model for clinical supervision to promote the clinical practice of nursing students. The study was implemented in Finland and it was carried out in three phases. Firstly, data were collected by means of a literature review and focus group interviews. Secondly, the data were analysed and described in expert groups, and finally the model itself was evaluated by 23 nursing experts. The data of literature review and focus group interviews consisted of 27 studies and four groups from three organisations: nurses (n=7), managers (n=6), teachers (n=8) and students (n=6). The data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The model devolved from the study includes the concepts describing prerequisites, content and influence of clinical supervision. The prerequisites are nursing skills, a holistic view of the nursing curriculum, pedagogical, organisational, development, cooperation and interaction competence and decision-making skills. The content of clinical supervision includes support of professional development, pedagogical competence, research and development activities and collaborative working. Clinical supervision has influence on students' professional and personal development and conception of the future of nursing profession, students' preparedness for career planning and the teacher's and preceptor's professional development. The model could unify the notions of all parties concerned of the prerequisites, content and influence of clinical supervision. Furthermore, the entire supervision process and its control could be clarified. The model may be utilised in selecting and educating preceptors and evaluating the quality of clinical supervision. PMID:17936544

  6. Promoting a Strategic Approach to Clinical Nurse Leader Practice Integration.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marjory; Avolio, Alice E; Ott, Karen M; Miltner, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    The Office of Nursing Services of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) piloted implementation of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) into the care delivery model and established a strategic goal in 2011 to implement the CNL role across the VA health care system. The VA Office of Nursing Services CNL Implementation and Evaluation (CNL I&E) Service was created as one mechanism to facilitate that goal in response to a need identified by facility nurse executives for consultative support for CNL practice integration. This article discusses strategies employed by the CNL I&E consultative team to help facility-level nursing leadership integrate CNLs into practice. Measures of success include steady growth in CNL practice capacity as well as positive feedback from nurse executives about the value of consultative engagement. Future steps to better integrate CNL practice into the VA include consolidation of lessons learned, collaboration to strengthen the evidence base for CNL practice, and further exploration of the transformational potential of CNL practice across the care continuum. PMID:26636231

  7. Promoting a Strategic Approach to Clinical Nurse Leader Practice Integration.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marjory; Avolio, Alice E; Ott, Karen M; Miltner, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    The Office of Nursing Services of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) piloted implementation of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) into the care delivery model and established a strategic goal in 2011 to implement the CNL role across the VA health care system. The VA Office of Nursing Services CNL Implementation and Evaluation (CNL I&E) Service was created as one mechanism to facilitate that goal in response to a need identified by facility nurse executives for consultative support for CNL practice integration. This article discusses strategies employed by the CNL I&E consultative team to help facility-level nursing leadership integrate CNLs into practice. Measures of success include steady growth in CNL practice capacity as well as positive feedback from nurse executives about the value of consultative engagement. Future steps to better integrate CNL practice into the VA include consolidation of lessons learned, collaboration to strengthen the evidence base for CNL practice, and further exploration of the transformational potential of CNL practice across the care continuum.

  8. The Teaching Styles and Use of Adult Learning Theory among Nursing Professional Development Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    The American Nurses Association advocates for nursing professional development (NPD) specialists to have an earned graduate degree, as well as educational and clinical expertise. However, many NPD specialists have limited exposure to adult learning theory (ALT), and this lack of exposure may reduce organizational knowledge transfer (KT) and the…

  9. Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories.

    PubMed

    Ewertsson, Mona; Allvin, Renée; Holmström, Inger K; Blomberg, Karin

    2015-07-01

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified - walking the bridge - in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking. PMID:25892366

  10. Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories.

    PubMed

    Ewertsson, Mona; Allvin, Renée; Holmström, Inger K; Blomberg, Karin

    2015-07-01

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified - walking the bridge - in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking.

  11. Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Communication Process in the Clinical Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotecki, Catherine Nuss

    2002-01-01

    Interviews (n=22) and observations (n=14) in clinical settings were coded and analyzed to identify student nurses' problems in communicating with patients and the process of learning solutions. The process involved affirming the self, engaging the patient, experiencing communication breakdown, and refining the repertoire of communication…

  12. Clinical evaluation--difficulties experienced by sessional clinical teachers of nursing: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Duke, M

    1996-02-01

    Evaluation of nursing students in the clinical field requires the clinical teacher to make judgements regarding student progress in a number of areas. In this study concepts of role theory, oppressed group behaviour and the ethics of caring emerged and were used as conceptual frameworks to interpret the data relating to the evaluation of undergraduate students. The number of experienced faculty available for clinical teaching and evaluation has become inadequate and a large number of casual or sessional clinical teachers are employed to teach students in the clinical field. Despite the well documented problems associated with clinical teaching and the use of inexperienced clinical teachers, sessional clinical teachers are nevertheless expected to evaluate student success in meeting the clinical requirements of the nursing course, often resulting in disparate decisions for students. A phenomenological study was carried out using unstructured interviews and written clinical scenarios, to explore the evaluation process from the perspective of the sessional clinical teachers. Research findings indicate that although the sessional clinical teachers were skilled at identifying student problems, they were reluctant to make difficult evaluation decisions, due to low self-esteem, role conflict and their ethic of caring. It seems that gender socialization, patriarchal dominance and apprenticeship training had effected their confidence in their own decision making. The implications of such findings are of concern for the ongoing credibility and integrity of nursing courses, as clinical teachers have an influence on the nursing profession through the preparation of its practitioners.

  13. Key components of financial-analysis education for clinical nurses.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji Young; Noh, Wonjung

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we identified key components of financial-analysis education for clinical nurses. We used a literature review, focus group discussions, and a content validity index survey to develop key components of financial-analysis education. First, a wide range of references were reviewed, and 55 financial-analysis education components were gathered. Second, two focus group discussions were performed; the participants were 11 nurses who had worked for more than 3 years in a hospital, and nine components were agreed upon. Third, 12 professionals, including professors, nurse executive, nurse managers, and an accountant, participated in the content validity index. Finally, six key components of financial-analysis education were selected. These key components were as follows: understanding the need for financial analysis, introduction to financial analysis, reading and implementing balance sheets, reading and implementing income statements, understanding the concepts of financial ratios, and interpretation and practice of financial ratio analysis. The results of this study will be used to develop an education program to increase financial-management competency among clinical nurses.

  14. A randomised controlled crossover trial of nurse practitioner versus doctor led outpatient care in a bronchiectasis clinic

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, L; Edmunds, J; Bilton, D; Hollingworth, W; Caine, N; Keogan, M; Exley, A

    2002-01-01

    Background: With the decrease in junior doctor hours, the advent of specialist registrars, and the availability of highly trained and experienced nursing personnel, the service needs of patients with chronic respiratory diseases attending routine outpatient clinics may be better provided by appropriately trained nurse practitioners. Methods: A randomised controlled crossover trial was used to compare nurse practitioner led care with doctor led care in a bronchiectasis outpatient clinic. Eighty patients were recruited and randomised to receive 1 year of nurse led care and 1 year of doctor led care in random order. Patients were followed up for 2 years to ensure patient safety and acceptability and to assess differences in lung function. Outcome measures were forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), 12 minute walk test, health related quality of life, and resource use. Results: The mean difference in FEV1 was 0.2% predicted (95% confidence interval –1.6 to 2.0%, p=0.83). There were no significant differences in the other clinical or health related quality of life measures. Nurse led care resulted in significantly increased resource use compared with doctor led care (mean difference £1497, 95% confidence interval £688 to £2674, p<0.001), a large part of which resulted from the number and duration of hospital admissions. The mean difference in resource use was greater in the first year (£2625) than in the second year (£411). Conclusions: Nurse practitioner led care for stable patients within a chronic chest clinic is safe and is as effective as doctor led care, but may use more resources. PMID:12149523

  15. [Swiss Research Agenda for Nursing (SRAN): the development of an agenda for clinical nursing research in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Imhof, Lorenz; Abderhalden, Christoph; Cignacco, Eva; Eicher, Manuela; Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Schubert, Maria; Shaha, Maya

    2008-08-01

    In many Anglo-Saxon and North European countries nursing research agendas have been developed to address priorities in nursing research in accordance with a nationally defined health policy. In Switzerland, due to lack of a nationwide governmental health policy, co-ordination of nursing research so far was scarce. The "Swiss Research Agenda for Nursing (SRAN)" project developed an agenda for clinical nursing research between 2005 and 2007. Based on literature reviews, expert panels and a national survey a project team formulated an agenda which passed a consensus conference. The agenda recommends aspects that should lead research and defines seven research priorities for nursing in Switzerland for the time between 2007 and 2017. Nursing research should prioritize to investigate 1) the effectiveness of nursing interventions; 2) the influences of service adaptations in a changing health care system; 3) the phenomena in patients requiring nursing care; 4) the influence of the work environment on the quality of nursing care; 5) the functioning of family and social systems; 6) varieties of life circumstances and their integration; and 7) the implementation of ethical principles in nursing. Written in German and French, the Swiss Research Agenda for Nursing for the first time formulates priorities for nursing research in Switzerland and can be used for strategic discussions. As a next step, the development of an action plan to enhance nursing research will take place in Switzerland.

  16. A Clinical Librarian-Nursing Partnership to Bridge Clinical Practice and Research in an Oncology Setting.

    PubMed

    Ginex, Pamela K; Hernandez, Marisol; Vrabel, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Nurses today work in practice settings where the expectation is to "draw upon the best evidence to provide the care most appropriate to each patient" (Olsen, Goolsby, & McGinnis, 2009, p. 10) while caring for patients with high acuity in highly specialized settings. Within the nursing profession, the Magnet Recognition Program® advocates for exemplary professional practice and the generation of new knowledge through research and clinical innovation. Nurses working in a clinical setting are often the best resource to identify important clinical questions and gaps in practice, but a lack of resources presents challenges to nurses in fully developing their questions and identifying the most appropriate methods to answer them. These challenges often fall into three broad categories: individual nurse characteristics, organizational characteristics, and environmental characteristics (Dobbins, Ciliska, Cockerill, Barnsley, & DiCenso, 2002). Creating a dedicated partnership between nurses and library staff is one method that can overcome these challenges to use existing resources and support nurses who are asking and answering important clinical questions (DePalma, 2005; Vrabel, 2005). 
. PMID:27541547

  17. Positioning advanced practice nurses for financial success in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kennerly, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are well prepared for patient care, but not for the financial aspects of clinical practice. A lack of reimbursement knowledge and skills limits the prospects for APNs to be key players in business and practice ventures. Faculty are challenged to strengthen the advanced practice reimbursement component of the financial management core to promote the reimbursement competency of APNs. The author discusses 4 primary content categories that are critical to financial success in clinical practice.

  18. Survey design research: a tool for answering nursing research questions.

    PubMed

    Siedlecki, Sandra L; Butler, Robert S; Burchill, Christian N

    2015-01-01

    The clinical nurse specialist is in a unique position to identify and study clinical problems in need of answers, but lack of time and resources may discourage nurses from conducting research. However, some research methods can be used by the clinical nurse specialist that are not time-intensive or cost prohibitive. The purpose of this article is to explain the utility of survey methodology for answering a number of nursing research questions. The article covers survey content, reliability and validity issues, sample size considerations, and methods of survey delivery.

  19. The Virtual Clinical Practicum: an innovative telehealth model for clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Grady, Janet L

    2011-01-01

    The Virtual Clinical Practicum (VCP) involves a clinical nursing education delivery strategy that uses video teleconferencing technology to address time, distance, and resource barriers. Technology-delivered education can augment the existing curriculum by increasing student access to clinical experts in specialty areas, thus supporting efficient use of faculty resources. This article describes the implementation of the VCP process and student perceptions of its effectiveness and usefulness. The VCP was shown to be a successful method of clinical nursing education, offering students exposure to clinical situations not available by other means. Opportunities for dialogue, critical reflection, and synthesis allowed students to experience the benefits of a traditional experience, enhanced through technology and tailored to the specific needs of the students. Respondents overwhelmingly recommended further use of the VCP to augment existing clinical nursing education methods.

  20. Developing emergency nursing competence.

    PubMed

    Proehl, Jean A

    2002-03-01

    Developing and maintaining the competence emergency nurses need is an important function of emergency clinical nurse specialists (CNS), educators, and other members of the emergency department (ED) leadership team. A thorough orientation is the first and most important step in developing the competence of emergency nurses. After orientation, the challenge is to maintain currency of practice in the face of incessant change such as new medications, new equipment, and new therapies in emergency care. This article focuses on the orientation of emergency nurses. A related article in this issue addresses assessment of competency. PMID:11818264

  1. Developing a clinical academic career pathway for nursing.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Maureen; Latter, Sue; Richardson, Alison

    Since the publication of the UK Clinical Research Collaboration's (UKRC, 2007) recommendations on careers in clinical research, interest has grown in the concept of clinical academic nursing careers, with increased debate on how such roles might be developed and sustained (Department of Health, 2012). To embed clinical academic nursing roles in the NHS and universities, a clear understanding and appreciation of the contribution that such posts might make to organisational objectives and outcomes must be developed. This paper outlines an initiative to define the potential practice and research contribution of clinical academic roles through setting out role descriptors. This exercise was based on our experience of a clinical academic career initiative at the University of Southampton run in partnership with NHS organisations. Role descriptors were developed by a group of service providers, academics and two clinical academic award-holders from the local programme. This paper outlines clinical academic roles from novice to professor and describes examples of role descriptors at the different levels of a career pathway. These descriptors are informed by clinical academic posts in place at Southampton as well as others at the planning stage. Understanding the nature of clinical academic posts and the contribution that these roles can make to healthcare will enable them to become embedded into organisational structures and career pathways.

  2. How Do Dyslexic Nursing Students Cope with Clinical Practice Placements? The Impact of the Dyslexic Profile on the Clinical Practice of Dyslexic Nursing Students: Pedagogical Issues and Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Geraldine A.; Gale, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The safety of dyslexic nurses, and whether they are a danger to their patients, has been widely discussed. This empirical study sought to discover the impact of the dyslexic profile on clinical practice for nursing students. Two focus groups of third-year nursing students in higher education were set up: a control group and a dyslexic group. The…

  3. [Nursing outcomes and the reform of care processes (IV). Clinical pathways and reflexive training of nurses].

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Moreno Javier

    2002-10-01

    This article states the danger that exists if human activities are substituted by a standardized instrument; it insists that standardized treatment plans or clinical trajectories should be a tool which facilitates a nurse's labor and allows a nurse to dedicate more time at a patient's bedside. In terms of professional development, this implies a focus directed at the acquisition of procedures as well as social and intellectual aptitudes. This also assumes that the directors, who occupy a post that is key to setting treatment policy, adopt a position which favors the development of an autonomous role in professional practice.

  4. Nurses' Clinical Decision Making on Adopting a Wound Clinical Decision Support System.

    PubMed

    Khong, Peck Chui Betty; Hoi, Shu Yin; Holroyd, Eleanor; Wang, Wenru

    2015-07-01

    Healthcare information technology systems are considered the ideal tool to inculcate evidence-based nursing practices. The wound clinical decision support system was built locally to support nurses to manage pressure ulcer wounds in their daily practice. However, its adoption rate is not optimal. The study's objective was to discover the concepts that informed the RNs' decisions to adopt the wound clinical decision support system as an evidence-based technology in their nursing practice. This was an exploratory, descriptive, and qualitative design using face-to-face interviews, individual interviews, and active participatory observation. A purposive, theoretical sample of 14 RNs was recruited from one of the largest public tertiary hospitals in Singapore after obtaining ethics approval. After consenting, the nurses were interviewed and observed separately. Recruitment stopped when data saturation was reached. All transcribed interview data underwent a concurrent thematic analysis, whereas observational data were content analyzed independently and subsequently triangulated with the interview data. Eight emerging themes were identified, namely, use of the wound clinical decision support system, beliefs in the wound clinical decision support system, influences of the workplace culture, extent of the benefits, professional control over nursing practices, use of knowledge, gut feelings, and emotions (fear, doubt, and frustration). These themes represented the nurses' mental outlook as they made decisions on adopting the wound clinical decision support system in light of the complexities of their roles and workloads. This research has provided insight on the nurses' thoughts regarding their decision to interact with the computer environment in a Singapore context. It captured the nurses' complex thoughts when deciding whether to adopt or reject information technology as they practice in a clinical setting. PMID:26066306

  5. Worksite Physical Activity Intervention for Ambulatory Clinic Nursing Staff.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Sharon; Farrington, Michele; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine M; Clark, M Kathleen; Dawson, Cindy; Quinn, Geralyn J; Laffoon, Trudy; Perkhounkova, Yelena

    2016-07-01

    Health behaviors, including physical activity (PA), of registered nurses (RNs) and medical assistants (MAs) are suboptimal but may improve with worksite programs. Using a repeated-measures crossover design, the authors explored if integrating a 6-month worksite non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) intervention, with and without personalized health coaching via text messaging into workflow could positively affect sedentary time, PA, and body composition of nursing staff without jeopardizing work productivity. Two ambulatory clinics were randomly assigned to an environmental NEAT intervention plus a mobile text message coaching for either the first 3 months (early texting group, n = 27) or the last 3 months (delayed texting group, n = 13), with baseline 3-month and 6-month measurements. Sedentary and PA levels, fat mass, and weight improved for both groups, significantly only for the early text group. Productivity did not decline for either group. This worksite intervention is feasible and may benefit nursing staff. PMID:27143144

  6. [Nurses' perceptions about a conference of students during a clinical nursing practicum].

    PubMed

    Muroya, Kazuko; Kawachi, Shinobu

    2011-03-01

    We conducted an investigation of students in a nursing practice leadership workshop for the purpose of understanding their perceptions about a student conference that was held during a clinical nursing practicum. As a result, we found that, at the time of the conference, a large proportion of students felt difficulty related to "Inexperience in discussion procedures" and "Students' inability to have an active exchange of opinions". A large proportion also thought that "Cooperation among students" and "The theme" had an effect on the conference. Compared to the group that had had experience as clinical practice leaders, the group that had not had such experience felt troubled by "Silence" during the conference. The group that had had experience as clinical practice leaders thought that "The physical environment of the setting" had an effect on the conference. In free descriptions of the learning, the following three categories were discovered: "Acquisition of problem-solving techniques", "Widening of the perspectives of nursing", and "Cultivation of an attitude toward the nursing profession".

  7. An international comparison of the clinical trials nurse role.

    PubMed

    Brinkman-Denney, Sandra

    2013-12-01

    The collaborative role of clinical trials nurses (CTNs) is crucial to the management of research protocols in clinical settings. As part of a literature review of ten articles, comparisons were made of CTN roles in countries across North America, Europe and the Asia-Pacific region. The research looked at collaborative competencies relating to issues ranging from protocol assessment and informed consent to the research team and study site management. It found that this aspect of CTNs' advanced specialty role in clinical trials research meets the requirements of standards of professional nursing practice in the US, but that in some nations CTNs have different scopes of practice, so more research is needed to clarify and standardise the role. PMID:24266577

  8. Use of mobile handheld computers in clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Maureen J; Rose, Louise

    2008-01-01

    Personal digital assistants (PDAs) are increasingly in use in both clinical practice and nursing education as a method of providing timely access to resources at the point of care. This article describes the use of PDAs during the medical-surgical clinical component of a Bachelor of Nursing program in Australia. The aim of the study was to investigate whether PDAs would enhance students' pharmacological and clinical contextual knowledge and to identify issues associated with the use of PDAs in students' clinical experience. A mixed-method approach was used incorporating a quasi-experimental design with pretest and posttest of pharmacological knowledge and focus group discussions. Students using the PDAs demonstrated a moderate increase in their mean score, which was double the increase in the control group. Findings from the focus group discussions indicated that students found the PDAs easy to use and perceived their use as beneficial to their learning in the clinical area. This study provides support for the ongoing implementation of PDAs into nursing education.

  9. Costing nursing care: using the clinical care classification system to value nursing intervention in an acute-care setting.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jacqueline; Saba, Virginia

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to combine an established methodology for coding nursing interventions and action types using the Clinical Care Classification System with a reliable formula (relative value units) to cost nursing services. Using a flat per-diem rate to cost nursing care greatly understates the actual costs and fails to address the high levels of variability within and across units. We observed nurses performing commonly executed nursing interventions and recorded these into an electronic database with corresponding Clinical Care Classification System codes. The duration of these observations was used to calculate intervention costs using relative value unit calculation formulas. The costs of the five most commonly executed interventions were nursing care coordination/manage-refer ($2.43), nursing status report/assess-monitor ($4.22), medication treatment/perform-direct ($6.33), physical examination/assess-monitor ($3.20), and universal precautions/perform-direct ($1.96). Future studies across a variety of nursing specialties and units are needed to validate the relative value unit for Clinical Care Classification System action types developed for use with the Clinical Care Classification System nursing interventions as a method to cost nursing care.

  10. The Lived Experience of Nurses Working with Student Nurses in the Clinical Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathorn, Donna; Machtmes, Krisanna; Tillman, Ken

    2009-01-01

    One response to the nursing shortage is to increase promotion and retention in nursing programs: However, negative attitudes of nurses threaten student progression and retention. A phenomenological study explored the lived experience of nurses who worked with student nurses to discover "what" attitudes nurses had toward student nurses and "how"…

  11. High Accuracy of Common HIV-Related Oral Disease Diagnoses by Non-Oral Health Specialists in the AIDS Clinical Trial Group

    PubMed Central

    Shiboski, Caroline H.; Chen, Huichao; Secours, Rode; Lee, Anthony; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Evans, Scott; Bernard, Daphné; Reznik, David; Dittmer, Dirk P.; Hosey, Lara; Sévère, Patrice; Aberg, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Many studies include oral HIV-related endpoints that may be diagnosed by non-oral-health specialists (non-OHS) like nurses or physicians. Our objective was to assess the accuracy of clinical diagnoses of HIV-related oral lesions made by non-OHS compared to diagnoses made by OHS. Methods A5254, a cross-sectional study conducted by the Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance within the AIDS Clinical Trial Group, enrolled HIV-1-infected adults participants from six clinical trial units (CTU) in the US (San Francisco, New York, Chapel Hill, Cleveland, Atlanta) and Haiti. CTU examiners (non-OHS) received standardized training on how to perform an oral examination and make clinical diagnoses of specific oral disease endpoints. Diagnoses by calibrated non-OHS were compared to those made by calibrated OHS, and sensitivity and specificity computed. Results Among 324 participants, the majority were black (73%), men (66%), and the median CD4+ cell count 138 cells/mm3. The overall frequency of oral mucosal disease diagnosed by OHS was 43% in US sites, and 90% in Haiti. Oral candidiasis (OC) was detected in 153 (47%) by OHS, with erythematous candidiasis (EC) the most common type (39%) followed by pseudomembranous candidiasis (PC; 26%). The highest prevalence of OC (79%) was among participants in Haiti, and among those with CD4+ cell count ≤ 200 cells/mm3 and HIV-1 RNA > 1000 copies/mL (71%). The sensitivity and specificity of OC diagnoses by non-OHS were 90% and 92% (for EC: 81% and 94%; PC: 82% and 95%). Sensitivity and specificity were also high for KS (87% and 94%, respectively), but sensitivity was < 60% for HL and oral warts in all sites combined. The Candida culture confirmation of OC clinical diagnoses (as defined by ≥ 1 colony forming unit per mL of oral/throat rinse) was ≥ 93% for both PC and EC. Conclusion Trained non-OHS showed high accuracy of clinical diagnoses of OC in comparison with OHS, suggesting their usefulness in studies in resource-poor settings

  12. Enhancing moral agency: clinical ethics residency for nurses.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Ellen M; Lee, Susan M; Zollfrank, Angelika; Jurchak, Martha; Frost, Debra; Grace, Pamela

    2014-09-01

    One antidote to moral distress is stronger moral agency-that is, an enhanced ability to act to bring about change. The Clinical Ethics Residency for Nurses, an educational program developed and run in two large northeastern academic medical centers with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration, intended to strengthen nurses' moral agency. Drawing on Improving Competencies in Clinical Ethics Consultation: An Education Guide, by the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities, and on the goals of the nursing profession, CERN sought to change attitudes, increase knowledge, and develop skills to act on one's knowledge. One of the key insights the faculty members brought to the design of this program is that knowledge of clinical ethics is not enough to develop moral agency. In addition to lecture-style classes, CERN employed a variety of methods based in adult learning theory, such as active application of ethics knowledge to patient scenarios in classroom discussion, simulation, and the clinical practicum. Overwhelmingly, the feedback from the participants (sixty-seven over three years of the program) indicated that CERN achieved transformative learning.

  13. [Nursing care of clients in an abortion clinic].

    PubMed

    Corstiaensen, J; Kruiswijk, C

    1981-08-25

    The nursing care of clients visiting an abortion clinic for induced abortion is discussed. Generally good care of patients, psychosocially as well as somatically, is essential. For clients in an abortion clinic it is important that psychosocial care is optimal and technical procedures are medically responsible. The initial contact is very important to the client because first impressions of the clinic can be significant in the further course of the entire treatment. Both nurse and doctor are usually involved in the admission interview and preliminary examination. After the physician's anamnesis and internal examination to determine gestational age, patient and doctor determine future contraception. Both abortion and contraception problems are discussed and the treatment procedure explained. It is important to recognize possible patient coercion or ambivalence in which case the client is sometimes advised to think things over. The actual intervention is generally fairly short, from 5 to 15 minutes. The abortion can be emotionally taxing for the client. The nurse's role in providing reassurance and understanding is important. 30 to 60 minutes following intervention the patient can go home. Follow-up, usually 3-5 weeks after intervention, is the final phase of treatment. During this check-up and internal examination the client can discuss her experience and progress in contraception. Case studies are included giving insight into the background of abortion seekers. Abortion clinic nurses must possess specific characteristics and attitudes, such as: 1) a nonjudgmental attitude towards sexuality and induced abortion; 2) empathy in her relationship with clients; 3) personal warmth and ability to help client overcome fear; 4) ability to discuss sexuality and abortion sympathetically; 5) assessment of possible interpersonal relational problems of client; 6) ability to relate to and understand different ethnic groups; 7) be informed on contraceptive methods and agents; and 8

  14. Familiarity knowledge in student nurses' clinical studies: exemplified by student nurses in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Haugan, Grethe; Hanssen, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    In this article based on a literary study, the form of knowledge named familiarity knowledge is examined. Although rooted in the philosophical tradition of Wittgenstein and Polanyi, the development of familiarity knowledge is tied in with clinical practice and particular patients and contexts while paying attention to the framework factors influencing the setting as a whole as well as with theoretical knowledge relevant to the situation at hand. Palliative care makes a backdrop for some of the discussion. Familiarity knowledge can never be context free and attends to that which is unique in every nurse-patient relationship. Both assertive and familiarity knowledge are needed to care for dying patients in a competent, sensitive, and truly caring manner. Mentors need to help students synthesize assertive knowledge and familiarity knowledge during their clinical studies to enrich both kinds of knowledge and deepen their understanding. Student nurses expertly mentored and tutored while caring for dying patients living at home become, for instance, less apprehensive about facing dying patients than students not so mentored. Nurses need to understand the complexity of nursing care to be able to see the uniqueness of the situation and approach the individual patient on the bases of experience and insight.

  15. [Planning nursing teaching: educational purposes and clinical competence].

    PubMed

    Dell'Acqua, Magda Cristina Queiroz; Miyadahira, Ana Maria Kazue; Ide, Cilene Aparecida Costardi

    2009-06-01

    Thinking about nursing education implies articulating this issue with the expressions of theoretical frameworks, from the perspective of a pedagogical aspect that includes both constructivism and competencies. The objective was to characterize, from a longitudinal view, the construction of care competencies that exist in the teaching plans of nursing undergraduate programs. This exploratory-descriptive study used a qualitative approach. Documentary analysis was performed on the nine teaching plans of undergraduate care subjects. The ethical-legal aspects were guaranteed, so that data was collected only after the study had been approved by the Research Ethics Committee. The data evidenced a curriculum organization centered on subjects, maintaining internal rationales that seem to resist summative organizations. Signs emerge of hardly substantial links between any previous knowledge and the strengthening of critical judgment and clinical reasoning. As proposed, the study contributed with reconsiderations for the teaching-learning process and showed the influence of constructivism on the proposal of clinical competencies.

  16. Components of the Doctoral Curriculum That Build Success in the Clinical Nurse Researcher Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Karen E.

