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Sample records for clinical oncology chemotherapy

  1. Chemotherapy safety in clinical veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Klahn, Shawna

    2014-09-01

    Exposure to chemotherapy is a health hazard for all personnel in facilities that store, prepare, or administer antineoplastic agents. Contamination levels have been measured as much as 15 times higher in the veterinary medicine sector than in human facilities. Recent publications in human and veterinary medicine indicate that exposure extends beyond the clinic walls to affect the patient's home and family. This article provides an update on the advances in chemotherapy safety, the current issues, and the impact on cancer management in veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Implementation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Oncology Nursing Society chemotherapy safety standards.

    PubMed

    Vioral, Anna N; Kennihan, Heather K

    2012-12-01

    Chemotherapy involves an intricate, high-risk, multidisciplinary process of prescribing, dispensing, and administering complex multimedication regimens with narrow therapeutic indices. Chemotherapeutic agents also require safe-handling precautions for patients and healthcare providers. In addition, a number of chemotherapy and targeted therapies have expanded to nononcology populations. This complexity demands standardization of chemotherapy practice for all healthcare providers to ensure safe outcomes. This article describes one organization's multidisciplinary effort to standardize chemotherapy practice according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Oncology Nursing Society's 31 safety standards for chemotherapy administration. The article also describes how the organization integrated and developed standards of practice using interdisciplinary approaches. The educational processes used during implementation and the lessons learned are discussed to assist healthcare providers involved in standardizing chemotherapy administration. The article equips healthcare professionals with a multidisciplinary process for high-quality clinical standards of practice that may reduce errors and ensure safety.

  3. 2016 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards, Including Standards for Pediatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Neuss, Michael N; Gilmore, Terry R; Belderson, Kristin M; Billett, Amy L; Conti-Kalchik, Tara; Harvey, Brittany E; Hendricks, Carolyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Mangu, Pamela B; McNiff, Kristen; Olsen, MiKaela; Schulmeister, Lisa; Von Gehr, Ann; Polovich, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards and to highlight standards for pediatric oncology. Methods The ASCO/ONS Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards were first published in 2009 and updated in 2011 to include inpatient settings. A subsequent 2013 revision expanded the standards to include the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy. A joint ASCO/ONS workshop with stakeholder participation, including that of the Association of Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurses and American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, was held on May 12, 2015, to review the 2013 standards. An extensive literature search was subsequently conducted, and public comments on the revised draft standards were solicited. Results The updated 2016 standards presented here include clarification and expansion of existing standards to include pediatric oncology and to introduce new standards: most notably, two-person verification of chemotherapy preparation processes, administration of vinca alkaloids via minibags in facilities in which intrathecal medications are administered, and labeling of medications dispensed from the health care setting to be taken by the patient at home. The standards were reordered and renumbered to align with the sequential processes of chemotherapy prescription, preparation, and administration. Several standards were separated into their respective components for clarity and to facilitate measurement of adherence to a standard. Conclusion As oncology practice has changed, so have chemotherapy administration safety standards. Advances in technology, cancer treatment, and education and training have prompted the need for periodic review and revision of the standards. Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/chemo-standards .

  4. Principles and major agents in clinical oncology chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    This paper provides a brief classification of drugs available for veterinary chemotherapy, as well as justifications for their use. Some common neoplasia and the drugs of choice for their treatment are described. A listing by class of systemic chemotherapeutic agents, their mode of action, tumors responsive to the drugs, precautions and common adverse effects and mode of administration is provided. 2 tabs. (MHB)

  5. American Society of Clinical Oncology Technology Assessment: chemotherapy sensitivity and resistance assays.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Deborah; Garewal, Harinder S; Burstein, Harold J; Samson, David J; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Somerfield, Mark R

    2004-09-01

    To develop a technology assessment of chemotherapy sensitivity and resistance assays in order to define the role of these tests in routine oncology practice. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) established a Working Group to develop the technology assessment. The Working Group collaborated with the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association (BCBSA) Technology Evaluation Center. The Working Group developed independent criteria for selecting articles for inclusion in the ASCO assessment, and developed a structured data abstraction tool to facilitate review of selected manuscripts. One Working Group member and an ASCO staff member independently reviewed the 1,139 abstracts identified by the BCBSA comprehensive literature search, and by an updated literature search performed by ASCO using the BCBSA search strategy (1966 to January 2004). Of the 12 articles included in this technology assessment, eight were identified by the original BCBSA systematic review, one was provided by industry, and three were identified by the ASCO updated literature review. Review of the literature does not identify any CSRAs for which the evidence base is sufficient to support use in oncology practice. The use of chemotherapy sensitivity and resistance assays to select chemotherapeutic agents for individual patients is not recommended outside of the clinical trial setting. Oncologists should make chemotherapy treatment recommendations on the basis of published reports of clinical trials and a patient's health status and treatment preferences. Because the in vitro analytic strategy has potential importance, participation in clinical trials evaluating these technologies remains a priority.

  6. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Newly Diagnosed, Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Society of Gynecologic Oncology and American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alexi A; Bohlke, Kari; Armstrong, Deborah K; Bookman, Michael A; Cliby, William A; Coleman, Robert L; Dizon, Don S; Kash, Joseph J; Meyer, Larissa A; Moore, Kathleen N; Olawaiye, Alexander B; Oldham, Jessica; Salani, Ritu; Sparacio, Dee; Tew, William P; Vergote, Ignace; Edelson, Mitchell I

    2016-10-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians regarding the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval cytoreduction among women with stage IIIC or IV epithelial ovarian cancer. The Society of Gynecologic Oncology and the American Society of Clinical Oncology convened an Expert Panel and conducted a systematic review of the literature. Four phase III clinical trials form the primary evidence base for the recommendations. The published studies suggest that for selected women with stage IIIC or IV epithelial ovarian cancer, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval cytoreduction are noninferior to primary cytoreduction and adjuvant chemotherapy with respect to overall and progression-free survival and are associated with less perioperative morbidity and mortality. All women with suspected stage IIIC or IV invasive epithelial ovarian cancer should be evaluated by a gynecologic oncologist prior to initiation of therapy. The primary clinical evaluation should include a CT of the abdomen and pelvis, and chest imaging (CT preferred). Women with a high perioperative risk profile or a low likelihood of achieving cytoreduction to < 1 cm of residual disease (ideally to no visible disease) should receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Women who are fit for primary cytoreductive surgery, and with potentially resectable disease, may receive either neoadjuvant chemotherapy or primary cytoreductive surgery. However, primary cytoreductive surgery is preferred if there is a high likelihood of achieving cytoreduction to < 1 cm (ideally to no visible disease) with acceptable morbidity. Before neoadjuvant chemotherapy is delivered, all patients should have confirmation of an invasive ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/NACT-ovarian-guideline and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki. © 2016 Society of Gynecologic Oncology and American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for newly diagnosed, advanced ovarian cancer: Society of Gynecologic Oncology and American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alexi A; Bohlke, Kari; Armstrong, Deborah K; Bookman, Michael A; Cliby, William A; Coleman, Robert L; Dizon, Don S; Kash, Joseph J; Meyer, Larissa A; Moore, Kathleen N; Olawaiye, Alexander B; Oldham, Jessica; Salani, Ritu; Sparacio, Dee; Tew, William P; Vergote, Ignace; Edelson, Mitchell I

    2016-10-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians regarding the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval cytoreduction among women with stage IIIC or IV epithelial ovarian cancer. The Society of Gynecologic Oncology and the American Society of Clinical Oncology convened an Expert Panel and conducted a systematic review of the literature. Four phase III clinical trials form the primary evidence base for the recommendations. The published studies suggest that for selected women with stage IIIC or IV epithelial ovarian cancer, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval cytoreduction are non-inferior to primary cytoreduction and adjuvant chemotherapy with respect to overall and progression-free survival and are associated with less perioperative morbidity and mortality. All women with suspected stage IIIC or IV invasive epithelial ovarian cancer should be evaluated by a gynecologic oncologist prior to initiation of therapy. The primary clinical evaluation should include a CT of the abdomen and pelvis, and chest imaging (CT preferred). Women with a high perioperative risk profile or a low likelihood of achieving cytoreduction to <1cm of residual disease (ideally to no visible disease) should receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Women who are fit for primary cytoreductive surgery, and with potentially resectable disease, may receive either neoadjuvant chemotherapy or primary cytoreductive surgery. However, primary cytoreductive surgery is preferred if there is a high likelihood of achieving cytoreduction to <1cm (ideally to no visible disease) with acceptable morbidity. Before neoadjuvant chemotherapy is delivered, all patients should have confirmation of an invasive ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/NACT-ovarian-guideline and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Revisions to the 2009 American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society chemotherapy administration safety standards: expanding the scope to include inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Joseph O; Polovich, Martha; Gilmore, Terry R; Schulmeister, Lisa; Esper, Peg; Lefebvre, Kristine B; Neuss, Michael N

    2012-01-01

    In November 2009, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) jointly published a set of 31 voluntary chemotherapy safety standards for adult patients with cancer, as the end result of a highly structured, multistakeholder process. The standards were explicitly created to address patient safety in the administration of parenteral and oral chemotherapeutic agents in outpatient oncology settings. In January 2011, a workgroup consisting of ASCO and ONS members was convened to review feedback received since publication of the standards, to address interim changes in practice, and to modify the standards as needed. The most significant change to the standards is to extend their scope to the inpatient setting. This change reflects the conviction that the same standards for chemotherapy administration safety should apply in all settings. The proposed set of standards has been approved by the Board of Directors for both ASCO and ONS and has been posted for public comment. Comments were used as the basis for final editing of the revised standards. The workgroup recognizes that the safety of oral chemotherapy usage, nononcology medication reconciliation, and home chemotherapy administration are not adequately addressed in the original or revised standards. A separate process, cosponsored by ASCO and ONS, will address the development of safety standards for these areas.

  9. 2013 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards Including Standards for the Safe Administration and Management of Oral Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Neuss, Michael N.; Polovich, Martha; McNiff, Kristen; Esper, Peg; Gilmore, Terry R.; LeFebvre, Kristine B.; Schulmeister, Lisa; Jacobson, Joseph O.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, ASCO and the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) published standards for the safe use of parenteral chemotherapy in the outpatient setting, including issues of practitioner orders, preparation, and administration of medication. In 2011, these were updated to include inpatient facilities. In December 2011, a multistakeholder workgroup met to address the issues associated with orally administered antineoplastics, under the leadership of ASCO and ONS. The workgroup participants developed recommended standards, which were presented for public comment. Public comments informed final edits, and the final standards were reviewed and approved by the ASCO and ONS Boards of Directors. Significant newly identified recommendations include those associated with drug prescription and the necessity of ascertaining that prescriptions are filled. In addition, the importance of patient and family education regarding administration schedules, exception procedures, disposal of unused oral medication, and aspects of continuity of care across settings were identified. This article presents the newly developed standards. PMID:23914148

  10. Clinical evaluation of dental and periodontal status in a group of oncological patients before chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    López-Galindo, Mónica Paula; Bagán, José V; Jiménez-Soriano, Yolanda; Alpiste, Francisco; Camps, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the dental status of 88 cancer patients before chemotherapy. Eighty-eight patients with cancer in different body locations were studied and compared with a control group. Dental plaque was assessed by means of the Silness and Löe index, dental status with the DMFT index, and periodontal status with the modified CPI index. In the oncological patients the mean Silness and Löe index was 1.28-/+0.11. Patients showed multiple missing teeth (mean number 7.55-/+0.80); the mean number of decayed teeth was 2.10-/+0.36; and the mean number of filled teeth was 2.27-/+0.37. As to periodontal status, the mean modified CPI index was 1.45-/+0.11. In the control group, the mean Silness and Löe index was 0.94-/+0.00. The mean number of decayed teeth was 1.21-/+0.25; the mean number of missing teeth was 4.97-/+0.67; and the mean number of filled teeth was 4.82-/+0.44. The mean modified CPI index was 1.29-/+0.10. Oncological patients in our study showed more dental plaque versus healthy patients and more decayed and missing teeth. However, patients in the control group showed more filled teeth than cancer patients. Periodontal status as determined by the modified CPI index was similar in both patient groups.

  11. How Variable Is Our Delivery of Information? Approaches to Patient Education About Oral Chemotherapy in the Pediatric Oncology Clinic.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Justine M; Athale, Uma H; Clavell, Luis A; Cole, Peter D; Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Laverdiere, Caroline; Michon, Bruno; Schorin, Marshall A; Welch, Jennifer J G; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Kelly, Kara M

    In pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, adherence to oral chemotherapy relies largely on a parent's comprehension of the drug's indication and administration guidelines. We assessed how pediatric oncology providers educate families about oral chemotherapy. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 68 physicians and nurses from 9 institutions in the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Consortium. The inter-individual approach to patient education is variable and may consist of handouts, treatment calendars, and discussions. The extent of teaching often varies depending on a provider's subjective assessment of a family's needs. Twenty-five percent of providers suggested standardizing patient teaching. When developing educational models, care teams should consider approaches that (a) objectively identify families in need of extensive teaching, (b) designate allotted teaching time by nursing staff during clinic visits, and (c) maintain the variation and dynamism that informs a successful provider-patient relationship.

  12. 2011 Focused Update of 2009 American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update on Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azzoli, Christopher G.; Temin, Sarah; Aliff, Timothy; Baker, Sherman; Brahmer, Julie; Johnson, David H.; Laskin, Janessa L.; Masters, Gregory; Milton, Daniel; Nordquist, Luke; Pao, William; Pfister, David G.; Piantadosi, Steven; Schiller, Joan H.; Smith, Reily; Smith, Thomas J.; Strawn, John R.; Trent, David; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Purpose An American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) focused update updates a single recommendation (or subset of recommendations) in advance of a regularly scheduled guideline update. This document updates one recommendation of the ASCO Guideline Update on Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) regarding switch maintenance chemotherapy. Clinical Context Recent results from phase III clinical trials have demonstrated that in patients with stage IV NSCLC who have received four cycles of first-line chemotherapy and whose disease has not progressed, an immediate switch to alternative, single-agent chemotherapy can extend progression-free survival and, in some cases, overall survival. Because of limitations in the data, delayed treatment with a second-line agent after disease progression is also acceptable. Recent Data Seven randomized controlled trials of carboxyaminoimidazole, docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, gemcitabine, and pemetrexed have evaluated outcomes in patients who received an immediate, non–cross resistant alternative therapy (switch maintenance) after first-line therapy. Recommendation In patients with stage IV NSCLC, first-line cytotoxic chemotherapy should be stopped at disease progression or after four cycles in patients whose disease is stable but not responding to treatment. Two-drug cytotoxic combinations should be administered for no more than six cycles. For those with stable disease or response after four cycles, immediate treatment with an alternative, single-agent chemotherapy such as pemetrexed in patients with nonsquamous histology, docetaxel in unselected patients, or erlotinib in unselected patients may be considered. Limitations of this data are such that a break from cytotoxic chemotherapy after a fixed course is also acceptable, with initiation of second-line chemotherapy at disease progression. PMID:21900105

  13. Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent (ESA) Practice Patterns in Patients With Chemotherapy-Induced Anemia (CIA) Treated at Hospital Oncology Clinics.

    PubMed

    Reitan, John F; van Breda, Arletta; Shreay, Sanatan; Corey-Lisle, Patricia K; Cong, Ze

    2013-02-01

    To characterize erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) usage initiated in hospital outpatient oncology centers that employ weekly (QW) and every-3-week (Q3W) ESA dosing regimens; describe the frequency of ESA dosing, transfusions, hemoglobin determinations, and anemia-related visits between these 2 regimens; and compare the rates at which inpatient ESA doses are administered on QW versus Q3W schedules. This was a retrospective, observational record review evaluating ESA usage in 641 patients from 8 outpatient oncology clinics throughout the United States. Adult patients who initiated myelosuppressive chemotherapy for a documented solid tumor between August 1, 2007 and June 30, 2009 and received their first 3 consecutive outpatient ESA doses on a QW or Q3W schedule were eligible for study inclusion. During a single course of chemotherapy, ESA administrations were recorded as long as ESA therapy was continued on the initial regimen. ESA doses were captured until termination of ESA therapy, until 9 months had elapsed since the first ESA dose, until the patient was switched to another ESA regimen, or until death. ESA administration during inpatient admissions was also recorded. ESA utilization varied between the dosing groups, with fewer ESA doses administered per follow-up month in patients receiving Q3W versus QW ESA therapy (mean, 1 vs 2 doses). Compared to weekly administration, extended-dose ESA therapy also reduced the number of hemoglobin determinations and anemia-related visits without chemotherapy required per follow-up month. Neither the number of transfusions nor the number of packed red blood cell units administered per follow-up month differed between treatment groups. Compared to weekly ESA therapy, Q3W administration reduced costs associated with ESA prescribing and utilization. Extended-dose ESA therapy (Q3W dosing) may improve practice efficiency and may be associated with reduced frequencies of hemoglobin determinations and ESA doses required. Q3W

  14. Revisions to the 2009 american society of clinical oncology/oncology nursing society chemotherapy administration safety standards: expanding the scope to include inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Joseph O; Polovich, Martha; Gilmore, Terry R; Schulmeister, Lisa; Esper, Peg; Lefebvre, Kristine B; Neuss, Michael N

    2012-01-01

    In November 2009, ASCO and the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) jointly published a set of 31 voluntary chemotherapy safety standards for adult patients with cancer, as the end result of a highly structured, multistakeholder process. The standards were explicitly created to address patient safety in the administration of parenteral and oral chemotherapeutic agents in outpatient oncology settings. In January 2011, a workgroup consisting of ASCO and ONS members was convened to review feedback received since publication of the standards, to address interim changes in practice, and to modify the standards as needed. The most significant change to the standards is to extend their scope to the inpatient setting. This change reflects the conviction that the same standards for chemotherapy administration safety should apply in all settings. The proposed set of standards has been approved by the Board of Directors for both ASCO and ONS and has been posted for public comment. Comments were used as the basis for final editing of the revised standards. The workgroup recognizes that the safety of oral chemotherapy usage, nononcology medication reconciliation, and home chemotherapy administration are not adequately addressed in the original or revised standards. A separate process, cosponsored by ASCO and ONS, will address the development of safety standards for these areas.

  15. American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline update on chemotherapy for stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Azzoli, Christopher G; Baker, Sherman; Temin, Sarah; Pao, William; Aliff, Timothy; Brahmer, Julie; Johnson, David H; Laskin, Janessa L; Masters, Gregory; Milton, Daniel; Nordquist, Luke; Pfister, David G; Piantadosi, Steven; Schiller, Joan H; Smith, Reily; Smith, Thomas J; Strawn, John R; Trent, David; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2009-12-20

    The purpose of this article is to provide updated recommendations for the treatment of patients with stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer. A literature search identified relevant randomized trials published since 2002. The scope of the guideline was narrowed to chemotherapy and biologic therapy. An Update Committee reviewed the literature and made updated recommendations. One hundred sixty-two publications met the inclusion criteria. Recommendations were based on treatment strategies that improve overall survival. Treatments that improve only progression-free survival prompted scrutiny of toxicity and quality of life. For first-line therapy in patients with performance status of 0 or 1, a platinum-based two-drug combination of cytotoxic drugs is recommended. Nonplatinum cytotoxic doublets are acceptable for patients with contraindications to platinum therapy. For patients with performance status of 2, a single cytotoxic drug is sufficient. Stop first-line cytotoxic chemotherapy at disease progression or after four cycles in patients who are not responding to treatment. Stop two-drug cytotoxic chemotherapy at six cycles even in patients who are responding to therapy. The first-line use of gefitinib may be recommended for patients with known epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation; for negative or unknown EGFR mutation status, cytotoxic chemotherapy is preferred. Bevacizumab is recommended with carboplatin-paclitaxel, except for patients with certain clinical characteristics. Cetuximab is recommended with cisplatin-vinorelbine for patients with EGFR-positive tumors by immunohistochemistry. Docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, or pemetrexed is recommended as second-line therapy. Erlotinib is recommended as third-line therapy for patients who have not received prior erlotinib or gefitinib. Data are insufficient to recommend the routine third-line use of cytotoxic drugs. Data are insufficient to recommend routine use of molecular markers to select chemotherapy.

  16. American Society of Clinical Oncology provisional clinical opinion: chronic hepatitis B virus infection screening in patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy for treatment of malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Artz, Andrew S; Somerfield, Mark R; Feld, Jordan J; Giusti, Andrew F; Kramer, Barnett S; Sabichi, Anita L; Zon, Robin T; Wong, Sandra L

    2010-07-01

    PURPOSE An American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) provisional clinical opinion (PCO) offers timely clinical direction to ASCO's membership following publication or presentation of potentially practice-changing information. This PCO addresses recommendations for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection screening in patients receiving cytotoxic or immunosuppressive chemotherapy for treatment of malignant diseases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued Recommendations for Identification and Public Health Management of Persons with Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection, recommending screening for hepatitis B infection (hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg], antihepatitis B core antigen [anti-HBc], and antibodies to HBsAg [anti-HBs]) for "persons receiving cytotoxic or immunosuppressive therapy (eg, chemotherapy for malignant diseases...)." The evidence is insufficient to determine the net benefits and harms of routine screening for chronic HBV infection in individuals with cancer who are about to receive cytotoxic or immunosuppressive therapy or who are already receiving therapy. Individuals with cancer who undergo certain cytotoxic or immunosuppressive therapies and have HBV infection or prior exposure to HBV may be at elevated risk of liver failure from HBV reactivation. As such, HBV screening requires clinical judgment. Physicians may consider screening patients belonging to groups at heightened risk for chronic HBV infection or if highly immunosuppressive therapy is planned. Highly immunosuppressive treatments include, but are not limited to, hematopoietic cell transplantation and regimens including rituximab. Screening based on a high risk of prior HBV exposure or risk of reactivation due to planned therapeutic regimens should include testing for HBsAg as a serologic marker for HBV infection. In some populations, testing for anti-HBc should also be considered. There is no evidence to support serologic testing for anti-HBs in this context

  17. Side effects of chemotherapy in musculoskeletal oncology.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Romantini, Matteo; Angelini, Andrea; Ruggieri, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    With recent advances in medical and orthopedic oncology, radiation therapy and single- or multiple-agent perioperative chemotherapy are currently applied as an essential part of the multidisciplinary treatment to improve disease-free and overall survival of patients with primary and metastatic bone and soft tissue tumors. However, these treatments have led to unwanted complications. A better understanding of the effects of various antineoplastic agents on bone, soft tissue, and organs may provide the basis for the more efficacious use of antiproliferative drugs when fracture healing or allograft incorporation is required. This knowledge may also provide a rationale for concurrent treatment with drugs that protect against or compensate for adverse effects in osseous repair resulting from chemotherapy.

  18. Guidelines for timely initiation of chemotherapy: a proposed framework for access to medical oncology and haematology cancer clinics and chemotherapy services.

    PubMed

    Alexander, M; Beattie-Manning, R; Blum, R; Byrne, J; Hornby, C; Kearny, C; Love, N; McGlashan, J; McKiernan, S; Milar, J L; Murray, D; Opat, S; Parente, P; Thomas, J; Tweddle, N; Underhill, C; Whitfield, K; Kirsa, S; Rischin, D

    2016-08-01

    These guidelines, informed by the best available evidence and consensus expert opinion, provide a framework to guide the timely initiation of chemotherapy for treating cancer. They sit at the intersection of patient experience, state-of-the-art disease management and rational efficient service provision for these patients at a system level. Internationally, cancer waiting times are routinely measured and publicly reported. In Australia, there are existing policies and guidelines relating to the timeliness of cancer care for surgery and radiation therapy; however, until now, equivalent guidance for chemotherapy was lacking. Timeliness of care should be informed, where available, by evidence for improved patient outcomes. Independent of this, it should be recognised that shorter waiting periods are likely to reduce patient anxiety. While these guidelines were developed as part of a proposed framework for consideration by the Victorian Department of Health, they are clinically relevant to national and international cancer services. They are intended to be used by clinical and administrative staff within cancer services. Adoption of these guidelines, which are for the timely triage, review and treatment of cancer patients receiving systemic chemotherapy, aims to ensure that patients receive care within a timeframe that will maximise health outcomes, and that access to care is consistent and equitable across cancer services. Local monitoring of performance against this guideline will enable cancer service providers to manage proactively future service demand. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  19. Comorbidities and Risk of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Among Participants 65 Years or Older in Southwest Oncology Group Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Hershman, Dawn L; Till, Cathee; Wright, Jason D; Awad, Danielle; Ramsey, Scott D; Barlow, William E; Minasian, Lori M; Unger, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Neuropathy is a debilitating toxicity associated with various chemotherapy agents. We evaluated the association between common comorbid conditions and the development of peripheral neuropathy in patients treated with taxane-based chemotherapy. We examined the Southwest Oncology Group database to identify phase II and III trials that included taxane therapy from 1999 to 2011. We linked the Southwest Oncology Group clinical records to Medicare claims data according to Social Security number, sex, and date of birth. The following disease conditions potentially associated with peripheral neuropathy were evaluated: diabetes, hypothyroidism, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, varicella zoster, peripheral vascular disease, and autoimmune diseases. Multivariate logistic regression was used to model the odds of experiencing grade 2 to 4 neuropathy. A total of 1,401 patients from 23 studies were included in the analysis. Patients receiving paclitaxel were more likely to experience grade 2 to 4 neuropathy compared with docetaxel (25% v 12%, respectively; OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.52 to 3.18; P < .001). The inclusion of a platinum agent was also associated with greater neuropathy (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.18 to 2.40; P = .004). For each increase in age of 1 year, the odds of neuropathy increased 4% (P = .006). Patients with complications from diabetes had more than twice the odds of having neuropathy (OR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.31 to 3.46; P = .002) compared with patients with no diabetes. In contrast, patients with autoimmune disease were half as likely to experience neuropathy (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.24 to 1.02; P = .06). The other conditions were not associated with neuropathy. We found that in addition to drug-related factors, age and history of diabetes were independent predictors of the development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Interestingly, we also observed that a history of autoimmune disease was associated with reduced odds of neuropathy. Patients with diabetic

  20. Chemotherapy drug shortages in pediatric oncology: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Decamp, Matthew; Joffe, Steven; Fernandez, Conrad V; Faden, Ruth R; Unguru, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    Shortages of essential drugs, including critical chemotherapy drugs, have become commonplace. Drug shortages cost significant time and financial resources, lead to adverse patient outcomes, delay clinical trials, and pose significant ethical challenges. Pediatric oncology is particularly susceptible to drug shortages, presenting an opportunity to examine these ethical issues and provide recommendations for preventing and alleviating shortages. We convened the Working Group on Chemotherapy Drug Shortages in Pediatric Oncology (WG) and developed consensus on the core ethical values and practical actions necessary for a coordinated response to the problem of shortages by institutions, agencies, and other stakeholders. The interdisciplinary and multiinstitutional WG included practicing pediatric hematologist-oncologists, nurses, hospital pharmacists, bioethicists, experts in emergency management and public policy, legal scholars, patient/family advocates, and leaders of relevant professional societies and organizations. The WG endorsed 2 core ethical values: maximizing the potential benefits of effective drugs and ensuring equitable access. From these, we developed 6 recommendations: (1) supporting national polices to prevent shortages, (2) optimizing use of drug supplies, (3) giving equal priority to evidence-based uses of drugs whether they occur within or outside clinical trials, (4) developing an improved clearinghouse for sharing drug shortage information, (5) exploring the sharing of drug supplies among institutions, and (6) developing proactive stakeholder engagement strategies to facilitate prevention and management of shortages. Each recommendation includes an ethical rationale, action items, and barriers that must be overcome. Implemented together, they provide a blueprint for effective and ethical management of drug shortages in pediatric oncology and beyond.

  1. Chemotherapy Drug Shortages in Pediatric Oncology: A Consensus Statement

    PubMed Central

    DeCamp, Matthew; Joffe, Steven; Fernandez, Conrad V.; Faden, Ruth R.

    2014-01-01

    Shortages of essential drugs, including critical chemotherapy drugs, have become commonplace. Drug shortages cost significant time and financial resources, lead to adverse patient outcomes, delay clinical trials, and pose significant ethical challenges. Pediatric oncology is particularly susceptible to drug shortages, presenting an opportunity to examine these ethical issues and provide recommendations for preventing and alleviating shortages. We convened the Working Group on Chemotherapy Drug Shortages in Pediatric Oncology (WG) and developed consensus on the core ethical values and practical actions necessary for a coordinated response to the problem of shortages by institutions, agencies, and other stakeholders. The interdisciplinary and multiinstitutional WG included practicing pediatric hematologist-oncologists, nurses, hospital pharmacists, bioethicists, experts in emergency management and public policy, legal scholars, patient/family advocates, and leaders of relevant professional societies and organizations. The WG endorsed 2 core ethical values: maximizing the potential benefits of effective drugs and ensuring equitable access. From these, we developed 6 recommendations: (1) supporting national polices to prevent shortages, (2) optimizing use of drug supplies, (3) giving equal priority to evidence-based uses of drugs whether they occur within or outside clinical trials, (4) developing an improved clearinghouse for sharing drug shortage information, (5) exploring the sharing of drug supplies among institutions, and (6) developing proactive stakeholder engagement strategies to facilitate prevention and management of shortages. Each recommendation includes an ethical rationale, action items, and barriers that must be overcome. Implemented together, they provide a blueprint for effective and ethical management of drug shortages in pediatric oncology and beyond. PMID:24488741

  2. Comorbidities and Risk of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Among Participants 65 Years or Older in Southwest Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Till, Cathee; Wright, Jason D.; Awad, Danielle; Ramsey, Scott D.; Barlow, William E.; Minasian, Lori M.; Unger, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuropathy is a debilitating toxicity associated with various chemotherapy agents. We evaluated the association between common comorbid conditions and the development of peripheral neuropathy in patients treated with taxane-based chemotherapy. Methods We examined the Southwest Oncology Group database to identify phase II and III trials that included taxane therapy from 1999 to 2011. We linked the Southwest Oncology Group clinical records to Medicare claims data according to Social Security number, sex, and date of birth. The following disease conditions potentially associated with peripheral neuropathy were evaluated: diabetes, hypothyroidism, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, varicella zoster, peripheral vascular disease, and autoimmune diseases. Multivariate logistic regression was used to model the odds of experiencing grade 2 to 4 neuropathy. Results A total of 1,401 patients from 23 studies were included in the analysis. Patients receiving paclitaxel were more likely to experience grade 2 to 4 neuropathy compared with docetaxel (25% v 12%, respectively; OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.52 to 3.18; P < .001). The inclusion of a platinum agent was also associated with greater neuropathy (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.18 to 2.40; P = .004). For each increase in age of 1 year, the odds of neuropathy increased 4% (P = .006). Patients with complications from diabetes had more than twice the odds of having neuropathy (OR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.31 to 3.46; P = .002) compared with patients with no diabetes. In contrast, patients with autoimmune disease were half as likely to experience neuropathy (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.24 to 1.02; P = .06). The other conditions were not associated with neuropathy. Conclusion We found that in addition to drug-related factors, age and history of diabetes were independent predictors of the development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Interestingly, we also observed that a history of autoimmune disease was associated with reduced odds of

  3. American Society of Clinical Oncology

    MedlinePlus

    ... The 10th Joint MSKCC/HSS/IOR Course in Musculoskeletal Tumor Pathology and Clinical Oncology New York, New York, United ... The 10th Joint MSKCC/HSS/IOR Course in Musculoskeletal Tumor Pathology and Clinical Oncology Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center ...

  4. Clinical trials of interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuaki

    2012-08-01

    Interventional oncology has great potential to be a good treatment modality in the field of oncology, because its procedures are minimally invasive and fairly quick. However, except for a few procedures such as percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and trans-catheter arterial chemo-embolization that have been recognized as standard treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma, most procedures have not been established as the standard treatment modality due to the limited number of clinical trials with compelling evidence. There are several common problems when performing clinical trials of interventional oncology. The first is that the outcomes of clinical trials are greatly influenced by the level of technical skill of the physicians. The second is that equipment and devices vary widely in countries and regions, and they also influence the outcomes. The third is that the methodology of clinical trials for techniques such as interventional oncology has not yet been established. The fourth is the difficulty of setting appropriate endpoints; quality of life is suitable for evaluating interventional oncology in palliative care, but it is not easy to set as the endpoint. The fifth is the difficulty of employing a blinded design, because the procedure cannot be performed without the physician's awareness. Despite such difficult situations, many multi-institutional clinical trials of interventional oncology have been carried out in Japan, with some challenging results. Establishing evidence is critical to making interventional oncology the standard treatment. Interventional radiologists should know the importance of clinical trials, and should move ahead in this direction in a step-by-step manner.

  5. [Clinical prediction in medical oncology].

    PubMed

    González Barón, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Predictive factors (PF) are variables that give information about survival, treatment response or toxicity and future complications on cancer patients. The foremost utility of PF takes root in the possibility to furnish an individualized treatment schedule with higher succeeding options. They include clinical characteristics of the patient, tumour features, treatment administrated, classical pathological and new molecular data obtained from patients clinical samples. Clinical parameters comprise age, sex, underlying diseases and performance status among others, and in concurrence with tumour pathology and clinical stage (TNM) usually define the best treatment options. Also, chemotherapy response can modify natural history of several tumours, and thus is a PF. Modifications in evolving PF typically induce a variation in patient outcome. Hence, surgical tumour size reduction or neoadjuvant down-staging improve survival in several cancers. In the other side, treatment adjustment to steady PF should offers better outcome than "standard therapies". Recent advances on cancer research have generated a great deal of biological data that help us to search new treatment and diagnostic modalities. Biotechnology offers a great amount of possibilities in the next future and probably a true individualized therapy. Conversely, there are a small amount of molecular evidences that imply a creal variation in current clinical practice. Hence, more scientific and financial efforts are necessary to exploit to the full knowledge spurting up from basic science. In summary, the prediction in oncology is a hard task derived from clinical observation, tumour behaviour, treatment schedules and biological evidences that must offer realistic predictions on a concrete cancer patient. Oncologists have a duty to know all these variables to accomplish this thorny assignment. This review will focus on classical and recent biological PF in cancer.

  6. Second-Line Hormonal Therapy for Men With Chemotherapy-Naïve, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion.

    PubMed

    Virgo, Katherine S; Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K; Rumble, R Bryan; Carducci, Michael A; Nordquist, Luke; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Winquist, Eric; Singer, Eric A

    2017-06-10

    Purpose ASCO provisional clinical opinions (PCOs) offer direction to the ASCO membership after publication or presentation of potential practice-changing data. This PCO addresses second-line hormonal therapy for chemotherapy-naïve men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) who range from being asymptomatic with only biochemical evidence of CRPC to having documented metastases but minimal symptoms. Clinical Context The treatment goal for CRPC is palliation. Despite resistance to initial androgen deprivation therapy, most men respond to second-line hormonal therapies. However, guidelines have neither addressed second-line hormonal therapy for nonmetastatic CRPC nor provided specific guidance with regard to the chemotherapy-naïve population. Recent Data Six phase III randomized controlled trials and expert consensus opinion inform this PCO. Provisional Clinical Opinion For men with CRPC, a castrate state should be maintained indefinitely. Second-line hormonal therapy (eg, antiandrogens, CYP17 inhibitors) may be considered in patients with nonmetastatic CRPC at high risk for metastatic disease (rapid prostate-specific antigen doubling time or velocity) but otherwise is not suggested. In patients with radiographic evidence of metastases and minimal symptoms, enzalutamide or abiraterone plus prednisone should be offered after discussion with patients about potential harms, benefits, costs, and patient preferences. Radium-223 and sipuleucel-T also are options. No evidence provides guidance about the optimal order of hormonal therapies for CRPC beyond second-line treatment. Prostate-specific antigen testing every 4 to 6 months is reasonable for men without metastases. Routine radiographic restaging generally is not suggested but can be considered for patients at risk for metastases or who exhibit symptoms or other evidence of progression. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/genitourinary-cancer-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  7. Oncology market research provides a feasible index for standardization of colorectal cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Uchida, Keiichi; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2011-10-01

    Measures to evaluate standardization of cancer therapy after the major revision of guidelines for treatment of cancer are not well established. Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of oncology market research for measuring the effect of the guidelines on standardization of colorectal cancer chemotherapy. The source of data for this analysis was the Oncology Analyzer™, which provides insight into oncology markets worldwide. We compared colorectal cancer chemotherapy before (July 2008-June 2009) and after the major revision (July 2009-June 2010) of the Japanese guideline in 2009 to determine the effect of the new guidelines on clinical practice. A total of 1425 patients were enrolled. We confirmed that guideline revision had an effect on drug treatment. Regimens used were in agreement with the recommendations of the new guidelines, except that some characteristics depended on hospital specialization. A time-course study in 1 year also showed evident change in the use of colorectal cancer chemotherapy by the third quarter after the revision. Oncology market research is a useful tool for evaluating standardization of colorectal cancer chemotherapy. Furthermore, we expect that this method will contribute to the development of more effective cancer therapies.

  8. Tissue Microarrays in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, David; Kenney, Challayne; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2008-01-01

    The tissue microarray is a recently-implemented, high-throughput technology for the analysis of molecular markers in oncology. This research tool permits the rapid assessment of a biomarker in thousands of tumor samples, using commonly available laboratory assays such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Although introduced less than a decade ago, the TMA has proven to be invaluable in the study of tumor biology, the development of diagnostic tests, and the investigation of oncological biomarkers. This review describes the impact of TMA-based research in clinical oncology and its potential future applications. Technical aspects of TMA construction, and the advantages and disadvantages inherent to this technology are also discussed. PMID:18314063

  9. Medical Oncology Pharmacy: A New Role for the Clinical Pharmacist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Carl R.; Hickman, Mary Johne

    1977-01-01

    The University of Tennessee has established a training program for clinical pharmacists dealing with cancer chemotherapy patients. Health-care settings are described in which these individuals can contribute as unique health-care team members in oncology. (Author/LBH)

  10. Medical Oncology Pharmacy: A New Role for the Clinical Pharmacist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Carl R.; Hickman, Mary Johne

    1977-01-01

    The University of Tennessee has established a training program for clinical pharmacists dealing with cancer chemotherapy patients. Health-care settings are described in which these individuals can contribute as unique health-care team members in oncology. (Author/LBH)

  11. Limited Chemotherapy and Shrinking Field Radiotherapy for Osteolymphoma (Primary Bone Lymphoma): Results From the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 99.04 and Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group LY02 Prospective Trial;Bone; Lymphoma; Radiotherapy; Chemotherapy; Clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, David; Dear, Keith; Le, Thai; Barton, Michael; Wirth, Andrew; Porter, David; Roos, Daniel; Pratt, Gary

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To establish benchmark outcomes for combined modality treatment to be used in future prospective studies of osteolymphoma (primary bone lymphoma). Methods and Materials: In 1999, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) invited the Australasian Leukemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) to collaborate on a prospective study of limited chemotherapy and radiotherapy for osteolymphoma. The treatment was designed to maintain efficacy but limit the risk of subsequent pathological fractures. Patient assessment included both functional imaging and isotope bone scanning. Treatment included three cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and radiation to a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a shrinking field technique. Results: The trial closed because of slow accrual after 33 patients had been entered. Accrual was noted to slow down after Rituximab became readily available in Australia. After a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the five-year overall survival and local control rates are estimated at 90% and 72% respectively. Three patients had fractures at presentation that persisted after treatment, one with recurrent lymphoma. Conclusions: Relatively high rates of survival were achieved but the number of local failures suggests that the dose of radiotherapy should remain higher than it is for other types of lymphoma. Disability after treatment due to pathological fracture was not seen.

  12. Best practice in nurse-led chemotherapy review: a position statement from the United Kingdom Oncology Nursing Society

    PubMed Central

    Lennan, E; Vidall, C; Roe, H; Jones, P; Smith, J; Farrell, C

    2012-01-01

    This position statement has been formulated by nurses from the United Kingdom Oncology Nursing Society (UKONS) to provide guidance on the provision of nurse-led chemotherapy review clinics for adult patients. For the purposes of this statement, a nurse-led chemotherapy clinic is defined as one that conducts formal review (in a consultation room) before the decision to proceed and prescribe the next cycle of chemotherapy. This statement does not address the toxicity checks that take place immediately prior to the administration of chemotherapy, although many of the same principles will apply to both settings. PMID:22879834

  13. Design of oncology clinical trials: a review.

    PubMed

    Ananthakrishnan, Revathi; Menon, Sandeep

    2013-10-01

    Cancer is a disease that occurs due to the uncontrolled multiplication of cells that invade nearby tissues and can spread to other parts of the body. An increased incidence of cancer in the world has led to an increase in oncology research and in the number of oncology trials. Well designed oncology clinical trials are a key part of developing effective anti-cancer drugs. This review focuses on statistical considerations in the design and analysis of oncology clinical trials.

  14. Sedation in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    González Barón, Manuel; Gómez Raposo, César; Pinto Marín, Alvaro

    2005-08-01

    The clinical status of terminal cancer patients is very complex and is affected by several severe symptoms, of extended duration, changing with time and of multifactorial origin. When there are no reasonable cancer treatments specifically able to modify the natural history of the disease, symptom control acquires priority and favours the possible better adaptation to the general inexorable deterioration related to the neoplasic progression. Despite the important advances in Palliative Medicine, symptoms are frequently observed that are intolerable for the patient and which do not respond to usual palliative measures. This situation, characterised by rapid deterioration of the patient, very often heralds, implicitly or explicitly, approaching death. The intolerable nature and being refractory to treatment indicates to the health-care team, on many occasions, the need for sedation of the patient. The requirement for sedation of the cancer patient is a situation that does not allow for an attitude of doubt regarding maintenance of the patient in unnecessary suffering for more than a reasonable time. Given the undoubted clinical difficulty in its indication, it is important to have explored at an earlier stage all usual treatments possible and the grade of response, commensurate with the patient's values and desires. Sedation consists of the deliberate administration of drugs in minimum doses and combinations required not only to reduce the consciousness of the patients but also to achieve adequate alleviation of one or more refractory symptoms, and with the prior consent given by the patient explicitly, or implicitly or delegated. Sedation is accepted as ethically warranted when considering the imperative of palliation and its administration and, whenever contemplated, the arguments that justify them are clear recorded in the clinical history. It is not an easy decision for the physician since, traditionally, the training has been "for the fight to save life

  15. Trajectories of Evening Fatigue in Oncology Outpatients Receiving Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Fay; Melkus, Gail D’Eramo; Hammer, Marilyn; Schmidt, Brian L.; Knobf, M. Tish; Paul, Steven M.; Cartwright, Frances; Mastick, Judy; Cooper, Bruce A.; Chen, Lee-May; Melisko, Michelle; Levine, Jon D.; Kober, Kord; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Context Fatigue is a distressing, persistent sense of physical tiredness that is not proportional to a person’s recent activity. Fatigue impacts patients’ treatment decisions and can limit their self-care activities. While significant interindividual variability in fatigue severity has been noted, little is known about predictors of interindividual variability in initial levels and trajectories of evening fatigue severity in oncology patients receiving chemotherapy (CTX). Objectives To determine whether demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics were associated with initial levels as well as the trajectories of evening fatigue. Methods A sample of outpatients with breast, gastrointestinal, gynecological, and lung cancer (N=586) completed demographic and symptom questionnaires a total of six times over two cycles of CTX. Fatigue severity was evaluated using the Lee Fatigue Scale. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used to answer the study objectives. Results A large amount of interindividual variability was found in the evening fatigue trajectories. A piecewise model fit the data best. Patients who were White, diagnosed with breast, gynecological, or lung cancer, and who had more years of education, child care responsibilities, lower functional status, and higher levels of sleep disturbance and depression reported higher levels of evening fatigue at enrollment. Conclusion This study identified both non-modifiable (e.g., ethnicity) and modifiable (e.g., child care responsibilities, depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance) risk factors for more severe evening fatigue. Using this information, clinicians can identify patients at higher risk for more severe evening fatigue, provide individualized patient education, and tailor interventions to address the modifiable risk factors. PMID:25828560

  16. Japanese Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guidelines 2010 for antiemesis in oncology: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hideki; Saeki, Toshiaki; Aiba, Keisuke; Tamura, Kazuo; Aogi, Kenjiro; Eguchi, Kenji; Okita, Kenji; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Ryuhei; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Fujii, Hirofumi; Boku, Narikazu; Wada, Makoto; Akechi, Tatsuo; Udagawa, Yasuhiro; Okawa, Yutaka; Onozawa, Yusuke; Sasaki, Hidenori; Shima, Yasuo; Shimoyama, Naohito; Takeda, Masayuki; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Akifumi; Ikeda, Tadashi; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to disseminate the standard of antiemetic therapy for Japanese clinical oncologists. On the basis of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II instrument, which reflects evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, a working group of the Japanese Society of Clinical Oncology (JSCO) reviewed clinical practice guidelines for antiemesis and performed a systematic review of evidence-based domestic practice guidelines for antiemetic therapy in Japan. In addition, because health-insurance systems in Japan are different from those in other countries, a consensus was reached regarding standard treatments for chemotherapy that induce nausea and vomiting. Current evidence was collected by use of MEDLINE, from materials from meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and from European Society of Medical Oncology/Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer guidelines for antiemesis. Initially, 21 clinical questions (CQ) were selected on the basis of CQs from other guidelines. Patients treated with highly emetic agents should receive a serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5HT3) receptor antagonist, dexamethasone, and a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist. For patients with moderate emetic risk, 5HT3 receptor antagonists and dexamethasone were recommended, whereas for those receiving chemotherapy with low emetic risk dexamethasone only is recommended. Patients receiving high-emetic-risk radiation therapy should also receive a 5HT3 receptor antagonist. In this paper the 2010 JSCO clinical practice guidelines for antiemesis are presented in English; they reveal high concordance of Japanese medical circumstances with other antiemetic guidelines that are similarly based on evidence.

  17. Chemotherapy for elderly patients with advanced cancer: A pilot study in Institute of Oncology Bucharest

    PubMed Central

    Grigorescu, Alexandru C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives First objective was better understanding of the indications of chemotherapy in elderly with advanced cancer, tolerability and toxicity of chemotherapy in this age group. The second objective was to define current practice in chemotherapy for elderly people with advanced cancer for a selected group of patients treated in Institute of Oncology Bucharest (IOB). Materials and Methods The study makes a clinical analysis of medical records of 27 patients from the archive of Institute of Oncology Bucharest treated by the same doctor. Patients were selected according to: age ≥ 65 years, ECOG performance status 0–1, normal blood counts and blood biochemistry, histological confirmation of the diagnosis of cancer, patients should received at least 3 cycles of chemotherapy. We extract characteristics of the patients to see if they were a homogeneous group of patients and to compare them with data from the literature. Overall survival was calculated by the Kaplan Meyer curve. Results 295 patients more then 65 years were treated in our site in 2 years 2011, 2012. 93 patients received chemotherapy and only 27 patients were enrolled in this study following inclusion criteria. Common sites of cancer were lung and breast. The most used cytostatics for lung cancer was gemcitabine and carboplatine and cyclophosphamide, metotrexat and 5 fluorouracil for breast cancer. Toxicity was mild with the prevalence of hematologic toxicity. Overall survival without taking into account the type of cancer was 27.7 month. Conclusions For selected patients, chemotherapy was well tolerated and appears to prolong survival regardless of the location of cancer. The relatively small number of elderly patients who received chemotherapy is probably due to lack of compliance to treatment, the increased number of co-morbidities and evaluation of performance status only by the ECOG index known not to be good enough to establish the indication of chemotherapy. PMID:27847881

  18. Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Clinical oncology and chemical thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Seitz, D E; Pearce, H L

    1990-01-01

    The development of oncolytic agents for cancer chemotherapy is often based on chance discovery and intensive structure modification. A mechanistic understanding of the essential biochemistry of many anticancer drugs remains elusive because of the biological complexity of drug-drug and drug-target interactions. The potential of computational science to analyze and quantify these interactions may provide a rational basis for drug modification and clinical trial design.

  20. Best Practices for Chemotherapy Administration in Pediatric Oncology: Quality and Safety Process Improvements (2015).

    PubMed

    Looper, Karen; Winchester, Kari; Robinson, Deborah; Price, Andrea; Langley, Rachel; Martin, Gina; Jones, Sally; Holloway, Jodi; Rosenberg, Susanne; Flake, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The administration of chemotherapy to children with cancer is a high-risk process that must be performed in a safe and consistent manner with high reliability. Clinical trials play a major role in the treatment of children with cancer; conformance to chemotherapy protocol requirements and accurate documentation in the medical record are critical. Inconsistencies in the administration and documentation of chemotherapy were identified as opportunities for errors to occur. A major process improvement was initiated to establish best practices for nurses who administer chemotherapy to children. An interdisciplinary team was formed to evaluate the current process and to develop best practices based on current evidence, protocol requirements, available resources, and safety requirements. The process improvement focused on the establishment of standardized and safe administration techniques, exact administration times, and consistent electronic documentation that could easily be retrieved in medical record audits. Quality improvement tools including SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation), process mapping, PDSA (Plan, Do. Study, Act) cycles, and quality metrics were used with this process improvement. The team established best practices in chemotherapy administration to children that have proven to be safe and reliable. Follow-up data have demonstrated that the project was highly successful and improved accuracy, patient and nurse safety, and effectiveness of chemotherapy administration. © 2015 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  1. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  2. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  3. Clinical ethics consultation in oncology.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Andrew G; Montas, Sacha M; Barnosky, Andrew R; Smith, Lauren B; Fins, Joseph J; McCabe, Mary S

    2013-09-01

    There is limited empirical research exploring the nature of clinical ethical consultations within the oncology population. Our objective was to review and describe clinical ethics consultations at two National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers to identify opportunities for systems improvement in clinical care and opportunities for staff education. This case series is derived from two institutional prospectively maintained clinical ethics consultation databases. All ethics consultations from 2007 through 2011 that related to adult patients with cancer were included. A total of 208 eligible patient cases were identified. The most common primary issues leading to ethics consultation were code status and advance directives (25%), surrogate decision making (17%), and medical futility (13%). Communication lapses were identified in 45% of patient cases, and interpersonal conflict arose in 51%. Before ethics consultation, 26% of patients had do-not-resuscitate orders, which increased to 60% after ethics consultation. Palliative care consultation occurred in 41% of patient cases. Ethics consultations among patients with cancer reflect the complexities inherent to their clinical management. Appropriately honoring patients' wishes within the context of overall goals of care is crucial. Thoughtful consideration of the role of and relationship with palliative care experts, communication barriers, sources of interpersonal conflict, symptom control, and end-of-life care is paramount to optimal management strategies in this patient population.

  4. Impact of paroxetine on sleep problems in 426 cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: A trial from the University of Rochester Cancer Center Community Clinical Oncology Program

    PubMed Central

    Palesh, Oxana G.; Mustian, Karen M.; Peppone, Luke J.; Janelsins, Michelle; Sprod, Lisa K.; Kesler, Shelli; Innominato, Pasquale F.; Roth, Thomas; Manber, Rachel; Heckler, Charles; Fiscella, Kevin; Morrow, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sleep problems are a frequent distressing symptom in cancer patients, yet little is known about their treatment. Sleep problems and depression frequently co-occur, leading healthcare professionals to treat depression with the expectation that sleep problems will also improve. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of paroxetine to placebo on sleep problems via a secondary data analysis of a RCT designed to compare the effects of paroxetine to placebo on fatigue in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. A previously published report found a significant effect of paroxetine on depression in this cohort. Methods A total of 426 patients were randomized following Cycle 2 of chemotherapy to receive either 20 mg of paroxetine or placebo. Sleep problems were assessed using questions from the Hamilton Depression Inventory three times during chemotherapy. Results A total of 217 patients received paroxetine and 209 received placebo. Significantly fewer patients taking paroxetine reported sleep problems compared to patients on placebo (Paroxetine 79% versus Placebo 88%; p < 0.05). These differences remained significant even after controlling for baseline sleep problems and depression (p < 0.05). Conclusion Paroxetine had a significant benefit on sleep problems in both depressed and non-depressed cancer patients. However, rates of sleep problems remained high even among those effectively treated for depression with paroxetine. There is a need to develop and deliver sleep-specific interventions to effectively treat sleep-related side effects of cancer treatments. These findings suggest that sleep problems and depression are prevalent and co-morbid. Cancer progression, its response to treatment, and overall patient survival are intricately linked to host factors, such as inflammatory response and circadian rhythms, including sleep/wake cycles. Sleep problems and depression are modifiable host factors that can influence inflammation and impact cancer

  5. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: An American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology Focused Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Recht, Abram; Comen, Elizabeth A; Fine, Richard E; Fleming, Gini F; Hardenbergh, Patricia H; Ho, Alice Y; Hudis, Clifford A; Hwang, E Shelley; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Morrow, Monica; Salerno, Kilian E; Sledge, George W; Solin, Lawrence J; Spears, Patricia A; Whelan, Timothy J; Somerfield, Mark R; Edge, Stephen B

    A joint American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology panel convened to develop a focused update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline concerning use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT).

  6. Risk factors for readmission in patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal carcinoma who are receiving front-line chemotherapy on a clinical trial (GOG 218): an NRG oncology/gynecologic oncology group study (ADS-1236).

    PubMed

    Duska, Linda R; Java, James J; Cohn, David E; Burger, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    Readmission within 30days is a measure of care quality. Ovarian cancer patients are at high risk for readmission, but specific risk factors are not defined. This study was designed to determine risk factors in patients with ovarian cancer receiving upfront surgery and chemotherapy. The study population was enrolled to GOG 0218. Factors predictive of admission within 30days of a previous admission or 40days of cytoreductive surgery were investigated. Categorical variables were compared by Pearson chi-square test, continuous variables by Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. A logistic regression model was used to evaluate independent prognostic factors and to estimate covariate-adjusted odds. All tests were two-tailed, α=0.05. Of 1873 patients, 197 (10.5%) were readmitted, with 59 experiencing >1 readmission. One-hundred-forty-four (73%) readmissions were post-operative (readmission rate 7.7%). Significant risk factors include: disease stage (stage 3 vs 4, p=0.008), suboptimal cytoreduction (36% vs 64%, p=0.001), ascites, (p=0.018), BMI (25.4 vs 27.6, p<0.001), poor PS (p<0.001), and higher baseline CA 125 (p=0.017). Patients readmitted within 40days of surgery had a significantly shorter interval from surgery to chemotherapy initiation (22 versus 32days, p<0.0001). Patients treated with bevacizumab had higher readmission rates in the case of patients with >1 readmission. On multivariate analysis, the odds of re-hospitalization increased with doubling of BMI (OR=1.81, 95% CI: 1.07-3.07) and PS of 2 (OR=2.05, 95% CI 1.21-3.48). Significant risk factors for readmission in ovarian cancer patients undergoing primary surgery and chemotherapy include stage, residual disease, ascites, high BMI and poor PS. Readmissions are most likely after the initial surgical procedure, a discrete period to target with a prospective intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of administrative/billing data to expected protocol-mandated chemotherapy exposure in children with acute myeloid leukemia: A report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Miller, Tamara P; Troxel, Andrea B; Li, Yimei; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Alonzo, Todd A; Gerbing, Robert B; Hall, Matt; Torp, Kari; Fisher, Brian T; Bagatell, Rochelle; Seif, Alix E; Sung, Lillian; Gamis, Alan; Rubin, David; Luger, Selina; Aplenc, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Recently investigators have used analysis of administrative/billing datasets to answer clinical and pharmacoepidemiology questions in pediatric oncology. However, the accuracy of pharmacy data from administrative/billing datasets have not yet been evaluated. The primary objective of this study was to determine the concordance of Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) administrative/billing chemotherapy data with Children's Oncology Group (COG) protocol-mandated chemotherapy and to assess the implications of this level of concordance for further PHIS research. Data from 384 pediatric patients (1,060 courses of chemotherapy) with acute myeloid leukemia treated on COG clinical trial AAML0531 were previously merged with PHIS data. PHIS chemotherapy administrative/billing data were reviewed for the first three courses of chemotherapy. Accuracy was assessed using three metrics: recognizability of chemotherapy pattern by course, chemotherapy administration pattern by individual medication, and concordance with the number of days of protocol-defined chemotherapy. The chemotherapy pattern was recognizable in 87.3% of courses when course-wide accuracy was assessed. Chemotherapy administration pattern varied by medication. Cytarabine had perfect concordance 70.9% of the time, daunorubicin had perfect concordance 77.4% of the time, and etoposide had perfect concordance 67.8% of the time. The accuracy of chemotherapy administrative/billing data supports the continued use of PHIS data for epidemiology studies as long as investigators perform data quality control checks and evaluate each specific medication prior to undertaking definitive analyses. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement on Clinical Pathways in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Zon, Robin T; Frame, James N; Neuss, Michael N; Page, Ray D; Wollins, Dana S; Stranne, Steven; Bosserman, Linda D

    2016-03-01

    The use of clinical pathways in oncology care is increasingly important to patients and oncology providers as a tool for enhancing both quality and value. However, with increasing adoption of pathways into oncology practice, concerns have been raised by ASCO members and other stakeholders. These include the process being used for pathway development, the administrative burdens on oncology practices of reporting on pathway adherence, and understanding the true impact of pathway use on patient health outcomes. To address these concerns, ASCO's Board of Directors established a Task Force on Clinical Pathways, charged with articulating a set of recommendations to improve the development of oncology pathways and processes, allowing the demonstration of pathway concordance in a manner that promotes evidence-based, high-value care respecting input from patients, payers, and providers. These recommendations have been approved and adopted by ASCO's Board of Directors on August 12, 2015, and are presented herein.

  9. Veterinary oncology clinical trials: design and implementation.

    PubMed

    Thamm, Douglas H; Vail, David M

    2015-08-01

    There has been a recent increase in interest among veterinarians and the larger biomedical community in the evaluation of novel cancer therapies in client-owned (pet) animals with spontaneous cancer. This includes novel drugs designed to be veterinary therapeutics, as well as agents for which data generated in animals with tumors may inform human clinical trial design and implementation. An understanding of the process involved in moving a therapeutic agent through the stages of clinical evaluation is critical to the successful implementation of clinical investigations, as well as interpretation of the veterinary oncology literature. This review outlines considerations in the design and conduct of the various phases of oncology clinical trials, along with recent adaptations/modifications of these basic designs that can enhance the generation of timely and meaningful clinical data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Selection of Optimal Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens for Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) -Negative and Adjuvant Targeted Therapy for HER2-Positive Breast Cancers: An American Society of Clinical Oncology Guideline Adaptation of the Cancer Care Ontario Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Denduluri, Neelima; Somerfield, Mark R; Eisen, Andrea; Holloway, Jamie N; Hurria, Arti; King, Tari A; Lyman, Gary H; Partridge, Ann H; Telli, Melinda L; Trudeau, Maureen E; Wolff, Antonio C

    2016-07-10

    A Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) guideline on the selection of optimal adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for early breast cancer including adjuvant targeted therapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancers was identified for adaptation. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for adapting clinical practice guidelines developed by other organizations. The CCO guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor and content applicability. On the basis of the content review of the CCO guideline, the ASCO Panel agreed that, in general, the recommendations were clear and thorough and were based on the most relevant scientific evidence, and they presented options that will be acceptable to patients. However, for some topics addressed in the CCO guideline, the ASCO Panel formulated a set of adapted recommendations on the basis of local context and practice beliefs of the Panel members. Decisions regarding adjuvant chemotherapy regimens should take into account baseline recurrence risk, toxicities, likelihood of benefit, and host factors such as comorbidities. In high-risk HER2-negative populations with excellent performance status, anthracycline- and taxane-containing regimens are the standard of care. Docetaxel and cyclophosphamide for four cycles is an acceptable non-anthracycline regimen. In high-risk HER2-positive disease, sequential anthracycline and taxanes administered concurrently with trastuzumab or docetaxel, carboplatin, and trastuzumab for six cycles are recommended. An alternative regimen in a lower-risk, node-negative, HER2-positive population is paclitaxel and trastuzumab once per week for 12 cycles. Trastuzumab should be given for 1 year. Platinum salts should not be routinely administered in the adjuvant triple-negative population until survival efficacy data become available. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  11. Antiemetics: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update.

    PubMed

    Basch, Ethan; Prestrud, Ann Alexis; Hesketh, Paul J; Kris, Mark G; Feyer, Petra C; Somerfield, Mark R; Chesney, Maurice; Clark-Snow, Rebecca Anne; Flaherty, Anne Marie; Freundlich, Barbara; Morrow, Gary; Rao, Kamakshi V; Schwartz, Rowena N; Lyman, Gary H

    2011-11-01

    To update the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guideline for antiemetics in oncology. A systematic review of the medical literature was completed to inform this update. MEDLINE, the Cochrane Collaboration Library, and meeting materials from ASCO and the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer were all searched. Primary outcomes of interest were complete response and rates of any vomiting or nausea. Thirty-seven trials met prespecified inclusion and exclusion criteria for this systematic review. Two systematic reviews from the Cochrane Collaboration were identified; one surveyed the pediatric literature. The other compared the relative efficacy of the 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT(3)) receptor antagonists. Combined anthracycline and cyclophosphamide regimens were reclassified as highly emetic. Patients who receive this combination or any highly emetic agents should receive a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist, dexamethasone, and a neurokinin 1 (NK(1)) receptor antagonist. A large trial validated the equivalency of fosaprepitant, a single-day intravenous formulation, with aprepitant; either therapy is appropriate. Preferential use of palonosetron is recommended for moderate emetic risk regimens, combined with dexamethasone. For low-risk agents, patients can be offered dexamethasone before the first dose of chemotherapy. Patients undergoing high emetic risk radiation therapy should receive a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist before each fraction and for 24 hours after treatment and may receive a 5-day course of dexamethasone during fractions 1 to 5. The Update Committee noted the importance of continued symptom monitoring throughout therapy. Clinicians underestimate the incidence of nausea, which is not as well controlled as emesis.