    1991-01-01

    Increasing numbers of hospitals and medical centers employ clinical nurse researchers. Nursing doctoral programs can prepare graduates for this role with courses in philosophy and ethics; research methods, statistics, and measurement; grantsmanship; and information dissemination. (SK)

  17. Preliminary clinical nursing leadership competency model: a qualitative study from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Supamanee, Treeyaphan; Krairiksh, Marisa; Singhakhumfu, Laddawan; Turale, Sue

    2011-12-01

    This qualitative study explored the clinical nursing leadership competency perspectives of Thai nurses working in a university hospital. To collect data, in-depth interviews were undertaken with 23 nurse administrators, and focus groups were used with 31 registered nurses. Data were analyzed using content analysis, and theory development was guided by the Iceberg model. Nurses' clinical leadership competencies emerged, comprising hidden characteristics and surface characteristics. The hidden characteristics composed three elements: motive (respect from the nursing and healthcare team and being secure in life), self-concept (representing positive attitudes and values), and traits (personal qualities necessary for leadership). The surface characteristics comprised specific knowledge of nurse leaders about clinical leadership, management and nursing informatics, and clinical skills, such as coordination, effective communication, problem solving, and clinical decision-making. The study findings help nursing to gain greater knowledge of the essence of clinical nursing leadership competencies, a matter critical for theory development in leadership. This study's results later led to the instigation of a training program for registered nurse leaders at the study site, and the formation of a preliminary clinical nursing leadership competency model.

  18. Nursing preceptors' experiences of two clinical education models.

    PubMed

    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena; Hellström-Hyson, Eva; Persson, Elisabeth; Mårtensson, Gunilla

    2014-08-01

    Preceptors play an important role in the process of developing students' knowledge and skills. There is an ongoing search for the best learning and teaching models in clinical education. Little is known about preceptors' perspectives on different models. The aim of the study was to describe nursing preceptors' experiences of two clinical models of clinical education: peer learning and traditional supervision. A descriptive design and qualitative approach was used. Eighteen preceptors from surgical and medical departments at two hospitals were interviewed, ten representing peer learning (student work in pairs) and eight traditional supervision (one student follows a nurse during a shift). The findings showed that preceptors using peer learning created room for students to assume responsibility for their own learning, challenged students' knowledge by refraining from stepping in and encouraged critical thinking. Using traditional supervision, the preceptors' individual ambitions influenced the preceptorship and their own knowledge was empathized as being important to impart. They demonstrated, observed and gradually relinquished responsibility to the students. The choice of clinical education model is important. Peer learning seemed to create learning environments that integrate clinical and academic skills. Investigation of pedagogical models in clinical education should be of major concern to managers and preceptors. PMID:24512652

  19. Clinical mentoring of nurse practitioners: the doctors' experience.

    PubMed

    Barton, Thomas David

    The clinical development of nurse practitioners (NPs) has historically been dependent on mentorship from medical practitioners, yet their experience of this mentorship is generally unexplored. NPs have an ambiguous relationship with medicine as they have been dependent on medical mentorship to develop clinical skills, and they substitute into roles traditionally associated with medical practice. Consequently, NPs challenge professional boundaries and present particular concerns to their medical mentors. Practitioner ethnography examined the experiences of medical mentors, nurse practitioner students and academic staff during a clinical degree programme. This paper reports specifically on the medical mentors, focusing primarily on their professional authority relationship with their students and on their experience of imparting and sharing clinical knowledge. These experiences fell into three perspective stages, the provisional perspective, transitional perspective, and final perspective. Medical mentors were instrumental to the advanced clinical role of the student NP. This resulted in a conflicting experience of promoting a clinical role that challenged traditional medical authority. The effect of this was a cautious re-negotiation of professional boundaries. In future NP students (and their academic teachers) need to acknowledge this if they are to mutually gain the most from their relationship with their medical mentors.

  20. Pediatric Specialists

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  1. Supporting student nurse professionalisation: the role of the clinical teacher.

    PubMed

    Brown, Janie; Stevens, John; Kermode, Stephen

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports aspects of the findings from the qualitative component of a mixed methods research study that investigated the role of the Clinical Teacher in student nurse professional socialisation. Graduates and Clinical Teachers were interviewed to identify the domains where the support of a Clinical Teacher was crucial in the students' development of a professional identity. Emergent themes were clustered into seven (7) domains as follows: Professional role concept; Acculturation; Acquisition of Knowledge; Acquisition of Skill; Acquisition of Professional Values; Assimilation into the Organisation; and a seventh domain encompassing the role model attributes of Clinical Teachers. The domains are presented alongside exemplars from the interviews, in order to illustrate the importance of the support of a Clinical Teacher.

  2. Understanding Suicidal Behaviour in Young People Referred to Specialist CAMHS: A Qualitative Psychoanalytic Clinical Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jan; Hurst, Margaret; Marques, Ana; Millar, David; Moya, Sue; Pover, Lesley; Stewart, Sue

    2012-01-01

    A qualitative psychoanalytic clinical research project using a post-Kleinian contemporary approach was undertaken by a team of seven qualified and experienced child psychotherapists working in community Tier 3 Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). A number of referred young people who deliberately harmed themselves or attempted…

  3. Using clinical nurses as preceptors to teach leadership and management to senior nursing students: a qualitative descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Lillibridge, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    The preceptor model of clinical education uses nurses to fulfill the role of 'teacher' in a one-on-one relationship with students. The current nursing shortage, however, places increased demands on nurses and threatens their continuation in this role. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to gain a better understanding of the nurse preceptor's experience. Five themes evolved during data analysis: (1) making it worthwhile for the nurse, (2) making a difference, (3) engaging in the process, (4) "I love being a preceptor, but..., and (5) accepting the role, taking responsibility. Making it worthwhile for the nurse included how nurses saw personal and professional rewards and benefits in precepting. Making a difference described how nurses felt they made a difference in student learning. Engaging in the process described how nurses created learning opportunities for students by being a good role model and protecting students from negative experiences. "I love being a preceptor, but..." identified aspects of the precepting role that were difficult. Accepting the role, taking responsibility identified the different people involved in the complex precepting experience; the preceptor, nursing faculty, students, and the nurse manager that all had to work together if students were to have a good experience. Findings can be used to develop better support for preceptors as well as more structured and consistent orientation to the role. PMID:17689423

  4. Clinical outcomes for patients with liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer: Arguing the case for specialist hepatobiliary multidisciplinary assessment.

    PubMed

    Thillai, K; Repana, D; Korantzis, I; Kane, P; Prachalias, A; Ross, P

    2016-09-01

    In patients with liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer, hepatic resection can offer a significant survival benefit over systemic therapy alone. Specialist hepatobiliary multidisciplinary meetings are currently believed to provide the best forum to discuss the management for these patients. A retrospective analysis was undertaken of patients diagnosed with liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer over 6 months within a cancer network in the United Kingdom. In addition, patients who were diagnosed but not referred to the hepatobiliary meeting were discussed within a virtual multi-disciplinary setting. Contributors were blinded and proposed management recorded. 159 newly diagnosed patients with liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer were identified. 68 (43%) were referred at initial diagnosis and 38 (24%) referred following systemic treatment. 35 (51%) who were discussed at baseline underwent a subsequent hepatectomy or radiofrequency ablation, as did 18 (47%) patients referred after chemotherapy. Of the remaining 53 (33%) patients not referred, imaging was available for 31 (58%). Decisions regarding potential liver-directed therapy were discussed within a multi-disciplinary setting. 13 (42%) were identified as resectable or potentially resectable and 11 (36%) may have been suitable for a clinical trial. In reality, none of these 31 patients (100%) underwent surgery or ablation. Whilst the majority of patients with liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer were referred appropriately, this study demonstrates that a significant number with potentially resectable disease are not being discussed at specialist meetings. A review of all diagnosed cases would ensure that an increased number of patients are offered hepatic resection or ablation. PMID:27174600

  5. Foot care and footwear practices among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Gayle, Krystal A T; Tulloch Reid, Marshall K; Younger, Novie O; Francis, Damian K; McFarlane, Shelly R; Wright-Pascoe, Rosemarie A; Boyne, Michael S; Wilks, Rainford J; Ferguson, Trevor S

    2012-10-12

    This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic who engage in recommended foot care and footwear practices. Seventy-two participants from the UHWI Diabetes Clinic completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants were a subset of a sex-stratified random sample of clinic attendees and were interviewed in 2010. Data analysis included frequency estimates of the various foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants had a mean age of 57.0±14.3 years and mean duration of diabetes of 17.0±10.3 years. Fifty-three percent of participants reported being taught how to care for their feet, while daily foot inspection was performed by approximately 60% of participants. Most participants (90%) reported daily use of moisturizing lotion on the feet but almost 50% used lotion between the toes. Approximately 85% of participants reported wearing shoes or slippers both indoors and outdoors but over 40% reported walking barefoot at some time. Thirteen percent wore special shoes for diabetes while over 80% wore shoes without socks at some time. Although much larger proportions reported wearing broad round toe shoes (82%) or leather shoes (64%), fairly high proportions reported wearing pointed toe shoes (39%), and 43% of women wore high heel shoes. In conclusion, approximately 60% of patients at the UHWI diabetic clinic engage in daily foot inspection and other recommended practices, but fairly high proportions reported foot care or footwear choices that should be avoided.

  6. Specialist adult ADHD clinics in East Anglia: service evaluation and audit of NICE guideline compliance†

    PubMed Central

    Magon, Rakesh Kumar; Latheesh, Beena; Müller, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Aims and method To measure compliance with National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommendations in two adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) clinics and to guide further service development. We audited the case notes of 150 patients referred to adult ADHD clinics in East Anglia in 2010-2011 against NICE standards using an adapted version of the ADHD audit support tool. Results We found good compliance with NICE standards for diagnosis, assessment and pharmacological treatment of adult ADHD. There was a failure in smooth transitional arrangements from child and adolescent mental health to adult ADHD services. Comprehensive treatment programmes addressing psychological, behavioural, educational and occupational needs were not well developed. Deficiencies were observed in conducting recommended physical examinations. Substance use was prevalent in almost half of ADHD patients. Clinical implications Greater attention is needed in delivering better transitional arrangements and comprehensive treatment programmes for adult ADHD. More structured training with emphasis on ADHD-specific psychological interventions, physical examination and treatment of complex cases, especially with comorbid substance misuse, should be offered to clinicians. PMID:26191453

  7. Preparing Dedicated Education Unit Staff Nurses for the Role of Clinical Teacher.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Susan A; Bonham, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Dedicated Education Units optimize the expertise of staff nurses to provide clinical instruction to nursing students, thereby creating a need to prepare staff nurses for the teaching role and educate them about clinical teaching strategies. A curriculum to educate Dedicated Education Unit staff nurses in the art of clinical instruction was created to fill this gap in staff development. This article describes the development of an innovative, interactive, evidence-based curriculum to prepare Dedication Education Unit staff nurses and strengthen an academic-practice partnership.

  8. Preparing Dedicated Education Unit Staff Nurses for the Role of Clinical Teacher.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Susan A; Bonham, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Dedicated Education Units optimize the expertise of staff nurses to provide clinical instruction to nursing students, thereby creating a need to prepare staff nurses for the teaching role and educate them about clinical teaching strategies. A curriculum to educate Dedicated Education Unit staff nurses in the art of clinical instruction was created to fill this gap in staff development. This article describes the development of an innovative, interactive, evidence-based curriculum to prepare Dedication Education Unit staff nurses and strengthen an academic-practice partnership. PMID:27434320

  9. Electronic Nursing Documentation: Patient Care Continuity Using the Clinical Care Classification System (CCC).

    PubMed

    Whittenburg, Luann; Meetim, Aunchisa

    2016-01-01

    An innovative nursing documentation project conducted at Bumrungrad International Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand demonstrated patient care continuity between nursing patient assessments and nursing Plans of Care using the Clinical Care Classification System (CCC). The project developed a new generation of interactive nursing Plans of Care using the six steps of the American Nurses Association (ANA) Nursing process and the MEDCIN® clinical knowledgebase to present CCC coded concepts as a natural by-product of a nurse's documentation process. The MEDCIN® clinical knowledgebase is a standardized point-of-care terminology intended for use in electronic health record systems. The CCC is an ANA recognized nursing terminology. PMID:27332153

  10. The importance of communication for clinical leaders in mental health nursing: the perspective of nurses working in mental health.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Gary; Happell, Brenda; Broadbent, Marc; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2013-11-01

    Communication has been identified as an important attribute of clinical leadership in nursing. However, there is a paucity of research on its relevance in mental health nursing. This article presents the findings of a grounded theory informed study exploring the attributes and characteristics required for effective clinical leadership in mental health nursing, specifically the views of nurses working in mental health about the importance of effective communication in day to day clinical leadership. In-depth interviews were conducted to gain insight into the participants' experiences and views on clinical leadership in mental health nursing. The data that emerged from these interviews were constantly compared and reviewed, ensuring that any themes that emerged were based on the participants' own experiences and views. Participants recognized that effective communication was one of the attributes of effective clinical leadership and they considered communication as essential for successful working relationships and improved learning experiences for junior staff and students in mental health nursing. Four main themes emerged: choice of language; relationships; nonverbal communication, and listening and relevance. Participants identified that clinical leadership in mental health nursing requires effective communication skills, which enables the development of effective working relationships with others that allows them to contribute to the retention of staff, improved outcomes for clients, and the development of the profession.

  11. The importance of communication for clinical leaders in mental health nursing: the perspective of nurses working in mental health.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Gary; Happell, Brenda; Broadbent, Marc; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2013-11-01

    Communication has been identified as an important attribute of clinical leadership in nursing. However, there is a paucity of research on its relevance in mental health nursing. This article presents the findings of a grounded theory informed study exploring the attributes and characteristics required for effective clinical leadership in mental health nursing, specifically the views of nurses working in mental health about the importance of effective communication in day to day clinical leadership. In-depth interviews were conducted to gain insight into the participants' experiences and views on clinical leadership in mental health nursing. The data that emerged from these interviews were constantly compared and reviewed, ensuring that any themes that emerged were based on the participants' own experiences and views. Participants recognized that effective communication was one of the attributes of effective clinical leadership and they considered communication as essential for successful working relationships and improved learning experiences for junior staff and students in mental health nursing. Four main themes emerged: choice of language; relationships; nonverbal communication, and listening and relevance. Participants identified that clinical leadership in mental health nursing requires effective communication skills, which enables the development of effective working relationships with others that allows them to contribute to the retention of staff, improved outcomes for clients, and the development of the profession. PMID:24131413

  12. Clinical imprinting: the impact of early clinical learning on career long professional development in nursing.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Nicola

    2013-05-01

    The literature recognises a relationship between clinical experience and a successful undergraduate experience in nursing; however what constitutes an effective approach remains the subject of debate, particularly in relation to first year of learning. There is evidence from a biological standpoint that early experience impacts on the behavioural development of animals, described by Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989) as 'imprinting'. The concept of imprinting has resonance for nursing. In this article the importance of 'getting it right at the beginning' is explored and what, if anything, Lorenz's theory tells us about the impact of early clinical learning on subsequent professional development.

  13. Nurses' perceptions of administrative social support.

    PubMed

    Ihlenfeld, J T

    1996-01-01

    A meta-analysis of 125 nurses in three types of nursing roles investigated whether these nurses received social support from their administrators, the types of social support received, and whether more or less social support from these managers was desired. The Arizona Social Support Interview Schedule (ASSIS) was used to assess these questions. Results showed that home health nurses received social participation and physical assistance, whereas staff nurses received positive feedback and physical assistance. Nursing faculty received little support from their managers. Social exchange theory predicts that intangibles such as social support should exist in equitable relationships. It is possible that the difference in the nurses' and administrators' statuses and power levels affected staff nurses' results. Mental health clinical nurse specialists can use these results to help nurses understand their work relationships.

  14. Nurses' perceptions of administrative social support.

    PubMed

    Ihlenfeld, J T

    1996-01-01

    A meta-analysis of 125 nurses in three types of nursing roles investigated whether these nurses received social support from their administrators, the types of social support received, and whether more or less social support from these managers was desired. The Arizona Social Support Interview Schedule (ASSIS) was used to assess these questions. Results showed that home health nurses received social participation and physical assistance, whereas staff nurses received positive feedback and physical assistance. Nursing faculty received little support from their managers. Social exchange theory predicts that intangibles such as social support should exist in equitable relationships. It is possible that the difference in the nurses' and administrators' statuses and power levels affected staff nurses' results. Mental health clinical nurse specialists can use these results to help nurses understand their work relationships. PMID:8920344

  15. Opening our hearts and minds: the meaning of international clinical nursing electives in the personal and professional lives of nurses.

    PubMed

    Callister, Lynn Clark; Cox, Amy Harmer

    2006-06-01

    Although international opportunities are the hallmark of nursing education at a large private university, the meaning of participating in such clinical nursing electives has not been described. The purpose of this phenomenological study of nurses was to examine the personal and professional meaning of participating in international clinical nursing electives during their undergraduate nursing studies. Audiotaped interviews were conducted with 20 former nursing students who had had this opportunity. "Opening our hearts and minds" was described by the study's participants, with the following themes: increasing understanding of other cultures and peoples, increasing understanding of global sociopolitical and health issues, increasing the commitment to make a difference, experiencing personal and professional growth, contributing to professional development in the host country, making interpersonal connexions, and developing cultural competence. This study makes an important contribution to the documentation of the meaning of participating in international nursing clinical experiences. Data are being used for long-term curricular planning in the development and refinement of future international clinical nursing electives and to provide outcomes data for professional accreditation. There are broader implications for the movement beyond individual cultural competence to increasing global consciousness and the improvement of global health care. PMID:16764561

  16. Facilitating undergraduate nurses clinical practicum: the lived experience of clinical facilitators.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Cathy; Walker, Jane; Bourgeois, Sharon

    2006-07-01

    Clinical practicum experience for undergraduate nurses remains undisputed as an essential component of any program. Exposure to the reality of professional practice and its integration of explicit, with tacit knowledge, is invaluable in producing skilled clinicians. Currently there are many issues that have arisen regarding clinical practice education for undergraduate nurses in Australia including; ongoing financial support and resourcing of clinical placements. Developing an understanding of these issues is central to the provision of quality clinical education. The aim of this study is to reveal dimensions of the lived experience of being a clinical facilitator, a popular model of nursing clinical education, to come to an understanding of how facilitation actually takes place in the clinical environment. The Hermeneutic phenomenological approach used in this study has brought to light five essential themes that elucidate the phenomena of facilitation. Those themes have been identified as; knowing your own limitations, employing the notion of stepping in or stepping back, developing alliances, acknowledging the reciprocity of the learning experience, and identifying appropriate clinical buddies. The recommendations from this study will have an impact on current issues and will inturn, influence the quality of clinical education for all stakeholders.

  17. Expert nurses' clinical reasoning under uncertainty: representation, structure, and process.

    PubMed Central

    Fonteyn, M. E.; Grobe, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    How do expert nurses reason when planning care and making clinical decisions for a patient who is at risk, and whose outcome is uncertain? In this study, a case study involving a critically ill elderly woman whose condition deteriorated over time, was presented in segments to ten expert critical care nurses. Think aloud method was used to elicit knowledge from these experts to provide conceptual information about their knowledge and to reveal their reasoning processes and problem-solving strategies. The verbatim transcripts were then analyzed using a systematic three-step method that makes analysis easier and adds creditability to study findings by providing a means of retracing and explaining analysis results. Findings revealed information about how patient problems were represented during reasoning, the manner in which experts subjects structured their plan of care, and the reasoning processes and heuristics they used to formulate solutions for resolving the patient's problems and preventing deterioration in the patient's condition. PMID:1482907

  18. Qualitative investigation of patients’ experience of a glaucoma virtual clinic in a specialist ophthalmic hospital in London, UK

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Aachal; Bonstein, Karen; Cable, Richard; Cammack, Jocelyn; Clipston, Jane; Foster, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore how patients felt about delivery of care in a novel technician-delivered virtual clinic compared with delivery of care in a doctor-delivered model. Design A qualitative investigation using one-to-one interviews before and after patients’ appointments at either the standard outpatient glaucoma clinic or the new technician-delivered virtual glaucoma clinic (Glaucoma Screening and Stable Monitoring Service, GSMS). Setting A glaucoma clinic based in a tertiary ophthalmic specialist hospital in London. Participants 43 patients (38 Caucasian, 5 African/Afro-Caribbean) were interviewed prior to their glaucoma appointment; 38 patients were interviewed between 4 and 6 weeks after their appointment. Consecutive patients were identified from patient reception lists and telephoned prior to their appointment inviting them to participate. Results Trust in the patient–provider relationship emerged as a key theme in patients’ acceptance of not being seen in a traditional doctor-delivered service. Patients who were well informed regarding their glaucoma status and low risk of progression to sight loss were more accepting of the GSMS. Patients valued the reassurance received through effective communication with their healthcare practitioner at the time of their appointment. Conclusions This study suggests that patients are accepting of moving to a model of service delivery whereby the doctor is removed from the consultation as long as they are informed about the status of their condition and reassured by the interaction with staff they meet. This study highlights the importance of patient engagement when introducing new models of service delivery. PMID:26671959

  19. High School Students' Self-Reported Use of School Clinics and Nurses.

    PubMed

    Harper, Christopher R; Liddon, Nicole; Dunville, Richard; Habel, Melissa A

    2016-10-01

    Access to school health clinics and nurses has been linked with improved student achievement and health. Unfortunately, no studies have examined how many students report using school clinics or nurses and for which services. This study addressed this gap with data from a nationally representative sample of 15- to 25-year-olds. Respondents who reported being in high school were provided a list of services and asked whether they had gone to a school nurse or clinic for any of the listed services. Nearly 90% reported having access to a school clinic or nurse. Among students with access, 65.6% reported using at least one service. Non-White students and younger students were more likely to report having access to a clinic or nurse. These results show many students have access to clinics or nurses and are using these services, although not uniformly for all services. PMID:27302959

  20. Primary care clinical placements: The views of Australian registered nurse mentors and pre-registration nursing students (part 2).

    PubMed

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Hardy, Jennifer; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    An increased burden of chronic and complex conditions treated in the community and an aging population have exacerbated the primary care workload. Predicted nursing shortages will place further stressors on this workforce. High quality clinical placements may provide a strategic pathway to introduce and recruit new nurses to this speciality. This paper is Part 2 of a two part series reporting the findings of a mixed methods project. Part 1 reported on the qualitative study and Part 2 reports on the quantitative study. Forty-five pre-registration nursing students from a single Australian tertiary institution and 22 primary care Registered Nurse (RN) mentors who supervised student learning completed an online survey. Students largely regarded their primary care placement positively and felt this to be an appropriate learning opportunity. Most RNs were satisfied with mentoring pre-registration nursing students in their setting. Furthermore, the RNs desire to mentor students and the support of general practitioners (GPs) and consumers were seen as key enablers of pre-registration nursing placements. Findings from this study provide a preliminary impression of primary care clinical placements from the perspective of pre-registration nursing students and registered nurse mentors. Further research should examine whether a broader scope of non-traditional health settings such as non-government organisations, charities, pharmacies, welfare and social services can also provide appropriate learning environments for pre-registration nursing students. PMID:25960063

  1. Maximizing Opportunities in Your Career: Lessons From a Magnet® Nurse of the Year.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Cathy C

    2016-01-01

    This month's Magnet® Perspectives column is authored by one of the winners of the 2015 Magnet Nurse of the Year award. Cathy Cartwright, a pediatric clinical nurse specialist in neurosurgery, reflects on lessons learned during her nursing career by taking advantage of opportunities and persevering to maximize her impact on patient care. PMID:27442897

  2. What's It Like to Work with a Clinical Psychologist of a Specialist Learning Disabilities Service? Views from People with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Clive; Evers, Catherine; Walden, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Clinical psychologists are well placed to work with people with learning disabilities given the high prevalence of psychiatric disorders in this population and the specialist training undertaken by psychologists. The evidence for psychological interventions in learning disabilities is scarce compared to the evidence for mainstream psychological…

  3. Role of clinical nursing path combined with traditional Chinese dialectical nursing in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunyan; Sun, Chunxia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of clinical nursing path in combination with Chinese dialectical nursing on patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Randomized controlled trial of 60 patients with knee osteoarthritis in our hospital between 2012 and 2013 was enrolled. The control group received only routine care by using traditional model, while the experimental group was subjected to routine care with additional Chinese dialectical nursing. Results: No significant difference in WOMAC scores in the two groups after admission (P>0.05). The WOMAC scores were significantly improved in the experimental group 3 weeks after admission (P<0.05). The mastery of disease and self health care knowledge, compliance with the doctor, nursing satisfaction index and the standard rate of health education in intervention group are obviously better than the control group, the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Following-up study indicates that the WOMAC scores and readmission rate was significantly decreased in the intervention group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Combination of clinical nursing path with Chinese dialectical nursing can significantly improve the clinical presentation, self-care consciousness and the clinical nursing satisfaction, and it is worthy of clinical application. PMID:26131221

  4. Application of a Judgment Model toward Measurement of Clinical Judgment in Senior Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pongmarutai, Tiwaporn

    2010-01-01

    Clinical judgment, defined as "the application of the nurse's knowledge and experience in making decisions about client care" (The National Council of State Boards of Nursing, 2005, p. 2), has been recognized as a vital and essential skill for healthcare providers when caring for clients. Undisputedly, nurses represent the largest component of the…

  5. Telehealth nurse practitioner student clinical experiences: an essential educational component for today's health care setting.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Shelley Yerger

    2012-11-01

    In order to meet the continuous changes and innovations within the health care system, nurse practitioner faculty must look to the future and prepare nurse practitioner graduates who deliver safe, quality patient care addressing the realities of a global society with a fast-paced expansion of technologies. Preparing nurse practitioner students for practice must include more than information technology knowledge in graduate nursing programs. Formal clinical experiences using various telehealth applications must be integrated into nurse practitioner training. Innovative strategies must be explored by nurse practitioner faculty to assure that graduates can meet the demanding technological demands of our current health care society.

  6. [Research competencies in nursing specialties].

    PubMed

    Oltra-Rodríguez, Enrique; Rich-Ruiz, Manuel; Orts-Cortés, María Isabel; Sánchez-López, Dolores; González-Carrión, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Since nursing became an university degree in 1977, there have been several regulations to develop specialties, all of them agreeing on the need to include skills in research. Indeed, the relevance of acquiring these skills in all current disciplines has led to Royal Decree 99/2011, which regulates the official PhD courses, and recognises specialist nurses as qualified to access PhD studies. Nowadays, students from six of the seven specialties included in the Royal Decree 450/2005 on nursing specialties, are performing their training. The acquisition of research skills is seen as an opportunity and a challenge. However, the organizational structure of training facilities (multiprofessional teaching units) and the incorporation of nurses as clinical tutors, who initiated this teaching activity, deserve special attention to ensure the correct acquisition of research skills in the training of specialist nurses.

  7. [Research competencies in nursing specialties].

    PubMed

    Oltra-Rodríguez, Enrique; Rich-Ruiz, Manuel; Orts-Cortés, María Isabel; Sánchez-López, Dolores; González-Carrión, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Since nursing became an university degree in 1977, there have been several regulations to develop specialties, all of them agreeing on the need to include skills in research. Indeed, the relevance of acquiring these skills in all current disciplines has led to Royal Decree 99/2011, which regulates the official PhD courses, and recognises specialist nurses as qualified to access PhD studies. Nowadays, students from six of the seven specialties included in the Royal Decree 450/2005 on nursing specialties, are performing their training. The acquisition of research skills is seen as an opportunity and a challenge. However, the organizational structure of training facilities (multiprofessional teaching units) and the incorporation of nurses as clinical tutors, who initiated this teaching activity, deserve special attention to ensure the correct acquisition of research skills in the training of specialist nurses. PMID:24011526

  8. Clinical Evaluation of Baccalaureate Nursing Students Using SBAR Format: Faculty versus Self Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saied, Hala; James, Joemol; Singh, Evangelin Jeya; Al Humaied, Lulawah

    2016-01-01

    Clinical training is of paramount importance in nursing education and clinical evaluation is one of the most challenging responsibilities of nursing faculty. The use of objective tools and criteria and involvement of the students in the evaluation process are some techniques to facilitate quality learning in the clinical setting. Aim: The aim of…

  9. Evaluation and Treatment of Low Back Pain: A Clinically Focused Review for Primary Care Specialists.

    PubMed

    Hooten, W Michael; Cohen, Steven P

    2015-12-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. In the absence of a classification system for pain syndromes, classification of LBP on the basis of the distribution of pain as axial (pain generally localized to the low back) or radicular neuropathic (pain radiating to the lower extremities) is relevant to clinical practice because the distribution of pain is often a corollary of frequently occurring disease processes involving the lumbar spine. Common sources of axial LBP include the intervertebral disc, facet joint, sacroiliac joint, and paraspinal musculature, whereas common sources of radicular pain include a herniated intervertebral disc and spinal stenosis. The accuracy of historical and physical examination findings has been established for sacroiliac joint pain, radiculopathy, and lumbar spinal stenosis. However, the accuracy of similar data, so-called red flags, for identifying the underlying medical sources of LBP has been overstated. Diagnostic imaging studies can be useful, and adherence to established guidelines can protect against overuse. Multiple pharmacological trials exist for the management of LBP; however, the long-term outcomes of commonly used drugs are mixed. For carefully selected patients with axial LBP, radiofrequency denervation techniques can provide sustained pain relief. In patients with radicular pain, transforaminal epidural steroid injections may provide short-term pain relief, but neurostimulation may confer more enduring benefits of refractory symptoms. Pain-related indications for commonly performed operations include spinal decompression for radicular symptoms as well as spinal fusion or disc prosthesis for discogenic LBP. Physical modalities and psychological treatments can improve pain and functioning, but patient preferences may influence treatment adherence. PMID:26653300

  10. The effect of nursing staff on student learning in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Webster, Alanna; Bowron, Caitlin; Matthew-Maich, Nancy; Patterson, Priscilla

    2016-06-01

    Aim To explore baccalaureate nursing students' perspectives of the influence of nursing staff on their learning and experience in the clinical setting. Method A qualitative description approach was used. Thirty nursing students were interviewed individually or in focus groups. Data were analysed using content analysis. Four researchers analysed the data separately and agreed on the themes. Findings Nursing staff had positive (enabling) and negative (hindering) effects on students' clinical learning and socialisation to nursing. Nursing staff may encourage and excite students when they behave as positive mentors, facilitators and motivators. However, their actions may also have a negative effect on students, decreasing their confidence, learning and desire to continue in the profession. Conclusion Nursing staff influence student learning. Their actions, attitude and willingness to teach are influential factors. The findings have implications for patient safety, nurse retention and recruitment, and preparing students for professional practice. PMID:27275914

  11. The effect of nursing staff on student learning in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Webster, Alanna; Bowron, Caitlin; Matthew-Maich, Nancy; Patterson, Priscilla

    2016-06-01

    Aim To explore baccalaureate nursing students' perspectives of the influence of nursing staff on their learning and experience in the clinical setting. Method A qualitative description approach was used. Thirty nursing students were interviewed individually or in focus groups. Data were analysed using content analysis. Four researchers analysed the data separately and agreed on the themes. Findings Nursing staff had positive (enabling) and negative (hindering) effects on students' clinical learning and socialisation to nursing. Nursing staff may encourage and excite students when they behave as positive mentors, facilitators and motivators. However, their actions may also have a negative effect on students, decreasing their confidence, learning and desire to continue in the profession. Conclusion Nursing staff influence student learning. Their actions, attitude and willingness to teach are influential factors. The findings have implications for patient safety, nurse retention and recruitment, and preparing students for professional practice.

  12. Advanced nursing roles: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jokiniemi, Krista; Pietilä, Anna-Maija; Kylmä, Jari; Haatainen, Kaisa

    2012-09-01

    In this systematic literature review, we analyzed and synthesized the literature on one specialized advance practice nursing role in three countries for the purpose of describing and comparing these roles, as well as discussing whether an international consensus of the advance practice nursing definition is possible. A systematic search on CINAHL and PubMed Medline was conducted in 2011 to search the literature on the nurse consultant in the UK, the clinical nurse specialist in the USA, and the clinical nurse consultant in Australia. The studies (n = 42) were analyzed and combined using qualitative content analysis method. The roles of the nurse consultant, clinical nurse specialist, and clinical nurse consultant were similar. The variation in the roles appears to derive from organizational or individual choices, not the country in question. The study process comprised a synthesized representation of one specialized advance practice nursing role. More work is needed to further define the concept of the advance practice nursing, as well as its implementation on other cultures beyond this review. Based on this review, an international consensus regarding the definition of advance practice nursing and its subroles is possible. PMID:22950621

  13. Enhancing quantity and quality of clinical experiences in a baccalaureate nursing program.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Kathleen; Levin, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Nursing programs encounter barriers to clinical education, which may include limited clinical capacity for nursing students. Congestion of clinical placements compounded by multiple external influences prompted a need to develop an alternative approach for meeting program standards pertaining to clinical education. A curriculum improvement project was implemented within a school of nursing with the primary goal of expanding clinical learning opportunities while maintaining program quality. The unique aspect of this project was a comprehensive evaluative design, including qualitative responses from students, faculty, and clinical site stakeholders, as well as standardized student test scores. Augmenting the tools and processes for evaluation of clinical learning required collaboration from the faculty. Project outcomes include expanded clinical capacity, increased variety of clinical learning experiences, and improved quality of the clinical experiences. Collaborative partnerships yielded valuable lessons, which have implications for other nursing programs challenged with clinical placements. PMID:25205733

  14. [Clinical decision making and critical thinking in the nursing diagnostic process].

    PubMed

    Müller-Staub, Maria

    2006-10-01

    The daily routine requires complex thinking processes of nurses, but clinical decision making and critical thinking are underestimated in nursing. A great demand for educational measures in clinical judgement related with the diagnostic process was found in nurses. The German literature hardly describes nursing diagnoses as clinical judgements about human reactions on health problems / life processes. Critical thinking is described as an intellectual, disciplined process of active conceptualisation, application and synthesis of information. It is gained through observation, experience, reflection and communication and leads thinking and action. Critical thinking influences the aspects of clinical decision making a) diagnostic judgement, b) therapeutic reasoning and c) ethical decision making. Human reactions are complex processes and in their course, human behavior is interpreted in the focus of health. Therefore, more attention should be given to the nursing diagnostic process. This article presents the theoretical framework of the paper "Clinical decision making: Fostering critical thinking in the nursing diagnostic process through case studies".

  15. Developing a manual for strengthening mental health nurses' clinical supervision.

    PubMed

    Buus, Niels; Cassedy, Paul; Gonge, Henrik

    2013-05-01

    In this article, we report findings from a study aimed at developing the content and implementation of a manual for a research-based intervention on clinical supervision of mental health nursing staff. The intervention was designed to strengthen already existing supervision practices through educational preparation for supervision and systematic reflection on supervision. The intervention consists of three sessions and was implemented on two groups of mental health hospital staff. We present an outline of the manual and explain how the trial sessions made us adjust the preliminary manual. The effects of implementing the manual will subsequently be analysed in an independent randomised controlled trial.

  16. Psychological needs, service utilization and provision of care in a specialist mental health clinic for young refugees: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Michelson, Daniel; Sclare, Irene

    2009-04-01

    This study addressed psychological needs, patterns of service utilization and provision of care in a specialist mental health service for young refugees and asylum seekers in London. Comparisons were made between two groups with different levels of postulated mental health need: unaccompanied minors (UAMs; n = 49) and children accompanied to the UK by one or more primary caregivers (n = 29). Significant differences were observed in referral pathways, with UAMs more likely to be referred by social services and less likely to be referred from medical agencies. UAMs also attended fewer sessions during treatment, and missed a greater proportion of scheduled appointments. Contrary to prediction, group comparisons revealed similar levels of post-migration stress and overall psychological morbidity. However, UAMs experienced significantly more traumatic events prior to resettlement, and were more likely to exhibit symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than their accompanied peers. Despite their elevated risk of PTSD, UAMs were less likely than accompanied children to have received trauma-focused interventions. UAMs were also significantly less likely to have been treated using cognitive therapy, anxiety management and parent/carer training, as well as receiving fewer types of practical assistance with basic social needs. The clinical and service implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:19293323

  17. Telecommunications Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication contains 17 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of telecommunications specialist, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 17 units are as…

  18. Accounting Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication identifies 20 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of accounting specialist, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 20 units are as follows:…

  19. Clinical profile of people referred to mental health nurses under the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Tom; Robertson, Samantha

    2013-10-01

    The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) was established in Australia during 2007. The program enables mental health nurses to work in partnership with general practitioners (GPs) in the assessment and treatment of people with severe mental health problems. This paper provides insights into the demographic and clinical profile of 403 people enrolled in the MHNIP in the Ipswich area of Queensland. The clinical presentation (illness severity and symptoms) of those referred to the MHNIP is compared to that of: (i) people referred to a related program known as Access to Allied Psychological Services (ATAPS); and (ii) to clients admitted to acute inpatient care in Queensland. While people referred to the MHNIP presented with more severe problems than those referred to ATAPS, they had less severe problems than those admitted to acute inpatient care. The findings indicate that the MHNIP is meeting the needs of people with complex mental and physical health problems. Further evaluation work is required to determine if the findings from this study can be generalized more broadly. At the national level, consideration should be given to the routine collection of clinical, cost, and demographic data to enable the ongoing monitoring of the program.

  20. Are there long-term benefits of experiential, interprofessional education for non-specialists on clinical behaviours and outcomes in diabetes care? A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Daniel; Forte, Denise; Aitchison, Elizabeth; Earle, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to assess the impact of an educational initiative for non-specialist, healthcare professionals in the community on the process and quality measures of diabetes care delivered, and changes in their learning experiences and clinical management behaviour in the short and long term. Setting Single locality of 26 primary care practices associated with one secondary centre. Participants General practitioners and practice nurses managing 4167 patients with diabetes. Intervention A rolling 10-week, experiential, interprofessional education programme delivered to 57 practitioners and observations in practice. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcomes were changes in the proportion of patients receiving foot care, urine albumin:creatinine ratio assessments and achieving National Quality Outcome Framework targets for blood pressure (<145/80 mm Hg), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c; >86 mmol/mol (10%) and <57.4 mmol/mol (7.4%)) and total cholesterol (<5 mmol/L) thresholds. Secondary outcomes were evidence of sustained learning and changes in the number of patients referred to secondary care. Results Evaluation of care processes and quality outcomes took place 15 months after the programme was initiated. The proportion of patients with a HbA1c of <57.4 mmol/mol (7.4%) and >85 mmol/mol (10%) was significantly higher (44% vs 53% p=0.0001) and lower (12.5% vs 10%; p=0.002) respectively. There was an increase in the proportion (95% CI) of patients receiving foot care reviews (+26.0% (24.0% to 28.1%)), microalbuminuria screening (+29.8% (27.7% to 31.9%)) and who achieved targets for blood pressure (+9.6% (7.5% to 11.6%)) and total cholesterol (+14.4% (12.3% to 16.5%); p<0.001). 241 fewer patients were referred to secondary care. Increases in the healthcare professional's confidence and collaborative clinical behaviour were evident 3 years after completing the programme. Conclusions An experiential, interprofessional intervention can

  1. Integrating quality and safety education into clinical nursing education through a dedicated education unit.

    PubMed

    Masters, Kelli

    2016-03-01

    The Institute of Medicine and American Association of Colleges of Nursing are calling for curriculum redesign that prepares nursing students with the requisite knowledge and skills to provide safe, high quality care. The purpose of this project was to improve nursing students' knowledge of quality and safety by integrating Quality and Safety Education for Nurses into clinical nursing education through development of a dedicated education unit. This model, which pairs nursing students with front-line nursing staff for clinical experiences, was implemented on a medical floor in an acute care hospital. Prior to implementation, nurses and students were educated about the dedicated education unit and quality and safety competencies. During each clinical rotation, students collaborated with their nurses on projects related to these competencies. Students' knowledge was assessed using questions related to quality and safety. Students who participated in the dedicated education unit had higher scores than those with traditional clinical rotations. Focus groups were held mid-semester to assess nurses' perceptions of the experience. Five themes emerged from the qualitative data including thirsting for knowledge, building teamwork and collaboration, establishing trust and decreasing anxiety, mirroring organization and time management skills, and evolving confidence in the nursing role. PMID:26777871

  2. Integrating quality and safety education into clinical nursing education through a dedicated education unit.

    PubMed

    Masters, Kelli

    2016-03-01

    The Institute of Medicine and American Association of Colleges of Nursing are calling for curriculum redesign that prepares nursing students with the requisite knowledge and skills to provide safe, high quality care. The purpose of this project was to improve nursing students' knowledge of quality and safety by integrating Quality and Safety Education for Nurses into clinical nursing education through development of a dedicated education unit. This model, which pairs nursing students with front-line nursing staff for clinical experiences, was implemented on a medical floor in an acute care hospital. Prior to implementation, nurses and students were educated about the dedicated education unit and quality and safety competencies. During each clinical rotation, students collaborated with their nurses on projects related to these competencies. Students' knowledge was assessed using questions related to quality and safety. Students who participated in the dedicated education unit had higher scores than those with traditional clinical rotations. Focus groups were held mid-semester to assess nurses' perceptions of the experience. Five themes emerged from the qualitative data including thirsting for knowledge, building teamwork and collaboration, establishing trust and decreasing anxiety, mirroring organization and time management skills, and evolving confidence in the nursing role.

  3. A handbook for student nurses to guide clinical experiences in the school setting.

    PubMed

    English, D; Marcontel, M

    2001-08-01

    For more than 30 years, nursing students have had the opportunity to have clinical experiences related to their course requirements in the Dallas Public Schools. The Dallas Independent School District School Health Services Department staff provide an orientation to student nurses before their first day in the school clinic. To enhance their learning experience and clarify the regulations and expectations for student nurses, a handbook was prepared for the use of school nurses and the students. The Basic Health Care for the School-age Child: A Handbook for Student Nurses outlines the use of the school as a clinical experience setting. Another purpose for the handbook is to reduce the stress of this clinical rotation for the student nurse and for the staff nurse who serves as the student nurse's preceptor. This article describes the development of the expectations for the clinical experience and the information included in the handbook. An outline of the material included in each section is presented to provide ideas for school nurses who provide or are considering providing a rotation for student nurses in their schools.

  4. Acuity-based nurse assignment and patient scheduling in oncology clinics.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bohui; Turkcan, Ayten

    2016-09-01

    The oncology clinics use different nursing care delivery models to provide chemotherapy treatment to cancer patients. Functional and primary care delivery models are the most commonly used methods in the clinics. In functional care delivery model, patients are scheduled for a chemotherapy appointment without considering availabilities of individual nurses, and nurses are assigned to patients according to patient acuities, nursing skill, and patient mix on a given day after the appointment schedule is determined. Patients might be treated by different nurses on different days of their treatment. In primary care delivery model, each patient is assigned to a primary nurse, and the patients are scheduled to be seen by the same nurse every time they come to the clinic for treatment. However, these clinics might experience high variability in daily nurse workload due to treatment protocols that should be followed strictly. In that case, part-time nurses can be utilized to share the excess workload of the primary nurses. The aim of this study is to develop optimization methods to reduce the time spent for nurse assignment and patient scheduling in oncology clinics that use different nursing care delivery models. For the functional delivery model, a multiobjective optimization model with the objectives of minimizing patient waiting times and nurse overtime is proposed to solve the nurse assignment problem. For the primary care delivery model, another multiobjective optimization model with the objectives of minimizing total overtime and total excess workload is proposed to solve the patient scheduling problem. Spreadsheet-based optimization tools are developed for easy implementation. Computational results show that the proposed models provide multiple nondominated solutions, which can be used to determine the optimal staffing levels.

  5. [Possible contributions of acupuncture in the teaching of clinical simulation in nursing].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Mateus Casanova; Leite, Maria Cecília Lorea; Heck, Rita Maria

    2011-03-01

    This study situates the emerging discussion about the possibility of integration of knowledge from acupuncture as a contribution to the pedagogicalpractices of simulated clinical education of undergraduate nursing education. The reflective work emerged as an approach to the dissertation project "Study on the evaluation of trigger learning simulation - Morphofunctional Lab/College of Nursing/Universidade Federal de Pelotas". The integral relationship between man and nature developed in acupuncture emerges as a suggestion of discussions and a potential pedagogical toolfor the clinical simulation in nursing. In this reflection, results prove that there is a need to develop this educational resource aimed at expanding the teaching of clinical simulation in nursing.

  6. An investigation of nurse educator's perceptions and experiences of undertaking clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Williams, Angela; Taylor, Cathy

    2008-11-01

    Educational policy (DOH, 1999. Making a difference: strengthening the nursing, midwifery and health visiting contribution to health and healthcare. Department of Health, London; UKCC, 1999. Fitness for Practice. United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting, London; Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2006. Standards to support learning and assessment in practice. Nursing and Midwifery Council, London) and current nursing literature (Griscti, O., Jacono, B., Jacono, J., 2005. The nurse educator's clinical role. Journal of Advanced Nursing 50 (1), 84-92; Owen, S., Ferguson, K., Baguley, I., 2005. The clinical activity of mental health nurse lecturers. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing 12, 310-316), place increasing emphasis on nurse educators undertaking clinical practice to facilitate their clinical confidence and competence. This study investigated nurse educators' perceptions and experiences of undertaking clinical practice. A qualitative design and descriptive, exploratory approach were used. A purposive sample of 11 nurse educators in one nursing department, took part in two focus group interviews, one with 5 and the other with 6 respondents, to identify and discuss their perceptions and experiences of undertaking clinical practice. A process of thematic content analysis revealed three broad themes relating to the meaning and importance of clinical practice, perceived benefits and barriers which are examined and discussed. The paper concludes that despite policy recommendations, barriers highlighted in this study such as insufficient time, heavy workload and a lack of valuing of the clinical role have been raised over the past few decades. The effect of undertaking clinical practice, particularly on the quality of teaching is argued to be valuable armoury in the battle to secure sufficient resources to support engagement in clinical practice. Financial and organisational commitment; valuing of clinical practice and research

  7. Clinical research nursing: a critical resource in the national research enterprise.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Clare E; Fisher, Cheryl A; McCabe, Margaret A; Allison, J; Brassil, D; Offenhartz, M; Browning, S; DeCandia, E; Medina, R; Duer-Hefele, J; McClary, K; Mullen, N; Ottosen, M; Britt, S; Sanchez, T; Turbini, V

    2012-01-01

    Translational clinical research has emerged as an important priority for the national research enterprise, with a clearly stated mandate to more quickly deliver prevention strategies, treatments and cures based on scientific innovations to the public. Within this national effort, a lack of consensus persists concerning the need for clinical nurses with expertise and specialized training in study implementation and the delivery of care to research participants. This paper reviews efforts to define and document the role of practicing nurses in implementing studies and coordinating clinical research in a variety of clinical settings, and differentiates this clinical role from the role of nurses as scientists and principal investigators. We propose an agenda for building evidence that having nurses provide and coordinate study treatments and procedures can potentially improve research efficiency, participant safety, and the quality of research data. We also provide recommendations for the development of the emerging specialty of clinical research nursing. PMID:22172370

  8. The Nijmegen Decision Tool for Chronic Low Back Pain. Development of a Clinical Decision Tool for Secondary or Tertiary Spine Care Specialists

    PubMed Central

    van Hooff, Miranda L.; van Loon, Jan; van Limbeek, Jacques; de Kleuver, Marinus

    2014-01-01

    Background In Western Europe, low back pain has the greatest burden of all diseases. When back pain persists, different medical specialists are involved and a lack of consensus exists among these specialists for medical decision-making in Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP). Objective To develop a decision tool for secondary or tertiary spine care specialists to decide which patients with CLBP should be seen by a spine surgeon or by other non-surgical medical specialists. Methods A Delphi study was performed to identify indicators predicting the outcome of interventions. In the preparatory stage evidence from international guidelines and literature were summarized. Eligible studies were reviews and longitudinal studies. Inclusion criteria: surgical or non-surgical interventions and persistence of complaints, CLBP-patients aged 18–65 years, reported baseline measures of predictive indicators, and one or more reported outcomes had to assess functional status, quality of life, pain intensity, employment status or a composite score. Subsequently, a three-round Delphi procedure, to reach consensus on candidate indicators, was performed among a multidisciplinary panel of 29 CLBP-professionals (>five years CLBP-experience). The pre-set threshold for general agreement was ≥70%. The final indicator set was used to develop a clinical decision tool. Results A draft list with 53 candidate indicators (38 with conclusive evidence and 15 with inconclusive evidence) was included for the Delphi study. Consensus was reached to include 47 indicators. A first version of the decision tool was developed, consisting of a web-based screening questionnaire and a provisional decision algorithm. Conclusions This is the first clinical decision tool based on current scientific evidence and formal multidisciplinary consensus that helps referring the patient for consultation to a spine surgeon or a non-surgical spine care specialist. We expect that this tool considerably helps in clinical decision

  9. Clinical coaching in forensic psychiatry: an innovative program to recruit and retain nurses.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Gail; Moorhouse, Pamela; Antonello, Carolyn

    2009-05-01

    Ontario is currently experiencing a nursing shortage crisis. Recruitment and retention of nursing staff are critical issues. In response, retention strategies have been developed by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The Late Career Nurse Initiative is one such strategy. This innovative program encourages nurses age 55 and older to remain in the workforce by providing opportunities to use their nursing experience in less physically demanding alternate roles for a portion of their time. The Royal Ottawa Health Care Group has developed a clinical coach program in forensics that matches these veteran nurses with new graduates or nurses new to forensic psychiatric nursing. The program has resulted in retention rates of more than 91% after 1 year. This article provides background about the program and highlights its outcomes. PMID:19489514

  10. Assimilating to Hierarchical Culture: A Grounded Theory Study on Communication among Clinical Nurses.

    PubMed

    Kim, MinYoung; Oh, Seieun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate a substantive model that accounts for the explanatory social processes of communication in which nurses were engaged in clinical settings in Korea. Grounded theory methodology was used in this study. A total of 15 clinical nurses participated in the in-depth interviews. "Assimilating to the hierarchical culture" emerged as the basic social process of communication in which the participants engaged in their work environments. To adapt to the cultures of their assigned wards, the nurses learned to be silent and engaged in their assimilation into the established hierarchy. The process of assimilation consisted of three phases based on the major goals that nurses worked to achieve: getting to know about unspoken rules, persevering within the culture, and acting as senior nurse. Seven strategies and actions utilized to achieve the major tasks emerged as subcategories, including receiving strong disapproval, learning by observing, going silent, finding out what is acceptable, minimizing distress, taking advantages as senior nurse, and taking responsibilities as senior nurse. The findings identified how the pattern of communication in nursing organizations affected the way in which nurses were assimilated into organizational culture, from individual nurses' perspectives. In order to improve the rigid working atmosphere and culture in nursing organizations and increase members' satisfaction with work and quality of life, managers and staff nurses need training that focuses on effective communication and encouraging peer opinion-sharing within horizontal relationships. Moreover, organization-level support should be provided to create an environment that encourages free expression.

  11. Comparison of second-degree and traditional undergraduate nursing students' sense of belonging during clinical placements.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, Monique

    2013-11-01

    Second-degree undergraduate nursing programs are proliferating throughout Canada. Although these shorter programs are attracting students from a variety of disciplines and professions, a sense of belonging and the meaning or implications of belongingness have not been examined for this unique nursing student cohort. A survey design, using the Belongingness Scale-Clinical Placement Experience questionnaire, explores second-degree nursing students' sense of belonging, compared with that of 4-year undergraduate nursing students. Overall, second-degree nursing students experienced a sense of belonging during clinical placements to a lesser degree than their counterparts in a traditional nursing program. Providing second-degree students with opportunities to know and create partnerships with nurse educators and staff while on placements, as well as providing them with feedback presented in positive terms, will help these students flourish and engender a greater sense of belonging. PMID:24127179

  12. Optometry Specialist (AFSC 91255).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kille, Michael O.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for optometry specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are optometry clinic administration (optometry career and field training, ethical relationships and professionalism, eligibility for optometric care and appointment…

  13. An evaluation of the clinical performance of newly qualified nurses: a competency based assessment.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, S E; Pearce, J; Smith, R L; Voegeli, D; Walton, P

    2001-10-01

    The clinical performance of newly qualified staff nurses, or their 'fitness for purpose' has become a central professional and corporate issue and highlighted as a central causes for the reforms recommended by the Peach report (Peach 1999). However the ability to gauge the performance of newly qualified nurses remains a largely subjective exercise relying upon anecdotal evidence or general statements of newly qualified nurses' feelings of inadequacy on qualification. This article seeks to address this issue by reporting the findings of project that sought to compare the expectations of senior nurses regarding the level of competence of newly qualified nurses with that of the actual level of competency as assessed by the preceptors after 8 weeks in post. Using a specifically designed instrument to assess clinical competency a comparison has been made between 139 senior nurses' expectations of the competency of newly qualified nurses and the actual competence as assessed by preceptors of 36 newly qualified nurses after 8 weeks in post. The findings indicate that the senior nurses have clear subjective expectations of the competence level of newly qualified nurses. However these expectations are consistently lower than the actual level of competency demonstrated by the newly qualified nurses as assessed by their preceptors. This research demonstrates that through the use of a validated tool newly qualified nurses consistently perform at a higher level of competency than that expected by senior nurses. The ability to estimate competency levels by objective means should be developed. Further research is needed involving a larger sample of Trusts and Schools of Nursing to replicate the results of this study and to compare methods of the assessment of performance in terms of competency in practice on qualification. It is through developments based upon research such as this that a systematic evaluation of the contribution of Schools of Nursing to the competence of newly

  14. Nurse-led sexually transmitted disease clinics: staff perceptions concerning the quality of the service.

    PubMed

    Mindel, A; Fennema, J S A; Christie, E; van Leent, E

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate staff perception of a nurse-led sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinical service. The staff at the Amsterdam STI clinic were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. A series of eight questions was designed to determine the perceived advantages or disadvantages of nurse-led clinics, based on personal experience, using a Likert scale. After completion of the structured interview, the staff were offered the opportunity of providing comments. All 36 members of staff completed the survey. Twenty-seven (75%) agreed or strongly agreed that nurse-led clinics provided more time with patients. Sixty-four percent agreed or strongly agreed that such a service provided greater confidentiality and 94% agreed or strongly agreed that 'nurse-led clinics provided a high level of job satisfaction for nurses.' In contrast, only 64% agreed or strongly agreed that nurse-led clinics provided a high level of job satisfaction for doctors. When staff comments were evaluated, four common themes emerged. First, that this was an efficient way of providing services; second, that the clinic was a pleasant environment, there was excellent teamwork and greater job satisfaction; third, that a good deal of rivalry existed between doctors and nurses and finally, that there was a need for and importance of protocols, rules and staff training and development. In conclusion, there was a high level of staff satisfaction with the service. Nurse-led STI clinics may be a useful adjunct to existing STI facilities.

  15. Stimulating Healthy Aging with a Model Nurse-Managed Free Clinic in a Senior Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Ruth H.

    As part of a Geriatric Education and Health Management program, a model nurse-managed free clinic has been established at an urban senior center by faculty and students of the University of New Mexico College of Nursing. Funded by a 3-year grant from the Department of Health and Human Services, the weekly clinic is based on Orem's self-care theory…

  16. Authenticity in Learning--Nursing Students' Experiences at a Clinical Education Ward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students' experiences of learning at a clinical education ward. Design/methodology/approach: The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students' encounters with patients,…

  17. Iranian Effective Clinical Nurse Instructor evaluation tool: Development and psychometric testing

    PubMed Central

    Shahsavari, Hooman; Yekta, Zohreh Parsa; Zare, Zahra; Sigaroodi, Abdolhossain Emami

    2014-01-01

    Background: Clinical education is the heart of the nursing education program. Effective nursing clinical instructors are needed for graduating the future qualified nurses. There is a well-developed body of knowledge about the effectiveness of clinical teaching and the instructors. However, translating this knowledge into a context-based evaluation tool for measuring the effectiveness of Iranian clinical nursing instructors remains a deficiency. The purpose of this study is to describe the development and psychometric testing process of an instrument to evaluate the characteristics of Iranian effective clinical nurse instructor. Materials and Methods: Following a precise review of Iranian literatures and expert consultation, 83 statements about the characteristics that make clinical nurse instructors effective were extracted. In the next phase, the psychometric properties of the instrument were established by looking at the content validity, face validity, and internal consistency. Content validity of the instrument was assessed based on the comments of an expert panel including 10 nursing faculty members. During this phase, 30 items of the instrument were omitted or merged. Face validity of the instrument was assured based on the advices of 10 nursing students and 10 nursing faculty members. Finally, in the pilot test, the data of 168 filled questionnaires were gathered and analyzed by an exploratory factor analysis to reduce the items and identify the factor structure of the instrument. Results: Through subsequent analyses, of the 83 items, 31 items were merged or omitted. At last, 52 retained items were divided into four subscales including student-centric behaviors, clinical performances, planning ability, and personality traits. The Cronbach's alpha level of the inventory was 0.96, with the value for each domain ranging from 0.87 to 0.94. Conclusions: Iranian Effective Clinical Nurse Instructor evaluation tool has acceptable psychometric properties and can be

  18. Neurofibromatosis Specialists

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health The Minnesota Neurofibromatosis Clinic without Walls • Minneapolis, MN Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota Neurocutaneous Syndromes Clinic • Minneapolis, MN Mayo Clinic Department of Medical Genetics • Rochester, MN ...