  12. A randomized Phase II trial of systemic chemotherapy with and without trastuzumab followed by surgery in HER2-positive advanced gastric or esophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma with extensive lymph node metastasis: Japan Clinical Oncology Group study JCOG1301 (Trigger Study).

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kozo; Tokunaga, Masanori; Mizusawa, Junki; Machida, Nozomu; Katayama, Hiroshi; Shitara, Kohei; Tomita, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Kenichi; Boku, Narikazu; Sano, Takeshi; Terashima, Masanori; Sasako, Mitsuru

    2015-11-01

    Pre-operative chemotherapy with S-1 plus cisplatin is considered to be acceptable as one of the standard treatment options for gastric cancer patients with extensive lymph node metastases in Japan. Addition of trastuzumab to chemotherapy is shown to be effective for HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer patients, and we have commenced a randomized Phase II trial in March 2015 to evaluate S-1 plus cisplatin plus trastuzumab compared with S-1 plus cisplatin alone in the neoadjuvant setting for HER2-positive gastric cancer patients with ELM, which are followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 for 1 year. A total of 130 patients will be accrued from 41 Japanese institutions over 3 years. The primary endpoint is overall survival. The secondary endpoints are progression-free survival, response rate of pre-operative chemotherapy, proportion of patients with R0 resection, proportion of patients who complete the pre-operative chemotherapy and surgery, proportion of patients who complete the protocol treatment including post-operative chemotherapy, pathological response rate and adverse events. This trial has been registered in the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN 000016920. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. [Quality management in oncology supported by clinical cancer registries].

    PubMed

    Klinkhammer-Schalke, Monika; Gerken, Michael; Barlag, Hagen; Tillack, Anett

    2015-01-01

    Efforts in nationwide quality management for oncology have so far failed to comprehensively document all levels of care. New organizational structures such as population-based clinical cancer registries or certified organ cancer centers were supposed to solve this problem more sufficiently, but they have to be accompanied by valid trans-sectoral documentation and evaluation of clinical data. To measure feasibility and qualitative effectiveness of guideline implementation we approached this problem with a nationwide investigation from 2000 to 2011. The rate of neoadjuvant radio/chemotherapy in stage UICC II/III rectum cancer, cut-off point 80% for separating good from insufficient quality, was used as a quality indicator. The nationwide analysis indicates an increase from 45% to 70%, but only with the implementation strategy of CME. The combination of new structures, evidence-based quality indicators, organ cancer center and clinical cancer registries has shown good feasibility and seems promising.

  14. Laparoscopy mitigates adverse oncological effects of delayed adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Gantt, Gerald A; Ashburn, Jean; Kiran, Ravi P; Khorana, Alok A; Kalady, Matthew F

    2015-02-01

    Delaying initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy more than 8 weeks after surgical resection for colorectal cancer adversely affects overall patient survival. The effect of a laparoscopic surgical approach on initiation of chemotherapy has not been studied. The goal of this study was to determine if a laparoscopic approach to colon cancer resection affects the timing of adjuvant chemotherapy and outcomes. Patients who underwent curative surgery for stage II or III colon cancer and received adjuvant chemotherapy between 2003 and 2010 were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Patients were categorized according to surgical approach: open or laparoscopic. Patient demographics, clinicopathologic variables, postoperative complications, time from surgery to initiation of chemotherapy, and long-term oncologic outcomes were compared. Age, gender, ASA class, BMI, tumor stage, and postoperative complications were similar for laparoscopic and open cases, while length of stay was 2 days shorter for laparoscopic cases (5.4 vs 7.6 days, p < 0.01). The proportion of patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy more than 8 weeks after surgery did not differ between the groups (35.6 % open vs 38.7 % laparoscopic, p = 0.77). In the open group, delay in chemotherapy after surgery was associated with decreased disease-free and overall survival (p = 0.01, 0.01, respectively). However, delay in chemotherapy more than 8 weeks did not affect disease-free or overall survival in the laparoscopy group (p = 0.93, 0.51, respectively). The benefits of quicker recovery after laparoscopic surgery did not translate into earlier initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy in this retrospective study. However, a laparoscopic approach negated the inferior oncologic outcomes of patients who received delayed initiation of chemotherapy.

  15. Chemotherapy for neuroendocrine tumors: the Beatson Oncology Centre experience.

    PubMed

    Hatton, M Q; Reed, N S

    1997-01-01

    The role of chemotherapy in malignant neuroendocrine tumours is difficult to assess because of their rarity and variation in biological behaviour. We present a retrospective review of chemotherapy given to 18 patients with metastatic and one with locally advanced neuroendocrine tumours. There were eight poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumours, six thyroid medullary carcinomas, two phaeochromocytomas, two pancreatic islet cell tumours and one undifferentiated neuroblastoma. Four patients were given 3-weekly dacarbazine, vincristine and cyclophosphamide (DOC) chemotherapy. In eight patients, this regimen was modified by substituting the dacarbazine and cisplatin and etoposide (OPEC). A further six patients were treated with dacarbazine reintroduced into the 3-weekly regimen (DOPEC). The remaining patient received cisplatin and etoposide. There were two complete responses (both with OPEC) and eight partial responses (two with DOC, three with OPEC and three with DOPEC). Five patients had stable disease and four progressed. Four received further chemotherapy on relapse, producing one complete and one partial response. The median response duration to initial chemotherapy was 10 months (range 3-34). The median survival was 12 months (range 1-42). The main toxicity was haematological, with grade 3-4 neutropenia in 12 patients; eight suffered episodes of sepsis. One death was treatment related. Other toxicity was mild although three patients discontinued vincristine with grade 2 neurotoxicity. The response rate and side effects of these three regimens appear comparable. We conclude that, although these patient numbers are small, combination chemotherapy produces an encouraging response rate (53%; 95% CI 30-75) in malignant neuroendocrine tumours, with acceptable toxicity.

  16. Improved immunogenicity of high-dose influenza vaccine compared to standard-dose influenza vaccine in adult oncology patients younger than 65 years receiving chemotherapy: A pilot randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Jamshed, Saad; Walsh, Edward E; Dimitroff, Lynda J; Santelli, Jeanine Seguin; Falsey, Ann R

    2016-01-27

    Patients undergoing chemotherapy often fail to develop robust responses to influenza vaccination. Compared to standard-dose influenza vaccine (SD), high-dose influenza vaccine (HD) has shown improved immunogenicity and protection against influenza illness in adults 65 years and older. This study compared the immunogenicity and tolerability of HD to SD in adults younger than 65 years of age receiving chemotherapy. This double-blind study randomized patients receiving chemotherapy to vaccination with either SD or HD influenza vaccine. Hemagglutination inhibition assays (HAI) were performed prior to and 4 weeks after vaccination. HAI were summarized as geometric mean titers (GMT), seroconversion rates, and seroprotection rates. A total of 105 subjects were enrolled in the trial (51 received SD and 54 received HD). Subjects were well matched for demographic and medical conditions. Both vaccines were well tolerated with no SAEs. Of the 100 subjects with evaluable data, seroconversion rates for all 3 influenza antigens & post-vaccination GMTs for H3N2 & B strains were significantly improved with HD compared to SD. Seroprotection was excellent and equivalent in both groups. Trivalent high-dose influenza vaccine can be safely administered to patients receiving chemotherapy with improved immunogenicity and seroconversion compared to standard-dose vaccine. Post-vaccination seroprotection rates were similar in both groups. A larger study is needed to show clinical benefits with HD in this population. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT01666782. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Phase II/III randomized controlled trial comparing perioperative versus postoperative chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 for lower rectal cancer with suspected lateral pelvic node metastasis: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG1310 (PRECIOUS study).

    PubMed

    Ohue, Masayuki; Iwasa, Satoru; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Shiozawa, Manabu; Ito, Masaaki; Yasui, Masayoshi; Katayama, Hiroshi; Mizusawa, Junki; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    A randomized phase II/III trial was started in May 2015 comparing perioperative versus postoperative chemotherapy with modified infusional fluorouracil and folinic acid with oxaliplatin for lower rectal cancer patients with suspected lateral pelvic node metastasis. The standard arm is total mesorectal excision or tumor-specific mesorectal excision with lateral pelvic node dissection (LND) followed by postoperative chemotherapy (modified infusional fluorouracil and folinic acid with oxaliplatin; 12 cycles). The experimental (perioperative chemotherapy) arm is six courses of modified infusional fluorouracil and folinic acid with oxaliplatin before and six courses after total mesorectal excision with lateral pelvic node dissection. The aim of this trial is to confirm the superiority of perioperative chemotherapy. A total of 330 patients will be enrolled over 7 years. The primary endpoint in Phase II part is proportion of R0 resection and that in Phase III part is overall survival. Secondary endpoints are progression-free survival, local progression-free survival, etc. This trial has been registered in the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000017603 [http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index-j.htm].

  18. The Johns Hopkins Oncology Clinical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Lenhard, Raymond E.; Blum, Bruce I.; Sunderland, Jeffery M.; Braine, Hayden G.; Saral, Rein

    1982-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins Oncology Center has developed and maintains a clinical information system to support patient care, education, research and administrative functions. It operates on a dedicated mini-computer (PDP-11) programmed in MUMPS. Clinical information collelcted includes patient medical status and laboratory values. Data are used daily in patient care and also in support of retrospective and prospective research. The use of the system to manage a large blood product pheresis program and to study and treat infectious disease is described. Administrative functions include patient and personnel scheduling, program evaluation and projects directed toward control of costs.

  19. Lessons Learned from Radiation Oncology Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei-Fei; Okunieff, Paul; Bernhard, Eric J.; Stone, Helen B.; Yoo, Stephen; Coleman, C. Norman; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Brown, Martin; Buatti, John; Guha, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    A Workshop entitled “Lessons Learned from Radiation Oncology Trials” was held on December 7–8th, 2011 in Bethesda, MD, to present and discuss some of the recently conducted Radiation Oncology clinical trials with a focus on those that failed to refute the null hypothesis. The objectives of this Workshop were to summarize and examine the questions that these trials provoked, to assess the quality and limitations of the pre-clinical data that supported the hypotheses underlying these trials, and to consider possible solutions to these challenges for the design of future clinical trials. Several themes emerged from the discussions, including the: a) opportunities to learn from null-hypothesis trials through tissue and imaging studies; b) value of pre-clinical data supporting the design of combinatorial therapies; c) significance of validated biomarkers; d) necessity of quality assurance in radiotherapy delivery; e) conduct of sufficiently-powered studies to address the central hypothesis; and f) importance of publishing results of the trials regardless of the outcome. The fact that well-designed hypothesis-driven clinical trials produce null or negative results is expected given the limitations of trial design, and complexities of cancer biology. It is important to understand the reasons underlying such null results however, in order to effectively merge the technological innovations with the rapidly evolving biology for maximal patient benefit, through the design of future clinical trials. PMID:24043463

  20. Factors associated with oncology patients' involvement in shared decision making during chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Colley, Alexis; Halpern, Jodi; Paul, Steven; Micco, Guy; Lahiff, Maureen; Wright, Fay; Levine, Jon D; Mastick, Judy; Hammer, Marilyn J; Miaskowski, Christine; Dunn, Laura B

    2016-09-20

    Oncology patients are increasingly encouraged to play an active role in treatment decision making. While previous studies have evaluated relationships between demographic characteristics and decision-making roles, less is known about the association of symptoms and psychological adjustment characteristics (eg, coping styles and personality traits) and decision-making roles. As part of a larger study of symptom clusters, patients (n = 765) receiving chemotherapy for breast, gastrointestinal, gynecological, or lung cancer provided information on demographic, clinical, symptom, and psychological adjustment characteristics. Patient-reported treatment decision-making roles (ie, preferred role and role actually played) were assessed using the Control Preferences Scale. Differences among patients, who were classified as passive, collaborative, or active, were evaluated using χ(2) analyses and analyses of variance. Over half (56.3%) of the patients reported that they both preferred and actually played a collaborative role. Among those patients with concordant roles, those who were older, those with less education and lower income, and those who were less resilient were more likely to prefer a passive role. Several psychological adjustment characteristics were associated with decision-making role, including coping style, personality, and fatalism. Oncology patients' preferences for involvement in treatment decision making are associated with demographic characteristics as well as with symptoms and psychological adjustment characteristics, such as coping style and personality. These results reaffirm the complexities of predicting patients' preferences for involvement in decision making. Further study is needed to determine if role or coping style may be influenced by interventions designed to teach adaptive coping skills. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies in oncology: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Gharwan, Helen; Groninger, Hunter

    2016-04-01

    Molecularly targeted cancer therapies, such as small-molecule kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, constitute a rapidly growing and an important part of the oncology armamentarium. Unlike conventional (cytotoxic) chemotherapeutics, targeted therapies were designed to disrupt cancer cell pathogenesis at specific biological points essential for the development and progression of the tumour. These agents were developed to disrupt specific targets with the aim of minimizing treatment burden compared with conventional chemotherapy. Nevertheless the increasingly common use of targeted therapies has revealed some unanticipated, often clinically significant toxic effects, as well as compromising effective palliative and end-of-life management approaches. Although patients and clinicians welcome improvements in cancer prognosis, these changes can also impact patient quality-of-life. Therefore, as demand for oncology expertise increases, physicians need to apprise themselves of targeted therapies and their clinical implications, including drug-specific side effects, impact on quality of life, and cost issues, especially in relation to end-of-life care. This Review provides a useful summary and guide for professionals treating patients with malignant diseases.

  2. A retrospective review of antiemetic use for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in pediatric oncology patients at a tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Aseeri, Mohammed; Mukhtar, Amnah; Al Khansa, Sara; Elimam, Nagla; Jastaniah, Wasil

    2013-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting are the most dreaded and distressing side effects for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment. These side effects have a significant impact on the patients' quality of life and can interfere with their ability to receive intensive chemotherapy regimens. With the recent advances in antiemetic pharmacotherapy and supportive care, the current treatments for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, when used appropriately, have become highly effective in mitigating these adverse effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current practice involving antiemetic treatment in newly diagnosed pediatric oncology patients at our center. This was a retrospective cohort study of newly diagnosed pediatric oncology patients who were less than 14 years of age receiving their first cycle of inpatient chemotherapy. The data abstracted included the following: age, gender, type of cancer, chemotherapy regimen, emetogenic risk and level, prescribed prophylactic antiemetic regimen, incidence of breakthrough emesis, and breakthrough antiemetic medications used. Emetogenic risk was classified based on published guidelines into low, moderate, or high emetogenic chemotherapy, and a scoring system to determine the emetogenic level of combined chemotherapy agents was followed to monitor the efficacy of the antiemetic regimens. Clinical effectiveness was assessed based on breakthrough emesis. A total of 49 patients were eligible for the study. High emetogenic chemotherapy was administered in 28/49 (57.1%) and moderate emetogenic chemotherapy was administered in 21/49 (42.9%) patients. Only 10/49 (20.4%) received appropriate antiemetic prophylaxis, whereas 39/49 (79.6%) received inadequate antiemetic prophylaxis; 14/49 (28.6%) patients experienced breakthrough emesis. Breakthrough emesis occurred in 11/28 (39.3%) patients receiving high emetogenic chemotherapy and 3/21 (14.3%) patients receiving moderate emetogenic chemotherapy. The use

  3. [Long term results of exclusive chemotherapy for glottic squamous cell carcinoma complete clinical responders after induction chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Vachin, F; Hans, S; Atlan, D; Brasnu, D; Menard, M; Laccourreye, O

    2004-06-01

    To evaluate the long-term results of exclusive chemotherapy for T1-T3N0M0 glottic squamous cell carcinoma complete clinical responders after induction chemotherapy. Between 1985 and 2000, 69 patients with glottic squamous cell carcinoma complete clinical responders after induction chemotherapy were managed with exclusive chemotherapy at our department. Chemotherapy associated platinum and fluorouracil. This retrospective analysis evaluated actuarial survival, treatment morbidity, oncologic events and laryngeal preservation. Various independent factors were tested for potential correlation with survival and local recurrence. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival, local control, lymph node control estimate were 83,6%, 64,8%, 98,6% respectively. Chemotherapy never resulted in death. The 10-year actuarial metachronous second primary tumors estimate was 32%. The overall laryngeal preservation rate was 98,6%. Altogether our data and the review of the literature suggest that in patients achieving a complete clinical response after and induction based chemotherapy regimen, the completion of an exclusive chemotherapy regimen appears to be a valid alternative to the conventional use of radiotherapy or chemo-radiation protocols.

  4. Knowledge Level on Administration of Chemotherapy through Peripheral and Central Venous Catheter among Oncology Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Kapucu, Sevgisun; Özkaraman, Ayşe Özaydın; Uysal, Neşe; Bagcivan, Gulcan; Şeref, Ferhan Çetin; Elöz, Aygül

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the knowledge levels of oncology nurses about peripheral and central venous catheter during their chemotherapy administration. Methods: Data collection of this descriptive study was started on April 15, 2015–July 15, 2015. The data presented in this summary belong to 165 nurses. Data were collected with data collection form including questions related to sociodemographic qualifications and knowledge levels of nurses. Data collection forms were E-mailed to the members of Turkish Oncology Nursing Society. Data presented with numbers, percentages, and mean ± standard deviation. Results: The mean age of nurses was 33.60 ± 7.34 years and mean duration for oncology nursing experience was 2.65 ± 0.91 years. Nurses had correct information about the importance of selecting peripheral venous catheter and choosing the placement area for chemotherapy administration (63.6%), control of catheter before the administration (93.9%), influence of chemotherapeutic agent on length of catheter (40.6%), and management of extravasation (75.7%). Nurses also had correct information about the first use of port catheter (67.3%) and checking the catheter whether it is working properly or not (75.8%). Conclusions: In General, nurses’ level of knowledge related to catheter is 50% and higher. It is recommended to increase the knowledge of nurses about evidence-based information for catheter care as a step to safe chemotherapy practice. PMID:28217732

  5. Economic impact with home delivery of chemotherapy to pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, M T; Raisch, D W; Chavez, C M; Duncan, M H; Parasuraman, T V; Cox, F M

    1997-02-01

    To examine the economic impact of a home chemotherapy program (HCP) for pediatric oncology patients. Factors that led to initiation of an HCP included availability of specially trained nurses and programmable ambulatory infusion devices at local home care agencies, routine central venous catheter placement, inpatient bed space shortages, and the availability of ondansetron. Chemotherapy delivery in the home setting from June 1991 through June 1994. Charge data and nausea and vomiting severity data were collected for patients treated through the HCP. Economic impact was calculated by incorporating and summing all charge categories associated with hospital admission for chemotherapy (HAC) versus delivery by the HCP. All data were adjusted for 1993 dollars, and reflect changes for the average patient size (1 m2). Charge data for each chemotherapy protocol delivered in the home were analyzed by calculating the differences between HAC and HCP charges using the following formula: charge difference (HAC - HCP) per protocol times the number of courses. Total economic impact was calculated by summing the differences in charges for each protocol. A total of 262 chemotherapy courses were given to 44 patients (mean age 9.5 +/- 5.1 y) through the HCP, which represented 1012 patient care days and 24 different chemotherapy protocols. Monetary savings from the HCP ranged from $5180 per course of ifosfamide plus etoposide to $367 per course for high-dose methotrexate. Total monetary savings from the HCP during the 3-year period was $640,793. Successful control of nausea and vomiting with a combination of ondansetron plus methylprednisolone was achieved in approximately 80% of the patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy protocols. HCP for pediatric oncology patients results in substantial monetary savings to payors. Effective control of nausea and vomiting can be accomplished at home in the majority of patients with an ondansetron-based antiemetic regimen.

  6. Adaptive clinical trial designs in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yong; Lee, J. Jack

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive designs have become popular in clinical trial and drug development. Unlike traditional trial designs, adaptive designs use accumulating data to modify the ongoing trial without undermining the integrity and validity of the trial. As a result, adaptive designs provide a flexible and effective way to conduct clinical trials. The designs have potential advantages of improving the study power, reducing sample size and total cost, treating more patients with more effective treatments, identifying efficacious drugs for specific subgroups of patients based on their biomarker profiles, and shortening the time for drug development. In this article, we review adaptive designs commonly used in clinical trials and investigate several aspects of the designs, including the dose-finding scheme, interim analysis, adaptive randomization, biomarker-guided randomization, and seamless designs. For illustration, we provide examples of real trials conducted with adaptive designs. We also discuss practical issues from the perspective of using adaptive designs in oncology trials. PMID:25811018

  7. Effects of Video Games on the Adverse Corollaries of Chemotherapy in Pediatric Oncology Patients: A Single-Case Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolko, David J.; Rickard-Figueroa, Jorge L.

    1985-01-01

    Assessed effects of video games on adverse corollaries of chemotherapy in three pediatric oncology patients. Results indicated that access to video games resulted in reduction in the number of anticipatory symptoms experienced and observed, as well as a diminution in the aversiveness of chemotherapy side effects. (Author/NRB)

  8. Effects of Video Games on the Adverse Corollaries of Chemotherapy in Pediatric Oncology Patients: A Single-Case Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolko, David J.; Rickard-Figueroa, Jorge L.

    1985-01-01

    Assessed effects of video games on adverse corollaries of chemotherapy in three pediatric oncology patients. Results indicated that access to video games resulted in reduction in the number of anticipatory symptoms experienced and observed, as well as a diminution in the aversiveness of chemotherapy side effects. (Author/NRB)

  9. [Hospital information systems ineffectiveness in costing ambulatory chemotherapy in pulmonary oncology].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Raholimina, V; Ferri-Dessens, R M; Pibarot, M; Penot Ragon, C; Gregoire, R; Kleisbauer, J P

    2000-06-01

    The real cost of medical consumption was compared with the proportion of medication consumption of (the) GHM n(o) 681 (homogeneous group of patients, chemotherapy for cancer in day care) in the French case mix system (PMSI). For those patients in our thoracic oncology unit (Sainte-Marguerite Hospital, Marseille, France), the real medication cost was calculated from prices paid by the hospital, then compared to the expected expenditures for the medication consumption of the GHM 681, i.e. 678 French francs (24.1% of the 225 ISA points (synthetic activity index)). Over a period of 2 months in 1998, 87 patients (mean age 63 +/- 11) had 194 chemotherapy sessions in day care, with multi-drug therapy in 38 cases. Vinorelbine or gemcitabine represented 81% of the single drug chemotherapy. In 84% of the single drug and 76% of the multi-drug chemotherapy, the real cost of medication consumption was above the allocated budget. The mean cost for single drug chemotherapy was 1722 FF and 2920 FF for multi-drug chemotherapy. The budget allocated by the PMSI shows a deficit in the most cases. To avoid a restriction in the use of some drugs, it appears that the French system of budget evaluation needs to be improved.

  10. Oral Health Status of Chinese Paediatric and Adolescent Oncology Patients with Chemotherapy in Hong Kong: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kung, A.Y.H; Zhang, S; Zheng, L.W; Wong, G.H.M; Chu, C.H

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To study the oral health status of Chinese children and adolescents undergoing chemotherapy in Hong Kong. Method: All Chinese children and adolescent oncology patients aged 18 or below attending the Children's Centre for Cancer and Blood Disease at a hospital for chemotherapy were invited and parental consent was sought before they were accepted into the study. The study comprised of 1) a parental questionnaire, 2) the collection of medical history and 3) a clinical examination for tooth decay (caries) and mucosal status. Results: A total of 69 patients were invited, and they all participated in this study. Their mean age was 9.2±5.0 and 44 (64%) were males. Twenty-six patients (38%) had no caries experience (DMFT and/or dmft = 0). Higher caries experience was detected in participants that were not born in Hong Kong, had completed active chemotherapy, participated in school dental care service and whose parents had low educational levels. There were 41 patients with active chemotherapy, 24 of whom were diagnosed with acute leukaemia, 5 with haematological malignancies other than leukaemia and 11 with solid tumours. Antimetabolites, cytotoxic antibiotics, alkylating agents and plant alkaloids were administered in 49%, 32%, 24% and 22% of them, respectively. Twenty-six (63%) patients showed no mucosal complications. The most common oral complication was oral mucositis (24%) followed by petechiae (10%). Conclusion: About two-thirds of paediatric and adolescent cancer patients had caries experience, which was more common among those who had completed chemotherapy. Oral mucositis followed by petechiae were the two most common complications of receiving chemotherapy. PMID:25674168

  11. Oncology Nursing Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Account Login Cart Search the ONS website Continuing Nursing Education Courses and Activities Access Devices: The Virtual ... Vomiting Chemotherapy for Non-Oncology Conditions Clinical Trials Nursing 101 Cognitive Impairment Fundamentals of Blood and Marrow ...

  12. Strategic physician communication and oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, T L; Blanchard, C; Ruckdeschel, J C; Coovert, M; Strongbow, R

    1999-10-01

    Clinical trials are the primary means for determining new, effective treatments for cancer patients, yet the number of patients that accrue is relatively limited. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between physician behavior and patient accrual to a clinical trial by videotaping the interaction. Forty-eight patient-physician interactions involving 12 different oncologists were videotaped in several clinics at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute (Tampa, FL). The purpose of each interaction was to present the possibility of a clinical trial to the patient. A coding system, the Moffitt Accrual Analysis System, was developed by the authors to code behaviors that represented both the legal-informational and social influence models of communication behavior. Thirty-two patients agreed to participate in the clinical trial. Videotaping was found to be a viable, valid, and reliable method for studying the interaction. Physicians who were observed to use both models of influence were found to enroll more patients. Thus, patients were more likely to accrue to the trial when their physician verbally presented items normally included in an informed consent document and when they behaved in a reflective, patient-centered, supportive, and responsive manner. Discussion of benefits, side effects, patient concerns and resources to manage the concerns were all associated with accrual. This research has implications for modifying physician behavior and, thus, increasing the numbers of patients accruing to oncology clinical trials.

  13. Clinical oncology in Malaysia: 1914 to present

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    A narration of the development of staff, infrastructure and buildings in the various parts of the country is given in this paper. The role of universities and other institutions of learning, public health, palliative care, nuclear medicine and cancer registries is described together with the networking that has been developed between the government, non-governmental organisations and private hospitals. The training of skilled manpower and the commencement of the Master of Clinical Oncology in the University of Malaya is highlighted. Efforts taken to improve the various aspects of cancer control which includes prevention of cancer, early detection, treatment and palliative care are covered. It is vital to ensure that cancer care services must be accessible and affordable throughout the entire health system, from the primary care level up to the centres for tertiary care, throughout the whole country. PMID:21614216

  14. Protection behaviors for cytotoxic drugs in oncology nurses of chemotherapy centers in Shiraz hospitals, South of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Khadijeh; Hazrati, Maryam; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Ansari, Jasem; Sajadi, Mahboubeh; Hosseinnazzhad, Azam; Moshiri, Esmail

    2016-01-01

    Context: The use of antineoplastic agents for the treatment of cancer is an increasingly common practice in hospitals. As a result, workers involved with handling antineoplastic drugs may be accidentally exposed to these agents, placing them at potential risk for long-term adverse effects. This study aimed to determine the occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs. Subjects and Methods: The study was designed as an analytic descriptive survey. The research settings took place in six centers of chemotherapy in Shiraz, Iran. The participants were 86 nurses who worked in oncology units and administered cytotoxic drugs. Data were collected using a questionnaire and a checklist which was developed by the investigators to determine occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs. Percentage calculations and the independent samples t-test were used to see the general distribution and analysis of data. To statistically analyze of the data, SPSS software (version 16) was applied. Results: The mean age of participants was 30.52 ± 6.50 years and 66.27% of the nurses worked on inpatient oncology wards. The mean practice score was 21.1 ± 3.76 that ranged from 12.5 to 31. The independent samples t-test showed the outpatient nurses were weaker in practice (17.2 ± 2.52) in comparison with university hospitals (23.35 ± 3.02, P < 0.001). Occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs especially during administration and disposal of medicines was poor and rarely trained with this subject and was observed under the standard conditions. Conclusions: There is deficiency in the understanding and related protection practices of clinical nursing staff vocationally exposed to cytotoxic drugs. It is recommended that all clinical nursing staff should receive full occupational protection training about these matters and the authorities provide standard conditions of oncology

  15. Protection behaviors for cytotoxic drugs in oncology nurses of chemotherapy centers in Shiraz hospitals, South of Iran.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Khadijeh; Hazrati, Maryam; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Ansari, Jasem; Sajadi, Mahboubeh; Hosseinnazzhad, Azam; Moshiri, Esmail

    2016-01-01

    The use of antineoplastic agents for the treatment of cancer is an increasingly common practice in hospitals. As a result, workers involved with handling antineoplastic drugs may be accidentally exposed to these agents, placing them at potential risk for long-term adverse effects. This study aimed to determine the occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs. The study was designed as an analytic descriptive survey. The research settings took place in six centers of chemotherapy in Shiraz, Iran. The participants were 86 nurses who worked in oncology units and administered cytotoxic drugs. Data were collected using a questionnaire and a checklist which was developed by the investigators to determine occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs. Percentage calculations and the independent samples t-test were used to see the general distribution and analysis of data. To statistically analyze of the data, SPSS software (version 16) was applied. The mean age of participants was 30.52 ± 6.50 years and 66.27% of the nurses worked on inpatient oncology wards. The mean practice score was 21.1 ± 3.76 that ranged from 12.5 to 31. The independent samples t-test showed the outpatient nurses were weaker in practice (17.2 ± 2.52) in comparison with university hospitals (23.35 ± 3.02, P < 0.001). Occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs especially during administration and disposal of medicines was poor and rarely trained with this subject and was observed under the standard conditions. There is deficiency in the understanding and related protection practices of clinical nursing staff vocationally exposed to cytotoxic drugs. It is recommended that all clinical nursing staff should receive full occupational protection training about these matters and the authorities provide standard conditions of oncology wards.

  16. [Clinical impact of locoregional hyperthermia in gynecological oncology].

    PubMed

    Bischoff, J; Lindner, L H; Issels, R D; Costa, S

    2006-10-01

    In the last decade progress in gynecological oncology has been achieved mainly by new cytotoxic drugs and advances in radiation technology. For example, the use of taxanes in the primary therapy of ovarian cancers and of combined radio-chemotherapy in cervical cancer has led to significant prolongations of survival. However, in case of relapse most gynaecological malignancies are associated with very poor prognosis. Efficacy of local and systemic therapy can be increased by combining radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy with locoregional hyperthermia (LRH). Increasing the temperature of the target tissue up to 41-43 degrees C leads to local hyperaemia and the tumor tissue becomes more responsive to cytotoxic interventions. In several prospective randomized studies the combination between LRH and radiotherapy was superior to radiotherapy alone in terms of local control (e. g. chest wall recurrence in breast cancer) and has led to longer overall survival in advanced cervical cancer. Platinum derivatives and other cytotoxic drugs have shown synergistic effects with LRH and the combination of both has elicited high response rates in recurrent cervical cancer. In phase-II-clinical trials the newly developed liposomal anthracyclines demonstrated synergistic effects with LRH in patients with refractory ovarian cancer. Our own experience has shown that adding LRH to radio- and/or chemotherapy is well tolerated by the patients. Despite of the fact, that the available data are still preliminary, the inclusion of LRH into multimodal cancer therapy concepts appears to be very promising. Well-designed comparative studies are still needed to evaluate the role of hyperthermia as an adjunct to conventional cancer therapy.

  17. Selenium in oncology: from chemistry to clinics.

    PubMed

    Micke, Oliver; Schomburg, Lutz; Buentzel, Jens; Kisters, Klaus; Muecke, Ralph

    2009-10-12

    The essential trace element selenium, which is a crucial cofactor in the most important endogenous antioxidative systems of the human body, is attracting more and more the attention of both laypersons and expert groups. The interest of oncologists mainly focuses in the following clinical aspects: radioprotection of normal tissues, radiosensitizing in malignant tumors, antiedematous effect, prognostic impact of selenium, and effects in primary and secondary cancer prevention. Selenium is a constituent of the small group of selenocysteine-containing selenoproteins and elicits important structural and enzymatic functions. Selenium deficiency has been linked to increased infection risk and adverse mood states. It has been shown to possess cancer-preventive and cytoprotective activities in both animal models and humans. It is well established that Se has a key role in redox regulation and antioxidant function, and hence in membrane integrity, energy metabolism and protection against DNA damage. Recent clinical trials have shown the importance of selenium in clinical oncology. Our own clinical study involving 48 patients suggest that selenium has a positive effect on radiation-associated secondary lymphedema in patients with limb edemas, as well as in the head and neck region, including endolaryngeal edema. Another randomized phase III study of our group was performed to examine the cytoprotective properties of selenium in radiation oncology. The aim was to evaluate whether sodium selenite is able to compensate a preexisting selenium deficiency and to prevent radiation induced diarrhea in adjuvant radiotherapy for pelvic gynecologic malignancies. Through this study, the significant benefits of sodium selenite supplementation with regards to selenium deficiency and radiotherapy induced diarrhea in patients with cervical and uterine cancer has been shown for the first time in a prospective randomized trial. Survival data imply that supplementation with selenium does not

  18. Survey of Medical Oncology Status in Korea (SOMOS-K): A National Survey of Medical Oncologists in the Korean Association for Clinical Oncology (KACO).

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Yeun; Lee, Yun Gyoo; Kim, Bong-Seog

    2017-07-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the current role of medical oncologists in cancer care with a focus on increasing the recognition of medical oncology as an independent specialty. Questionnaires modified from the Medical Oncology Status in Europe Survey dealing with oncology structure, resources, research, and patterns of care given by medical oncologists were selected. Several modifications were made to the questionnaire after feedback from the insurance and policy committee of the Korean Association for Clinical Oncology (KACO). The online survey was then sent to KACO members. A total of 214 medical oncologists (45.8% of the total inquiries), including 71 directors of medical oncology institutions, took the survey. Most institutions had various resources, including a medical oncology department (94.1%) and a department of radiation oncology (82.4%). There was an average of four medical oncologists at each institution. Medical oncologists were involved in various treatments from diagnosis to end-of-life care. They were also chemotherapy providers from a wide range of institutions that treated many types of solid cancers. In addition, 86.2% of the institutions conducted research. This is the first national survey in Korea to show that medical oncologists are involved in a wide range of cancer treatments and care. This survey emphasizes the contributions and proper roles of medical oncologists in the evolving health care environment in Korea.

  19. Effects of Age Expectations on Oncology Social Workers' Clinical Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conlon, Annemarie; Choi, Namkee G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the influence of oncology social workers' expectations regarding aging (ERA) and ERA with cancer (ERAC) on their clinical judgment. Methods: Oncology social workers (N = 322) were randomly assigned to one of four vignettes describing a patient with lung cancer. The vignettes were identical except for the patent's age…

  20. Effects of Age Expectations on Oncology Social Workers' Clinical Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conlon, Annemarie; Choi, Namkee G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the influence of oncology social workers' expectations regarding aging (ERA) and ERA with cancer (ERAC) on their clinical judgment. Methods: Oncology social workers (N = 322) were randomly assigned to one of four vignettes describing a patient with lung cancer. The vignettes were identical except for the patent's age…

  1. Oncologic outcomes after adjuvant chemotherapy using FOLFOX in MSI-H sporadic stage III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Yeop; Kim, Do Yoon; Kim, Young Bae; Suh, Kwang Wook

    2013-10-01

    Little is known of the oncological outcomes after adjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy in patients with stage III colon cancer showing microsatellite instability high (MSI-H). In the present study we investigated the prognostic impact of MSI-H in patients with stage III colon cancer receiving FOLFOX chemotherapy. We analyzed the MSI status in 127 patients with stage III colon cancer who underwent curative surgical resection followed by FOLFOX chemotherapy between January 2003 and December 2010. We assessed disease-free and overall survival (OS) in patients with MSI-H colon cancer compared with those showing microsatellite instability low or microsatellite stable (MSI-L/MSS) disease. Sixteen of the patients (12.6 %) were MSI-H, and 111 patients (87.4 %) were MSI-L/MSS. There was no significant difference between patients showing MSI-H and MSI-L/MSS except for age (P = 0.030), tumor location (P < 0.001), and differentiation (P = 0.031). Compared with MSI-L/MSS colon cancer, patients with MSI-H colon cancer had no significant difference in 5-year disease-free and OS (72.2 vs 68.5 %, P = 0.874; 68.1 vs 71.1 %, P = 0.437). Our study indicates that FOLFOX chemotherapy can be considered to treat stage III colon cancer patients with MSI-H after surgery, although the study was not randomized and included only a limited number of patients.

  2. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy clinical trials: Review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Gewandter, Jennifer S; Freeman, Roy; Kitt, Rachel A; Cavaletti, Guido; Gauthier, Lynn R; McDermott, Michael P; Mohile, Nimish A; Mohlie, Supriya G; Smith, A Gordon; Tejani, Mohamedtaki A; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2017-08-22

    To assess the design characteristics and reporting quality of published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for treatments of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) initiated before or during chemotherapy. In this systematic review of RCTs of preventive or symptomatic pharmacologic treatments for CIPN initiated before or during chemotherapy treatment, articles were identified by updating the PubMed search utilized in the CIPN treatment guidelines published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology in 2014. Thirty-eight articles were identified. The majority included only patients receiving platinum therapies (61%) and used a placebo control (79%). Common exclusion criteria were preexisting neuropathy (84%), diabetes (55%), and receiving treatments that could potentially improve neuropathy symptoms (45%). Ninety-five percent of studies initiated the experimental treatment before CIPN symptoms occurred. Although 58% of articles identified a primary outcome measure (POM), only 32% specified a primary analysis. Approximately half (54%) of the POMs were patient-reported outcome measures of symptoms and functional impairment. Other POMs included composite measures of symptoms and clinician-rated signs (23%) and vibration tests (14%). Only 32% of articles indicated how data from participants who prematurely discontinued chemotherapy were analyzed, and 21% and 29% reported the number of participants who discontinued chemotherapy due to neuropathy or other/unspecified reasons, respectively. These data identify reporting practices that could be improved in order to enhance readers' ability to critically evaluate RCTs of CIPN treatments and use the findings to inform the design of future studies and clinical practice. Reporting recommendations are provided. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  3. Chemotherapy for Metastatic Breast Cancer – An Anachronism in the Era of Personalised and Targeted Oncological Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Schneeweiss, A.; Ruckhäberle, E.; Huober, J.

    2015-01-01

    Based on the findings of modern molecular biology, breast cancer is nowadays considered to be a heterogeneous disease. This leads to the objective of an individualised, more patient-oriented therapy. A series of target molecules for this purpose has already been identified. The principle of targeted oncological therapy was realised decades ago with the introduction of endocrine therapy for patients with hormone receptor-positive tumours. The modern therapy for HER2-positive tumours is a further example for the translation of targeted therapy into clinical routine. For patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer, to date two targeted drugs, bevacizumab and everolimus, are available for routine clinical use. Many other substances are still undergoing clinical development. However, validated predictive markers to aid in therapeutic decision-making and therapy control are still lacking. Chemotherapy constitutes an effective palliative therapy with proven efficacy for the patients. In this process strategies have also been realised for a targeted therapy against tumour cells with the help of chemotherapeutic agents such as, for example, the intracellular activation of the prodrug capecitabine or the active albumin-mediated transport of nab-paclitaxel which leads to higher peri- and intratumoural enrichments. The continuing unchanged relevance of chemotherapy is often underestimated in the current discussions and will be comprehensively evaluated in this review. PMID:26166838

  4. The impacts of a pharmacist-managed outpatient clinic and chemotherapy-directed electronic order sets for monitoring oral chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Battis, Brandon; Clifford, Linda; Huq, Mostaqul; Pejoro, Edrick; Mambourg, Scott

    2016-10-12

    Patients treated with oral chemotherapy appear to have less contact with the treating providers. As a result, safety, adherence, medication therapy monitoring, and timely follow-up may be compromised. The trend of treating cancer with oral chemotherapy agents is on the rise. However, standard clinical guidance is still lacking for prescribing, monitoring, patient education, and follow-up of patients on oral chemotherapy across the healthcare settings. The purpose of this project is to establish an oral chemotherapy monitoring clinic, to create drug and lab specific provider order sets for prescribing and lab monitoring, and ultimately to ensure safe and effective treatment of the veterans we serve. A collaborative agreement was reached among oncology pharmacists, a pharmacy resident, two oncologists, and a physician assistant to establish a pharmacist-managed oral chemotherapy monitoring clinic at the VA Sierra Nevada Healthcare System. Drug-specific electronic order sets for prescribing and lab monitoring were created for initiating new drug therapy and prescription renewal. The order sets were created to be provider-centric, minimizing clicks needed to order necessary medications and lab monitoring. A standard progress note template was developed for documenting interventions made by the clinic. Patients new to an oral chemotherapy regimen were first counseled by an oncology pharmacist. The patients were then enrolled into the oral chemotherapy monitoring clinic for subsequent follow up and pharmacist interventions. Further, patients lacking monitoring or missing provider appointments were captured through a Clinical Dashboard developed by the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Regional Office (VISN21) using SQL Server Reporting Services. Between September 2014 and April 2015, a total of 68 patients on different oral chemotherapy agents were enrolled into the clinic. Out of the 68 patients enrolled into the oral chemotherapy monitoring clinic, 31 patients (45

  5. Clinical oncology practice 2015: preparing for the future.

    PubMed

    Kosty, Michael P; Acheson, Anupama Kurup; Tetzlaff, Eric D

    2015-01-01

    The clinical practice of oncology has become increasingly complex. An explosion of medical knowledge, increased demands on provider time, and involved patients have changed the way many oncologists practice. What was an acceptable practice model in the past may now be relatively inefficient. This review covers three areas that address these changes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) National Oncology Census defines who the U.S. oncology community is, and their perceptions of how practice patterns may be changing. The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-ASCO Teams in Cancer Care Project explores how best to employ team science to improve the efficiency and quality of cancer care in the United States. Finally, how physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) might be best integrated into team-based care in oncology and the barriers to integration are reviewed.

  6. Antiemetics: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Paul J; Kris, Mark G; Basch, Ethan; Bohlke, Kari; Barbour, Sally Y; Clark-Snow, Rebecca Anne; Danso, Michael A; Dennis, Kristopher; Dupuis, L Lee; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Eng, Cathy; Feyer, Petra C; Jordan, Karin; Noonan, Kimberly; Sparacio, Dee; Somerfield, Mark R; Lyman, Gary H

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO guideline for antiemetics in oncology. Methods ASCO convened an Expert Panel and conducted a systematic review of the medical literature for the period of November 2009 to June 2016. Results Forty-one publications were included in this systematic review. A phase III randomized controlled trial demonstrated that adding olanzapine to antiemetic prophylaxis reduces the likelihood of nausea among adult patients who are treated with high emetic risk antineoplastic agents. Randomized controlled trials also support an expanded role for neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists in patients who are treated with chemotherapy. Recommendation Key updates include the addition of olanzapine to antiemetic regimens for adults who receive high-emetic-risk antineoplastic agents or who experience breakthrough nausea and vomiting; a recommendation to administer dexamethasone on day 1 only for adults who receive anthracycline and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy; and the addition of a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist for adults who receive carboplatin area under the curve ≥ 4 mg/mL per minute or high-dose chemotherapy, and for pediatric patients who receive high-emetic-risk antineoplastic agents. For radiation-induced nausea and vomiting, adjustments were made to anatomic regions, risk levels, and antiemetic administration schedules. Rescue therapy alone is now recommended for low-emetic-risk radiation therapy. The Expert Panel reiterated the importance of using the most effective antiemetic regimens that are appropriate for antineoplastic agents or radiotherapy being administered. Such regimens should be used with initial treatment, rather than first assessing the patient's emetic response with less-effective treatment. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  7. [Personal experience with VP-16 in the treatment of malignant lymphomas at the Chemotherapy Clinic of the Oncology Center--M. Skłodowskiej-Curie Institute in Warsaw].

    PubMed

    Pałucka, A; Walewski, J; Siedlecki, P; Zborzil, J

    1990-01-01

    Eighteen patients with advanced malignant lymphomas who had progressed with previous chemotherapy were treated with LEPP (chlorambucil, VP-16, procarbazine, prednisone). One complete response and 5 partial remissions were observed, yielding an overall response rate of 33%, with median response duration of about 2 months. Twenty three patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease all who had progressed with previous chemotherapy (MOPP and ABVD) and 19 of them also after radiation therapy were treated with third line salvage chemotherapy consisting of OPEC (VP- 16, chlorambucil, vincristine and prednisone). Two complete response and 3 partial remissions were obtained for overall response rate of 21% with median duration of about 9 months.

  8. Medication Therapy Management for Patients Receiving Oral Chemotherapy Agents at a Community Oncology Center: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, Nathan S; Bindler, Ross J; Wilson, Poppy L; Kim, Anne P; Ward, Beverly

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of a pharmacist-driven medication therapy management (MTM) program for patients receiving oral chemotherapy agents. Methods: We assessed the impact of MTM consultations with a pharmacist for patients who were receiving a new prescription for an oral chemotherapy agent. Data were assessed for outcomes including (1) number of medication errors identified in electronic medical records (EMRs), (2) number of interventions performed by the pharmacist, (3) time spent on the MTM process, and (4) patient satisfaction. Data were compared between patients who received their oral chemotherapy agents from the onsite specialty pharmacy or from a mail-order pharmacy. The data were also examined for correlations, and logistic regression was utilized to determine the largest variant cofactor to create an equation for estimating the number of errors in a patient's EMR. Results: Fifteen patients received an MTM consultation, and the pharmacists identified an average of 6 medication EMR errors per patient. There was an average of 3 pharmacist-led interventions per patient. Multiple significant correlations were noted between the variables: (1) total number of prescriptions a patient was taking, (2) total number of medication errors identified, (3) time spent on the MTM process, and (4) total number of interventions performed by the pharmacist. Patient satisfaction was favorable for the program. Conclusion: The implementation of a pharmacist-driven MTM program for patients receiving a prescription for an oral chemotherapy agent had a significant impact on patient care by improving medication reconciliation, identifying drug-related problems, and strengthening pharmacist-patient interactions in the oncology clinic.

  9. How to Develop a Cardio-Oncology Clinic.

    PubMed

    Snipelisky, David; Park, Jae Yoon; Lerman, Amir; Mulvagh, Sharon; Lin, Grace; Pereira, Naveen; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin; Villarraga, Hector R; Herrmann, Joerg

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular demands to the care of cancer patients are common and important given the implications for morbidity and mortality. As a consequence, interactions with cardiovascular disease specialists have intensified to the point of the development of a new discipline termed cardio-oncology. As an additional consequence, so-called cardio-oncology clinics have emerged, in most cases staffed by cardiologists with an interest in the field. This article addresses this gap and summarizes key points in the development of a cardio-oncology clinic.

  10. Randomized comparison of ABVD chemotherapy with a strategy that includes radiation therapy in patients with limited-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma: National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Ralph M; Gospodarowicz, Mary K; Connors, Joseph M; Pearcey, Robert G; Bezjak, Andrea; Wells, Woodrow A; Burns, Bruce F; Winter, Jane N; Horning, Sandra J; Dar, A Rashid; Djurfeldt, Marina S; Ding, Keyue; Shepherd, Lois E

    2005-07-20

    We report results of a randomized trial comparing ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine) chemotherapy alone with treatment that includes radiation therapy in patients with limited-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. Patients with nonbulky clinical stage I to IIA Hodgkin's lymphoma were stratified into favorable and unfavorable risk cohorts. Patients allocated to radiation-containing therapy received subtotal nodal radiation if favorable risk or combined-modality therapy if unfavorable risk. Patients allocated to ABVD received four to six treatment cycles. We evaluated 399 patients. Median follow-up is 4.2 years. In comparison with ABVD alone, 5-year freedom from disease progression is superior in patients allocated to radiation therapy (P = .006; 93% v 87%); no differences in event-free survival (P = .06; 88% v 86%) or overall survival (P = .4; 94% v 96%) were detected. In a subset analyses comparing patients stratified into the unfavorable cohort, freedom from disease progression was superior in patients allocated to combined-modality treatment (P = .004; 95% v 88%); no difference in overall survival was detected (P = .3; 92% v 95%). Of 15 deaths observed, nine were attributed to causes other than Hodgkin's lymphoma or acute treatment-related toxicity. In patients with limited-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma, no difference in overall survival was detected between patients randomly assigned to receive treatment that includes radiation therapy or ABVD alone. Although 5-year freedom from disease progression was superior in patients receiving radiation therapy, this advantage is offset by deaths due to causes other than progressive Hodgkin's lymphoma or acute treatment-related toxicity.

  11. American Society of Clinical Oncology National Census of Oncology Practices: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Forte, Gaetano J; Hanley, Amy; Hagerty, Karen; Kurup, Anupama; Neuss, Michael N; Mulvey, Therese M

    2013-01-01

    In response to reports of increasing financial and administrative burdens on oncology practices and a lack of systematic information related to these issues, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) leadership started an effort to collect key practice-level data from all oncology practices in the United States. The result of the effort is the ASCO National Census of Oncology Practices (Census) launched in June 2012. The initial Census work involved compiling an inventory of oncology practices from existing lists of oncology physicians in the United States. A comprehensive, online data collection instrument was developed, which covered a number of areas, including practice characteristics (staffing configuration, organizational structure, patient mix and volume, types of services offered); organizational, staffing, and service changes over the past 12 months; and an assessment of the likelihood that the practice would experience organizational, staffing, and service changes in the next 12 months. More than 600 practices participated in the Census by providing information. In this article, we present preliminary highlights from the data gathered to date. We found that practice size was related to having experienced practice mergers, hiring additional staff, and increasing staff pay in the past 12 months, that geographic location was related to having experienced hiring additional staff, and that practices in metropolitan areas were more likely to have experienced practice mergers in the past 12 months than those in nonmetropolitan areas. We also found that practice size and geographic location were related to higher likelihoods of anticipating practice mergers, sales, and purchases in the future.

  12. Oncology clinical trials nursing: developing competencies for the novice.

    PubMed

    Lubejko, Barbara; Good, Marjorie; Weiss, Patricia; Schmieder, Linda; Leos, David; Daugherty, Penny

    2011-12-01

    Oncology clinical trials are important in the improvement of outcomes for people with or at risk for cancer. Because of the complexity of oncology clinical trials and the needs of patients with cancer, nurses play a crucial and unique role in the trial setting. However, great variability exists in how the role of the nurse on a research team is defined and implemented. An Oncology Nursing Society project team set out to identify the core competencies required of a novice oncology clinical trials nurse (CTN) across diverse settings. This article describes the process used to develop core competencies for the novice CTN, presents the final core competencies, and offers examples of how those competencies might be used in practice.

  13. [Requests for utilization of a semen bank among oncological patients. Semen cryopreservation prior to chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery].

    PubMed

    González Casbas, José Manuel; Calderay Domínguez, Milagros

    2004-11-01

    Oncological therapies, either surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy, may cause irreversible subfertiliy/infertility. Both chemotherapy and radiotherapy have cytotoxic effects on gametogenesis and there are not preventive alternatives currently available. The objective of this article is to review current criteria for semen cryopreservation and its usefulness as a method for preservation of fertility in patients with cancer. We reviewed a large group of recent original articles and systematic reviews on the issue with a common feature: evaluation of fertility status after oncological therapy. Every male patient in fertile age who could wish future fatherhood should be offered the option to storage cryopreserved semen samples before starting oncological therapies, with the exception of patients with azoospermia at the time of diagnosis.

  14. Methods of IR spectroscopy in monitoring of chemotherapy of oncological pathologies using palladium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Bel'kov, M. V.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Pekhn'o, V. I.; Kozachkova, A. N.; Tsarik, N. V.; Kutsenko, I. P.; Sharykina, N. I.

    2014-11-01

    FTIR spectroscopy is used to study mammary-gland tissues of mice with a sarcoma tumor (strain 180). Spectral features that are typical of malignant tumors are revealed in the FTIR spectra in the sarcoma-tumor tissues. Tumor tissues are studied after treatment using coordination compounds based on palladium complexes with 3-amino-1-hydroxypropylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid and zoledronic acid. A therapeutic effect is not revealed after treatment using palladium complex with 3-amino-1-hydroxypropylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid. The suppression of tumor growth amounts to 59% when palladium complexes with zoledronic acid are used. Suppression of tumor growth is accompanied by variations in spectral characteristics. With respect to diagnostic features, the FTIR spectra of tumor tissues after treatment with the palladium complexes with zoledronic acid are similar to the FTIR spectra of tissues that are free of malignant tumors. Specific spectroscopic characteristics that make it possible to control the chemotherapy of oncological pathologies are determined.

  15. The prevalence of depression in pediatric oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Arabiat, Diana H; Elliott, Barbara; Draper, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depression in pediatric oncology patients in Jordan, comparing them with peers who suffered from chronic conditions or were healthy. The authors investigated 58 children with cancer, 56 with chronic illnesses, and 64 healthy controls using the Arabic version of the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). There was no significant difference in CDI scores between children with cancer, children with chronic illnesses, and healthy controls. Using the conventional cutoff point of a score of 20 gives a prevalence of 20.68% for child-reported depression in the cancer group. This is toward the high end of the range for similar studies in other countries. The results suggest that children with cancer undergoing chemotherapy are no more likely to be depressed than children with chronic illnesses or healthy controls, although further research is warranted.

  16. Improving the efficiency of a chemotherapy day unit: applying a business approach to oncology.

    PubMed

    van Lent, Wineke A M; Goedbloed, N; van Harten, W H

    2009-03-01

    To improve the efficiency of a hospital-based chemotherapy day unit (CDU). The CDU was benchmarked with two other CDUs to identify their attainable performance levels for efficiency, and causes for differences. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis using a business approach, called lean thinking, was performed. An integrated set of interventions was implemented, among them a new planning system. The results were evaluated using pre- and post-measurements. We observed 24% growth of treatments and bed utilisation, a 12% increase of staff member productivity and an 81% reduction of overtime. The used method improved process design and led to increased efficiency and a more timely delivery of care. Thus, the business approaches, which were adapted for healthcare, were successfully applied. The method may serve as an example for other oncology settings with problems concerning waiting times, patient flow or lack of beds.

  17. The integration of BRCA testing into oncology clinics.

    PubMed

    Percival, Natalie; George, Angela; Gyertson, Jennifer; Hamill, Monica; Fernandes, Andreia; Davies, Emily; Rahman, Nazneen; Banerjee, Susana

    2016-06-23

    The PARP inhibitor, Olaparib, is approved for women with BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer. Therefore there is an urgent need to test patients and obtain results in time to influence treatment. Models of BRCA testing, such as the mainstreaming oncogenetic pathway, involving oncology health professionals are being used. The authors report on the establishment of the extended role of the clinical nurse specialist in consenting women for BRCA testing in routine gynaecology-oncology clinics using the mainstreaming model. Nurses undertook generic consent training and specific counselling training for BRCA testing in the form of a series of online videos, written materials and checklists before obtaining approval to consent patients for germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Between July 2013 and December 2015, 108 women with ovarian cancer were counselled and consented by nurses in the medical oncology clinics at a single centre (The Royal Marsden, UK). This represented 36% of all ovarian cancer patients offered BRCA testing in the oncology clinics at the centre. Feedback from patients and nurses was encouraging with no significant issues raised in the counselling and consenting process. The mainstreaming model allows for greater access to BRCA testing for ovarian cancer patients, many of whom may benefit from personalised therapy (PARP inhibitors). This is the first report of oncology nurses in the BRCA testing pathway. Specialist oncology nurses trained in BRCA testing have an important role within a multidisciplinary team counselling and consenting patients to undergo BRCA testing.

  18. Clinical Trials in the Era of Personalized Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Maitland, Michael L.; Schilsky, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid pace of discoveries in tumor biology, imaging technology, and human genetics hold promise for an era of personalized oncology care. The successful development of a handful of new targeted agents has generated much hope and hype about the delivery of safer and more effective new treatments for cancer. The design and conduct of clinical trials has not yet adjusted to a new era of personalized oncology and so we are more in transition to that era than in it. With the development of treatments for breast cancer as a model, we review the approaches to clinical trials and development of novel therapeutics in the prior era of population oncology, the current transitional era, and the future era of personalized oncology. PMID:22034206

  19. Regulatory and clinical considerations for biosimilar oncology drugs.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Charles L; Chen, Brian; Hermanson, Terhi; Wyatt, Michael D; Schulz, Richard M; Georgantopoulos, Peter; Kessler, Samuel; Raisch, Dennis W; Qureshi, Zaina P; Lu, Z Kevin; Love, Bryan L; Noxon, Virginia; Bobolts, Laura; Armitage, Melissa; Bian, John; Ray, Paul; Ablin, Richard J; Hrushesky, William J; Macdougall, Iain C; Sartor, Oliver; Armitage, James O

    2014-12-01

    Biological oncology products are integral to cancer treatment, but their high costs pose challenges to patients, families, providers, and insurers. The introduction of biosimilar agents-molecules that are similar in structure, function, activity, immunogenicity, and safety to the original biological drugs-provide opportunities both to improve health-care access and outcomes, and to reduce costs. Several international regulatory pathways have been developed to expedite entry of biosimilars into global marketplaces. The first wave of oncology biosimilar use was in Europe and India in 2007. Oncology biosimilars are now widely marketed in several countries in Europe, and in Australia, Japan, China, Russia, India, and South Korea. Their use is emerging worldwide, with the notable exception of the USA, where several regulatory and cost barriers to biosimilar approval exist. In this Review, we discuss oncology biosimilars and summarise their regulatory frameworks, clinical experiences, and safety concerns.

  20. Regulatory and clinical considerations for biosimilar oncology drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Charles L; Chen, Brian; Hermanson, Terhi; Wyatt, Michael D; Schulz, Richard M; Georgantopoulos, Peter; Kessler, Samuel; Raisch, Dennis W; Qureshi, Zaina P; Lu, Z Kevin; Love, Bryan L; Noxon, Virginia; Bobolts, Laura; Armitage, Melissa; Bian, John; Ray, Paul; Ablin, Richard J; Hrushesky, William J; Macdougall, Iain C; Sartor, Oliver; Armitage, James O

    2015-01-01

    Biological oncology products are integral to cancer treatment, but their high costs pose challenges to patients, families, providers, and insurers. The introduction of biosimilar agents—molecules that are similar in structure, function, activity, immunogenicity, and safety to the original biological drugs—provide opportunities both to improve healthcare access and outcomes, and to reduce costs. Several international regulatory pathways have been developed to expedite entry of biosimilars into global marketplaces. The first wave of oncology biosimilar use was in Europe and India in 2007. Oncology biosimilars are now widely marketed in several countries in Europe, and in Australia, Japan, China, Russia, India, and South Korea. Their use is emerging worldwide, with the notable exception of the USA, where several regulatory and cost barriers to biosimilar approval exist. In this Review, we discuss oncology biosimilars and summarise their regulatory frameworks, clinical experiences, and safety concerns. PMID:25456378

  1. Platinum-based Chemotherapy in Primary Advanced Seminoma—a Retrospective Analysis: Treatment Results at the Northern Israel Oncology Center (1989–2010)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Moshe E.; Drumea, Karen; Charas, Tomer; Gershuny, Anthony; Ben-Yosef, Rahamim

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Over the past 30 years, great strides have been made in the treatment of disseminated testicular tumors. Despite the low number of patients and the rarity of studies concerning primary advanced seminoma, the efficacy of chemotherapy is clear, mainly 3–4-cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Aiming to contribute to the understanding and implementation of proper chemotherapeutic management in advanced seminoma patients, we retrospectively summarized our experience with 26 patients who were referred for platinum-based chemotherapy, post-orchiectomy to the Northern Israel Oncology Center between 1989 and 2010. Response rate, side effects, and long-term outcome were investigated. Methods: Before chemotherapy, meticulous staging was done, including tumor markers (B-human chorionic gonadotropin (B-HCG), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH)), and abdominal and pelvic computerized tomography (CT) scans were carried out. Results: All 26 treated patients achieved complete remission, clinically and symptomatically, with normalization of their CT scans. At a median follow-up of 120 months (range, 24–268 months) all patients are alive, without evidence of recurrent disease. One patient whose disease recurred twice achieved a third complete remission following salvage treatment with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation. Another patient, who preferred surveillance, relapsed abdominally after 9 months but achieved long-standing complete remission with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Both these patients are alive with no evidence of disease. Three patients recovered uneventfully from bleomycin-induced pneumonitis. Conclusions: Advanced seminoma is a highly curable disease using platinum-based chemotherapy. Our study confirms the efficacy and safety of cisplatin-based chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced seminoma. PMID:24498512

  2. Results of an Oncology Clinical Trial Nurse Role Delineation Study.

    PubMed

    Purdom, Michelle A; Petersen, Sandra; Haas, Barbara K

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the relevance of a five-dimensional model of clinical trial nursing practice in an oncology clinical trial nurse population. 
. Web-based cross-sectional survey.
. Online via Qualtrics.
. 167 oncology nurses throughout the United States, including 41 study coordinators, 35 direct care providers, and 91 dual-role nurses who provide direct patient care and trial coordination.
. Principal components analysis was used to determine the dimensions of oncology clinical trial nursing practice.
. Self-reported frequency of 59 activities.
. The results did not support the original five-dimensional model of nursing care but revealed a more multidimensional model.
. An analysis of frequency data revealed an eight-dimensional model of oncology research nursing, including care, manage study, expert, lead, prepare, data, advance science, and ethics.
. This evidence-based model expands understanding of the multidimensional roles of oncology nurses caring for patients with cancer enrolled in clinical trials.

  3. Induction chemotherapy-based larynx preservation program for locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer: oncologic and functional outcomes and prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Bozec, Alexandre; Benezery, Karen; Ettaiche, Marc; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Vandersteen, Clair; Dassonville, Olivier; Poissonnet, Gilles; Riss, Jean-Christophe; Hannoun-Lévi, Jean-Michel; Chand, Marie-Eve; Leysalle, Axel; Saada, Esma; Guigay, Joël; Sudaka, Anne; Demard, François; Santini, José; Peyrade, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate oncologic and functional outcomes and prognostic factors in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer included in an induction chemotherapy (ICT)-based larynx preservation program in daily clinical practice. All patients with locally advanced (T3/4, N0-3, M0) hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, technically suitable for total pharyngo-laryngectomy, treated by docetaxel (75 mg/m(2), day 1), cisplatin (75 mg/m(2), day 1) and 5-fluorouracil (750 mg/m(2)/day, day 1-5) (TPF)-ICT (2-3 cycles) for larynx preservation at our institution between 2004 and 2013, were included in this retrospective study. Prognostic factors of oncologic (overall, cause-specific and recurrence-free survival: OS, SS and RFS) and functional (dysphagia outcome and severity scale, permanent enteral nutrition, larynx preservation) outcomes were assessed in univariate and multivariate analyses. A total of 53 patients (42 men and 11 women, mean age 58.6 ± 8.2 years) were included in this study. Grade 3-4 toxicities were experienced by 17 (32 %) patients during ICT. The rate of poor response (response <50 % without larynx remobilization) to ICT was 10 %. At 5 years, OS, SS and RFS rates were 56, 60 and 54 %, respectively. Four patients required definitive enteral nutrition (permanent enteral tube feeding). The rate of patients alive, disease-free and with a functional larynx at 2 years was 58 %. T4 tumor stage (p = 0.005) and response to ICT <50 % (p = 0.02) were independent prognostic factors of OS. Response to ICT was significantly associated with the risk of permanent enteral nutrition (p = 0.04) and larynx preservation (p = 0.01). In daily clinical practice, a TPF-ICT-based larynx preservation protocol can be used in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer with satisfactory results in terms of tolerance, efficacy and oncologic and functional outcomes.

  4. Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Raditic, Donna M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology.

  5. Presurgical chemotherapy compared with immediate surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy for nonmetastatic osteosarcoma: Pediatric Oncology Group Study POG-8651.

    PubMed

    Goorin, Allen M; Schwartzentruber, Douglas J; Devidas, Meenakshi; Gebhardt, Mark C; Ayala, Alberto G; Harris, Michael B; Helman, Lee J; Grier, Holcombe E; Link, Michael P

    2003-04-15

    Successful therapeutic interventions to prevent disease progression in patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma have included surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy. Presurgical chemotherapy has been advocated for these patients because of putative improvement in event-free survival (EFS). The advantages of presurgical chemotherapy include early administration of systemic chemotherapy, shrinkage of primary tumor, and pathologic identification of risk groups. The theoretic disadvantage is that it exposes a large tumor burden to marginally effective chemotherapy. The contribution of chemotherapy and surgery timing has not been tested rigorously. Between 1986 and 1993, we conducted a prospective trial in patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma who were assigned randomly to immediate surgery or presurgical chemotherapy. Except for the timing of surgery (week 0 or 10), patients received 44 weeks of identical combination chemotherapy that included high-dose methotrexate with leucovorin rescue, doxorubicin, cisplatin, bleomycin, cyclophosphamide, and dactinomycin. One hundred six patients were enrolled onto this study. Six were excluded from analysis. Of the remaining 100 patients, 45 were randomly assigned to immediate chemotherapy, and 55 were randomly assigned to immediate surgery. Sixty-seven patients remain disease-free. At 5 years, the projected EFS +/- SE is 65% +/- 6% (69% +/- 8% for immediate surgery and 61% +/- 8% for presurgical chemotherapy; P =.8). The treatment arms had similar incidence of limb salvage (55% for immediate surgery and 50% for presurgical chemotherapy). Chemotherapy was effective in both treatment groups. There was no advantage in EFS for patients given presurgical chemotherapy.

  6. [Physical Therapy for Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Pediatric Oncology].

    PubMed

    Jung, M; Rein, N; Fuchs, B

    2016-11-01

    Background: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a frequent side-effect of drugs that are used in the treatment of cancer. Affected individuals can suffer from motor, sensory or autonomy nerve damage. Further medication is used for the treatment of CIPN which can cause further side-effects. Patients should be offered physical therapy treatment to relieve the symptoms. Objective: The aim of this article is to give an overview of available literature investigating physical therapy in CIPN in pediatric oncology. Methods: To determine relevant literature, a systematic review was conducted in the databases CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, ERIC, MEDPILOT, PEDro, PsycARTICLES, PsycINFO, PubMed and DIMDI. Besides the methodological quality of the identified literature is supposed to be reviewed. Results: There is no current literature regarding the subject of this article, so no evaluation of the quality could be carried out. Although several publications concerning adults could be identified and transfer could be established for pediatrics. Conclusion: Acupuncture appeared to be effective in the treatment of CIPN in adults. Good results appeared especially regarding pain. Sensorimotor training, balance training, electrotherapy and alternative methods like Reiki and Yoga showed good results for patients symptoms. These treatment methods give a future prospect how CIPN in children can be treated successfully - but further pediatric research is necessary. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. [Roles of clinical psychologists in cancer chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Koike, Makiko

    2004-01-01

    Cancer patients face a variety of problems and undergo psychological turbulence during the clinical course of their disease. In particular, problems related to treatment, such as chemotherapy, can pose a great burden and place the patients in an unstable status, involving both anxiety and expectation related to problems faced in daily life and the unreliability of the therapeutic effects. To cope with the various psychological problems experienced by cancer patients, individual counseling, group therapy, and behavioral therapy, including progressive muscle relaxation training and autonomic training, are employed, depending on the situation of each individual patient. Clinical psychologists participating in cancer treatment need a basic knowledge and understanding of the pathological characteristics of cancer, methods of treatment, and the characteristic clinical course of various cancers, in order to be in close contact and maintain communication with physicians, nurses, and other medical staff, and to provide the support demanded by the patients and their family through a variety of approaches.

  8. Potentially Curable Pancreatic Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Khorana, Alok A; Mangu, Pamela B; Berlin, Jordan; Engebretson, Anitra; Hong, Theodore S; Maitra, Anirban; Mohile, Supriya G; Mumber, Matthew; Schulick, Richard; Shapiro, Marc; Urba, Susan; Zeh, Herbert J; Katz, Matthew H G

    2017-04-11

    Purpose To update the Potentially Curable Pancreatic Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published on May 31, 2016. The October 2016 update focuses solely on new evidence that pertains to clinical question 4 of the guideline: What is the appropriate adjuvant regimen for patients with pancreatic cancer who have undergone an R0 or R1 resection of their primary tumor? Methods The recently published results of a randomized phase III study prompted an update of this guideline. The high quality of the reported evidence and the potential for its clinical impact prompted the Expert Panel to revise one of the guideline recommendations. Results The ESPAC-4 study, a multicenter, international, open-label randomized controlled phase III trial of adjuvant combination chemotherapy compared gemcitabine and capecitabine with gemcitabine monotherapy in 730 evaluable patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Median overall survival was improved in the doublet arm to 28.0 months (95% CI, 23.5 to 31.5 months) versus 25.5 months (95% CI, 22.7 to 27.9 months) for gemcitabine alone (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.98; P = .032). Grade 3 and 4 adverse events were similar in both arms, although higher rates of hand-foot syndrome and diarrhea occurred in patients randomly assigned to the doublet arm. Recommendations All patients with resected pancreatic cancer who did not receive preoperative therapy should be offered 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy in the absence of medical or surgical contraindications. The doublet regimen of gemcitabine and capecitabine is preferred in the absence of concerns for toxicity or tolerance; alternatively, monotherapy with gemcitabine or fluorouracil plus folinic acid can be offered. Adjuvant treatment should be initiated within 8 weeks of surgical resection, assuming complete recovery. The remaining recommendations from the original 2016 ASCO guideline are unchanged.

  9. Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Wen, Patrick Y; Chang, Susan M; Van den Bent, Martin J; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Macdonald, David R; Lee, Eudocia Q

    2017-07-20

    Development of novel therapies for CNS tumors requires reliable assessment of response and progression. This requirement has been particularly challenging in neuro-oncology for which contrast enhancement serves as an imperfect surrogate for tumor volume and is influenced by agents that affect vascular permeability, such as antiangiogenic therapies. In addition, most tumors have a nonenhancing component that can be difficult to accurately quantify. To improve the response assessment in neuro-oncology and to standardize the criteria that are used for different CNS tumors, the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) working group was established. This multidisciplinary international working group consists of neuro-oncologists, medical oncologists, neuroradiologists, neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, neuropsychologists, and experts in clinical outcomes assessments, working in collaboration with government and industry to enhance the interpretation of clinical trials. The RANO working group was originally created to update response criteria for high- and low-grade gliomas and to address such issues as pseudoresponse and nonenhancing tumor progression from antiangiogenic therapies, and pseudoprogression from radiochemotherapy. RANO has expanded to include working groups that are focused on other tumors, including brain metastases, leptomeningeal metastases, spine tumors, pediatric brain tumors, and meningiomas, as well as other clinical trial end points, such as clinical outcomes assessments, seizures, corticosteroid use, and positron emission tomography imaging. In an effort to standardize the measurement of neurologic function for clinical assessment, the Neurologic Assessment in Neuro-Oncology scale was drafted. Born out of a workshop conducted by the Jumpstarting Brain Tumor Drug Development Coalition and the US Food and Drug Administration, a standardized brain tumor imaging protocol now exists to reduce variability and improve reliability. Efforts by RANO

  10. Antidrug Antibody Formation in Oncology: Clinical Relevance and Challenges.

    PubMed

    van Brummelen, Emilie M J; Ros, Willeke; Wolbink, Gertjan; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M

    2016-10-01

    : In oncology, an increasing number of targeted anticancer agents and immunotherapies are of biological origin. These biological drugs may trigger immune responses that lead to the formation of antidrug antibodies (ADAs). ADAs are directed against immunogenic parts of the drug and may affect efficacy and safety. In other medical fields, such as rheumatology and hematology, the relevance of ADA formation is well established. However, the relevance of ADAs in oncology is just starting to be recognized, and literature on this topic is scarce. In an attempt to fill this gap in the literature, we provide an up-to-date status of ADA formation in oncology. In this focused review, data on ADAs was extracted from 81 clinical trials with biological anticancer agents. We found that most biological anticancer drugs in these trials are immunogenic and induce ADAs (63%). However, it is difficult to establish the clinical relevance of these ADAs. In order to determine this relevance, the possible effects of ADAs on pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety parameters need to be investigated. Our data show that this was done in fewer than 50% of the trials. In addition, we describe the incidence and consequences of ADAs for registered agents. We highlight the challenges in ADA detection and argue for the importance of validating, standardizing, and describing well the used assays. Finally, we discuss prevention strategies such as immunosuppression and regimen adaptations. We encourage the launch of clinical trials that explore these strategies in oncology.

  11. Prevalence of emotional symptoms in Chilean oncology patients before the start of chemotherapy: potential of the distress thermometer as an ultra-brief screening instrument

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Jorge; Campla, Cristóbal; D’Aguzan, Nicole; Barraza, Soledad; Padilla, Oslando; Sánchez, Cesar; Palma, Silvia; González, Matías

    2014-01-01

    Emotional distress (ED) is greater for oncology patients in comparison with the general population, and this has implications for the quality of life of the patient and his/her family, adherence to the treatment, and eventually, survivorship. In general, the detection of these symptoms is low, which explains the need for detection systems appropriate to the clinical reality of the oncology team. The objective of this study is to evaluate for the first time the usefulness of an ultra-brief screening instrument [distress thermometer (DT)], in a group of Chilean oncology patients. A total of 166 outpatients were evaluated at the Cancer Center of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, before starting chemotherapy. Two screening instruments were applied: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and DT. The application of HADS resulted in a prevalence of 32.7% of anxiety symptoms (HADS-A ≥ 8), 15.7% of depression symptoms (HADS-D ≥ 8), and 39.8% had a total score of HADS-T ≥ 11. The DT resulted in the prevalence of 32.5% of distress or ED (DT ≥ 5). The validity of the DT was evaluated as a screening tool in comparison with HADS, observing, in relation to the anxiety scale (HADS-A), a sensitivity of 88.9% and specificity of 78.4% (DT ≥ 4); depression (HADS-D), a sensitivity of 69.2% and specificity of 74.3% (DT ≥ 5); and in relation to the total scale (HADS-T), a sensitivity of 68.2% and specificity of 73.0% (DT ≥ 4). This study demonstrates the elevated prevalence of emotional symptoms in Chilean oncology patients, before the start of chemotherapy, and confirms the potential of the DT as a brief screening instrument with easy application. The DT will allow the clinician to increase the detection threshold in the Chilean oncology population, intervene in a timely manner, and contribute to the comprehensive handling of the oncology patient without affecting the time needed for assistance. PMID:24966889

  12. Trends in medical oncology outreach clinics in rural areas.

    PubMed

    Gruca, Thomas S; Nam, Inwoo; Tracy, Roger

    2014-09-01

    To examine the long-term trends in medical oncology outreach in Iowa, a state with a high proportion of rural residents, and to assess the involvement of the 2011 Iowa oncology workforce in visiting consultant clinics using a unique data source. Outreach locations and clinic frequencies are tracked annually in the Visiting Medical Consultant Database (Carver College of Medicine) along with the physicians' primary practice locations. Growth in the number of cities served and number of clinic days from 1989 to 2011 was analyzed using joinpoint analysis. Data from 2011 were used to estimate the trip length for participating oncologists. The number of rural cities served by medical oncology outreach increased significantly between 1989 and 1996. Clinic days grew significantly in two periods: 1989 to 1998 and 2003 to 2005. In 2011, more than 2,100 clinic days were provided in 66 sites (95% of clinic days in rural areas). Almost half of all Iowa-based oncologists regularly participate in outreach. Oncologists staffing visiting consultant clinics in Iowa drive an estimated 21,000 miles per month. For more than 20 years, visiting medical oncologists have brought cancer care to rural patients in Iowa. Access to cancer care in rural Iowa (ie, clinic days) increased significantly in the post-Medicare Modernization Act period (after 2005). High participation rates and travel burdens may influence oncologist training and retention strategies. Because the Affordable Care Act seeks to expand access for vulnerable populations (eg, rural elderly), it is critical to better understand the existing system of rural cancer care delivery. Copyright © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Optimizing the Design of Preprinted Orders for Ambulatory Chemotherapy: Combining Oncology, Human Factors, and Graphic Design

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jennifer; White, Rachel E.; Hunt, Richard G.; Cassano-Piché, Andrea L.; Easty, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a set of guidelines for developing ambulatory chemotherapy preprinted orders. Methods: Multiple methods were used to develop the preprinted order guidelines. These included (A) a comprehensive literature review and an environmental scan; (B) analyses of field study observations and incident reports; (C) critical review of evidence from the literature and the field study observation analyses; (D) review of the draft guidelines by a clinical advisory group; and (E) collaboration with graphic designers to develop sample preprinted orders, refine the design guidelines, and format the resulting content. Results: The Guidelines for Developing Ambulatory Chemotherapy Preprinted Orders, which consist of guidance on the design process, content, and graphic design elements of ambulatory chemotherapy preprinted orders, have been established. Conclusion: Health care is a safety critical, dynamic, and complex sociotechnical system. Identifying safety risks in such a system and effectively addressing them often require the expertise of multiple disciplines. This study illustrates how human factors professionals, clinicians, and designers can leverage each other's expertise to uncover commonly overlooked patient safety hazards and to provide health care professionals with innovative, practical, and user-centered tools to minimize those hazards. PMID:23077436

  14. Optimizing the design of preprinted orders for ambulatory chemotherapy: combining oncology, human factors, and graphic design.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jennifer; White, Rachel E; Hunt, Richard G; Cassano-Piché, Andrea L; Easty, Anthony C

    2012-03-01

    To establish a set of guidelines for developing ambulatory chemotherapy preprinted orders. Multiple methods were used to develop the preprinted order guidelines. These included (A) a comprehensive literature review and an environmental scan; (B) analyses of field study observations and incident reports; (C) critical review of evidence from the literature and the field study observation analyses; (D) review of the draft guidelines by a clinical advisory group; and (E) collaboration with graphic designers to develop sample preprinted orders, refine the design guidelines, and format the resulting content. The Guidelines for Developing Ambulatory Chemotherapy Preprinted Orders, which consist of guidance on the design process, content, and graphic design elements of ambulatory chemotherapy preprinted orders, have been established. Health care is a safety critical, dynamic, and complex sociotechnical system. Identifying safety risks in such a system and effectively addressing them often require the expertise of multiple disciplines. This study illustrates how human factors professionals, clinicians, and designers can leverage each other's expertise to uncover commonly overlooked patient safety hazards and to provide health care professionals with innovative, practical, and user-centered tools to minimize those hazards.

  15. Clinical Trials and the Role of the Oncology Clinical Trials Nurse.

    PubMed

    Ness, Elizabeth A; Royce, Cheryl

    2017-03-01

    Clinical trials are paramount to improving human health. New trial designs and informed consent issues are emerging as a result of genomic profiling and the development of molecularly targeted agents. Many groups and individuals are responsible for ensuring the protection of research participants and the quality of the data produced. The specialty role of the clinical trials nurse (CTN) is critical to clinical trials. Oncology CTNs have competencies that can help guide their practice; however, not all oncology clinical trials are supervised by a nurse. Using the process of engagement, one organization has restructured oncology CTNs under a nurse-supervised model.

  16. Workflow-driven clinical decision support for personalized oncology.

    PubMed

    Bucur, Anca; van Leeuwen, Jasper; Christodoulou, Nikolaos; Sigdel, Kamana; Argyri, Katerina; Koumakis, Lefteris; Graf, Norbert; Stamatakos, Georgios

    2016-07-21

    The adoption in oncology of Clinical Decision Support (CDS) may help clinical users to efficiently deal with the high complexity of the domain, lead to improved patient outcomes, and reduce the current knowledge gap between clinical research and practice. While significant effort has been invested in the implementation of CDS, the uptake in the clinic has been limited. The barriers to adoption have been extensively discussed in the literature. In oncology, current CDS solutions are not able to support the complex decisions required for stratification and personalized treatment of patients and to keep up with the high rate of change in therapeutic options and knowledge. To address these challenges, we propose a framework enabling efficient implementation of meaningful CDS that incorporates a large variety of clinical knowledge models to bring to the clinic comprehensive solutions leveraging the latest domain knowledge. We use both literature-based models and models built within the p-medicine project using the rich datasets from clinical trials and care provided by the clinical partners. The framework is open to the biomedical community, enabling reuse of deployed models by third-party CDS implementations and supporting collaboration among modelers, CDS implementers, biomedical researchers and clinicians. To increase adoption and cope with the complexity of patient management in oncology, we also support and leverage the clinical processes adhered to by healthcare organizations. We design an architecture that extends the CDS framework with workflow functionality. The clinical models are embedded in the workflow models and executed at the right time, when and where the recommendations are needed in the clinical process. In this paper we present our CDS framework developed in p-medicine and the CDS implementation leveraging the framework. To support complex decisions, the framework relies on clinical models that encapsulate relevant clinical knowledge. Next to

  17. Outbreak of Tsukamurella species bloodstream infection among patients at an oncology clinic, West Virginia, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    See, Isaac; Nguyen, Duc B; Chatterjee, Somu; Shwe, Thein; Scott, Melissa; Ibrahim, Sherif; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; McNulty, Steven; Noble-Wang, Judith; Price, Cindy; Schramm, Kim; Bixler, Danae; Guh, Alice Y

    2014-03-01

    To determine the source and identify control measures of an outbreak of Tsukamurella species bloodstream infections at an outpatient oncology facility. Epidemiologic investigation of the outbreak with a case-control study. A case was an infection in which Tsukamurella species was isolated from a blood or catheter tip culture during the period January 2011 through June 2012 from a patient of the oncology clinic. Laboratory records of area hospitals and patient charts were reviewed. A case-control study was conducted among clinic patients to identify risk factors for Tsukamurella species bloodstream infection. Clinic staff were interviewed, and infection control practices were assessed. Fifteen cases of Tsukamurella (Tsukamurella pulmonis or Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens) bloodstream infection were identified, all in patients with underlying malignancy and indwelling central lines. The median age of case patients was 68 years; 47% were male. The only significant risk factor for infection was receipt of saline flush from the clinic during the period September-October 2011 (P = .03), when the clinic had been preparing saline flush from a common-source bag of saline. Other infection control deficiencies that were identified at the clinic included suboptimal procedures for central line access and preparation of chemotherapy. Although multiple infection control lapses were identified, the outbreak was likely caused by improper preparation of saline flush syringes by the clinic. The outbreak demonstrates that bloodstream infections among oncology patients can result from improper infection control practices and highlights the critical need for increased attention to and oversight of infection control in outpatient oncology settings.

  18. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cancer cells. This is called palliative chemotherapy. Chemotherapy for conditions other than cancer Some chemotherapy drugs ... you'll receive. Side effects that occur during chemotherapy treatment Common side effects of chemotherapy drugs include: ...

  19. Clinical oncology and palliative medicine as a combined specialty--a unique model in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Rebecca; Wong, Kam-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Keung; Wong, Ka-Yan; Yau, Yvonne; Lo, Sing-Hung; Liu, Rico

    2015-07-01

    The importance of early integration of palliative care (PC) into oncology treatment is increasingly being recognized. However, there is no consensus on what is the optimal way of integration. This article describes a unique model in Hong Kong where clinical oncology and palliative medicine (PM) is integrated through the development of PM as a subspecialty under clinical oncology.

  20. American Society of Clinical Oncology Strategic Plan for Increasing Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Oncology Workforce.

    PubMed

    Winkfield, Karen M; Flowers, Christopher R; Patel, Jyoti D; Rodriguez, Gladys; Robinson, Patricia; Agarwal, Amit; Pierce, Lori; Brawley, Otis W; Mitchell, Edith P; Head-Smith, Kimberly T; Wollins, Dana S; Hayes, Daniel F

    2017-08-01

    In December 2016, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Board of Directors approved the ASCO Strategic Plan to Increase Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Oncology Workforce. Developed through a multistakeholder effort led by the ASCO Health Disparities Committee, the purpose of the plan is to guide the formal efforts of ASCO in this area over the next three years (2017 to 2020). There are three primary goals: (1) to establish a longitudinal pathway for increasing workforce diversity, (2) to enhance ASCO leadership diversity, and (3) to integrate a focus on diversity across ASCO programs and policies. Improving quality cancer care in the United States requires the recruitment of oncology professionals from diverse backgrounds. The ASCO Strategic Plan to Increase Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Oncology Workforce is designed to enhance existing programs and create new opportunities that will move us closer to the vision of achieving an oncology workforce that reflects the demographics of the US population it serves.

  1. Challenges in launching multinational oncology clinical trials in India

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Kamal S.; Agarwal, Gaurav; Jagannathan, Ramesh; Metzger-Filho, Otto; Saini, Monika L.; Mistry, Khurshid; Ali, Raghib; Gupta, Sudeep

    2013-01-01

    In the recent past, there has been an impressive growth in the number of clinical trials launched worldwide, including India. Participation in well-designed oncology clinical trials is of advantage to Indian healthcare system in general, and cancer patients in particular. However, the number of clinical trials being run in India is not commensurate with the cancer burden prevailing in the country. In this article, the authors investigate the reasons for this discrepancy, highlight critical bottlenecks, and propose ways to ameliorate the situation. PMID:24455545

  2. EMT: Present and future in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Patricia G; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Portillo, Francisco; Cano, Amparo

    2017-07-01

    Epithelial/mesenchymal transition (EMT) has emerged as a key regulator of metastasis by facilitating tumor cell invasion and dissemination to distant organs. Recent evidences support that the reverse mesenchymal/epithelial transition (MET) is required for metastatic outgrowth; moreover, the existence of hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (E/M) phenotypes is increasingly being reported in different tumor contexts. The accumulated data strongly support that plasticity between epithelial and mesenchymal states underlies the dissemination and metastatic potential of carcinoma cells. However, the translation into the clinics of EMT and epithelial plasticity processes presents enormous challenges and still remains a controversial issue. In this review, we will evaluate current evidences for translational applicability of EMT and depict an overview of the most recent EMT in vivo models, EMT marker analyses in human samples as well as potential EMT therapeutic approaches and ongoing clinical trials. We foresee that standardized analyses of EMT markers in solid and liquid tumor biopsies in addition to innovative tools targeting the E/M states will become promising strategies for future translation to the clinical setting. © 2017 The Authors. Published by FEBS Press and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Common and Distinct Characteristics Associated With Trajectories of Morning and Evening Energy in Oncology Patients Receiving Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Abid, Hamza; Kober, Kord M; Smoot, Betty; Paul, Steven M; Hammer, Marilyn; Levine, Jon D; Lee, Kathryn; Wright, Fay; Cooper, Bruce A; Conley, Yvette P; Miaskowski, Christine

    2017-05-01

    Although energy conservation strategies are recommended in clinical practice guidelines, little is known about changes in energy levels in oncology patients undergoing cancer treatment. The objective of this study was to identify variations in the trajectories of morning and evening energy levels and determine which characteristics predicted initial levels and the trajectories of morning and evening energy. Outpatients receiving chemotherapy (CTX) completed demographic and symptom questionnaires six times over two CTX cycles. Energy was assessed using the Lee Fatigue Scale. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to analyze the data. A large amount of interindividual variability was found in the morning and evening energy trajectories. Patients who lived alone, had childcare responsibilities, had a lower functional status, did not exercise on a regular basis, had lower hemoglobin levels, had lower attentional function, higher trait anxiety, and higher sleep disturbance reported lower morning energy levels at enrollment. Variations in the trajectories of morning energy were associated with a higher body mass index and higher levels of morning energy and higher sleep disturbance scores. For evening energy, patients who were female, white, had lower functional status, and had lower attentional function and higher sleep disturbance reported lower evening energy levels at enrollment. Evening energy levels at enrollment were associated with changes in evening energy over time. Patients undergoing CTX experience decrements in both morning and evening energy. The modifiable characteristics associated with these decrements can be used to design intervention studies to increase energy levels in these patients. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. American Society of Clinical Oncology provisional clinical opinion: the integration of palliative care into standard oncology care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas J; Temin, Sarah; Alesi, Erin R; Abernethy, Amy P; Balboni, Tracy A; Basch, Ethan M; Ferrell, Betty R; Loscalzo, Matt; Meier, Diane E; Paice, Judith A; Peppercorn, Jeffrey M; Somerfield, Mark; Stovall, Ellen; Von Roenn, Jamie H

    2012-03-10

    An American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) provisional clinical opinion (PCO) offers timely clinical direction to ASCO's membership following publication or presentation of potentially practice-changing data from major studies. This PCO addresses the integration of palliative care services into standard oncology practice at the time a person is diagnosed with metastatic or advanced cancer. Palliative care is frequently misconstrued as synonymous with end-of-life care. Palliative care is focused on the relief of suffering, in all of its dimensions, throughout the course of a patient's illness. Although the use of hospice and other palliative care services at the end of life has increased, many patients are enrolled in hospice less than 3 weeks before their death, which limits the benefit they may gain from these services. By potentially improving quality of life (QOL), cost of care, and even survival in patients with metastatic cancer, palliative care has increasing relevance for the care of patients with cancer. Until recently, data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) demonstrating the benefits of palliative care in patients with metastatic cancer who are also receiving standard oncology care have not been available. Seven published RCTs form the basis of this PCO. Based on strong evidence from a phase III RCT, patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer should be offered concurrent palliative care and standard oncologic care at initial diagnosis. While a survival benefit from early involvement of palliative care has not yet been demonstrated in other oncology settings, substantial evidence demonstrates that palliative care-when combined with standard cancer care or as the main focus of care-leads to better patient and caregiver outcomes. These include improvement in symptoms, QOL, and patient satisfaction, with reduced caregiver burden. Earlier involvement of palliative care also leads to more appropriate referral to and use of hospice, and

  5. Medication Reconciliation in Oncological Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Vega, Triana González-Carrascosa; Sierra-Sánchez, Jesús Francisco; Martínez-Bautista, María José; García-Martín, Fátima; Suárez-Carrascosa, Francisco; Baena-Cañada, Jose Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Medication reconciliation is considered to be an important strategy for increasing the safety of medication use. However, few studies have been carried out showing the effect of a medication reconciliation program on the incidence of reconciliation errors (REs) in oncological patients treated in the outpatient setting. To measure the effect of a medication reconciliation program on the incidence of reconciliation error that reached the patient (RERP) in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy as outpatients. A randomized, prospective, controlled study was carried out to identify the proportion of patients with at least 1 RERP. Medication reconciliation (intervention group) was compared with standard practice (control group) in patients starting new chemotherapy and who were receiving at least 1 home medication before the start of chemotherapy. A prespecified analysis of factors capable of influencing the occurrence of RE in oncological patients was also carried out. A total of 147 patients were included (76 in the intervention group and 71 controls) in this study. There were 3 (4%) patients with RERP (primary endpoint) in the intervention group and 21 (30%) patients in the control group (relative risk [RR] = 0.13, 95% CI = 0.04-0.43; P = 0.0009). The prespecified analysis of the effects of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG), Charlson Comorbidity Index score, and degree of poly-medication upon the number of patients with RE showed the Charlson Comorbidity Index to be unrelated to RE occurrence. However, the risk of RE was greater in patients with ECOG ≥ 2 (RR = 2.18, 95% CI = 1.4-3.4; P = 0.018) and among patients with major poly-medication (RR = 2.49, 95% CI = 1.52-4.09; P <0.001). Medication reconciliation results in a marked decrease in RERP in cancer patients. The factors that may influence RE occurrence in oncological patients have not been fully established, although parameters such as the degree of poly-medication and

  6. MRI Biomarkers in Oncology Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Richard G.; Arlinghaus, Lori; Dula, Adrienne; Quarles, C. Chad; Stokes, Ashley; Weis, Jared; Whisenant, Jennifer; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Zhukov, Igor; Williams, Jason; Yankeelov, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have the ability to quantitatively report various pathophysiological processes associated with cancer. These measures have been shown to provide complementary information to that typically obtained from standard morphologically based criteria (e.g., size) and, furthermore, have been shown to outperform sized based measures in certain applications. In this review, we discuss eight areas of quantitative MRI that are either currently employed in clinical trials, or are emerging as promising techniques for both diagnosing cancer as well as assessing—or even predicting—the response of cancer to various therapies. The currently employed methods include the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST), dynamic susceptibility MRI (DSC-MRI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). The emerging techniques covered are chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI (CEST-MRI), elastography, hyperpolarized MRI, and multi-parameter MRI. After a brief introduction to each technique, we present a small number of illustrative applications before noting the existing limitations of each method and what must be done to move each to more routine clinical application. PMID:26613873

  7. [Refining the French system of cost assessment for oncology patients following chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Lévy-Piedbois, Christine; Borella, Laurent; Bergerot, Philippe; Peuvrel, Patrick; Erard, Cristel; Parmentier, Gérard; Ravaud, Alain; Trombert Paviot, Béatrice; Armand, Jean-Pierre; Rodrigues, Jean-Marie

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this study was to check the clinical predictive variables of the variance of the total cost by GHM for patients undergoing chemotherapy. 10 different hospitals registered 537 hospital stays and 1,535 day care sessions. The initial disease, metastases, other pathologies, participation to randomised trial were recorded. Each day health status, pain, stage of the protocol and the drugs, use of catheter, pump or chamber implant were noted. Work was measured separately for physicians and nurses per 24 hours using a visual analogy scale. Lab tests and drugs were recorded for each patient. The cost of the drugs explain 98% of the variance of the total cost for the day care and 50% for the hospitalisations. For the latter, beside the cost of drugs, the length of stay, labor, initial disease, age, pain and associated pathology are predictive variables. According to this results, we conclude that the drugs for chemotherapy should be paid separately. No other change should be made for day care. DRG for hospitalized patients should take into account initial disease, age and pain.

  8. Highlights from the 1st Latin American meeting on metronomic chemotherapy and drug repositioning in oncology, 27–28 May, 2016, Rosario, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rosé, Adriana; André, Nicolas; Rozados, Viviana R.; Mainetti, Leandro E; Márquez, Mauricio Menacho; Rico, María José; Schaiquevich, Paula; Villarroel, Milena; Gregianin, Lauro; Graupera, Jaume Mora; García, Wendy Gómez; Epelman, Sidnei; Alasino, Carlos; Alonso, Daniel; Chantada, Guillermo; Scharovsky, O Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Following previous metronomic meetings in Marseille (2011), Milano (2014), and Mumbai (2016), the first Latin American metronomic meeting was held in the School of Medical Sciences, National University of Rosario, Rosario, Argentina on 27 and 28 of May, 2016. For the first time, clinicians and researchers with experience in the field of metronomics, coming from different countries in Latin America, had the opportunity of presenting and discussing their work. The talks were organised in three main sessions related to experience in the pre-clinical, and clinical (paediatric and adult) areas. The different presentations demonstrated that the fields of metronomic chemotherapy and repurposing drugs in oncology, known as metronomics, constitute a branch of cancer therapy in permanent evolution, which have strong groups working in Latin America, both in the preclinical and the clinical settings including large, adequately designed randomised studies. It was shown that metronomics offers treatments, which, whether they are combined or not with the standard therapeutic approaches, are not only effective but also minimally toxic, with the consequent improvement of the patient’s quality of life, and inexpensive, a feature very important in low resource clinical settings. The potential use of metronomic chemotherapy was proposed as a cost/effective treatment in low-/middle-income countries, for adjuvant therapy in selected tumours. The fundamental role of the governmental agencies and non-governmental alliances, as the Metronomic Global Health Initiative, in supporting this research with public interest was underlined. PMID:27610198

  9. Highlights from the 1st Latin American meeting on metronomic chemotherapy and drug repositioning in oncology, 27-28 May, 2016, Rosario, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rosé, Adriana; André, Nicolas; Rozados, Viviana R; Mainetti, Leandro E; Márquez, Mauricio Menacho; Rico, María José; Schaiquevich, Paula; Villarroel, Milena; Gregianin, Lauro; Graupera, Jaume Mora; García, Wendy Gómez; Epelman, Sidnei; Alasino, Carlos; Alonso, Daniel; Chantada, Guillermo; Scharovsky, O Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Following previous metronomic meetings in Marseille (2011), Milano (2014), and Mumbai (2016), the first Latin American metronomic meeting was held in the School of Medical Sciences, National University of Rosario, Rosario, Argentina on 27 and 28 of May, 2016. For the first time, clinicians and researchers with experience in the field of metronomics, coming from different countries in Latin America, had the opportunity of presenting and discussing their work. The talks were organised in three main sessions related to experience in the pre-clinical, and clinical (paediatric and adult) areas. The different presentations demonstrated that the fields of metronomic chemotherapy and repurposing drugs in oncology, known as metronomics, constitute a branch of cancer therapy in permanent evolution, which have strong groups working in Latin America, both in the preclinical and the clinical settings including large, adequately designed randomised studies. It was shown that metronomics offers treatments, which, whether they are combined or not with the standard therapeutic approaches, are not only effective but also minimally toxic, with the consequent improvement of the patient's quality of life, and inexpensive, a feature very important in low resource clinical settings. The potential use of metronomic chemotherapy was proposed as a cost/effective treatment in low-/middle-income countries, for adjuvant therapy in selected tumours. The fundamental role of the governmental agencies and non-governmental alliances, as the Metronomic Global Health Initiative, in supporting this research with public interest was underlined.

  10. Clinical oncologic applications of PET/MRI: a new horizon

    PubMed Central

    Partovi, Sasan; Kohan, Andres; Rubbert, Christian; Vercher-Conejero, Jose Luis; Gaeta, Chiara; Yuh, Roger; Zipp, Lisa; Herrmann, Karin A; Robbin, Mark R; Lee, Zhenghong; Muzic, Raymond F; Faulhaber, Peter; Ros, Pablo R

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) leverages the high soft-tissue contrast and the functional sequences of MR with the molecular information of PET in one single, hybrid imaging technology. This technology, which was recently introduced into the clinical arena in a few medical centers worldwide, provides information about tumor biology and microenvironment. Studies on indirect PET/MRI (use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images software fused with MRI images) have already generated interesting preliminary data to pave the ground for potential applications of PET/MRI. These initial data convey that PET/MRI is promising in neuro-oncology and head & neck cancer applications as well as neoplasms in the abdomen and pelvis. The pediatric and young adult oncology population requiring frequent follow-up studies as well as pregnant woman might benefit from PET/MRI due to its lower ionizing radiation dose. The indication and planning of therapeutic interventions and specifically radiation therapy in individual patients could be and to a certain extent are already facilitated by performing PET/MRI. The objective of this article is to discuss potential clinical oncology indications of PET/MRI. PMID:24753986

  11. Integration of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Betty R; Temel, Jennifer S; Temin, Sarah; Alesi, Erin R; Balboni, Tracy A; Basch, Ethan M; Firn, Janice I; Paice, Judith A; Peppercorn, Jeffrey M; Phillips, Tanyanika; Stovall, Ellen L; Zimmermann, Camilla; Smith, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based recommendations to oncology clinicians, patients, family and friend caregivers, and palliative care specialists to update the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) provisional clinical opinion (PCO) on the integration of palliative care into standard oncology care for all patients diagnosed with cancer. Methods ASCO convened an Expert Panel of members of the ASCO Ad Hoc Palliative Care Expert Panel to develop an update. The 2012 PCO was based on a review of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) by the National Cancer Institute Physicians Data Query and additional trials. The panel conducted an updated systematic review seeking randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, as well as secondary analyses of RCTs in the 2012 PCO, published from March 2010 to January 2016. Results The guideline update reflects changes in evidence since the previous guideline. Nine RCTs, one quasiexperimental trial, and five secondary analyses from RCTs in the 2012 PCO on providing palliative care services to patients with cancer and/or their caregivers, including family caregivers, were found to inform the update. Recommendations Inpatients and outpatients with advanced cancer should receive dedicated palliative care services, early in the disease course, concurrent with active treatment. Referral of patients to interdisciplinary palliative care teams is optimal, and services may complement existing programs. Providers may refer family and friend caregivers of patients with early or advanced cancer to palliative care services.

  12. The circadian timing system in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Innominato, Pasquale F; Roche, Véronique P; Palesh, Oxana G; Ulusakarya, Ayhan; Spiegel, David; Lévi, Francis A

    2014-06-01

    The circadian timing system (CTS) controls several critical molecular pathways for cancer processes and treatment effects over the 24 hours, including drug metabolism, cell cycle, apoptosis, and DNA damage repair mechanisms. This results in the circadian time dependency of whole-body and cellular pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of anticancer agents. However, CTS robustness and phase varies among cancer patients, based on circadian monitoring of rest- activity, body temperature, sleep, and/or hormonal secretion rhythms. Circadian disruption has been further found in up to 50% of patients with metastatic cancer. Such disruption was associated with poor outcomes, including fatigue, anorexia, sleep disorders, and short progression-free and overall survival. Novel, minimally invasive devices have enabled continuous CTS assessment in non-hospitalized cancer patients. They revealed up to 12-hour differences in individual circadian phase. Taken together, the data support the personalization of chronotherapy. This treatment method aims at the adjustment of cancer treatment delivery according to circadian rhythms, using programmable-in-time pumps or novel release formulations, in order to increase both efficacy and tolerability. A fixed oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin chronotherapy protocol prolonged median overall survival in men with metastatic colorectal cancer by 3.3 months as compared to conventional delivery, according to a meta-analysis (P=0.009). Further analyses revealed the need for the prevention of circadian disruption or the restoration of robust circadian function in patients on chronotherapy, in order to further optimize treatment effects. The strengthening of external synchronizers could meet such a goal, through programmed exercise, meal timing, light exposure, improved social support, sleep scheduling, and the properly timed administration of drugs that target circadian clocks. Chrono-rehabilitation warrants clinical testing for improving

  13. Translating genomic discoveries to the clinic in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Glade Bender, Julia; Verma, Anupam; Schiffman, Joshua D

    2015-02-01

    The present study describes the recent advances in the identification of targetable genomic alterations in pediatric cancers, along with the progress and associated challenges in translating these findings into therapeutic benefit. Each field within pediatric cancer has rapidly and comprehensively begun to define genomic targets in tumors that potentially can improve the clinical outcome of patients, including hematologic malignancies (leukemia and lymphoma), solid malignancies (neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and osteosarcoma), and brain tumors (gliomas, ependymomas, and medulloblastomas). Although each tumor has specific and sometimes overlapping genomic targets, the translation to the clinic of new targeted trials and precision medicine protocols is still in its infancy. The first clinical tumor profiling studies in pediatric oncology have demonstrated feasibility and patient enthusiasm for the personalized medicine paradigm, but have yet to demonstrate clinical utility. Complexities influencing implementation include rapidly evolving sequencing technologies, tumor heterogeneity, and lack of access to targeted therapies. The return of incidental findings from the germline also remains a challenge, with evolving policy statements and accepted standards. The translation of genomic discoveries to the clinic in pediatric oncology continues to move forward at a brisk pace. Early adoption of genomics for tumor classification, risk stratification, and initial trials of targeted therapeutic agents has led to powerful results. As our experience grows in the integration of genomic and clinical medicine, the outcome for children with cancer should continue to improve.

  14. Radio-chemotherapy in anal cancer: Institutional experience at a large radiation oncology center in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Moisés; Ovalle, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Aim In this article the aim is to provide a concise narrative review and inform the institutional experience at a referral center in Chile with the use of radio-chemotherapy in anal cancer. Background Cancer of the anus and anal canal is mainly a loco-regional disease. For years the standard of care has been concomitant radio-chemotherapy, which permits organ preservation and better local control than alternative surgical procedures. Materials and methods A retrospective analysis of 44 patients treated between 2002 and 2010 was performed. Local recurrence, distant recurrence and overall survival were analyzed with the Kaplan–Meier method. Relevant groups where compared with the log-rank test and univariate analysis were done with the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Median follow-up of the cohort was 56 months, with a minimum follow-up of at least 24 months. There was a significant difference between clinical stages in disease free survival (log-rank trend p < 0.001), and a significant difference in overall survival (OS) when comparing clinical stages that were grouped in stage I–IIIa and IIIB (log-rank p = 0.001). On univariate analysis, age older than 60, having received full treatment and dose above 45 Gy were all significantly related to OS (p < 0.05). An overall survival of 45% and disease free survival of 45% at 5 years were found in our series. Conclusions Our findings show that results at the Instituto de Radiomedicina in Chile are comparable to published literature. Dismal results in stage IIIb cases indicate much work remains in therapies to achieve loco-regional control in locally advanced cases. PMID:25061522

  15. Symptom cluster analyses based on symptom occurrence and severity ratings among pediatric oncology patients during myelosuppressive chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baggott, Christina; Cooper, Bruce A; Marina, Neyssa; Matthay, Katherine K; Miaskowski, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Symptom cluster research is an emerging field in symptom management. The ability to identify symptom clusters that are specific to pediatric oncology patients may lead to improved understanding of symptoms' underlying mechanisms among patients of all ages. The purpose of this study, in a sample of children and adolescents with cancer who underwent a cycle of myelosuppressive chemotherapy, was to compare the number and types of symptom clusters identified using patients' ratings of symptom occurrence and symptom severity. Children and adolescents with cancer (10-18 years of age; N = 131) completed the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale 10-18 on the day they started a cycle of myelosuppressive chemotherapy, using a 1-week recall of experiences. Symptom data based on occurrence and severity ratings were examined using exploratory factor analysis. The defined measurement model suggested by the best exploratory factor analysis model was then examined with a latent variable analysis. Three clusters were identified when symptom occurrence ratings were evaluated, which were classified as a chemotherapy sequela cluster, mood disturbance cluster, and a neuropsychological discomfort cluster. Analysis of symptom severity ratings yielded similar cluster configurations. Cluster configurations remained relatively stable between symptom occurrence and severity ratings. The evaluation of patients at a common point in the chemotherapy cycle may have contributed to these findings. Additional uniformity in symptom clusters investigations is needed to allow appropriate comparisons among studies. The dissemination of symptom cluster research methodology through publication and presentation may promote uniformity in this field.

  16. Implementation and evaluation of medicine and therapeutic information service by clinical pharmacists in oncology care setting.

    PubMed

    Patel, Himanshu; Gurumurthy, Parthasarathi

    2017-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to explore the role of clinical pharmacists in providing medicine and therapeutic information service in oncology care setting. Methods It was a prospective study conducted for a period of three years after implementation of medicine and therapeutic information service as an integral part of oncology pharmacy services. The medicine and therapeutic information queries were received during ward rounds, at ambulatory care and via telephone by clinical pharmacists. All the medicine and therapeutic information requests were reviewed and answered to the concerned requester(s). Answered medicine and therapeutic information requests were electronically documented in the hospital drug information database and analyzed further. Results A total of 484 medicine and therapeutic information requests were received by clinical pharmacists during period of August 2013 to June 2016. Majority of medicine and therapeutic information queries were requested by radiation oncologists (27.2%) followed by medical oncologists (26.4%), general physicians (14.04%), resident medical officers (11.7%), ambulatory care nurses (8.6%), in-patient nurses (5.1%) and patients and care takers (6.6%). Majority of the medicine and therapeutic information queries were asked for the purpose of improving patient care (48.3%) followed by to update knowledge (30.9%) and training sessions to nurses (6.6%). The most common categories of medicine and therapeutic information were adverse drug reactions and its management (21.4%) followed by dosage adjustments of chemotherapy and biologicals (15.5%), supportive care related (14.6%), contraindications (14%), drug-drug interactions (11.9%), management of co-morbidities (7.8%), chemotherapy selection in special populations (4.5%). Conclusion The provision of medicine and therapeutic information was found to be useful in providing medicine information to improve patient care and to update knowledge of health care professionals at the

  17. Updates in Gastrointestinal Oncology – insights from the 2008 44th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Javle, Milind; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2009-01-01

    We have reviewed the pivotal presentations rcelated to colorectal cancer (CRC) and other gastrointestinal malignancies from 2008 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). We have discussed the scientific findings and the impact on practice guidelines and ongoing clinical trials. The report on KRAS status in patients with metastatic CRC receiving epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeted antibody treatment has led to a change in National Comprehensive Cancer Network guideline that recommends only patients with wild-type KRAS tumor should receive this treatment. The results of double biologics (bevacizumab and anti-EGFR antibody) plus chemotherapy as first-line treatment in patients with metastatic CRC has shown a worse outcome than bevacizumab-based regimen. Microsatellite Instability has again been confirmed to be an important predictor in patients with stage II colon cancer receiving adjuvant treatment. Adjuvant gemcitabine therapy for pancreatic cancer was investigated by the CONKO-001 study; this resulted in superior survival as compared with observation and can be regarded as an acceptable option, without the addition of radiotherapy. The addition of bevacizumab to gemcitabine and erlotinib was not supior to gemcitabine and erlotinib for advanced disease. Second-line therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer with 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin resulted in a survival benefit. Irinotecan plus cisplatin and paclitaxel plus cisplatin result in similar survival when combined with radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. The novel fluoropyrimidine S1 appears to be active in gastric cancer, as a single agent or as combination therapy. Adjuvant intraperitoneal mitomycin-C may decrease the incidence of peritoneal recurrence of gastric cancer. Sorafenib is an effective agent in Asian patients with hepatocellular carcinoma secondary to hepatitis B; its utility in child's B cirrhosis remains to be proven. Sunitinib is also an active agent in

  18. A STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF HYPOTONIC HYPER-HYDRATION FLUIDS ON SODIUM BALANCE IN PAEDIATRIC HAEMATOLOGY/ONCOLOGY PATIENTS RECEIVING CHEMOTHERAPY.

    PubMed

    Keane, Sinead; Butler, Eileen

    2016-09-01

    To determine the effect, if any, that hyper-hydration with hypotonic fluids has on sodium balance in paediatric haematology/oncology patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy treatment for malignancies. A literature review was carried out and a snapshot of current practice across paediatric haematology/oncology centres in the UK was obtained. A prospective study was carried out in a tertiary paediatric haematology/oncology centre. A total of 98 patient episodes involved hyper-hydration with isotonic 0.9% NaCl, almost isotonic 0.45% NaCl+2.5% glucose with added sodium bicarbonate or hypotonic 0.45% NaCl+2.5% glucose. Serum sodium was monitored before and during hyper-hydration. Results were analysed according to whether children experienced a drop in serum sodium. Patients who were hyper-hydrated with hypotonic 0.45% NaCl & 2.5% Glucose experienced the greatest mean drop in serum sodium. The mean drop in sodium was 2.11 mmol/L in the group receiving the hypotonic 0.45% NaCl & 2.5% Glucose compared to 0.47 mmol/L in the group who received isotonic 0.9% NaCl or 0.45% NaCl & 2.5% Glucose with added sodium bicarbonate. During the course of the study five patients who received 0.45% NaCl & 2.5% Glucose dropped their sodium to 130 mmol/L or less constituting hyponatraemia. No patient dropped their serum sodium to 130 mmol/L or less in the other two groups. During the course of the study no patient experienced clinical manifestations of hyponatraemia. No child became hypernatraemic. In paediatric haematology/oncology patients receiving hyper-hydration with concurrent chemotherapy isotonic fluids are preferable. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Systemic Therapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Gregory A.; Temin, Sarah; Azzoli, Christopher G.; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Baker, Sherman; Brahmer, Julie R.; Ellis, Peter M.; Gajra, Ajeet; Rackear, Nancy; Schiller, Joan H.; Smith, Thomas J.; Strawn, John R.; Trent, David; Johnson, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based recommendations to update the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline on systemic therapy for stage IV non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods An Update Committee of the American Society of Clinical Oncology NSCLC Expert Panel based recommendations on a systematic review of randomized controlled trials from January 2007 to February 2014. Results This guideline update reflects changes in evidence since the previous guideline. Recommendations There is no cure for patients with stage IV NSCLC. For patients with performance status (PS) 0 to 1 (and appropriate patient cases with PS 2) and without an EGFR-sensitizing mutation or ALK gene rearrangement, combination cytotoxic chemotherapy is recommended, guided by histology, with early concurrent palliative care. Recommendations for patients in the first-line setting include platinum-doublet therapy for those with PS 0 to 1 (bevacizumab may be added to carboplatin plus paclitaxel if no contraindications); combination or single-agent chemotherapy or palliative care alone for those with PS 2; afatinib, erlotinib, or gefitinib for those with sensitizing EGFR mutations; crizotinib for those with ALK or ROS1 gene rearrangement; and following first-line recommendations or using platinum plus etoposide for those with large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Maintenance therapy includes pemetrexed continuation for patients with stable disease or response to first-line pemetrexed-containing regimens, alternative chemotherapy, or a chemotherapy break. In the second-line setting, recommendations include docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, or pemetrexed for patients with nonsquamous cell carcinoma; docetaxel, erlotinib, or gefitinib for those with squamous cell carcinoma; and chemotherapy or ceritinib for those with ALK rearrangement who experience progression after crizotinib. In the third-line setting, for patients who have not received erlotinib or gefitinib, treatment with erlotinib is

  20. Oral ulcers in children under chemotherapy: clinical characteristics and their relation with Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Ester; Brethauer, Ursula; Rojas, Jaime; Fernández, Eduardo; Le Fort, Patricia

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of oral ulcers in pediatric oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy and their relation with the presence of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) type 1 and Candida albicans. The sample consisted of 20 ulcerative lesions from 15 children treated with chemotherapy in the Pediatric Service of the Regional Hospital of Concepción, Chile. Two calibrated clinicians performed clinical diagnosis of the ulcers and registered general data from the patients (age, general diagnosis, absolute neutrophil count, and number of days after chemotherapy) and clinical characteristic of the ulcers: number, size, location, presence or absence of pain and inflammatory halo, edge characteristics, and exudate type. Additional to clinical diagnosis, culture for Candida albicans (C) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 was performed. Ten ulcers occurred in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, five in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia and five in patients with other neoplastic diseases. Eight ulcers were HSV (+) / C (-), 6 HSV (-) / C (-), 4 HSV (+) / C (+) and 2 HSV (-) / C (+). Preferential location was the hard palate. Most lesions were multiple, painful, with inflammatory halo, irregular edges and fibrinous exudate. The average size was 6,5 millimeters, and the mean number of days after chemotherapy was 7.5 days. Oral ulcers in children with oncological diseases did not present a specific clinical pattern. They were strongly associated with HSV.

  1. Estimating glomerular filtration rate in oncology patients receiving Cisplatin chemotherapy: Predicted creatinine clearance against 99mTc-DTPA methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaidah Syed Sahab, Sharifah; Manap, Mahayuddin; Hamzah, Fadzilah

    2017-05-01

    The therapeutic potential of cisplatin as the best anticancer treatment for solid tumor is limited by its potential nephrotoxicity. This study analyses the incidence of cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in oncology patients through GFR estimation using 99mTc-DTPA plasma sampling (reference method) and to compare with predicted creatinine clearance and Tc-99m renal scintigraphy. A prospective study of 33 oncology patients referred for GFR estimation in Penang Hospital. The incidence of cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity was analysed via radionuclide and creatinine based method. Of 33 samples, only 21 selected for the study. The dose of cisplatin given was 75 mg/m2 for each cycle. The mean difference of GFR pre and post chemotherapy (PSC 2) was 13.38 (-4.60, 31.36) ml/min/1.73m2 (p 0.136). Of 21 patients, 3 developed severe nephrotoxicity (GFR < 50ml/min/1.73 m2) contributing 14.3% of incidence. Bland-Altman plot showed only PSC 1 is in agreement with PSC 2 technique. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC) also showed that PSC 1 has high degree of reliability in comparison to PSC 2 (p < 0.001). The other methods do not show reliability and agreement in comparison to PSC 2 (p < 0.05). 3 of 21 patients (14.3%) developed severe nephrotoxicity post cisplatin chemotherapy. This percentage is much less than the reported 20 - 25% of cases from other studies, probably due to small sample size and biased study population due to strict exclusion criteria. Radionuclide method for evaluating GFR is the most sensitive method for the detection of cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity by showing 3 of 21 patients developing severe nephrotoxicity. PSC 1 was found to be a reliable substitute of PSC 2. The other methods are not reliable for detection of early nephrotoxicity. We will recommend the use of single plasma sampling method (PSC 1) for GFR estimation in monitoring post cisplatin chemotherapy patients.

  2. [Verbal information in clinical trials at an oncology department].

    PubMed

    Jensen, A B

    1990-11-26

    Prior to participation in clinical trials, patients must give their consent on the basis of information from the doctor. The content of the information is defined in the Helsinki Declaration. Information given in an oncological department was investigated and the patients were interviewed about the information obtained. The problems associated with the informative interviews with the patients were that these were frequently unstructured, that the patients were more concerned with their illness and treatment and that doctors had done too little to ensure that the patients had understood the information. It was most difficult for the doctors to provide thorough information about side-effects and disadvantages. Patients had greatest difficulty in understanding the principle of randomization. The patients' main reason for participation in the trial was the hope for therapeutic benefit. In departments where clinical research is undertaken, constant attention is required for how information on clinical trials is best given.

  3. Long-term oncological outcome after post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection in men with metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell tumour.

    PubMed

    Fléchon, Aude; Tavernier, Emmanuelle; Boyle, Helen; Meeus, Pierre; Rivoire, Michel; Droz, Jean-Pierre

    2010-09-01

    To determine whether conformity to standard recommendations of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) after chemotherapy for testicular and primary retroperitoneal nonseminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGCT) and completeness of surgical excision have an effect on oncological outcome. This was a retrospective study of patients with testicular and primary retroperitoneal NSGCT, with initial involvement of RPLNs, treated between June 1992 and December 2002 in one institution. We reviewed the clinical, surgical and histological charts of 151 such patients who had a RPLND after first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. The recommendations used to define conformity to RPLND standards were: the indication based on initial and residual lymph node size, shrinkage, extension of dissection and completeness of resection. RPLND conformed to standard recommendations in 70 of the 151 (46%) patients. Conformity was complete for the surgeon who operated on 48 patients and was 26% of the others. Fifteen patients (10%) relapsed in the retroperitoneum, 14 of whom had initial lymph nodes of > or =5 cm. Two patients (3%) relapsed in the group of 70 patients with conformed and complete RPLND, vs 13 (16%) in the 81 with conformed but incomplete resection or with non-conformed and complete or incomplete RPLND. After a median (range) follow-up of 77 (1.3-186.5) months 132 patients were alive with no evidence of disease, 18 died and one was alive with progressive disease. The limitations of this study were the relatively few patients and that it was retrospective. There was conformity of RLNPD to the recommendations, and completeness of resection, in half of the patients operated; this might have an effect on oncological outcome. Our data suggest that patients should be treated in tertiary centres.

  4. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... during chemotherapy. Chemotherapy is most often given in cycles. These cycles may last 1 day, several days, or a ... period when no chemotherapy is given between each cycle. A rest period may last for days, weeks, ...

  5. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: a review and implications for oncology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Wickham, Rita

    2007-06-01

    Advances in supportive care have increased the likelihood that previously less common adverse effects of chemotherapy will be more evident. The incidence of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is increasing because more neurotoxic drugs have been developed and because patients are living longer and receiving multiple chemotherapy regimens. This article reviews the anatomy of the peripheral nervous system, the proposed mechanisms of CIPN, and manifestations of CIPN from vinca alkaloids, taxanes, and platinum analogs. Major topics of this article are evidence-based data regarding symptom management, a review of medical management, and a synthesis of nursing care for patients at risk for or experiencing CIPN.

  6. Process mining routinely collected electronic health records to define real-life clinical pathways during chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baker, Karl; Dunwoodie, Elaine; Jones, Richard G; Newsham, Alex; Johnson, Owen; Price, Christopher P; Wolstenholme, Jane; Leal, Jose; McGinley, Patrick; Twelves, Chris; Hall, Geoff

    2017-07-01

    There is growing interest in the use of routinely collected electronic health records to enhance service delivery and facilitate clinical research. It should be possible to detect and measure patterns of care and use the data to monitor improvements but there are methodological and data quality challenges. Driven by the desire to model the impact of a patient self-test blood count monitoring service in patients on chemotherapy, we aimed to (i) establish reproducible methods of process-mining electronic health records, (ii) use the outputs derived to define and quantify patient pathways during chemotherapy, and (iii) to gather robust data which is structured to be able to inform a cost-effectiveness decision model of home monitoring of neutropenic status during chemotherapy. Electronic Health Records at a UK oncology centre were included if they had (i) a diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer and received adjuvant epirubicin and cyclosphosphamide chemotherapy or (ii) colorectal cancer and received palliative oxaliplatin and infusional 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy, and (iii) were first diagnosed with cancer between January 2004 and February 2013. Software and a Markov model were developed, producing a schematic of patient pathways during chemotherapy. Significant variance from the assumed care pathway was evident from the data. Of the 535 patients with breast cancer and 420 with colorectal cancer there were 474 and 329 pathway variants respectively. Only 27 (5%) and 26 (6%) completed the planned six cycles of chemotherapy without having unplanned hospital contact. Over the six cycles, 169 (31.6%) patients with breast cancer and 190 (45.2%) patients with colorectal cancer were admitted to hospital. The pathways of patients on chemotherapy are complex. An iterative approach to addressing semantic and data quality issues enabled the effective use of routinely collected patient records to produce accurate models of the real-life experiences of chemotherapy patients and

  7. The use of combinations of monoclonal antibodies in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Linda M; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Beijnen, Jos H

    2015-12-01

    Treatment with monoclonal antibodies is becoming increasingly important in clinical oncology. These antibodies specifically inhibit signaling pathways in tumor growth and/or induce immunological responses against tumor cells. By combining monoclonal antibodies several pathways may be targeted simultaneously, potentially leading to additive or synergistic effects. Theoretically, antibodies are very suitable for use in combination therapy, because of limited overlapping toxicity and lack of pharmacokinetic interactions. In this article an overview is given of preclinical and clinical data on twenty-five different combinations of antibodies in oncology. Some of these combinations have proven clinical benefit, for example the combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer, which exemplifies an additive or synergistic effect on antitumor activity in clinical studies and the combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab, which results in significant increases in progression-free and overall survival in patients with advanced melanoma. However, other combinations may lead to unfavorable results, such as bevacizumab with cetuximab or panitumumab in advanced colorectal cancer. These combinations result in shorter progression-free survival and increased toxicity compared to therapy with a single antibody. In summary, the different published studies showed widely varying results, depending on the combination of antibodies, indication and patient population. More preclinical and clinical studies are necessary to unravel the mechanisms behind synergistic or antagonistic effects of combining monoclonal antibodies. Most research on combination therapies is still in an early stage, but it is expected that for several tumor types the use of combination therapy of antibodies will become standard of care in the near future.