  19. Learning Clinical Skills: An Interprofessional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeth, Della; Nicol, Maggie

    1998-01-01

    In a clinical skills center, nurses, doctors, and specialists helped nursing and medical students develop clinical and communication skills in the context of holistic patient care. Two aspects of the format received high ratings: realistic patient scenarios and interdisciplinary team teaching. (SK)

  20. Do calculation errors by nurses cause medication errors in clinical practice? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kerri

    2010-01-01

    This review aims to examine the literature available to ascertain whether medication errors in clinical practice are the result of nurses' miscalculating drug dosages. The research studies highlighting poor calculation skills of nurses and student nurses have been tested using written drug calculation tests in formal classroom settings [Kapborg, I., 1994. Calculation and administration of drug dosage by Swedish nurses, student nurses and physicians. International Journal for Quality in Health Care 6(4): 389 -395; Hutton, M., 1998. Nursing Mathematics: the importance of application Nursing Standard 13(11): 35-38; Weeks, K., Lynne, P., Torrance, C., 2000. Written drug dosage errors made by students: the threat to clinical effectiveness and the need for a new approach. Clinical Effectiveness in Nursing 4, 20-29]; Wright, K., 2004. Investigation to find strategies to improve student nurses' maths skills. British Journal Nursing 13(21) 1280-1287; Wright, K., 2005. An exploration into the most effective way to teach drug calculation skills to nursing students. Nurse Education Today 25, 430-436], but there have been no reviews of the literature on medication errors in practice that specifically look to see whether the medication errors are caused by nurses' poor calculation skills. The databases Medline, CINAHL, British Nursing Index (BNI), Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA) and Archives and Cochrane reviews were searched for research studies or systematic reviews which reported on the incidence or causes of drug errors in clinical practice. In total 33 articles met the criteria for this review. There were no studies that examined nurses' drug calculation errors in practice. As a result studies and systematic reviews that investigated the types and causes of drug errors were examined to establish whether miscalculations by nurses were the causes of errors. The review found insufficient evidence to suggest that medication errors are caused by nurses' poor

  1. A study of the informatics literacy of clinical nurses in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hsin-Ginn; Chen, Rai-Fu; Chang, Li-Hui; Hsiao, Ju-Ling

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the essential components for informatics literacy for clinical nurses working in Taiwanese hospitals. We developed a framework to explore the critical informatics literacy factors that clinical nurses should understand to be proficient in performing their professional duties. Survey methodology was used and the participants were senior administrators of nursing and other personnel in charge of implementing nursing information systems for 84 regional hospitals and medical centers. A total of 50 valid questionnaires was returned, with a 59.5% response rate. In summary, the results of the Taiwanese study are divided into three factors: informatics knowledge, informatics skills, and computer attitudes. A total of 58 questions was used for the measurement of initial nursing informatics literacy, and 49 items were considered to be the most required informatics literacy skills specifically for clinical nurses.

  2. Critical thinking in clinical nurse education: application of Paul's model of critical thinking.

    PubMed

    Andrea Sullivan, E

    2012-11-01

    Nurse educators recognize that many nursing students have difficulty in making decisions in clinical practice. The ability to make effective, informed decisions in clinical practice requires that nursing students know and apply the processes of critical thinking. Critical thinking is a skill that develops over time and requires the conscious application of this process. There are a number of models in the nursing literature to assist students in the critical thinking process; however, these models tend to focus solely on decision making in hospital settings and are often complex to actualize. In this paper, Paul's Model of Critical Thinking is examined for its application to nursing education. I will demonstrate how the model can be used by clinical nurse educators to assist students to develop critical thinking skills in all health care settings in a way that makes critical thinking skills accessible to students.

  3. SAFETY: an integrated clinical reasoning and reflection framework for undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Hicks Russell, Bedelia; Geist, Melissa J; House Maffett, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Nurse educators can no longer focus on imparting to students knowledge that is merely factual and content specific. Activities that provide students with opportunities to apply concepts in real-world scenarios can be powerful tools. Nurse educators should take advantage of student-patient interactions to model clinical reasoning and allow students to practice complex decision making throughout the entire curriculum. In response to this change in nursing education, faculty in a pediatric course designed a reflective clinical reasoning activity based on the SAFETY template, which is derived from the National Council of State Boards of Nursing RN practice analysis. Students were able to prioritize key components of nursing care, as well as integrate practice issues such as delegation, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act violations, and questioning the accuracy of orders. SAFETY is proposed as a framework for integration of content knowledge, clinical reasoning, and reflection on authentic professional nursing concerns.

  4. Mobile technology and its use in clinical nursing education: a literature review.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Andrews, Tom

    2015-03-01

    Nursing students face a variety of challenges to learning in clinical practice, from the theory-practice gap, to a lack of clinical supervision and the ad hoc nature of learning in clinical environments. Mobile technology is proposed as one way to address these challenges. This article comprehensively summarizes and critically reviews the available literature on mobile technology used in undergraduate clinical nursing education. It identifies the lack of clear definitions and theory in the current body of evidence; the variety of mobile devices and applications used; the benefits of mobile platforms in nursing education; and the complexity of sociotechnical factors, such as the cost, usability, portability, and quality of mobile tools, that affect their use in undergraduate clinical nursing education. Implications for nursing education and practice are outlined, and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  5. Master's-Level Nurse Practitioner Educational Programs: Findings from the 2000-2001 Collaborative Curriculum Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Linda E.; Harper, Doreen; Werner, Kathryn E.; Stennett, Janis

    Based on a survey of master's level nurse practitioner (NP) educational programs, this report presents data on: (1) types of programs and their characteristics; (2) programs by NP role preparation (single track, dual track, or combined NP/clinical nurse specialist); (3) course content areas included in core master's and clinical (didactic and/or…

  6. Relation between spiritual intelligence and clinical competency of nurses in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Karimi-Moonaghi, Hossein; Gazerani, Akram; Vaghee, Saeed; Gholami, Hassan; Salehmoghaddam, Amir Reza; Gharibnavaz, Raheleh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clinical competency is one of the most important requirements in nursing profession, based on which nurses are assessed. To obtain an effective and improved form of clinical competency, several factors are observed and monitored by the health educational systems. Among these observed factors, spiritual intelligence is considered as one of the most significant factors in nurses’ success and efficacy. In this study, it is aimed to determine the spiritual intelligence status and its relationship with clinical competency. Materials and Methods: The descriptive–correlational research was carried out on 250 nurses in Mashhad educational hospitals, selected by multi-stage sampling. Demographic, clinical competency, and spiritual intelligence questionnaires were used for data collection and 212 questionnaires were analyzed. Results: About 53.3% of nurses obtained above average scores in spiritual intelligence. Clinical competency was evaluated by both self-evaluation and head nurse evaluation methods. Most nurses (53.8%) were having good level of clinical competency based on self-evaluation, 48.2% were at average level based on head nurse evaluation, and 53.3% were at average level based on overall score. A significant correlation was found between spiritual intelligence and clinical competency. Conclusions: In this study, the positive significant correlation between nurses’ spiritual intelligence and their clinical competency is investigated. Because of the positive effects of spiritual intelligence on nurses’ clinical competency and quality of care, it is recommended to develop nurses’ spiritual intelligence during their education and by way of continuous medical education. PMID:26793250

  7. [Analysis of nursing skills in the clinical diagnosis and evaluation setting].

    PubMed

    Pedarribes, Georges; Lefeuvre, Gwenaël

    2014-01-01

    The research work presented in this article concerns reengineering of the registered nurse diploma, particularly definition of Skills group No. 1: evaluate a clinical situation and establish a nursing diagnosis. It was designed to analyse real nursing practices in a typical clinical evaluation and diagnosis setting on admission of a patient to hospital. This analysis essentially focused on the cognitive processes used to organise nursing practices. The theoretical framework of professional training allowed this analysis to be performed on the basis of concepts of skills, schema and operative model. The research protocol focused on self-assessment interviews allowing explanation of the schemas used by a skilled nurse and a trainee nurse on admission of a patient in the day hospital for colonoscopy. An analysis of these schemas and especially the operative model of the skilled nurse demonstrated the organising concepts of effective nursing practice. The results, apart from their heuristic value to provide a better understanding of nursing professional practices, also provide resources to design training in nursing clinical evaluation. PMID:25490222

  8. Continuing Education in Research Ethics for the Clinical Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffers, Brenda Recchia

    2002-01-01

    Review of professional nursing statements, federal policy, and recommendations for protection of human research subjects resulted in a topic and content outline for research ethics training for nurses. Suggestions for continuing education programs on research ethics were formulated. (SK)

  9. Critical thinking and clinical judgment of professional nurses in a career mobility program.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, G A; Smith, J N; Printz, V; Gronseth, D

    1993-01-01

    This study's purpose was to establish the impact of a Career Advancement Program on critical thinking and clinical judgment of Registered Nurses. Findings of the study suggest that critical thinking and clinical judgment are not influenced by patterns of upward mobility. Additionally, an analysis did not indicate significant predictors in education, specialty area, or years of nursing experience related to scores. Whereas this study questions the efficacy of career mobility programs on critical thinking and clinical judgment, it does not measure the impact of career advancement programs on other key outcome variables. The study suggests nurse educators emphasize critical thinking and clinical judgment rather than transmission of information in educational offerings.

  10. Senior student nurse proficiency: A comparative study of two clinical immersion models.

    PubMed

    Kumm, Sharon; Godfrey, Nelda; Richards, Veronica; Hulen, Jennifer; Ray, Kristin

    2016-09-01

    This study focused on identifying the best clinical learning model that would support nursing practice readiness following each immersion experience. Practicum preceptors completed surveys in which evaluated student preparation/readiness by assessing clinical knowledge, technical skills, critical thinking, communication, professionalism, management of responsibilities, and overall performance. The study results yielded no statistical significance when comparing both models. Future research is needed to analyze the impact of clinical hours offered in the senior immersion experience along with the curriculum content differences among various models of clinical experiences in undergraduate nursing programs to ensure practice readiness of nursing graduates. PMID:27429344

  11. A framework to support preceptors' evaluation and development of new nurses' clinical judgment.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Ann; Lasater, Kathie; Stock, Mary

    2016-07-01

    In today's complex, fast-paced world of hospital nursing, new graduate nurses do not have well-developed clinical judgment skills. Nurse preceptors are charged with bridging the gap between new graduates' learning in school and their autonomous practice as RNs. In one large, urban medical center in the U.S., a clinical judgment model and rubric were used as a framework for a new evaluation and orientation process. Preceptors of new graduate nurses who had used the former and new processes described their experiences using the framework. The findings indicated that having a structured framework provided objective ways to evaluate and help develop new graduate nurses' clinical judgment. It is hypothesized that academic clinical supervisors may find such a framework useful to prepare students for transition to practice. PMID:27428698

  12. Baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of learning and supervision in the clinical environment.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadou, Maria; Papastavrou, Evridiki; Efstathiou, Georgios; Theodorou, Mamas

    2015-06-01

    This study is an exploration of nursing students' experiences within the clinical learning environment (CLE) and supervision provided in hospital settings. A total of 357 second-year nurse students from all universities in Cyprus participated in the study. Data were collected using the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher instrument. The dimension "supervisory relationship (mentor)", as well as the frequency of individualized supervision meetings, were found to be important variables in the students' clinical learning. However, no statistically-significant connection was established between successful mentor relationship and team supervision. The majority of students valued their mentor's supervision more highly than a nurse teacher's supervision toward the fulfillment of learning outcomes. The dimensions "premises of nursing care" and "premises of learning" were highly correlated, indicating that a key component of a quality clinical learning environment is the quality of care delivered. The results suggest the need to modify educational strategies that foster desirable learning for students in response to workplace demands.

  13. Teaching during clinical practice: strategies and techniques used by preceptors in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Elisabeth, Carlson; Christine, Wann-Hansson; Ewa, Pilhammar

    2009-07-01

    The preceptor is a nurse who teaches and supports the student and is seen as pivotal to student learning within the clinical setting. Earlier studies have shown that preceptors' pedagogical competence is significant for facilitating learning during clinical practice. However, studies describing pedagogical competence, especially in terms of teaching strategies, seem to be scarce. The aim of this study was to describe which strategies and techniques preceptors use to teach undergraduate nursing students during clinical practice. The study had an ethnographic approach; methods used were participant observations and focus group interviews with nurses who were experienced in precepting undergraduate nursing students. Findings illustrated how preceptors used different strategies and techniques in a continuous process of adjusting, performing and evaluating precepting. Increased knowledge on how the preceptors actually teach student nurses during clinical practice will help facilitate educational programmes for preceptors, which will enhance their pedagogical skills and competences.

  14. Use of Simulation to Study Nurses' Acceptance and Nonacceptance of Clinical Decision Support Suggestions.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Vanessa E C; Lopez, Karen Dunn; Febretti, Alessandro; Stifter, Janet; Yao, Yingwei; Johnson, Andrew; Wilkie, Diana J; Keenan, Gail M

    2015-10-01

    Our long-term goal was to ensure nurse clinical decision support works as intended before full deployment in clinical practice. As part of a broader effort, this pilot project explored factors influencing acceptance/nonacceptance of eight clinical decision support suggestions displayed in an electronic health record-based nursing plan of care software prototype. A diverse sample of 21 nurses participated in this high-fidelity clinical simulation experience and completed a questionnaire to assess reasons for accepting/not accepting the clinical decision support suggestions. Of 168 total suggestions displayed during the experiment (eight for each of the 21 nurses), 123 (73.2%) were accepted, and 45 (26.8%) were not accepted. The mode number of acceptances by nurses was seven of eight, with only two of 21 nurses accepting all. The main reason for clinical decision support acceptance was the nurse's belief that the suggestions were good for the patient (100%), with other features providing secondary reinforcement. Reasons for nonacceptance were less clear, with fewer than half of the subjects indicating low confidence in the evidence. This study provides preliminary evidence that high-quality simulation and targeted questionnaires about specific clinical decision support selections offer a cost-effective means for testing before full deployment in clinical practice. PMID:26361268

  15. An Investigation of Factors Influencing Nurses' Clinical Decision-Making Skills.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Yang, Jinqiu; Liu, Lingying; Ye, Benlan

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the influencing factors on nurses' clinical decision-making (CDM) skills. A cross-sectional nonexperimental research design was conducted in the medical, surgical, and emergency departments of two university hospitals, between May and June 2014. We used a quantile regression method to identify the influencing factors across different quantiles of the CDM skills distribution and compared the results with the corresponding ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates. Our findings revealed that nurses were best at the skills of managing oneself. Educational level, experience, and the total structural empowerment had significant positive impacts on nurses' CDM skills, while the nurse-patient relationship, patient care and interaction, formal empowerment, and information empowerment were negatively correlated with nurses' CDM skills. These variables explained no more than 30% of the variance in nurses' CDM skills and mainly explained the lower quantiles of nurses' CDM skills distribution. PMID:26906246

  16. An Investigation of Factors Influencing Nurses' Clinical Decision-Making Skills.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Yang, Jinqiu; Liu, Lingying; Ye, Benlan

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the influencing factors on nurses' clinical decision-making (CDM) skills. A cross-sectional nonexperimental research design was conducted in the medical, surgical, and emergency departments of two university hospitals, between May and June 2014. We used a quantile regression method to identify the influencing factors across different quantiles of the CDM skills distribution and compared the results with the corresponding ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates. Our findings revealed that nurses were best at the skills of managing oneself. Educational level, experience, and the total structural empowerment had significant positive impacts on nurses' CDM skills, while the nurse-patient relationship, patient care and interaction, formal empowerment, and information empowerment were negatively correlated with nurses' CDM skills. These variables explained no more than 30% of the variance in nurses' CDM skills and mainly explained the lower quantiles of nurses' CDM skills distribution.

  17. A systematic review of strategies to address the clinical nursing faculty shortage.

    PubMed

    Wyte-Lake, Tamar; Tran, Kim; Bowman, Candice C; Needleman, Jack; Dobalian, Aram

    2013-05-01

    This systematic review provides a comprehensive assessment of models used to expand the ranks of clinical nursing faculty. Nursing faculty shortages constrict the pipeline for educating nurses and make addressing the projected nursing shortage more difficult. Schools of nursing have denied admission to qualified applicants, citing insufficient numbers of nursing faculty as one major reason. Using key search terms in PubMed(®) and CINAHL(®), we identified 14 peer-reviewed articles published between 1980 and 2010 about models for expanding clinical faculty. Partnership models (n = 11) and expanded use of faculty resources (n = 9) were the most common strategies. Few (n = 8) studies assessed program efficacy. A need was identified for studies to assess the effect of alternative models on educational capacity and student performance and to examine the subcomponents of academic-practice partnerships and other innovative approaches to understand the essential factors necessary to implement successful programs.

  18. An innovative model of supportive clinical teaching and learning for undergraduate nursing students: the cluster model.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Sharon; Drayton, Nicola; Brown, Ann-Marie

    2011-03-01

    Students look forward to their clinical practicum to learn within the context of reality nursing. As educators we need to actively develop models of clinical practicum whereby students are supported to engage and learn in the clinical learning environment. The aim of this paper is to describe an innovative model of supportive clinical teaching and learning for undergraduate nursing students as implemented in a large teaching hospital in New South Wales, Australia. The model of supportive clinical teaching and learning situates eight students at a time, across a shift, on one ward, with an experienced registered nurse from the ward specialty, who is employed as the clinical teacher to support nursing students during their one to two week block practicum. Results from written evaluation statements inform the discussion component of the paper for a model that has proved to be successful in this large healthcare facility.

  19. International nursing students and what impacts their clinical learning: literature review.

    PubMed

    Edgecombe, Kay; Jennings, Michele; Bowden, Margaret

    2013-02-01

    This paper reviews the sparse literature about international nursing students' clinical learning experiences, and also draws on the literature about international higher education students' learning experiences across disciplines as well as nursing students' experiences when undertaking international clinical placements. The paper aims to identify factors that may impact international nursing students' clinical learning with a view to initiating further research into these students' attributes and how to work with these to enhance the students' clinical learning. Issues commonly cited as affecting international students are socialisation, communication, culture, relationships, and unmet expectations and aspirations. International student attributes tend to be included by implication rather than as part of the literature's focus. The review concludes that recognition and valuing of international nursing students' attributes in academic and clinical contexts are needed to facilitate effective strategies to support their clinical practice in new environments. PMID:22939701

  20. Clinical ethics in African countries and emerging nurse's role in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adejumo, A O; Adejumo, P O

    2009-12-01

    Emerging trends in nursing have broadened the traditional scope of nursing practice with growing demands for ethical considerations in clinical judgments. Nurses are experiencing more ethical dilemmas in areas such as end of life issues, organ donation and transplantation, and truth telling among others. It is expected that these challenges will continue to increase and even become more complex. Despite this, the academic and professional preparation of nurses in Africa to cope with these issues is doubtful. The myriad of peculiar socioeconomic and political problems in many African societies present potential threat to the adoption of ethical standards in health care practice. Many health care workers including nurses attach little importance to consumer rights in making informed decisions in issues related to clinical care and research participation. The alleged participation of nurses in the inhuman treatment of the children recruited during the Pfizer's clinical trial of Trovan for cerebrospinal meningitis in northern Nigeria exemplifies this. Such conducts could reduce patients' worth as persons, and at the same time an indictment of nurses' moral sanctity. This paper reviews the current ethical challenges facing professional nurses in Nigeria. The concept and critical relevance of clinical ethics in giving adequate information to patients, relatives and other health workers upon which ethically sound informed decision making is done in clinical situations were highlighted. PMID:20499623

  1. Residency Programs and Clinical Leadership Skills Among New Saudi Graduate Nurses.

    PubMed

    Al-Dossary, Reem Nassar; Kitsantas, Panagiota; Maddox, P J

    2016-01-01

    Nurse residency programs have been adopted by health care organizations to assist new graduate nurses with daily challenges such as intense working environments, increasing patient acuity, and complex technologies. Overall, nurse residency programs are proven beneficial in helping nurses transition from the student role to independent practitioners and bedside leaders. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of residency programs on leadership skills of new Saudi graduate nurses who completed a residency program compared to new Saudi graduate nurses who did not participate in residency programs. The study design was cross-sectional involving a convenience sample (n = 98) of new graduate nurses from three hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The Clinical Leadership Survey was used to measure the new graduate nurses' clinical leadership skills based on whether they completed a residency program or not. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to examine leadership skills in this sample of new Saudi graduate nurses. A significant difference was found between residents and nonresidents in their leadership skills (t = 10.48, P = .000). Specifically, residents were significantly more likely to show higher levels of leadership skills compared to their counterparts. Attending a residency program was associated with a significant increase in clinical leadership skills. The findings of this study indicate that there is a need to implement more residency programs in hospitals of Saudi Arabia. It is imperative that nurse managers and policy makers in Saudi Arabia consider these findings to improve nurses' leadership skills, which will in turn improve patient care. Further research should examine how residency programs influence new graduate nurses' transition from student to practitioner with regard to clinical leadership skills in Saudi Arabia.

  2. Technology-based strategies for promoting clinical reasoning skills in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Shellenbarger, Teresa; Robb, Meigan

    2015-01-01

    Faculty face the demand of preparing nursing students for the constantly changing health care environment. Effective use of online, classroom, and clinical conferencing opportunities helps to enhance nursing students' clinical reasoning capabilities needed for practice. The growth of technology creates an avenue for faculty to develop engaging learning opportunities. This article presents technology-based strategies such as electronic concept mapping, electronic case histories, and digital storytelling that can be used to facilitate clinical reasoning skills.

  3. Clinical Self-Efficacy in Senior Nursing Students: A Mixed- Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdal, Marzieh; Masoudi Alavi, Negin; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clinical education has a basic role in nursing education, and effective clinical training establishes a sense of clinical self-efficacy in senior nursing students. Self-efficacy is a key component for acting independently in the nursing profession. Objectives: This study was designed to outline senior nursing students’ views about clinical self-efficacy and to determine its level in nursing students. Patients and Methods: A mixed-methods approach, including a quantitative cross-sectional study and qualitative content analysis,was used in this study. Participants were senior nursing students who were in their two last semesters. During the initial quantitative stage, all students in the 7th and 8th semesters of the nursing major were invited to participate. They were asked to complete the Nursing Clinical Self-Efficacy Scale (NCSES) and, during the subsequent qualitative stage, the 14 students in the 7th and 8th semesters were asked to participate in semi-structured interviews. Results: In the quantitative part, 58 students completed the self-efficacy questionnaire; the mean score was 219.28 ± 35.8, which showed moderate self-efficacy in students. Self-efficacy was different across skills. In the qualitative part, the 355 open codes that were extracted from the interviews were clustered to 12 categories and 3 themes. The main themes included the factors related to self-efficacy, outcomes of self-efficacy, and ways to improve self-efficacy. Conclusions: Students had moderate self-efficacy. Several factors such as environment, nursing colleagues, and clinical educators could influence the creation of clinical self-efficacy in nursing students. PMID:26576443

  4. Usability of Academic Electronic Medical Record Application for Nursing Students' Clinical Practicum

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Suk; Park, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Nursing curricula for undergraduate nursing students need to reflect the information technology used in current nursing practice. A smart-device Academic Electronic Medical Record (AEMR) application can help nursing students access and document records for the clinical practicum. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the usability of an AEMR application before applying it to the clinical nursing practicum. Methods A previously developed EMR application was modified as an AEMR to access patient information at bedside and to practice documentation. We added several features to the current EMR application to create an AEMR environment. We created a series of document forms and several useful scales on an external application, which included nursing admission notes, vital signs, and intake/output. The case scenarios and tasks were created by a research team to evaluate aspects of AEMRs, including their usability and functionality. Five nursing students completed 15 tasks using a think-aloud method with a tablet device. Results Minor usability issues were identified and rectified. All participants indicated that they became familiar with the application with little effort. They said that the application icons were intuitive, which helped them find patient information more quickly and accurately. Conclusions The application will improve timely access to patient data and documentation for nursing students. We are confident that this AEMR application will enhance nursing students' experience with their clinical practicum, and help them to better understand patient conditions and document them with ideal accessibility. PMID:26279956

  5. An exploratory study of the sources of influence on the clinical decisions of community nurses.

    PubMed

    Luker, K A; Kenrick, M

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports a small exploratory study which identifies what community nurses consider to be the scope of their practice and the sources of influence on their clinical decisions. The study was stimulated by the emergence of the nurse prescribing initiative, which is likely to bring clinical decision making to the centre of professional debate. The study was carried out over a 5-month period and data were collected from 47 community nurses in four district health authorities. A qualitative method was employed and field work involved observation of 40 home visits and five nurse-run clinics, individual interviews and group discussions with the nurses, and scrutiny of nursing records. The data were content analysed and classified, and the categories were validated by practitioners. Findings suggest that although community nurses consider that a large proportion of their work requires a scientific basis, their practice is largely founded on experiential knowledge, and on the whole they are not positively disposed to research knowledge. The findings are discussed in the context of nurse prescribing. Questions are raised about the nature of a 'professional' knowledge base and the reclassification of scientific knowledge as nursing or experiential knowledge once it has diffused into practice.

  6. Clinical placements in general practice: relationships between practice nurses and tertiary institutions.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kathleen; Halcomb, Elizabeth J; McInnes, Susan

    2013-05-01

    As a practice-based discipline a key component of undergraduate nurse education is clinical practice experience. The quality of clinical experiences has a significant impact on the students' ability to function competently post graduation. The relationship between higher education institutions (HEIs) and health service placement providers impacts upon the quality of clinical placements. In Australia, the growth of primary care nursing and the shortage of acute clinical places has prompted HEIs to explore the placement of students in general practice. Given the increasing attention being paid to non-traditional clinical placements, it is timely to explore how universities are establishing relationships and models of clinical placement. This paper uses qualitative research methods to explore the perspectives of 12 Australian general practice nurses who have experience in facilitating undergraduate clinical placements about the relationships between HEIs and nurses. Findings are presented in the following three themes: (1) Appropriate preparation for placement: They don't know what primary health really means, (2) Seeking greater consultation in the organisation of clinical placements: they've got to do it one way for everyone, and (3) Uncertainty and lack of support: I had no contact with the university. Clinical placements in general practice can be an innovative strategy providing non-traditional, yet high quality, teaching and learning experiences for undergraduate nursing students. To optimise the quality of these placements, however, it is essential that HEIs provide appropriate support to the practice nurses mentoring these students. PMID:23069694

  7. Nurses' attitudes, abilities and educational preference related to using family pedigrees in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Pestka, Elizabeth L; Meiers, Sonja J; L Shah, Lisa; Junglen, Laura M; Delgado, Adriana

    2013-10-01

    There is growing worldwide interest in using family pedigrees to assess health risks for diseases and implementing potential preventive interventions for health promotion. Nurses have been identified as key professionals in the process of collecting family history information and constructing pedigrees, and there is a gap in the literature related to these activities. The purpose of this study was to determine nurses' knowledge about, attitudes towards, perceived ability to use, and educational preference related to inclusion of family pedigrees in clinical practice. The study utilized a survey method with 174 nurses and correlational descriptive design. Results showed 74% of the nurses were interested in learning about family pedigrees and 64% responded positively to including them in clinical practice with the belief by 88% that they are helpful for preventive health care. Findings may be used to advance education and utilization of family pedigrees for nurses in clinical practice.

  8. The clinical nurse leader in the perioperative setting: a preceptor experience.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, Michael S; Casey, Gwendolyn L; Berry, Shirley J; Gannon, Jane

    2014-07-01

    The U.S. Veterans Administration (VA) has implemented the clinical nurse leader (CNL) role nationwide. Nursing leaders at the Malcolm Randall VA Medical Center in Gainesville, Florida, implemented the development of the CNL role in the perioperative setting during the summer of 2012. The perioperative department developed the position in partnership with the University of Florida College of Nursing, Gainesville, Florida. The team developed a description of the roles and experiences of the preceptors, the clinical nurse leader resident, and the University of Florida faculty member. The clinical nurse leader resident's successes and the positive outcomes, such as improved patient outcomes, experienced by the perioperative department demonstrated the importance of the CNL role.

  9. Co-Designing Mobile Apps to Assist in Clinical Nursing Education: A Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Andrews, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Mobile applications (apps) to train health professionals is gaining momentum as the benefits of mobile learning (mLearning) are becoming apparent in complex clinical environments. However, most educational apps are generic, off-the-shelf pieces of software that do not take into consideration the unique needs of nursing students. The proposed study will apply a user-centred design process to create a tailored mobile app for nursing students to learn and apply clinical skills in practice. The app will be piloted and evaluated to understand how nursing students use mobile technology in clinical settings to support their learning and educational needs. PMID:27332433

  10. Closing the Gap between Research Evidence and Clinical Practice: Jordanian Nurses' Perceived Barriers to Research Utilisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Khalaileh, Murad; Al Qadire, Mohammad; Musa, Ahmad S.; Al-Khawaldeh, Omar A.; Al Qudah, Hani; Alhabahbeh, Atalla

    2016-01-01

    Background: The nursing profession is a combination of theory and practical skill, and nurses are required to generate and develop knowledge through implementing research into clinical practice. Considerable number of barriers could hind implementing research findings into practice. Barriers to research utilisation are not identified in the…

  11. What Students Really Learn: Contrasting Medical and Nursing Students' Experiences of the Clinical Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liljedahl, Matilda; Boman, Lena Engqvist; Fält, Charlotte Porthén; Bolander Laksov, Klara

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores and contrasts undergraduate medical and nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment. Using a sociocultural perspective of learning and an interpretative approach, 15 in-depth interviews with medical and nursing students were analysed with content analysis. Students' experiences are described using a…

  12. Electronic Assessment and Feedback Tool in Supervision of Nursing Students during Clinical Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mettiäinen, Sari

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine nursing teachers' and students' attitudes to and experiences of using an electronic assessment and feedback tool in supervision of clinical training. The tool was called eTaitava, and it was developed in Finland. During the pilot project, the software was used by 12 nursing teachers and 430 nursing…

  13. Assessment of the Impact of Integrated Simulation on Critical Thinking and Clinical Judgment in Nursing Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Rita Allen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of using simulation and didactic instruction on critical thinking and clinical judgment with student nurses enrolled in a fall semester medical-surgical class. Specifically, it was of interest to compare the performance of these fall semester nursing students with the performance of nursing…

  14. Bullying Behaviors and Self Efficacy among Nursing Students at Clinical Settings: Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassem, Awatef Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nursing students who experienced bullying behaviors feel anger and missing their concentration, their capability to achieve a desired outcome. Also self-efficacy, often referred to as self-confidence, is essential to nursing students' ability and performance in the clinical setting. Aim: Study aimed to examine relation between bullying…

  15. Experience of Adjunct Novice Clinical Nursing Faculty: An Interpretive Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive case study was to describe the experience of adjunct novice clinical nursing faculty who has less than three years teaching experience or feels novice in this setting. The nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and is forecasted to have significant impacts on the health care delivery…

  16. An Examination of Accelerated and Basic Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumwiede, Kelly A.

    2010-01-01

    Developing decision-making skills is essential in education in order to be a competent nurse. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the perceptions of clinical decision-making skills of students enrolled in accelerated and basic baccalaureate nursing programs. A comparative descriptive research design was used for this study.…

  17. Classroom to clinic: incorporating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into nurse practitioner education & practice.