  8. Clinical research in surgical oncology: an analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Amber S; Barnes, Alison; Scheer, Adena S; Martel, Guillaume; Moloo, Husein; Boushey, Robin P; Sabri, Elham; Auer, Rebecca C

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a descriptive analysis of registered clinical trials in surgical oncology at ClinicalTrials.gov. Data was extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov using the following search engine criteria: "Cancer" as Condition, "Surgery OR Operation OR Resection" as Intervention, and Non-Industry sponsored. The search was limited to Canada and the United States and included trials registered from January 1, 2001 to January 1, 2011. Of 9,961 oncology trials, 1,049 (10.5%) included any type of surgical intervention. Of these trials, 125 (11.9%, 1.3% of all oncology trials) assessed a surgical variable, 773 (73.7%) assessed adjuvant/neoadjuvant therapies, and 151 (14.4%) were observational studies. Of the trials assessing adjuvant therapies, systemic treatment (362 trials, 46.8%) and multimodal therapy (129 trials, 16.7%) comprised a large focus. Of the 125 trials where surgery was the intervention, 59 trials (47.2%) focused on surgical techniques or devices, 45 trials (36.0%) studied invasive diagnostic methods, and 21 trials (16.8%) evaluated surgery versus no surgery. The majority of the 125 trials were nonrandomized (72, 57.6%). The number of registered surgical oncology trials is small in comparison to oncology trials as a whole. Clinical trials specifically designed to assess surgical interventions are vastly outnumbered by trials focusing on adjuvant therapies. Randomized surgical oncology trials account for <1% of all registered cancer trials. Barriers to the design and implementation of randomized trials in surgical oncology need to be clarified in order to facilitate higher-level evidence in surgical decision-making.

  9. Nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine as first-line palliative chemotherapy in a patient with metastatic pancreatic cancer with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2.

    PubMed

    Martín, Andrés J Muñoz; Alfonso, Pilar García; Rupérez, Ana B; Jiménez, Miguel Martín

    2016-07-01

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer (PC) has been associated with a considerably poor prognosis. Due to its toxicity, first-line combination chemotherapy is limited to patients with a good performance status (PS). Previously nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine has been demonstrated to improve the overall survival rate in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer with a good PS. The present study reports a case of a patient with metastatic PC with a poor PS (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 2) and a complex set of comorbidities treated with nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine as a first-line palliative therapy. Adjusted doses of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine reached a favourable clinical, radiological and biochemical response in the present patient, which increased the quality of life for the patient. Eventually, the patient succumbed to acute cholangitis. Based on the results of the present study, nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine appears to be a favourable treatment as first-line palliative chemotherapy for patients with metastatic PC, comorbidities and poor PS.

  10. Management of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in pediatric oncology patients: A North American survey of pediatric hematology/oncology and pediatric infectious disease physicians.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Rochelle R; Egan-Sherry, Dana; Gill, Jonathan B; Roth, Michael E

    2017-07-27

    Chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (FN) is traditionally managed with hospital admission for parenteral antibiotics until neutropenia resolves. Recent studies have explored risk stratification and the safety of managing "low-risk" patients as outpatients. Few studies have directly assessed pediatric provider preferences for managing FN. We conducted a survey of practicing US and Canadian pediatric hematology/oncology (PHO) and pediatric infectious disease (PID) physicians to assess their FN management preferences using case scenarios with varying risk profiles. Twenty-one percent (n = 186) of PHO and 32% (n = 123) of PID physicians completed the survey. Overall, both groups of providers agreed regarding which patients with FN could be managed outpatient. For a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia receiving maintenance chemotherapy with an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of 400 cells/μl, 35% (n = 66) of PHO and 49% (n = 60) of PID physicians would consider outpatient management (P = 0.02). Of those physicians selecting inpatient management, 41% (n = 49) of PHO and 52% (n = 33) of PID physicians would be willing to discharge the patient without an increase in ANC, if afebrile with a negative blood culture (P = 0.16). For a similar patient with an ANC of 100 cells/μl, only 23% (n = 35) of PHO and 42% (n = 39) of PID physicians would consider discharge without an increase in ANC (P = 0.002). Despite the lack of established guidelines for low-risk pediatric FN, a significant proportion of North American physicians report willingness to modify traditional management. This reinforces the need for evidence-based low-risk criteria and outpatient management guidelines to optimize consistency of care for these patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group clinical trials with misonidazole

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, T.H.; Stetz, J.; Phillips, T.L.

    1981-05-15

    This paper presents a review of the progressive clinical trials of the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, misonidazole, in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Presentation is made of all the schemas of the recently completed and currently active RTOG Phase II and Phase III studies. Detailed information is provided on the clinical toxicity of the Phase II trials, specifically regarding neurotoxicity. With limitations in drug total dose, a variety of dose schedules have proven to be tolerable, with a moderate incidence of nausea and vomiting and mild peripheral neuropathy or central neuropathy. No other organ toxicity has been seen, specifically no liver, renal or bone marrow toxicities. An additional Phase III malignant glioma trial in the Brain Tumor Study Group is described.

  12. Symptom Cluster Analyses Based on Symptom Occurrence and Severity Ratings Among Pediatric Oncology Patients During Myelosuppressive Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Baggott, Christina; Cooper, Bruce A.; Marina, Neyssa; Matthay, Katherine K.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Background Symptom cluster research is an emerging field in symptom management. The ability to identify symptom clusters that are specific to pediatric oncology patients may lead to improved understanding of symptoms’ underlying mechanisms among patients of all ages. Objective The purpose of this study, in a sample of children and adolescents with cancer who underwent a cycle of myelosuppressive chemotherapy, was to compare the number and types of symptom clusters identified using patients’ ratings of symptom occurrence and symptom severity. Interventions/Methods Children and adolescents with cancer (10 to 18 years of age; N=131) completed the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale 10–18 on the day they started a cycle of myelosuppressive chemotherapy, using a one week recall of experiences. Symptom data based on occurrence and severity ratings were examined using Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA). The defined measurement model suggested by the best EFA model was then examined with a latent variable analysis. Results Three clusters were identified when symptom occurrence ratings were evaluated which were classified as a chemotherapy sequelae cluster, mood disturbance cluster, and a neuropsychological discomforts cluster. Analysis of symptom severity ratings yielded similar cluster configurations. Conclusions Cluster configurations remained relatively stable between symptom occurrence and severity ratings. The evaluation of patients at a common point in the chemotherapy cycle may have contributed to these findings. Implications for Practice Additional uniformity in symptom clusters investigations is needed to allow appropriate comparisons among studies. The dissemination of symptom clusters research methodology through publication and presentation may promote uniformity in this field. PMID:21921793

  13. Toward a science of tumor forecasting for clinical oncology

    DOE PAGES

    Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Quaranta, Vito; Evans, Katherine J.; ...

    2015-03-15

    We propose that the quantitative cancer biology community makes a concerted effort to apply lessons from weather forecasting to develop an analogous methodology for predicting and evaluating tumor growth and treatment response. Currently, the time course of tumor response is not predicted; instead, response is only assessed post hoc by physical examination or imaging methods. This fundamental practice within clinical oncology limits optimization of a treatment regimen for an individual patient, as well as to determine in real time whether the choice was in fact appropriate. This is especially frustrating at a time when a panoply of molecularly targeted therapiesmore » is available, and precision genetic or proteomic analyses of tumors are an established reality. By learning from the methods of weather and climate modeling, we submit that the forecasting power of biophysical and biomathematical modeling can be harnessed to hasten the arrival of a field of predictive oncology. Furthermore, with a successful methodology toward tumor forecasting, it should be possible to integrate large tumor-specific datasets of varied types and effectively defeat one cancer patient at a time.« less

  14. Toward a science of tumor forecasting for clinical oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Quaranta, Vito; Evans, Katherine J.; Rericha, Erin C.

    2015-03-15

    We propose that the quantitative cancer biology community makes a concerted effort to apply lessons from weather forecasting to develop an analogous methodology for predicting and evaluating tumor growth and treatment response. Currently, the time course of tumor response is not predicted; instead, response is only assessed post hoc by physical examination or imaging methods. This fundamental practice within clinical oncology limits optimization of a treatment regimen for an individual patient, as well as to determine in real time whether the choice was in fact appropriate. This is especially frustrating at a time when a panoply of molecularly targeted therapies is available, and precision genetic or proteomic analyses of tumors are an established reality. By learning from the methods of weather and climate modeling, we submit that the forecasting power of biophysical and biomathematical modeling can be harnessed to hasten the arrival of a field of predictive oncology. Furthermore, with a successful methodology toward tumor forecasting, it should be possible to integrate large tumor-specific datasets of varied types and effectively defeat one cancer patient at a time.

  15. Toward a science of tumor forecasting for clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; Quaranta, Vito; Evans, Katherine J; Rericha, Erin C

    2015-03-15

    We propose that the quantitative cancer biology community makes a concerted effort to apply lessons from weather forecasting to develop an analogous methodology for predicting and evaluating tumor growth and treatment response. Currently, the time course of tumor response is not predicted; instead, response is only assessed post hoc by physical examination or imaging methods. This fundamental practice within clinical oncology limits optimization of a treatment regimen for an individual patient, as well as to determine in real time whether the choice was in fact appropriate. This is especially frustrating at a time when a panoply of molecularly targeted therapies is available, and precision genetic or proteomic analyses of tumors are an established reality. By learning from the methods of weather and climate modeling, we submit that the forecasting power of biophysical and biomathematical modeling can be harnessed to hasten the arrival of a field of predictive oncology. With a successful methodology toward tumor forecasting, it should be possible to integrate large tumor-specific datasets of varied types and effectively defeat one cancer patient at a time. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Towards a Science of Tumor Forecasting for Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Quaranta, Vito; Evans, Katherine J.; Rericha, Erin C.

    2015-01-01

    We propose that the quantitative cancer biology community make a concerted effort to apply lessons from weather forecasting to develop an analogous methodology for predicting and evaluating tumor growth and treatment response. Currently, the time course of tumor response is not predicted; instead, response is- only assessed post hoc by physical exam or imaging methods. This fundamental practice within clinical oncology limits optimization of atreatment regimen for an individual patient, as well as to determine in real time whether the choice was in fact appropriate. This is especially frustrating at a time when a panoply of molecularly targeted therapies is available, and precision genetic or proteomic analyses of tumors are an established reality. By learning from the methods of weather and climate modeling, we submit that the forecasting power of biophysical and biomathematical modeling can be harnessed to hasten the arrival of a field of predictive oncology. With a successful methodology towards tumor forecasting, it should be possible to integrate large tumor specific datasets of varied types, and effectively defeat cancer one patient at a time. PMID:25592148

  17. Osteosarcoma: the addition of muramyl tripeptide to chemotherapy improves overall survival--a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Paul A; Schwartz, Cindy L; Krailo, Mark D; Healey, John H; Bernstein, Mark L; Betcher, Donna; Ferguson, William S; Gebhardt, Mark C; Goorin, Allen M; Harris, Michael; Kleinerman, Eugenie; Link, Michael P; Nadel, Helen; Nieder, Michael; Siegal, Gene P; Weiner, Michael A; Wells, Robert J; Womer, Richard B; Grier, Holcombe E

    2008-02-01

    To compare three-drug chemotherapy with cisplatin, doxorubicin, and methotrexate with four-drug chemotherapy with cisplatin, doxorubicin, methotrexate, and ifosfamide for the treatment of osteosarcoma. To determine whether the addition of muramyl tripeptide (MTP) to chemotherapy enhances event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival in newly diagnosed patients with osteosarcoma. Six hundred sixty-two patients with osteosarcoma without clinically detectable metastatic disease and whose disease was considered resectable received one of four prospectively randomized treatments. All patients received identical cumulative doses of cisplatin, doxorubicin, and methotrexate and underwent definitive surgical resection of primary tumor. Patients were randomly assigned to receive or not to receive ifosfamide and/or MTP in a 2 x 2 factorial design. The primary end points for analysis were EFS and overall survival. In the current analysis, there was no evidence of interaction, and we were able to examine each intervention separately. The chemotherapy regimens resulted in similar EFS and overall survival. There was a trend toward better EFS with the addition of MTP (P = .08). The addition of MTP to chemotherapy improved 6-year overall survival from 70% to 78% (P = .03). The hazard ratio for overall survival with the addition of MTP was 0.71 (95% CI, 0.52 to 0.96). The addition of ifosfamide to cisplatin, doxorubicin, and methotrexate did not enhance EFS or overall survival for patients with osteosarcoma. The addition of MTP to chemotherapy resulted in a statistically significant improvement in overall survival and a trend toward better EFS.

  18. The roots of modern oncology: from discovery of new antitumor anthracyclines to their clinical use.

    PubMed

    Cassinelli, Giuseppe

    2016-06-02

    In May 1960, the Farmitalia CEO Dr. Bertini and the director of the Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori of Milan Prof. Bucalossi (talent scout and city's Mayor) signed a research agreement for the discovery and development up to clinical trials of new natural antitumor agents. This agreement can be considered as a pioneering and fruitful example of a translational discovery program with relevant transatlantic connections. Owing to an eclectic Streptomyces, found near Castel del Monte (Apulia), and to the skilled and motivated participants of both institutions, a new natural antitumor drug, daunomycin, was ready for clinical trials within 3 years. Patent interference by the Farmitalia French partner was overcome by the good quality of the Italian drug and by the cooperation between Prof. Di Marco, director of the Istituto Ricerche Farmitalia Research Laboratories for Microbiology and Chemotherapy, and Prof. Karnofsky, head of the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute of New York, leading to the first transatlantic clinical trials. The search for daunomycin's sister anthracyclines led to the discovery and development of adriamycin, one of the best drugs born in Milan. This was the second act prologue of the history of Italian antitumor discovery and clinical oncology, which started in July 1969 when Prof. Di Marco sent Prof. Bonadonna the first vials of adriamycin (doxorubicin) to be tested in clinical trials. This article reviews the Milan scene in the 1960s, a city admired and noted for the outstanding scientific achievements of its private and public institutions in drugs and industrial product discovery.

  19. Metronomic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mutsaers, Anthony J

    2009-08-01

    Chemotherapy drugs are usually administered at doses that are high enough to result in an obligatory break period to allow for the observation of potential side effects and institution of supportive care, if required. In recent years, efforts to administer chemotherapy on a more continuous basis, with a much shorter break period, or none at all, have received increased interest, and the practice has come to be known as metronomic chemotherapy. The basis for success with this currently investigational approach may be rooted in continuous drug exposure to susceptible cancer cells, inhibition of tumor blood vessel growth-a process known as tumor angiogenesis, and/or alterations in tumor immunology. Increased benefit also appears to occur when metronomic chemotherapy is used in combination with newer, targeted antiangiogenic agents, and therefore represents a promising approach to combination therapy, particularly as targeted oncology drugs make their way into veterinary oncology applications. There is still much to be learned in this field, especially with regard to optimization of the proper drugs, dose, schedule, and tumor applications. However, the low cost, ease of administration, and acceptable toxicity profiles potentially associated with this therapeutic strategy make metronomic chemotherapy protocols attractive and suitable to veterinary applications. Preliminary clinical trial results have now been reported in both human and veterinary medicine, including adjuvant treatment of canine splenic hemangiosarcoma and incompletely resected soft tissue sarcoma, and, further, more powerful studies are currently ongoing.

  20. Phase 0 clinical trials in oncology new drug development

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Umesh Chandra; Bhatia, Sandeep; Garg, Amit; Sharma, Amit; Choudhary, Vaibhav

    2011-01-01

    Research focus of pharmaceutical industry has expanded to a larger extent in last few decades putting many more new molecules, particularly targeted agents, for the clinical development. On the other hand, researchers are facing serious challenges due to high failure rates of new molecules in clinical studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in combination with academia and industry experts identified many factors responsible for failures of new molecules, and with a vision of taking traditional drug development model toward an innovative paradigm shift, issued regulatory guidance on conduct of exploratory investigational new drug (exploratory IND) studies, often called as phase 0 clinical trials, requiring reduced preclinical testing, which has special relevance to life-threatening diseases such as cancer. Phase 0 trials, utilizing much lower drug doses, provide an opportunity to explore the clinical behavior of new molecules very early in the drug development pathway, helping to identify the promising candidates and eliminating non-promising molecules, thus improving the efficiency of overall drug development with significant savings of resources. Being non-therapeutic in nature, these studies, however, pose certain ethical challenges requiring careful study designing and informed consent process. This article reviews the insights and perspectives for the feasibility, utility, planning, designing and conduct of phase 0 clinical trials, in addition to ethical issues and industrial perspective focused at oncology new drug development. PMID:21584177

  1. Phase 0 clinical trials in oncology new drug development.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Umesh Chandra; Bhatia, Sandeep; Garg, Amit; Sharma, Amit; Choudhary, Vaibhav

    2011-01-01

    Research focus of pharmaceutical industry has expanded to a larger extent in last few decades putting many more new molecules, particularly targeted agents, for the clinical development. On the other hand, researchers are facing serious challenges due to high failure rates of new molecules in clinical studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in combination with academia and industry experts identified many factors responsible for failures of new molecules, and with a vision of taking traditional drug development model toward an innovative paradigm shift, issued regulatory guidance on conduct of exploratory investigational new drug (exploratory IND) studies, often called as phase 0 clinical trials, requiring reduced preclinical testing, which has special relevance to life-threatening diseases such as cancer. Phase 0 trials, utilizing much lower drug doses, provide an opportunity to explore the clinical behavior of new molecules very early in the drug development pathway, helping to identify the promising candidates and eliminating non-promising molecules, thus improving the efficiency of overall drug development with significant savings of resources. Being non-therapeutic in nature, these studies, however, pose certain ethical challenges requiring careful study designing and informed consent process. This article reviews the insights and perspectives for the feasibility, utility, planning, designing and conduct of phase 0 clinical trials, in addition to ethical issues and industrial perspective focused at oncology new drug development.

  2. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Stoffel, Elena M.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Kalady, Matthew F.; Lau, Michelle Wan Yee; Lu, Karen H.; Roach, Nancy; Limburg, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide recommendations on prevention, screening, genetics, treatment, and management for people at risk for hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. Methods The Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published in 2013 on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Guidelines Working Group in Annals of Oncology was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists, with content and recommendations reviewed by an ASCO endorsement panel. Results The ASCO endorsement panel determined that the recommendations of the ESMO guidelines are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. The ASCO panel endorsed the ESMO guidelines and added a few qualifying statements. Recommendations Approximately 5% to 6% of patient cases of CRC are associated with germline mutations that confer an inherited predisposition for cancer. The possibility of a hereditary cancer syndrome should be assessed for every patient at the time of CRC diagnosis. A diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or another genetic syndrome can influence clinical management for patients with CRC and their family members. Screening for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients with CRC should include review of personal and family histories and testing of tumors for DNA mismatch repair deficiency and/or microsatellite instability. Formal genetic evaluation is recommended for individuals who meet defined criteria. PMID:25452455

  3. [Systemic learning planification for medical students during oncology clinical rotation].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Anthony; Viens, Patrice; Gilabert, Marine; Turrini, Olivier; Lambaudie, Eric; Prebet, Thomas; Farnault, Bertrand; Eisinger, François; Gorincour, Guillaume; Bertucci, François

    2011-12-01

    The expected increase in cancer incidence emphasizes the need for specific training in this area, including either family physician or specialized oncologists. In France, the fourth to sixth years of medical teaching include both theoretical classes at the university and daily actual practice at the hospital. Thus, clinical rotations are thought to play a major role in the training of medical students and also largely participate to the choice of the student of his/her final specialty. Pedagogic quality of these rotations is dependent on multiple parameters, including a rigorous planification of the expected learning. Here, we reported a systemic planification of learning activities for medical students during an oncology rotation at the Paoli-Calmettes Institute in Marseille, France, a regional comprehensive cancer center. This planification includes an evaluation of learning requirements, definition of learning objectives, selection of learning methods and choice of methods of assessment of the students' achievement of these objectives as well as the learning activity itself.

  4. [Report of the 10th Annual Meeting of the Chinese society of Clinical Oncology].

    PubMed

    Cho, William Chi-Shing

    2008-03-01

    The 10th Annual Meeting of the Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) was held on 19-23 September 2007 in Harbin. The theme of this conference was "putting standard multidisciplinary cancer management into practice" and special reports of standard multidisciplinary management on various cancers were presented. Over 3 500 clinical oncologists and scientists participated in the 2007 CSCO Annual Meeting where more than ten international top experts were invited to exchange valuable experiences with the delegates. The programs consisted of Education Session, Satellite Symposium and Meet the Professor Session. The latest research results were presented as oral presentations and posters at the congress. Several hotspots were particularly highlighted in this report, including innovative radiotherapy and chemotherapy methods, researches on molecular targets and clinical trials of targeted therapy, such as endostatin, volociximab, cetuximab, bevacizumab and temozolomide. The remarkable research results of anti-cancer Chinese medicine, cancer screening and prognosis were also introduced. This article tries to call the attention to some hot topics in the program that are both new and noteworthy, and it may serve as a highlight of this important international cancer research meeting for clinical oncologists and scientists.

  5. Contract research organizations in oncology clinical research: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Daniel A; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Steensma, David P

    2016-05-15

    Contract research organizations (CROs) represent a multibillion dollar industry that is firmly embedded in the contemporary clinical trial process. Over the past 30 years, and especially within the last decade, the reach of CROs has extended to service all phases of drug trials in an increasingly global research environment. The presence of CROs is particularly noticeable in medical oncology because of the large number of investigational compounds developed to treat cancer that are currently undergoing testing in human subjects. Although limited data are available with which to objectively define the effects that CROs have had on the clinical trial process, with the expansion of these organizations, several reports have called into question whether ethical and professional standards in research conduct are at times secondary to economic considerations. CROs can add considerable value to the clinical trial process, but difficulty communicating with CRO representatives and time spent answering trivial data queries generated by CROs are current obstacles for study site personnel interacting with CROs. Further study of the effect of the CRO industry on the clinical trial process is needed to ensure efficient data collection and patient safety while collaboratively developing novel therapies in an expedited fashion. Cancer 2016;122:1476-82. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  6. Addressing Low Literacy and Health Literacy in Clinical Oncology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sofia F.; Hahn, Elizabeth A.; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Low functional literacy and low health literacy continue to be under-recognized and are associated with poorer patient health outcomes. Health literacy is a dynamic state influenced by how well a healthcare system delivers information and services that match patients’ abilities, needs and preferences. Oncology care poses considerable health literacy demands on patients who are expected to process high stakes information about complex multidisciplinary treatment over lengths of time. Much of the information provided to patients in clinical care and research is beyond their literacy levels. In this paper, we provide an overview of currently available guidelines and resources to improve how the needs of patients with diverse literacy skills are met by cancer care providers and clinics. We present recommendations for health literacy assessment in clinical practice and ways to enhance the usability of health information and services by improving written materials and verbal communication, incorporating multimedia and culturally appropriate approaches, and promoting health literacy in cancer care settings. The paper also includes a list of additional resources that can be used to develop and implement health literacy initiatives in cancer care clinics. PMID:20464884

  7. Multiplex profiling identifies distinct local and systemic alterations during intraperitoneal chemotherapy for ovarian cancer: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group Study.

    PubMed

    Grabosch, Shannon; Tseng, George; Edwards, Robert P; Lankes, Heather A; Moore, Kathleen; Odunsi, Kunle; Vlad, Anda; Ma, Tianzhou; Strange, Mary; Brozick, Joan; Lugade, Amit; Omilian, Angela; Bshara, Wiam; Stuckey, Ashley R; Walker, Joan L; Birrer, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Ovarian cancer leads to abdominal carcinomatosis and late stage (III/IV) diagnosis in 75% of patients. Three randomized phase III trials have demonstrated that intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy improves outcomes in epithelial ovarian cancer. While IP treatment is validated by clinical trials, there is a poor understanding of the mechanism(s) leading to the survival advantage other than the increased concentration of cytotoxic drugs within the tumor microenvironment. A better understanding of this process through analysis of dynamic biomarkers should promote novel approaches that may enhance tumor clearance. We propose this pilot study to confirm the feasibility of collecting serial peritoneal samples from implanted catheters in women receiving IP chemotherapy. We believe these specimens may be used for multiplex analysis to reveal unique biomarker fluctuations when compared to peripheral blood. From 13 women participating on GOG 252, 30 whole blood, 12 peritoneal fluid (PF), and 20 peritoneal wash (PW) with 30mL saline were obtained. Samples were requested prior to the first three chemotherapy cycles. Samples were assessed for volume, cell populations, protein, RNA, and miRNA content changes. Median volume for PF was 1.6mL and 3.1mL for PW. PW is a dilution of PF capable of capturing measurable biomarkers. Peritoneal aspirates contain a unique profile of biomarkers distinct from blood. miRNA undergo earlier alteration with chemotherapy than genes. Flow cytometry does not adequately capture biomarker fluctuations. As a proof of principle study, this trial provides evidence that sampling the peritoneal cavity can be adapted for biomarker analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Chemotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    Chemotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses drugs to kill cancer cells. Learn how chemotherapy works against cancer, why it causes side effects, and how it is used with other cancer treatments.

  9. Improving quality and decreasing cost in gynecologic oncology care. Society of gynecologic oncology recommendations for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rimel, B J; Burke, William M; Higgins, Robert V; Lee, Paula S; Lutman, Christopher V; Parker, Lynn

    2015-05-01

    To identify potential cost savings in gynecologic oncology care without sacrificing quality. Members of the Clinical Practice Committee of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology were asked to review current practice patterns in gynecologic oncology and assess the potential for cost savings founded on evidence-based medicine and current guidelines. Five clinical practices were identified including the following: vaginal cytology for endometrial cancer survivors; colposcopy for low grade cytologic abnormalities for cervical cancer survivors; routine imaging studies for gynecologic cancer survivors; screening for ovarian cancer with serum biomarkers and ultrasound; and improving palliative care for gynecologic cancer patients. Review of the published literature and guidelines were performed to make evidence-based recommendations for cost effective quality gynecologic oncology care. • Do not perform Pap tests of the vaginal cuff in patients with a history of endometrial cancer. • Do not perform colposcopy for low grade Pap tests in women with a history of cervical cancer. • Avoid routine imaging for cancer surveillance in asymptomatic women with gynecologic cancer, specifically ovarian, endometrial, cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancer. • Do not screen women at low risk for ovarian cancer with ultrasound or CA-125 or other biomarkers. • Do not delay basic level palliative care for women with advanced or relapsed gynecologic cancer, do refer to a palliative care specialist when needed, and avoid unnecessary treatments at life's end. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Clinical relevance of immunotyping of oncologic and hematologic diseases].

    PubMed

    Diehl, V; Pfreundschuh, M

    1987-06-01

    Progress in immunology and molecular biology have provided a better understanding of etiology, pathogenesis and biology of many oncological and hematological diseases. In clinical practice, certain new methods of immunotyping (IT) are of diagnostic importance in assigning undifferentiated tumors to lymphoid, epithelial or mesenchymal origin and in defining subgroups of leukemias and lymphomas. The demonstration of rearrangements of gene coding for immunoglobulins or T-cell receptors assigns hematological malignancies of early differentiation to the B- or T-cell lineage, discriminates between reactive lymphoid changes and clonal lymphoid expansion and detects persistent clonal growth after therapy. In certain clinical entities (e.g. ALL) the immunological subtypes are of importance for differential therapy. By means of IT new clinical entities have been defined (Ki-1-lymphoma, T gamma-lymphoproliferative, LFA-1-deficiency) and the pathomechanisms of others have been elucidated (Bernard-Soulier-disease Syndrome, Glanzmann-Nägeli thrombasthenia). Of immediate therapeutic importance is the identification by IT of receptors for specific hormones or biological response modifiers on malignant cells. In-vivo diagnosis by monoclonal antibodies opens a way to define more exactly the extent of malignant disease by scintigrams or NMR.

  11. Practical use of perioperative chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer: summary of session at the Society of Urologic Oncology annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Apolo, Andrea B; Grossman, Herbert Barton; Bajorin, Dean; Steinberg, Gary; Kamat, Ashish M

    2012-01-01

    At the 11th annual meeting of the Society of Urologic Oncology, an expert panel was convened to discuss the practical use of perioperative chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The discussion was structured as a case-based debate among the panelists. The topics included: neoadjuvant chemotherapy with a focus on T2 disease, pros and cons, survival data, tolerability of cisplatin-based therapy, can we avoid radical cystectomy in complete responders, limitations and alternatives to cisplatin-based therapy, management of 'suboptimal' chemotherapy, residual disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, and key aspects of radical cystectomy and lymph-node dissection in multimodal therapy. The presentations were derived from published literature. The panelists agreed that patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer should be managed with a multidisciplinary team, including urologist and medical oncologist. Cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy has demonstrated improved survival and should be incorporated into the management of all eligible patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. However, in some centers, neoadjuvant chemotherapy is reserved for patients with >T2 disease or high-risk features. There are no data for the administration of non-cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, such as carboplatin-combinations. Cisplatin-ineligible patients should proceed directly to surgical extirpation with adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy considered based on pathologic findings. However, the data for adjuvant chemotherapy is less compelling. As our refinement of the selection process continues, we may be able to better identify subsets of patients who may be spared chemotherapy, but much work remains to be done in this arena. The current standard for muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients is cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy and pelvic lymph-node dissection.

  12. Practical Use of Perioperative Chemotherapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Summary of Session at the Society of Urologic Oncology Annual Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Apolo, Andrea B.; Grossman, H. Barton; Bajorin, Dean; Steinberg, Gary; Kamat, Ashish M.

    2012-01-01

    At the 11th annual meeting of the Society of Urologic Oncology, an expert panel was convened to discuss the practical use of perioperative chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The discussion was structured as a case-based debate among the panelist. The topics included: neoadjuvant chemotherapy with a focus on T2 disease, pros and cons, survival data, tolerability of cisplatin-based therapy, can we avoid radical cystectomy in complete responders, limitations and alternatives to cisplatin-based therapy, management of ‘suboptimal’ chemotherapy, residual disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy and key aspects of radical cystectomy and lymph-node dissection in multi-modal therapy. The presentations were derived from published literature. The panelists agreed that patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer should be managed with a multidisciplinary team including urologist and medical oncologist. Cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy has demonstrated improved survival and should be incorporated into the management of all eligible patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. However, in some centers neoadjuvant chemotherapy is reserved for patients with >T2 disease or high-risk features. There are no data for the administration of non-cisplatin based neoadjuvant chemotherapy such as carboplatin-combinations. Cisplatin-ineligible patients should proceed directly to surgical extirpation with adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy considered based on pathologic findings. However, the data for adjuvant chemotherapy is less compelling. As our refinement of the selection process continues we may be able to better identify subsets of patients who may be spared chemotherapy, but much work remains to be done in this arena. The current standard for muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients is cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy and pelvic lymph-node dissection. PMID:23218068

  13. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... people. But knowing what chemotherapy is, how it works, and what to expect can often help calm your fears. It can also give you a better sense of control over your cancer treatment. ... Drugs Work CancerQuest: Chemotherapy [video] Interactive Chemotherapy Program from Emmi ...

  14. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results

  15. Clinical neuro-oncology formal education opportunities for medical students in the United States and Canada.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Karan S; Nicholas, Martin Kelly; Lukas, Rimas V

    2014-12-01

    To develop an understanding of the availability of the formal clinical neuro-oncology educational opportunities for medical students. The curriculum websites of all medical schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education were reviewed for the presence of clinical neuro-oncology electives as well as other relevant data. Ten (6.8%) of medical schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education offer formal neuro-oncology electives. Half are clustered in the Midwest. Forty percent are at institutions with neuro-oncology fellowships. All are at institutions with neurosurgery and neurology residency programs. Formal clinical neuro-oncology elective opportunities for medical students in the United States and Canada are limited. Additional such opportunities may be of value in the education of medical students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis of oncological [11C]radiopharmaceuticals for clinical PET.

    PubMed

    Lodi, Filippo; Malizia, Claudio; Castellucci, Paolo; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Fanti, Stefano; Boschi, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine modality which provides quantitative images of biological processes in vivo at the molecular level. Several PET radiopharmaceuticals labeled with short-lived isotopes such as (18)F and (11)C were developed in order to trace specific cellular and molecular pathways with the aim of enhancing clinical applications. Among these [(11)C]radiopharmaceuticals are N-[(11)C]methyl-choline ([(11)C]choline), l-(S-methyl-[(11)C])methionine ([(11)C]methionine) and 1-[(11)C]acetate ([(11)C]acetate), which have gained an important role in oncology where the application of 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([(18)F]FDG) is suboptimal. Nevertheless, the production of these radiopharmaceuticals did not reach the same level of standardization as for [(18)F]FDG synthesis. This review describes the most recent developments in the synthesis of the above-mentioned [(11)C]radiopharmaceuticals aiming to increase the availability and hence the use of [(11)C]choline, [(11)C]methionine and [(11)C]acetate in clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of the clinical research coordinator – data manager – in oncology clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Hernando, Teresa; Sanz, Juan-Luis; López-Alonso, Antonio; Salamanca, Oscar; Camps, Carlos; Rosell, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the standard tasks performed by clinical research coordinators (CRCs) in oncology clinical trials. Methods Forty-one CRCs were anonymously surveyed, using a four-page self-administered questionnaire focused on demographics, qualifications, and professional experience. The survey questions on responsibilities consisted of an ad-hoc 32-item questionnaire where respondents had to rate the frequency of involvement in the listed activities using a 3-point scale. We defined as "standard" a task that was rated as "in all or nearly all trials" by at least half of the respondents. Results A response rate of 90% (37 out of 41) was achieved after two mailings. Less than half of the respondents had received additional training in oncology, clinical research or Good Clinical Practices (GCP). Overall, all standard tasks performed by CRCs were in the category of "monitoring activities" (those usually performed by a Clinical Research Associate "CRA") and included patient registration/randomization, recruitment follow-up, case report form completion, collaboration with the CRA, serious adverse events reporting, handling of investigator files, and preparing the site for and/or attending audits. Conclusions CRCs play a key role in the implementation of oncology clinical trials, which goes far beyond mere data collection and/or administrative support, and directly contributes to the gathering of good quality data. PMID:15043760

  18. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: An American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology Focused Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Recht, Abram; Comen, Elizabeth A; Fine, Richard E; Fleming, Gini F; Hardenbergh, Patricia H; Ho, Alice Y; Hudis, Clifford A; Hwang, E Shelley; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Morrow, Monica; Salerno, Kilian E; Sledge, George W; Solin, Lawrence J; Spears, Patricia A; Whelan, Timothy J; Somerfield, Mark R; Edge, Stephen B

    2016-12-20

    Purpose A joint American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology panel convened to develop a focused update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline concerning use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Methods A recent systematic literature review by Cancer Care Ontario provided the primary evidentiary basis. The joint panel also reviewed targeted literature searches to identify new, potentially practice-changing data. Recommendations The panel unanimously agreed that available evidence shows that PMRT reduces the risks of locoregional failure (LRF), any recurrence, and breast cancer mortality for patients with T1-2 breast cancer with one to three positive axillary nodes. However, some subsets of these patients are likely to have such a low risk of LRF that the absolute benefit of PMRT is outweighed by its potential toxicities. In addition, the acceptable ratio of benefit to toxicity varies among patients and physicians. Thus, the decision to recommend PMRT requires a great deal of clinical judgment. The panel agreed clinicians making such recommendations for individual patients should consider factors that may decrease the risk of LRF, attenuate the benefit of reduced breast cancer-specific mortality, and/or increase risk of complications resulting from PMRT. When clinicians and patients elect to omit axillary dissection after a positive sentinel node biopsy, the panel recommends that these patients receive PMRT only if there is already sufficient information to justify its use without needing to know additional axillary nodes are involved. Patients with axillary nodal involvement after neoadjuvant systemic therapy should receive PMRT. The panel recommends treatment generally be administered to both the internal mammary nodes and the supraclavicular-axillary apical nodes in addition to the chest wall or reconstructed breast.

  19. Combination chemotherapy for advanced sarcomas of bone and mesothelioma utilizing rubidazone and DTIC: a Southwest Oncology Group Study.

    PubMed

    Zidar, B L; Benjamin, R S; Frank, J; Lane, M; Baker, L H

    1983-02-01

    Twenty-three patients with disseminated bony sarcoma and 23 patients with malignant mesothelioma were evaluable in a Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) clinical trial utilizing rubidazone and DTIC. One partial remission (PR) was observed in a previously untreated patient with metastatic Ewing's sarcoma. One patient with giant cell tumor of bone had an improvement, short of PR. Thirteen patients with osteogenic sarcoma and 23 with malignant mesothelioma had no response to this combination of drugs. The major toxic effects of therapy included nausea, vomiting, and myelosuppression, especially leukopenia; no cardiac toxicity was noted. We conclude that the combination of rubidazone and DTIC is inactive in bony sarcoma and mesothelioma.

  20. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and treatment in patients with cancer: american society of clinical oncology clinical practice guideline update 2014.

    PubMed

    Lyman, Gary H; Bohlke, Kari; Khorana, Alok A; Kuderer, Nicole M; Lee, Agnes Y; Arcelus, Juan Ignacio; Balaban, Edward P; Clarke, Jeffrey M; Flowers, Christopher R; Francis, Charles W; Gates, Leigh E; Kakkar, Ajay K; Key, Nigel S; Levine, Mark N; Liebman, Howard A; Tempero, Margaret A; Wong, Sandra L; Somerfield, Mark R; Falanga, Anna

    2015-02-20

    To provide current recommendations about the prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with cancer. PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and clinical practice guidelines from November 2012 through July 2014. An update committee reviewed the identified abstracts. Of the 53 publications identified and reviewed, none prompted a change in the 2013 recommendations. Most hospitalized patients with active cancer require thromboprophylaxis throughout hospitalization. Routine thromboprophylaxis is not recommended for patients with cancer in the outpatient setting. It may be considered for selected high-risk patients. Patients with multiple myeloma receiving antiangiogenesis agents with chemotherapy and/or dexamethasone should receive prophylaxis with either low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or low-dose aspirin. Patients undergoing major surgery should receive prophylaxis starting before surgery and continuing for at least 7 to 10 days. Extending prophylaxis up to 4 weeks should be considered in those undergoing major abdominal or pelvic surgery with high-risk features. LMWH is recommended for the initial 5 to 10 days of treatment for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism as well as for long-term secondary prophylaxis (at least 6 months). Use of novel oral anticoagulants is not currently recommended for patients with malignancy and VTE because of limited data in patients with cancer. Anticoagulation should not be used to extend survival of patients with cancer in the absence of other indications. Patients with cancer should be periodically assessed for VTE risk. Oncology professionals should educate patients about the signs and symptoms of VTE. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Does time interval between surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy administration in advanced ovarian cancer carry a prognostic impact? An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group study ancillary study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Soto, Arlene E; Java, James J; Nieves Neira, Wilberto; Pearson, J Matthew; Cohn, David E; Lele, Shashikant B; Tewari, Krishnansu S; Walker, Joan L; Alvarez Secord, Angeles; Armstrong, Deborah K; Copeland, Larry J

    2016-12-01

    To determine the relationship of the time from surgery to intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy (TSIC) initiation with survival of patients with stage III epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients using ancillary data from cooperative group clinical trials. Data from 420 patients with stage III EOC treated with IP chemotherapy under GOG-0114 and 172 were reviewed. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to evaluate independent prognostic factors and estimate their covariate-adjusted effects on PFS and OS. The median TSIC was 62.5days (interquartile range 28-83). The median TSIC was longer for patients in GOG-0114 vs those in GOG-172 (83 vs 26days, p<0.001). TSIC was significantly associated (p=0.049) with PFS: each 10% increase in TSIC (days) decreases the risk of progression by 3%. TSIC was not significantly associated with OS in this model. In a linear regression model, gross residual disease was significantly associated with shorter TSIC (R(2) -0.141, 95%CI -0.217, -0.064, p<0.001). When only data from GOG-172 were considered, no statistical significant association was found between TSIC and PFS or OS. In this ancillary data study, TSIC was not associated with improved OS in patients with stage III epithelial ovarian cancer. TSIC was significantly associated with PFS for the entire cohort, suggesting increase in PFS with longer TSIC. However, this was not found when only data from GOG 172 or GOG 114 were analyzed separately. Hence, the relationship between IP chemotherapy initiation and time from surgery needs to be studied further. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Using the New ASCO Clinical Practice Guideline for Palliative Care Concurrent With Oncology Care Using the TEAM Approach.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cardinale B; Phillips, Tanyanika; Smith, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Palliative care alongside usual oncology care is now recommended by ASCO as the standard of care for any patient with advanced cancer on the basis of multiple randomized trials that show better results with concurrent care than with usual oncology care. Some benefits include better quality of life, better symptom management, reduced anxiety and depression, less caregiver distress, more accordance of care with the wishes of the patient, and less aggressive end-of-life care. Several studies show a survival advantage of several months, and many show considerable cost savings: better care at an affordable cost. However, there are not enough palliative care specialists available, so oncologists must practice exemplary primary palliative care. Protocols used in the clinical trials, similar to those designed for new chemotherapy agents, help oncologists use the TEAM approach of extra time, typically an hour a month spent with the palliative care team; education, especially about prognostic awareness and realistic options, which include formal setting of goals of care and discussion of advance directives; formal assessments for symptoms and for spiritual and psychosocial health; and management by an interdisciplinary team. These are all potentially accomplished by an oncology practice to replicate the services provided by concurrent palliative care.

  3. Phase 3 Oncology Clinical Trials in South Africa: Experimentation or Therapeutic Misconception?

    PubMed

    Malan, Tina; Moodley, Keymanthri

    2016-02-01

    Although clinical research in oncology is vital to improve current understanding of cancer and to validate new treatment options, voluntary informed consent is a critical component. Oncology research participants are a particularly vulnerable population; hence, therapeutic misconception often leads to ethical and legal challenges. We conducted a qualitative study administering semi-structured questionnaires on 29 adult, Phase 3, oncology clinical trial participants at three different private oncology clinical trial sites in South Africa. A descriptive content analysis was performed to identify perceptions of these participants regarding Phase 3 clinical trials. We found that most participants provided consent to be included in the trial for self-benefit. More than half of the participants had a poor understanding of Phase 3 clinical trials, and almost half the participants believed the clinical trial did not pose any significant risk to them. The word "hope" was used frequently by participants, displaying clear optimism with regard to the clinical trial and its outcome. This indicated that therapeutic misconception does occur in the South African oncology research setting and has the potential to lead to underestimation of the risks of a Phase 3 clinical trial. Emphasizing the experimental nature of a clinical trial during the consent process is critical to address therapeutic misconception in oncology research.

  4. Phase II Trial Assessing the Ability of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy With or Without Second-Look Surgery to Eliminate Measurable Disease for Nongerminomatous Germ Cell Tumors: A Children's Oncology Group Study.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Stewart; Bouffet, Eric; Fisher, Paul G; Allen, Jeffrey C; Robertson, Patricia L; Chuba, Paul J; Donahue, Bernadine; Kretschmar, Cynthia S; Zhou, Tianni; Buxton, Allen B; Pollack, Ian F

    2015-08-01

    This phase II trial evaluated the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without second-look surgery before craniospinal irradiation on response rates and survival outcomes in children with newly diagnosed non-germinomatous germ cell tumors. Induction chemotherapy consisted of six cycles of carboplatin/etoposide alternating with ifosfamide/etoposide. Patients demonstrating less than complete response after induction chemotherapy were encouraged to undergo second-look surgery. Patients who did not achieve complete response or partial response after chemotherapy with or without second-look surgery proceeded to high-dose chemotherapy with thiotepa and etoposide and autologous peripheral blood stem-cell rescue before craniospinal irradiation. The study included 102 patients treated between January 2004 and July 2008. Median age was 12 years, and 76% were male; 53.9% had pineal region masses, and 23.5% had suprasellar lesions. Sixty-nine percent of patients achieved complete response or partial response with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. At 5 years, event-free survival was 84% ± 4% (SE) and overall survival was 93% ± 3%. During the median follow-up of 5.1 years, 16 patients recurred or progressed, with seven deaths after relapse. No deaths were attributed to therapy-related toxicity. Relapse occurred at the site of primary disease in 10 patients, at a distant site in three patients, or both in one patient. In two patients, progression was detected by marker increase alone. Increased serum α-fetoprotein was a negative prognostic variable. Histologic subtype and increase of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin were not significantly correlated with worse outcomes. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without second-look surgery achieved high response rates contributing to excellent survival outcomes in children with newly diagnosed non-germinomatous germ cell tumors. This regimen should be included as a backbone for further studies. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical

  5. Developing and implementing a complex Complementary and Alternative (CAM) nursing intervention for breast and gynecologic cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy--report from the CONGO (complementary nursing in gynecologic oncology) study.

    PubMed

    Klafke, Nadja; Mahler, Cornelia; von Hagens, Cornelia; Blaser, Gisela; Bentner, Martina; Joos, Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a complex nursing intervention including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for breast and gynecologic cancer patients during chemotherapy to improve quality of life. Data sources Theoretical framework and concepts, practical nursing knowledge, and evidence-based studies were compiled in interprofessional meetings. Data synthesis The final complex intervention consists of three autonomous, but interacting components: (1) CAM nursing package, (2) resource-oriented counseling, and (3) evidence-based information material on CAM. CAM interventions include acupressure, aromatherapy, compress, and massage, targeting 14 clinically relevant symptoms during chemotherapy. Participants receive these interventions during chemotherapy with instructions for self care. During a counseling interview, the patient's needs and preferences are assessed by trained nurses. Furthermore, participants are equipped with evidence-based information material (booklet and DVD). Prior to study start, nurses attended training modules for administering CAM therapies and for communicating and counseling within the salutogenic approach. It was possible to design a multimodal CAM nursing intervention based on a theoretical concept, evidence-based studies, and practical nursing experience targeting the prevention or relief of side-effects women suffer during chemotherapy. The systematic analysis of the CONGO study will contribute to evidence-based CAM nursing care within supportive cancer care. Oncology nurses play an important role in supportive CAM care of breast and gynecologic cancer patients in daily clinical practice. Within oncology outpatient services, the implementation of evidence-based CAM nursing interventions and counseling may contribute to understand the impact of nursing on patient quality of life and symptom relief. This can lead to a new understanding of the nurse's professional role.

  6. Outbreak of Pantoea agglomerans Bloodstream Infections at an Oncology Clinic-Illinois, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Brian R; Dantes, Raymund; Tsai, Victoria; Lim, Rachel; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Arduino, Matthew; Jensen, Bette; Patel, Megan Toth; Vernon, Michael O; Grant-Greene, Yoran; Christiansen, Demian; Conover, Craig; Kallen, Alexander; Guh, Alice Y

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the source of a healthcare-associated outbreak of Pantoea agglomerans bloodstream infections. DESIGN Epidemiologic investigation of the outbreak. SETTING Oncology clinic (clinic A). METHODS Cases were defined as Pantoea isolation from blood or catheter tip cultures of clinic A patients during July 2012-May 2013. Clinic A medical charts and laboratory records were reviewed; infection prevention practices and the facility's water system were evaluated. Environmental samples were collected for culture. Clinical and environmental P. agglomerans isolates were compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. RESULTS Twelve cases were identified; median (range) age was 65 (41-78) years. All patients had malignant tumors and had received infusions at clinic A. Deficiencies in parenteral medication preparation and handling were identified (eg, placing infusates near sinks with potential for splash-back contamination). Facility inspection revealed substantial dead-end water piping and inadequate chlorine residual in tap water from multiple sinks, including the pharmacy clean room sink. P. agglomerans was isolated from composite surface swabs of 7 sinks and an ice machine; the pharmacy clean room sink isolate was indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis from 7 of 9 available patient isolates. CONCLUSIONS Exposure of locally prepared infusates to a contaminated pharmacy sink caused the outbreak. Improvements in parenteral medication preparation, including moving chemotherapy preparation offsite, along with terminal sink cleaning and water system remediation ended the outbreak. Greater awareness of recommended medication preparation and handling practices as well as further efforts to better define the contribution of contaminated sinks and plumbing deficiencies to healthcare-associated infections are needed. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:314-319.

  7. Chemotherapy Order Entry by a Clinical Support Pharmacy Technician in an Outpatient Medical Day Unit

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Heather; Broadfield, Larry; Harding, Claudia; Heukshorst, Shelley; Sweetapple, Jennifer; Rolle, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pharmacy technicians are expanding their scope of practice, often in partnership with pharmacists. In oncology, such a shift in responsibilities may lead to workflow efficiencies, but may also cause concerns about patient risk and medication errors. Objectives: The primary objective was to compare the time spent on order entry and order-entry checking before and after training of a clinical support pharmacy technician (CSPT) to perform chemotherapy order entry. The secondary objectives were to document workflow interruptions and to assess medication errors. Methods: This before-and-after observational study investigated chemotherapy order entry for ambulatory oncology patients. Order entry was performed by pharmacists before the process change (phase 1) and by 1 CSPT after the change (phase 2); order-entry checking was performed by a pharmacist during both phases. The tasks were timed by an independent observer using a personal digital assistant. A convenience sample of 125 orders was targeted for each phase. Data were exported to Microsoft Excel software, and timing differences for each task were tested with an unpaired t test. Results: Totals of 143 and 128 individual orders were timed for order entry during phase 1 (pharmacist) and phase 2 (CSPT), respectively. The mean total time to perform order entry was greater during phase 1 (1:37 min versus 1:20 min; p = 0.044). Totals of 144 and 122 individual orders were timed for order-entry checking (by a pharmacist) in phases 1 and 2, respectively, and there was no difference in mean total time for order-entry checking (1:21 min versus 1:20 min; p = 0.69). There were 33 interruptions not related to order entry (totalling 39:38 min) during phase 1 and 25 interruptions (totalling 30:08 min) during phase 2. Three errors were observed during order entry in phase 1 and one error during order-entry checking in phase 2; the errors were rated as having no effect on patient care. Conclusions: Chemotherapy order

  8. Chemotherapy Order Entry by a Clinical Support Pharmacy Technician in an Outpatient Medical Day Unit.

    PubMed

    Neville, Heather; Broadfield, Larry; Harding, Claudia; Heukshorst, Shelley; Sweetapple, Jennifer; Rolle, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacy technicians are expanding their scope of practice, often in partnership with pharmacists. In oncology, such a shift in responsibilities may lead to workflow efficiencies, but may also cause concerns about patient risk and medication errors. The primary objective was to compare the time spent on order entry and order-entry checking before and after training of a clinical support pharmacy technician (CSPT) to perform chemotherapy order entry. The secondary objectives were to document workflow interruptions and to assess medication errors. This before-and-after observational study investigated chemotherapy order entry for ambulatory oncology patients. Order entry was performed by pharmacists before the process change (phase 1) and by 1 CSPT after the change (phase 2); order-entry checking was performed by a pharmacist during both phases. The tasks were timed by an independent observer using a personal digital assistant. A convenience sample of 125 orders was targeted for each phase. Data were exported to Microsoft Excel software, and timing differences for each task were tested with an unpaired t test. Totals of 143 and 128 individual orders were timed for order entry during phase 1 (pharmacist) and phase 2 (CSPT), respectively. The mean total time to perform order entry was greater during phase 1 (1:37 min versus 1:20 min; p = 0.044). Totals of 144 and 122 individual orders were timed for order-entry checking (by a pharmacist) in phases 1 and 2, respectively, and there was no difference in mean total time for order-entry checking (1:21 min versus 1:20 min; p = 0.69). There were 33 interruptions not related to order entry (totalling 39:38 min) during phase 1 and 25 interruptions (totalling 30:08 min) during phase 2. Three errors were observed during order entry in phase 1 and one error during order-entry checking in phase 2; the errors were rated as having no effect on patient care. Chemotherapy order entry by a trained CSPT appeared to be just as safe and

  9. Porphyrin and nonporphyrin photosensitizers in oncology: preclinical and clinical advances in photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Aisling E; Gallagher, William M; Byrne, Annette T

    2009-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is now a well-recognized modality for the treatment of cancer. While PDT has developed progressively over the last century, great advances have been observed in the field in recent years. The concept of dual selectivity of PDT agents is now widely accepted due to the relative specificity and selectivity of PDT along with the absence of harmful side effects often encountered with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Traditionally, porphyrin-based photosensitizers have dominated the PDT field but these first generation photosensitizers have several disadvantages, with poor light absorption and cutaneous photosensitivity being the predominant side effects. As a result, the requirement for new photosensitizers, including second generation porphyrins and porphyrin derivatives as well as third generation photosensitizers has arisen, with the aim of alleviating the problems encountered with first generation porphyrins and improving the efficacy of PDT. The investigation of nonporphyrin photosensitizers for the development of novel PDT agents has been considerably less extensive than porphyrin-based compounds; however, structural modification of nonporphyrin photosensitizers has allowed for manipulation of the photochemotherapeutic properties. The aim of this review is to provide an insight into PDT photosensitizers clinically approved for application in oncology, as well as those which show significant potential in ongoing preclinical studies.

  10. Integrative oncology drug discovery accompanied by preclinical translational research as prerequisite for clinical development.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jens

    2014-06-01

    The molecular heterogeneity of cancer calls for individualized therapies to become the standard of care. It is now generally accepted that target-specific compounds require specific new development programs. But, even for new drugs with general mode of action (i.e., chemotherapy), tailored treatment approaches, such as specific schedules or combinations, have been shown to improve the therapeutic outcome. Therefore, the preclinical development of new therapeutic agents needs, next to the "classical pharmacodynamic studies", the implementation of integrative translational research (TR) as early as possible. New TR approaches, starting already at target identification and validation (TIV) will allow to defining the optimal patient population for clinical development, to tailor individual treatment of the tumor disease and to choose a rational basis among the manifold options for treatment combinations. We will discuss several examples from TR studies, which have initially been started to evaluate the molecular mode of action and to recognize mechanisms which can lead to resistance. Research was extended later to identify predictive response biomarkers and establish a rationale for combination with different therapies. A detailed gene expression analysis of lung cancer cells and apoptotic pathway interference studies in colon cancer cells provided insight in the molecular mechanisms of action. These new findings are correlated with results from other studies performed during the preclinical development program. We discuss pros and cons, successes and failures of our integrative preclinical development program and provide recommendations for future oncology projects.

  11. Detailed prospective peer review in a community radiation oncology clinic.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, James D; Chesnut, Thomas J; Eastham, David V; Demandante, Carlo N; Hoopes, David J

    In 2012, we instituted detailed prospective peer review of new cases. We present the outcomes of peer review on patient management and time required for peer review. Peer review rounds were held 3 to 4 days weekly and required 2 physicians to review pertinent information from the electronic medical record and treatment planning system. Eight aspects were reviewed for each case: 1) workup and staging; 2) treatment intent and prescription; 3) position, immobilization, and simulation; 4) motion assessment and management; 5) target contours; 6) normal tissue contours; 7) target dosimetry; and 8) normal tissue dosimetry. Cases were marked as, "Meets standard of care," "Variation," or "Major deviation." Changes in treatment plan were noted. As our process evolved, we recorded the time spent reviewing each case. From 2012 to 2014, we collected peer review data on 442 of 465 (95%) radiation therapy patients treated in our hospital-based clinic. Overall, 91 (20.6%) of the cases were marked as having a variation, and 3 (0.7%) as major deviation. Forty-two (9.5%) of the cases were altered after peer review. An overall peer review score of "Variation" or "Major deviation" was highly associated with a change in treatment plan (P < .01). Changes in target contours were recommended in 10% of cases. Gastrointestinal cases were significantly associated with a change in treatment plan after peer review. Indicators on position, immobilization, simulation, target contours, target dosimetry, motion management, normal tissue contours, and normal tissue dosimetry were significantly associated with a change in treatment plan. The mean time spent on each case was 7 minutes. Prospective peer review is feasible in a community radiation oncology practice. Our process led to changes in 9.5% of cases. Peer review should focus on technical factors such as target contours and dosimetry. Peer review required 7 minutes per case. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Photodynamic therapy in oncology: mechanisms and clinical use.

    PubMed

    Pass, H I

    1993-03-17

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), a sensitizer, light, and oxygen are used to cause photochemically induced cell death. The mechanism of cytotoxicity involves generation of singlet oxygen and other free radicals when the light-excited sensitizer loses or accepts an electron. Although selective retention of sensitizer by malignant tissue is seen in vivo, the mechanisms for this sensitizer targeting remain unclear. The first-generation sensitizers are porphyrin based and vary in lipophilicity and hydrophilicity. Targeting of the vasculature seems to be a prominent feature of the cytotoxic effect of these sensitizers in vivo, with resulting necrosis. Treatment depth varies with the wavelength of light that activates the sensitizer used, and the second-generation sensitizers are activated at longer wavelengths, allowing for a 30% increase in treatment depths. The selectivity of targeting can be increased when the sensitizer is delivered with the use of liposomes or monoclonal antibodies specific for tumor antigens. Studies have demonstrated direct effects of PDT on immune effector cells, specifically those with lineage from macrophages or other monocytes. Clinically, this therapy has been chiefly used for palliation of endobronchial and esophageal obstruction, as well as for treatment of bladder carcinomas, skin malignancies, and brain tumors. The future of PDT rests in defining its use either as an intraoperative adjuvant to marginal surgical procedures or as a primary treatment for superficial malignancies. Phase III trials in esophageal cancer and lung cancer are in progress and will help in evaluation of whether Photofrin II, the most widely used sensitizer, can be added to the oncologic armamentarium, pending approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  13. Funding oncology clinical trials: are cooperative group trials sustainable?

    PubMed

    Seow, Hsien-Yeang; Whelan, Patrick; Levine, Mark N; Cowan, Kathryn; Lysakowski, Barbara; Kowaleski, Brenda; Snider, Anne; Xu, Rebecca Y; Arnold, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Many oncology clinical trials departments (CTDs) are in serious fiscal deficit and their sustainability is in jeopardy. This study investigates whether the payment models used to fund industry versus cooperative group trials contribute to the fiscal deficit of a CTD. We examined the lifetime costs of all cooperative group and industry trials activated in the CTD of a cancer center between 2007 and 2011. A trial's lifetime is defined as being from the date the first patient was accrued until the last patient's actual or projected final follow-up visit. For each trial, we calculated the lifetime monthly net income, which was defined as monthly revenue minus monthly costs. Data sources included study protocols, trial budgets, and accrual data. Of the 97 trials analyzed, 64 (66%) were cooperative group trials. The pattern of lifetime net income for cooperative group trials has a positive peak during patient accrual followed by a negative trough during follow-up. In contrast, the pattern for industry trials resembled an "l" shape. The patterns reflect the differing payment models: upfront lump-sum payments (cooperative group) versus milestone payments (industry). The negative trough in the lifetime net income of a cooperative group trial occurs because follow-up costs are typically not funded or are underfunded. CTDs accrue more patients in new trials to offset that deficit. The CTD uses revenue from accrual to existing trials to cross-subsidize past trials in follow-up. As the number of patients on follow-up increases, the fiscal deficit grows larger each year, perpetuating the cycle.

  14. HER2 Testing and Clinical Decision Making in Gastroesophageal Adenocarcinoma: Guideline From the College of American Pathologists, American Society for Clinical Pathology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Angela N; Washington, Mary Kay; Ventura, Christina B; Ismaila, Nofisat; Colasacco, Carol; Benson, Al B; Carrato, Alfredo; Gulley, Margaret L; Jain, Dhanpat; Kakar, Sanjay; Mackay, Helen J; Streutker, Catherine; Tang, Laura; Troxell, Megan; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2016-12-01

    ERBB2 (erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 or HER2) is currently the only biomarker established for selection of a specific therapy for patients with advanced gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma (GEA). However, there are no comprehensive guidelines for the assessment of HER2 in patients with GEA. To establish an evidence-based guideline for HER2 testing in patients with GEA, to formalize the algorithms for methods to improve the accuracy of HER2 testing while addressing which patients and tumor specimens are appropriate, and to provide guidance on clinical decision making. The College of American Pathologists, American Society for Clinical Pathology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology convened an expert panel to conduct a systematic review of the literature to develop an evidence-based guideline with recommendations for optimal HER2 testing in patients with GEA. The panel is proposing 11 recommendations with strong agreement from the open-comment participants. The panel recommends that tumor specimen(s) from all patients with advanced GEA, who are candidates for HER2-targeted therapy, should be assessed for HER2 status before the initiation of HER2-targeted therapy. Clinicians should offer combination chemotherapy and a HER2-targeted agent as initial therapy for all patients with HER2-positive advanced GEA. For pathologists, guidance is provided for morphologic selection of neoplastic tissue, testing algorithms, scoring methods, interpretation and reporting of results, and laboratory quality assurance. This guideline provides specific recommendations for assessment of HER2 in patients with advanced GEA while addressing pertinent technical issues and clinical implications of the results. © 2016 College of American Pathologists, American Society for Clinical Pathology, and the American Society of Clinical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. [Clinical experience with chemotherapy of the malignant tumor of germinal cells (dysgerminoma) of the ovary].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Torres, Nicolás; Basavilvazo Rodríguez, María Antonia; Téllez Márquez, Alejandro; Robles Robles, Germán; Lemus Rocha, Roberto; Hernández Valencia, Marcelino

    2004-10-01

    To evaluate two alternative plans of chemotherapy with EP (etoposide, platinum) and BEP (bleomycin, etoposide, platinum) after oncological surgery. A clinical, longitudinal and descriptive study was done, where the cases with pure dysgerminoma diagnosed in the gynecology-oncology service during the years from 1992 to 2003 were included. Information was recollected in a precoding survey that included sociodemographic characteristics, tumor size, free survival of disease, general survival, recurrence index and the index of fertility. The age of the group studied was of 22.1 +/- 6.5 years, with stratification to 9 patients in phase I (50%), phase III in 7 patients (38.9%) and phase IV in 2 patients (11.1%). Histological study confirmed the pure dysgerminoma, with a mean duration of the symptoms of 5.2 months, the free survival of disease was of 39.6 months and general survival was of 49.5 months. It was administered early chemotherapy in 11 patients, from which 7 received EP and the other 4 received BEP. Eight patients were found in advanced phases and with metastasis. There were 4 (22.2%) recurrences, of which 3 corresponded to phase III and a case to phase IV with tumors all of them over 15 cm. There were 3 patients rescued with chemotherapy of second line and a patient with radiotherapy to central nervous system. The statistical analysis showed that size of tumor among the recurrent group (24.2 cm) and the group without recurrence (14.5 cm) had significant differences (p = 0.018), the size of the tumor and the free survival of disease did not have significant correlation (p = 0.99), but upon comparing the general survival with the phase of the disease, a significant correlation was found (p = 0.03), where the survival to 5 years was observed in 6 cases (33.3%), of which a case was treated with surgery and without chemotherapy, 4 cases with EP and a case with BEP. Out of the 11 cases treated with conservative surgery, two patients got pregnancy in three occasions.

  16. Implementing effective and sustainable multidisciplinary clinical thoracic oncology programs

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Richard K.; Krasna, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Three models of care are described, including two models of multidisciplinary care for thoracic malignancies. The pros and cons of each model are discussed, the evidence supporting each is reviewed, and the need for more (and better) research into care delivery models is highlighted. Key stakeholders in thoracic oncology care delivery outcomes are identified, and the need to consider stakeholder perspectives in designing, validating and implementing multidisciplinary programs as a vehicle for quality improvement in thoracic oncology is emphasized. The importance of reconciling stakeholder perspectives, and identify meaningful stakeholder-relevant benchmarks is also emphasized. Metrics for measuring program implementation and overall success are proposed. PMID:26380186

  17. Risk of Febrile Neutropenia Associated With Select Myelosuppressive Chemotherapy Regimens in a Large Community-Based Oncology Practice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanli; Family, Leila; Yang, Su-Jau; Klippel, Zandra; Page, John H; Chao, Chun

    2017-09-01

    Background: NCCN has classified commonly used chemotherapy regimens into high (>20%), intermediate (10%-20%), or low (<10%) febrile neutropenia (FN) risk categories based primarily on clinical trial evidence. Many chemotherapy regimens, however, remain unclassified by NCCN or lack FN incidence data in real-world clinical practice. Patients and Methods: We evaluated incidence proportions of FN and grade 4 and 3/4 neutropenia during the first chemotherapy course among patients from Kaiser Permanente Southern California who received selected chemotherapy regimens without well-established FN risk. Patients given granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) prophylaxis were excluded. Sensitivity analyses were performed to account for FN misclassification and censoring. Results: From 2008 to 2013, 1,312 patients with breast cancer who received docetaxel and cyclophosphamide (TC; n=853) or docetaxel, carboplatin, and trastuzumab (TCH; n=459); 1,321 patients with colorectal cancer who received capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX; n=401) or leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX6; n=920); 307 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who received bendamustine with or without rituximab; and 181 patients with multiple myeloma who received lenalidomide with or without dexamethasone were included. Crude FN risk was >20% for both breast cancer regimens (TC and TCH). Crude FN risks for XELOX, FOLFOX6, bendamustine, and lenalidomide were <10%; however, when potential FN misclassification and censoring were considered, FN risks were >10%. Conclusions: Our results support published literature highlighting the real-world, "high" FN risk of the TC and TCH regimens for breast cancer. There is strong suggestive evidence that FN risks for XELOX, FOLFOX6, bendamustine, and lenalidomide are >10%. Calculation of chemotherapy course-level FN incidence without controlling for differential censoring for patients who discontinued regimens early, or possible FN misclassification, might

  18. Music therapy services in pediatric oncology: a national clinical practice review.

    PubMed

    Tucquet, Belinda; Leung, Maggie

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national clinical practice review conducted in Australia of music therapy services in pediatric oncology hospitals. Literature specifically related to music therapy and symptom management in pediatric oncology is reviewed. The results from a national benchmarking survey distributed to all music therapists working with children with cancer in Australian pediatric hospitals are discussed. Patient and family feedback provided from a quality improvement activity conducted at a major pediatric tertiary hospital is summarized, and considerations for future growth as a profession and further research is proposed. © 2014 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  19. Prospective roles for Canadian oncology nurses in breast cancer rapid diagnostic clinics.

    PubMed

    Zanchetta, M S; Maheu, C; Baku, L; Wedderburn, P J S; Lemonde, M

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of rapid diagnostic clinics for breast cancer increases oncology nurses' (ONs) responsibility for patient education and coordination of multidisciplinary care. Developed as an outcome of the E-Mentorship Oncology Nursing Program, this paper proposes new roles for these nurses to respond effectively and competently to such diagnostic innovation. The Oslo Manual Conceptual Framework of Innovation inspired the idea of change in prospective ONs' roles, corroborated by the Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology's Standards of Practice and Competencies. New roles for ONs that are informed by the domain of information dynamics and evidence-based care are proposed.

  20. C-arm cone-beam computed tomography in interventional oncology: technical aspects and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Floridi, Chiara; Radaelli, Alessandro; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Grass, Micheal; Lin, Ming De; Chiaradia, Melanie; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Kobeiter, Hishman; Squillaci, Ettore; Maleux, Geert; Giovagnoni, Andrea; Brunese, Luca; Wood, Bradford; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Rotondo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a new imaging technology integrated in modern angiographic systems. Due to its ability to obtain cross-sectional imaging and the possibility to use dedicated planning and navigation software, it provides an informed platform for interventional oncology procedures. In this paper, we highlight the technical aspects and clinical applications of CBCT imaging and navigation in the most common loco-regional oncological treatments. PMID:25012472

  1. Screening for domestic violence in an oncology clinic: barriers and potential solutions.

    PubMed

    Owen-Smith, Ashli; Hathaway, Jeanne; Roche, Maria; Gioiella, Marie Elena; Whall-Strojwas, Denise; Silverman, Jay

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the implementation of a domestic violence screening protocol in an oncology clinic. A retrospective review of a random sample of clinic medical records and qualitative surveys of nursing staff. A gynecologic oncology clinic in a large teaching hospital. 204 charts were abstracted and six oncology nurses completed surveys. A random sample of patients from clinic appointment schedules was selected 6 and 12 months after the implementation of a domestic violence screening protocol. A brief written survey of nursing staff also was conducted. Documentation of domestic violence screening, barriers to screening and documentation, and potential solutions to the barriers. Sixty-three percent of the charts reviewed had a domestic violence screening record present, but only 12% of the charts with a screening record had documentation. Patients with domestic violence screening documentation were more likely to have had five or more clinic visits during the study period. The most frequent barriers to protocol implementation cited by nursing staff were forgetting to screen or document domestic violence screening. Nursing staff recommended adding domestic violence screening questions to forms and providing reminders to screen. Several barriers to successful implementation of a domestic violence screening protocol in a gynecologic oncology clinic, including documentation issues, were encountered. Nurses interested in implementing a domestic violence screening protocol in their oncology clinic should consider reviewing the barriers to domestic violence screening and documentation and the potential solutions identified in this study.

  2. Preliminary report: the development of the NCCN Comparative Therapeutic Index™ as a clinical evaluative process for existing data in oncology.

    PubMed

    Li, Edward C; DeMartino, Jessica

    2010-08-01

    The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) develops and communicates the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) to oncologists and other clinicians. The NCCN Guidelines are widely recognized and applied as the standard for clinical policy in the United States. These guidelines and related documents, such as the NCCN Drugs & Biologics Compendium (NCCN Compendium), are used extensively by public and private payors as the basis for the setting of coverage policies. Given the demand for comparative effectiveness (CE) analyses, as described and discussed in this report, the NCCN has begun work on a paradigm to integrate evidence-based CE analysis into the NCCN Guidelines deliberative process. This report presents NCCN's initial thinking on the use of NCCN expert panel members in developing a process that can be used to compare health care technologies (e.g., radiation modalities, chemotherapy regimens) in a formal, systematic way. Draft considerations are provided to stimulate discussion and feedback, particularly in the oncology community, as NCCN moves through processes such as methodologic review, validation of rating scales, and review of implications for public policy, toward finalization of an NCCN CE analytic paradigm.

  3. Adjuvant systemic chemotherapy for stages II and III colon cancer after complete resection: a clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, B.M.; Cosby, R.; Quereshy, F.; Jonker, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Updated practice guidelines on adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected colon cancer are lacking. In 2008, Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care developed a guideline on adjuvant therapy for stages ii and iii colon cancer. With newer regimens being assessed in this patient population and older agents being either abandoned because of non-effectiveness or replaced by agents that are more efficacious, a full update of the original guideline was undertaken. Methods Literature searches (January 1987 to August 2015) of medline, embase, and the Cochrane Library were conducted; in addition, abstracts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the European Society for Medical Oncology, and the European Cancer Congress were reviewed (the latter for January 2007 to August 2015). A practice guideline was drafted that was then scrutinized by internal and external reviewers whose comments were incorporated into the final guideline. Results Twenty-six unique reports of eighteen randomized controlled trials and thirteen unique reports of twelve meta-analyses or pooled analyses were included in the evidence base. The 5 recommendations developed included 3 for stage ii colon cancer and 2 for stage iii colon cancer. Conclusions Patients with completely resected stage iii colon cancer should be offered adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5fu)–based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin (based on definitive data for improvements in survival and disease-free survival). Patients with resected stage ii colon cancer without “high-risk” features should not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. For patients with “high-risk” features, 5fu-based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin should be offered, although no clinical trials have been conducted to conclusively demonstrate the same benefits seen in stage iii colon cancer. PMID:28050138

  4. The importance of clinical grading of heart failure and other cardiac toxicities during chemotherapy: updating the common terminology criteria for clinical trial reporting.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Akm; Chen, Alice; Ivy, Percy; Lenihan, Daniel J; Kaltman, Jonathan; Taddei-Peters, Wendy; Remick, Scot C

    2011-07-01

    Although the use of chemotherapy and targeted therapy has improved the clinical benefit, progression-free survival, and overall survival of various cancers in recent years, old and new toxicities have limited their use. To balance the risk with the benefit of treatment, Common Toxicity Criteria and now Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) have been used by the oncology community for more than 20 years to assess toxicity from cancer treatment. This article details the description and grading of cardiac toxicities reported in association with cancer treatment and the use of CTCAE to assess them.

  5. Adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline endorsement.

    PubMed

    Freedland, Stephen J; Rumble, R Bryan; Finelli, Antonio; Chen, Ronald C; Slovin, Susan; Stein, Mark N; Mendelson, David S; Wackett, Colin; Sandler, Howard M

    2014-12-01

    To endorse the American Urological Association (AUA)/American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines developed by other professional organizations. The guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ASCO endorsement panel then reviewed the content and recommendations. The panel determined that the guideline recommendations on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy, published in August 2013, are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorsed the guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy, adding one qualifying statement that not all candidates for adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy have the same risk of recurrence or disease progression, and thus, risk-benefit ratios are not the same for all men. Those at the highest risk for recurrence after radical prostatectomy include men with seminal vesicle invasion, Gleason score 8 to 10, extensive positive margins, and detectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Physicians should discuss adjuvant radiotherapy with patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiotherapy with patients with PSA or local recurrence after prostatectomy. The discussion of radiotherapy should include possible short- and long-term adverse effects and potential benefits. The decision to administer radiotherapy should be made by the patient and multidisciplinary treatment team, keeping in mind that not all men are at equal risk of recurrence or clinically meaningful disease progression. Thus, the risk-benefit ratio will differ for each patient. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical

  6. Report on the use of non-clinical studies in the regulatory evaluation of oncology drugs.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Kawada, Manabu; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Saya, Hideyuki; Seimiya, Hiroyuki; Yao, Ryoji; Hayashi, Masahiro; Kai, Chieko; Matsuda, Akira; Naoe, Tomoki; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Okazaki, Taku; Saji, Hideo; Sata, Masataka; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Toi, Masakazu; Irimura, Tatsuro

    2016-02-01

    Non-clinical studies are necessary at each stage of the development of oncology drugs. Many experimental cancer models have been developed to investigate carcinogenesis, cancer progression, metastasis, and other aspects in cancer biology and these models turned out to be useful in the efficacy evaluation and the safety prediction of oncology drugs. While the diversity and the degree of engagement in genetic changes in the initiation of cancer cell growth and progression are widely accepted, it has become increasingly clear that the roles of host cells, tissue microenvironment, and the immune system also play important roles in cancer. Therefore, the methods used to develop oncology drugs should continuously be revised based on the advances in our understanding of cancer. In this review, we extensively summarize the effective use of those models, their advantages and disadvantages, ranges to be evaluated and limitations of the models currently used for the development and for the evaluation of oncology drugs.

  7. Evaluation of Employee Vaccination Policies in Outpatient Oncology Clinics: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Luthy, Karlen E; Stocksdale, Sarah L; Macintosh, Janelle L B; Eden, Lacey M; Beckstrand, Renea L; Edmonds, Katie

    2016-10-01

    All major hospital facilities in the state of Utah have employee vaccination policies. However, the presence of healthcare worker vaccination policies in outpatient oncology clinics was unknown. The objectives of this article are to identify oncology outpatient employee vaccination policies in Utah and to identify what consequences, if any, are present for unvaccinated employees. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study design in which clinic managers from outpatient oncology clinics were asked, via questionnaire, to describe the clinic's employee vaccination policy and the consequences for refusing the policy. Most vaccination policies applied to employees primarily assigned to work in the direct patient care area. Most commonly, influenza and hepatitis B vaccines were required as part of the vaccination policy. Most managers offered free vaccinations to employees, but most managers also allowed employees to refuse to follow the vaccination policy for medical, religious, or personal reasons.

  8. Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Sohal, Davendra P.S.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Khorana, Alok A.; Shah, Manish A.; Philip, Philip A.; O’Reilly, Eileen M.; Uronis, Hope E.; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.; Crane, Christopher H.; Engebretson, Anitra; Ruggiero, Joseph T.; Copur, Mehmet S.; Lau, Michelle; Urba, Susan; Laheru, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based recommendations to oncologists and others for the treatment of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. Methods American Society of Clinical Oncology convened an Expert Panel of medical oncology, radiation oncology, surgical oncology, gastroenterology, palliative care, and advocacy experts to conduct a systematic review of the literature from April 2004 to June 2015. Outcomes were overall survival, disease-free survival, progression-free survival, and adverse events. Results Twenty-four randomized controlled trials met the systematic review criteria. Recommendations A multiphase computed tomography scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis should be performed. Baseline performance status and comorbidity profile should be evaluated. Goals of care, patient preferences, treatment response, psychological status, support systems, and symptom burden should guide decisions for treatments. A palliative care referral should occur at first visit. FOLFIRINOX (leucovorin, fluorouracil, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin; favorable comorbidity profile) or gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound (NAB) -paclitaxel (adequate comorbidity profile) should be offered to patients with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) 0 to 1 based on patient preference and support system available. Gemcitabine alone is recommended for patients with ECOG PS 2 or with a comorbidity profile that precludes other regimens; the addition of capecitabine or erlotinib may be offered. Patients with an ECOG PS ≥ 3 and poorly controlled comorbid conditions should be offered cancer-directed therapy only on a case-by-case basis; supportive care should be emphasized. For second-line therapy, gemcitabine plus NAB-paclitaxel should be offered to patients with first-line treatment with FOLFIRINOX, an ECOG PS 0 to 1, and a favorable comorbidity profile; fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin, irinotecan, or nanoliposomal irinotecan should be offered to patients with

  9. Updates in non-small cell lung cancer - insights from the 2009 45th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We have reviewed the pivotal presentations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from the 2009 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. We have discussed the scientific data, the impact on standards of care, and ongoing clinical trials. In patients with early-stage NSCLC, there is still no data to support the superiority of either neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. However, adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy has sustained the survival benefits after median follow-up of more than 9 years. The first-line treatment with inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) could be considered for the treatment of EGFR mutated patients with metastatic disease. Several maintenance studies with cytotoxic or biological agents have also demonstrated promising outcomes. Finally, novel targeted agents such as inhibitors of histone deacetylase and multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor have shown promising activity in NSCLC treatment. PMID:20433767

  10. Differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics and quality of life outcomes among oncology patients with different types of pain.

    PubMed

    Posternak, Victoria; Dunn, Laura B; Dhruva, Anand; Paul, Steven M; Luce, Judith; Mastick, Judy; Levine, Jon D; Aouizerat, Bradley E; Hammer, Marylin; Wright, Fay; Miaskowski, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The purposes of this study, in oncology outpatients receiving chemotherapy (n = 926), were to: describe the occurrence of different types of pain (ie, no pain, only noncancer pain [NCP], only cancer pain [CP], or both CP and NCP) and evaluate for differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics, and quality of life (QOL) among the 4 groups. Patients completed self-report questionnaires on demographic and symptom characteristics and QOL. Patients who had pain were asked to indicate if it was or was not related to their cancer or its treatment. Medical records were reviewed for information on cancer and its treatments. In this study, 72.5% of the patients reported pain. Of the 671 who reported pain, 21.5% reported only NCP, 37.0% only CP, and 41.5% both CP and NCP. Across the 3 pain groups, worst pain scores were in the moderate to severe range. Compared with the no pain group, patients with both CP and NCP were significantly younger, more likely to be female, have a higher level of comorbidity, and a poorer functional status. In addition, these patients reported: higher levels of depression, anxiety, fatigue, and sleep disturbance; lower levels of energy and attentional function; and poorer QOL. Patients with only NCP were significantly older than the other 3 groups. The most common comorbidities in the NCP group were back pain, hypertension, osteoarthritis, and depression. Unrelieved CP and NCP continue to be significant problems. Oncology outpatients need to be assessed for both CP and NCP conditions.

  11. Companion diagnostics and molecular imaging-enhanced approaches for oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Van Heertum, Ronald L; Scarimbolo, Robert; Ford, Robert; Berdougo, Eli; O'Neal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, diagnostic approaches are helping pharmaceutical and biotechnology sponsors streamline the clinical trial process. Molecular assays and diagnostic imaging are routinely being used to stratify patients for treatment, monitor disease, and provide reliable early clinical phase assessments. The importance of diagnostic approaches in drug development is highlighted by the rapidly expanding global cancer diagnostics market and the emergent attention of regulatory agencies worldwide, who are beginning to offer more structured platforms and guidance for this area. In this paper, we highlight the key benefits of using companion diagnostics and diagnostic imaging with a focus on oncology clinical trials. Nuclear imaging using widely available radiopharmaceuticals in conjunction with molecular imaging of oncology targets has opened the door to more accurate disease assessment and the modernization of standard criteria for the evaluation, staging, and treatment responses of cancer patients. Furthermore, the introduction and validation of quantitative molecular imaging continues to drive and optimize the field of oncology diagnostics. Given their pivotal role in disease assessment and treatment, the validation and commercialization of diagnostic tools will continue to advance oncology clinical trials, support new oncology drugs, and promote better patient outcomes.

  12. Companion diagnostics and molecular imaging-enhanced approaches for oncology clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Van Heertum, Ronald L; Scarimbolo, Robert; Ford, Robert; Berdougo, Eli; O’Neal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, diagnostic approaches are helping pharmaceutical and biotechnology sponsors streamline the clinical trial process. Molecular assays and diagnostic imaging are routinely being used to stratify patients for treatment, monitor disease, and provide reliable early clinical phase assessments. The importance of diagnostic approaches in drug development is highlighted by the rapidly expanding global cancer diagnostics market and the emergent attention of regulatory agencies worldwide, who are beginning to offer more structured platforms and guidance for this area. In this paper, we highlight the key benefits of using companion diagnostics and diagnostic imaging with a focus on oncology clinical trials. Nuclear imaging using widely available radiopharmaceuticals in conjunction with molecular imaging of oncology targets has opened the door to more accurate disease assessment and the modernization of standard criteria for the evaluation, staging, and treatment responses of cancer patients. Furthermore, the introduction and validation of quantitative molecular imaging continues to drive and optimize the field of oncology diagnostics. Given their pivotal role in disease assessment and treatment, the validation and commercialization of diagnostic tools will continue to advance oncology clinical trials, support new oncology drugs, and promote better patient outcomes. PMID:26392755

  13. Adjuvant intrahepatic chemotherapy with mitomycin and 5-FU combined with hepatic irradiation in high-risk patients with carcinoma of the colon: a Southwest Oncology Group phase II pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, J.D.; Weatherall, T.J.; Oishi, N.; Janaki, L.; Boyer, C.

    1985-01-01

    The Southwest Oncology Group conducted a pilot study in patients who had had total clinical resection of cancer of the colon and had a high risk of recurrence (Duke's C); the purpose of the study was to determine the toxic effects of intra-arterial chemotherapy combined with hepatic radiotherapy, in anticipation of their potential use in an adjuvant groupwide protocol. The treatment plan included intra-arterial chemotherapy with mitomycin (3 mg/m2) on Days 1, 4, 35, and 38 by slow intra-arterial push and 5-FU (1000 mg/m2) on Days 1-4 and 35-38 by continuous 96-hour infusion. Radiation therapy was begun on Day 8 of therapy and consisted of 1950 rads in 13 fractions over 2 1/2 weeks. Nineteen patients have been studied. Of 13 fully evaluable patients, two have relapsed in the liver. Eleven patients have developed significant, persistent liver enzyme elevations, and one patient has died from therapy-related liver failure. Combined radiotherapy and intra-arterial chemotherapy may result in significant chronic liver damage, and caution should be exercised in future adjuvant trials.

  14. Medication double-checking procedures in clinical practice: a cross-sectional survey of oncology nurses' experiences

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Yvonne; Taxis, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Background Double-checking is widely recommended as an essential method to prevent medication errors. However, prior research has shown that the concept of double-checking is not clearly defined, and that little is known about actual practice in oncology, for example, what kind of checking procedures are applied. Objective To study the practice of different double-checking procedures in chemotherapy administration and to explore nurses' experiences, for example, how often they actually find errors using a certain procedure. General evaluations regarding double-checking, for example, frequency of interruptions during and caused by a check, or what is regarded as its essential feature was assessed. Methods In a cross-sectional survey, qualified nurses working in oncology departments of 3 hospitals were asked to rate 5 different scenarios of double-checking procedures regarding dimensions such as frequency of use in practice and appropriateness to prevent medication errors; they were also asked general questions about double-checking. Results Overall, 274 nurses (70% response rate) participated in the survey. The procedure of jointly double-checking (read-read back) was most commonly used (69% of respondents) and rated as very appropriate to prevent medication errors. Jointly checking medication was seen as the essential characteristic of double-checking—more frequently than ‘carrying out checks independently’ (54% vs 24%). Most nurses (78%) found the frequency of double-checking in their department appropriate. Being interrupted in one's own current activity for supporting a double-check was reported to occur frequently. Regression analysis revealed a strong preference towards checks that are currently implemented at the responders' workplace. Conclusions Double-checking is well regarded by oncology nurses as a procedure to help prevent errors, with jointly checking being used most frequently. Our results show that the notion of independent checking needs to be

  15. Advances in brain metastases presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2016 Annual Meeting: Part I.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lucy F; Patel, Jyoti D; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-11-01

    American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, USA, 3-7 June 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting took place in Chicago, IL, USA from 3 to 7 June 2016. Over 30,000 oncologists, researchers, related professionals and advocates participated in the conference which covered all aspects of oncology. An overview of the key studies in brain metastases presented at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting is highlighted here. This report highlights biology, epidemiology, prognosis and treatment sequelae of brain metastases.

  16. Advances in brain metastases presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2016 Annual Meeting: Part II.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lucy F; Patel, Jyoti D; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-12-01

    American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, USA, 3-7 June 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting took place in Chicago, IL, USA, from 3 to 7 June 2016. Over 30,000 oncologists, researchers, related professionals and advocates participated in the conference, which covered all aspects of oncology. An overview of the key studies in brain metastases presented at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting is highlighted here. Key data presented on radiotherapy, and systemic therapy for brain metastases are reviewed.

  17. Clinical Practice Guidelines and Consensus Statements in Oncology – An Assessment of Their Methodological Quality

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Carmel; Graham, Ian D.; Makarski, Julie; Chassé, Michaël; Fergusson, Dean; Hutton, Brian; Clemons, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines are widely available for enhancing the care of cancer patients. Despite subtle differences in their definition and purpose, these terms are often used interchangeably. We systematically assessed the methodological quality of consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published in three commonly read, geographically diverse, cancer-specific journals. Methods Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published between January 2005 and September 2013 in Current Oncology, European Journal of Cancer and Journal of Clinical Oncology were evaluated. Each publication was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) rigour of development and editorial independence domains. For assessment of transparency of document development, 7 additional items were taken from the Institute of Medicine’s standards for practice guidelines and the Journal of Clinical Oncology guidelines for authors of guidance documents. Methods Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published between January 2005 and September 2013 in Current Oncology, European Journal of Cancer and Journal of Clinical Oncology were evaluated. Each publication was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) rigour of development and editorial independence domains. For assessment of transparency of document development, 7 additional items were taken from the Institute of Medicine's standards for practice guidelines and the Journal of Clinical Oncology guidelines for authors of guidance documents. Findings Thirty-four consensus statements and 67 clinical practice guidelines were evaluated. The rigour of development score for consensus statements over the three journals was 32% lower than that of clinical practice guidelines. The editorial independence score was 15% lower for consensus statements than clinical practice guidelines. One journal

  18. Innovative techniques in radiation oncology. Clinical research programs to improve local and regional control in cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, L.W.; Markoe, A.M.; Micaily, B.; Fisher, S.A.; Lamm, F.R. )

    1990-02-01

    There is a growing importance in failure analysis in cancer management. In these analyses locoregional failure as the cause of death emerges as a significant problem in many tumor sites, e.g., head and neck cancer, gynecologic cancer, genitourinary cancer. Because of these data, the radiation oncology community has attributed high priority to research efforts to improve locoregional control. These efforts include the following: (1) brachytherapy alone or with external beam radiation therapy or surgery; (2) intraoperative radiation therapy; (3) hyperthermia with radiation therapy; (4) particle irradiation (protons, neutrons, stripped nuclei, and pions); and (5) routes of administration of the treatment, including infusional (intravenous) chemotherapy with radiation therapy, intraarterial monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides, and intraarterial chemotherapy with radiation therapy. Each area of investigation is discussed.

  19. The history and future of the Urologic Oncology Study Group (UOSG) of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG).

    PubMed

    Tobisu, Kenichi

    2012-05-01

    The Urologic Oncology Study Group (UOSG) of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group was founded in 2001. At the beginning, 41 collaborative institutions participated, and the first group representative was Kenichi Tobisu, from the Shizuoka Cancer Center. In the last 10 years, three JCOG studies have been conducted. In two of them, patient registration has been closed and they are now in the follow-up period. The third study has just started registration in 2011. At present, we have not yet completed the final data analyses in any of the studies. In the meantime, however, we have performed a few retrospective analyses by collecting clinical data from each of the participating institutions, and the results were published as important Japanese data. All the activities of the investigation were supported by the Health and Labor Sciences Research Grants for Clinical Research in Japan. The UOSG encountered great difficulties in planning the prospective study, completing the sophisticated protocol and recruiting the expected number of patients. It usually took a longer time than expected to achieve the final goal. This was probably due to insufficient experience in conducting sophisticated protocol studies and immaturity in managing a study group. Now, the UOSG consists of 38 institutions and is gradually overcoming these problems. In 2011, the UOSG changed its group representative to Yoshiyuki Kakehi from Kagawa University and continues to strive to meet the challenge of becoming a more active group. In this review, we provide an overview of the history and achievements of the UOSG over the past 10 years, along with a list of participating institutions.

  20. Optimizing oncology therapeutics through quantitative translational and clinical pharmacology: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, K; Friberg, L E; Ouellet, D; Mettetal, J T; Stein, A; Trocóniz, I F; Bruno, R; Mehrotra, N; Gobburu, J; Mould, D R

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in biomedical research that have deepened our understanding of cancer hallmarks, resulting in the discovery and development of targeted therapies, the success rates of oncology drug development remain low. Opportunities remain for objective dose selection informed by exposure-response understanding to optimize the benefit-risk balance of novel therapies for cancer patients. This review article discusses the principles and applications of modeling and simulation approaches across the lifecycle of development of oncology therapeutics. Illustrative examples are used to convey the value gained from integration of quantitative clinical pharmacology strategies from the preclinical-translational phase through confirmatory clinical evaluation of efficacy and safety.

  1. American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guidelines: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Somerfield, Mark R; Einhaus, Kaitlin; Hagerty, Karen L; Brouwers, Melissa C; Seidenfeld, Jerome; Lyman, Gary H

    2008-08-20

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) published its first clinical practice guideline, which focused on the use of hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors, in 1994. Since then, ASCO has published 24 additional guidelines or technology assessments on a range of topics and is developing 11 additional guidelines. Guidelines are among ASCO's most valued products, according to membership surveys and data from the JCO.org Web site. However, the same data from ASCO members have highlighted a number of limitations to the guideline program. These relate to the timelines of guideline updates, difficulties locating guidelines and related products, and challenges to implementing ASCO guidelines in everyday clinical practice. This article outlines the concrete steps that the ASCO Health Services Committee (HSC) is taking to address these limitations, including the institution of a more aggressive guideline updating schedule, a transition from narrative to systematic literature reviews to support the practice recommendations, a new Board of Directors-approved policy to permit endorsement of other groups' guidelines, and a robust Clinical Tools and Resources program that offers a range of guideline dissemination and implementation aids. Additional work is underway to establish stronger and deeper collaborations with practicing oncologists to expand their role in the review, field testing, and implementation of guideline clinical tools and resources. Finally, the HSC is discussing evaluation of the guidelines program to maximize the impact of ASCO clinical practice guidelines on clinical decision making and, ultimately, the quality of cancer care.

  2. Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology. Report on a WHO Working Group (The Hague, The Netherlands, December 6-8, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The 1978 report of the Working Group of Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology, convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe in collaboration with the government of The Netherlands, is presented. The groups analyzed models of postgraduate training in clinical oncology and evaluated their suitability in relation to…

  3. Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology. Report on a WHO Working Group (The Hague, The Netherlands, December 6-8, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The 1978 report of the Working Group of Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology, convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe in collaboration with the government of The Netherlands, is presented. The groups analyzed models of postgraduate training in clinical oncology and evaluated their suitability in relation to…

  4. Early phase clinical trials in pediatric hematology and oncology.

    PubMed

    Corbacioglu, S

    2012-04-01

    Pediatric oncology is an unrivaled success story in the recent history of medicine. This success is mostly based on a persistent refinement of evidence based therapeutic concepts. With that regard physicians and their staff are highly experience in the conduct of prospective evidence based trials and are therefore competent partners for the pharmaceutical industry. In times of personalized medicine the individual target population is diminishing and the borders of indications are not more disease based. A situation that requires new concepts from the industry. Therefore children with cancer could benefit early from the current developments as well as the pharmaceutical industry could benefit from the legislative incentives through highly recruiting and well conducted prospective trials. Pivotal is a functional platform of communication in order to maintain a close dialogue between academia and pharmaceutical companies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  6. Merging of the National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative oncology group data with an administrative data source to develop a more effective platform for clinical trial analysis and comparative effectiveness research: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Aplenc, R; Fisher, B T; Huang, Y S; Li, Y; Alonzo, T A; Gerbing, R B; Hall, M; Bertoch, D; Keren, R; Seif, A E; Sung, L; Adamson, P C; Gamis, A

    2012-05-01

    The National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative oncology group trials have improved overall survival for children with cancer from 10% to 85% and have set standards of care for adults with malignancies. Despite these successes, cooperative oncology groups currently face substantial challenges. We are working to develop methods to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of these trials. Specifically, we merged data from the Children's Oncology Group (COG) and the Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS) to improve toxicity monitoring, to estimate treatment-associated resource utilization and costs, and to address important clinical epidemiology questions. COG and PHIS data on patients enrolled on a phase III COG trial for de novo acute myeloid leukemia at 43 PHIS hospitals were merged using a probabilistic algorithm. Resource utilization summary statistics were then tabulated for the first chemotherapy course based on PHIS data. Of 416 patients enrolled on the phase III COG trial at PHIS centers, 392 (94%) were successfully matched. Of these, 378 (96%) had inpatient PHIS data available beginning at the date of study enrollment. For these, daily blood product usage and anti-infective exposures were tabulated and standardized costs were described. These data demonstrate that patients enrolled in a cooperative group oncology trial can be successfully identified in an administrative data set and that supportive care resource utilization can be described. Further work is required to optimize the merging algorithm, map resource utilization metrics to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for monitoring toxicity, to perform comparative effectiveness studies, and to estimate the costs associated with protocol therapy. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis and Treatment in Patients With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update 2014

    PubMed Central

    Lyman, Gary H.; Bohlke, Kari; Khorana, Alok A.; Kuderer, Nicole M.; Lee, Agnes Y.; Arcelus, Juan Ignacio; Balaban, Edward P.; Clarke, Jeffrey M.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Francis, Charles W.; Gates, Leigh E.; Kakkar, Ajay K.; Key, Nigel S.; Levine, Mark N.; Liebman, Howard A.; Tempero, Margaret A.; Wong, Sandra L.; Somerfield, Mark R.; Falanga, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide current recommendations about the prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with cancer. Methods PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and clinical practice guidelines from November 2012 through July 2014. An update committee reviewed the identified abstracts. Results Of the 53 publications identified and reviewed, none prompted a change in the 2013 recommendations. Recommendations Most hospitalized patients with active cancer require thromboprophylaxis throughout hospitalization. Routine thromboprophylaxis is not recommended for patients with cancer in the outpatient setting. It may be considered for selected high-risk patients. Patients with multiple myeloma receiving antiangiogenesis agents with chemotherapy and/or dexamethasone should receive prophylaxis with either low–molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or low-dose aspirin. Patients undergoing major surgery should receive prophylaxis starting before surgery and continuing for at least 7 to 10 days. Extending prophylaxis up to 4 weeks should be considered in those undergoing major abdominal or pelvic surgery with high-risk features. LMWH is recommended for the initial 5 to 10 days of treatment for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism as well as for long-term secondary prophylaxis (at least 6 months). Use of novel oral anticoagulants is not currently recommended for patients with malignancy and VTE because of limited data in patients with cancer. Anticoagulation should not be used to extend survival of patients with cancer in the absence of other indications. Patients with cancer should be periodically assessed for VTE risk. Oncology professionals should educate patients about the signs and symptoms of VTE. PMID:25605844

  8. Media Reporting of Practice-Changing Clinical Trials in Oncology: A North American Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Michael M.; O’Connor, Stephen; Valdes, Mario; Tang, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Media reporting of clinical trials impacts patient-oncologist interactions. We sought to characterize the accuracy of media and Internet reporting of practice-changing clinical trials in oncology. Materials and Methods. The first media articles referencing 17 practice-changing clinical trials were collected from 4 media outlets: newspapers, cable news, cancer websites, and industry websites. Measured outcomes were media reporting score, social media score, and academic citation score. The media reporting score was a measure of completeness of information detailed in media articles as scored by a 15-point scoring instrument. The social media score represented the ubiquity of social media presence referencing 17 practice-changing clinical trials in cancer as determined by the American Society of Clinical Oncology in its annual report, entitled Clinical Cancer Advances 2012; social media score was calculated from Twitter, Facebook, and Google searches. The academic citation score comprised total citations from Google Scholar plus the Scopus database, which represented the academic impact per clinical cancer advance. Results. From 170 media articles, 107 (63%) had sufficient data for analysis. Cohen’s κ coefficient demonstrated reliability of the media reporting score instrument with a coefficient of determination of 94%. Per the media reporting score, information was most complete from industry, followed by cancer websites, newspapers, and cable news. The most commonly omitted items, in descending order, were study limitations, exclusion criteria, conflict of interest, and other. The social media score was weakly correlated with academic citation score. Conclusion. Media outlets appear to have set a low bar for coverage of many practice-changing advances in oncology, with reports of scientific breakthroughs often omitting basic study facts and cautions, which may mislead the public. The media should be encouraged to use a standardized reporting

  9. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  10. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  11. A clinically translatable mouse model for chemotherapy-related fatigue.

    PubMed

    Zombeck, Jonathan A; Fey, Edward G; Lyng, Gregory D; Sonis, Stephen T

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is a debilitating and pervasive complication of cancer and cancer care. Clinical research investigating potential therapies is hindered by variability in patient histories, different metrics for measuring fatigue, and environmental factors that may affect fatigue. The purpose of this study was to establish an animal model of chemotherapy-related fatigue. Female HSD:ICR mice were treated with doxorubicin (2.5 mg/kg) or saline in 2 cycles (days 1 through 3 and 10 through 12). After treatment, mice were individually housed in cages equipped with running wheels. Open-field activity and motor coordination were examined after each cycle of treatment and after each week of wheel running. In a separate cohort, modafinil (50 mg/kg) was assessed as a potential treatment for fatigue. Doxorubicin administration resulted in greater than 30% less wheel running compared with that of saline controls. Activity differences were specific to wheel running: neither distance traveled in the open field nor motor coordination according to the rotarod test differed between groups. Compared with control values, RBC counts in the doxorubicin group were decreased on days 15 and 22 but recovered to control levels by study completion. Modafinil was efficacious in increasing wheel running in the doxorubicin group. The current results establish an animal model of chemotherapy-related fatigue that recapitulates the physical symptoms of cancer-related fatigue as manifested as decreased voluntary activity. This model is sensitive to pharmaceutical intervention and can be used to screen potential treatments for fatigue.

  12. Innovations for phase I dose-finding designs in pediatric oncology clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Doussau, Adelaide; Geoerger, Birgit; Jiménez, Irene; Paoletti, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Phase I oncology clinical trials are designed to identify the optimal dose that will be recommended for phase II trials. In pediatric oncology, the conduct of those trials raise specific challenges, as the disease is rare with limited therapeutic options. In addition, the tolerance profile is known from adult trials. This paper provides a review of the major recent developments in the design of these trials, inspired by the need to cope with the specific challenges of dose finding in cancer pediatric oncology. We reviewed simulation studies comparing designs dedicated to address these challenges. We also reviewed the design used in published dose-finding trials in pediatric oncology over the period 2009–2014. Three main fields of innovation were identified. First, designs that were developed in order to relax the rules for more flexible inclusions. Second, methods to incorporate data emerging from adult studies. Third, designs accounting for toxicity evaluation at repeated cycles in pediatric oncology. In addition to this overview, we propose some further directions for designing pediatric dose-finding trials. PMID:26825023

  13. Tracking the workforce: the American Society of Clinical Oncology workforce information system.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, M Kelsey; Kosty, Michael P; Bajorin, Dean F; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Goldstein, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    In anticipation of oncologist workforce shortages projected as part of a 2007 study, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) worked with a contractor to create a workforce information system (WIS) to assemble the latest available data on oncologist supply and cancer incidence and prevalence. ASCO plans to publish findings annually, reporting on new data and tracking trends over time. THE WIS REPORT IS COMPOSED OF THREE SECTIONS: supply, new entrants, and cancer incidence and prevalence. Tabulations of the number of oncologists in the United States are derived mainly from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. Information on fellows and residents in the oncology workforce pipeline come from published sources such as Journal of the American Medical Association. Incidence and prevalence estimates are published by the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute. The WIS reports a total of 13,084 oncologists working in the United States in 2011. Oncologists are defined as those physicians who designate hematology, hematology/oncology, or medical oncology as their specialty. The WIS compares the characteristics of these oncologists with those of all physicians and tracks emerging trends in the physician training pipeline. Observing characteristics of the oncologist workforce over time allows ASCO to identify, prioritize, and evaluate its workforce initiatives. Accessible figures and reports generated by the WIS can be used by ASCO and others in the oncology community to advocate for needed health care system and policy changes to help offset future workforce shortages.

  14. Tracking the Workforce: The American Society of Clinical Oncology Workforce Information System

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, M. Kelsey; Kosty, Michael P.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Goldstein, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In anticipation of oncologist workforce shortages projected as part of a 2007 study, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) worked with a contractor to create a workforce information system (WIS) to assemble the latest available data on oncologist supply and cancer incidence and prevalence. ASCO plans to publish findings annually, reporting on new data and tracking trends over time. Methods: The WIS report is composed of three sections: supply, new entrants, and cancer incidence and prevalence. Tabulations of the number of oncologists in the United States are derived mainly from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. Information on fellows and residents in the oncology workforce pipeline come from published sources such as Journal of the American Medical Association. Incidence and prevalence estimates are published by the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute. Results: The WIS reports a total of 13,084 oncologists working in the United States in 2011. Oncologists are defined as those physicians who designate hematology, hematology/oncology, or medical oncology as their specialty. The WIS compares the characteristics of these oncologists with those of all physicians and tracks emerging trends in the physician training pipeline. Conclusion: Observing characteristics of the oncologist workforce over time allows ASCO to identify, prioritize, and evaluate its workforce initiatives. Accessible figures and reports generated by the WIS can be used by ASCO and others in the oncology community to advocate for needed health care system and policy changes to help offset future workforce shortages. PMID:23633965

  15. Innovations for phase I dose-finding designs in pediatric oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Doussau, Adelaide; Geoerger, Birgit; Jiménez, Irene; Paoletti, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Phase I oncology clinical trials are designed to identify the optimal dose that will be recommended for phase II trials. In pediatric oncology, the conduct of those trials raises specific challenges, as the disease is rare with limited therapeutic options. In addition, the tolerance profile is known from adult trials. This paper provides a review of the major recent developments in the design of these trials, inspired by the need to cope with the specific challenges of dose finding in cancer pediatric oncology. We reviewed simulation studies comparing designs dedicated to address these challenges. We also reviewed the design used in published dose-finding trials in pediatric oncology over the period 2009-2014. Three main fields of innovation were identified. First, designs that were developed in order to relax the rules for more flexible inclusions. Second, methods to incorporate data emerging from adult studies. Third, designs accounting for toxicity evaluation at repeated cycles in pediatric oncology. In addition to this overview, we propose some further directions for designing pediatric dose-finding trials.

  16. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services.

  17. [Evaluation of oncology clinical practice guidelines: the contribution of certified centers].

    PubMed

    Wesselmann, Simone

    2015-01-01

    The German Guideline Program in Oncology defines quality indicators which provide the basis for the certification of oncology centers of the German Cancer Society. The results of the quality indicators are published annually in benchmarking reports which summarize the data of over 400,000 oncological patients in the course of time. The reports will be presented to the guideline groups during their guideline updating process. In addition, the explanation of the certified centers and the auditors for non-adherence to guideline recommendations is being recorded. In this way, the guideline group obtains important information about how and to which extent the guideline is implemented in clinical routine, and can derive conclusions for the further definition of recommendations and quality indicators.

  18. Single-Cell Sequencing Technology in Oncology: Applications for Clinical Therapies and Research

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Baixin; Gao, Qingping; Zeng, Zhi; Stary, Creed M.; Jian, Zhihong; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Gu, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Cellular heterogeneity is a fundamental characteristic of many cancers. A lack of cellular homogeneity contributes to difficulty in designing targeted oncological therapies. Therefore, the development of novel methods to determine and characterize oncologic cellular heterogeneity is a critical next step in the development of novel cancer therapies. Single-cell sequencing (SCS) technology has been recently employed for analyzing the genetic polymorphisms of individual cells at the genome-wide level. SCS requires (1) precise isolation of the single cell of interest; (2) isolation and amplification of genetic material; and (3) descriptive analysis of genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic data. In addition to targeted analysis of single cells isolated from tumor biopsies, SCS technology may be applied to circulating tumor cells, which may aid in predicting tumor progression and metastasis. In this paper, we provide an overview of SCS technology and review the current literature on the potential application of SCS to clinical oncology and research. PMID:27313981

  19. Single-Cell Sequencing Technology in Oncology: Applications for Clinical Therapies and Research.

    PubMed

    Ye, Baixin; Gao, Qingping; Zeng, Zhi; Stary, Creed M; Jian, Zhihong; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Gu, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Cellular heterogeneity is a fundamental characteristic of many cancers. A lack of cellular homogeneity contributes to difficulty in designing targeted oncological therapies. Therefore, the development of novel methods to determine and characterize oncologic cellular heterogeneity is a critical next step in the development of novel cancer therapies. Single-cell sequencing (SCS) technology has been recently employed for analyzing the genetic polymorphisms of individual cells at the genome-wide level. SCS requires (1) precise isolation of the single cell of interest; (2) isolation and amplification of genetic material; and (3) descriptive analysis of genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic data. In addition to targeted analysis of single cells isolated from tumor biopsies, SCS technology may be applied to circulating tumor cells, which may aid in predicting tumor progression and metastasis. In this paper, we provide an overview of SCS technology and review the current literature on the potential application of SCS to clinical oncology and research.

  20. Assessing the Value of an Optional Radiation Oncology Clinical Rotation During the Core Clerkships in Medical School

    SciTech Connect

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Malatesta, Theresa M.; Den, Robert B.; Wuthrick, Evan; Ahn, Peter H.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Shi, Wenyin; Dicker, Adam P.; Anne, P. Rani; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Few medical students are given proper clinical training in oncology, much less radiation oncology. We attempted to assess the value of adding a radiation oncology clinical rotation to the medical school curriculum. Methods and Materials: In July 2010, Jefferson Medical College began to offer a 3-week radiation oncology rotation as an elective course for third-year medical students during the core surgical clerkship. During 2010 to 2012, 52 medical students chose to enroll in this rotation. The rotation included outpatient clinics, inpatient consults, didactic sessions, and case-based presentations by the students. Tests of students' knowledge of radiation oncology were administered anonymously before and after the rotation to evaluate the educational effectiveness of the rotation. Students and radiation oncology faculty were given surveys to assess feedback about the rotation. Results: The students' prerotation test scores had an average of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61-66%). The postrotation test scores improved to an average of 82% (95% CI, 80-83%; 18% absolute improvement). In examination question analysis, scores improved in clinical oncology from 63% to 79%, in radiobiology from 70% to 77%, and in medical physics from 62% to 88%. Improvements in all sections but radiobiology were statistically significant. Students rated the usefulness of the rotation as 8.1 (scale 1-9; 95% CI, 7.3-9.0), their understanding of radiation oncology as a result of the rotation as 8.8 (95% CI, 8.5-9.1), and their recommendation of the rotation to a classmate as 8.2 (95% CI, 7.6-9.0). Conclusions: Integrating a radiation oncology clinical rotation into the medical school curriculum improves student knowledge of radiation oncology, including aspects of clinical oncology, radiobiology, and medical physics. The rotation is appreciated by both students and faculty.

  1. Quantitative assessment of workload and stressors in clinical radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Lukasz M; Mosaly, Prithima R; Jackson, Marianne; Chang, Sha X; Burkhardt, Katharin Deschesne; Adams, Robert D; Jones, Ellen L; Hoyle, Lesley; Xu, Jing; Rockwell, John; Marks, Lawrence B

    2012-08-01

    Workload level and sources of stressors have been implicated as sources of error in multiple settings. We assessed workload levels and sources of stressors among radiation oncology professionals. Furthermore, we explored the potential association between workload and the frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the World Health Organization (WHO). Data collection was aimed at various tasks performed by 21 study participants from different radiation oncology professional subgroups (simulation therapists, radiation therapists, physicists, dosimetrists, and physicians). Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index (NASA TLX). Sources of stressors were quantified using observational methods and segregated using a standard taxonomy. Comparisons between professional subgroups and tasks were made using analysis of variance ANOVA, multivariate ANOVA, and Duncan test. An association between workload levels (NASA TLX) and the frequency of radiotherapy incidents (WHO incidents) was explored (Pearson correlation test). A total of 173 workload assessments were obtained. Overall, simulation therapists had relatively low workloads (NASA TLX range, 30-36), and physicists had relatively high workloads (NASA TLX range, 51-63). NASA TLX scores for physicians, radiation therapists, and dosimetrists ranged from 40-52. There was marked intertask/professional subgroup variation (P<.0001). Mental demand (P<.001), physical demand (P=.001), and effort (P=.006) significantly differed among professional subgroups. Typically, there were 3-5 stressors per cycle of analyzed tasks with the following distribution: interruptions (41.4%), time factors (17%), technical factors (13.6%), teamwork issues (11.6%), patient factors (9.0%), and environmental factors (7.4%). A positive association between workload and frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the WHO was found (r = 0.87, P value=.045). Workload level and sources of stressors vary

  2. Quantitative Assessment of Workload and Stressors in Clinical Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, Lukasz M.; Mosaly, Prithima R.; Jackson, Marianne; Chang, Sha X.; Burkhardt, Katharin Deschesne; Adams, Robert D.; Jones, Ellen L.; Hoyle, Lesley; Xu, Jing; Rockwell, John; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Workload level and sources of stressors have been implicated as sources of error in multiple settings. We assessed workload levels and sources of stressors among radiation oncology professionals. Furthermore, we explored the potential association between workload and the frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the World Health Organization (WHO). Methods and Materials: Data collection was aimed at various tasks performed by 21 study participants from different radiation oncology professional subgroups (simulation therapists, radiation therapists, physicists, dosimetrists, and physicians). Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index (NASA TLX). Sources of stressors were quantified using observational methods and segregated using a standard taxonomy. Comparisons between professional subgroups and tasks were made using analysis of variance ANOVA, multivariate ANOVA, and Duncan test. An association between workload levels (NASA TLX) and the frequency of radiotherapy incidents (WHO incidents) was explored (Pearson correlation test). Results: A total of 173 workload assessments were obtained. Overall, simulation therapists had relatively low workloads (NASA TLX range, 30-36), and physicists had relatively high workloads (NASA TLX range, 51-63). NASA TLX scores for physicians, radiation therapists, and dosimetrists ranged from 40-52. There was marked intertask/professional subgroup variation (P<.0001). Mental demand (P<.001), physical demand (P=.001), and effort (P=.006) significantly differed among professional subgroups. Typically, there were 3-5 stressors per cycle of analyzed tasks with the following distribution: interruptions (41.4%), time factors (17%), technical factors (13.6%), teamwork issues (11.6%), patient factors (9.0%), and environmental factors (7.4%). A positive association between workload and frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the WHO was found (r = 0.87, P value=.045

  3. Survival times of women with metastatic breast cancer starting first-line chemotherapy in routine clinical practice versus contemporary randomised trials.

    PubMed

    Thientosapol, E S; Tran, T T; Della-Fiorentina, S A; Adams, D H; Chantrill, L; Stockler, M R; Kiely, B E

    2013-08-01

    Survival times of women starting first-line chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer (MBC) in routine clinical practice were determined and compared with those from a systematic review of randomised clinical trials. We identified women with MBC starting first-line chemotherapy from June 2003 to February 2011 and recorded their demographics, tumour and treatment characteristics, and survival times from the start of chemotherapy. Their survival distribution was summarised by the following percentiles (represented scenarios for survival): 90th (worst-case), 75th (lower-typical), 25th (upper-typical) and 10th (best-case), which were compared with the same percentiles from our systematic review of first-line chemotherapy trials. The 273 women had a median age of 56 years, and a median time from diagnosis of MBC of 3 months. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 0-1 in 80%. Tumours were hormone receptor positive in 69%, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive in 27% and triple negative in 13%. Survival times in months in routine clinical practice (vs the systematic review) were: 90th percentile 4 (6); 75th percentile 9 (12); median 20 (22); 25th percentile 36 (36) and 10th percentile 61 (56). Independent predictors of overall survival included HER2-positive disease (hazard ratio (HR) 0.49, P = 0.0002), hormone receptor positive disease (HR 0.51, P = 0.0004), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1 (HR 0.36, P < 0.0001) and adjuvant chemotherapy (HR 1.86, P = 0.0002). Median and better survival times in routine practice were similar to those from randomised clinical trials; however, survival times worse than the median were shorter, likely reflecting patient selection in trials. Oncologists should adjust trial-based survival estimates for patients not meeting typical trial eligibility criteria. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  4. POG 8625: a randomized trial comparing chemotherapy with chemoradiotherapy for children and adolescents with Stages I, IIA, IIIA1 Hodgkin Disease: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Kung, Faith H; Schwartz, Cindy L; Ferree, Carolyn R; London, Wendy B; Ternberg, Jessie L; Behm, Fred G; Wharam, Moody D; Falletta, John M; de Alarcon, Pedro; Chauvenet, Allen R

    2006-06-01

    To determine if 6 courses of chemotherapy alone could achieve the same or better outcome than 4 courses of chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy (chemoradiotherapy) in pediatric and adolescent patients with Hodgkin disease. Children < or =21 years old with biopsy-proven, pathologically staged I, IIA, or IIIA1 Hodgkin disease were randomly assigned 6 courses of alternating nitrogen mustard, oncovin, prednisone, and procarbazine/doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (treatment 1) or 4 courses of alternating nitrogen mustard, oncovin, prednisone, and procarbazine/doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine +2550 cGy involved-field radiotherapy (treatment 2). The complete response rate was 89%, with a complete response and partial response rate of 99.4%. There was no statistically significant difference in event-free survival (EFS) or overall survival between arms. The EFS for those who achieved an early complete response was significantly higher than for those who did not. For pediatric patients with asymptomatic low-stage and intermediate-stage Hodgkin disease, chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy both resulted in 3-year EFS of approximately 90% and statistically indistinguishable 8-year EFS and overall survival, without significant long-term toxicity. Early response to therapy was associated with higher EFS, a concept that has led to the Children's Oncology Group paradigm of response-based risk-adapted therapy for pediatric Hodgkin disease.

  5. Making Molecular Imaging a Clinical Tool for Precision Oncology: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mankoff, David A; Farwell, Michael D; Clark, Amy S; Pryma, Daniel A

    2017-05-01

    Individualized cancer treatment, tailored to a particular patient and the tumor's biological features (precision oncology), requires a detailed knowledge of tumor biology. Biological characterization is typically performed on biopsy material, but this approach can present challenges for widespread and/or heterogeneous disease and for performing serial assays to infer changes in response to therapy. Molecular imaging is a complementary approach that provides noninvasive and quantitative measures of the in vivo biology of the full disease burden and is well suited to serial assay. Molecular imaging can provide unique information to guide precision oncology that includes measuring the regional expression of therapeutic targets, measuring drug pharmacokinetics, measuring therapy pharmacodynamics, and providing a marker of therapeutic efficacy that is highly indicative of outcome. Thus far, most trials of novel molecular imaging in oncology have been small, single-center trials. Only a few methods have progressed to multicenter trials and even fewer have become part of clinical practice. Molecular imaging holds great promise for precision oncology, complementing tissue-based markers to guide more effective, less toxic, and more cost-effective cancer treatments. Beyond logistical and technical challenges, moving new imaging tests from the laboratory to the clinic requires a compelling use case that will benefit patients and/or improve cost-effectiveness, and it requires the collaboration of imagers, oncologists, and industry to reach its true clinical potential.

  6. [Low grade parosteal osteosarcoma. Clinical and oncological outcomes].

    PubMed

    Albergo, José I; Farfalli, Germán L; Ayerza, Miguel A; Muscolo, Domingo L; Aponte-Tinao, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze a group of patients with low grade parosteal osteosarcoma treated with limb salvage surgery and reconstructed with bone allograft. A retrospective review from our oncologic data base between 1980 and 2010 was done and all patients with diagnosis of low grade parosteal osteosarcoma, treated with limb salvage surgery and reconstructed with allograft were included. Twenty-two patients were included for the analysis. The mean age was 32±11 years (10-59) y the mean follow-up 93±69 months (8-237). Ten year overall survival of the series was 91% (95% CI: 79-100). Four patients developed local recurrence, 2 of them histological classified after the resection dedifferentiated parosteal osteosarcoma. Two patients developed distant recurrence, being the lung the only site of metastasis. Ten year limb salvage reconstruction survival was 65% (95% CI: 44-86). Long term survival rate in low grade parosteal osteosarcoma is over 90%. Surgical resection wide margin should be the elective treatment and biological limb salvage reconstruction is a good alternative.

  7. Innovations in American Society of Clinical Oncology Practice Guideline Development.

    PubMed

    Somerfield, Mark R; Bohlke, Kari; Browman, George P; Denduluri, Neelima; Einhaus, Kaitlin; Hayes, Daniel F; Khorana, Alok A; Miller, Robert S; Mohile, Supriya G; Oliver, Thomas K; Ortiz, Eduardo; Lyman, Gary H

    2016-09-10

    Since the beginning of its guidelines program in 1993, ASCO has continually sought ways to produce a greater number of guidelines while maintaining its commitment to using the rigorous development methods that minimize the biases that threaten the validity of practice recommendations. ASCO is implementing a range of guideline development and implementation innovations. In this article, we describe innovations that are designed to (1) integrate consideration of multiple chronic conditions into practice guidelines; (2) keep more of its guidelines current by applying evolving signals or (more) rapid, for-cause updating approaches; (3) increase the number of high-quality guidelines available to its membership through endorsement and adaptation of other groups' products; (4) improve coverage of its members' guideline needs through a new topic nomination process; and (5) enhance dissemination and promote implementation of ASCO guidelines in the oncology practice community through a network of volunteer ambassadors. We close with a summary of ASCO's plans to facilitate the integration of data from its rapid learning system, CancerLinQ, into ASCO guidelines and to develop tactics through which guideline recommendations can be embedded in clinicians' workflow in digital form. We highlight the challenges inherent in reconciling the need to provide clinicians with more interactive, point-of-care guidance with ASCO's abiding commitment to methodologic rigor in guideline development.

  8. Evaluation of clinical pharmacists' follow-up service in an oncology pain clinic.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Nikki; Chambers, Carole; Ralph, Christopher; England, Dean; Cusano, Frances

    2013-06-01

    Patients who present with pain in an oncology setting are often complex and require a multidisciplinary approach for symptom control. The Pain and Symptom Control Clinic at Tom Baker Cancer Center includes two pharmacists who participate in weekly multidisciplinary clinics and provide a follow-up service to patients. This study will assess the impact of the pharmacists' follow-up service with respect to activities performed as well as patient and health care professional satisfaction. The activities performed will also be compared to defined objectives for pharmacy practice in a hospital setting. Activities performed by the pharmacists over a 10-week period were recorded and tabulated. Online surveys were completed by health care professionals and telephone surveys were completed by patients 1 month post clinic visit. Over 6 weeks, 44 patients assessed in clinic required follow-up from a pharmacist. There was an average of 2.3 interactions per patient and an average time of 85 min was spent on each patient outside of clinic. The three activities that occurred most frequently included: (1) interacting with other health care professionals, (2) making alterations to patients' medication regimens, and (3) organizing refills. All health care professionals surveyed felt that the pharmacists' follow-up service was a valuable component of the Pain and Symptom Control Clinic and nearly all patients surveyed reported a positive experience with the service received. The inclusion of pharmacists in the Pain and Symptom Control Clinic is favored by patients and health care professionals and provides increased efficiency to the clinic.

  9. A clinical research information system: an example of prospective observational study in oncology.

    PubMed

    Leskosek, Branimir L

    2008-11-06

    The paper presents a web-based clinical research information system (RIS) used by physicians and pharmacists at Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana and its geographically remote partners to collect research clinical data for observational study. The RIS development was focused mainly on: formal electronic data collection with on-line data validation, computer data preparation for uniform analyses, user friendliness, security issues, low establishment and maintenance costs.

  10. Effect of Selumetinib versus Chemotherapy on Progression-Free Survival in Uveal Melanoma: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Richard D.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Quevedo, Jorge Fernando; Milhem, Mohammed M.; Joshua, Anthony Michael; Kudchadkar, Ragini R.; Linette, Gerald P.; Gajewski, Thomas F.; Lutzky, Jose; Lawson, David H.; Lao, Christopher D.; Flynn, Patrick J.; Albertini, Mark R.; Sato, Takami; Lewis, Karl; Doyle, Austin; Ancell, Kristin; Panageas, Katherine S.; Bluth, Mark; Hedvat, Cyrus; Erinjeri, Joseph; Ambrosini, Grazia; Marr, Brian; Abramson, David; Dickson, Mark Andrew; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Chapman, Paul B.; Schwartz, Gary K.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Uveal melanoma is characterized by mutations in GNAQ and GNA11, resulting in MAPK pathway activation. Objective To assess the efficacy of selumetinib, a selective, non-ATP competitive inhibitor of MEK1 and MEK2, in uveal melanoma. Design Randomized open-label phase II clinical trial comparing selumetinib versus chemotherapy. Those receiving chemotherapy could receive selumetinib at the time of radiographic progression. Setting Fifteen academic oncology centers. Participants 120 patients with metastatic uveal melanoma. Interventions 101 patients were randomized on a 1:1 ratio to selumetinib 75 mg orally twice daily on a continual basis (n=50) or chemotherapy (temozolomide 150 mg/m2 orally daily for 5 of every 28 days or DTIC 1000 mg/m2 intravenously every 21 days; investigator choice; n=51) until disease progression, death, intolerable toxicity, or withdrawal of consent. Following primary outcome analysis, enrollment continued in a non-randomized fashion to the superior therapy. Main Outcomes Final analysis of progression-free survival, the primary endpoint, was assessed as of April 22, 2013. Additional endpoints, including overall survival, response rate, and safety/toxicity, were assessed as of December 31, 2013. Results Median progression-free survival for those randomized to chemotherapy and selumetinib was 7 (95% CI, 4.3 – 8.4; median treatment duration of 8 weeks (IQR, 4.3–16)) and 15.9 weeks (95% CI, 8.4 – 21.1; median treatment duration of 16.1 weeks (IQR, 8.1–25.3)), respectively (hazard ratio 0.46; 95% CI, 0.30 – 0.71; p < 0.001). Median overall survival was 9.1 (95% CI, 6.1 – 11.1) and 11.8 months (95% CI, 9.8 – 15.7) for those randomized to chemotherapy and selumetinib, respectively (hazard ratio 0.66; 95% CI, 0.41–1.06; p=0.09). No objective responses were observed with chemotherapy. 49% of patients treated with selumetinib achieved tumor regression, with 14% achieving an objective radiographic response to therapy. Treatment

  11. Psychological morbidity, burden, and the mediating effect of social support in adult children caregivers of oncological patients undergoing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ricardo J; Pereira, Maria Graça

    2013-07-01

    This study examines the association between psychological morbidity, social support, and demographic and clinical variables in adult children of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Special attention was given to the variable level of parental dependency. The main predictors of caregiving burden were tested, as well as the mediating role of social support in the relationship between psychological morbidity and burden. A total of 214 adult children caregivers of parents with cancer were recruited in Northern Portugal central hospitals. Caregivers completed Portuguese versions of the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales, Impact of Event Scale-Revised, Satisfaction with Social Support Scale, and Burden Assessment Scale. Significant associations among psychological, demographic, and clinical variables were found. Adult children with a greater perception of parent's dependency showed more distress, higher posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, greater caregiving burden, and less satisfaction with social support. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed the main predictors of caregiver burden to be as follows: being a woman, caregiving duration, having a dependent parent, more distress and PTSD symptoms, and poorer social support. Social support was found to be a partial mediator in the relationship between psychological morbidity and caregiver burden. Results underscore the importance of perceived parental dependency in offspring's caregivers. Findings support the multidimensional issues associated to burden in this specific population, stressing satisfaction with social support as an important mediator between distress/PTSD and burden. Implications for further research as well as limitations of the present study are discussed. Psychosocial interventions should focus on caregivers' social resources to facilitate psychological well-being. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Multi-scale Modeling in Clinical Oncology: Opportunities and Barriers to Success.