    PubMed

    Haley, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Although nursing is well grounded in the conceptualization of person as body-mind-spirit, there is little evidence that advanced practice nurses routinely address the spirit in giving patient care, especially with adolescents in the outpatient setting. The neglect of spiritual aspects of care may be related to lack of a framework, or education/incorporation into nurse practitioner preparation. This article describes one method of integrating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into a nurse practitioner clinical course. Readings, assignments, and a grading rubric are offered.

  18. Supporting Recognition of Clinical Nurses With the DAISY Award.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Bonnie; Barnes, Mark; Sweeney, Cynthia D

    2016-04-01

    What is meaningful recognition? As a nurse leader, are you prepared to answer that question? Understanding the implications and impact of recognition for nursing staff is a powerful tool for nursing leaders. The DAISY Award is used in more than 2,100 organizations around the globe to give meaning to recognition. Here is a glimpse of the power that recognition can bring to an organization, to its leaders, and most importantly to staff. PMID:27011149

  19. Impact of clinical supervision on field training of nursing students at Urmia University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    DEHGHANI, MOHAMMADREZA; GHANAVATI, SHIRIN; SOLTANi, BEHROUZ; AGHAKHANI, NADER; HAGHPANAH, SEZANEH

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obtaining clinical competency in clinical education is one of the problems in nursing and use of the new methods of clinical training is very important. Clinical supervision is one of the methods used as a mechanism to promote knowledge and skill for promoting professional performance in nursing students. This study is carried out to determine the impact of clinical supervision on field training of nursing students at Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Methods In the present experimental study, 32 nursing students were enrolled in the study based on census and randomly assigned into two groups of experimental and control by block randomization. Clinical supervision was used in the experimental group and the control group received routine clinical trainings in the field. The students’ clinical skills were assessed using a researcher-made checklist, the validity of which was confirmed through content validity method by 13 faculty members and its reliability was approved by test-retest method on 20 nursing students in the form of a pilot study and through Cronbach’s alpha (87%). Data were analyzed using SPSS, version 14. Results ‍There was a significant difference between the experimental and control groups in clinical skills such as recognition and administration of medication, team participation,  patients and their relatives’ education, considering the safety,  infection prevention and  nursing process (p<0.005). Conclusion The study demonstrated that in clinical supervision process, students have a better communication and cooperation with their instructor and with each other and their confidence and understanding and the amount of learning in practical skills was enhanced more than routine clinical training. The implementation of this clinical training method for students of nursing and other fields of medical sciences is recommendable. PMID:27104203

  20. Professional excellence and career advancement in nursing: a conceptual framework for clinical leadership development.

    PubMed

    Adeniran, Rita Kudirat; Bhattacharya, Anand; Adeniran, Anthony A

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, stakeholders in the health care community are recognizing nursing as key to solving the nation's health care issues. This acknowledgment provides a unique opportunity for nursing to demonstrate leadership by developing clinical nurse leaders to collaborate with the multidisciplinary care team in driving evidence-based, safe quality, cost-effective health care services. One approach for nursing success is standardizing the entry-level education for nurses and developing a uniform professional development and career advancement trajectory with appropriate incentives to encourage participation. A framework to guide and provide scientific evidence of how frontline nurses can be engaged will be paramount. The model for professional excellence and career advancement provides a framework that offers a clear path for researchers to examine variables influencing nurses' professional development and career advancement in a systematic manner. Professional Excellence and Career Advancement in Nursing underscores professional preparedness of a registered nurse as central to leadership development. It also describes the elements that influence nurses' participation in professional development and career advancement under 4 main categories emphasizing mentorship and self-efficacy as essential variables.

  1. Learning challenges of nursing students in clinical environments: A qualitative study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Baraz, Shahram; Memarian, Robabeh; Vanaki, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clinical learning environment is a complex social entity. This environment is effective on the learning process of nursing students in the clinical area. However, learning in clinical environment has several benefits, but it can be challenging, unpredictable, stressful, and constantly changing. In attention to clinical experiences and factors contributing to the learning of these experiences can waste a great deal of time and energy, impose heavy financial burden on educational systems, cause mental, familial and educational problems for students, and compromise the quality of patient care. Therefore, this study was carried out with the goal of determining the learning challenges of nursing students in clinical environments in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study carried out in 2012–2013, 18 undergraduate nursing students were selected by using purposive sampling method from the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery of Tehran and Shahid Beheshti Universities. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. The content analysis method was used to determine relevant themes. Results: Two themes were derived from the data analysis, which represented the students’ clinical learning challenges. These two themes included insufficient qualification of nursing instructors and unsupportive learning environment. Conclusions: Identification of the students’ clinical learning challenges and actions to remove or modify them will create more learning opportunities for the students, improve the achievement of educational goals, provide training to nursing students with the needed competencies to meet the complex demands of caring and for application of theories in practice, and improve the quality of healthcare services. PMID:26430679

  2. The Challenges of Nursing Students in the Clinical Learning Environment: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Nahid; Molazem, Zahra; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Torabizadeh, Camellia; Najafi Kalyani, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Clinical learning is a main part of nursing education. Students' exposure to clinical learning environment is one of the most important factors affecting the teaching-learning process in clinical settings. Identifying challenges of nursing students in the clinical learning environment could improve training and enhance the quality of its planning and promotion of the students. We aimed to explore Iranian nursing students' challenges in the clinical learning environment. Materials and Methods. This is a qualitative study using the content analysis approach. The participants consisted of seventeen nursing students and three nursing instructors. The participants were selected through purposive sampling method and attended semistructured interviews and focus groups. Results. Three themes emerged after data analysis, including ineffective communications, inadequate readiness, and emotional reactions. Conclusion. Nursing students in Iran are faced with many challenges in the clinical learning environment. All challenges identified in this study affected the students' learning in clinical setting. Therefore, we recommend that the instructors prepare students with a specific focus on their communication and psychological needs. PMID:27366787

  3. The Challenges of Nursing Students in the Clinical Learning Environment: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Nahid; Molazem, Zahra; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Torabizadeh, Camellia; Najafi Kalyani, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Clinical learning is a main part of nursing education. Students' exposure to clinical learning environment is one of the most important factors affecting the teaching-learning process in clinical settings. Identifying challenges of nursing students in the clinical learning environment could improve training and enhance the quality of its planning and promotion of the students. We aimed to explore Iranian nursing students' challenges in the clinical learning environment. Materials and Methods. This is a qualitative study using the content analysis approach. The participants consisted of seventeen nursing students and three nursing instructors. The participants were selected through purposive sampling method and attended semistructured interviews and focus groups. Results. Three themes emerged after data analysis, including ineffective communications, inadequate readiness, and emotional reactions. Conclusion. Nursing students in Iran are faced with many challenges in the clinical learning environment. All challenges identified in this study affected the students' learning in clinical setting. Therefore, we recommend that the instructors prepare students with a specific focus on their communication and psychological needs. PMID:27366787

  4. Evaluation of undergraduate nursing students' clinical confidence following a mental health recovery camp.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Thomas; Sumskis, Sue; Moxham, Lorna; Taylor, Ellie; Brighton, Renee; Patterson, Chris; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, we evaluate the impact of participation in a mental health recovery camp on the clinical confidence of undergraduate nursing students in dealing with individuals with mental illness. Twenty undergraduate nursing students who participated in the recovery camp completed the Mental Health Nursing Clinical Confidence Scale both before and directly after attending the camp. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Participation in the recovery camp was associated with a statistically-significant increase in students' level of overall confidence between the pretest and post-test data (P < 0.005). The results also demonstrated that students over the age of 25 years and who do not have a family history of mental illness are more likely to self-report a higher level of confidence in both the pre- and post-results. The clinical confidence of undergraduate nursing students improved through participation in an immersive clinical experience within the recovery camp.

  5. Assimilating to Hierarchical Culture: A Grounded Theory Study on Communication among Clinical Nurses.

    PubMed

    Kim, MinYoung; Oh, Seieun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate a substantive model that accounts for the explanatory social processes of communication in which nurses were engaged in clinical settings in Korea. Grounded theory methodology was used in this study. A total of 15 clinical nurses participated in the in-depth interviews. "Assimilating to the hierarchical culture" emerged as the basic social process of communication in which the participants engaged in their work environments. To adapt to the cultures of their assigned wards, the nurses learned to be silent and engaged in their assimilation into the established hierarchy. The process of assimilation consisted of three phases based on the major goals that nurses worked to achieve: getting to know about unspoken rules, persevering within the culture, and acting as senior nurse. Seven strategies and actions utilized to achieve the major tasks emerged as subcategories, including receiving strong disapproval, learning by observing, going silent, finding out what is acceptable, minimizing distress, taking advantages as senior nurse, and taking responsibilities as senior nurse. The findings identified how the pattern of communication in nursing organizations affected the way in which nurses were assimilated into organizational culture, from individual nurses' perspectives. In order to improve the rigid working atmosphere and culture in nursing organizations and increase members' satisfaction with work and quality of life, managers and staff nurses need training that focuses on effective communication and encouraging peer opinion-sharing within horizontal relationships. Moreover, organization-level support should be provided to create an environment that encourages free expression. PMID:27253389

  6. HIPAA--clinical and ethical considerations for nurses.

    PubMed

    Erlen, Judith A

    2004-01-01

    Congress enacted the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) to protect patients' basic rights to privacy and their control over the disclosure of their personal health information. Advances in and the more widespread use of communication technology were increasing the public's concerns over the ease with which their health information could be transmitted, how protected that information was during such transmissions, and their lack of approval for the use of that information by known and unknown third parties. This article, the first of two papers focusing on HIPAA, discusses HIPAA from the clinical perspective and focuses primarily on the HIPAA Privacy Rule. Under what circumstances can a covered entity disclose protected health information? What are the ethical issues inherent in HIPAA? What does HIPAA require of covered entities? What are the implications of HIPAA for professional nurses? The goal of HIPAA is to ensure the protection of confidential health information through having appropriate security systems to guard against unintentional disclosure of that information.

  7. Classifying clinical decision making: interpreting nursing intuition, heuristics and medical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, C D; Adams, A

    2000-10-01

    This is the second of two linked papers exploring decision making in nursing. The first paper, 'Classifying clinical decision making: a unifying approach' investigated difficulties with applying a range of decision-making theories to nursing practice. This is due to the diversity of terminology and theoretical concepts used, which militate against nurses being able to compare the outcomes of decisions analysed within different frameworks. It is therefore problematic for nurses to assess how good their decisions are, and where improvements can be made. However, despite the range of nomenclature, it was argued that there are underlying similarities between all theories of decision processes and that these should be exposed through integration within a single explanatory framework. A proposed solution was to use a general model of psychological classification to clarify and compare terms, concepts and processes identified across the different theories. The unifying framework of classification was described and this paper operationalizes it to demonstrate how different approaches to clinical decision making can be re-interpreted as classification behaviour. Particular attention is focused on classification in nursing, and on re-evaluating heuristic reasoning, which has been particularly prone to theoretical and terminological confusion. Demonstrating similarities in how different disciplines make decisions should promote improved multidisciplinary collaboration and a weakening of clinical elitism, thereby enhancing organizational effectiveness in health care and nurses' professional status. This is particularly important as nurses' roles continue to expand to embrace elements of managerial, medical and therapeutic work. Analysing nurses' decisions as classification behaviour will also enhance clinical effectiveness, and assist in making nurses' expertise more visible. In addition, the classification framework explodes the myth that intuition, traditionally associated

  8. A Conceptual Framework for Decision-making Support in Uncertainty- and Risk-based Diagnosis of Rare Clinical Cases by Specialist Physicians.

    PubMed

    Santos, Adriano A; Moura, J Antão B; de Araújo, Joseana Macêdo Fechine Régis

    2015-01-01

    Mitigating uncertainty and risks faced by specialist physicians in analysis of rare clinical cases is something desired by anyone who needs health services. The number of clinical cases never seen by these experts, with little documentation, may introduce errors in decision-making. Such errors negatively affect well-being of patients, increase procedure costs, rework, health insurance premiums, and impair the reputation of specialists and medical systems involved. In this context, IT and Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) play a fundamental role, supporting decision-making process, making it more efficient and effective, reducing a number of avoidable medical errors and enhancing quality of treatment given to patients. An investigation has been initiated to look into characteristics and solution requirements of this problem, model it, propose a general solution in terms of a conceptual risk-based, automated framework to support rare-case medical diagnostics and validate it by means of case studies. A preliminary validation study of the proposed framework has been carried out by interviews conducted with experts who are practicing professionals, academics, and researchers in health care. This paper summarizes the investigation and its positive results. These results motivate continuation of research towards development of the conceptual framework and of a software tool that implements the proposed model. PMID:26262173

  9. Support in Clinical Settings as Perceived by Nursing Students in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Joolaee, Soodabeh; Ashghali Farahani, Mansoureh; Jafarian Amiri, Seyedeh Roghayeh; Varaei, Shokoh

    2016-01-01

    Background Although support is one of the most substantial needs of nursing students during clinical education, it is not clearly defined in the literature. Objectives The current study aimed to explore the concept of support in clinical settings as perceived by nursing students. Materials and Methods A qualitative content analysis was used to explore the meaning of student support in clinical settings. A purposive sampling with maximum variation was used to select the participants among bachelor nursing students in the nursing school of Babol University of Medical Sciences in the north of Iran. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to gather the perceptions and experiences of seventeen nursing students. Conventional content analysis was applied to analyze the data. Results In the current study, the main theme, nurturance, was emerged with seven subthemes of humanistic behavior with the student, respectful communication with students, accepting the student in the clinical setting, sustaining confidence, need based supervision, accepting the profession in the society and empowerment. Conclusions Nursing students support in the clinical education requires a nurturing care; a care that leads to the sense of worthiness and respectability in students and contributes to the improvement of their clinical abilities. PMID:27331057

  10. Nursing students' perceptions of their clinical learning environment in placements outside traditional hospital settings

    PubMed Central

    Bjørk, Ida T; Berntsen, Karin; Brynildsen, Grethe; Hestetun, Margrete

    2014-01-01

    Aims and objectives To explore students' opinions of the learning environment during clinical placement in settings outside traditional hospital settings. Background Clinical placement experiences may influence positively on nursing students attitudes towards the clinical setting in question. Most studies exploring the quality of clinical placements have targeted students' experience in hospital settings. The number of studies exploring students' experiences of the learning environment in healthcare settings outside of the hospital venue does not match the growing importance of such settings in the delivery of health care, nor the growing number of nurses needed in these venues. Design A survey design was used. Method The Clinical Learning Environment Inventory was administered to two cohorts of undergraduate nursing students (n = 184) after clinical placement in mental health care, home care and nursing home care. Results Nursing students' overall contentment with the learning environment was quite similar across all three placement areas. Students in mental health care had significantly higher scores on the subscale individualisation, and older students had significantly higher scores on the total scale. Compared with other studies where the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory has been used, the students' total scores in this study are similar or higher than scores in studies including students from hospital settings. Conclusion Results from this study negate the negative views on clinical placements outside the hospital setting, especially those related to placements in nursing homes and mental healthcare settings. Relevance to clinical practice Students' experience of the learning environment during placements in mental health care, home care and nursing homes indicates the relevance of clinical education in settings outside the hospital setting. PMID:24460862

  11. Neurofibromatosis Specialists

    MedlinePlus

    ... NF Conference Network For Healthcare Professionals Clinical Drug Pipeline Get Involved Join the NF Registry Kids Program ... Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina ...

  12. Preparing nursing students for the future: an innovative approach to clinical education.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Ann E; Noone, Joanne; Voss, Heather; Mathews, Launa Rae

    2013-07-01

    A clinical education model was developed and implemented by nursing faculty in the Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education undergraduate curriculum to improve clinical learning for preparation of nurses to practice in the 21st century. This clinical education model, developed though collaborative work by nursing practice and education representatives throughout the state, moves away from a "random access opportunity" model of clinical education reliant on "total patient care" experiences to an intentional design of clinical learning activities based on course competencies appropriate to student level. Five elements of the model were proposed: case-based, concept-based, intervention skill-based, focused direct client care and integrative experiences. Different elements are dominant in early, middle and late clinical experiences to best support the developmental level of the student. Expectations for faculty, students and clinical staff were also developed to enhance best practices in clinical learning. Preparation of clinical partners for a change in clinical learning and student accountability are essential for optimal learning. This paper provides an overview of the model with clinical application examples for each element with a particular emphasis on case-based, concept-based and integrative clinical experiences.

  13. Nurse on the Move: Lisa Gorski.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Lisa; Gavin, Cara

    2016-01-01

    After a short hiatus, Nurses On the Move is back and better than ever! I am excited to bring you our next nurse leader, Lisa A. Gorski MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI, FAAN. With more than 30 years in the field, Gorski is an expert in both home healthcare and infusion nursing. As a clinical nurse specialist at Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice in Wisconsin, an editorial board member of Home Healthcare Now, an associate consultant for OASIS ANSWERS, Inc., and a published author, her knowledge of the nursing profession is truly impressive.Through our phone interview, I spoke with Gorski about why she decided to enter into home healthcare, her time as president of the Infusion Nurses Society, and what advice she has for a nurse starting their career. PMID:26645841

  14. Nurse on the Move: Lisa Gorski.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Lisa; Gavin, Cara

    2016-01-01

    After a short hiatus, Nurses On the Move is back and better than ever! I am excited to bring you our next nurse leader, Lisa A. Gorski MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI, FAAN. With more than 30 years in the field, Gorski is an expert in both home healthcare and infusion nursing. As a clinical nurse specialist at Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice in Wisconsin, an editorial board member of Home Healthcare Now, an associate consultant for OASIS ANSWERS, Inc., and a published author, her knowledge of the nursing profession is truly impressive.Through our phone interview, I spoke with Gorski about why she decided to enter into home healthcare, her time as president of the Infusion Nurses Society, and what advice she has for a nurse starting their career.

  15. Use of anecdotal notes by clinical nursing faculty: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mellisa A; Daly, Barbara J; Madigan, Elizabeth A

    2010-03-01

    Although the use of anecdotal notes by faculty to document clinical performance is thought to be a common practice, no empirical study of this evaluation tool has been conducted. To investigate the frequency and pattern of use, a faculty questionnaire was developed using the Context, Input, Process, Product (CIPP) evaluation model as a framework. The model was adapted to focus on clinical nursing education. Sixty-four nursing faculty from six schools participated in the regional study. A descriptive design was used to collect quantitative data from clinical faculty. Findings indicated that 97% of clinical faculty use anecdotal notes during the student evaluation process, and the majority of faculty do so on a weekly basis. Based on faculty feedback and the CIPP evaluation model, a clinical nursing faculty tool was developed after study completion to support clinical faculty in note use.

  16. Design of an Electronic Reminder System for Supporting the Integerity of Nursing Records.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Min; Hou, I-Ching; Chen, Hsiao-Ping; Weng, Yung-Ching

    2016-01-01

    The integrity of electronic nursing records (ENRs) stands for the quality of medical records. But patients' conditions are varied (e.g. not every patient had wound or need fall prevention), to achieve the integrity of ENRs depends much on clinical nurses' attention. Our study site, an one 2,300-bed hospital in northern Taiwan, there are a total of 20 ENRs including nursing assessments, nursing care plan, discharge planning etc. implemented in the whole hospital before 2014. It become important to help clinical nurses to decrease their human recall burden to complete these records. Thus, the purpose of this study was to design an ENRs reminder system (NRS) to facilitate nursing recording process. The research team consisted of an ENR engineer, a clinical head nurse and a nursing informatics specialist began to investigate NRS through three phases (e.g. information requirements; design and implementation). In early 2014, a qualitative research method was used to identify NRS information requirements through both groups (e.g. clinical nurses and their head nurses) focus interviews. According to the their requirements, one prototype was created by the nursing informatics specialist. Then the engineer used Microsoft Visual Studio 2012, C#, and Oracle to designed a web-based NRS (Figure 1). Then the integrity reminder system which including a total of twelve electronic nursing records was designed and the preliminary accuracy validation of the system was 100%. NRS could be used to support nursing recording process and prepared for implementing in the following phase.

  17. Integrating the Illness Beliefs Model in clinical practice: a Family Systems Nursing knowledge utilization model.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, Fabie; Dupuis, France; Turcotte, Annie; Martinez, Anne-Marie; Goudreau, Johanne

    2015-05-01

    To promote the integration of Family Systems Nursing (FSN) in clinical practice, we need to better understand how nurses overcome the challenges of FSN knowledge utilization. A qualitative exploratory study was conducted with 32 practicing female nurses from hospital and community settings who had received FSN intervention training and skill development based on the Illness Beliefs Model and the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models. The participants were interviewed about how they utilized FSN knowledge in their nursing practice. From the data analysis, a FSN Knowledge Utilization Model emerged that involves three major components: (a) nurses' beliefs in FSN and in their FSN skills, (b) nurses' knowledge utilization strategies to address the challenges of FSN practice, and (c) FSN positive outcomes. The FSN Knowledge Utilization Model describes a circular, incremental, and iterative process used by nurses to integrate FSN in daily nursing practice. Findings point to a need for re-evaluation of educational and management strategies in clinical settings for advancing the practice of FSN.

  18. Assimilating to Hierarchical Culture: A Grounded Theory Study on Communication among Clinical Nurses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate a substantive model that accounts for the explanatory social processes of communication in which nurses were engaged in clinical settings in Korea. Grounded theory methodology was used in this study. A total of 15 clinical nurses participated in the in-depth interviews. “Assimilating to the hierarchical culture” emerged as the basic social process of communication in which the participants engaged in their work environments. To adapt to the cultures of their assigned wards, the nurses learned to be silent and engaged in their assimilation into the established hierarchy. The process of assimilation consisted of three phases based on the major goals that nurses worked to achieve: getting to know about unspoken rules, persevering within the culture, and acting as senior nurse. Seven strategies and actions utilized to achieve the major tasks emerged as subcategories, including receiving strong disapproval, learning by observing, going silent, finding out what is acceptable, minimizing distress, taking advantages as senior nurse, and taking responsibilities as senior nurse. The findings identified how the pattern of communication in nursing organizations affected the way in which nurses were assimilated into organizational culture, from individual nurses’ perspectives. In order to improve the rigid working atmosphere and culture in nursing organizations and increase members’ satisfaction with work and quality of life, managers and staff nurses need training that focuses on effective communication and encouraging peer opinion-sharing within horizontal relationships. Moreover, organization-level support should be provided to create an environment that encourages free expression. PMID:27253389

  19. Factors impacting on nurses' transference of theoretical knowledge of holistic care into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Saras

    2002-12-01

    Since nurse education moved to universities, a reoccurring concern of health consumers, health administrators, and some practising nurses is that nurses are not able to transfer the theoretical knowledge of holistic care into practice. Much has been written about this concern usually under the heading of the theory-practice gap. A common reason that has been highlighted as the cause of this gap is that the theoretical knowledge that nurses learn in academia is predicated on concepts such as humanism and holistic caring. In contrast, the bureaucratic organisation where nurses provide care tends to be based on management concepts where cost containment and outcome measures are more acceptable. Hence nurses' learned values of holistic caring are pitted against the reality of the practice setting. So what is this practice reality? This paper attempts to provide an insider view of why the theoretical knowledge of holistic care may be difficult to enact in the clinical setting. In-depth taped interviews with nurses and participant observation were conducted in acute care hospitals in Western Australia. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the constant comparative method. The findings indicated that utilitarian nursing and role models had impacted on the transference of theoretical knowledge of holistic care into practice. The paper outlines some measures that nurses themselves can undertake to ensure the narrowing of the theory-practice gap in this area.

  20. Promoting the Self-Regulation of Clinical Reasoning Skills in Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, R; Pesut, D; Kautz, D

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this paper is to describe the research surrounding the theories and models the authors united to describe the essential components of clinical reasoning in nursing practice education. The research was conducted with nursing students in health care settings through the application of teaching and learning strategies with the Self-Regulated Learning Model (SRL) and the Outcome-Present-State-Test (OPT) Model of Reflective Clinical Reasoning. Standardized nursing languages provided the content and clinical vocabulary for the clinical reasoning task. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study described the application of the OPT model of clinical reasoning, use of nursing language content, and reflective journals based on the SRL model with 66 undergraduate nursing students over an 8 month period of time. The study tested the idea that self-regulation of clinical reasoning skills can be developed using self-regulation theory and the OPT model. Results: This research supports a framework for effective teaching and learning methods to promote and document learner progress in mastering clinical reasoning skills. Self-regulated Learning strategies coupled with the OPT model suggest benefits of self-observation and self-monitoring during clinical reasoning activities, and pinpoints where guidance is needed for the development of cognitive and metacognitive awareness. Recommendations and Conclusions: Thinking and reasoning about the complexities of patient care needs requires attention to the content, processes and outcomes that make a nursing care difference. These principles and concepts are valuable to clinical decision making for nurses globally as they deal with local, regional, national and international health care issues. PMID:19888432

  1. Can script concordance testing be used in nursing education to accurately assess clinical reasoning skills?

    PubMed

    Dawson, Tyia; Comer, Linda; Kossick, Mark A; Neubrander, Judy

    2014-05-01

    The Script Concordance Test (SCT) has been used successfully in medical schools to assess clinical reasoning in medical students, but it has not been widely used in nursing education. The purpose of this study was to provide additional evidence of the validity and reliability of the SCT in evaluating clinical reasoning in nursing students by replicating a previous study. The test was administered to 48 first-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing students. A scoring grid was developed using the aggregate scores method based on the modal responses of 13 panel members. The reliability of the scores was measured by Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and the scores of the students and the panel were compared using a t test. The difference between the panel's and the students' scores was statistically significant, and the reliability of the scores is high. The SCT provides a reliable, standardized, and easy-to-administer method of evaluating clinical reasoning in nursing students.

  2. Narrative thematic analysis of baccalaureate nursing students' reflections: critical thinking in the clinical education context.

    PubMed

    Naber, Jessica L; Hall, Joanne; Schadler, Craig Matthew

    2014-09-01

    This study sought to identify characteristics of clinically situated critical thinking in nursing students' reflections, originally part of a study guided by Richard Paul's model of critical thinking. Nurses are expected to apply critical thinking in all practice situations to improve health outcomes, including patient safety and satisfaction. In a previous study, Paul's model of critical thinking was used to develop questions for reflective writing assignments. Within that study, 30 nursing students completed six open-ended narratives of nurse-patient clinical encounters during an 8-week period. Improvements were seen in critical thinking scores after the intervention. This article reports the qualitative analysis of the content of six open-ended narratives. Six overarching themes were identified and combined into a tentative conceptual model. Faculty's understanding of the characteristics of critical thinking in the context of clinical education will help them to teach and evaluate students' progress and competencies for future practice.