    PubMed

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; An, Gary; Saut, Oliver; Luebeck, E Georg; Popel, Aleksander S; Ribba, Benjamin; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Weis, Jared A; Ye, Kaiming; Genin, Guy M

    2016-09-01

    Hierarchical processes spanning several orders of magnitude of both space and time underlie nearly all cancers. Multi-scale statistical, mathematical, and computational modeling methods are central to designing, implementing and assessing treatment strategies that account for these hierarchies. The basic science underlying these modeling efforts is maturing into a new discipline that is close to influencing and facilitating clinical successes. The purpose of this review is to capture the state-of-the-art as well as the key barriers to success for multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology. We begin with a summary of the long-envisioned promise of multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology, including the synthesis of disparate data types into models that reveal underlying mechanisms and allow for experimental testing of hypotheses. We then evaluate the mathematical techniques employed most widely and present several examples illustrating their application as well as the current gap between pre-clinical and clinical applications. We conclude with a discussion of what we view to be the key challenges and opportunities for multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology.

  13. Multi-scale Modeling in Clinical Oncology: Opportunities and Barriers to Success

    PubMed Central

    Yankeelov, Thomas E.; An, Gary; Saut, Oliver; Luebeck, E. Georg; Popel, Aleksander S.; Ribba, Benjamin; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Weis, Jared A.; Ye, Kaiming; Genin, Guy M.

    2016-01-01

    Hierarchical processes spanning several orders of magnitude of both space and time underlie nearly all cancers. Multi-scale statistical, mathematical, and computational modeling methods are central to designing, implementing and assessing treatment strategies that account for these hierarchies. The basic science underlying these modeling efforts is maturing into a new discipline that is close to influencing and facilitating clinical successes. The purpose of this review is to capture the state-of-the-art as well as the key barriers to success for multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology. We begin with a summary of the long-envisioned promise of multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology, including the synthesis of disparate data types into models that reveal underlying mechanisms and allow for experimental testing of hypotheses. We then evaluate the mathematical techniques employed most widely and present several examples illustrating their application as well as the current gap between pre-clinical and clinical applications. We conclude with a discussion of what we view to be the key challenges and opportunities for multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology. PMID:27384942

  14. A national study of the provision of oncology sperm banking services among Canadian fertility clinics.

    PubMed

    Yee, S; Buckett, W; Campbell, S; Yanofsky, R A; Barr, R D

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the current state of oncology sperm banking services provided by fertility clinics across Canada. A total of 78 Canadian fertility facilities were invited to complete a questionnaire related to the availability, accessibility, affordability and utilisation of sperm banking services for cancer patients. The total response rate was 59%, with 20 (69%) in vitro fertilisation clinics and 26 (53%) other fertility centres returning the survey. A total of 24 responding facilities accepted oncology sperm banking referrals. The time frame to book the first banking appointment for 19 (79%) facilities was within 2 days. Inconsistent practice was found regarding the consent process for cancer patients who are of minority age. Eight (33%) facilities did not provide any subsidy and charged a standard banking fee regardless of patients' financial situations. Overall, the utilisation of oncology sperm banking services was low despite its availability and established efficacy, suggesting that Canadian cancer patients are notably underserved. The study has highlighted some important issues for further consideration in improving access to sperm banking services for cancer patients, especially for adolescents. Better collaboration between oncology and reproductive medicine to target healthcare providers would help to improve sperm banking rates. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Molecular Biomarkers for the Evaluation of Colorectal Cancer: Guideline From the American Society for Clinical Pathology, College of American Pathologists, Association for Molecular Pathology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Antonia R; Hamilton, Stanley R; Allegra, Carmen J; Grody, Wayne; Cushman-Vokoun, Allison M; Funkhouser, William K; Kopetz, Scott E; Lieu, Christopher; Lindor, Noralane M; Minsky, Bruce D; Monzon, Federico A; Sargent, Daniel J; Singh, Veena M; Willis, Joseph; Clark, Jennifer; Colasacco, Carol; Rumble, R Bryan; Temple-Smolkin, Robyn; Ventura, Christina B; Nowak, Jan A

    2017-03-01

    To develop evidence-based guideline recommendations through a systematic review of the literature to establish standard molecular biomarker testing of colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues to guide epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapies and conventional chemotherapy regimens. The American Society for Clinical Pathology, College of American Pathologists, Association for Molecular Pathology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology convened an expert panel to develop an evidence-based guideline to establish standard molecular biomarker testing and guide therapies for patients with CRC. A comprehensive literature search that included more than 4,000 articles was conducted. Twenty-one guideline statements were established. Evidence supports mutational testing for EGFR signaling pathway genes, since they provide clinically actionable information as negative predictors of benefit to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody therapies for targeted therapy of CRC. Mutations in several of the biomarkers have clear prognostic value. Laboratory approaches to operationalize CRC molecular testing are presented. Key Words: Molecular diagnostics; Gastrointestinal; Histology; Genetics; Oncology. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pathology, College of American Pathologists, Association for Molecular Pathology, American Society for Clinical Oncology, and American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. HER2 Testing and Clinical Decision Making in Gastroesophageal Adenocarcinoma: Guideline From the College of American Pathologists, American Society for Clinical Pathology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Angela N; Washington, Mary Kay; Ventura, Christina B; Ismaila, Nofisat; Colasacco, Carol; Benson, Al B; Carrato, Alfredo; Gulley, Margaret L; Jain, Dhanpat; Kakar, Sanjay; Mackay, Helen J; Streutker, Catherine; Tang, Laura; Troxell, Megan; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2016-12-01

    - ERBB2 (erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 or HER2) is currently the only biomarker established for selection of a specific therapy for patients with advanced gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma (GEA). However, there are no comprehensive guidelines for the assessment of HER2 in patients with GEA. - To establish an evidence-based guideline for HER2 testing in patients with GEA, to formalize the algorithms for methods to improve the accuracy of HER2 testing while addressing which patients and tumor specimens are appropriate, and to provide guidance on clinical decision making. - The College of American Pathologists, American Society for Clinical Pathology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology convened an expert panel to conduct a systematic review of the literature to develop an evidence-based guideline with recommendations for optimal HER2 testing in patients with GEA. - The panel is proposing 11 recommendations with strong agreement from the open-comment participants. - The panel recommends that tumor specimen(s) from all patients with advanced GEA, who are candidates for HER2-targeted therapy, should be assessed for HER2 status before the initiation of HER2-targeted therapy. Clinicians should offer combination chemotherapy and a HER2-targeted agent as initial therapy for all patients with HER2-positive advanced GEA. For pathologists, guidance is provided for morphologic selection of neoplastic tissue, testing algorithms, scoring methods, interpretation and reporting of results, and laboratory quality assurance. - This guideline provides specific recommendations for assessment of HER2 in patients with advanced GEA while addressing pertinent technical issues and clinical implications of the results.

  17. The role of clinical trials in veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Burton, Jenna; Khanna, Chand

    2014-09-01

    Clinical trials for companion animals are becoming more common and more accessible to pet owners as veterinary oncologists seek to expand their knowledge of tumor biology in companion animal species and improve the way they diagnose and treat cancer for these animals. Many owners enroll their pets because they wish to participate in clinical cancer research that may ultimately benefit pets and people. Understanding the goals, benefits, and risks of clinical trials participation provides the knowledge needed by primary care veterinarians to counsel their clients as to whether clinical trial participation is a good choice for them and their pets.

  18. Inside the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium: part 1 - kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Buti, Sebastiano; Ciccarese, Chiara; Iacovelli, Roberto; Bersanelli, Melissa; Scarpelli, Marina; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, Moscone West Building, San Francisco, CA, USA, 7-9 January 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, held in San Francisco (CA, USA), from 7 to 9 January 2016, focused on 'patient-centric care: translating research to results'. Every year, this meeting is a must for anyone studying genitourinary tumors to keep abreast of the most recent innovations in this field, exchange views on behaviors customarily adopted in daily clinical practice, and discuss future topics of scientific research. This two-part report highlights the key themes presented at the 2016 ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, with part 1 reporting the main novelties of kidney cancer and part 2 discussing the most relevant issues which have emerged for bladder and prostate tumors.

  19. Ki67 Proliferation Index as a Tool for Chemotherapy Decisions During and After Neoadjuvant Aromatase Inhibitor Treatment of Breast Cancer: Results From the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group Z1031 Trial (Alliance).

    PubMed

    Ellis, Matthew J; Suman, Vera J; Hoog, Jeremy; Goncalves, Rodrigo; Sanati, Souzan; Creighton, Chad J; DeSchryver, Katherine; Crouch, Erika; Brink, Amy; Watson, Mark; Luo, Jingqin; Tao, Yu; Barnes, Michael; Dowsett, Mitchell; Budd, G Thomas; Winer, Eric; Silverman, Paula; Esserman, Laura; Carey, Lisa; Ma, Cynthia X; Unzeitig, Gary; Pluard, Timothy; Whitworth, Pat; Babiera, Gildy; Guenther, J Michael; Dayao, Zoneddy; Ota, David; Leitch, Marilyn; Olson, John A; Allred, D Craig; Hunt, Kelly

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To determine the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate in estrogen receptor (ER) -positive primary breast cancer triaged to chemotherapy when the protein encoded by the MKI67 gene (Ki67) level was > 10% after 2 to 4 weeks of neoadjuvant aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy. A second objective was to examine risk of relapse using the Ki67-based Preoperative Endocrine Prognostic Index (PEPI). Methods The American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG) Z1031A trial enrolled postmenopausal women with stage II or III ER-positive (Allred score, 6 to 8) breast cancer whose treatment was randomly assigned to neoadjuvant AI therapy with anastrozole, exemestane, or letrozole. For the trial ACOSOG Z1031B, the protocol was amended to include a tumor Ki67 determination after 2 to 4 weeks of AI. If the Ki67 was > 10%, patients were switched to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A pCR rate of > 20% was the predefined efficacy threshold. In patients who completed neoadjuvant AI, stratified Cox modeling was used to assess whether time to recurrence differed by PEPI = 0 score (T1 or T2, N0, Ki67 < 2.7%, ER Allred > 2) versus PEPI > 0 disease. Results Only two of the 35 patients in ACOSOG Z1031B who were switched to neoadjuvant chemotherapy experienced a pCR (5.7%; 95% CI, 0.7% to 19.1%). After 5.5 years of median follow-up, four (3.7%) of the 109 patients with a PEPI = 0 score relapsed versus 49 (14.4%) of 341 of patients with PEPI > 0 (recurrence hazard ratio [PEPI = 0 v PEPI > 0], 0.27; P = .014; 95% CI, 0.092 to 0.764). Conclusion Chemotherapy efficacy was lower than expected in ER-positive tumors exhibiting AI-resistant proliferation. The optimal therapy for these patients should be further investigated. For patients with PEPI = 0 disease, the relapse risk over 5 years was only 3.6% without chemotherapy, supporting the study of adjuvant endocrine monotherapy in this group. These Ki67 and PEPI triage approaches are being definitively studied in the ALTERNATE trial (Alternate

  20. Integrating Personalized Medicine in the Canadian Environment: Efforts Facilitating Oncology Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Syme, Rachel; Carleton, Bruce; Leyens, Lada; Richer, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a rapid evolution of clinical practices based on the introduction of patient stratification and molecular diagnosis that is likely to improve health outcomes. Building on a strong research base, complemented by strong support from clinicians and health authorities, the oncology field is at the forefront of this evolution. Yet, clinical research is still facing many challenges that need to be addressed in order to conduct necessary studies and effectively translate medical breakthroughs based on personalized medicine into standards of care. Leveraging its universal health care system and on resources developed to support oncology clinical research, Canada is well positioned to join the international efforts deployed to address these challenges. Available resources include a broad range of structures and funding mechanisms, ranging from direct clinical trial support to post-marketing surveillance. Here, we propose a clinical model for the introduction of innovation for precision medicine in oncology that starts with patients' and clinicians' unmet needs to initiate a cycle of discovery, validation, translation and sustainability development.

  1. Precision medicine ethics: selected issues and developments in next-generation sequencing, clinical oncology, and ethics.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Robin N; Goodman, Kenneth W

    2016-01-01

    In early 2015 the National Institutes of Health launched a new, national Precision Medicine Initiative with the primary goal of rapidly improving the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cancers. The first-stage emphasis on oncology presents unique opportunities for clinical oncology to influence how the ethical challenges of precision medicine are to be articulated and addressed. Thus, a review of recent developments in connection with the Initiative, in particular on core ethics issues in clinical genomics, is a useful starting point. Unique ethical issues arise in precision medicine because of the enormous amounts of data generated by clinical whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing and the extent of current uncertainties with respect to data interpretations and disease associations. Among the most ethically challenging issues for clinicians are complicated informed consent processes, returning results - particularly secondary and incidental findings-and privacy and confidentiality. The first tests of precision medicine ethics in practice will be in clinical oncology, providing a rare opportunity to shape the agenda and integrate practical ethics considerations. These efforts can benefit from pre-existing research ethics analyses and recommendations from clinical and translational genetics research.

  2. Assessing the Eventual Publication of Clinical Trial Abstracts Submitted to a Large Annual Oncology Meeting.

    PubMed

    Massey, Paul R; Wang, Ruibin; Prasad, Vinay; Bates, Susan E; Fojo, Tito

    2016-03-01

    Despite the ethical imperative to publish clinical trials when human subjects are involved, such data frequently remain unpublished. The objectives were to tabulate the rate and ascertain factors associated with eventual publication of clinical trial results reported as abstracts in the Proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (American Society of Clinical Oncology). Abstracts describing clinical trials for patients with breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian, and prostate cancer from 2009 to 2011 were identified by using a comprehensive online database (http://meetinglibrary.asco.org/abstracts). Abstracts included reported results of a treatment or intervention assessed in a discrete, prospective clinical trial. Publication status at 4-6 years was determined by using a standardized search of PubMed. Primary outcomes were the rate of publication for abstracts of randomized and nonrandomized clinical trials. Secondary outcomes included factors influencing the publication of results. A total of 1,075 abstracts describing 378 randomized and 697 nonrandomized clinical trials were evaluated. Across all years, 75% of randomized and 54% of nonrandomized trials were published, with an overall publication rate of 61%. Sample size was a statistically significant predictor of publication for both randomized and nonrandomized trials (odds ratio [OR] per increase of 100 participants = 1.23 [1.11-1.36], p < .001; and 1.64 [1.15-2.34], p = .006, respectively). Among randomized studies, an industry coauthor or involvement of a cooperative group increased the likelihood of publication (OR 2.37, p = .013; and 2.21, p = .01, respectively). Among nonrandomized studies, phase II trials were more likely to be published than phase I (p < .001). Use of an experimental agent was not a predictor of publication in randomized (OR 0.76 [0.38-1.52]; p = .441) or nonrandomized trials (OR 0.89 [0.61-1.29]; p = .532). This is the largest reported study examining why oncology trials are

  3. Being-in-the-Chemotherapy-Suite versus Being-in-the-Oncology-Ward: An Analytical View of Two Hospital Sites Occupied by People Experiencing Cancer †

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Catherine; van Heugten, Kate; Keeling, Sally; Szekely, Francisc

    2017-01-01

    How do people with cancer occupy places within the health system during their journey through palliative care? The answer to this question was explored by the authors as part of a wider ethnographic study of eight people’s journeys from referral to palliative care services to the end of life. This article reports on findings that have emerged from ongoing analysis that has been completed in the years proceeding data collection. An ethnographic research design was used to collect data about the participants and their family members over a three-year period. Data was collected using participant observation and semi-structured interviews. Over 380 transcripts based on field note entries and taped interviews were produced during the 1121 h of contact with participants and family members that made up the research period. Analysis of these texts identified two focal sites within Christchurch Hospital that were occupied by the participants. These were the Chemotherapy Suite and the Oncology Ward. Drawing on literature concerning previous anthropological analysis, research was conducted to understand how places affect people and how people affect places. The researchers have used a model outlined by the American ethnographer Miles Richardson to analyse two distinct sites within one hospital. As explained in Richardson’s article, whose title is used to model the title of this article, a sense of place becomes apparent when comparing and contrasting two sites within the same location. Richardson’s article is highly interpretative and relies not only on pre-existing theoretical frameworks but also on personal interpretation. The same approach has been used in the current article. Here, ethnographic methods require the researcher’s interpretation of how participants occupied these sites. Following this approach, the Chemotherapy Suite is presented as a place where medicine dominates illness, and appears as distinct from the Oncology Ward, where disease predominates and

  4. Differences in Demographic, Clinical, and Symptom Characteristics and Quality of Life Outcomes Among Oncology Patients with Different Types of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Posternak, Victoria; Dunn, Laura B.; Dhruva, Anand; Paul, Steven M.; Luce, Judith; Mastick, Judy; Levine, Jon D.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Hammer, Marylin; Wright, Fay; Miaskowski, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study, in oncology outpatients receiving chemotherapy (CTX, n=926), were to: describe the occurrence of different types of pain (i.e., no pain, only non-cancer pain (NCP), only cancer pain (CP), or both CP and NCP) and evaluate for differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics, and quality of life (QOL) among the four groups. Patients completed self-report questionnaires on demographic and symptom characteristics and QOL. Patients who had pain were asked to indicate if it was or was not related to their cancer or its treatment. Medical records were reviewed for information on cancer and its treatments. In this study, 72.5% of the patients reported pain. Of the 671 who reported pain, 21.5% reported only NCP, 37.0% only CP, and 41.5% both CP and NCP. Across the three pain groups, worst pain scores were in the moderate to severe range. Compared to the no pain group, patients with both CP and NCP were significantly younger, more likely to be female, have a higher level of comorbidity and a poorer functional status. In addition, these patients reported: higher levels of depression, anxiety, fatigue, and sleep disturbance; lower levels of energy and attentional function; and poorer QOL. Patients with only NCP were significantly older than the other three groups. The most common comorbidities in the NCP group were back pain, hypertension, osteoarthritis, and depression. Unrelieved CP and NCP continue to be significant problems. Oncology outpatients need to be assessed for both CP and NCP conditions. PMID:26683234

  5. Fertility preservation for patients with cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update.

    PubMed

    Loren, Alison W; Mangu, Pamela B; Beck, Lindsay Nohr; Brennan, Lawrence; Magdalinski, Anthony J; Partridge, Ann H; Quinn, Gwendolyn; Wallace, W Hamish; Oktay, Kutluk

    2013-07-01

    To update guidance for health care providers about fertility preservation for adults and children with cancer. A systematic review of the literature published from March 2006 through January 2013 was completed using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library. An Update Panel reviewed the evidence and updated the recommendation language. There were 222 new publications that met inclusion criteria. A majority were observational studies, cohort studies, and case series or reports, with few randomized clinical trials. After review of the new evidence, the Update Panel concluded that no major, substantive revisions to the 2006 American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations were warranted, but clarifications were added. As part of education and informed consent before cancer therapy, health care providers (including medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, gynecologic oncologists, urologists, hematologists, pediatric oncologists, and surgeons) should address the possibility of infertility with patients treated during their reproductive years (or with parents or guardians of children) and be prepared to discuss fertility preservation options and/or to refer all potential patients to appropriate reproductive specialists. Although patients may be focused initially on their cancer diagnosis, the Update Panel encourages providers to advise patients regarding potential threats to fertility as early as possible in the treatment process so as to allow for the widest array of options for fertility preservation. The discussion should be documented. Sperm and embryo cryopreservation as well as oocyte cryopreservation are considered standard practice and are widely available. Other fertility preservation methods should be considered investigational and should be performed by providers with the necessary expertise.

  6. Polymer-Drug Conjugates: Recent Development in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun; Wallace, Sidney

    2008-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery aims to increase the therapeutic index by making more drug molecules available at the diseased sites while reducing systemic drug exposure. In this update, we provide an overview of polymer-drug conjugates that have advanced into the clinical trials. These systems use synthetic water-soluble polymers as the drug carriers. The preclinical pharmacology and recent data in clinical trials with poly(L-glutamic acid)-paclitaxel (PG-TXL) are discussed first. This is followed by a summary of conjugates of a variety of polymeric conjugates with chemotherapeutic agents. Results from early clinical trials of these polymer-drug conjugates have demonstrated several advantages over the corresponding parent drugs, including fewer side effects, enhanced therapeutic efficacy, ease of drug administration, and improved patient compliance. Collectively, these data warrant further clinical development of polymer-drug conjugates as a new class of anticancer agents. PMID:18374448

  7. Processes for quality improvements in radiation oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, T J; Urie, Marcia; Ulin, Kenneth; Laurie, Fran; Yorty, Jeffrey; Hanusik, Richard; Kessel, Sandy; Jodoin, Maryann Bishop; Osagie, Gani; Cicchetti, M Giulia; Pieters, Richard; McCarten, Kathleen; Rosen, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Quality assurance in radiotherapy (RT) has been an integral aspect of cooperative group clinical trials since 1970. In early clinical trials, data acquisition was nonuniform and inconsistent and computational models for radiation dose calculation varied significantly. Process improvements developed for data acquisition, credentialing, and data management have provided the necessary infrastructure for uniform data. With continued improvement in the technology and delivery of RT, evaluation processes for target definition, RT planning, and execution undergo constant review. As we move to multimodality image-based definitions of target volumes for protocols, future clinical trials will require near real-time image analysis and feedback to field investigators. The ability of quality assurance centers to meet these real-time challenges with robust electronic interaction platforms for imaging acquisition, review, archiving, and quantitative review of volumetric RT plans will be the primary challenge for future successful clinical trials.

  8. Photoacoustic Imaging in Oncology: Translational Preclinical and Early Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Valluru, Keerthi S.; Wilson, Katheryne E.

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has evolved into a clinically translatable platform with the potential to complement existing imaging techniques for the management of cancer, including detection, characterization, prognosis, and treatment monitoring. In photoacoustic imaging, tissue is optically excited to produce ultrasonographic images that represent a spatial map of optical absorption of endogenous constituents such as hemoglobin, fat, melanin, and water or exogenous contrast agents such as dyes and nanoparticles. It can therefore provide functional and molecular information that allows noninvasive soft-tissue characterization. Photoacoustic imaging has matured over the years and is currently being translated into the clinic with various clinical studies underway. In this review, the current state of photoacoustic imaging is presented, including techniques and instrumentation, followed by a discussion of potential clinical applications of this technique for the detection and management of cancer. © RSNA, 2016 PMID:27429141

  9. Clinically relevant drug–drug interactions in oncology

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Howard L

    1998-01-01

    Although anticancer agents are one of the most toxic classes of medication prescribed today, there is relatively little information available about clinically relevant drug–drug interactions. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions have been described, including alterations in absorption, catabolism, and excretion. For example, an increased bioavailability of 6-mercaptopurine has been observed when combined with either allopurinol or methotrexate, leading to increased toxicity in some patients. Induction of etoposide or teniposide clearance by anticonvulsants has also been described, resulting in a lower systemic exposure and risk for lower anticancer activity. Alterations in elimination of methotrexate has been observed with probenecid, presumably through competition for renal secretion. There are also several examples of pharmacodynamic interactions. The combination of 5-fluorouracil plus folinic acid results in more efficient inhibition of thymidylate synthase, a finding which is now utilized routinely in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Improvements in the in vitro and early clinical testing now allow a relatively high degree of prediction of potential clinical drug interactions, prior to observations of untoward drug effects. In conclusion, drug interactions among commonly used anticancer agents have been identified. Their clinical significance can have more impact than many other classes of medications due to the narrow therapeutic index of antineoplastic agents and the potential for lethal side-effects. It is only through prospective, preclinical and early clinical evaluation that the presence of clinically significant drug interactions can be identified and the information used to provide better therapy for this significant health problem. PMID:9663808

  10. CHARACTERISTICS OF DRUG COMBINATION THERAPY IN ONCOLOGY BY ANALYZING CLINICAL TRIAL DATA ON CLINICALTRIALS.GOV

    PubMed Central

    WU, MENGHUA; SIROTA, MARINA; BUTTE, ATUL J.

    2015-01-01

    Within the past few decades, drug combination therapy has been intensively studied in oncology and other complex disease areas, especially during the early drug discovery stage, as drug combinations have the potential to improve treatment response, minimize development of resistance or minimize adverse events. In the present, designing combination trials relies mainly on clinical and empirical experience. While empirical experience has indeed crafted efficacious combination therapy clinical trials (combination trials), however, garnering experience with patients can take a lifetime. The preliminary step to eliminating this barrier of time, then, is to understand the current state of combination trials. Thus, we present the first large-scale study of clinical trials (2008–2013) from ClinicalTrials.gov to compare combination trials to non-combination trials, with a focus on oncology. In this work, we developed a classifier to identify combination trials and oncology trials through natural language processing techniques. After clustering trials, we categorized them based on selected characteristics and observed trends present. Among the characteristics studied were primary purpose, funding source, endpoint measurement, allocation, and trial phase. We observe a higher prevalence of combination therapy in oncology (25.6% use combination trials) in comparison to other disease trials (6.9%). However, surprisingly the prevalence of combinations does not increase over the years. In addition, the trials supported by the NIH are significantly more likely to use combinations of drugs than those supported by industry. Our preliminary study of current combination trials may facilitate future trial design and move more preclinical combination studies to the clinical trial stage. PMID:25592569

  11. Identifying Health Information Technology Needs of Oncologists to Facilitate the Adoption of Genomic Medicine: Recommendations From the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Omics and Precision Oncology Workshop.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Kevin S; Ambinder, Edward P; Hess, Gregory P; Yu, Peter Paul; Bernstam, Elmer V; Routbort, Mark J; Clemenceau, Jean Rene; Hamm, John T; Febbo, Phillip G; Domchek, Susan M; Chen, James L; Warner, Jeremy L

    2017-09-20

    At the ASCO Data Standards and Interoperability Summit held in May 2016, it was unanimously decided that four areas of current oncology clinical practice have serious, unmet health information technology needs. The following areas of need were identified: 1) omics and precision oncology, 2) advancing interoperability, 3) patient engagement, and 4) value-based oncology. To begin to address these issues, ASCO convened two complementary workshops: the Omics and Precision Oncology Workshop in October 2016 and the Advancing Interoperability Workshop in December 2016. A common goal was to address the complexity, enormity, and rapidly changing nature of genomic information, which existing electronic health records are ill equipped to manage. The subject matter experts invited to the Omics and Precision Oncology Workgroup were tasked with the responsibility of determining a specific, limited need that could be addressed by a software application (app) in the short-term future, using currently available genomic knowledge bases. Hence, the scope of this workshop was to determine the basic functionality of one app that could serve as a test case for app development. The goal of the second workshop, described separately, was to identify the specifications for such an app. This approach was chosen both to facilitate the development of a useful app and to help ASCO and oncologists better understand the mechanics, difficulties, and gaps in genomic clinical decision support tool development. In this article, we discuss the key challenges and recommendations identified by the workshop participants. Our hope is to narrow the gap between the practicing oncologist and ongoing national efforts to provide precision oncology and value-based care to cancer patients.

  12. American Society of Hematology/American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update on the use of epoetin and darbepoetin in adult patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, J Douglas; Brouwers, Melissa; Hurley, Patricia; Seidenfeld, Jerome; Arcasoy, Murat O; Spivak, Jerry L; Bennett, Charles L; Bohlius, Julia; Evanchuk, Darren; Goode, Matthew J; Jakubowski, Ann A; Regan, David H; Somerfield, Mark R

    2010-11-18

    To update American Society of Hematology/American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations for use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in patients with cancer. An Update Committee reviewed data published between January 2007 and January 2010. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library were searched. The literature search yielded one new individual patient data analysis and four literature-based meta-analyses, two systematic reviews, and 13 publications reporting new results from randomized controlled trials not included in prior or new reviews. For patients undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy who have a hemoglobin (Hb) level less than 10 g/dL, the Update Committee recommends that clinicians discuss potential harms (eg, thromboembolism, shorter survival) and benefits (eg, decreased transfusions) of ESAs and compare these with potential harms (eg, serious infections, immune-mediated adverse reactions) and benefits (eg, rapid Hb improvement) of RBC transfusions. Individual preferences for assumed risk should contribute to shared decisions on managing chemotherapy-induced anemia. The Committee cautions against ESA use under other circumstances. If used, ESAs should be administered at the lowest dose possible and should increase Hb to the lowest concentration possible to avoid transfusions. Available evidence does not identify Hb levels ≥ 10 g/dL either as thresholds for initiating treatment or as targets for ESA therapy. Starting doses and dose modifications after response or nonresponse should follow US Food and Drug Administration-approved labeling. ESAs should be discontinued after 6 to 8 weeks in nonresponders. ESAs should be avoided in patients with cancer not receiving concurrent chemotherapy, except for those with lower risk myelodysplastic syndromes. Caution should be exercised when using ESAs with chemotherapeutic agents in diseases associated with increased risk of thromboembolic complications. Table 1 lists detailed recommendations.

  13. American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Society of Hematology clinical practice guideline update on the use of epoetin and darbepoetin in adult patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, J Douglas; Brouwers, Melissa; Hurley, Patricia; Seidenfeld, Jerome; Arcasoy, Murat O; Spivak, Jerry L; Bennett, Charles L; Bohlius, Julia; Evanchuk, Darren; Goode, Matthew J; Jakubowski, Ann A; Regan, David H; Somerfield, Mark R

    2010-11-20

    To update American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Society of Hematology recommendations for use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in patients with cancer. An Update Committee reviewed data published between January 2007 and January 2010. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library were searched. The literature search yielded one new individual patient data analysis and four literature-based meta-analyses, two systematic reviews, and 13 publications reporting new results from randomized controlled trials not included in prior or new reviews. For patients undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy who have a hemoglobin (Hb) level less than 10 g/dL, the Update Committee recommends that clinicians discuss potential harms (eg, thromboembolism, shorter survival) and benefits (eg, decreased transfusions) of ESAs and compare these with potential harms (eg, serious infections, immune-mediated adverse reactions) and benefits (eg, rapid Hb improvement) of RBC transfusions. Individual preferences for assumed risk should contribute to shared decisions on managing chemotherapy-induced anemia. The Committee cautions against ESA use under other circumstances. If used, ESAs should be administered at the lowest dose possible and should increase Hb to the lowest concentration possible to avoid transfusions. Available evidence does not identify Hb levels ≥ 10 g/dL either as thresholds for initiating treatment or as targets for ESA therapy. Starting doses and dose modifications after response or nonresponse should follow US Food and Drug Administration-approved labeling. ESAs should be discontinued after 6 to 8 weeks in nonresponders. ESAs should be avoided in patients with cancer not receiving concurrent chemotherapy, except for those with lower risk myelodysplastic syndromes. Caution should be exercised when using ESAs with chemotherapeutic agents in diseases associated with increased risk of thromboembolic complications. Table 1 lists detailed recommendations.

  14. [Chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia: about 200 episodes. Clinical, microbiological and therapeutic characteristics].

    PubMed

    Gharbi, O; Ben Hadj Hassen, S; Kaabia, N; Limam, S; Hadj Amor, M; Ben Fatma, L; Landolsi, A; Hochlef, M; Letaief, A; Boukadida, J; Ben Ahmed, S

    2008-05-01

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy suppresses the haematopoietic system, febrile neutropenia is the most serious haematological toxicity associated with the risk of life-threatening infections. We present a retrospective study of 200 episodes of febrile neutropenia in 128 patients treated in department of medical oncology. The aim of this study was to determinate the clinical, therapeutic and evolutive characteristics in patients treated essentially for solid tumors. Among these patients, 72% of them have at least two episodes, the median age was 34 years with extremes six and 75 years. It has been noticed that 26.3% of patients have diabetes, the dominate neoplasm was solid tumors in 79.7%, 65% of patients have received preventive colony-stimulating factors, 83% have received preventive buccal disinfection with antifungic. The median duration of hospitalisation was 12 days, the median delay of febrile neutropenia was 10 days with extremes two and 31 days, median duration of febrile neutropenia was 5.45 days with extremes one and 24 days. Among these cases, 9.45% of them have nadir zero, 68% of patients have clinical documented infections, ORL in 47% of cases. According to the study, 12% of cases have documented microbiological fever, the sites was urinary in 33% of cases, blood in 33% of cases, derm in 30% of cases. The microbe was staphylococcus negative coagulase in 37.5% essentially in blood and derm, the Escherichia coli in 20.8% essentially in urinary and blood. First line antibiotherapy was cefotaxim associated with amikacine in 93.5%, second line antibiotherapy was association of imipenam and amikacine in 82% of cases. Among these cases,7% of them have received anti-staphylococcus, and antifungic treatment in 50% of cases. The thermic defervescence was obtained in median delay of 2.8 days. We have noted nine deaths (22% of cases). Recent surveys indicate that neutropenia remains a prevalent problem associated with substantial morbidity, mortality and costs. The colony

  15. Informed consent in oncology clinical trials: A Brown University Oncology Research Group prospective cross-sectional pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Andrew; Sikov, William M.; Quesenberry, Matthew I.; Safran, Howard; Khurshid, Humera; Mitchell, Kristen M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Informed consent forms (ICFs) for oncology clinical trials have grown increasingly longer and more complex. We evaluated objective understanding of critical components of informed consent among patients enrolling in contemporary trials of conventional or novel biologic/targeted therapies. Methods We evaluated ICFs for cancer clinical trials for length and readability, and patients registered on those studies were asked to complete a validated 14-question survey assessing their understanding of key characteristics of the trial. Mean scores were compared in groups defined by trial and patient characteristics. Results Fifty patients, of whom half participated in trials of immunotherapy or biologic/targeted agents and half in trials of conventional therapy, completed the survey. On average, ICFs for industry-originated trials (N = 9 trials) were significantly longer (P < .0001) and had lower Flesch ease-of-reading scores (P = .003) than investigator-initiated trials (N = 11). At least 80% of patients incorrectly responded to three key questions which addressed the experimental nature of their trial therapy, its purported efficacy and potential risks relative to alternative treatments. The mean objective understanding score was 76.9±8.8, but it was statistically significantly lower for patients who had not completed high school (P = .011). The scores did not differ significantly by type of cancer therapy (P = .12) or trial sponsor (P = .38). Conclusions Many participants enrolled on cancer trials had poor understanding of essential elements of their trial. In order to ensure true informed consent, innovative approaches, such as expanded in-person counseling adapted to the patient’s education level or cultural characteristics should be evaluated across socio-demographic groups. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01772511 PMID:28235011

  16. Perspectives on the design of clinical trials for targeted therapies and immunotherapy in veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Marconato, Laura; Buracco, Paolo; Aresu, Luca

    2015-08-01

    The field of oncology research has undergone major changes in recent years. Progress in molecular and cellular biology has led to a greater understanding of the cellular pathways and mechanisms of cell proliferation and tissue invasion associated with cancer. New classes of cancer therapies are becoming available or are in development but these new agents require a paradigm shift in the design of oncology clinical trials. This review provides an overview of clinical trial designs for the development of tumour vaccines and targeted therapeutic agents. In addition, some of the successes, limitations and challenges of these trials are discussed, with a special emphasis on the difficulties and particularities that are encountered in veterinary medicine compared to similar work in human patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel dose-finding designs and considerations on practical implementations in oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo; Bycott, Paul; Talukder, Enayet

    2017-01-01

    One of the main objectives in phase I oncology trials is to evaluate safety and tolerability of an experimental treatment by estimating the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) based on the rate of dose-limiting toxicities (DLT). To meet emerging challenges in dose-finding studies, over the past two decades, extensive research has been conducted by statistical and medical researchers to create innovative dose finding designs that perform better than the standard 3 + 3 design, which often exhibits undesirable statistical and operational properties. However, clinical implementation and practical usage of these new designs have been limited. This article begins with a review of the most recent literature and then provides some perspectives on implementing novel adaptive dose finding designs in oncology phase I trials from a pharmaceutical industry perspective. Statistical planning and logistical considerations on how to effectively execute such designs in multi-center clinical trials are discussed using two recent case studies.

  18. Intensified Chemotherapy With Dexrazoxane Cardioprotection in Newly Diagnosed Nonmetastatic Osteosarcoma: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Cindy L; Wexler, Leonard H; Krailo, Mark D; Teot, Lisa A; Devidas, Meenakshi; Steinherz, Laurel J; Goorin, Allen M; Gebhardt, Mark C; Healey, John H; Sato, Judith K; Meyers, Paul A; Grier, Holcombe E; Bernstein, Mark L; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2016-01-01

    Although chemotherapy has improved outcome of osteosarcoma, 30-40% of patients succumb to this disease. Survivors experience substantial morbidity and mortality from anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity. We hypothesized that the cardioprotectant dexrazoxane would (i) support escalation of the cumulative doxorubicin dose (600 mg/m(2)) and (ii) not interfere with the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy measured by necrosis grading in comparison to historical control data. Children and adolescents with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma were treated with MAP (methotrexate, doxorubicin, cisplatin) or MAPI (MAP/ifosfamide). Dexrazoxane was administered with all doxorubicin doses. Cardioprotection was assessed by measuring left ventricular fractional shortening. Interference with chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity was determined by measuring tumor necrosis after induction chemotherapy. Feasibility of intensifying therapy with either high cumulative-dose doxorubicin or high-dose ifosfamide/etoposide was evaluated for "standard responders" (SR, <98% tumor necrosis at definitive surgery). Dexrazoxane did not compromise response to induction chemotherapy. With doxorubicin (450-600 mg/m(2)) and dexrazoxane, grade 1 or 2 left ventricular dysfunction occurred in five patients; 4/5 had transient effects. Left ventricular fractional shortening z-scores (FSZ) showed minimal reductions (0.0170  ±  0.009/week) over 78 weeks. Two patients (<1%) had secondary leukemia, one as a first event, a similar rate to what has been observed in prior trials. Intensification with high-dose ifosfamide/etoposide was also feasible. Dexrazoxane cardioprotection was safely administered. It did not impair tumor response or increase the risk of secondary malignancy. Dexrazoxane allowed for therapeutic intensification increasing the cumulative doxorubicin dose in SR to induction chemotherapy. These findings support the use of dexrazoxane in children and adolescents with osteosarcoma. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals

  19. Factors associated with clinical trial screening failures in gynecologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Manders, Dustin B; Paulsen, Annette; Richardson, Debra L; Kehoe, Siobhan M; Miller, David S; Lea, Jayanthi S

    2014-09-01

    Low enrollment of adult cancer patients in clinical trials is an ongoing challenge in cancer research. We sought to determine factors associated with clinical trial screening failures in women with gynecologic malignancies at a large urban university health system. A retrospective review was conducted of women with gynecologic malignancies who presented to an urban university system between 12/2009 and 12/2012. Data collected included demographic, clinico-pathologic and trial-related factors, as well as reasons for non-participation. Two hundred twenty-one patients were eligible for a clinical trial. Of these, 44% participated while 56% did not. There were more screening failures when trials were offered at the time of primary treatment than at recurrence (62% vs. 38%, p=0.001). There was no significant difference in participation based on age, ethnicity, hospital setting, payor status, family history, comorbidities, prior treatment, substance abuse, recent surgery or trial type. Of the non-participants, 62% declined the study due to perceived harm and 10% due to socio-economic barriers while 20% were excluded due to co-morbidities and 8% due to noncompliance. Significantly more screening failures for clinical trials occurred when trials were offered at the time of primary treatment. The majority of patients declined based on perceived harm from enrolling in a clinical trial, although 20% of eligible patients were not offered enrollment despite not meeting any exclusion criteria. Our findings underscore the importance of appropriate counseling when offering clinical trials, as well as overcoming physician biases in deciding who is an appropriate candidate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Clinical Decision Support Tool To Predict Survival in Cancer Patients beyond 120 Days after Palliative Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Terence

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Palliative chemotherapy is often administered to terminally ill cancer patients to relieve symptoms. Yet, unnecessary use of chemotherapy can worsen patients' quality of life due to treatment-related toxicities. Thus, accurate prediction of survival in terminally ill patients can help clinicians decide on the most appropriate palliative care for these patients. However, studies have shown that clinicians often make imprecise predictions of survival in cancer patients. Hence, the purpose of this study was to create a clinical decision support tool to predict survival in cancer patients beyond 120 days after palliative chemotherapy. Materials and Methods Data were obtained from a retrospective study of 400 randomly selected terminally ill cancer patients in the National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) from 2008 to 2009. After removing patients with missing data, there were 325 patients remaining for model development. Three classification algorithms, naive Bayes (NB), neural network (NN), and support vector machine (SVM) were used to create the models. A final model with the best prediction performance was then selected to develop the tool. Results The NN model had the best prediction performance. The accuracy, specificity, sensitivity, and area under the curve (AUC) of this model were 78%, 82%, 74%, and 0.857, respectively. Five patient attributes (albumin level, alanine transaminase level (ATL), absolute neutrophil count, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status, and number of metastatic sites) were included in the model. Conclusions A decision support tool to predict survival in cancer patients beyond 120 days after palliative chemotherapy was created. With further validation, this tool coupled with the professional judgment of clinicians can help improve patient care. PMID:22690950

  1. Metro-Minnesota Community Clinical Oncology Program (MM-CCOP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The Metro-Minnesota Community Clinical Oncology (MMCCOP) program has a long-standing history which clearly demonstrates the success of the consortium, as demonstrated by both the ongoing commitment of the original consortium members and the growth of the consortium from 1979 through 2014. The MMCCOP consortium represents an established community program base which began in 1979 through its NCI-funded Community Hospital Cancer Program (CHCP) Award. |

  2. Effect of Low-Intensity Physical Activity and Moderate- to High-Intensity Physical Exercise During Adjuvant Chemotherapy on Physical Fitness, Fatigue, and Chemotherapy Completion Rates: Results of the PACES Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    van Waart, Hanna; Stuiver, Martijn M; van Harten, Wim H; Geleijn, Edwin; Kieffer, Jacobien M; Buffart, Laurien M; de Maaker-Berkhof, Marianne; Boven, Epie; Schrama, Jolanda; Geenen, Maud M; Meerum Terwogt, Jetske M; van Bochove, Aart; Lustig, Vera; van den Heiligenberg, Simone M; Smorenburg, Carolien H; Hellendoorn-van Vreeswijk, Jeannette A J H; Sonke, Gabe S; Aaronson, Neil K

    2015-06-10

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a low-intensity, home-based physical activity program (Onco-Move) and a moderate- to high-intensity, combined supervised resistance and aerobic exercise program (OnTrack) versus usual care (UC) in maintaining or enhancing physical fitness, minimizing fatigue, enhancing health-related quality of life, and optimizing chemotherapy completion rates in patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. We randomly assigned patients who were scheduled to undergo adjuvant chemotherapy (N = 230) to Onco-Move, OnTrack, or UC. Performance-based and self-reported outcomes were assessed before random assignment, at the end of chemotherapy, and at the 6-month follow-up. We used generalized estimating equations to compare the groups over time. Onco-Move and OnTrack resulted in less decline in cardiorespiratory fitness (P < .001), better physical functioning (P ≤ .001), less nausea and vomiting (P = .029 and .031, respectively) and less pain (P = .003 and .011, respectively) compared with UC. OnTrack also resulted in better outcomes for muscle strength (P = .002) and physical fatigue (P < .001). At the 6-month follow-up, most outcomes returned to baseline levels for all three groups. A smaller percentage of participants in OnTrack required chemotherapy dose adjustments than those in the UC or Onco-Move groups (P = .002). Both intervention groups returned earlier (P = .012), as well as for more hours per week (P = .014), to work than the control group. A supervised, moderate- to high-intensity, combined resistance and aerobic exercise program is most effective for patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy. A home-based, low-intensity physical activity program represents a viable alternative for women who are unable or unwilling to follow the higher intensity program. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. Vienna Summer School on Oncology: how to teach clinical decision making in a multidisciplinary environment.

    PubMed

    Lütgendorf-Caucig, Carola; Kaiser, Philipp A; Machacek, Alexandra; Waldstein, Cora; Pötter, Richard; Löffler-Stastka, Henriette

    2017-06-06

    Clinical decision making in oncology is based on both inter- and multidisciplinary approach. Hence teaching future doctors involved in oncology or general health practice is crucial. The aim of the Vienna Summer School on Oncology (VSSO) as an international, integrated, undergraduate oncology course is to teach medical students interdisciplinary team communication and application of treatment concepts/algorithms in a multidisciplinary setting. The teaching is based on an inter- and multidisciplinary faculty and a multimodal education approach to address different learning styles. The participants rated their satisfaction of the program voluntarily after finishing the course according to a grading scale from one (not good) to five (very good). The learning success was assessed by a compulsory pre-VSSO and post-VSSO single choice questionnaire. Program organisation was rated with a mean score of 4.47 out of 5.0 (SD 0.51), composition of the program and range of topics with a mean score of 4.68 (SD 0.58) and all teachers with a mean score of 4.36 (SD 0.40) points. Student evaluation at the beginning and end of the program indicated significant knowledge acquisition -i.e., general aspects of cancer: median 8.75 points (IQR 7.5-9.4) vs.10.0 points (IQR 9.4-10.0) p = 0.005; specific aspects of cancer: median 4.87 points (IQR 3.33-5.71) vs. 8.72 points (IQR 6.78-9.49) p ≤ 0.001, respectively. Even though the participants represent a selection of students with special interest in cancer, the results of the VSSO indicate the benefit of an inter- and multidisciplinary teaching approach within an oncology module.

  4. Medication double-checking procedures in clinical practice: a cross-sectional survey of oncology nurses' experiences.

    PubMed

    Schwappach, D L B; Pfeiffer, Yvonne; Taxis, Katja

    2016-06-13

    Double-checking is widely recommended as an essential method to prevent medication errors. However, prior research has shown that the concept of double-checking is not clearly defined, and that little is known about actual practice in oncology, for example, what kind of checking procedures are applied. To study the practice of different double-checking procedures in chemotherapy administration and to explore nurses' experiences, for example, how often they actually find errors using a certain procedure. General evaluations regarding double-checking, for example, frequency of interruptions during and caused by a check, or what is regarded as its essential feature was assessed. In a cross-sectional survey, qualified nurses working in oncology departments of 3 hospitals were asked to rate 5 different scenarios of double-checking procedures regarding dimensions such as frequency of use in practice and appropriateness to prevent medication errors; they were also asked general questions about double-checking. Overall, 274 nurses (70% response rate) participated in the survey. The procedure of jointly double-checking (read-read back) was most commonly used (69% of respondents) and rated as very appropriate to prevent medication errors. Jointly checking medication was seen as the essential characteristic of double-checking-more frequently than 'carrying out checks independently' (54% vs 24%). Most nurses (78%) found the frequency of double-checking in their department appropriate. Being interrupted in one's own current activity for supporting a double-check was reported to occur frequently. Regression analysis revealed a strong preference towards checks that are currently implemented at the responders' workplace. Double-checking is well regarded by oncology nurses as a procedure to help prevent errors, with jointly checking being used most frequently. Our results show that the notion of independent checking needs to be transferred more actively into clinical practice. The

  5. Experiences and preferences of patients visiting a head and neck oncology outpatient clinic: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Bisschop, Jeroen A S; Kloosterman, Fabienne R; van Leijen-Zeelenberg, Janneke E; Huismans, Geert Willem; Kremer, Bernd; Kross, Kenneth W

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study is to report on an in-depth evaluation of patient experiences and preferences at a Head and Neck Oncology outpatient clinic. A qualitative research design was used to determine the experiences and preferences of Head and Neck Cancer patients in an Oncology Outpatient Clinic, Maastricht University Medical Center, The Netherlands. Head and Neck Cancer Patients, treated for at least 6 months at the Oncology Clinic, were included. A qualitative research design with patient interviews was used. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim to increase validity. Analysis was done with use of the template approach and qualitative data analysis software. Three of the six dimensions predominated in the interview: (1) respect for patients' values, preferences and expressed need, (2) information, communication and education and (3) involvement of family and friends. The dimensions physical comfort; emotional support; coordination and integration of care were considered to be of less significance. The findings from this study resulted in a deeper understanding of patients' experiences and preferences and can be useful in the transition towards a more patient-centered approach of health care.

  6. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy statement: oversight of clinical research.

    PubMed

    2003-06-15

    Well-publicized lapses in the review or implementation of clinical research studies have raised public questions about the integrity of the clinical research process. Public trust in the integrity of research is critical not only for funding and participation in clinical trials but also for confidence in the treatments that result from the trials. The questions raised by these unfortunate cases pose an important opportunity to reassess the clinical trials oversight system to ensure the integrity of clinical research and the safety of those who enroll in clinical trials. Since its inception, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has worked for the advancement of cancer treatments through clinical research and to help patients gain prompt access to scientifically excellent and ethically unimpeachable clinical trials. As an extension of its mission, ASCO is affirming with this policy statement the critical importance of a robust review and oversight system to ensure that clinical trials participants give fully informed consent and that their safety is a top priority. Ensuring the integrity of research cannot be stressed enough because of its seminal connection to the advancement of clinical cancer treatment. The overall goal of this policy is to enhance public trust in the cancer clinical trials process. To achieve this, the following elements are essential: 1. Ensure safety precautions for clinical trial participants and their fully informed consent. 2. Ensure the validity and integrity of scientific research. 3. Enhance the educational training of clinical scientists and research staff to ensure the highest standards of research conduct. 4. Promote accountability and responsibility among all those involved in clinical research (not just those serving on institutional review boards [IRBs], but also institutional officials, researchers, sponsors, and participants) and ensure support for an effective oversight process. 5. Enhance the professional and public

  7. Is the clinical use of cannabis by oncology patients advisable?

    PubMed

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Avisar, Adva; Batash, Ron; Schaffer, Moshe

    2014-06-01

    The use of the cannabis plant for various medical indications by cancer patients has been rising significantly in the past few years in several European countries, the US and Israel. The increase in use comes from public demand for the most part, and not due to a scientific basis. Cannabis chemistry is complex, and the isolation and extraction of the active ingredient remain difficult. The active agent in cannabis is unique among psychoactive plant materials, as it contains no nitrogen and, thus, is not an alkaloid. Alongside inconclusive evidence of increased risks of lung and head and neck cancers from prolonged smoking of the plant produce, laboratory evidence of the anti-cancer effects of plant components exists, but with no clinical research in this direction. The beneficial effects of treatment with the plant, or treatment with medicine produced from its components, are related to symptoms of the disease: pain, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight loss. The clinical evidence of the efficacy of cannabis for these indications is only partial. However, recent scientific data from studies with THC and cannabidiol combinations report the first clinical indication of cancer-related pain relief. The difficulties of performing research into products that are not medicinal, such as cannabis, have not allowed a true study of the cannabis plant extract although, from the public point of view, such studies are greatly desirable.

  8. Clinical applications of continuous infusion chemotherapy ahd concomitant radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, C.J.; Rotman, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: theoretical basis and clinical applications of 5-FU as a radiosensitizer; treatment of hepatic metastases from gastro intestingal primaries with split course radiation therapy; combined modality therapy with 5-FU, Mitomycin-C and radiation therapy for sqamous cell cancers; treatment of bladder carcinoma with concomitant infusion chemotherapy and irradiation; a treatment of invasiv bladder cancer by the XRT/5FU protocol; concomitant radiation therapy and doxorubicin by continuous infusion in advanced malignancies; cis platin by continuous infusion with concurrent radiation therapy in malignant tumors; combination of radiation with concomitant continuous adriamycin infusion in a patient with partially excised pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma of the lower extremeity; treatment of recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses using concomitant infusion cis-platinum and radiation therapy; hepatic artery infusion for hepatic metastases in combination with hepatic resection and hepatic radiation; study of simultaneous radiation therapy, continuous infusion, 5FU and bolus mitomycin-C; cancer of the esophagus; continuous infusion VP-16, bolus cis-platinum and simultaneous radiation therapy as salvage therapy in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma; and concomitant radiation, mitomycin-C and 5-FU infusion in gastro intestinal cancer.

  9. Using Patient Reported Outcomes in Oncology Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Sarah A; Somers, Tamara J; Locklear, Tracie; Crosswell, Alexandra D; Abernethy, Amy P

    2016-10-01

    Patient reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly being implemented into the care of patients with cancer. The use of a standard set of PROs (e.g., pain) in cancer is becoming established and there is interest in what additional PROs might provide valuable information. The goal of this observational study was to examine how the PROs of self-efficacy for pain and other symptoms assessed at the point of service were associated with pain, symptom severity and distress, and physical and psychosocial functioning in a sample of breast and gastrointestinal patients. We also sought to examine differences in these relationships by cancer type (breast and gastrointestinal) as well as understand differences in self-assessment mode (paper/pencil or electronic tablet). 178 patients with breast (n=65) and gastrointestinal cancer (n = 113) completed the Chronic Pain Self Efficacy Scale, M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory, and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General questionnaires. Measures were completed with paper and pencil and electronically using a tablet computer while patients waited for their clinical appointment. Responses from the initial completed questionnaires on both the paper and electronic instruments were analyzed. Patients' self-efficacy scores for pain and other symptoms correlated positively with pain, symptom severity and distress, and physical and psychosocial functioning; patients with lower levels of self-efficacy reported poorer outcomes and functioning overall. The results were independent of cancer type and mode of assessment. No statistically significant differences were found in the PROs when collected by electronic technology versus paper-pencil mode; patients were very satisfied with using the tablet computer to complete the PRO measures. Our results suggest that self-efficacy for pain and symptom management may be a beneficial addition to clinic-based PRO assessment batteries for patients with cancer and other chronic diseases. Existing short

  10. Recent trends for drug lag in clinical development of oncology drugs in Japan: does the oncology drug lag still exist in Japan?

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideki; Kurokawa, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    This study exhaustively and historically investigated the status of drug lag for oncology drugs approved in Japan. We comprehensively investigated oncology drugs approved in Japan between April 2001 and July 2014, using publicly available information. We also examined changes in the status of drug lag between Japan and the United States, as well as factors influencing drug lag. This study included 120 applications for approval of oncology drugs in Japan. The median difference over a 13-year period in the approval date between the United States and Japan was 875 days (29.2 months). This figure peaked in 2002, and showed a tendency to decline gradually each year thereafter. In 2014, the median approval lag was 281 days (9.4 months). Multiple regression analysis identified the following potential factors that reduce drug lag: "Japan's participation in global clinical trials"; "bridging strategies"; "designation of priority review in Japan"; and "molecularly targeted drugs". From 2001 to 2014, molecularly targeted drugs emerged as the predominant oncology drug, and the method of development has changed from full development in Japan or bridging strategy to global simultaneous development by Japan's taking part in global clinical trials. In line with these changes, the drug lag between the United States and Japan has significantly reduced to less than 1 year.

  11. Addition of Muramyl Tripeptide to Chemotherapy for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Osteosarcoma: a Report from the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Alexander J.; Kleinerman, Eugenie S.; Krailo, Mark D.; Chen, Zhengjia; Betcher, Donna L.; Healey, John H.; Conrad, Ernest U.; Nieder, Michael L.; Weiner, Michael A.; Wells, Robert J.; Womer, Richard B.; Meyers, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The addition of liposomal muramyl tripeptide phosphatidylethanolamine (L-MTPPE) to chemotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival in patients with non-metastatic osteosarcoma (OS). We report the results of L-MTP-PE addition to chemotherapy for patients with metastatic OS. METHODS Intergroup-0133 (INT-0133) was a prospective randomized phase III trial for the treatment of newly diagnosed patients with OS. We compared three drug chemotherapy with cisplatin, doxorubicin, and high-dose methotrexate (Regimen A) to the same three drugs with the addition of ifosfamide (Regimen B). We evaluated the addition of L-MTP-PE to chemotherapy. RESULTS Five-year EFS for patients who received L-MTP-PE (n=46) was 42% versus 26% for those who did not (n=45) (relative risk for L-MTP-PE: 0.72, p=0.23, 95% CI: 0.42-1.2). The 5-year overall survival for patients who received MTP-PE versus no MTP-PE was 53% and 40% respectively (relative risk for L-MTP-PE: 0.72, p=0.27, 95% CI: 0.40-1.3). The comparison of Regimen A with regimen B did not suggest a difference for EFS (35% v. 34% respectively, relative risk for regimen B: 1.07, p=0.79, 95% CI: 0.62-1.8) or overall survival (52% v. 43% respectively, relative risk for regimen B: 1.1, p=0.75, 95% CI: 0.61-2.0). CONCLUSIONS When the metastatic cohort was considered in isolation, the addition of L-MTPPE to chemotherapy did not achieve a statistically significant improvement in outcome. However, the pattern of outcome is similar to the pattern in nonmetastatic patients. PMID:19637348

  12. [American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2011 essential data: the editorial board of the Bulletin du Cancer point of view].

    PubMed

    Vignot, Stéphane; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Blay, Jean-Yves; Gonçalves, Anthony; Massard, Christophe; Thariat, Juliette; Wislez, Marie; André, Thierry

    2011-12-01

    Many data are presented each year during the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting, redrawing the state of knowledge in oncology and hematology. This article proposed by the editorial board of the Bulletin du Cancer proposes to discuss new information with a drop of a few months with the aim of trying to identify the results that can have an immediate or future impact on clinical practice.

  13. Clinically relevant doses of chemotherapy agents reversibly block formation of glioblastoma neurospheres

    PubMed Central

    Mihaliak, Alicia M.; Gilbert, Candace A.; Li, Li; Daou, Marie-Claire; Moser, Richard P.; Reeves, Andrew; Cochran, Brent H.; Ross, Alonzo H.

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma patients have a poor prognosis, even after surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy with temozolomide or 1,3-bis(2-chloroethy)-1-nitrosourea. We developed an in vitro recovery model using neurosphere cultures to analyze the efficacy of chemotherapy treatments, and tested whether glioblastoma neurosphere initiating cells are resistant. Concentrations of chemotherapy drugs that inhibit neurosphere formation are similar to clinically relevant doses. Some lines underwent a transient cell cycle arrest and a robust recovery of neurosphere formation. These results indicate that glioblastoma neurospheres can regrow after treatment with chemotherapy drugs. This neurosphere recovery assay will facilitate studies of chemo-resistant subpopulations and methods to enhance glioblastoma therapy. PMID:20435409

  14. Clinical practice audit concerning antimicrobial prophylaxis in paediatric neurosurgery: results from a German paediatric oncology unit.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Katja; Simon, Arne; Graf, Norbert; Schöpe, Jakob; Oertel, Joachim; Linsler, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis (PAP) has been identified as an important target for internal audits, concerning the judicious use of antibiotics. Paediatric oncology patients with brain tumours face an increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after neurosurgery and receive routine PAP in this setting. All patients younger than 18 years admitted to the paediatric oncology centre (POC) with a neurosurgical intervention. Systematic audit of routine clinical data is divided in two groups: retrospective (Jan 01, 2012-March 31, 2014) and prospective (April 01, 2014-March 31, 2015) referring to an internal PAP guideline, invented in Jan. 2014). Surveillance of SSI up to 30 days after the operation with standard criteria (Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, USA). In total, 53 neurosurgical operations were analysed in 33 paediatric oncology patients. Twelve patients received more than one operation. The detailed analysis of PAP revealed prophylactic cefuroxim doses about 30 mg/kg instead of 50 mg/kg and no repeated dosing in operations lasting longer than 4 h. In addition, Cefotaxim, which is not indicated as PAP in neurosurgery, was used instead of Cefuroxim (or Ampicillin-Sulbactam) in 23 % of all cases in the retrospective and 18 % of all cases in the prospective audit. PAP for more than 3 doses (>24 h) was administered in 66 % in the retrospective group and in 60 % in the prospective group (p = n.s.). In both groups, no SSI was detected. This first comprehensive audit of PAP in paediatric oncology patients undergoing neurosurgery outlines significant opportunities to improve clinical practice in terms of correct dosing, the correct choice of the antibiotic, a correct timing schedule and a shorter duration of PAP. In addition, our results illustrate in detail the challenges in clinical practice when an evidence-based approach to improve a standard workflow has to be implemented.

  15. Assessing the Eventual Publication of Clinical Trial Abstracts Submitted to a Large Annual Oncology Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruibin; Prasad, Vinay; Bates, Susan E.; Fojo, Tito

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite the ethical imperative to publish clinical trials when human subjects are involved, such data frequently remain unpublished. The objectives were to tabulate the rate and ascertain factors associated with eventual publication of clinical trial results reported as abstracts in the Proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (American Society of Clinical Oncology). Materials and Methods. Abstracts describing clinical trials for patients with breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian, and prostate cancer from 2009 to 2011 were identified by using a comprehensive online database (http://meetinglibrary.asco.org/abstracts). Abstracts included reported results of a treatment or intervention assessed in a discrete, prospective clinical trial. Publication status at 4−6 years was determined by using a standardized search of PubMed. Primary outcomes were the rate of publication for abstracts of randomized and nonrandomized clinical trials. Secondary outcomes included factors influencing the publication of results. Results. A total of 1,075 abstracts describing 378 randomized and 697 nonrandomized clinical trials were evaluated. Across all years, 75% of randomized and 54% of nonrandomized trials were published, with an overall publication rate of 61%. Sample size was a statistically significant predictor of publication for both randomized and nonrandomized trials (odds ratio [OR] per increase of 100 participants = 1.23 [1.11–1.36], p < .001; and 1.64 [1.15–2.34], p = .006, respectively). Among randomized studies, an industry coauthor or involvement of a cooperative group increased the likelihood of publication (OR 2.37, p = .013; and 2.21, p = .01, respectively). Among nonrandomized studies, phase II trials were more likely to be published than phase I (p < .001). Use of an experimental agent was not a predictor of publication in randomized (OR 0.76 [0.38–1.52]; p = .441) or nonrandomized trials (OR 0.89 [0.61–1.29]; p = .532). Conclusion

  16. [Loco-regional chemotherapy at the outpatient clinic for gastric cancer patients with home enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Michio; Nagahama, Takeshi; Sugano, Norihide; Satoh, Eigo; Maruyama, Shouji; Tanami, Hideo; Chiba, Tetsuma; Murakata, Ayano; Mitsuhashi, Yosuke; Uehira, Daisuke; Akazawa, Naoya; Suzuki, Keiichirou

    2011-11-01

    In over the 10 years from 2000-2010, 21 gastric cancer patients received loco-regional chemotherapy with home enteral nutrition (HEN) at an outpatient clinic because of insufficient oral intake. These loco-regional chemotherapy regimens consisted of 5 intra-aortic chemotherapies, 4 hepato-arterial infusions and 12 intra-peritoneal chemotherapies. Five out of 8 cases that had measurable lesions showed PR, and 3 cases revealed PD. The patients received HEN with peptide central formula, 400-1,200 kcal/day in night time. The average duration of HEN was 12.9 months. The post-operative nutritional management was needed for continuation and securing of outpatient chemotherapy. The author reported an experience of the outpatient loco-regional chemotherapy with HEN for the gastric cancer patients who could not eat a sufficient volume of food.

  17. Clinically Meaningful Use of Blood Tumor Markers in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Pagliaro, Lance

    2016-01-01

    Before the introduction of modern imaging techniques and the recent developments in molecular diagnosis, tumor markers (TMs) were among the few available diagnostic tools for the management of cancer patients. Easily obtained from serum or plasma samples, TMs are minimally invasive and convenient, and the associated costs are low. Single TMs were traditionally used but these have come under scrutiny due to their low sensitivity and specificity when used, for example, in a screening setting. However, recent research has shown superior performance using a combination of multiple TMs as a panel for assessment, or as part of validated algorithms that also incorporate other clinical factors. In addition, newer TMs have been discovered that have an increased sensitivity and specificity profile for defined malignancies. The aim of this review is to provide a concise overview of the appropriate uses of both traditional and newer TMs and their roles in diagnosis, prognosis, and the monitoring of patients in current clinical practice. We also look at the future direction of TMs and their integration with other diagnostic modalities and other emerging serum based biomarkers, such as circulating nucleic acids, to ultimately advance diagnostic performance and improve patient management. PMID:28042579

  18. A clinical oncologic perspective on breast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Sara; Morrow, Monica

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging identifies cancer not found by clinical examination or other breast imaging studies, but its effect on patient outcomes is controversial. To date, its use has not been shown to increase the likelihood of obtaining negative surgical margins, decrease the rate of conversion from lumpectomy to mastectomy, or decrease local recurrence. The rate of tumor identification with MR imaging is 2 to 3 times higher than the incidence of local recurrence, resulting in mastectomies that may not be beneficial to the patient. This is also a concern with the use of MR imaging for contralateral cancer detection. The use of MR imaging for early detection of local recurrence does not take into account what is known about the biology of local recurrence because a short interval to local recurrence is associated with poor prognosis. In problem areas, such as evaluation of response to neoadjuvant therapy and detection of cancer presenting as axillary adenopathy, MR imaging provides information that is useful for clinical management. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of procalcitonin in clinical oncology: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sbrana, Andrea; Torchio, Martina; Comolli, Giuditta; Antonuzzo, Andrea; Danova, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The use of procalcitonin (PCT) as an early marker of infectious episodes in cancer patients is still controversial. We performed a MEDLINE search of peer-reviewed articles published between January 1990 and December 2015, and finally we analysed 15 articles. PCT seems to have a good diagnostic value of infectious episodes in cancer patients and its accuracy seems greater if we consider major events, such as bloodstream infections and sepsis. Serial evaluations of this protein seem to be more accurate in the diagnostic phase and useful to predict outcome and response to antibacterial treatment. On the other hand, some issues have yet to be solved, such as the use of a validated method of determination, the definition of a standard cut-off, and the heterogeneity among different settings of patients (e.g. early versus advanced-stage cancer, or haematological versus solid tumours). However, it is credible to think that PCT use in everyday clinical practice, preferably in combination with other clinical or laboratory tests, might be of help in finding and detecting early infectious complications in cancer patients.

  20. Media Reporting of Practice-Changing Clinical Trials in Oncology: A North American Perspective.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Peter; Vickers, Michael M; O'Connor, Stephen; Valdes, Mario; Tang, Patricia A

    2016-03-01

    Media reporting of clinical trials impacts patient-oncologist interactions. We sought to characterize the accuracy of media and Internet reporting of practice-changing clinical trials in oncology. The first media articles referencing 17 practice-changing clinical trials were collected from 4 media outlets: newspapers, cable news, cancer websites, and industry websites. Measured outcomes were media reporting score, social media score, and academic citation score. The media reporting score was a measure of completeness of information detailed in media articles as scored by a 15-point scoring instrument. The social media score represented the ubiquity of social media presence referencing 17 practice-changing clinical trials in cancer as determined by the American Society of Clinical Oncology in its annual report, entitled Clinical Cancer Advances 2012; social media score was calculated from Twitter, Facebook, and Google searches. The academic citation score comprised total citations from Google Scholar plus the Scopus database, which represented the academic impact per clinical cancer advance. From 170 media articles, 107 (63%) had sufficient data for analysis. Cohen's κ coefficient demonstrated reliability of the media reporting score instrument with a coefficient of determination of 94%. Per the media reporting score, information was most complete from industry, followed by cancer websites, newspapers, and cable news. The most commonly omitted items, in descending order, were study limitations, exclusion criteria, conflict of interest, and other. The social media score was weakly correlated with academic citation score. Media outlets appear to have set a low bar for coverage of many practice-changing advances in oncology, with reports of scientific breakthroughs often omitting basic study facts and cautions, which may mislead the public. The media should be encouraged to use a standardized reporting template and provide accessible references to original source

  1. Fertility Preservation for Patients With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update

    PubMed Central

    Loren, Alison W.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Beck, Lindsay Nohr; Brennan, Lawrence; Magdalinski, Anthony J.; Partridge, Ann H.; Quinn, Gwendolyn; Wallace, W. Hamish; Oktay, Kutluk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To update guidance for health care providers about fertility preservation for adults and children with cancer. Methods A systematic review of the literature published from March 2006 through January 2013 was completed using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library. An Update Panel reviewed the evidence and updated the recommendation language. Results There were 222 new publications that met inclusion criteria. A majority were observational studies, cohort studies, and case series or reports, with few randomized clinical trials. After review of the new evidence, the Update Panel concluded that no major, substantive revisions to the 2006 American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations were warranted, but clarifications were added. Recommendations As part of education and informed consent before cancer therapy, health care providers (including medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, gynecologic oncologists, urologists, hematologists, pediatric oncologists, and surgeons) should address the possibility of infertility with patients treated during their reproductive years (or with parents or guardians of children) and be prepared to discuss fertility preservation options and/or to refer all potential patients to appropriate reproductive specialists. Although patients may be focused initially on their cancer diagnosis, the Update Panel encourages providers to advise patients regarding potential threats to fertility as early as possible in the treatment process so as to allow for the widest array of options for fertility preservation. The discussion should be documented. Sperm and embryo cryopreservation as well as oocyte cryopreservation are considered standard practice and are widely available. Other fertility preservation methods should be considered investigational and should be performed by providers with the necessary expertise. PMID:23715580

  2. Recommendations for Obesity Clinical Trials in Cancer Survivors: American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement.

    PubMed

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Alfano, Catherine M; Hershman, Dawn; Ballard, Rachel M; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Courneya, Kerry S; Daniels, Elvan C; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Frank, Elizabeth S; Goodwin, Pamela J; Irwin, Melinda L; Levit, Laura A; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Minasian, Lori M; O'Rourke, Mark A; Pierce, John P; Stein, Kevin D; Thomson, Cynthia A; Hudis, Clifford A

    2015-11-20

    Observational evidence has established a relationship between obesity and cancer risk and outcomes. Interventional studies have demonstrated the feasibility and benefits of lifestyle change after cancer diagnosis, and guidelines recommend weight management and regular physical activity in cancer survivors; however, lifestyle interventions are not a routine part of cancer care. The ASCO Research Summit on Advancing Obesity Clinical Trials in Cancer Survivors sought to identify the knowledge gaps that clinical trials addressing energy balance factors in cancer survivors have not answered and to develop a roadmap for the design and implementation of studies with the potential to generate data that could lead to the evidence-based incorporation of weight management and physical activity programs into standard oncology practice. Recommendations highlight the need for large-scale trials evaluating the impact of energy balance interventions on cancer outcomes, as well as the concurrent conduct of studies focused on dissemination and implementation of interventions in diverse populations of cancer survivors, including answering critical questions about the degree of benefit in key subgroups of survivors. Other considerations include the importance of incorporating economic metrics into energy balance intervention trials, the need to establish intermediate biomarkers, and the importance of integrating traditional and nontraditional funding sources. Establishing lifestyle change after cancer diagnosis as a routine part of cancer care will require a multipronged effort to overcome barriers related to study development, funding, and stakeholder engagement. Given the prevalence of obesity and inactivity in cancer survivors in the United States and elsewhere, energy balance interventions hold the potential to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality in millions of patients, and it is essential that we move forward in determining their role in cancer care with the same care and

  3. Republished: Importance of carcinoma-associated fibroblast-derived proteins in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Valcz, Gabor; Sipos, Ferenc; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnar, Bela; Yagi, Yukako

    2015-05-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblast (CAF) as prominent cell type of the tumour microenvironment has complex interaction with both the cancer cells and other non-neoplastic surrounding cells. The CAF-derived regulators and extracellular matrix proteins can support cancer progression by providing a protective microenvironment for the cancer cells via reduction of chemotherapy sensitivity. On the other hand, these proteins may act as powerful prognostic markers as well as potential targets of anticancer therapy. In this review, we summarise the clinical importance of the major CAF-derived signals influencing tumour behaviour and determining the outcome of chemotherapy.

  4. Importance of carcinoma-associated fibroblast-derived proteins in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Valcz, Gabor; Sipos, Ferenc; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnar, Bela; Yagi, Yukako

    2014-12-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblast (CAF) as prominent cell type of the tumour microenvironment has complex interaction with both the cancer cells and other non-neoplastic surrounding cells. The CAF-derived regulators and extracellular matrix proteins can support cancer progression by providing a protective microenvironment for the cancer cells via reduction of chemotherapy sensitivity. On the other hand, these proteins may act as powerful prognostic markers as well as potential targets of anticancer therapy. In this review, we summarise the clinical importance of the major CAF-derived signals influencing tumour behaviour and determining the outcome of chemotherapy.

  5. Clinical applications of liquid biopsies in gastrointestinal oncology

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jason

    2016-01-01

    “Liquid biopsies” are blood based assays used to detect and analyze circulating tumor products, including circulating tumor cells (CTCs), circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), circulating messenger RNA (mRNA), circulating microRNA (miRNA), circulating exosomes, and tumor educated platelets (TEP). For patients with gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies, blood based biopsies may offer several advantages. First, tumor tissue samples are often challenging to procure, and when obtainable, are often insufficient for genomic profiling. Second, blood based assays offer a real-time overview of the entire tumor burden, and allow anatomically unbiased genomic profiling. Third, given the convenience and relative safety of liquid biopsies, this technology may facilitate identification of genomic alterations that confer sensitivity and resistance to targeted therapeutics. This review will assess the clinical applications of circulating tumor products for patients with GI tumors. PMID:27747082

  6. Statins in oncological research: from experimental studies to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kubatka, Peter; Kruzliak, Peter; Rotrekl, Vladimir; Jelinkova, Sarka; Mladosievicova, Beata

    2014-12-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors are commonly used drugs in the treatment of dyslipidemias, primarily raised cholesterol. Recently, many epidemiological and preclinical studies pointed to anti-tumor properties of statins, including anti-proliferative activities, apoptosis, decreased angiogenesis and metastasis. These processes play an important role in carcinogenesis and, therefore, the role of statins in cancer disease is being seriously discussed among oncologists. Anti-neoplastic properties of statins combined with an acceptable toxicity profile in the majority of individuals support their further development as anti-tumor drugs. The mechanism of action, current preclinical studies and clinical efficacy of statins are reviewed in this paper. Moreover, promising results have been reported regarding the statins' efficacy in some cancer types, especially in esophageal and colorectal cancers, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Statins' hepatotoxicity has traditionally represented an obstacle to the prescription of this class of drugs and this issue is also discussed in this review.

  7. A combined PET/CT scanner for clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Beyer, T; Townsend, D W; Brun, T; Kinahan, P E; Charron, M; Roddy, R; Jerin, J; Young, J; Byars, L; Nutt, R

    2000-08-01

    The availability of accurately aligned, whole-body anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) images could have a significant impact on diagnosing and staging malignant disease and on identifying and localizing metastases. Computer algorithms to align CT and PET images acquired on different scanners are generally successful for the brain, whereas image alignment in other regions of the body is more problematic. A combined PET/CT tomograph with the unique capability of acquiring accurately aligned functional and anatomical images for any part of the human body has been designed and built. The PET/CT scanner was developed as a combination of a Siemens Somatom AR.SP spiral CT and a partial-ring, rotating ECAT ART PET scanner. All components are mounted on a common rotational support within a single gantry. The PET and CT components can be operated either separately, or in combined mode. In combined mode, the CT images are used to correct the PET data for scatter and attenuation. Fully quantitative whole-body images are obtained for an axial extent of 100 cm in an imaging time of less than 1 h. When operated in PET mode alone, transmission scans are acquired with dual 137Cs sources. The scanner is fully operational and the combined device has been operated successfully in a clinical environment. Over 110 patients have been imaged, covering a range of different cancers, including lung, esophageal, head and neck, melanoma, lymphoma, pancreas, and renal cell. The aligned PET and CT images are used both for diagnosing and staging disease and for evaluating response to therapy. We report the first performance measurements from the scanner and present some illustrative clinical studies acquired in cancer patients. A combined PET and CT scanner is a practical and effective approach to acquiring co-registered anatomical and functional images in a single scanning session.

  8. Role of American Society of Clinical Oncology in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jyoti D; Galsky, Matthew D; Chagpar, Anees B; Pyle, Doug; Loehrer, Patrick J

    2011-08-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is a global community of health care professionals whose stated purpose is to "make a world of difference" by improving cancer care around the world. Unfortunately, cancer survival rates vary significantly among countries with differing financial and infrastructural resources. Because ASCO is a professional oncology society committed to conquering cancer through research, education, prevention, and delivery of high-quality patient care, it is ideally suited to address this issue. ASCO could bring together oncology professionals and other necessary stakeholders from around the world to improve cancer care and lessen suffering for patients worldwide. As part of the ongoing commitment of ASCO to the future of cancer care, the Leadership Development Program was created to foster the leadership skills of early and midcareer oncologists and provide these participants with a working knowledge of the depth and breadth of the organization. As participants in the inaugural class of the ASCO Leadership Development Program, we were charged with investigating how ASCO might favorably affect cancer prevention and treatment in resource-poor countries in a cost-effective, scalable, and sustainable fashion. ASCO can significantly influence cancer care in low- and middle-income countries through a comprehensive approach that promotes cancer awareness and education, improves clinical practice by identifying and removing barriers to delivery of quality cancer care, and fosters innovation to initiate novel solutions to complex problems.

  9. Personalized care in neuro-oncology coming of age: why we need MGMT and 1p/19q testing for malignant glioma patients in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Michael; Stupp, Roger; Hegi, Monika E.; van den Bent, Martin; Tonn, Joerg C.; Sanson, Marc; Wick, Wolfgang; Reifenberger, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Histological subtyping and grading by malignancy are the cornerstones of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. They shall provide clinicians with guidance as to the course of disease to be expected and the choices of treatment to be made. Nonetheless, patients with histologically identical tumors may have very different outcomes, notably in patients with astrocytic and oligodendroglial gliomas of WHO grades II and III. In gliomas of adulthood, 3 molecular markers have undergone extensive studies in recent years: 1p/19q chromosomal codeletion, O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2. However, the assessment of these molecular markers has so far not been implemented in clinical routine because of the lack of therapeutic implications. In fact, these markers were considered to be prognostic irrespective of whether patients were receiving radiotherapy (RT), chemotherapy, or both (1p/19q, IDH1/2), or of limited value because testing is too complex and no chemotherapy alternative to temozolomide was available (MGMT). In 2012, this situation has changed: long-term follow-up of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9402 and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer 26951 trials demonstrated an overall survival benefit from the addition to RT of chemotherapy with procarbazine/CCNU/vincristine confined to patients with anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors with (vs without) 1p/19q codeletion. Furthermore, in elderly glioblastoma patients, the NOA-08 and the Nordic trial of RT alone versus temozolomide alone demonstrated a profound impact of MGMT promoter methylation on outcome by therapy and thus established MGMT as a predictive biomarker in this patient population. These recent results call for the routine implementation of 1p/19q and MGMT testing at least in subpopulations of malignant glioma patients and represent an encouraging

  10. Pharmacogenomics in Pediatric Oncology: Review of Gene—Drug Associations for Clinical Use †

    PubMed Central

    Mlakar, Vid; Huezo-Diaz Curtis, Patricia; Satyanarayana Uppugunduri, Chakradhara Rao; Krajinovic, Maja; Ansari, Marc

    2016-01-01

    During the 3rd congress of the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT) in Budapest in 2015, a preliminary meeting was held aimed at establishing a pediatric individualized treatment in oncology and hematology committees. The main purpose was to facilitate the transfer and harmonization of pharmacogenetic testing from research into clinics, to bring together basic and translational research and to educate health professionals throughout Europe. The objective of this review was to provide the attendees of the meeting as well as the larger scientific community an insight into the compiled evidence regarding current pharmacogenomics knowledge in pediatric oncology. This preliminary evaluation will help steer the committee’s work and should give the reader an idea at which stage researchers and clinicians are, in terms of personalizing medicine for children with cancer. From the evidence presented here, future recommendations to achieve this goal will also be suggested. PMID:27618021

  11. The conceptual and clinical problems of paraneoplastic syndrome in oncology and internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Bilynsky, B T; Dzhus, M B; Litvinyak, R I

    2015-06-01

    Symptomatology of oncological diseases consists not only of local symptoms caused by the primary malignancy or its metastases, but also by general systemic signs that are not directly connected with the tumor. These symptoms are mostly associated with auto-immunity or endocrine influences. In many cases, the source of paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) is unknown. Nearly 15% of oncological patients demonstrate these syndromes but it is diagnosed much more rarely. The survey of the numerous PNS is offered. The significance of the PNS differs for oncologists and other physicians who encounter it in their practice. The reason of those differences, as well as the connection between PNS and cancer toxicity is discussed. The experience of antitoxic therapy (hemosorption, lymphosorption, enterosorption) used in our clinic in the previous years is overviewed.

  12. Ethical Considerations for the Clinical Oncologist in an Era of Oncology Drug Shortages

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Rebecca; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Bradbury, Angela; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Grubbs, Stephen; Moy, Beverly

    2014-01-01

    Shortages of injectable drugs affect many cancer patients and providers in the U.S. today. Scholars and policymakers have recently begun to devote increased attention to these issues, but only a few tangible resources exist to guide clinical oncologists in developing strategies for dealing with drug shortages on a recurring basis. This article discusses existing information from the scholarly literature, policy analyses, and other relevant sources and seeks to provide practical ethical guidance to the broad audience of oncology professionals who are increasingly confronted with such cases in their practice. We begin by providing a brief overview of the history, causes, and regulatory context of oncology drug shortages in the U.S., followed by a discussion of ethical frameworks that have been proposed in this setting. We conclude with practical recommendations for ethical professional behavior in these increasingly common and challenging situations. PMID:24449096

  13. Pharmacogenomics in Pediatric Oncology: Review of Gene-Drug Associations for Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Mlakar, Vid; Huezo-Diaz Curtis, Patricia; Satyanarayana Uppugunduri, Chakradhara Rao; Krajinovic, Maja; Ansari, Marc

    2016-09-08

    During the 3rd congress of the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT) in Budapest in 2015, a preliminary meeting was held aimed at establishing a pediatric individualized treatment in oncology and hematology committees. The main purpose was to facilitate the transfer and harmonization of pharmacogenetic testing from research into clinics, to bring together basic and translational research and to educate health professionals throughout Europe. The objective of this review was to provide the attendees of the meeting as well as the larger scientific community an insight into the compiled evidence regarding current pharmacogenomics knowledge in pediatric oncology. This preliminary evaluation will help steer the committee's work and should give the reader an idea at which stage researchers and clinicians are, in terms of personalizing medicine for children with cancer. From the evidence presented here, future recommendations to achieve this goal will also be suggested.

  14. Computational oncology.

    PubMed

    Lefor, Alan T

    2011-08-01

    Oncology research has traditionally been conducted using techniques from the biological sciences. The new field of computational oncology has forged a new relationship between the physical sciences and oncology to further advance research. By applying physics and mathematics to oncologic problems, new insights will emerge into the pathogenesis and treatment of malignancies. One major area of investigation in computational oncology centers around the acquisition and analysis of data, using improved computing hardware and software. Large databases of cellular pathways are being analyzed to understand the interrelationship among complex biological processes. Computer-aided detection is being applied to the analysis of routine imaging data including mammography and chest imaging to improve the accuracy and detection rate for population screening. The second major area of investigation uses computers to construct sophisticated mathematical models of individual cancer cells as well as larger systems using partial differential equations. These models are further refined with clinically available information to more accurately reflect living systems. One of the major obstacles in the partnership between physical scientists and the oncology community is communications. Standard ways to convey information must be developed. Future progress in computational oncology will depend on close collaboration between clinicians and investigators to further the understanding of cancer using these new approaches.

  15. Mucosal malignant melanoma - a clinical, oncological, pathological and genetic survey.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Lauge H; Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; von Buchwald, Christian; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T; Prause, Jan U; Heegaard, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    Mucosal melanomas constitute 1.3% of all melanomas and they may develop in any mucosal membrane. Conjunctival melanomas (0.5/million/year) and melanomas in the sinonasal cavity (0.5/million/year) are the most common, followed by anorectal melanomas (0.4/million/year) and melanomas in the oral cavity (0.2/million/year). Anorectal melanoma occurs slightly more often in females, whereas oral melanoma has a male predilection. Mucosal melanoma most commonly develops in a patient's sixth or seventh decade of life, and no differences between races have been found except for sinonasal melanoma and conjunctival melanoma, which are very rare in Black people. The symptoms are not tumour-specific and are related to the organ system affected, and the disease is most often diagnosed at an advanced clinical stage. The diagnosis of a primary tumour is difficult, and metastatic cutaneous melanoma and choroidal melanoma must be excluded. Mutations in KIT are frequently found, while BRAF and NRAS mutations are rarely found - except in conjunctival melanomas that carry BRAF mutations. Mutations in the TERT promotor region are also found in mucosal melanomas. Complete surgical resection with free margins is the treatment of choice. The prognosis is poor, with the 5-year survival rate ranging from 0% (gastric melanoma) to 80% (conjunctival melanoma).

  16. American Society of Clinical Oncology position statement on obesity and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Alfano, Catherine M; Courneya, Kerry S; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Burger, Robert A; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Fabian, Carol J; Gucalp, Ayca; Hershman, Dawn L; Hudson, Melissa M; Jones, Lee W; Kakarala, Madhuri; Ness, Kirsten K; Merrill, Janette K; Wollins, Dana S; Hudis, Clifford A

    2014-11-01

    Rates of obesity have increased significantly over the last three decades in the United States and globally. In addition to contributing to heart disease and diabetes, obesity is a major unrecognized risk factor for cancer. Obesity is associated with worsened prognosis after cancer diagnosis and also negatively affects the delivery of systemic therapy, contributes to morbidity of cancer treatment, and may raise the risk of second malignancies and comorbidities. Research shows that the time after a cancer diagnosis can serve as a teachable moment to motivate individuals to adopt risk-reducing behaviors. For this reason, the oncology care team--the providers with whom a patient has the closest relationships in the critical period after a cancer diagnosis--is in a unique position to help patients lose weight and make other healthy lifestyle changes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology is committed to reducing the impact of obesity on cancer and has established a multipronged initiative to accomplish this goal by 1) increasing education and awareness of the evidence linking obesity and cancer; 2) providing tools and resources to help oncology providers address obesity with their patients; 3) building and fostering a robust research agenda to better understand the pathophysiology of energy balance alterations, evaluate the impact of behavior change on cancer outcomes, and determine the best methods to help cancer survivors make effective and useful changes in lifestyle behaviors; and 4) advocating for policy and systems change to address societal factors contributing to obesity and improve access to weight management services for patients with cancer. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. [Approval procedures for clinical trials in the field of radiation oncology].

    PubMed

    Simon, Monique; Habeck, Matthias; Büttner, Daniel; Habeck, Uta; Nölling, Torsten; Krause, Mechthild; Brix, Gunnar; Willich, Normann; Wenz, Frederik; Schmidberger, Heinz; Debus, Jürgen; Baumann, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Application of ionizing radiation for the purpose of medical research in Germany needs to be approved by the national authority for radiation protection (Bundesamt für Strahlenschutz, BfS). For studies in the field of radiation oncology, differentiation between use of radiation for "medical care (Heilkunde)" versus "medical research" frequently leads to contradictions. The aim of this article is to provide principle investigators, individuals, and institutions involved in the process, as well as institutional review or ethics committees, with the necessary information for this assessment. Information on the legal frame and the approval procedures are also provided. A workshop was co-organized by the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO), the Working Party for Radiation Oncology (ARO) of the German Cancer Society (DKG), the German Society for Medical Physics (DGMP), and the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) in October 2013. This paper summarizes the results of the workshop and the follow-up discussions between the organizers and the BfS. Differentiating between "Heilkunde" which does not need to be approved by the BfS and "medical research" is whether the specific application of radiation (beam quality, dose, schedule, target volume, etc.) is a clinically established and recognized procedure. This must be answered by the qualified physician(s) ("fachkundiger Arzt" according to German radiation protection law) in charge of the study and the treatments of the patients within the study, taking into consideration of the best available evidence from clinical studies, guidelines and consensus papers. Among the important parameters for assessment are indication, total dose, and fractionation. Radiation treatments applied outside clinical trials do not require approval by the BfS, even if they are applied within a randomized or nonrandomized clinical trial. The decision-making by the "fachkundigem Arzt" may be supported on request by an opinion given by the DEGRO

  18. Clinical and Economic Burden of Emergency Department Presentations for Neutropenia Following Outpatient Chemotherapy for Cancer in Victoria, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Craike, Melinda; Slavin, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To examine the clinical characteristics and financial charges associated with treating adult cancer patients receiving chemotherapy in outpatient clinics who presented to the emergency department (ED) with neutropenia. Design and Setting. A retrospective audit was conducted across two health services involving ED episodes and subsequent hospital admissions of patients who received chemotherapy through day oncology from January 1 to December 31, 2007 and presented to the ED with neutropenia. ED data were collected from the Victorian Emergency Minimum Dataset and charges were collected from Health Information Services. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were used to describe the patient and clinical characteristics and financial outcomes, and to explore associations between these factors. Results. In total, 200 neutropenic episodes in 159 outpatients were seen in the ED over the survey period. The mean patient age was 56.6 years (standard deviation, 13.2 years) and 47.2% were male. Overall, 70.0% of ED episodes were triaged as Australasian Triage Scale 2 (emergency). The median ED wait time was 10 minutes and the median ED length of stay was 6.8 hours. The median charge for each ED episode was $764.08 Australian dollars. The total combined ED and inpatient charge per episode was in the range of $144.27–$174,732.68, with a median charge of $5,640.87. Conclusions. This study provides important insights into the clinical and economic burden of neutropenia from both the ED and inpatient perspectives. Alternative treatment models, such as outpatient treatment, early discharge programs or prophylactic interventions to reduce the clinical and economic burden of neutropenia on our health system, must be explored. PMID:22707511

  19. Children of parents with cancer: a collaborative project between a child psychiatry clinic and an adult oncology clinic.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Florence; Manninen, Hanna; Santalahti, Päivi; Savonlahti, Elina; Pyrhönen, Seppo; Romer, Georg; Piha, Jorma

    2007-07-01

    This article describes the development of a collaborative relationship between a child psychiatry clinic and an adult oncology clinic within a university hospital. The interest of the child psychiatry clinic was to pay attention to children of parents with cancer, and to propose an intervention to support them. A child-centred family counselling model was designed for this purpose. The preparation, implementation, and results of this project are described. Positive results, as well as mistakes and failures are discussed, and recommendations are made regarding this kind of collaboration.

  20. Attitudinal barriers to participation in oncology clinical trials: factor analysis and correlates of barriers.

    PubMed

    Manne, S; Kashy, D; Albrecht, T; Wong, Y-N; Lederman Flamm, A; Benson, A B; Miller, S M; Fleisher, Linda; Buzaglo, J; Roach, N; Katz, M; Ross, E; Collins, M; Poole, D; Raivitch, S; Miller, D M; Kinzy, T G; Liu, T; Meropol, N J

    2015-01-01

    Patient participation in cancer clinical trials is low. Little is known about attitudinal barriers to participation, particularly among patients who may be offered a trial during an imminent initial oncology consult. The aims of the present study were to confirm the presence of proposed subscales of a recently developed cancer clinical trial attitudinal barriers measure, describe the most common cancer clinical trials attitudinal barriers, and evaluate socio-demographic, medical and financial factors associated with attitudinal barriers. A total of 1256 patients completed a survey assessing demographic factors, perceived financial burden, prior trial participation and attitudinal barriers to clinical trials participation. Results of a factor analysis did not confirm the presence of the proposed four attitudinal barriers subscale/factors. Rather, a single factor represented the best fit to the data. The most highly-rated barriers were fear of side-effects, worry about health insurance and efficacy concerns. Results suggested that less educated patients, patients with non-metastatic disease, patients with no previous oncology clinical trial participation, and patients reporting greater perceived financial burden from cancer care were associated with higher barriers. These patients may need extra attention in terms of decisional support. Overall, patients with fewer personal resources (education, financial issues) report more attitudinal barriers and should be targeted for additional decisional support. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The American Society of Clinical Oncology's Efforts to Support Global Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    El-Saghir, Nagi S.; Cufer, Tanja; Cazap, Eduardo; de Guzman, Roselle; Othieno-Abinya, Nicholas Anthony; Sanchez, Jose Angel; Pyle, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Despite much progress in the management of malignant diseases, the number of new cases and cancer-related deaths continues to rise around the world. More than half of new cases occur in economically developing countries, where more than two thirds of cancer deaths are expected. However, implementation of all necessary steps to accomplish the dissemination of state-of-the-art prevention, diagnosis, and management will require increased allocation of resources, and, more importantly, harmonization of the efforts of hundreds of national and international public health agencies, policy-setting bodies, governments, pharmaceutical companies, and philanthropic organizations. More than 30% of the members of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) reside and practice outside US borders, and more than half of attendees at all of the scientific congresses and symposia organized by ASCO are international. As cancer has become an increasingly global disease, ASCO has evolved as a global organization. The ASCO Board of Directors currently includes members from France, Brazil, and Canada. In 2013, the ASCO Board of Directors identified a number of strategic priorities for the future. Recognizing the importance of non-US members to the society, their first strategic priority was improving the society's service to non-US members and defining these members' identity in the international oncology community. This article reviews current ASCO activities in the international arena and its future plans in global oncology. PMID:26578614

  2. Population pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic modelling in oncology: a tool for predicting clinical response

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Brendan C; Schindler, Emilie; Friberg, Lena E

    2015-01-01

    In oncology trials, overall survival (OS) is considered the most reliable and preferred endpoint to evaluate the benefit of drug treatment. Other relevant variables are also collected from patients for a given drug and its indication, and it is important to characterize the dynamic effects and links between these variables in order to improve the speed and efficiency of clinical oncology drug development. However, the drug-induced effects and causal relationships are often difficult to interpret because of temporal differences. To address this, population pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modelling and parametric time-to-event (TTE) models are becoming more frequently applied. Population PKPD and TTE models allow for exploration towards describing the data, understanding the disease and drug action over time, investigating relevance of biomarkers, quantifying patient variability and in designing successful trials. In addition, development of models characterizing both desired and adverse effects in a modelling framework support exploration of risk-benefit of different dosing schedules. In this review, we have summarized population PKPD modelling analyses describing tumour, tumour marker and biomarker responses, as well as adverse effects, from anticancer drug treatment data. Various model-based metrics used to drive PD response and predict OS for oncology drugs and their indications are also discussed. PMID:24134068

  3. [Rethinking clinical research in surgical oncology. From comic opera to quality control].

    PubMed

    Evrard, Serge

    2016-01-01

    The evidence base for the effectiveness of surgical interventions is relatively poor and data from large, randomized prospective studies are rare with often a poor quality. Many efforts have been made to increase the number of high quality randomized trials in surgery and theoretical proposals have been put forward to improve the situation, but practical implementation of these proposals is seriously lacking. The consequences of this policy are not trivial; with very few patients included in surgical oncology trials, this represents wasted opportunity for advances in cancer treatment. In this review, we cover the difficulties inherent to clinical research in surgical oncology, such as quality control, equipoise, accrual, and funding and promote alternative designs to the randomized controlled trial. Although the classic randomized controlled trial has a valid but limited place in surgical oncology, other prospective designs need to be promoted as a new deal. This new deal not only implicates surgeons but also journal editors, tender jury, as well as regulatory bodies to cover legal gaps currently surrounding surgical innovation.

  4. Combination chemotherapy with hydroxyurea, dacarbazine (DTIC), and etoposide in the treatment of uterine leiomyosarcoma: a Gynecologic Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Currie, J; Blessing, J A; Muss, H B; Fowler, J; Berman, M; Burke, T W

    1996-04-01

    Advanced or recurrent uterine leiomyosarcomas have traditionally been resistant to most chemotherapeutic regimens. Preliminary reports suggested the combination of hydroxyurea, dacarbazine (DTIC), and etoposide (VP-16) was sufficiently effective to warrant larger trials. In a Phase II trial undertaken by the Gynecologic Oncology Group, 39 patients with advanced or recurrent leiomyosarcoma were treated with 2 g of hydroxyurea, 700 mg/m2 of DTIC, and 300 mg/m2 of VP-16 in divided doses every 4 weeks. Thirty-eight patients were evaluable for response. Two patients experienced complete responses and five had partial responses for a total objective response rate of 18.4% (95% confidence interval: 7.7-34.3%). In general, therapy was well tolerated with moderate toxicity. Six of the seven responders had disease outside the pelvis. The combination of hydroxyurea, DTIC, and VP-16 exhibits moderate activity against uterine leiomyosarcoma.

  5. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.

  6. PET-Based Personalized Management in Clinical Oncology: An Unavoidable Path for the Foreseeable Future.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    It is imperative that the thrust of clinical practice in the ensuing years would be to develop personalized management model for various disorders. PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) based molecular functional imaging has been increasingly utilized for assessment of tumor and other nonmalignant disorders and has the ability to explore disease phenotype on an individual basis and address critical clinical decision making questions related to practice of personalized medicine. Hence, it is essential to make a concerted systematic effort to explore and define the appropriate place of PET-CT in personalized clinical practice in each of malignancies, which would strengthen the concept further. The potential advantages of PET based disease management can be classified into broad categories: (1) Traditional: which includes assessment of disease extent such as initial disease staging and restaging, treatment response evaluation particularly early in the course and thus PET-CT response adaptive decision for continuing the same regimen or switching to salvage schedules; there has been continuous addition of newer application of PET based disease restaging in oncological parlance (eg, Richter transformation); (2) Recent and emerging developments: this includes exploring tumor biology with FDG and non-FDG PET tracers. The potential of multitracer PET imaging (particularly new and novel tracers, eg, 68Ga-DOTA-TOC/NOC/TATE in NET, 68Ga-PSMA and 18F-fluorocholine in prostate carcinoma, 18F-fluoroestradiol in breast carcinoma) has provided a scientific basis to stratify and select appropriate targeted therapies (both radionuclide and nonradionuclide treatment), a major boost for individualized disease management in clinical oncology. Integrating the molecular level information obtained from PET with structural imaging further individualizing treatment plan in radiation oncology, precision of interventions and biopsies of a particular lesion and forecasting disease prognosis.

  7. Developing emotional intelligence ability in oncology nurses: a clinical rounds approach.

    PubMed

    Codier, Estelle; Freitas, Beth; Muneno, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    To explore the feasibility and impact of an emotional intelligence ability development program on staff and patient care. A mixed method, pre/post-test design. A tertiary care hospital in urban Honolulu, HI. Rounds took place on a 24-bed inpatient oncology unit. 33 RNs in an oncology unit. After collection of baseline data, the emotional intelligence rounds were conducted in an inpatient oncology nursing unit on all shifts during a 10-month period. Demographic information, emotional intelligence scores, data from rounds, chart reviews of emotional care documentation, and unit-wide satisfaction and safety data. The ability to identify emotions in self and others was demonstrated less frequently than expected in this population. The low test response rate prevented comparison of scores pre- and postintervention. The staff's 94% participation in rounds, the positive (100%) evaluation of rounds, and poststudy improvements in emotional care documentation and emotional care planning suggest a positive effect from the intervention. Additional research is recommended over a longer period of time to evaluate the impact emotional intelligence specifically has on the staff's identification of emotions. Because the intervention involved minimal time and resources, feasibility for continuation of the intervention poststudy was rated "high" by the research team. Research in other disciplines suggests that improvement in emotional intelligence ability in clinical staff nurses may improve retention, performance, and teamwork in nursing, which would be of particular significance in high-risk clinical practice environments. Few research studies have explored development of emotional intelligence abilities in clinical staff nurses. Evidence from this study suggests that interventions in the clinical environment may be used to develop emotional intelligence ability. Impact from such development may be used in the future to not only improve the quality of nursing care, but also

  8. Exploratory survey of patients' needs and perceptions of psychosocial oncology.

    PubMed

    Preyde, Michele; Macdonald, Janice; Seegmiller, Merle

    2014-03-01

    Cancer is a major disease that affects a significant proportion of the population worldwide. With a decrease in mortality due to advancements in oncology treatment, there is an expanding role for psychosocial oncology. A satellite clinic for medical treatment (only chemotherapy) of cancer is available at the Guelph General Hospital (GGH). Patients accessing the chemotherapy clinic at GGH have minimal access to psychosocial or supportive care and it is not known if the existing services are addressing the psychosocial symptoms of cancer patients. Participants were asked to complete an anonymous survey which included self-report measures of depression, symptom severity, quality of life, and social support while receiving treatment at this facility. There was a great deal of variability in the patients' emotional symptoms at this satellite clinic, though many patients reported emotional difficulties. Greater social work presence may lead to better identification of patients who would benefit from psychosocial oncology services.

  9. A qualitative study evaluating causality attribution for serious adverse events during early phase oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Som D; Coombes, Megan E; Levine, Mitch; Cosby, Jarold; Kowaleski, Brenda; Arnold, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    In early phase oncology trials, novel targeted therapies are increasingly being tested in combination with traditional agents creating greater potential for enhanced and new toxicities. When a patient experiences a serious adverse event (SAE), investigators must determine whether the event is attributable to the investigational drug or not. This study seeks to understand the clinical reasoning, tools used and challenges faced by the researchers who assign causality to SAE's. Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with medical oncologists and trial coordinators at six Canadian academic cancer centres. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Individual interview content analysis was followed by thematic analysis across the interview set. Our study found that causality assessment tends to be a rather complex process, often without complete clinical and investigational data at hand. Researchers described using a common processing strategy whereby they gather pertinent information, eliminate alternative explanations, and consider whether or not the study drug resulted in the SAE. Many of the interviewed participants voiced concern that causality assessments are often conducted quickly and tend to be highly subjective. Many participants were unable to identify any useful tools to help in assigning causality and welcomed more objectivity in the overall process. Attributing causality to SAE's is a complex process. Clinical trial researchers apply a logical system of reasoning, but feel that the current method of assigning causality could be improved. Based on these findings, future research involving the development of a new causality assessment tool specifically for use in early phase oncology clinical trials may be useful.

  10. Implementation of electronic checklists in an oncology medical record: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Kevin V; Miller, Alexis A; Roeske, John C

    2011-07-01

    The quality of any medical treatment depends on the accurate processing of multiple complex components of information, with proper delivery to the patient. This is true for radiation oncology, in which treatment delivery is as complex as a surgical procedure but more dependent on hardware and software technology. Uncorrected errors, even if small or infrequent, can result in catastrophic consequences for the patient. We developed electronic checklists (ECLs) within the oncology electronic medical record (EMR) and evaluated their use and report on our initial clinical experience. Using the Mosaiq EMR, we developed checklists within the clinical assessment section. These checklists are based on the process flow of information from one group to another within the clinic and enable the processing, confirmation, and documentation of relevant patient information before the delivery of radiation therapy. The clinical use of the ECL was documented by means of a customized report. Use of ECL has reduced the number of times that physicians were called to the treatment unit. In particular, the ECL has ensured that therapists have a better understanding of the treatment plan before the initiation of treatment. An evaluation of ECL compliance showed that, with additional staff training, > 94% of the records were completed. The ECL can be used to ensure standardization of procedures and documentation that the pretreatment checks have been performed before patient treatment. We believe that the implementation of ECLs will improve patient safety and reduce the likelihood of treatment errors.

  11. Implementation of Electronic Checklists in an Oncology Medical Record: Initial Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Kevin V.; Miller, Alexis A.; Roeske, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of any medical treatment depends on the accurate processing of multiple complex components of information, with proper delivery to the patient. This is true for radiation oncology, in which treatment delivery is as complex as a surgical procedure but more dependent on hardware and software technology. Uncorrected errors, even if small or infrequent, can result in catastrophic consequences for the patient. We developed electronic checklists (ECLs) within the oncology electronic medical record (EMR) and evaluated their use and report on our initial clinical experience. Methods: Using the Mosaiq EMR, we developed checklists within the clinical assessment section. These checklists are based on the process flow of information from one group to another within the clinic and enable the processing, confirmation, and documentation of relevant patient information before the delivery of radiation therapy. The clinical use of the ECL was documented by means of a customized report. Results: Use of ECL has reduced the number of times that physicians were called to the treatment unit. In particular, the ECL has ensured that therapists have a better understanding of the treatment plan before the initiation of treatment. An evaluation of ECL compliance showed that, with additional staff training, > 94% of the records were completed. Conclusion: The ECL can be used to ensure standardization of procedures and documentation that the pretreatment checks have been performed before patient treatment. We believe that the implementation of ECLs will improve patient safety and reduce the likelihood of treatment errors. PMID:22043184

  12. Hot topics and landmark studies from the 43rd annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Fabio; Aprile, Giuseppe; Fasola, Gianpiero

    2008-02-01

    The results of several preclinical and clinical studies were reported by oncology professionals at the 43rd American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting, the largest international forum in which the latest achievements in cancer research are annually presented. The central theme this year was 'Translating Research into Practice', emphasizing the goal of forging stronger links between basic research and clinical practice. This review offers a critical, summarized selection of several of the foremost studies presented at the meeting. The focus is on the findings from randomized phase III trials that, in the authors' opinion, are most likely to have an immediate effect on clinical practice.

  13. Correlations between histopathological diagnosis of chemotherapy-induced hepatic injury, clinical features, and perioperative morbidity.

    PubMed

    Pilgrim, Charles H C; Satgunaseelan, Laveniya; Pham, Alan; Murray, William; Link, Emma; Smith, Marty; Usatoff, Val; Evans, Peter M; Banting, Simon; Thomson, Benjamin N; Phillips, Wayne A; Michael, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Chemotherapy has in some series been linked with increased morbidity after a hepatectomy. Hepatic injuries may result from the treatment with chemotherapy, but can also be secondary to co-morbid diseases. The aim of the present study was to draw correlations between clinical features, treatment with chemotherapy and injury phenotypes and assess the impact of each upon perioperative morbidity. Retrospective samples (n= 232) were scored grading steatosis, steatohepatitis and sinusoidal injury (SI). Clinical data were retrieved from medical records. Correlations were drawn between injury, clinical features and perioperative morbidity. Injury rates were 18%, 4% and 19% for steatosis, steatohepatitis and SI, respectively. High-grade steatosis was more common in patients with diabetes [odds ratio (OR) = 3.33, P= 0.01] and patients with a higher weight (OR/kg = 1.04, P= 0.02). Steatohepatitis was increased with metabolic syndrome (OR = 5.88, P= 0.02). Chemotherapy overall demonstrated a trend towards an approximately doubled risk of high-grade steatosis and steatohepatitis although not affecting SI. However, pre-operative chemotherapy was associated with an increased SI (OR = 2.18, P= 0.05). Operative morbidity was not increased with chemotherapy, but was increased with steatosis (OR = 2.38, P= 0.02). Diabetes and higher weight significantly increased the risk of steatosis, whereas metabolic syndrome significantly increased risk of steatohepatitis. The presence of high-grade steatosis increases perioperative morbidity, not administration of chemotherapy per se. © 2012 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  14. Relationships Between Authorship Contributions and Authors' Industry Financial Ties Among Oncology Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Susannah L.; Krzyzanowska, Monika K.; Joffe, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that authors who play key scientific roles in oncology clinical trials, and who therefore have increased influence over the design, analysis, interpretation or reporting of trials, are more likely than those who do not play such roles to have financial ties to industry. Methods Data were abstracted from all trials (n = 235) of drugs or biologic agents published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology between January 1, 2006 and June 30, 2007. Article-level data included sponsorship, age group (adult v pediatric), phase, single versus multicenter, country (United States v other), and number of authors. Author-level data (n = 2,927) included financial ties (eg, employment, consulting) and performance of key scientific roles (ie, conception/design, analysis/interpretation, or manuscript writing). Associations between performance of key roles and financial ties, adjusting for article-level covariates, were examined using generalized linear mixed models. Results One thousand eight hundred eighty-one authors (64%) reported performing at least one key role, and 842 authors (29%) reported at least one financial tie. Authors who reported performing a key role were more likely than other authors to report financial ties to industry (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 4.3; 99% CI, 3.0 to 6.0; P < .0001). The association was stronger among trials with, compared with those without, industry funding (OR, 5.0 [99% CI, 3.4 to 7.5] v OR, 2.5 [99% CI, 1.3 to 4.8]), but was present regardless of sponsorship. Conclusion Authors who perform key roles in the conception and design, analysis, and interpretation, or reporting of oncology clinical trials are more likely than authors who do not perform such roles to have financial ties to industry. PMID:20065190

  15. Relationships between authorship contributions and authors' industry financial ties among oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rose, Susannah L; Krzyzanowska, Monika K; Joffe, Steven

    2010-03-10

    PURPOSE To test the hypothesis that authors who play key scientific roles in oncology clinical trials, and who therefore have increased influence over the design, analysis, interpretation or reporting of trials, are more likely than those who do not play such roles to have financial ties to industry. METHODS Data were abstracted from all trials (n = 235) of drugs or biologic agents published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology between January 1, 2006 and June 30, 2007. Article-level data included sponsorship, age group (adult v pediatric), phase, single versus multicenter, country (United States v other), and number of authors. Author-level data (n = 2,927) included financial ties (eg, employment, consulting) and performance of key scientific roles (ie, conception/design, analysis/interpretation, or manuscript writing). Associations between performance of key roles and financial ties, adjusting for article-level covariates, were examined using generalized linear mixed models. Results One thousand eight hundred eighty-one authors (64%) reported performing at least one key role, and 842 authors (29%) reported at least one financial tie. Authors who reported performing a key role were more likely than other authors to report financial ties to industry (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 4.3; 99% CI, 3.0 to 6.0; P < .0001). The association was stronger among trials with, compared with those without, industry funding (OR, 5.0 [99% CI, 3.4 to 7.5] v OR, 2.5 [99% CI, 1.3 to 4.8]), but was present regardless of sponsorship. CONCLUSION Authors who perform key roles in the conception and design, analysis, and interpretation, or reporting of oncology clinical trials are more likely than authors who do not perform such roles to have financial ties to industry.

  16. Gastric Cancer, Version 3.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Ajani, Jaffer A; D'Amico, Thomas A; Almhanna, Khaldoun; Bentrem, David J; Chao, Joseph; Das, Prajnan; Denlinger, Crystal S; Fanta, Paul; Farjah, Farhood; Fuchs, Charles S; Gerdes, Hans; Gibson, Michael; Glasgow, Robert E; Hayman, James A; Hochwald, Steven; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Ilson, David H; Jaroszewski, Dawn; Johung, Kimberly L; Keswani, Rajesh N; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Korn, W Michael; Leong, Stephen; Linn, Catherine; Lockhart, A Craig; Ly, Quan P; Mulcahy, Mary F; Orringer, Mark B; Perry, Kyle A; Poultsides, George A; Scott, Walter J; Strong, Vivian E; Washington, Mary Kay; Weksler, Benny; Willett, Christopher G; Wright, Cameron D; Zelman, Debra; McMillian, Nicole; Sundar, Hema

    2016-10-01

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most frequently diagnosed cancer and the third leading cause of death from cancer in the world. Several advances have been made in the staging procedures, imaging techniques, and treatment approaches. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Gastric Cancer provide an evidence- and consensus-based treatment approach for the management of patients with gastric cancer. This manuscript discusses the recommendations outlined in the NCCN Guidelines for staging, assessment of HER2 overexpression, systemic therapy for locally advanced or metastatic disease, and best supportive care for the prevention and management of symptoms due to advanced disease. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  17. Clinical predictor of survival following docetaxel-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    LEE, HSIANG-YING; WU, WEN-JENG; HUANG, CHUN-HSIUNG; CHOU, YII-HER; HUANG, CHUN-NUNG; LEE, YUNG-CHIN; YANG, KAI-FU; LEE, MEI-HUI; HUANG, SHU-PIN

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common type of cancer in males in the USA and the incidence is increasing. For castration-resistant PCa (CRPC), previous studies have identified docetaxel-based chemotherapy as the first-line therapy. In the present study, the efficacy of docetaxel-based chemotherapy was investigated in a population of patients with CRPC. This study included 26 individuals (mean age, 73 years) with CRPC who were patients between July 2007 and October 2012 at the Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital (Kaohsiung, Taiwan). The regimen consisted of intravenous docetaxel (70 mg/m2) once every four weeks plus oral prednisolone (5 mg) twice daily for five days. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response (defined as a PSA decrease of >50% over four weeks), time to PSA progression, PCa-specific survival and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. For these 26 patients, the mean PSA level prior to chemotherapy treatment was 335.58 ng/ml. During follow-up, the average number of cycles of chemotherapy was approximately seven and 15 patients (58%) achieved a PSA response. PSA response was found to significantly correlate with OS and PCa-specific survival (P=0.014 and P=0.028, respectively). The mean value of the PSA nadir level was 89.97 ng/ml and time to PSA nadir was five months. The most common adverse event was leucopenia, which affected 88% of the patients. The results indicated that the length of time to PSA nadir and the occurrence of leucopenia may impact the PSA response. The docetaxel-based chemotherapy was a feasible and effective treatment regimen in patients with CRPC. However, the occurrence of adverse events, particularly the high incidence of leucopenia, may be cause for concern. PMID:25202411

  18. Overview, prevention and management of chemotherapy extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Kreidieh, Firas Y; Moukadem, Hiba A; El Saghir, Nagi S

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy extravasation remains an accidental complication of chemotherapy administration and may result in serious damage to patients. We review in this article the clinical aspects of chemotherapy extravasation and latest advances in definitions, classification, prevention, management and guidelines. We review the grading of extravasation and tissue damage according to various chemotherapeutic drugs and present an update on treatment and new antidotes including dexrazoxane for anthracyclines extravasation. We highlight the importance of education and training of the oncology team for prevention and prompt pharmacological and non-pharmacological management and stress the availability of new antidotes like dexrazoxane wherever anthracyclines are being infused. PMID:26862492

  19. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: current immediate clinical and oncological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Klajner, Sidney

    2014-10-21

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery continues to be a challenging operation associated to a steep learning curve. Robotic surgical systems have dramatically changed minimally invasive surgery. Three-dimensional, magnified and stable view, articulated instruments, and reduction of physiologic tremors leading to superior dexterity and ergonomics. Therefore, robotic platforms could potentially address limitations of laparoscopic rectal surgery. It was aimed at reviewing current literature on short-term clinical and oncological (pathological) outcomes after robotic rectal cancer surgery in comparison with laparoscopic surgery. A systematic review was performed for the period 2002 to 2014. A total of 1776 patients with rectal cancer underwent minimally invasive robotic treatment in 32 studies. After robotic and laparoscopic approach to oncologic rectal surgery, respectively, mean operating time varied from 192-385 min, and from 158-297 min; mean estimated blood loss was between 33 and 283 mL, and between 127 and 300 mL; mean length of stay varied from 4-10 d; and from 6-15 d. Conversion after robotic rectal surgery varied from 0% to 9.4%, and from 0 to 22% after laparoscopy. There was no difference between robotic (0%-41.3%) and laparoscopic (5.5%-29.3%) surgery regarding morbidity and anastomotic complications (respectively, 0%-13.5%, and 0%-11.1%). Regarding immediate oncologic outcomes, respectively among robotic and laparoscopic cases, positive circumferential margins varied from 0% to 7.5%, and from 0% to 8.8%; the mean number of retrieved lymph nodes was between 10 and 20, and between 11 and 21; and the mean distal resection margin was from 0.8 to 4.7 cm, and from 1.9 to 4.5 cm. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is being undertaken by experienced surgeons. However, the quality of the assembled evidence does not support definite conclusions about most studies variables. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is associated to increased costs and operating time. It also seems to be

  20. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: Current immediate clinical and oncological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Klajner, Sidney

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery continues to be a challenging operation associated to a steep learning curve. Robotic surgical systems have dramatically changed minimally invasive surgery. Three-dimensional, magnified and stable view, articulated instruments, and reduction of physiologic tremors leading to superior dexterity and ergonomics. Therefore, robotic platforms could potentially address limitations of laparoscopic rectal surgery. It was aimed at reviewing current literature on short-term clinical and oncological (pathological) outcomes after robotic rectal cancer surgery in comparison with laparoscopic surgery. A systematic review was performed for the period 2002 to 2014. A total of 1776 patients with rectal cancer underwent minimally invasive robotic treatment in 32 studies. After robotic and laparoscopic approach to oncologic rectal surgery, respectively, mean operating time varied from 192-385 min, and from 158-297 min; mean estimated blood loss was between 33 and 283 mL, and between 127 and 300 mL; mean length of stay varied from 4-10 d; and from 6-15 d. Conversion after robotic rectal surgery varied from 0% to 9.4%, and from 0 to 22% after laparoscopy. There was no difference between robotic (0%-41.3%) and laparoscopic (5.5%-29.3%) surgery regarding morbidity and anastomotic complications (respectively, 0%-13.5%, and 0%-11.1%). Regarding immediate oncologic outcomes, respectively among robotic and laparoscopic cases, positive circumferential margins varied from 0% to 7.5%, and from 0% to 8.8%; the mean number of retrieved lymph nodes was between 10 and 20, and between 11 and 21; and the mean distal resection margin was from 0.8 to 4.7 cm, and from 1.9 to 4.5 cm. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is being undertaken by experienced surgeons. However, the quality of the assembled evidence does not support definite conclusions about most studies variables. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is associated to increased costs and operating time. It also seems to be

  1. Generating and evaluating evidence of the clinical utility of molecular diagnostic tests in oncology.

    PubMed

    Deverka, Patricia; Messner, Donna A; McCormack, Robert; Lyman, Gary H; Piper, Margaret; Bradley, Linda; Parkinson, David; Nelson, David; Smith, Mary Lou; Jacques, Louis; Dutta, Tania; Tunis, Sean R

    2016-08-01

    Enthusiasm for molecular diagnostic (MDx) testing in oncology is constrained by the gaps in required evidence regarding its impact on patient outcomes (clinical utility (CU)). This effectiveness guidance document proposes recommendations for the design and evaluation of studies intended to reflect the evidence expectations of payers, while also reflecting information needs of patients and clinicians. Our process included literature reviews and key informant interviews followed by iterative virtual and in-person consultation with an expert technical working group and an advisory group comprising life-sciences industry experts, public and private payers, patients, clinicians, regulators, researchers, and other stakeholders. Treatment decisions in oncology represent high-risk clinical decision making, and therefore the recommendations give preference to randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for demonstrating CU. The guidance also describes circumstances under which alternatives to RCTs could be considered, specifying conditions under which test developers could use prospective-retrospective studies with banked biospecimens, single-arm studies, prospective observational studies, or decision-analytic modeling techniques that make a reasonable case for CU. Using a process driven by multiple stakeholders, we developed a common framework for designing and evaluating studies of the clinical validity and CU of MDx tests, achieving a balance between internal validity of the studies and the relevance, feasibility, and timeliness of generating the desired evidence.Genet Med 18 8, 780-787.

  2. Lack of timely accrual information in oncology clinical trials: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Aaron P; Hirsch, Bradford R; Abernethy, Amy P

    2014-03-25

    Poor accrual is a significant barrier to the successful completion of oncology clinical trials; half of all phase 3 oncology trials close due to insufficient accrual. Timely access to accrual data fosters an understanding of successful trial design and can be used to inform the design of new clinical trials prospectively. Accrual statistics are available within research networks, such as the cancer cooperative groups, but comprehensive data reflecting the overall portfolio of cancer clinical trials are lacking. As a demonstration case, the purpose of this study was to quantify the public availability of accrual data across all recent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) trials. The database for the Aggregate Analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov (AACT) summarizes all trials registered between October 2007 and September 2010. In total, 108 trials of pharmacologic therapy for RCC were included. Accrual data on these trials were gathered via ClinicalTrials.gov (CTG), a manual review of resulting publications, and online surveys sent to principle investigators or trial coordinators. In total, 26% (20 of 76) of trials listing a government, academic, or cooperative group (GAC) sponsor responded to the survey vs 0% (0 of 32) of those listing only industry sponsors. Across all methods, accrual data were available for only 40% (43 of 108) of trials, including 37% (28 of 76) of GAC trials and 47% (15 of 32) of industry trials. Moreover, 87% (66 of 76) of GAC trials were ongoing (open, actively recruiting, or of unknown status) vs 75% (24 of 32) of industry trials, while 9% (10 of 108) of trials were terminated or suspended. Despite extensive efforts (surveys, phone calls, CTG abstraction, publication searches), accurate accrual data remained inaccessible for 60% of the RCC trial cohort. While CTG reports trial results, ongoing accrual data are also critically needed. Poor access to accrual data will continue to limit attempts to develop a national summary of clinical trials metrics and to

  3. Enhancing value of clinical pharmacodynamics in oncology drug development: An alliance between quantitative pharmacology and translational science.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, K; Ecsedy, J A

    2017-01-01

    Clinical pharmacodynamic evaluation is a key component of the "pharmacologic audit trail" in oncology drug development. We posit that its value can and should be greatly enhanced via application of a robust quantitative pharmacology framework informed by biologically mechanistic considerations. Herein, we illustrate examples of intersectional blindspots across the disciplines of quantitative pharmacology and translational science and offer a roadmap aimed at enhancing the caliber of clinical pharmacodynamic research in the development of oncology therapeutics. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  4. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kevin L. Moiseenko, Vitali; Kagadis, George C.; McNutt, Todd R.; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-01-15

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authors contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy.

  5. Quantitative Imaging in Radiation Oncology: An Emerging Science and Clinical Service.

    PubMed

    Jaffray, David Anthony; Chung, Caroline; Coolens, Catherine; Foltz, Warren; Keller, Harald; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Publicover, Julia; Yeung, Ivan

    2015-10-01

    Radiation oncology has long required quantitative imaging approaches for the safe and effective delivery of radiation therapy. The past 10 years has seen a remarkable expansion in the variety of novel imaging signals and analyses that are starting to contribute to the prescription and design of the radiation treatment plan. These include a rapid increase in the use of magnetic resonance imaging, development of contrast-enhanced imaging techniques, integration of fluorinated deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography, evaluation of hypoxia imaging techniques, and numerous others. These are reviewed with an effort to highlight challenges related to quantification and reproducibility. In addition, several of the emerging applications of these imaging approaches are also highlighted. Finally, the growing community of support for establishing quantitative imaging approaches as we move toward clinical evaluation is summarized and the need for a clinical service in support of the clinical science and delivery of care is proposed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kevin L. Moiseenko, Vitali; Kagadis, George C.; McNutt, Todd R.; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-01-15

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authors contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy.