  3. A conceptual framework of clinical nursing care in intensive care1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção; Apostolidis, Thémistoklis; Brandão, Marcos Antônio Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to propose a conceptual framework for clinical nursing care in intensive care. Method: descriptive and qualitative field research, carried out with 21 nurses from an intensive care unit of a federal public hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic and lexical content analysis, supported by Alceste software. Results: the characteristics of clinical intensive care emerge from the specialized knowledge of the interaction, the work context, types of patients and nurses characteristic of the intensive care and care frameworks. Conclusion: the conceptual framework of the clinic's intensive care articulates elements characteristic of the dynamics of this scenario: objective elements regarding technology and attention to equipment and subjective elements related to human interaction, specific of nursing care, countering criticism based on dehumanization. PMID:26487133

  4. What Really Motivates Iranian Nurses to Be Creative in Clinical Settings?: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Isfahani, Sara Shahsavari; Hosseini, Mohammad Ali; Khoshknab, Masoud Fallahi; Peyrovi, Hamid; Khanke, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Creativity and innovation are key elements for organization improvement, particularly in nursing, and for finding alternatives for solving nurses’ occupational problems. Nurses’ creativity is affected by motivation. Although, there are many possible sources of motivation, the Iranian nurses’ creativity is seldom clarified, and the most important factors motivating nurses to be creative in clinical settings has rarely been addressed. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore Iranian nurses’ experiences regarding the most important factors that motivate their creativity in clinical settings. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted using conventional content analysis approach. A purposive sample of sixteen nurses was recruited from two educational hospitals affiliated to Tehran and Jahrom Universities of Medical Sciences in Iran. Data were gathered through conducting face-to-face semi-structured interviews and were analyzed by qualitative content analysis approach. Findings: Five main themes emerged from the data analysis, including: (a) Intrinsic motivators, (b) Extrinsic motivators, (c) Achievement motivators, (d) Relational or altruistic motivators, and (e) Spiritual motivators. Conclusions: Study findings indicated that nurses are creative and innovative individuals. So nurse managers and health policy makers should consider creativity as an integral part of all health and clinical strategies and policies. They should support creative and innovative efforts of nurses and provide a climate in which nurses engage in more creative and productive behaviors. PMID:26156918

  5. The organization of an educational program for specialists in clinical chemistry by the Greek Society of Clinical Chemistry-Clinical Biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Rizos, Demetrios; Karababa, Photini; Sarandakou, Angeliki; Panagiotakis, Othon; Haliassos, Alexander; Makris, Konstantinos; Psarra, Katerina; Bairaktari, Eleni; Spyropoulou, Panagiota; Nikolou, Chara; Galiatsatos, Nikolaos; Trakas, Nikolaos; Ferderigou, Angeliki; Seferiadis, Konstantin

    2011-01-01

    In Greece, there is no officially organized training in clinical chemistry for scientists. The Greek Society of Clinical Chemistry-Clinical Biochemistry decided to organize an intensive educational program of 18 seminars on clinical chemistry content as it is described in the EC4 Syllabus. The duration of each seminar was about 6 hours and consisted of 6 to 9 lectures. At the end of each seminar there was a voluntary written examination, comprised of 24 multiple choice questions. Successful completion of the Educational program was leading to a Certificate of Competence. Two cycles of the 18 seminars were performed: 1st cycle from October 2003 to December 2005 and 2nd cycle from March 2005 to October 2007. One hundred eighty nine colleagues was the mean attendance per seminar for the seminars of the 1st cycle and 38 colleagues for the seminars of the 2nd cycle. The mean participation to the examination for each seminar was almost 80% for the 1st cycle and 68% for the 2nd cycle. More than 80% of the participants performed Good or Very good in the examination in both cycles. It is estimated that more than 40% of the scientists who practice Clinical Chemistry in Greece, participated to this educational activity. This program is now provided as an e-learning application, and it is open for all scientists who want to follow the discipline of clinical chemistry.

  6. Clinical learning environments (actual and expected): perceptions of Iran University of Medical Sciences nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Pakpour, Vahid; Aalaa, Maryam; Shekarabi, Robabeh; Sanjari, Mahnaz; Haghani, Hamid; Mehrdad, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Educational clinical environment has an important role in nursing students' learning. Any difference between actual and expected clinical environment will decrease nursing students’ interest in clinical environments and has a negative correlation with their clinical performance. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study is an attempt to compare nursing students' perception of the actual and expected status of clinical environments in medical-surgical wards. Participants of the study were 127 bachelor nursing students of Iran University of Medical Sciences in the internship period. Data gathering instruments were a demographic questionnaire (including sex, age, and grade point average), and the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI) originally developed by Professor Chan (2001), in which its modified Farsi version (Actual and Preferred forms) consisting 42 items, 6 scales and 7 items per scale was used. Descriptive and inferential statistics (t-test, paired t-test, ANOVA) were used for data analysis through SPSS version 16. Results: The results indicated that there were significant differences between the preferred and actual form in all six scales. In other word, comparing with the actual form, the mean scores of all items in the preferred form were higher. The maximum mean difference was in innovation and the highest mean difference was in involvement scale. Conclusion: It is concluded that nursing students do not have a positive perception of their actual clinical teaching environment and this perception is significantly different from their perception of their expected environment. PMID:26034726

  7. Technological Feasibility of a Nursing Clinical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Jeddi, Fatemeh Rangraz; Hajbaghery, Mohsen Adib; Akbari, Hossein; Esmaili, Soheila

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A successful implementation of an information system is impossible without sufficient knowledge of available technical resources of an institute. The aim of this study was to determine technical feasibility of a nursing clinical information system (NCIS) in Mazandaran province, Iran, 2015. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in three steps. In the first step, a data gathering tool was developed through an unsystematic literature review. In the second step, a questionnaire was developed and validity of the tool was confirmed by receiving opinions of faculty members and calculating indices of Content Validity Index (CVI) and Content Validity Ratio (CVR). The questionnaire reliability was confirmed by calculating Cronbach’s alpha coefficient (α= 0.72). In the third step, the feasibility of implementation of NCIS was evaluated by forming a panel of IT experts (n= 30), and through a questionnaire. Data were collected by 5-point Likert scale, very low to very high (scoring 1–5). Scores of each item were calculated and score percentage was determined. Chi-square and Fisher Exact tests were used. Results Maximum possibility of implementing NCIS were in the hardware area, additional equipment (92.6%), in the area of software, financial software (99.4%), in the area of network equipment, the possibility of integration with other internal systems, (92.6%) and in the area of network security, the possibility of backup version for security purposes (97.4%). Type of employment was statistically significant according to IT experts’ opinions (p= 0.014) Conclusion Hardware and software infrastructures for implementation of NCIS were desirable. The provision of more portable computers, advanced equipment such as barcode scanner, Radio-frequency identification (RFID), some approaches for increase accessibility of the system and essential databases from other resources and also increase of network lines’ speed are necessary. PMID:27790348

  8. Fostering cultural and interdisciplinary awareness with "low-tech" simulation in a fundamentals nursing course to prepare student nurses for critical care clinical rotations.

    PubMed

    Ruth-Sahd, Lisa A; Schneider, Melissa A; Strouse, Abigail

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the advancement of nursing education and practice through implementing "low-tech" simulation in a fundamentals nursing course to foster an awareness of scope of practice and interdisciplinary teamwork and collaboration to prepare student nurses for their critical care clinical experience. The integration of low-tech simulation during the students' first clinical course at 2 different times during the semester was utilized to accomplish this awareness. This article was added to the scant published articles that highlight the benefits of low-tech simulation in a fundamentals of nursing course. PMID:21841419

  9. Transforming nursing practice: clinical systems and the nursing unit of the future.

    PubMed

    King, Lynne A; Wasdovich, Andrea; Young, Claire

    2004-01-01

    The healthcare industry has historically focused information system expenditures on financial systems. Finally, enabling the practice of clinicians through information systems is beginning to be viewed as a strategic initiative for hospitals and health systems. Vendor applications are now better able to support clinician workflow. Infrastructure is better able to support mobile devices, which bring information to the bedside. Implementation of nursing applications provides a unique opportunity to redesign inefficient and redundant documentation, thereby enabling greater efficiency. Healthcare organizations can jump-start nursing automation by setting a finite and clear tactical plan for initiatives to be rolled out within a year in a single location. The single location enables the organization to experience how well the initiatives integrate to support optimal delivery of care. This article explores nursing information technology initiatives planned to be deployed at a 1,000-bed teaching facility through the use of a Nursing Unit of the Future.

  10. Mixed Methods Approach for Measuring the Impact of Video Telehealth on Outpatient Clinic Triage Nurse Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Rhonda G.; Finkelstein, Stanley M.

    2015-01-01

    Nurse-delivered telephone triage is a common component of outpatient clinic settings. Adding new communication technology to clinic triage has the potential to not only transform the triage process, but also alter triage workflow. Evaluating the impact of new technology on an existing workflow is paramount to maximizing efficiency of the delivery system. This study investigated triage nurse workflow before and after the implementation of video telehealth using a sequential mixed methods protocol that combined ethnography and time-motion study to provide a robust analysis of the implementation environment. Outpatient clinic triage using video telehealth required significantly more time than telephone triage, indicating a reduction in nurse efficiency. Despite the increased time needed to conduct video telehealth, nurses consistently rated it useful in providing triage. Interpretive analysis of the qualitative and quantitative data suggests the increased depth and breadth of data available during video triage alters the assessment triage nurses provide physicians. This in turn could impact the time physicians spend formulating a diagnosis and treatment plan. While the immediate impact of video telehealth is a reduction in triage nurse efficiency, what is unknown is the impact of video telehealth on physician and overall clinic efficiency. Future studies should address this area. PMID:24080753

  11. Practice nurse involvement in general practice clinical care: policy and funding issues need resolution.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Hossein Haji Ali; Karnon, Jonathan; Beilby, Justin; Gray, Jodi; Holton, Christine; Banham, David

    2014-06-01

    In Australia, primary care-based funding initiatives have been implemented to encourage general practices to employ practice nurses. The aim of this paper is to discuss limitations of the current funding and policy arrangements in enhancing the clinical role of practice nurses in the management of chronic conditions. This paper draws on the results of a real-world economic evaluation, the Primary Care Services Improvement Project (PCSIP). The PCSIP linked routinely collected clinical and resource use data to undertake a risk-adjusted cost-effectiveness analysis of increased practice nurse involvement in clinical-based activities for the management of diabetes and obesity. The findings of the PCSIP suggested that the active involvement of practice nurses in collaborative clinical-based activities is cost-effective, as well as addressing general practice workforce issues. Although primary healthcare organisations (e.g. Medicare Locals) can play a key role in supporting enhanced practice nurse roles, improvements to practice nurse funding models could further encourage more efficient use of an important resource. PMID:24870661

  12. Use of Simulation to Study Nurses Acceptance and Non-Acceptance of Clinical Decision Support Suggestions

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Vanessa E. C.; Lopez, Karen Dunn; Febretti, Alessandro; Stifter, Janet; Yao, Yingwei; Johnson, Andrew; Wilkie, Diana J.; Keenan, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Our long term goal is to ensure nurse clinical decision support (CDS) works as intended before full deployment in clinical practice. As part of a broader effort, this pilot explores factors influencing acceptance/non-acceptance of 8 CDS suggestions displayed through selecting a blinking red button in an electronic health record (EHR) based nursing plan of care software prototype. A diverse sample of 21 nurses participated in this high fidelity clinical simulation experience and completed a questionnaire to assess reasons for accepting/not accepting the CDS suggestions. Of 168 total suggestions displayed during the experiment (8 for each of the 21 nurses), 123 (73.2%) were accepted and 45 (26.8%) were not accepted. The mode number of acceptances by nurses was 7 of 8 with only 2 of 21 nurses accepting all. The main reason for CDS acceptance was the nurse’s belief that the suggestions were good for the patient (n=100%) with other features being secondarily reinforcing. Reasons for non-acceptance were less clear, with under half of the subjects indicating low confidence in the evidence. This study provides preliminary evidence that high quality simulation and targeted questionnaires about specific CDS selections offers a cost effective means for testing before full deployment in clinical practice. PMID:26361268

  13. Wound staging: can nurses apply classroom education to the clinical setting?

    PubMed

    Arnold, N; Watterworth, B

    1995-06-01

    Traditionally, education on wound staging has been conducted in the classroom using drawings, photographs or slides to illustrate examples of wound stages. These methods portray wounds two-dimensionally, but clinically, wounds are three-dimensional. Seven home care nurses in central Florida were given a pre-test and post-test of 16 slides, four of each stage. Field visits with three of these nurses were then conducted by an ET nurse to evaluate the application of this education into clinical practice in the home setting. The questions studied were: Do nurses learn to accurately assess stages of wounds from classroom education? Does classroom ability to stage wounds equate to ability to stage correctly in the clinical setting? Test results showed Stage II and Stage III wounds to be most problematic in the classroom. The most improvement was seen in the staging of Stage II and Stage IV wounds two-dimensionally. In the field, one nurse consistently staged wounds correctly while two had problems with correct staging. Additional investigation is required to determine if these results can be generalized to other home health nurses and if changes in clinical ability will occur over time. PMID:7612139

  14. [Mediation of transcultural nursing care in clinical context: a tightrope walk].

    PubMed

    Domenig, D

    1999-12-01

    Our wish for suggestions for a line of action regarding our contact with migrants in the clinical context has led us to an increased acceptance of "Transcultural Nursing" by Madeleine Leininger. However, an uncritical adoption of this theory without theoretical and historical background information produces in practice a stereotyped image of migrants, and a cultural rating of social and individual aspects instead of mutual understanding. Hence, from the present-day perspective, Leininger's model is not suitable to establish transcultural nursing care in practice. A theory not encouraging the analysis of socio-cultural backgrounds of one's own but the sight "from without" of the so-called alien--a theory that does not make interaction its main object but culture, cannot serve as a basis for transcultural nursing care. Up-to-date transcultural nursing care does not need the introduction of a specific nursing concept for migrants but an extension of nursing by a socio-cultural and migration-specific dimension. However, nursing care does not seem to accept this challenge, what with it being far easier to add the "Leininger Culture Care Theory" to the existing curricula as an additional model. Thus nursing loses the opportunity of grappling with the adoption of certain theories and models of other disciplines. Even though Leininger is herself a nurse, she has developed her model in her capacity as a cultural anthropologist using the background of anthropological theories. But, the supplying of transcultural nursing care demands also from cultural anthropologists an analysis of the concrete context of nursing care and its approaches. Only by bearing this in mind, cultural anthropology can counter effectively the danger of being marginalized as a fringe discipline, and of being reduced to the level of providing cooking recipes.

  15. Entry into clinical trials in breast cancer: the importance of specialist teams. Scottish Breast Cancer Focus Group and Scottish Cancer Therapy Network.

    PubMed

    Twelves, C J; Thomson, C S; Young, J; Gould, A

    1998-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the factors influencing entry of women with invasive breast cancer into clinical trials in Scotland. Women diagnosed during 1987 and 1993 were identified from cancer registry data records and their case notes reviewed. Entry into clinical trials was recorded, along with clinical and demographic data for 4688 patients. In 1987, the proportion of women entering clinical trials was 12.3% and, allowing for shorter follow-up, this appeared unchanged in 1993. Patients seen by surgeons with a high case load and those referred to an oncologist were approximately seven times and three times, respectively, more likely to enter a clinical trial (P < 0.0001). The area of Scotland (Health Board) where the woman was first treated also influenced study entry (P < 0.0001), whereas social deprivation had no effect (P = 0.93). Older women, especially those over 80 years of age, were less likely to enter studies (P = 0.05). Extending the management of patients by specialist multidisciplinary teams should increase recruitment into clinical trials and help to identify better treatments for women with breast cancer.

  16. Problem-based learning in clinical nursing education: integrating theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Ehrenberg, Anna C; Häggblom, Marianne

    2007-03-01

    Over the last few decades, nursing education in Sweden has undergone many changes in its length, content, and academic level. Pedagogical developments have occurred, but not as much change has taken place in the clinical part of education. Therefore, a project was initiated to improve students' integrated learning, ability to actively search for knowledge, reflect critically, and to improve the clinical learning environment, during the clinical training part of the undergraduate nursing program at a Swedish university. This was accomplished through applying problem-based learning (PBL), supporting reflection, applying a new model for supervision, and supporting nursing preceptors. The project was carried out during clinical studies in acute care in the second year of a nursing undergraduate program. The aim of this study was to describe nursing students' and their preceptors' experiences of problem-based learning and a new model for supervision in clinical education. A total of 45 students and 30 preceptors participated by answering a questionnaire and an interview. The findings showed that the project overall was perceived positively by students and preceptors. The possibility for supervised reflection was perceived as positive by both students and preceptors, although it sometimes was difficult for preceptors to set aside time. Research-based knowledge was rarely used in clinical teaching. PMID:17689426

  17. Clinical Alarms in Intensive Care Units: Perceived Obstacles of Alarm Management and Alarm Fatigue in Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ok Min; Lee, Young Whee; Cho, Insook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate the current situation of clinical alarms in intensive care unit (ICU), nurses' recognition of and fatigue in relation to clinical alarms, and obstacles in alarm management. Methods Subjects were ICU nurses and devices from 48 critically ill patient cases. Data were collected through direct observation of alarm occurrence and questionnaires that were completed by the ICU nurses. The observation time unit was one hour block. One bed out of 56 ICU beds was randomly assigned to each observation time unit. Results Overall 2,184 clinical alarms were counted for 48 hours of observation, and 45.5 clinical alarms occurred per hour per subject. Of these, 1,394 alarms (63.8%) were categorized as false alarms. The alarm fatigue score was 24.3 ± 4.0 out of 35. The highest scoring item was "always get bothered due to clinical alarms". The highest scoring item in obstacles was "frequent false alarms, which lead to reduced attention or response to alarms". Conclusions Nurses reported that they felt some fatigue due to clinical alarms, and false alarms were also obstacles to proper management. An appropriate hospital policy should be developed to reduce false alarms and nurses' alarm fatigue. PMID:26893950

  18. Examining the Effectiveness of a Preceptorship on Clinical Competence for Senior Nursing Students in a Baccalaureate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Leslee H.

    2009-01-01

    Preceptorships are models of training in which a nurse, referred to as a preceptor, is assigned to one nursing student, for the purpose of facilitating learning in the clinical setting. There is a problem in the lack of documented evidence of the effectiveness of preceptorship programs in the education of nursing students, particularly the…

  19. Equivalence testing of traditional and simulated clinical experiences: undergraduate nursing students' knowledge acquisition.

    PubMed

    Schlairet, Maura C; Pollock, Jane W

    2010-01-01

    Although simulated clinical experience is being used increasingly in nursing education, vital evidence related to knowledge acquisition associated with simulated clinical experience does not exist. This intervention study used a 2×2 crossover design and equivalence testing to explore the effects of simulated clinical experiences on undergraduate students' (n = 74) knowledge acquisition in a fundamentals of nursing course. Following random assignment, students participated in laboratory-based simulated clinical experiences with high-fidelity human patient simulators and traditional clinical experiences and completed knowledge pretests and posttests. Analysis identified significant knowledge gain associated with both simulated and traditional clinical experiences, with the groups' knowledge scores being statistically significantly equivalent. A priori equivalence bounds around the difference between the groups were set at ± 5 points. Simulated clinical experience was found to be as effective as traditional clinical experience in promoting students' knowledge acquisition.

  20. The Effect of Applying Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) on Nursing Students’ Clinical Skills: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hengameh, Habibi; Afsaneh, Raiesifar; Morteza, Khaghanizade; Hosein, Mahmudi; Marjan, Seyed Mazhari; Ebadi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Remarkable advances in educational measurement have proved need to the implementation of modern and appropriate methods of clinical evaluation. This study was carried out to compare the effect of applying direct observation procedural skills and routine evaluation method on clinical skills of nursing students. Methods: This randomized clinical trial was conducted on students of Nursing Army College, Tehran, Iran. After obtaining approval from the Ethics Committee of the Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences Research Deputy, all nursing students and instructors who agreed to participate in this study sign the informed consent. The participants were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. After the teachers were trained and an inter-raters reliability test was conducted, evaluation was performed through DOPS in the intervention group while the control groups were evaluated through the routine method. Assessment checklists for two procedures (Intra venous catheterization and change dressing) were valid and reliable. Finally data were analyzed through descriptive and analytical statistics (Chi-square, t-test, Repeated Measure ANOVA) using SPSS version 16. Results: No significant difference was observed between the two groups in terms of demographic variables (P>0.05), but a significant difference was observed between intervention and control scores (P=0.000). In other words, application of DOPS has improved clinical skills of the students significantly. Conclusion: Using this new method improved the students’ scores in clinical procedures implementation; therefore, we suggest that nursing colleges apply this evaluation method for clinical education. PMID:26153199

  1. Challenges of assessing critical thinking and clinical judgment in nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    Gorton, Karen L; Hayes, Janice

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was a relationship between critical thinking skills and clinical judgment in nurse practitioner students. The study used a convenience, nonprobability sampling technique, engaging participants from across the United States. Correlational analysis demonstrated no statistically significant relationship between critical thinking skills and examination-style questions, critical thinking skills and scores on the evaluation and reevaluation of consequences subscale of the Clinical Decision Making in Nursing Scale, and critical thinking skills and the preceptor evaluation tool. The study found no statistically significant relationships between critical thinking skills and clinical judgment. Educators and practitioners could consider further research in these areas to gain insight into how critical thinking is and could be measured, to gain insight into the clinical decision making skills of nurse practitioner students, and to gain insight into the development and measurement of critical thinking skills in advanced practice educational programs.

  2. Non-medical prescribing in nurse-led community leg ulcer clinics.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Julia

    Over the past decade, nurse prescribing in the community has improved clinical care, providing timely access to many products required for patients to receive appropriate treatment. Until recently, nurses who have qualified as nurse prescribers have only been able to prescribe from a limited list of products. Within the leg ulcer clinic environment, the majority of prescriptions written have been related to wound care. This article describes the introduction of extended independent prescribing (now known as non-medical prescribing) and how this type of prescribing has scope for revolutionizing clinical practice in all healthcare settings. There are, however, many contentious issues for clinicians prescribing in this new role, including systems for communication, clinical governance, and attitudes of other professionals. PMID:16835510

  3. Using Co-Design with Nursing Students to Create Educational Apps for Clinical Training.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Andrews, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology is being trialed in nursing education to support students in clinical practice, as it can provide instant access to high quality educational material at the point of care. However, most educational mobile apps are generic, off-the-shelf applications that do not take into consideration the unique needs of nursing students, who can require personalised software solutions. This study adapted a socio-cognitive engineering approach and through a series of focus groups with final year nursing students explored the co-design process and gained their input on the design and functionality of a clinical skills based educational app. Results showed students required an uncluttered interface that was fast to navigate and easy to use in busy clinical environments. They also requested simple visual descriptions of key clinical skills and equipment to enable them to quickly refresh their memory so they could perform the skill in practice.

  4. Using Co-Design with Nursing Students to Create Educational Apps for Clinical Training.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Andrews, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology is being trialed in nursing education to support students in clinical practice, as it can provide instant access to high quality educational material at the point of care. However, most educational mobile apps are generic, off-the-shelf applications that do not take into consideration the unique needs of nursing students, who can require personalised software solutions. This study adapted a socio-cognitive engineering approach and through a series of focus groups with final year nursing students explored the co-design process and gained their input on the design and functionality of a clinical skills based educational app. Results showed students required an uncluttered interface that was fast to navigate and easy to use in busy clinical environments. They also requested simple visual descriptions of key clinical skills and equipment to enable them to quickly refresh their memory so they could perform the skill in practice. PMID:27332217

  5. Evaluating clinical competence during nursing education: A comprehensive integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Lejonqvist, Gun-Britt; Eriksson, Katie; Meretoja, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    This paper explored concepts, definitions and theoretical perspectives evaluating clinical competence during nursing education. The questions were: (i) How is clinical competence evaluated? and (ii) What is evaluated? An integrative review of 19 original research articles from 2009 to 2013 was performed. Results showed that evaluation tools were used in 14, observations in 2 and reflecting writing in 3 studies. The students participated in all but one evaluation alone or together with peers, faculty members or preceptors. Three themes were found: (i) professional practice with a caring perspective; (ii) clinical skills and reflective practice; and (iii) cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills both with a nursing perspective. This review shows an emphasis on structured methods with a risk reducing nursing to tasks and skills why combinations with qualitative evaluations are recommended. A holistic view of competence dominated and in designing evaluations, explicit perspectives and operationalized definitions of clinical competence became evident. PMID:26369943

  6. Smartphones in Clinical Nursing Practice: A Multiphased Approach to Implementation and Deployment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brad; Davison, C. J.; Moralejo, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Students in the undergraduate nursing program at the University of Calgary-Qatar are required to work with patients in clinical settings under faculty supervision. One of the main goals of clinical courses is to provide students with the opportunity to learn in context and "just-in-time," a much more realistic and memorable learning…

  7. Development and Use of Challenge Exams for Clinical Laboratory Nursing 2: Part 2 Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattstaedt, Mary Jane; Isaac, Margaret M.

    The report describes the development of a set of equivalency tests for students in Nursing 2 who have had prior clinical laboratory training or experience in pediatrics, obstetrics, or geriatrics. For each of the three areas the examination packet includes: the course clinical objectives, the challenge examination objectives, a self-study guide, a…

  8. Nurse-led clinics: 10 essential steps to setting up a service.

    PubMed

    Hatchett, Richard

    This article outlines 10 key steps for practitioners to consider when setting up and running a nurse-led clinic. It lays emphasis on careful planning, professional development and the need to audit and evaluate the service to ensure the clinic is measurably effective. PMID:19068891

  9. Electronic Portfolios for Distance Learning: A Case from a Nursing Clinical Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephsen, Jayne

    2012-01-01

    Clinical nursing courses can already be challenging, in the traditional context of placements and hours spent in a health care setting. These types of courses are additionally problematic when offered via distance learning, due to geographic separation of students, lack of clinical placement sites in the student's community, and lack of…

  10. A Nurse-Led Smoking Cessation Clinic--Quit Rate Results and Views of Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, K. A.; Parahoo, A. K.; Blair, N.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the success of a community nurse-led smoking cessation clinic, based in one trust in Northern Ireland. The clinic operated a group therapy approach. The study employed quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection to measure smoking behaviour and to gain the views of participants. Smoking behaviour was measured by…

  11. Clinical Education Partnership: A Model for School District and College of Nursing Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreulen, Grace J.; Bednarz, Patricia K.; Wehrwein, Teresa; Davis, James

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration between school districts and universities has potential to increase the level of health services available in schools while providing quality public health clinical nursing placements for universities. This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of the Clinical Education Partnership Model (CEPM), a dynamic…

  12. Relevance of the nature vs nurture debate to clinical nursing.

    PubMed

    McVicar, A; Clancy, J

    The philosophy of holistic care underpins nurse education, and the 'nature-nurture debate' is frequently used to facilitate discussion regarding the influence of interactions with the environment in 'shaping' the individual. A limitation to this approach is that much of the work cited in the literature relates primarily to psychosocial interactions. This conveys a narrow perspective on holism, and creates an impression that the debate cannot be applied to other aspects of health and wellbeing, yet models of nursing care emphasize the need for nurses to appreciate the interactional basis of health. This article uses examples from mental health, physical health and the influence of ageing, to argue that interactions must be viewed from a much wider perspective. Only in doing so can the principles and application of holistic care, and an understanding of the bases of health education practices, be appreciated.

  13. Relevance of the nature vs nurture debate to clinical nursing.

    PubMed

    McVicar, A; Clancy, J

    The philosophy of holistic care underpins nurse education, and the 'nature-nurture debate' is frequently used to facilitate discussion regarding the influence of interactions with the environment in 'shaping' the individual. A limitation to this approach is that much of the work cited in the literature relates primarily to psychosocial interactions. This conveys a narrow perspective on holism, and creates an impression that the debate cannot be applied to other aspects of health and wellbeing, yet models of nursing care emphasize the need for nurses to appreciate the interactional basis of health. This article uses examples from mental health, physical health and the influence of ageing, to argue that interactions must be viewed from a much wider perspective. Only in doing so can the principles and application of holistic care, and an understanding of the bases of health education practices, be appreciated. PMID:9004565

  14. The transition to practice of Direct Entry Clinical Nurse Leader graduates.

    PubMed

    Shatto, Bobbi; Meyer, Geralyn; Delicath, Timothy A

    2016-07-01

    This study looks at Direct Entry Clinical Nurse Leader graduates and how their transition to practice experiences develops over time as well as factors influencing their transition. Graduates were surveyed at graduation, three, six and 12 months. Seventeen participated; eight completed all surveys. Most were from the Millennial generation. The survey consisted of two parts: school satisfaction and the Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience Scale. The results showed the Casey-Fink total score at 12 months was 0.75 points higher than at three months; suggesting a positive transition. The highest score occurred at six months which conversely had the lowest levels of satisfaction with both educational experience and intent to stay in their current role. Despite having 850 precepted/mentored clinical hours, 57.1% of these graduates stated they felt unprepared for the reality of nursing after 12 months. Regardless of feeling unprepared, the results suggest these students displayed a positive transition to practice. At 12 months, 88.2% were still with their first employers which contrasted the results of Casey-Fink and other studies of Millennial gradate nurses, which showed higher actual and intent to leave results. This study suggests that Direct Entry Clinical Nurse Leader students do indeed transition to practice more positively than traditional nursing graduates. PMID:27428700

  15. Test-retest reliability of the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) scale.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Margareta; Blomberg, Karin; Holmefur, Marie

    2015-07-01

    The Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) scale evaluates the student nurses' perception of the learning environment and supervision within the clinical placement. It has never been tested in a replication study. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the CLES + T scale. The CLES + T scale was administered twice to a group of 42 student nurses, with a one-week interval. Test-retest reliability was determined by calculations of Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs) and weighted Kappa coefficients. Standard Error of Measurements (SEM) and Smallest Detectable Difference (SDD) determined the precision of individual scores. Bland-Altman plots were created for analyses of systematic differences between the test occasions. The results of the study showed that the stability over time was good to excellent (ICC 0.88-0.96) in the sub-dimensions "Supervisory relationship", "Pedagogical atmosphere on the ward" and "Role of the nurse teacher". Measurements of "Premises of nursing on the ward" and "Leadership style of the manager" had lower but still acceptable stability (ICC 0.70-0.75). No systematic differences occurred between the test occasions. This study supports the usefulness of the CLES + T scale as a reliable measure of the student nurses' perception of the learning environment within the clinical placement at a hospital. PMID:25814151

  16. Factors Related to Healthy Diet and Physical Activity in Hospital-Based Clinical Nurses.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M; Butler, Robert; Sorrell, Jeanne

    2014-09-30

    Hospitals often promote healthy lifestyles, but little is known about nurses' actual diet and physical activity. Greater understanding about these lifestyle choices for clinical nurses may improve existing hospital-based programs and/or create desirable services. This article discusses a study that considered diet and physical activity of clinical nurses, using elements of Pender's self-care theory as a conceptual framework. Study methods included a cross-sectional, correlational design and a convenience sample of 278 nurses who worked on units with 24 hours/day and seven days-per-week responsibilities. Participants completed diet and exercise questionnaires about perceptions of attitudes and opinions, barriers, diet benefits/exercise motivators, self-efficacy, and locus of control, and personal and work characteristics. Diet and activity categories were created. Study results demonstrated that over 50% of nurses had moderately healthy diets but were insufficiently active. Healthy diet and physical activity levels were associated with higher self-efficacy, more diet benefits and physical activity motivators, fewer perceived barriers, and confidence in body image. The article discussion and conclusion sections note areas for future research and suggest that focused interventions that address benefits, motivators, and self-efficacy may increase participation in hospital-based programs and enhance healthy lifestyle for hospital-based clinical nurses.

  17. The transition to practice of Direct Entry Clinical Nurse Leader graduates.

    PubMed

    Shatto, Bobbi; Meyer, Geralyn; Delicath, Timothy A

    2016-07-01

    This study looks at Direct Entry Clinical Nurse Leader graduates and how their transition to practice experiences develops over time as well as factors influencing their transition. Graduates were surveyed at graduation, three, six and 12 months. Seventeen participated; eight completed all surveys. Most were from the Millennial generation. The survey consisted of two parts: school satisfaction and the Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience Scale. The results showed the Casey-Fink total score at 12 months was 0.75 points higher than at three months; suggesting a positive transition. The highest score occurred at six months which conversely had the lowest levels of satisfaction with both educational experience and intent to stay in their current role. Despite having 850 precepted/mentored clinical hours, 57.1% of these graduates stated they felt unprepared for the reality of nursing after 12 months. Regardless of feeling unprepared, the results suggest these students displayed a positive transition to practice. At 12 months, 88.2% were still with their first employers which contrasted the results of Casey-Fink and other studies of Millennial gradate nurses, which showed higher actual and intent to leave results. This study suggests that Direct Entry Clinical Nurse Leader students do indeed transition to practice more positively than traditional nursing graduates.

  18. Development of the Computerized Model of Performance-Based Measurement System to Measure Nurses' Clinical Competence.

    PubMed

    Liou, Shwu-Ru; Liu, Hsiu-Chen; Tsai, Shu-Ling; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Yu, Wei-Chieh; Chu, Tsui-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Critical thinking skills and clinical competence are for providing quality patient care. The purpose of this study is to develop the Computerized Model of Performance-Based Measurement system based on the Clinical Reasoning Model. The system can evaluate and identify learning needs for clinical competency and be used as a learning tool to increase clinical competency by using computers. The system includes 10 high-risk, high-volume clinical case scenarios coupled with questions testing clinical reasoning, interpersonal, and technical skills. Questions were sequenced to reflect patients' changing condition and arranged by following the process of collecting and managing information, diagnosing and differentiating urgency of problems, and solving problems. The content validity and known-groups validity was established. The Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 was 0.90 and test-retest reliability was supported (r = 0.78). Nursing educators can use the system to understand students' needs for achieving clinical competence, and therefore, educational plans can be made to better prepare students and facilitate their smooth transition to a future clinical environment. Clinical nurses can use the system to evaluate their performance-based abilities and weakness in clinical reasoning. Appropriate training programs can be designed and implemented to practically promote nurses' clinical competence and quality of patient care. PMID:26829522

  19. Use of personal phones by senior nursing students to access health care information during clinical education: staff nurses' and students' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Wittmann-Price, Ruth A; Kennedy, Lynn D; Godwin, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    Research indicates that having electronic resources readily available increases learners' ability to make clinical decisions and confidence in patient care. This mixed-method, descriptive pilot study collected data about senior prelicensure nursing students using smartphones, a type of mobile electronic device (MED), in the clinical area. The smartphones contained nursing diagnosis, pharmacology, and laboratory information; an encyclopedia; and the MEDLINE database. Student (n = 7) data about smartphone use during a 10-week clinical rotation were collected via student-recorded usage logs and focus group recordings. Staff nurses' (n = 5) perceptions of students' use of smartphones for clinical educational resources were collected by anonymous survey. Both the focus group transcript and staff surveys were evaluated and the themes summarized by content analysis. Positive results and barriers to use, such as cost and technological comfort levels, are discussed. The results may help nurse educators and administrators initiate further research of MEDs as a clinical resource.

  20. Nursing students' perspectives on clinical instructors' effective teaching strategies: A descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Valiee, Sina; Moridi, Glorokh; Khaledi, Shahnaz; Garibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    An important factor contributing to the quality of clinical education is instructors' teaching performance. The aim of this study was to identify clinical instructors' most effective teaching strategies from nursing and midwifery students' perspectives. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. All third- and fourth-year bachelor's nursing and midwifery students studying at the Nursing and Midwifery Faculty of Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences were recruited to the study by using the census method. The study instrument consisted of a demographic questionnaire and the self-report 30-item Clinical Instructors' Effective Teaching Strategies Inventory. The SPSS v.16.0 was used for data analysis. The most effective teaching strategies of clinical instructors from nursing and midwifery students' perspectives were respectively 'treating students, clients, and colleagues with respect' and 'being eager for guiding students and manage their problems'. Clinical instructors need to be eager for education and also be able to establish effective communication with students. Empowering clinical instructors in specialized and technical aspects of clinical education seems necessary.

  1. inPractice: A Practical Nursing Package for Clinical Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Barry; Cavanna, Annlouise; Corbett, Beverley

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the recent development of a computer-assisted learning program--in Practice--at the School of Health Science, in the University of Wales Swansea. The project, which began in 2001, was developed in close collaboration with The Meningitis Trust, the aim being to produce a software package to increase nursing students' knowledge…

  2. Communicate with me: Information Exchanges between Nurses.

    PubMed

    2015-03-01

    Patient safety and continuity of quality care are dependent on effective communication. Clinical nurse specialists at the Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg were finding that when they sought out essential patient information from front-line nurses, they sometimes encountered gaps in knowledge about the patient. Having to acquire this information elsewhere was causing unnecessary delays in care. The authors, members of an advanced practice nurses group at the Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg, undertook a quality improvement project to gain an understanding of the problems in information exchanges between nurses. Through interviews with front-line nurses on four units, they found that many factors contributed to the lack of knowledge nurses had about patients, such as inconsistent documentation, poorly defined plans of care and variable communication patterns. This project highlighted the need to develop a standardized handoff template to aid in information exchanges.

  3. High-fidelity simulation: Assessment of student nurses' team achievements of clinical judgment.

    PubMed

    Hallin, Karin; Bäckström, Britt; Häggström, Marie; Kristiansen, Lisbeth

    2016-07-01

    Nursing educators have the challenge of preparing nursing students to handle complex patient care situations in real life, but much remains unknown about the ability to make clinical judgments. In this study, high-fidelity simulation (HFS) was used at a Swedish university to find answers about pre-licensure nursing students' success in clinical judgment in terms of team ability and relationships with theoretical achievements, and personal and scenario circumstances. The matrix Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR) was used to analyze and score the students' ability in teams to notice, interpret and respond to complex care situations. Overall, the results showed the student teams in their first meeting with HFS in a complex care situation achieved low clinical judgment points; most teams were in the stages of Beginning and Developing. For attaining high team achievements the majority of the students in the team should theoretically be "high performance". Being observers and having HFS experience before nursing education was significant too. However, age, health care experience, and assistant nurse degrees were of secondary importance. Further research at universities regionally, nationally, and internationally is needed. PMID:27428686

  4. Typology of undergraduate nursing students' unsafe clinical practices: Q-methodology.

    PubMed

    Mossey, Sharolyn; Montgomery, Phyllis; Raymond, June M; Killam, Laura A

    2012-05-01

    Undergraduate nursing students, as members of the health care team, must uphold patient safety as a professional and moral obligation during their clinical learning experiences. To address this imperative, in a humanistic paradigm, students engage in critical appraisal of self as a developing practitioner. Using Q-methodology, this study describes undergraduate nursing students' subjective understanding of unsafe clinical practices, and results revealed a typology of five groups of unsafe students. The results showed four discrete groups of students at risk for unsafe clinical practices-vulnerable, unprepared, unknowing, and distanced students. Overall, a consensus viewpoint described the presence of the displaced student as the greatest safety risk. Use of this typology as an assessment guide may help students and educators cooperatively create and maintain a culture of safety while developing competent novice nurses.

  5. [Clinical practice as an arborescent and rhizomorphic practice in surgical nursing work].

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Lenice Dutra; Lunardi, Wilson Danilo Filho; Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; de Figueiredo, Paula Pereira

    2013-12-01

    A qualitative and exploratory case study was conducted in a surgery unit of a university hospital. The study aimed to analyze the nurses' work from the perspective of health care production and clinical practice. The subjects of the study were six nurses. Non-participant observations, documentary research and in-depth interviews were carried out, followed by discursive textual analysis. Nursing work is organized according to two interconnected and interdependent perspectives: a clinical model, which forms the central structure of its practice, and a structure formed by multiple and heterogeneous elements. in this way, the clinical model of health care is organized as a centered structure that enables the fulfillment of biological needs and acts as a basis for connecting disparate knowledge and practices that expand practice through interconnections with the work environment. PMID:24626366

  6. Engaging a Nursing Workforce in Evidence-Based Practice: Introduction of a Nursing Clinical Effectiveness Committee.

    PubMed

    McKeever, Stephen; Twomey, Bernadette; Hawley, Meaghan; Lima, Sally; Kinney, Sharon; Newall, Fiona

    2016-02-01

    This column shares the best evidence-based strategies and innovative ideas on how to facilitate the learning of EBP principles and processes by clinicians as well as nursing and interprofessional students. Guidelines for submission are available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1741-6787. PMID:26606269

  7. 'Makes you wanna do treatment': benefits of a hepatitis C specialist clinic to clients in Christchurch, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Brener, Loren; Gray, Rebecca; Cama, Elena J; Treloar, Carla

    2013-03-01

    People with hepatitis C virus (HCV) are a marginalised population that may experience discrimination in everyday contexts, including health-care, due to the association of HCV with injecting drug use. Stigma and discrimination are known to have a range of negative effects on people with HCV, including diminished quality of life and avoidance of health-care. The Hepatitis C Community Clinic is an integrated care service established in 2008 in Christchurch, New Zealand to provide alternative access to health-care that is non-judgemental and supportive. As an integrated care service, the clinic aims to improve health outcomes and quality of life through a holistic approach to health-care for people with HCV and people who inject drugs. This qualitative study forms part of a broader mixed-methods evaluation of the clinic, and aims to assess the role of the clinic in improving health outcomes, knowledge, lifestyle practices and psychosocial functioning of the target population. Interviews were conducted with 24 health professionals and 24 clients of the clinic between April and November 2010. Findings illustrate that the clinic is a novel model of care that is effective in accessing a hard-to-reach and marginalised population in part due to the non-judgemental, caring and supportive environment that engenders trust with clients. Based on participant reports, the clinic assists clients in managing their HCV and other health concerns and in increasing their readiness for HCV treatment. Given the benefits of this community clinic to clients, it is proposed that future research investigate the feasibility and benefits of administering HCV treatment through community-based integrated care networks.

  8. Clinical evaluation and grading practices in schools of nursing: national survey findings part II.

    PubMed

    Oermann, Marilyn H; Yarbrough, Suzanne S; Saewert, Karen J; Ard, Nell; Charasika, Margie E

    2009-01-01

    To better understand how nurse educators evaluate and grade students' clinical practice, the Evaluation of Learning Advisory Council of the National League for Nursing conducted a survey of faculty (N = 1,573) in all types of prelicensure RN programs. This article describes the findings of that survey in relation to clinical evaluation and grading clinical practice. Nearly all faculty used a clinical evaluation tool to rate students' performance in the clinical setting (n = 1,534, 98 percent); most programs had the same basic tool in all courses, but modified to reflect the unique aspects of each course (n = 1,095, 70 percent). Faculty (n = 1,116, 83 percent) reported using pass/fail for grading in clinical courses rather than a letter or numerical grade.

  9. Evaluation of Nursing Students’ Communication Abilities in Clinical Courses in Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Shafakhah, Mahnaz; Zarshenas, Ladan; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Sarvestani, Raheleh Sabet

    2015-01-01

    Background: Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) has established, improving communication as a priority for improving patient safety since 2006. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate nursing students’ communication abilities to recognize their strengths and weaknesses in communication skills. Method: This cross-sectional study was carried out in 2014. The study participants included all the nursing students who passed two semesters in Fatemeh School of Nursing and Midwifery in Shiraz, Iran. The students’ communication skills were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Then, the data were entered into the SPSS statistical software (v. 16) and analyzed using both descriptive (mean and percentage) and inferential statistics (Pearson correlation and ANOVA). Results: Among the 200 students who completed the questionnaires, 58% were female and 42% were male with the mean age of 21.79 years (SD=2.14). The results of Pearson correlation analysis demonstrated a significant correlation between the nursing students’ clinical communication behavior scores and treatment communication ability scores (P<0.001). The findings demonstrated that most nursing students required improvement in their communication skills in both clinical communication behavior and treatment communication ability. Besides, a significant difference was observed among the students of different terms regarding clinical communication behaviors (P≤0.05), but not concerning communication abilities. Nursing students in higher semesters had better communication skills. Conclusions: The results showed that nursing students in this university had a moderate ability in clinical and treatment communication. Thus, paying attention to standard education, curriculum revision, and adding some specific theoretical lessons for improving communication skills are mandatory during the bachelor’s degree. PMID:25946924

  10. Predictors of Taiwanese baccalaureate nursing students' physio-psycho-social responses during clinical practicum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Wen; Hung, Chich-Hsiu

    2014-01-01

    The nursing educational process may contribute to stress in nursing students, particularly during clinical rotations. This descriptive study explored the relationships between perceived stress, coping behaviors, personality traits, and physio-psycho-social responses in a clinical practicum among baccalaureate nursing students and identified predictors for physio-psycho-social responses. A cross-sectional design was employed. One hundred and one juniors enrolled in a four-year baccalaureate nursing program in Taiwan participated in this study. Four structured questionnaires were utilized to collect data. Multiple regression analysis showed that three predictors accounted for 53.2% of the variance in students' physio-psycho-social responses, including perceived stress, students' gender, and personality traits. The implication for nursing educators is providing immediate assistance and appropriate support to guide students through difficult learning when they need. Nursing instructors also should pay attention to students' gender-linked differences and be aware of individuals' personality traits, especially those with emotional instability, unsocial behaviors, and depressive signs.

  11. Clinical practice of new nurse graduates in Lebanon: challenges and perspectives through the eyes of preceptors.

    PubMed

    Kantar, Lina D

    2012-11-01

    New nurse graduates continue to experience difficulty balancing their preparation for practice with the expectations of the workplace. Few studies have explored the transition practices of nurse graduates through the challenges that they experience. This article presents the findings of a research study that explored the perceptions of preceptors regarding the clinical practice of nurse graduates using the qualitative multiple case study design. Twenty preceptors, selected from three recognized hospitals in Beirut, Lebanon, underwent semistructured interviews. Interview questions were based on an extensive literature review and on Tanner's (2006) judgment dimensions to categorize transition practices. An exhaustive discussion of the practices led to the identification of major themes that illustrate the clinical experiences of new nurse graduates: (1) inventory of competencies, (2) learning experience, (3) technical and theoretical mysteries, and (4) challenge of one's potential. The themes provide directives that curriculum leaders and executive nurses can use to plan initiatives that assist in the effective transition of new nurse graduates to the professional role.

  12. Exploring masculinity and marginalization of male undergraduate nursing students' experience of belonging during clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, Monique G; Kellett, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive recruitment strategies used in Canadian undergraduate nursing programs have enjoyed only moderate success, given that male students represent a small percentage of the student population. To determine whether there were gender differences in their sense of belonging, undergraduate nursing students (n = 462) in southern Alberta were surveyed using the Belongingness Scale-Clinical Placement Experience questionnaire. No significant gender differences were found on two of the subscales. However, male students demonstrated significantly lower scores on the efficacy subscale (p = 0.02). This finding suggests that some men experience feelings of marginalization and discrimination. Nurse educators and students are encouraged to explore their worldviews related to gendered performances and teaching practices that create bias. Practice environments are encouraged to deinstitutionalize policies and procedures that accentuate femininities of care. Finally, men entering into the nursing profession are encouraged to reflect on how their gender performance may facilitate or detract from their feelings of belonging.

  13. Supporting generalist nurses in the rural setting with the introduction of a clinical assessment process.

    PubMed

    Rabbetts, Lyn

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the implementation of an assessment process for general nurses involved in providing end-of-life care. A mixed-method, three-phased study was conducted on a medical ward at a regional hospital in a rural setting. Participating nurses completed a questionnaire about their awareness levels of the five validated scales included in the assessment of patients receiving palliative care. Auditing of the completed assessment forms was conducted at the interim and post data collection points and focus groups were conducted in the final phase. Analysis of the data revealed that nurses were able to integrate the use of this assessment process into the care of this group of patients. The author concludes, while nurses working in rural settings require general clinical knowledge of a wide range of patient groups, validated assessment scales can assist them in the provision of evidence-based palliative care. PMID:27018738

  14. Impact of Simulation and Clinical Experience on Self-efficacy in Nursing Students: Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Kimhi, Einat; Reishtein, Judith L; Cohen, Miri; Friger, Michael; Hurvitz, Nancy; Avraham, Rinat

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effect of simulation and clinical experience timing on self-confidence/self-efficacy for the nursing process. Using a randomized, double-crossover design, self-efficacy was measured 3 times. Although self-efficacy was significantly higher at time 1 for students who had clinical experience, there was no difference between the groups at the end of the course (time 2). Thus, simulation increased self-confidence/self-efficacy equivalently if placed either before or after clinical experience.

  15. 'I Used to Fight with Them but Now I Have Stopped!': Conflict and Doctor-Nurse-Anaesthetists' Motivation in Maternal and Neonatal Care Provision in a Specialist Referral Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Aberese-Ako, Matilda; Agyepong, Irene Akua; Gerrits, Trudie; Van Dijk, Han

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives This paper analyses why and how conflicts occur and their influence on doctors and nurse-anaesthetists' motivation in the provision of maternal and neonatal health care in a specialist hospital. Methodology The study used ethnographic methods including participant observation, conversation and in-depth interviews over eleven months in a specialist referral hospital in Ghana. Qualitative analysis software Nvivo 8 was used for coding and analysis of data. Main themes identified in the analysis form the basis for interpreting and reporting study findings. Ethics Statement Ethical clearance was obtained from the Ghana Health Service Ethics Review board (approval number GHS-ERC:06/01/12) and from the University of Wageningen. Written consent was obtained from interview participants, while verbal consent was obtained for conversations. To protect the identity of the hospital and research participants pseudonyms are used in the article and the part of Ghana in which the study was conducted is not mentioned. Results Individual characteristics, interpersonal and organisational factors contributed to conflicts. Unequal power relations and distrust relations among doctors and nurse-anaesthetists affected how they responded to conflicts. Responses to conflicts including forcing, avoiding, accommodating and compromising contributed to persistent conflicts, which frustrated and demotivated doctors and nurse-anaesthetists. Demotivated workers exhibited poor attitudes in collaborating with co-workers in the provision of maternal and neonatal care, which sometimes led to poor health worker response to client care, consequently compromising the hospital's goal of providing quality health care to clients. Conclusion To improve health care delivery in health facilities in Ghana, health managers and supervisors need to identify conflicts as an important phenomenon that should be addressed whenever they occur. Effective mechanisms including training managers

  16. Re-envisioning clinical education for nurse practitioner programs: themes from a national leaders' dialogue.

    PubMed

    Giddens, Jean Foret; Lauzon-Clabo, Laurie; Morton, Patricia Gonce; Jeffries, Pamela; McQuade-Jones, Bambi; Ryan, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    As the need for primary care providers increases, nursing education programs face significant challenges to meet future workforce needs. A more resource-efficient approach for the clinical education of nurse practitioner students is needed. A think tank involving 20 thought leaders representing multiple disciplines was convened to discuss this issue. This article presents seven themes that emerged from this national leaders' dialog: academic practice co-design, standardized preclinical preparation, standardized student assessment, entrustable professional activities, immersive clinical experiences, interprofessional education for team-based care, and innovative education practices. PMID:24939338

  17. The Health Consultation Program: a model school nurse education program.

    PubMed

    Larter, N; Chernick, L; Maire, J A; DuBois, E

    1999-08-01

    The Health Consultation Program (HCP) provides educational resources to school nurses throughout the state of Washington. It has several components, including consultation with clinical nurse specialists, a video lending library, health education materials, continuing education seminars, and preceptorships. School nurses access desired services to assist them in a variety of activities, such as developing individualized health care plans or teaching other school personnel about a child's special needs. Quotations from school nurses gathered during HCP evaluations indicate greater self-care abilities by students, improved skills of teachers and other professionals, increased planning for safe and appropriate care, and improved quality of care. PMID:10745798

  18. The Effect of Nursing Faculty Presence on Students' Level of Anxiety, Self-Confidence, and Clinical Performance during a Clinical Simulation Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsley, Trisha Leann

    2012-01-01

    Nursing schools design their clinical simulation labs based upon faculty's perception of the optimal environment to meet the students' learning needs, other programs' success with integrating high-tech clinical simulation, and the funds available. No research has been conducted on nursing faculty presence during a summative…

  19. The ethics of nursing student international clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Levi, Amy

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the motivations for offering international nursing student experiences and the reasons students choose to participate. Students should prepare by learning cultural humility rather than cultural competency, and they should be oriented to the ethical responsibility implicit in caring for those in developing countries. Programs that provide these experiences need to be developed with an eye to sustainability so the lives of those receiving care will be enriched after the students go home.

  20. The effect of clinical nursing instructors on student self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rowbotham, Melodie; Owen, Rachel M

    2015-11-01

    Clinical practicum experiences for nursing students provides the students an opportunity to apply concepts learned in class, practice skills learned in lab, and interact with patients, families, and other nurses. Although students look forward to these experiences, they often feel intimated and anxious about them. Clinical instructors play an important role in this experience and can either help or hinder student learning and self-efficacy. Using Bandura's Social Learning Theory as foundation, this descriptive study examined the relationship between perceived instructor effectiveness and student self-efficacy. Data were collected from a BSN school of nursing at a Midwestern USA comprehensive masters university. The instruments used were the Nursing Clinical Teacher Effectiveness Inventory (NCTEI) and the student self-efficacy (SSE) questionnaire. Participants (n = 236) were from a traditional nursing program with 86% female and 14% male. Data was analyzed using Pearson's correlation and MANCOVA. Results indicated: Out of the five areas of attributes, one area showed significant (p < .01) difference between the lower and higher self-efficacy groups and with specific teacher behaviors within the Evaluation category. Students with high self-efficacy reported faculty who suggested ways to improve, identified strengths and weaknesses, observed frequently, communicated expectations, gives positive reinforcement ad corrects without belittling. This can help faculty develop behaviors that increases student learning and student self-efficacy. PMID:26482402

  1. Constructivism applied to psychiatric-mental health nursing: an alternative to supplement traditional clinical education.

    PubMed

    DeCoux Hampton, Michelle

    2012-02-01

    With the popularity of accelerated pre-licensure nursing programmes and the growth in nursing student enrolments, traditional clinical education continues to be a challenge to deliver. Nursing faculty members are required to develop and implement educational innovations that achieve effective learning outcomes, while using fewer resources. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the effectiveness of a constructivism-based learning project to achieve specific learning outcomes and to supplement approximately 30 clinical hours in a psychiatric-mental health nursing course. Students participated in a 10-week, multistage project that examined life histories, treatment resources, and evidence-based practice, as applied to a single individual with a mental illness. Students reported increased understanding of mental health and illness, developed personal relevance associated with the knowledge gained, and learned to problem solve with regard to nursing care of individuals diagnosed with mental illness. For many students, there also appeared to be a reduction in stigmatized attitudes towards mental illness. Constructivism-based learning is a promising alternative to supplement clinical hours, while effectively achieving learning outcomes. Future research is needed to further validate the use of this method for the learning of course content, as well as the reduction of stigma.

  2. Learning from clinical placement experience: Analysing nursing students' final reflections in a digital storytelling activity.

    PubMed

    Paliadelis, Penny; Wood, Pamela

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports on the learning potential of a reflective activity undertaken by final year nursing students, in which they were asked to recount two meaningful events that occurred during their clinical placements over the duration of their 3-year nursing degree program and reflect on how these events contributed to their learning to become beginning level Registered Nurses (RNs). This descriptive qualitative study gathered narratives from 92 students as individual postings in an online forum created within the University's learning management system. An analysis of the students' reflections are the focus of this paper particularly in relation to the value of reflecting on the identified events. Four themes emerged that clearly highlight the way in which these students interpreted and learned from both positive and negative clinical experiences, their strong desire to fit into their new role and their ability to re-imagine how they might respond to clinical events when they become Registered Nurses. The findings of this study may contribute to developing nursing curricula that better prepares final year students for the realities of practice. PMID:27428802

  3. The effect of clinical nursing instructors on student self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rowbotham, Melodie; Owen, Rachel M

    2015-11-01

    Clinical practicum experiences for nursing students provides the students an opportunity to apply concepts learned in class, practice skills learned in lab, and interact with patients, families, and other nurses. Although students look forward to these experiences, they often feel intimated and anxious about them. Clinical instructors play an important role in this experience and can either help or hinder student learning and self-efficacy. Using Bandura's Social Learning Theory as foundation, this descriptive study examined the relationship between perceived instructor effectiveness and student self-efficacy. Data were collected from a BSN school of nursing at a Midwestern USA comprehensive masters university. The instruments used were the Nursing Clinical Teacher Effectiveness Inventory (NCTEI) and the student self-efficacy (SSE) questionnaire. Participants (n = 236) were from a traditional nursing program with 86% female and 14% male. Data was analyzed using Pearson's correlation and MANCOVA. Results indicated: Out of the five areas of attributes, one area showed significant (p < .01) difference between the lower and higher self-efficacy groups and with specific teacher behaviors within the Evaluation category. Students with high self-efficacy reported faculty who suggested ways to improve, identified strengths and weaknesses, observed frequently, communicated expectations, gives positive reinforcement ad corrects without belittling. This can help faculty develop behaviors that increases student learning and student self-efficacy.

  4. A clinical ladder program based on Carper's Fundamental Patterns of Knowing in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Lee A; Nelson, Deana; Godfrey, Leah

    2003-03-01

    Clinical and career ladder programs were popular adjuncts to recruitment and retention during the nursing shortage of the 1980s. Programs commonly used Benner's work as an organizing framework and typically used activities such as continuing education credit, committee participation, work experience, certifications, academic degrees, community service, and performance appraisal scores as criteria for advancement. The authors present a unique clinical ladder program based on Carper's Fundamental Patterns of Knowing in Nursing. This philosophical work has been debated in the literature for many years, yet to the authors' knowledge, this work has never been used as the conceptual basis for program development. The four patterns of knowing in nursing were found to be consistent with the definition of professional nursing, and provided a meaningful organizing framework that was well received by staff registered nurses. An overall history of clinical ladders is presented, followed by the organization's prior experience with these programs, and finally the details of development and implementation of the program with plans for evaluation. PMID:12629301

  5. Satisfaction with clinical placement--The perspective of nursing students from multiple universities.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Scott; Brunero, Scott; Woods, Karen P

    2015-01-01

    Projected nursing shortfalls in Australia have identified the need for organisational planning and strategies around recruitment and retention in healthcare facilities. Strategies include but are not limited to alliances with university faculty and the quality of undergraduate clinical placement experience. This cross-sectional study explored undergraduate nursing students' satisfaction with clinical placement experience from the perspective of multiple university faculties, and the relationship this has with future employment intention at a metropolitan hospital in Sydney, New South Wales. Findings from respondents demonstrated satisfaction with the clinical placement on the following criteria: expectations being met; welcoming of unit staff and attitudes of thereafter; clinical and university facilitator support; and participation in patient care. Three quarters of respondents also indicated that they would consider the hospital as a future employer. Satisfaction with clinical placement experience may aid organisational recruitment strategies.

  6. Satisfaction with clinical placement--The perspective of nursing students from multiple universities.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Scott; Brunero, Scott; Woods, Karen P

    2015-01-01

    Projected nursing shortfalls in Australia have identified the need for organisational planning and strategies around recruitment and retention in healthcare facilities. Strategies include but are not limited to alliances with university faculty and the quality of undergraduate clinical placement experience. This cross-sectional study explored undergraduate nursing students' satisfaction with clinical placement experience from the perspective of multiple university faculties, and the relationship this has with future employment intention at a metropolitan hospital in Sydney, New South Wales. Findings from respondents demonstrated satisfaction with the clinical placement on the following criteria: expectations being met; welcoming of unit staff and attitudes of thereafter; clinical and university facilitator support; and participation in patient care. Three quarters of respondents also indicated that they would consider the hospital as a future employer. Satisfaction with clinical placement experience may aid organisational recruitment strategies. PMID:26285417

  7. Six-Year Experience of a Nurse-Led Colorectal Cancer Follow-Up Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Al Chalabi, Hasan; O'Riordan, James M.; Richardson, Alex; Flannery, Delia; O'Connor, Katrina; Stuart, Charlotte; Larkin, John; McCormick, Paul; Mehigan, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. To review the experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in a tertiary referral colorectal cancer centre. Methodology. Data from the nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in our unit was prospectively maintained in a colorectal cancer database. Data was analysed from January 1, 2006 until the December 31, 2011. Results. 1125 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and referred to our unit as a tertiary centre for specialised colorectal cancer. Nine hundred and four patients had surgical resection of their colorectal cancer. Four hundred and seven patients were referred to the nurse-led colorectal cancer clinic for surveillance. The mean age of the patient cohort was 67 years (range 32–88) and 56% of patients were male. One hundred and seventeen patients were discharged to their general practitioner having been disease free after 5 years of followup. Fifty-four patients were diagnosed with either local or distant recurrence. Conclusion. A nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic is running according to strict follow-up protocols. This type of clinic significantly reduces the number of routine follow-up patients that have to be seen by the colorectal surgical consultant. PMID:25374950

  8. The impact of clinical simulation on learner self-efficacy in pre-registration nursing education.

    PubMed

    Pike, Tamsin; O'Donnell, Victoria

    2010-07-01

    Clinical simulation is becoming increasingly popular in pre-registration nursing education. Incorporating teaching and learning strategies that enhance learner self-efficacy will theoretically improve clinical competence (Bandura, 1986, 1997). This paper presents the findings of a study that aimed to explore the impact of clinical simulation on self-efficacy beliefs amongst pre-registration nurses. A preliminary study (Pike, 2008) used a pre- and post-test design to measure learner self-efficacy before and after a clinical simulation session. Qualitative responses to questions on the post-test questionnaire provided themes to explore in a focus group interview with a convenience sample of nine participants. Thematic content analysis of the interview highlighted two principal findings. Firstly, students described low levels of self-efficacy with regards to communication skills, an area identified as a priority within pre-registration nursing education (NMC, 2007a). Second, students highlighted the need for learning experiences within clinical simulation to be more authentic, to improve the theory to practice gap. It is argued by incorporating strategies within clinical simulation that enhance learner self-efficacy, overall clinical competence will be improved. Suggestions for how pedagogical approaches may be developed within clinical simulation are discussed, whilst acknowledging the limitations of the small scale nature of the study.

  9. The perception of intuition in clinical practice by Iranian critical care nurses: a phenomenological study

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Parkhide; Abdi, Alireza; Jalali, Rostam; Salari, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Background Intuition as a way of learning in nursing is applied to decision making and judgment in complicated clinical situations. Several studies have been conducted on intuition in clinical settings, but comprehension of this concept is unclear. Moreover, there is a lack of information about intuition in critical care nurses caring for more seriously ill patients. This study aimed to explore Iranian critical care nurses’ understanding of intuition in clinical practice. Methods In a descriptive–phenomenological study, 12 nurses employed in critical care units of the hospitals affiliated to Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences were purposively recruited to the study. A semistructured interview was administered, and then written verbatim. The data were managed by MAXQDA 10 software, and qualitative analysis was undertaken using the seven-stage approach of Colaizzi. Results Of the 12 nurses who participated in the study, 7 (58.3%) were female and married, and 10 (88.3%) held a bachelor’s degree in nursing. The mean and standard deviations of participants’ age, job experience, and critical care experience were 36.66±7.01, 13.75±6.82, and 7.66±3.36 years, respectively. Four main themes and eleven sub-themes were elicited from the qualitative analysis; the main themes including “Understanding intuition as a feeling”, “Understanding intuition as a thought”, “Understanding intuition as receiving signs”, and “Understanding intuition as an alarm”. Because they have trust in their own intuition, the nurses made further assessments and paid more attention to patients. They were also better prepared after receiving intuition alarms to perform the appropriate responses, and acting upon the alarms reduced the nurses’ physical and psychological signs. Conclusion The findings showed how intuition was understood by the critical care nurses; therefore, these results can be considered to form a theoretical basis for designing other studies. Because

  10. Nurse practitioner education: enhancing performance through the use of the Objective Structured Clinical Assessment.

    PubMed

    Bramble, K

    1994-02-01

    An Objective Structured Clinical Assessment (OSCA) was implemented in a graduate nurse practitioner (NP) program to determine the effect that participation in this type of clinical simulation would have on the cognitive and clinical competency of students. Based on the analysis of data, participation in the OSCA simulations did not lead to significantly better cognitive or clinical performance. Support for the OSCA was shown, however, by NP students when subjectively evaluating their experiences. All students agreed or strongly agreed that OSCA participation was a valuable learning experience and that the feedback provided was beneficial to their clinical and cognitive performance.

  11. Communicating Nursing Care Using the Health Level Seven Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 Care Plan.

    PubMed

    Matney, Susan A; Dolin, Gay; Buhl, Lindy; Sheide, Amy

    2016-03-01

    A care plan provides a patient, family, or community picture and outlines the care to be provided. The Health Level Seven Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture (C-CDA) Release 2 Care Plan Document is used to structure care plan data when sharing the care plan between systems and/or settings. The American Nurses Association has recommended the use of two terminologies, Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) for assessments and outcomes and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) for problems, procedures (interventions), outcomes, and observation findings within the C-CDA. This article describes C-CDA, introduces LOINC and SNOMED CT, discusses how the C-CDA Care Plan aligns with the nursing process, and illustrates how nursing care data can be structured and encoded within a C-CDA Care Plan.

  12. Clinical problem solving ability of BSc and diploma nursing students in Indian setting--a comparison.

    PubMed

    Ezhilarasu, Punitha

    2012-01-01

    Clinical Problem Solving Ability (CPSA) is an important skill essential for nurses to achieve professional excellence which is developed during the educational process. A sample of 215 students from BSc and Diploma nursing educational programmes were studied to determine their CPSA and the differences were compared. A written simulation instrument (Ezhilarasu, 2000) with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.81 was used to measure the CPSA. BSc students scored significantly higher than Diploma students (p = 0). Final year students from both the programmes scored higher than the first year students (p = 0.01). The least commonly used step in clinical problem solving is evaluation. Along with other studies, this study also supports the influence of the educational process in the development of CPSA. Appropriate teaching strategies and role modelling by faculty should become an essential part in all nursing educational institutions.

  13. Preparing culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students for clinical practice in the health care setting.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Theresa; Robinson, Carolyn; Frohman, Rena

    2013-07-01

    The number of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students seeking enrollment in higher education courses in Western countries where English is the predominant language has grown considerably in the past decade, especially in undergraduate health care courses. When enrolled in nursing courses, students are required to complete clinical placements. Such experiences can create significant challenges for CALD students where language, cultural differences, and interpretation of cultural norms complicate the learning process. To assist CALD nursing students to transition successfully, an extracurricular integrated curriculum program was developed and implemented at a university in Queensland, Australia. The program is a series of interactive workshops based on the principles of caring pedagogy and student-centered learning. The program applies strategies that combine small-group discussions with peers, role-plays, and interactions with final-year nursing student volunteers. Evaluation of the program suggests it has assisted most of the students surveyed to be successful in their clinical studies. PMID:23721071

  14. Preparing culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students for clinical practice in the health care setting.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Theresa; Robinson, Carolyn; Frohman, Rena

    2013-07-01

    The number of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students seeking enrollment in higher education courses in Western countries where English is the predominant language has grown considerably in the past decade, especially in undergraduate health care courses. When enrolled in nursing courses, students are required to complete clinical placements. Such experiences can create significant challenges for CALD students where language, cultural differences, and interpretation of cultural norms complicate the learning process. To assist CALD nursing students to transition successfully, an extracurricular integrated curriculum program was developed and implemented at a university in Queensland, Australia. The program is a series of interactive workshops based on the principles of caring pedagogy and student-centered learning. The program applies strategies that combine small-group discussions with peers, role-plays, and interactions with final-year nursing student volunteers. Evaluation of the program suggests it has assisted most of the students surveyed to be successful in their clinical studies.

  15. Correlations between Clinical Judgement and Learning Style Preferences of Nursing Students in the Simulation Room

    PubMed Central

    Hallin, Karin; Häggström, Marie; Bäckström, Britt; Kristiansen, Lisbeth Porskrog

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health care educators account for variables affecting patient safety and are responsible for developing the highly complex process of education planning. Clinical judgement is a multidimensional process, which may be affected by learning styles. The aim was to explore three specific hypotheses to test correlations between nursing students’ team achievements in clinical judgement and emotional, sociological and physiological learning style preferences. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with Swedish university nursing students in 2012-2013. Convenience sampling was used with 60 teams with 173 nursing students in the final semester of a three-year Bachelor of Science in nursing programme. Data collection included questionnaires of personal characteristics, learning style preferences, determined by the Dunn and Dunn Productivity Environmental Preference Survey, and videotaped complex nursing simulation scenarios. Comparison with Lasater Clinical Judgement Rubric and Non-parametric analyses were performed. Results: Three significant correlations were found between the team achievements and the students’ learning style preferences: significant negative correlation with ‘Structure’ and ‘Kinesthetic’ at the individual level, and positive correlation with the ‘Tactile’ variable. No significant correlations with students’ ‘Motivation’, ‘Persistence’, ‘Wish to learn alone’ and ‘Wish for an authoritative person present’ were seen. Discussion and Conclusion: There were multiple complex interactions between the tested learning style preferences and the team achievements of clinical judgement in the simulation room, which provides important information for the becoming nurses. Several factors may have influenced the results that should be acknowledged when designing further research. We suggest conducting mixed methods to determine further relationships between team achievements, learning style preferences

  16. You never stop learning as an Admiral Nurse.

    PubMed

    Sprinks, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    What does your job involve? Admiral Nurses work with families affected by dementia, providing emotional support and practical advice. I lead a team of three, support them through management and supervision, allocate the busy caseload and oversee our ongoing evaluation work. I also carry a small clinical caseload and jointly work on some of our more complex cases with my team. As a nurse consultant, I also provide specialist input into service development locally. PMID:27573966

  17. Interprofessional Clinical Assignments: A Project in Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Turner, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Education involving interprofessional activities helps to improve learning and the ability to work in an effective collaborative environment. In this project, 16 baccalaureate nursing students were given the opportunity to work with other members of the health care team to develop an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of each group of professionals and the communication skills needed to provide quality and safe care to patients and to positively impact their motivation to work with members of other health professions. All the students in the group documented the successful completion of these objectives in their journals.

  18. Perceived Stress and Coping Strategies among Newly Nurse Students in Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahfouz, Rasha; Alsahli, Haya

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed at assessing the stress level and coping strategies among students who were newly in Practicing the clinical training in different hospitals, at the Nursing College, Princess Nourah University. The study design was a descriptive analytical one. The study was conducted at the beginning of second semester in the academic year…

  19. A CIS (Clinical Information System) Quality Evaluation Tool for Nursing Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Seon Ah

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a tool to evaluate the quality of a clinical information system (CIS) conceived by nurses and conduct a pilot test with the developed tool as an initial assessment. CIS quality is required for successful implementation in information technology (IT) environments. The study started with the realization that…

  20. Management Development in Health Care: Exploring the Experiences of Clinical Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Laura; Milner, Brigid

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dramatic reforms in the health service in recent years. Design/methodology/approach--Examines management development in health care, and explores the experiences of clinical nurse managers. Findings--Duplication of agencies and multiplication of roles have led to tensions in terms of both…

  1. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence, Self-Efficacy, and Clinical Performance in Associate Degree Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Eileen W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore self-efficacy, an individual's beliefs about his or her ability to perform a series of tasks, and emotional intelligence, an individual's ability to perceive, use, understand, and manage emotions, as predictors for successful clinical performance in nursing students. The participants were 49 female and 7…

  2. A Language-Focused Needs Analysis for ESL-Speaking Nursing Students in Class and Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Reports results of an extensive needs-analysis for English-as-a-Second-Language-speaking graduate nursing students. The analysis focuses on skills required for school, clinical practice, and interaction with a multicultural, socially stratified patient population. (Author/VWL)

  3. How different can you be and still survive? Homogeneity and difference in clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Barbara L; Osborne, Margaret; Gregory, David

    2004-01-01

    The article focuses on a component of a three-year institutional ethnography regarding the construction of cultural diversity in clinical education. Students in two Canadian schools of nursing described being a nursing student as bounded by unwritten and largely invisible expectations of homogeneity in the context of a predominant discourse of equality and cultural sensitivity. At the same time, they witnessed many incidents, both personally and those directed toward other individuals of the same culture, of clinical teachers problematizing difference and centering on difference as less than the expected norm. This complex and often contradictory experience of difference and homogeneity contributed to their construction of cultural diversity as a problem. The authors provide examples of how the perception of being different affected some students' learning in the clinical setting and their interactions with clinical teachers. They will illustrate that this occurred in the context of macro influences that shaped how both teachers and students experienced and perceived cultural diversity. The article concludes with a challenge to nurse educators to deconstruct their beliefs and assumptions about inclusivity in nursing education.

  4. Designing a system of case management for a rural nursing clinic for elderly patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Marietta P; Dunkin, Jeri W; Williams Thomas, L Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the process and procedures used to develop and implement a system of case management for middle-aged and older depressed adults in a rural health nursing clinic. This system included on-site case management for elderly clients and telephonic follow-up by case managers on an ongoing basis.

  5. A Bridge between Two Cultures: Uncovering the Chemistry Concepts Relevant to the Nursing Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Corina E.; Henry, Melissa L. M.; Barbera, Jack; Hyslop, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the undergraduate course that covers basic topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry at a mid-sized state university in the western United States. The central objective of the research was to identify the main topics of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was…

  6. Providing specialist clinical skills in soft tissue and intra-articular injection through a postgraduate masters module.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Kay; Waterfield, Jackie

    2005-01-01

    Current philosophy and policy changes in the National Health Service are encouraging healthcare practitioners to extend their clinical skills to create a more patient-centred approach thus allowing patients to be seen in a timely and more appropriate manner. This often requires further development of the practitioners' skills and knowledge. One approach to achieve this is through collaboration between employers and educational providers to ensure that educational experience is not only evidence based but also responsive to the needs of the current and future workforce. A postgraduate module was developed to raise critical and evaluative skills, as well as the technical skills of practitioners using injections in the management of joint and soft tissue pathology, while developing a professional responsibility towards injection practice. The module emphasized learning though experience by contextualizing the theoretical aspects of the module and by its student centred assessments. Further strengths of this module are that it has utilized academic and clinical expertise and knowledge to enable clinicians to gain additional skills and the multidisciplinary approach engendered good working practice Overall the module was evaluated positively by both tutors and students and not only met its aims but also addressed the current professional and policy issues around continuing professional development.

  7. Nursing students' experiences of ethical issues in clinical practice: A New Zealand study.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, J; Papps, E; Marshall, B

    2016-03-01

    Nursing students experience ethical problems in clinical practice in a different way from registered nurses. In order to develop ethical reasoning and competence in nursing students, nurse educators must recognise the unique issues students face. This research described the occurrence of ethical issues in clinical practice for 373 undergraduate nursing students who responded to a national questionnaire investigating the frequency of pre-determined ethical issues and the corresponding level of distress. Over two thirds of respondents experienced breaches of a patient's right to confidentiality, privacy, dignity or respect and 87% experienced unsafe working conditions. The most distressing issues were those that compromised patient safety, including unsafe healthcare practices, working conditions and suspected abuse or neglect. Themes that emerged from an open-ended question included lack of support and supervision, bullying and end of life issues. This research found the frequency at which ethical issues are experienced was highest in year three participants. However, the overall distress levels were lower for the majority of issues for those participants in the later part of their degree. Recommendations from this research include developing ethics education around the main concerns that students face in order to enhance students' understanding, resilience and ability to respond appropriately.

  8. An exploration of the empowerment of nursing students in a clinical context.

    PubMed

    Pearson, J

    1998-11-01

    At Whitireia Community Polytechnic the curriculum philosophy for the Bachelor of Nursing Degree Programme is based on the Treaty of Waitangi which provides a framework to articulate the concepts of Partnership, Governorship, Advocacy and Empowerment. This paper will describe a research study that aimed to explore the phenomenon of empowerment from the perspective of the student nurse. Using grounded theory methodology, and emancipatory and feminist philosophies, six, Year Two nursing student participants were interviewed and asked to define the term empowerment and give exemplars of moments when they had been empowered in a teaching/learning context. Analysis of data led to the discovery of a theory and development of a theoretical model that described the conditions and consequences that led to empowerment or disempowerment for the student. The theoretical model will be presented and explained, and the conditions that enhanced empowerment will be explored. Recommendations from the research included the need for relevant preparation for students prior to clinical placement, preparation of clinicians through preceptor programmes, greater awareness by registered nurses of the communication that is effective in supporting student nurses and support for assisted reflection for students following clinical placements. It was further recommended that the theoretical model be tested in other contexts.

  9. Evaluating students' perception of their clinical placements - testing the clinical learning environment and supervision and nurse teacher scale (CLES + T scale) in Germany.

    PubMed

    Bergjan, Manuela; Hertel, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Clinical nursing education in Germany has not received attention in nursing science and practice for a long time, as it often seems to be a more or less "formalized appendix" of nursing education. Several development projects of clinical education taking place are mainly focused on the qualification of clinical preceptors. However, the clinical context and its influence on learning processes have still not been sufficiently investigated. The aim of this study was the testing of a German version of the clinical learning environment and supervision and nurse teacher scale (CLES + T scale). The sample of the pilot study consists of first-, second- and third-year student nurses (n=240) of a university nursing school from January to March 2011. Psychometric testing of the instrument is carried out by selected methods of classical testing theories using SPPS 19. The results show transferability of all subcategories of the CLES + T scale in the non-academic nursing education system of a university hospital in Germany, without the teacher scale. The strongest factor is "supervisory relationship". The German version of the CLES + T scale may help to evaluate and compare traditional and new models in clinical nursing education. PMID:23200088

  10. Electroencephalogram associations to cognitive performance in clinically active nurses.

    PubMed

    Lees, Ty; Khushaba, Rami; Lal, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive impairment is traditionally identified via cognitive screening tools that have limited ability in detecting early or transitional stages of impairment. The dynamic nature of physiological variables such as the electroencephalogram (EEG) may provide alternate means for detecting these transitions. However, previous research examining EEG and cognitive performance is largely confined to samples with diagnosed cognitive impairments, and research examining non-impaired, and occupation specific samples, is limited. The present study aimed to investigate the associations between frontal pole and central EEG and cognitive performance in a sample of male and female nurses, and to determine the significance of these associations. Fifty seven nurses participated in the study, in which two lead bipolar EEG was recorded at positions Fp1 (frontal polar), Fp2, C3 (central) and C4 during a baseline and an active phase involving the common neuropsychological Stroop test. Participants' cognitive performance was assessed using the mini-mental state exam (MMSE) and Cognistat screening tools. Significant correlations between EEG beta activity and the outcome of MMSE and Cognistat were revealed, where an increased beta activity was associated to an increased global cognitive performance. Additionally, domain specific cognitive performance was also significantly associated to various EEG variables. The study identified potential EEG biomarkers for global and domain specific cognitive performance, and provides initial groundwork for the development of future EEG based biomarkers for detection of cognitive pathologies. PMID:27244262

  11. Participation in clinical supervision (PACS): an evaluation of student nurse clinical supervision facilitated by mental health service users.

    PubMed

    Maplethorpe, Fran; Dixon, Julie; Rush, Brenda

    2014-03-01

    This paper discusses an innovative learning approach in which people having experience of mental health services facilitated humanistic clinical supervision with groups of student nurses in the classroom. A four-day course of preparation for the role of supervisor is described and the results of subsequent clinical supervision sessions are analysed. Seven service users who had previous experience of teaching students in the classroom and fifty students on a Diploma/BSc in mental health nursing course participated in the project, which was evaluated through focus groups. The results indicated that the service user supervisors appreciated the skills they had gained on the course and felt that they were more appropriate than lecturers to facilitate clinical supervision sessions. Some students expressed initial uncertainty about the appropriateness of service users as supervisors but as changes to the pedagogical process of supervision were made and the supervisors gained more experience and confidence, students expressed greater satisfaction. The authors conclude that clinical supervision facilitated by service users who have preparation and continual support can add considerable value to the learning experience of student nurses. PMID:23981566

  12. The use of clinical logs to improve nursing students' metacognition: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fonteyn, M E; Cahill, M

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the use of a reflective clinical log to improve students' thinking strategies and metacognition (cognitive awareness). Rather than prepare a written nursing care plan prior to entering the clinical setting, students instead were asked to write in a clinical log at the completion of their clinical day, reflecting upon client problems that they had identified, the data that were used to identify these problems, the nursing interventions that were used, and the results of these interventions. The students reported that they preferred the use of a reflective log over writing nursing care plans and they felt that the logs improved their ability to think about their thinking (i.e. their metacognition). The results of this pilot study indicate that reflection in clinical logs assists students to become more active learners, to manage their own thinking, and to improve their metacognition. Additional research in this area is needed to confirm study findings and to provide further understanding regarding the effectiveness of clinical logs as a teaching strategy to improve students' metacognition. PMID:9687142

  13. Predictors of Undergraduate Nursing Student Satisfaction with Clinical Learning Environment: A Secondary Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lovecchio, Catherine P; DiMattio, Mary Jane K; Hudacek, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Nurse educators must develop evidence-based strategies that prepare new graduates to function in a dynamic health care environment. Student satisfaction with their clinical learning has been identified as a particular outcome of interest. A secondary analysis of pilot study data was performed to determine predictors of student satisfaction in the medical-surgical clinical environment. All dimensions of the clinical learning environment were measured using a published, validated instrument. Two dimensions, Task Orientation and Individualization, significantly predicted satisfaction, explaining 57 percent of the variance. To improve satisfaction, clinical faculty should make clear assignments, provide specific instructions, maintain organization, and provide individualized attention. PMID:26328295

  14. Exploring the structure and organization of information within nursing clinical handovers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Maree; Jefferies, Diana; Nicholls, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Clinical handover is the primary source of patient information for nurses; however, inadequate information transfer compromises patient safety. We investigated the content and organization of information conveyed at 81 handovers. A structure that captures and presents the information transferred at handover emerged: identification of the patient and clinical risks, clinical history/presentation, clinical status, care plan and outcomes/goals of care (ICCCO). This approach covers essential information while allowing for prioritization of information when required. Further research into the impact of ICCCO on patient safety is in progress.

  15. Nursing Clinical Documentation System Structured on NANDA-I, NOC, and NIC Classification Systems.

    PubMed

    Peres, Heloisa Helena C; de Almeida Lopes M da Cruz, Diná; Tellez, Michelle; de Cassia Gengo e Silva, Rita; dos S Diogo, Regina Celia; Ortiz, Diley Cardoso F; Ortiz, Dóris R

    2015-01-01

    Information is a key feature that health professionals need to exercise their profession with efficiency and quality. This study aims to present the experience of the usage of an electronic system for clinical documentation in nursing in a university hospital. It is a methodological research of technology production. The system was developed in four phases: Conception, Elaboration, Construction, and Transition, and was named Electronic Documentation System of the University of São Paulo Nursing Process (PROCEnf-USP™). The knowledge base of PROCEnf-USP™ was organized in hierarchy of domains and classes, according to NNN linkages.

  16. Nursing Students' Satisfaction with Mobile Academic Electronic Medical Records for Undergraduate Clinical Practicum.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mona; Park, Joon Ho; Lee, Hyeong Suk

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of study was to evaluate satisfaction with and usability of mobile academic electronic medical records (AEMR) for undergraduate nursing students' clinical practicum. After an AEMR application on mobile devices was applied to the experimental group while a PC-based EMR system was used for the control group as usual in the fall semester, 2014. Two items of practicum satisfaction such as preparation of lab test and understanding of the results, and nursing intervention and documentation were significantly higher in the experiment group. The findings of usability survey showed that students in the experiment group consider the use of mobile AEMR in their job would increase their productivity. PMID:27332454

  17. Towards Implementing a Global Competency-Based Nursing and Clinical Informatics Curriculum: Applying the TIGER Initiative.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Ursula; Ball, Marion; de Fátima Marin, Heimar; Chang, Polun; Wilson, Marisa; Anderson, Christel

    2016-01-01

    This workshop will review the history of the TIGER initiative in order to set the framework for an understanding of international informatics competencies. We will include a description of clinical nursing informatics programs in 37 countries as well as the results of a recent survey of nursing competencies in order to further discussions of internationally agreed-upon competency definitions. These two surveys will provide the basis for developing a consensus regarding the integration of core competencies into informatics curriculum developments. Expected outcomes include building consensus on core competencies and developing plans toward implementing intra- and inter-professional informatics competencies across disciplines globally. PMID:27332333

  18. Academic nursing clinic: impact on health and cost outcomes for vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Badger, Terry A; McArthur, Donna Behler

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine selected health and cost outcomes of clients who used an academic nursing clinic (ANC) located in a high-rise public housing facility for low-income citizens. Service use, health promotion and screening, quality of care, satisfaction and costs were examined. Health outcomes were improved. Estimated cost savings were about $36,000 during the first year with reduced paramedic and police calls, hospitalizations, and emergency room visits. Findings show that advanced practice nurses can positively influence health outcomes by providing cost-effective quality health care. PMID:12624864

  19. Academic profile, beliefs, and self-efficacy in research of clinical nurses: implications for the Nursing Research Program in a Magnet Journey™ hospital

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Eliseth Ribeiro; Farah, Olga Guilhermina; Reis, Elisa Aparecida Alves; de Barros, Claudia Garcia; Mizoi, Cristina Satoko

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the academic profile, research experience, beliefs, and self-efficacy in research of clinical nurses in a Magnet Journey™ hospital. Methods: Quantitative descriptive designed to assess research experience of clinical nurses. The survey was divided into demographics characteristics; scientific/academic profile (Nursing degree; membership in academic research groups, involvement in papers, teaching activities, scientific conferences, and posters presented); beliefs related to nursing research (about skills, benefits to career, reputation of institution, patient care; job satisfaction level); and Research Self-Efficacy (conducting literature review; evaluating quality of studies; using theory; understanding evidence; and scientific writing: putting ideas on paper easily; recognize and adapt the text to the reader; write to the standards required by science; write with objectivity, logical sequence, coherence, simplicity, clarity, and precision; insert the references in the text correctly; write the references appropriately; use correct spelling and grammar; write texts in English). Results: Most clinical nurses had low research experience, yet had positive beliefs in and perception of well-developed research skills. Conclusion: Our findings should contribute to the preparation of research programs aimed at facilitating the engagement of clinical nurses in the development of scientific projects. PMID:24488393

  20. Development of a standardised pro forma for specialist palliative care multidisciplinary team meetings.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Jennifer; Forman, Margaret Louise

    2012-05-01

    A pro forma of the caseload of the community palliative care clinical nurse specialists in the Central Lancashire Community Specialist Palliative Care Team was devised to provide a brief overview of each patient's plan of care for use in the multidisciplinary team meetings and as a consequence of preparing for the UK Department of Health's peer review process. The pro forma was also designed to be used in everyday clinical practice in Gold Standards Framework meetings in the community. It has been evaluated by the team and found to be helpful for highlighting key issues in clinical practice, such as symptoms, psychological and emotional needs, and Preferred Priorities of Care. Over the past 2 years, it has also complemented the organisation's drive to become 'paperless'. This article looks at how the pro forma was developed, how it has evolved over time, and how it works today. Consideration has also been given to its benefits and limitations.