  7. The use of a clinical resource nurse for newly graduated nurses in a pediatric oncology setting.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Lyndsay Jerusha; Bellamy-Stack, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The pediatric oncology nursing unit at the Alberta Children's Hospital experienced a large influx of new staff nurses between May 2008 and November 2008. There were 16 in total, and only a few had previous experience, whereas the majority was newly graduated nurses. As a solution to the high numbers of new staff nurses, the role of a Resource Nurse was developed as a temporary position to assist new staff nurses with their patient assignment, prioritize their day, and deal with complex patient procedures/treatments. Also, the Resource Nurse assisted all staff on the unit in dealing with increased patient acuity, chemotherapy administration, acuity issues, family teaching, and complicated family situations. A total of 55 prebooked shifts were scheduled from November 2008 to January 2009. A questionnaire was handed out to the staff nurses as a means to determine the effectiveness of having a Resource Nurse work on the unit. Twenty-three nurses responded by filling out the confidential questionnaire. Overall, respondents reported that the Resource Nurse was beneficial to their practice on the unit.

  8. Effect and Efficiency of an Embedded Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner in an Oncology Clinic.

    PubMed

    Walling, Anne M; D'Ambruoso, Sarah F; Malin, Jennifer L; Hurvitz, Sara; Zisser, Ann; Coscarelli, Anne; Clarke, Robin; Hackbarth, Andrew; Pietras, Christopher; Watts, Frances; Ferrell, Bruce; Skootsky, Samuel; Wenger, Neil S

    2017-09-01

    To test a simultaneous care model for palliative care for patients with advanced cancer by embedding a palliative care nurse practitioner (NP) in an oncology clinic. We evaluated the effect of the intervention in two oncologists' clinics beginning March 2014 by using implementation strategies, including use of a structured referral mechanism, routine symptom screening, integration of a psychology-based cancer supportive care center, implementation team meetings, team training, and a metrics dashboard for continuous quality improvement. After 1 year of implementation, we evaluated key process and outcome measures for supportive oncology and efficiency of the model by documenting tasks completed by the NP during a subset of patient visits and time-motion studies. Of approximately 10,000 patients with active cancer treated in the health system, 2,829 patients had advanced cancer and were treated by 42 oncologists. Documentation of advance care planning increased for patients of the two intervention oncologists compared with patients of the other oncologists. Hospice referral before death was not different at baseline, but was significantly higher for patients of intervention oncologists compared with patients of control oncologists (53% v 23%; P = .02) over the intervention period. Efficiency evaluation revealed that approximately half the time spent by the embedded NP potentially could have been completed by other staff (eg, a nurse, a social worker, or administrative staff). An embedded palliative care NP model using scalable implementation strategies can improve advance care planning and hospice use among patients with advanced cancer.

  9. Quality management for clinical trials within the German Competence Network Paediatric Oncology and Haematology.

    PubMed

    Creutzig, Ursula; Zimmermann, Martin; Hannemann, Julia; Krämer, Irene; Pfistner, Beate; Herold, Ralf; Henze, Günter

    2005-06-01

    The German 'Competence Network Paediatric Oncology and Haematology' aims at improving the structure of paediatric oncology and haematology as a whole, focussing in particular on the quality of clinical trials and study co-ordinating centres. This comprises the following measures: (1) Employment of research and trial assistants in order to improve the quality of documentation and study management in the participating hospitals. (2) Development of an internet portal to provide medical information for non-professionals, for patients and their families as well as for health professionals. (3) The project group 'Central Trial Support' supports study centres during the process of writing and examining new treatment protocols so that they are in compliance with the Good Clinical Practice criteria, formal criteria, legal requirements and statutory provisions. This group currently produces a structural standardisation of study protocols and case record forms in order to improve their usability. The 'Competence Network Malignant Lymphomas' is a project with similar aims and will be outlined for comparison.

  10. Nanotechnology in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew Z; Tepper, Joel E

    2014-09-10

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  11. Epidemiology and clinical characteristics of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza infection in pediatric hemato-oncology and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Babor, F; Grund, S; Siepermann, M; Oommen, P T; Kuhlen, M; Schuster, F R; Laws, H-J; Wessalowski, R; Bienemann, K; Janßen, G; Adams, O; Borkhardt, A; Meisel, R

    2012-12-01

    For children with hemato-oncologic diseases, especially after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), the risk for developing complications related to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 (pH1N1) infection is largely unknown. A retrospective chart study was performed of pH1N1 cases diagnosed between October 2009 to January 2010 in the hemato-oncologic unit of the University Children's Hospital of Düsseldorf, Germany. In total, 21 children were diagnosed with laboratory-confirmed pH1N1; in 16 patients with malignancies (acute leukemia 7, lymphoma 4, solid tumors 2, others 3) and in 5 with benign hematologic disorders. Five patients had undergone prior HSCT, although 1 patient was diagnosed during conditioning therapy with high-dose chemotherapy in preparation for haploidentical HSCT. Most frequent symptoms were fever (>38.5°C) and cough (in 100%), and rhinorrhea (57%). The 2 patients acquiring pH1N1 infection under high-dose or intensive chemotherapy did not require intensive care or mechanical ventilation, and both recovered under antiviral therapy. Oseltamivir was administered to 11 patients; in 1 patient, therapy was switched, on a compassionate-use basis, to intravenous zanamivir because of lack of clinical improvement after oseltamivir therapy. Complications were hospitalization (19%), demand of oxygen supplementation, delay/interruption of antineoplastic therapy, and prolonged administration of antibiotics and antipyretics. In the investigated patient population, pH1N1 was mild in most cases, but was associated with substantial morbidity in a proportion of patients and led to interruption and delay in anticancer treatment. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Clinical Characteristics Associated with Long-term Survival in Metastatic Gastric Cancer after Systemic Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Shigenori; Komori, Azusa; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi; Ito, Seiji; Tajika, Masahiro; Niwa, Yasumasa; Oze, Isao; Muro, Kei

    2015-01-01

    Systemic chemotherapy for patients with metastatic gastric cancer (MGC) is generally palliative, although some patients experience long-term survival after treatment. Thus, we identified clinical characteristics that are associated with long-term survival of patients with MGC after palliative chemotherapy. We retrospectively reviewed 514 MGC patients who received systemic chemotherapy at our institution from 2001 to 2008. To identify clinical predictors of survival beyond 2 years, multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed, and 5-year survival rates were estimated among MGC patients following chemotherapy. Among 514 patients, 96 (19%) and 16 (3%) survived beyond 2 and 5 years, respectively, and performance status of 0 or 1 (odds ratio [OR]=3.39; p=0.01), previous gastrectomy (OR=1.86; p=0.01), single metastatic site (OR=1.80; p=0.03), and normal alkaline phosphatase levels (OR=2.81; p<0.01) were identified as independent predictors of long-term survival. Of the 16 5-year survivors, six were alive at the end of the study and showed no evidence of disease despite cessation of chemotherapy. The present data demonstrate distinct clinical characteristics that are associated with long-term survival of MGC patients, and indicated that palliative chemotherapy can be curative in highly selected patients.

  13. A study of motivations and expectations of patients seen in phase 1 oncology clinics

    PubMed Central

    Dolly, Saoirse O.; Kalaitzaki, Eleftheria; Puglisi, Martina; Stimpson, Sarah; Hanwell, Janet; Fandos, Sonia Serrano; Stapleton, Sarah; Ansari, Thushara; Peckitt, Clare; Kaye, Stan; Lopez, Juanita; Yap, Timothy A.; van der Graaf, Winette; de Bono, Johann

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To better inform clinical practice, this study was aimed at capturing patients' motivations for enrolling in phase 1 trials and at quantifying their expectations of the benefits, risks, and commitment associated with clinical trials and the impact of the initial consultation on their expectations. METHODS This was a single‐center, prospective, quantitative study of newly referred adult patients considering their first phase 1 oncology trial. Participants completed questionnaires before they were seen and an abbreviated follow‐up version after their consultation. RESULTS Questionnaires were completed by 396 (99%) and 301 (76%) before and after the clinic, respectively. Participants ranked the possibility of tumor shrinkage (84%) as the most important motivation for considering a phase 1 trial; this was followed by no alternative treatments (56%), their physician's recommendation (44%), and the fact that the research might benefit others (38%). When they were asked about the potential personal benefit, 43% predicted tumor shrinkage initially. After the consultation, this increased to 47%. Fourteen percent of patients expected a cure. When asked about risks, 71% of the participants expected moderate side effects. When asked about expectations of time commitments, a majority of patients did not anticipate weekly visits, although this was understood by 93% of patients after the consultation. Overall, patients were keen to consider trials and when asked before and after the consultation 72% and 84% were willing to enroll in studies, respectively. CONCLUSIONS This study reports that more than 80% of patients enroll in early‐phase clinical oncology trials motivated by the potential of a clinical benefit, with approximately half expecting tumor shrinkage and approximately a tenth anticipating a cure. The typical phase 1 response rate is 4% to 20%, and this discrepancy exemplifies the challenges faced by patients and healthcare professionals during their

  14. Integrating next-generation sequencing into clinical oncology: strategies, promises and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Horak, Peter; Fröhling, Stefan; Glimm, Hanno

    2016-01-01

    We live in an era of genomic medicine. The past five years brought about many significant achievements in the field of cancer genetics, driven by rapidly evolving technologies and plummeting costs of next-generation sequencing (NGS). The official completion of the Cancer Genome Project in 2014 led many to envision the clinical implementation of cancer genomic data as the next logical step in cancer therapy. Stemming from this vision, the term ‘precision oncology’ was coined to illustrate the novelty of this individualised approach. The basic assumption of precision oncology is that molecular markers detected by NGS will predict response to targeted therapies independently from tumour histology. However, along with a ubiquitous availability of NGS, the complexity and heterogeneity at the individual patient level had to be acknowledged. Not only does the latter present challenges to clinical decision-making based on sequencing data, it is also an obstacle to the rational design of clinical trials. Novel tissue-agnostic trial designs were quickly developed to overcome these challenges. Results from some of these trials have recently demonstrated the feasibility and efficacy of this approach. On the other hand, there is an increasing amount of whole-exome and whole-genome NGS data which allows us to assess ever smaller differences between individual patients with cancer. In this review, we highlight different tumour sequencing strategies currently used for precision oncology, describe their individual strengths and weaknesses, and emphasise their feasibility in different clinical settings. Further, we evaluate the possibility of NGS implementation in current and future clinical trials, and point to the significance of NGS for translational research. PMID:27933214

  15. Nonclinical Evaluations of Small-Molecule Oncology Drugs: Integration into Clinical Dose Optimization and Toxicity Management.

    PubMed

    Dambach, Donna M; Simpson, Natalie E; Jones, Thomas W; Brennan, Richard J; Pazdur, Richard; Palmby, Todd R

    2016-06-01

    Multidisciplinary approaches that incorporate nonclinical pharmacologic and toxicologic characterization of small-molecule oncology drugs into clinical development programs may facilitate improved benefit-risk profiles and clinical toxicity management in patients. The performance of the current nonclinical safety-testing scheme was discussed, highlighting current strengths and areas for improvement. While current nonclinical testing appears to predict the clinical outcome where the prevalence of specific adverse effects are high, nonclinical testing becomes less reliable for predicting clinical adverse effects that occur infrequently, as with some kinase inhibitors. Although adverse effects associated with kinase inhibitors can often be predicted on the basis of target biology, drugs can be promiscuous and inhibit targets with poorly defined function and associated risks. Improvements in adverse effect databases and better characterization of the biologic activities of drug targets may enable better use of computational modeling approaches in predicting adverse effects with kinase inhibitors. Assessing safety of a lead candidate in parallel with other drug properties enables incorporation of a molecule's best features during chemical design, eliminates the worst molecules early, and permits timely investigation/characterization of toxicity mechanisms for identified liabilities. A safety lead optimization and candidate identification strategy that reduces intrinsic toxicity and metabolic risk and enhances selectivity can deliver selective kinase inhibitors that demonstrate on-target adverse effects identified nonclinically. Integrating clinical and nonclinical data during drug development can facilitate better identification and management of oncology drugs. Follow-up nonclinical studies may be used to better understand the risks in a given patient population and minimize or manage these risks more appropriately. Clin Cancer Res; 22(11); 2618-22. ©2016 AACR SEE ALL

  16. Who Enrolls Onto Clinical Oncology Trials? A Radiation Patterns of Care Study Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Movsas, Benjamin . E-mail: bmovsas1@hfhs.org; Moughan, Jennifer; Owen, Jean; Coia, Lawrence R.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Hanks, Gerald; Wilson, J. Frank

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To identify factors significantly influencing accrual to clinical protocols by analyzing radiation Patterns of Care Study (PCS) surveys of 3,047 randomly selected radiotherapy (RT) patients. Methods and Materials: Patterns of Care Study surveys from disease sites studied for the periods 1992-1994 and 1996-1999 (breast cancer, n = 1,080; prostate cancer, n = 1,149; esophageal cancer, n = 818) were analyzed. The PCS is a National Cancer Institute-funded national survey of randomly selected RT institutions in the United States. Patients with nonmetastatic disease who received RT as definitive or adjuvant therapy were randomly selected from eligible patients at each institution. To determine national estimates, individual patient records were weighted by the relative contribution of each institution and patients within each institution. Data regarding participation in clinical trials were recorded. The factors age, gender, race, type of insurance, and practice type of treating institution (academic or not) were studied by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Overall, only 2.7% of all patients were accrued to clinical protocols. Of these, 57% were enrolled on institutional review board-approved institutional trials, and 43% on National Cancer Institute collaborative group studies. On multivariate analysis, patients treated at academic facilities (p = 0.0001) and white patients (vs. African Americans, p = 0.0002) were significantly more likely to participate in clinical oncology trials. Age, gender, type of cancer, and type of insurance were not predictive. Conclusions: Practice type and race significantly influence enrollment onto clinical oncology trials. This suggests that increased communication and education regarding protocols, particularly focusing on physicians in nonacademic settings and minority patients, will be essential to enhance accrual.

  17. Presentation and subsequent publication rates of phase I oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Luis H; Bacik, Jennifer; Cheung, Alexander; Spriggs, David R

    2005-10-01

    Many trials submitted to scientific meetings are not reported in peer-reviewed journals. Results may vary substantially and the lack of final publication constitutes a form of reporting bias. The authors sought to determine the presentation and publication rates of Phase I trials submitted to a major oncology meeting and the factors impeding their subsequent publication. The authors identified all Phase I studies submitted to the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in 1997, categorizing them as novel (agents not approved by the Food and Drug Administration at the time of submission) or nonnovel (at least one agent approved), and as industry sponsored or not. MEDLINE searches and an E-mailed questionnaire confirmed publication in peer-reviewed literature and the reasons for nonpublication. Approximately 54% of the 275 Phase I studies were selected for presentation. Abstracts reporting novel agents were more likely selected for presentation than those reporting nonnovel compounds (68% vs. 38%; P < 0.0001). Seventy-two percent of the presented abstracts were subsequently published, compared with 62% of those not presented (P = 0.08). The overall publication rate was 67% at 7.5 years. Presentation status was associated with time to publication (P = 0.01), with abstracts chosen for presentation being published sooner. The median time from presentation to publication was found to be 3.4 years. Lack of time and author relocation were the major obstacles to publication. The underreporting of final results of Phase I oncology trials remains a serious problem. In the future, investigators must commit to the publication of final results in a timely manner. Journals should provide mechanisms for rapid reporting of Phase I trials.

  18. American Society of Clinical Oncology Position Statement on Obesity and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Alfano, Catherine M.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Burger, Robert A.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Fabian, Carol J.; Gucalp, Ayca; Hershman, Dawn L.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Jones, Lee W.; Kakarala, Madhuri; Ness, Kirsten K.; Merrill, Janette K.; Wollins, Dana S.; Hudis, Clifford A.

    2014-01-01

    Rates of obesity have increased significantly over the last three decades in the United States and globally. In addition to contributing to heart disease and diabetes, obesity is a major unrecognized risk factor for cancer. Obesity is associated with worsened prognosis after cancer diagnosis and also negatively affects the delivery of systemic therapy, contributes to morbidity of cancer treatment, and may raise the risk of second malignancies and comorbidities. Research shows that the time after a cancer diagnosis can serve as a teachable moment to motivate individuals to adopt risk-reducing behaviors. For this reason, the oncology care team—the providers with whom a patient has the closest relationships in the critical period after a cancer diagnosis—is in a unique position to help patients lose weight and make other healthy lifestyle changes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology is committed to reducing the impact of obesity on cancer and has established a multipronged initiative to accomplish this goal by 1) increasing education and awareness of the evidence linking obesity and cancer; 2) providing tools and resources to help oncology providers address obesity with their patients; 3) building and fostering a robust research agenda to better understand the pathophysiology of energy balance alterations, evaluate the impact of behavior change on cancer outcomes, and determine the best methods to help cancer survivors make effective and useful changes in lifestyle behaviors; and 4) advocating for policy and systems change to address societal factors contributing to obesity and improve access to weight management services for patients with cancer. PMID:25273035

  19. Characterizing distress, the 6th vital sign, in an oncology pain clinic

    PubMed Central

    Waller, A.; Groff, S.L.; Hagen, N.; Bultz, B.D.; Carlson, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Context The delineation of populations of cancer patients with complex symptoms can inform the planning and delivery of supportive care services. Objectives We explored the physical, psychosocial, and practical concerns experienced by patients attending an ambulatory oncology symptom control clinic. Methods Patients attending a Pain Clinic at a large tertiary cancer centre were invited to complete screening measures assessing distress, pain, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and practical and psychosocial problems. A matched sample of patients who did not attend the Pain Clinic were selected as a comparison group. Results Of all eligible Pain Clinic patients, 46 (77%) completed the measures; so did 46 comparison group patients. The percentages of patients reporting distress (78.3%), pain (93.5%), and fatigue (93.5%) were higher among Pain Clinic patients than among the comparison patients. A higher percentage of Pain Clinic patients also reported multiple, severe, concurrent symptoms: 87% scored 7 or higher in at least one of the pain, fatigue, or distress scales, and 30.4% of the patients scored 7 or higher on all three. The most common problem areas were feeling a burden to others, trouble talking with friends and family, spirituality, and sleep difficulties. Conclusions Higher levels of multiple, concurrent symptoms and psychosocial problems were found in Pain Clinic patients than in a group of patients who did not attend the Pain Clinic. Routine screening and triaging of cancer patients using a comprehensive and standardized panel of questions can facilitate symptom assessment and management, and can inform program planning. PMID:22514497

  20. Integrating Chemotherapy into the Management of Oligometastatic Colorectal Cancer: Evidence based Approach Using Clinical Trial Findings

    PubMed Central

    Semrad, Thomas J.; Fahrni, Ana Rodriguez; Gong, I-Yeh; Khatri, Vijay P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose With the use of case presentations, we present a review of the role of systemic chemotherapy in oligometastatic colorectal cancer and suggest ways to integrate clinical research findings into the interdisciplinary management of this potentially curable subset of patients. Methods This educational review discusses the role of chemotherapy in the management of oligometastatic metastatic colorectal cancer. Results In initially resectable oligometastatic colorectal cancer, the goal of chemotherapy is to eradicate micrometastatic disease. Perioperative 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin along with surgical resection can result in 5-year survival rates as high as 57%. With the development of increasingly successful chemotherapy regimens, attention is being paid to the use of chemotherapy to convert patients with initially unresectable metastasis into patients with a chance of surgical cure. The choice of chemotherapy regimen requires consideration of the goals of therapy and assessment of both tumor and patient-specific factors. Discussion Herein we discuss the choice and timing of chemotherapy in patients with initially resectable and borderline resectable metastatic colorectal cancer. Coordinated multidisciplinary care of such patients can optimize survival outcomes and result in the cure of patients with this otherwise lethal disease. PMID:26100816

  1. The geography of clinical cancer research: analysis of abstracts presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meetings.

    PubMed

    Saad, E D; Mangabeira, A; Masson, A L; Prisco, F E

    2010-03-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting is the largest forum for presentation of clinical research in oncology. We quantified the contribution of countries and assessed correlates of their presence at such meetings. After stratifying abstracts according to category of presentation (oral, poster, and 'publication only'), we took a random sample of 10% of the studies presented at years 2001-2003 and 2006-2008. We assigned abstract nationality using the affiliation of authors. For multinational studies, we developed an algorithm to assign nationality. Of the 22 045 eligible abstracts, 2206 were analyzed and represented 71 countries: 905 (41%) abstracts were from a single institution, 969 (44%) were multicenter, uninational studies, and 332 (15%) were multinational studies. United States nationality was assigned to 49% of all abstracts and the next 14 countries with a higher number of studies accounted for 41%. There was a statistically significant temporal trend in the proportion of multinational studies. Also, multinational studies and abstracts with United States nationality were more frequently presented in oral and poster fashion and had more frequent involvement of the pharmaceutical industry. This study provides a geographic overview of clinical cancer research and indicates that multinational collaboration is increasing.

  2. Pharmacogenomic biomarkers as inclusion criteria in clinical trials of oncology-targeted drugs: a mapping of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Vivot, Alexandre; Li, Jacques; Zeitoun, Jean-David; Mourah, Samia; Crequit, Perrine; Ravaud, Philippe; Porcher, Raphaël

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe pharmacogenomics-based inclusion criteria (enrichment) and the main characteristics of clinical trials involving oncology-targeted therapies. Clinical trials of oncology-targeted therapies approved after 2005 with pharmacogenomic testing required or recommended in their label were retrieved from a mapping of the ClinicalTrials.gov database. We examined information for 12 drugs and 858 trials. Overall, 434 trials (51%) were enriched on the biomarker first mentioned in the label and 145 (17%) were enriched on another biomarker, whereas 270 trials (31%) included all patients. The median proportion of trials corresponding to both the drug's indication and drug's target was 35%. Of the 361 trials that tested drugs in another disease than the first one in the label, 219 (61%) were without enrichment and 87 (24%) were actually enriched but on another biomarker than the first one in the label. Several drugs have been tested in trials enriched on many different biomarkers. Nonetheless, most targeted therapies have been developed only using biomarker-positive patients; therefore, exclusion of biomarker-negative patients from treatment relies on only preclinical data and on biological understanding of the disease and target.Genet Med 18 8, 796-805.

  3. Hidden outpatient oncology clinical nursing minimum data set: findings from an Italian multi-method study.

    PubMed

    Palese, Alvisa; Zanini, Antonietta; Carlevaris, Erika; Morandin, Annalisa; Carpanelli, Ivana; Dante, Angelo

    2013-08-01

    The main aim of this study was to present the hidden Clinical Nursing Minimum Data Set adopted by Italian nurses in outpatient oncology settings. A multi-method study design articulated in three phases was conducted from November 2009 to December 2010. A cross-sectional study design involving outpatient oncology centres located in the 20 Italian regions was undertaken in order to collect structured nursing records used by nurses in the documentation of daily nursing care. An evaluation of the items contained in each nursing record was performed in order to individuate homogeneities. A content analysis of the items was therefore undertaken in order to categorise them in assessment, problems, intervention, and outcomes. A total of 1080 different items from the structured nursing records were counted, comprising on average 29 items (range 8-175; ±40.4) for each record. A total of 330 (30.6%) out of 1080 were categorised as assessment items, 146 (13.5%) as problems, 583 (54.0%) as interventions and 21 (1.9%) as outcomes items. Italian nurses have developed a micro-system Clinical Nursing Minimum Data Set capturing and documenting several types of clinical data, following their implicit representation of what it is important to document: much consideration is given to nursing surveillance/monitoring and to at-risk problems, indicating the importance of the nursing role in the prevention and early recognition of a patient's clinical deterioration. However, there is a need to develop a macro-system national NMDS which will be useful for evaluating nursing outcomes and making decisions on workforce resources. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reduction of Inappropriate Prophylactic Pegylated Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Use for Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Who Receive Chemotherapy: An ASCO Quality Training Program Project of the Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Lindsey Martin; Moeller, Machelle B; Azzouqa, Abdel-Ghani; Guthrie, Amy E; Dalby, Carole K; Earl, Marc A; Cheng, Connie; Pennell, Nathan A; Shapiro, Marc; Velcheti, Vamsidhar; Stevenson, James P

    2016-01-01

    savings. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. [Galen's oncology].

    PubMed

    Vigliani, R

    1995-10-01

    "Claudius Galenus" is the Author of "De tumoribus praeter naturam". The book was studied on the original Greek text with Latin version edited by K.G. Kühn ("Opera omnia Claudii Galeni": VII, 705-732). This Galen's clinical and pathological oncology was examined as far as categorization, classification, morphology, etiology, pathogenesis, morphogenesis, topography, behaviour (with related therapeutic and prognostic implications) and terminology are concerned. Problems, aspects and concepts, more or less clarified by Galen, were extensively discussed with special reference to the Galen's scientific knowledge and compared with the modern oncology.

  6. Clinical efficacy of local targeted chemotherapy for triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Jinsong; Wang, Xianming; Guan, Hong; Chen, Weicai; Wang, Ming; Wu, Huisheng; Wang, Zun; Zhou, Ruming; Qiu, Shuibo

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of superselective intra-arterial targeted neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative (triple-negative) breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS.: A total of 47 triple-negative breast cancer patients (29 at stage II, 13 at stage III and 5 at stage IV) were randomly assigned to two groups: targeted chemotherapy group (n=24) and control group (n=23). Patients in the targeted chemotherapy group received preoperative superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy with CEF regimen (C: cyclophosphamide [600 mg/m(2)]; E: epirubicin [90 mg/m(2)]; F: 5-fluorouracil [600 mg/m(2)]), and those in the control group received routine neoadjuvant chemotherapy with CEF. The duration of the treatment, changes in lesions and the prognosis were determined. The average course of the treatment was 15 days in the targeted chemotherapy group which was significantly shorter than that in the control group (31 days) (P<0.01). The remission rate of lesions was 91.6% in the targeted chemotherapy group and 60.9% in the control group, respectively. Among these patients, 9 died within two years, including 2 (both at IV stage) in the targeted chemotherapy group and 7 (2 at stage II, 4 at stage III and 1 at stage IV) in the control group. As an neoadjuvant therapy, the superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy is effective for triple-negative breast cancer, with advantages of the short treatment course and favourable remission rates as well as prognoses.

  7. Uncaria tomentosa for Reducing Side Effects Caused by Chemotherapy in CRC Patients: Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Farias, I. L. G.; Araújo, M. C. S.; Farias, J. G.; Rossato, L. V.; Elsenbach, L. I.; Dalmora, S. L.; Flores, N. M. P.; Durigon, M.; Cruz, I. B. M.; Morsch, V. M.; Schetinger, M. R. C.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa in minimizing the side effects of chemotherapy and improving the antioxidant status of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, a randomized clinical trial was conducted. Patients (43) undergoing adjuvant/palliative chemotherapy with 5-Fluorouracil/leucovorin + oxaliplatin (FOLFOX4) were split into two groups: the UT group received chemotherapy plus 300 mg of Uncaria tomentosa daily and the C group received only FOLFOX4 and served as a control. Blood samples were collected before each of the 6 cycles of chemotherapy, and hemograms, oxidative stress, enzymes antioxidants, immunologic parameters, and adverse events were analyzed. The use of 300 mg of Uncaria tomentosa daily during 6 cycles of FOLFOX4 did not change the analyzed parameters, and no toxic effects were observed. PMID:21869902

  8. Uncaria tomentosa for Reducing Side Effects Caused by Chemotherapy in CRC Patients: Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Farias, I L G; Araújo, M C S; Farias, J G; Rossato, L V; Elsenbach, L I; Dalmora, S L; Flores, N M P; Durigon, M; Cruz, I B M; Morsch, V M; Schetinger, M R C

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa in minimizing the side effects of chemotherapy and improving the antioxidant status of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, a randomized clinical trial was conducted. Patients (43) undergoing adjuvant/palliative chemotherapy with 5-Fluorouracil/leucovorin + oxaliplatin (FOLFOX4) were split into two groups: the UT group received chemotherapy plus 300 mg of Uncaria tomentosa daily and the C group received only FOLFOX4 and served as a control. Blood samples were collected before each of the 6 cycles of chemotherapy, and hemograms, oxidative stress, enzymes antioxidants, immunologic parameters, and adverse events were analyzed. The use of 300 mg of Uncaria tomentosa daily during 6 cycles of FOLFOX4 did not change the analyzed parameters, and no toxic effects were observed.

  9. Patient-Clinician Communication: American Society of Clinical Oncology Consensus Guideline.

    PubMed

    Gilligan, Timothy; Coyle, Nessa; Frankel, Richard M; Berry, Donna L; Bohlke, Kari; Epstein, Ronald M; Finlay, Esme; Jackson, Vicki A; Lathan, Christopher S; Loprinzi, Charles L; Nguyen, Lynne H; Seigel, Carole; Baile, Walter F

    2017-09-11

    Purpose To provide guidance to oncology clinicians on how to use effective communication to optimize the patient-clinician relationship, patient and clinician well-being, and family well-being. Methods ASCO convened a multidisciplinary panel of medical oncology, psychiatry, nursing, hospice and palliative medicine, communication skills, health disparities, and advocacy experts to produce recommendations. Guideline development involved a systematic review of the literature and a formal consensus process. The systematic review focused on guidelines, systematic reviews and meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials published from 2006 through October 1, 2016. Results The systematic review included 47 publications. With the exception of clinician training in communication skills, evidence for many of the clinical questions was limited. Draft recommendations underwent two rounds of consensus voting before being finalized. Recommendations In addition to providing guidance regarding core communication skills and tasks that apply across the continuum of cancer care, recommendations address specific topics, such as discussion of goals of care and prognosis, treatment selection, end-of-life care, facilitating family involvement in care, and clinician training in communication skills. Recommendations are accompanied by suggested strategies for implementation. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  10. The contribution of limited-resource countries to the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meetings.

    PubMed

    Masmoudi, Amine

    2009-10-01

    Limited-resource countries (LRCs) are underrepresented in biomedical research, and data with respect to oncology are lacking. The aim of the present study was to assess the participation of LRCs in the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meetings. We analyzed the characteristics of abstracts originating from LRCs presented at the 2005-2007 ASCO meetings. We used a logistic regression model to identify country characteristics associated with contributions to the meetings. Eight percent of abstracts were generated by authors from LRCs. Abstracts from LRCs, compared with abstracts originating from high-income countries (HICs), were less commonly scheduled for oral and poster presentations (1.4% and 26.8% vs 8.8% and 52.8%, respectively; P < 0.001), and were less likely to report industry-provided funding (2.0% vs 12.7%; P < 0.001). However, the presentation type and the rate of reporting industry funding did not significantly differ between HIC abstracts and LRC abstracts involving one or more coauthors from HICs. In multivariate analysis, ASCO-related characteristics, but not geoeconomic parameters, were significantly predictive of country participation in the meetings. These data show that the contribution of LRCs to ASCO annual meetings is very low. Although abstracts originating from LRCs involving authors from HICs were associated with a higher-impact type of presentation, their relevance to the cancer care concerns of LRCs remains to be ascertained.

  11. [ANMCO/AICO/AIOM Consensus document: Clinical and management pathways in cardio-oncology].

    PubMed

    Tarantini, Luigi; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Maurea, Nicola; Abrignani, Maurizio Giuseppe; Bisceglia, Irma; Bovelli, Daniella; De Gennaro, Luisa; Del Sindaco, Donatella; Macera, Francesca; Parrini, Iris; Radini, Donatella; Russo, Giulia; Scardovi, Angela Beatrice; Inno, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    In Italy, cardiovascular diseases and cancer are the leading causes of death. Both diseases share the same risk factors and, having the highest incidence and prevalence in the elderly, they often coexist in the same individual. Furthermore, the enhanced survival of cancer patients registered in the last decades and linked to early diagnosis and improvement of care, not infrequently exposes them to the appearance of ominous cardiovascular complications due to the deleterious effects of cancer treatment on the heart and circulatory system. The above considerations have led to the development of a new branch of clinical cardiology based on the principles of multidisciplinary collaboration between cardiologists and oncologists: Cardio-oncology, which aims to find solutions to the prevention, monitoring, diagnosis and treatment of heart damage induced by cancer care in order to pursue, in the individual patient, the best possible care for cancer while minimizing the risk of cardiac toxicity. In this consensus document we provide practical recommendations on how to assess, monitor, treat and supervise the candidate or patient treated with potentially cardiotoxic cancer therapy in order to treat cancer and protect the heart at all stages of the oncological disease.

  12. Overview of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Viele, Carol S

    2003-11-01

    To provide a general overview of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea (CID) that will highlight the pathophysiology, incidence, and impact of this problem, as well as describe the oncology nurse's role in the management of CID. Primary and tertiary literature, the authors' clinical experience. CID is a frequent complication of many types of chemotherapy that can significantly affect patient quality of life, increase treatment costs, and limit the ability to deliver full doses of chemotherapy. Because patients may be reluctant to discuss diarrhea with their health care providers, vigilance on the part of the health care team is needed. Through ongoing, regular patient contact, the oncology nurse is uniquely situated to monitor patients for the development of CID, assess its severity, and provide guidance to the health care team on the patient's status.

  13. Differential clinical pharmacology of rolapitant in delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV)

    PubMed Central

    Rashad, Noha; Abdel-Rahman, Omar

    2017-01-01

    Rolapitant is a highly selective neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, orally administered for a single dose of 180 mg before chemotherapy with granisetron D1, dexamethasone 8 mg BID on day 2–4. It has a unique pharmacological characteristic of a long plasma half-life (between 163 and 183 hours); this long half-life makes a single use sufficient to cover the delayed emesis risk period. No major drug–drug interactions between rolapitant and dexamethasone or other cytochrome P450 inducers or inhibitors were observed. The clinical efficacy of rolapitant was studied in two phase III trials in highly emetogenic chemotherapy and in one clinical trial in moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving a complete response (defined as no emesis or use of rescue medication) in the delayed phase (>24–120 hours after chemotherapy). In comparison to granisetron (10 μg/kg intravenously) and dexamethasone (20 mg orally) on day 1, and dexamethasone (8 mg orally) twice daily on days 2–4 and placebo, rolapitant showed superior efficacy in the control of delayed and overall emesis. This review aims at revising the pharmacological characteristics of rolapitant, offering an updated review of the available clinical efficacy and safety data of rolapitant in different clinical settings, highlighting the place of rolapitant in the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) among currently available guidelines, and exploring the future directions of CINV management. PMID:28392676

  14. Effect of the clinical support nurse role on work-related stress for nurses on an inpatient pediatric oncology unit.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ann; Kicis, Jennifer; Sangha, Gurjit

    2007-01-01

    High patient acuity, heavy workload, and patient deaths can all contribute to work-related stress for pediatric oncology nurses. A new leadership role, the clinical support nurse (CSN), was recently initiated on the oncology unit of a large Canadian pediatric hospital to support frontline staff and reduce some of the stresses related to clinical activity. The CSN assists nurses with complex patient care procedures, provides hands-on education at the bedside, and supports staff in managing challenging family situations. This study explores the effect of the CSN role on the nurses' work-related stress using the Stressor Scale for Pediatric Oncology Nurses. A total of 58 nurses participated in this study for a response rate of 86%. The results show that the intensity of work-related stress experienced by nurses in this study is significantly less (P < .001) on shifts staffed with a CSN compared with shifts without a CSN.

  15. [Bipolar disorders in oncology: Characteristics and management].

    PubMed

    Reich, Michel; Kotecki, Nuria

    2017-05-01

    Bipolar disorders belong to the spectrum of mood disorders and represent a serious psychiatric comorbidity. Behaviors adopted by bipolar patients can foster cancer occurrence but also impact its management, especially during acute depressive or manic episode. Oncologists must adapt their protocols in order to obtain the best compliance for treatment and avoid any possible mood destabilization, with the inherent risk of suicidal attempt. Potential interactions between mood-stabilizing agents (lithium, divalproate, atypical antipsychotics, and anticonvulsivants) and oncologic treatment (chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, corticotherapy) will be particularly watched. To do so, a closely collaboration with the oncopsychiatrist but also with the referent or liaison psychiatry team is necessary during the patient's oncologic care. Some clinical vignettes will illustrate the modalities of care of bipolar disorders in oncology. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Improved clinical trial enrollments for uterine leiomyosarcoma patients after gynecologic oncology partnership with a sarcoma center.

    PubMed

    Lange, S E S; Liu, J; Adkins, D R; Powell, M A; Van Tine, B A; Mutch, D G

    2016-02-01

    A retrospective chart review was performed to determine patient outcomes before and after partnership by gynecologic oncologists (GYN/ONC) with a sarcoma center (SC) for patients with recurrent unresectable/metastatic (RM) uterine leiomyosarcoma (uLMS). 58 RM patients, identified from medical records of uLMS patients cared for by either GYN/ONC service and/or the SC between 1/1/2000-4/1/2014, were audited for patient and tumor characteristics, outcomes, and clinical trials enrollments. Of the 58 patients, 26 patients (48%) were treated by GYN/ONC alone and 32 were treated by a combination of GYN/ONC and SC (52%). Age, race, tumor size, grade, presence of lymphovascular invasion, cervical involvement, and FIGO stage at diagnosis were not statistically different between the two groups. There was a significant difference between the number of clinical trial enrollments (0.07 vs 0.84 trials/patient, p<0.001) and the number of chemotherapy regimens prescribed (2.67 vs 4.29/patient, p=0.03) by GYN/ONC vs SC; the latter was driven by the number of clinical trial enrollments by the SC. Sixty-nine percent of patients referred to the SC were enrolled in at least one clinical trial, while just 8% of patients in the GYN/ONC group were enrolled in at least one clinical trial, a difference that is significant (p<0.0001). Referral of RM uLMS patients by GYN/ONC to a dedicated clinical trials-based SC resulted in an increase in the number of chemotherapy regimens prescribed and clinical trial enrollments. Partnership between GYN/ONC and a dedicated SC with access to clinical trials should be encouraged for all RM uLMS patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Current status of adjuvant chemotherapy for resected lung cancer at our institute--focus on clinical trial enrollment].

    PubMed

    Sawada, Shigeki; Yamashita, Motohiro; Komori, Eisaku; Suehiro, Hiroshi; Ogino, Atsuko; Nogami, Hiroyuki; Segawa, Yoshihiko; Shinkai, Tetsu

    2010-03-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy after complete resection in Stage I B-III A non-small cell lung cancer is recommended. Several clinical trials of adjuvant chemotherapy are now underway in Japan. Our institute also participates in adjuvant clinical trials, but slow patient recruitment is a problem. In this paper, we reported the current status of adjuvant chemotherapy and recruitment for clinical trials at our institute. Between August 2001 and December 2008, candidates for adjuvant chemotherapy were 315 patients. Among them 186 who received adjuvant chemotherapy were younger and had less co-morbidity than those who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Twenty-five of the 186 patients participated in the clinical trials. The major reason of refusal of a clinical trial was that patients preferred to choose their own treatment and disliked randomized trials.

  18. Chemotherapy and novel therapeutics before radical prostatectomy for high-risk clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cha, Eugene K; Eastham, James A

    2015-05-01

    Although both surgery and radiation are potential curative options for men with clinically localized prostate cancer, a significant proportion of men with high-risk and locally advanced disease will demonstrate biochemical and potentially clinical progression of their disease. Neoadjuvant systemic therapy before radical prostatectomy (RP) is a logical strategy to improve treatment outcomes for men with clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer. Furthermore, delivery of chemotherapy and other systemic agents before RP affords an opportunity to explore the efficacy of these agents with pathologic end points. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy, primarily with docetaxel (with or without androgen deprivation therapy), has demonstrated feasibility and safety in men undergoing RP, but no study to date has established the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemohormonal therapies. Other novel agents, such as those targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, clusterin, and immunomodulatory therapeutics, are currently under investigation.

  19. Precision Oncology Medicine: The Clinical Relevance of Patient-Specific Biomarkers Used to Optimize Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Keith T; Chau, Cindy H; Price, Douglas K; Figg, William D

    2016-12-01

    Precision medicine in oncology is the result of an increasing awareness of patient-specific clinical features coupled with the development of genomic-based diagnostics and targeted therapeutics. Companion diagnostics designed for specific drug-target pairs were the first to widely utilize clinically applicable tumor biomarkers (eg, HER2, EGFR), directing treatment for patients whose tumors exhibit a mutation susceptible to an FDA-approved targeted therapy (eg, trastuzumab, erlotinib). Clinically relevant germline mutations in drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (eg, TPMT, DPYD) have been shown to impact drug response, providing a rationale for individualized dosing to optimize treatment. The use of multigene expression-based assays to analyze an array of prognostic biomarkers has been shown to help direct treatment decisions, especially in breast cancer (eg, Oncotype DX). More recently, the use of next-generation sequencing to detect many potential "actionable" cancer molecular alterations is further shifting the 1 gene-1 drug paradigm toward a more comprehensive, multigene approach. Currently, many clinical trials (eg, NCI-MATCH, NCI-MPACT) are assessing novel diagnostic tools with a combination of different targeted therapeutics while also examining tumor biomarkers that were previously unexplored in a variety of cancer histologies. Results from ongoing trials such as the NCI-MATCH will help determine the clinical utility and future development of the precision-medicine approach. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  20. Oncologic outcomes and survival in pT0 tumors after radical cystectomy in patients without neoadjuvant chemotherapy: results from a large multicentre collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Rouprêt, Morgan; Drouin, Sarah J; Larré, Stéphane; Neuzillet, Yann; Botto, Henry; Hitier, Maryam; Rigaud, Jerome; Crew, Jeremy; Xylinas, Evanguelos; Salomon, Laurent; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas; Iborra, François; Champetier, Denis; Rozet, François; Flamand, Vincent; Bastide, Cyrille; Cormier, Luc; Durand, Xavier; Lunardi, Pierre; Rischmann, Pascal; Nouhaud, François-Xavier; Ferlicot, Sophie; Patard, Jean-Jacques; Floch, Aurélie Paule; Irani, Jacques; Peyronnet, Benoit; Bensalah, Karim; Poissonnier, Laura; Grès, Pascale; Droupy, Stéphane; Casenave, Julien; Wallerand, Hervé; Soulié, Michel; Pfister, Christian

    2011-12-01

    To assess the postsurgical survival of patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder with pT0 tumor at pathologic examination of cystectomy specimens. A multi-institutional, retrospective database was analyzed with data from 4758 radical cystectomy (RC) patients who underwent RC without neoadjuvant chemotherapy and who were diagnosed with pT0 on the basis of the pathologic specimen. Survival curves were estimated. A multivariate Cox model was used to evaluate the association between prognosis factors and disease recurrence or survival. Overall, 258 patients (5.4%) were included in the study. The median age was 64 years. At last resection, 171 tumors were invasive (at least pT2), and 87 were not. Median follow-up was 51 months. At multivariate analysis, initial location of the tumor and absence of lymphadenectomy were associated with tumor recurrence (P = 0.03 and P = 0.005, respectively) and specific mortality (P = 0.005 and 0.001, respectively). The main limitation of the study is its retrospective design, which is due to the rarity of this situation. Cancer-specific and recurrence-free survival rates were 89 and 85%, respectively, at 5 years and 82 and 80%, respectively, at 10 years. Despite acceptable oncological outcomes, patients with a pT0 tumor at the time of RC are still at risk of recurrence and progression and should not be considered to be entirely cured. In this population, stringent follow-up according to current recommendations should be effective.

  1. Cognition and Quality of Life After Chemotherapy Plus Radiotherapy (RT) vs. RT for Pure and Mixed Anaplastic Oligodendrogliomas: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 9402

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Meihua; Cairncross, Gregory; Shaw, Edward

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9402 compared procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) chemotherapy plus radiation therapy (PCV + RT) vs. RT alone for anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Here we report longitudinal changes in cognition and quality of life, effects of patient factors and treatments on cognition, quality of life and survival, and prognostic implications of cognition and quality of life. Methods and Materials: Cognition was assessed by Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and quality of life by Brain-Quality of Life (B-QOL). Scores were analyzed for survivors and within 5 years of death. Shared parameter models evaluated MMSE/B-QOL with survival. Results: For survivors, MMSE and B-QOL scores were similar longitudinally and between treatments. For those who died, MMSE scores remained stable initially, whereas B-QOL slowly declined; both declined rapidly in the last year of life and similarly between arms. In the aggregate, scores decreased over time (p = 0.0413 for MMSE; p = 0.0016 for B-QOL) and were superior with age <50 years (p < 0.001 for MMSE; p = 0.0554 for B-QOL) and Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) 80-100 (p < 0.001). Younger age and higher KPS were associated with longer survival. After adjusting for patient factors and drop-out, survival was longer after PCV + RT (HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.49-0.9, p = 0.0084; HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.54-1.01, p = 0.0592) in models with MMSE and B-QOL. In addition, there were no differences in MMSE and B-QOL scores between arms (p = 0.4752 and p = 0.2767, respectively); higher scores predicted longer survival. Conclusion: MMSE and B-QOL scores held steady in the upper range in both arms for survivors. Younger, fitter patients had better MMSE and B-QOL and longer survival.

  2. Predicting the performance of a strategic alliance: an analysis of the Community Clinical Oncology Program.

    PubMed Central

    Kaluzny, A D; Lacey, L M; Warnecke, R; Hynes, D M; Morrissey, J; Ford, L; Sondik, E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study is designed to examine the effects of environment and structure of the Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) on performance as measured by patient accrual to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-approved treatment protocols. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. Data and analysis are part of a larger evaluation of the NCI Community Clinical Oncology Program during its second funding cycle, June 1987-May 1990. Data, taken from primary and secondary sources, included a survey of selected informants in CCOPs and research bases, CCOP grant applications, CCOP annual progress reports, and site visits to a subsample of CCOPs (N = 20) and research bases (N = 5). Accrual data were obtained from NCI records. STUDY DESIGN. Analysis involved three complementary sets of factors: the local health care resources environment available to the CCOP, the larger policy environment as reflected by the relationship of the CCOP to selected research bases and the NCI, and the operational structure of the CCOP itself. A hierarchical model examined the separate and cumulative effects of local and policy environment and structure on performance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Other things equal, the primary predictors of treatment accrual were: (1) the larger policy environment, as measured by the attendance of nurses at research base meetings; and (2) operational structure, as measured by the number and character of components within participating CCOPs and the number of hours per week worked by data managers. These factors explained 73 percent of the total variance in accrual performance. CONCLUSIONS. Findings suggest criteria for selecting the types of organizations to participate in the alliance, as well as for establishing guidelines for managing such alliances. A future challenge is to determine the extent to which factors predicting accrual to cancer treatment clinical trials are equally important as predictors of accrual to cancer prevention and control trials. PMID:8514498

  3. Lean methodology improves efficiency in outpatient academic uro-oncology clinics.

    PubMed

    Skeldon, Sean C; Simmons, Andrea; Hersey, Karen; Finelli, Antonio; Jewett, Michael A; Zlotta, Alexandre R; Fleshner, Neil E

    2014-05-01

    To determine if lean methodology, an industrial engineering tool developed to optimize manufacturing efficiency, can successfully be applied to improve efficiencies and quality of care in a hospital-based high-volume uro-oncology clinic. Before the lean initiative, baseline data were collected on patient volumes, wait times, cycle times (patient arrival to discharge), nursing assessment time, patient teaching, and physician ergonomics (via spaghetti diagram). Value stream analysis and a rapid improvement event were carried out, and significant changes were made to patient check-in, work areas, and nursing face time. Follow-up data were obtained at 30, 60, and 90 days. The Student t test was used for analysis to compare performance metrics with baseline. The median cycle time before the lean initiative was 46 minutes. This remained stable at 46 minutes at 30 days but improved to 35 minutes at 60 days and 41 minutes at 90 days. Shorter wait times allowed for increased nursing and physician face time. The average length of the physician assessment increased from 7.5 minutes at baseline to 10.6 minutes at 90 days. The average proportion of value-added time compared with the entire clinic visit increased from 30.6% at baseline to 66.3% at 90 days. Using lean methodology, we were able to shorten the patient cycle time and the time to initial assessment as well as integrate both an initial registered nurse assessment and registered nurse teaching to each visit. Lean methodology can effectively be applied to improve efficiency and patient care in an academic outpatient uro-oncology clinic setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Predicting the performance of a strategic alliance: an analysis of the Community Clinical Oncology Program.

    PubMed

    Kaluzny, A D; Lacey, L M; Warnecke, R; Hynes, D M; Morrissey, J; Ford, L; Sondik, E

    1993-06-01

    This study is designed to examine the effects of environment and structure of the Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) on performance as measured by patient accrual to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-approved treatment protocols. Data and analysis are part of a larger evaluation of the NCI Community Clinical Oncology Program during its second funding cycle, June 1987-May 1990. Data, taken from primary and secondary sources, included a survey of selected informants in CCOPs and research bases, CCOP grant applications, CCOP annual progress reports, and site visits to a subsample of CCOPs (N = 20) and research bases (N = 5). Accrual data were obtained from NCI records. Analysis involved three complementary sets of factors: the local health care resources environment available to the CCOP, the larger policy environment as reflected by the relationship of the CCOP to selected research bases and the NCI, and the operational structure of the CCOP itself. A hierarchical model examined the separate and cumulative effects of local and policy environment and structure on performance. Other things equal, the primary predictors of treatment accrual were: (1) the larger policy environment, as measured by the attendance of nurses at research base meetings; and (2) operational structure, as measured by the number and character of components within participating CCOPs and the number of hours per week worked by data managers. These factors explained 73 percent of the total variance in accrual performance. Findings suggest criteria for selecting the types of organizations to participate in the alliance, as well as for establishing guidelines for managing such alliances. A future challenge is to determine the extent to which factors predicting accrual to cancer treatment clinical trials are equally important as predictors of accrual to cancer prevention and control trials.

  5. Ethical issues of clinical trials in paediatric oncology from 2003 to 2013: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Jean-Claude K; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Doz, François

    2016-05-01

    A state-of-the art approach to the debates on ethical issues is key in order to gain guidance on research practices involving sick children and adolescents, as well as to identify research avenues in which it might be worth cooperating, to generate better or supplementary evidence. Based on a systematic literature search using MEDLINE, we report the main ethical developments in paediatric oncology clinical trials from 2003-13. The present knowledge about normative and empirical ethical demands in this setting is quantified and summarised in a list of 46 issues. This list primarily aims to provide readers with a comprehensive account of the main decision nodes and professional attitudes that enable families to make a safe, competent, and satisfactory decision about their child's enrolment, or non-participation, in cancer clinical trials. Our systematic Review shows how important it is for professionals to engage in a constant reflection on optimum trial designs, on the effect of offering trial participation on key family dynamics, and on the ways to understand families' needs and values accurately. In view of present scientific developments, we further emphasise the need to enhance societal awareness about research in children and adolescents, to prevent so-called research fatigue in small populations due to multiple solicitations or inadequate legal demands, and to reassess longstanding ethical certainties in the strictest view of promoting sick children's interests. This systematic Review allows a series of questions to be drawn to guide and encourage collective and individual endeavours that should lead to constant improvements in our research practices in paediatric clinical oncology research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Early clinical trials in paediatric oncology in Spain: a nationwide perspective].

    PubMed

    Bautista, Francisco; Gallego, Soledad; Cañete, Adela; Mora, Jaume; Díaz de Heredia, Cristina; Cruz, Ofelia; Fernández, José María; Rives, Susana; Berlanga, Pablo; Hladun, Raquel; Juan Ribelles, Antonio; Madero, Luis; Ramírez, Manuel; Fernández Delgado, Rafael; Pérez-Martínez, Antonio; Mata, Cristina; Llort, Anna; Martín Broto, Javier; Cela, María Elena; Ramírez, Gema; Sábado, Constantino; Acha, Tomás; Astigarraga, Itziar; Sastre, Ana; Muñoz, Ascensión; Guibelalde, Mercedes; Moreno, Lucas

    2017-09-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death between the first year of life and adolescence, and some types of diseases are still a major challenge in terms of cure. There is, therefore, a major need for new drugs. Recent findings in cancer biology open the door to the development of targeted therapies against individual molecular changes, as well as immunotherapy. Promising results in adult anti-cancer drug development have not yet been translated into paediatric clinical practice. A report is presented on the activity in early paediatric oncology trials (phase I-II) in Spain. All members of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Haematology Oncology (SEHOP) were contacted in order to identify early clinical trials in paediatric cancer opened between 2005 and 2015. A total of 30 trials had been opened in this period: 21 (70%) in solid tumours, and 9 (30%) in malignant haemopathies. A total of 212 patients have been enrolled. The majority was industry sponsored (53%). Since 2010, four centres have joined the international consortium of Innovative Therapies for Children with Cancer (ITCC), which has as its aim to develop novel therapies for paediatric tumours. A significant number of new studies have opened since 2010, improving the treatment opportunities for our children. Results of recently closed trials show the contribution of Spanish investigators, the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, and their benefits. The activity in clinical trials has increased in the years analysed. The SEHOP is committed to develop and participate in collaborative academic trials, in order to help in the advancement and optimisation of existing therapies in paediatric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology working group and European Association for Neuro-Oncology recommendations for the clinical use of PET imaging in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nathalie L; Weller, Michael; Suchorska, Bogdana; Galldiks, Norbert; Soffietti, Riccardo; Kim, Michelle M; la Fougère, Christian; Pope, Whitney; Law, Ian; Arbizu, Javier; Chamberlain, Marc C; Vogelbaum, Michael; Ellingson, Ben M; Tonn, Joerg C

    2016-09-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the use of PET imaging in gliomas. The review examines established clinical benefit in glioma patients of PET using glucose ((18)F-FDG) and amino acid tracers ((11)C-MET, (18)F-FET, and (18)F-FDOPA). An increasing number of studies have been published on PET imaging in the setting of diagnosis, biopsy, and resection as well radiotherapy planning, treatment monitoring, and response assessment. Recommendations are based on evidence generated from studies which validated PET findings by histology or clinical course. This guideline emphasizes the clinical value of PET imaging with superiority of amino acid PET over glucose PET and provides a framework for the use of PET to assist in the management of patients with gliomas. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Immune contexture and histological response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy predict clinical outcome of lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Remark, Romain; Lupo, Audrey; Alifano, Marco; Biton, Jerome; Ouakrim, Hanane; Stefani, Alessandro; Cremer, Isabelle; Goc, Jeremy; Régnard, Jean-Francois; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Damotte, Diane

    2016-01-01

    There is now growing evidence that the immune contexture influences cancer progression and clinical outcome of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). If chemotherapy is widely used to treat patients with advanced-stage NSCLC, it remains unclear how it could modify the immune contexture and impact its prognostic value. Here, we analyzed two retrospective cohorts, respectively composed of 122 stage III-N2 NSCLC patients treated with chemotherapy before surgery and 39 stage-matched patients treated by surgery only. In patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the histological characteristics, the expression of PD-L1 protein, and the tumor immune microenvironment (CD8(+) T cells, DC-LAMP(+) mature dendritic cells, and CD68(+) macrophages) were evaluated and their prognostic value assessed together with standard clinical parameters. By analyzing pre- and post-treatment specimens, we did not find any changes in the PD-L1 expression. We also found that the tumor immune contexture in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy exhibited a similar pattern that the one found in chemotherapy-naive patients, with comparable densities of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) and DC-LAMP(+) cells and a similar spatial organization. The percentage of residual viable tumor cells and the immune pattern (CD8(+) and DC-LAMP(+) cell densities) were significantly associated with the clinical outcome and allowed the identification of short- and long-term survivors, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the immune pattern was found to be the strongest independent prognostic factor. In conclusion, this study decrypts the complex interplay between cancer and immune cells in patients undergoing chemotherapy and supports potential beneficial synergistic effect of immunotherapy and chemotherapy.

  9. Using lean principles to improve outpatient adult infusion clinic chemotherapy preparation turnaround times.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Matthew H; Eckel, Stephen; Daniels, Rowell; Amerine, Lindsey B

    2015-07-01

    The workflow and chemotherapy preparation turnaround times at an adult infusion clinic were evaluated to identify opportunities to optimize workflow and efficiency. A three-phase study using Lean Six Sigma methodology was conducted. In phase 1, chemotherapy turnaround times in the adult infusion clinic were examined one year after the interim goal of a 45-minute turnaround time was established. Phase 2 implemented various experiments including a five-day Kaizen event, using lean principles in an effort to decrease chemotherapy preparation turnaround times in a controlled setting. Phase 3 included the implementation of process-improvement strategies identified during the Kaizen event, coupled with a final refinement of operational processes. In phase 1, the mean turnaround time for all chemotherapy preparations decreased from 60 to 44 minutes, and a mean of 52 orders for adult outpatient chemotherapy infusions was received each day. After installing new processes, the mean turnaround time had improved to 37 minutes for each chemotherapy preparation in phase 2. In phase 3, the mean turnaround time decreased from 37 to 26 minutes. The overall mean turnaround time was reduced by 26 minutes, representing a 57% decrease in turnaround times in 19 months through the elimination of waste and the implementation of lean principles. This reduction was accomplished through increased efficiencies in the workplace, with no addition of human resources. Implementation of Lean Six Sigma principles improved workflow and efficiency at an adult infusion clinic and reduced the overall chemotherapy turnaround times from 60 to 26 minutes. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Correlative Studies in Clinical Trials: A Position Statement From the International Thyroid Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Bible, Keith C.; Cote, Gilbert J.; Demeure, Michael J.; Elisei, Rossella; Jhiang, Sissy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Patients with progressive thyroid cancer in distant metastatic sites represent a population with a need for new therapeutic options. Aspiring to improve the treatment of such patients, the objective of this position statement from the International Thyroid Oncology Group (ITOG) is to clarify the importance of incorporating high-quality correlative studies into clinical trials. Participants: ITOG was formed to develop and support high-quality multicenter and multidisciplinary clinical trials for patients with aggressive forms of thyroid cancer. The Correlative Sciences Committee of the ITOG focuses on the quality and types of correlative studies included in ITOG-associated clinical trials. Evidence: This document represents expert consensus from ITOG regarding this issue based on extensive collective experience in clinical and translational trials informed by basic science. Consensus Process: The Correlative Studies Committee identified an international writing group representative of diverse specialties, including basic sciences. Drafts were reviewed by all members of the writing group, the larger committee, and the ITOG board. After consideration of all comments by the writing group and modification of the document, the final document was then approved by the authors and the ITOG board. Conclusions: High-quality correlative studies, which include variety in the types of correlates, should be intrinsic to the design of thyroid cancer clinical trials to offer the best opportunity for each study to advance treatment for patients with advanced and progressive thyroid cancer. PMID:26418285

  11. Building trust and diversity in patient-centered oncology clinical trials: An integrated model.

    PubMed

    Hurd, Thelma C; Kaplan, Charles D; Cook, Elise D; Chilton, Janice A; Lytton, Jay S; Hawk, Ernest T; Jones, Lovell A

    2017-04-01

    Trust is the cornerstone of clinical trial recruitment and retention. Efforts to decrease barriers and increase clinical trial participation among diverse populations have yielded modest results. There is an urgent need to better understand the complex interactions between trust and clinical trial participation. The process of trust-building has been a focus of intense research in the business community. Yet, little has been published about trust in oncology clinical trials or the process of building trust in clinical trials. Both clinical trials and business share common dimensions. Business strategies for building trust may be transferable to the clinical trial setting. This study was conducted to understand and utilize contemporary thinking about building trust to develop an Integrated Model of Trust that incorporates both clinical and business perspectives. A key word-directed literature search of the PubMed, Medline, Cochrane, and Google Search databases for entries dated between 1 January 1985 and 1 September 2015 was conducted to obtain information from which to develop an Integrated Model of Trust. Successful trial participation requires both participants and clinical trial team members to build distinctly different types of interpersonal trust to effect recruitment and retention. They are built under conditions of significant emotional stress and time constraints among people who do not know each other and have never worked together before. Swift Trust and Traditional Trust are sequentially built during the clinical trial process. Swift trust operates during the recruitment and very early active treatment phases of the clinical trial process. Traditional trust is built over time and operates during the active treatment and surveillance stages of clinical trials. The Psychological Contract frames the participants' and clinical trial team members' interpersonal trust relationship. The "terms" of interpersonal trust are negotiated through the psychological

  12. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy for relationships with companies: background and rationale.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology's (ASCO's) new conflict of interest policy reflects a commitment to transparency and independence in the development and presentation of scientific and educational content. ASCO supports thorough and accessible disclosure of financial relationships with companies at institutional and individual levels and calls for rigorous evaluation of content in light of the information disclosed. For abstracts and articles presenting original research, ASCO holds first, last, and corresponding authors to a clear standard of independence. In imposing restrictions, the new policy focuses on the role of these authors rather than of the principal investigator(s) as in the previous policy. ASCO remains actively engaged with the broader scientific community in seeking and implementing efficient, effective approaches to conflict of interest management.

  13. Impact of an oncology palliative care clinic on access to home care services.

    PubMed

    Jang, Raymond W; Burman, Debika; Swami, Nadia; Kotler, Jennifer; Banerjee, Subrata; Ridley, Julia; Mak, Ernie; Bryson, John; Rodin, Gary; Le, Lisa W; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2013-08-01

    Home care (HC) is important for patients with cancer as performance status declines. Our study of 1224 patients at a Canadian cancer center examined the impact of an oncology palliative care clinic (OPCC) on HC referral. The HC referral frequency was calculated before and after the first OPCC consultation, in total and according to performance status (Palliative Performance Scale, PPS). Characteristics associated with HC referral were investigated. After the first OPCC consultation, there was an increase in HC referral from 39% (477 of 1224; 49% of those with PPS ≤60) to 69% (841 of 1224; 88% of those with PPS ≤60). Factors independently associated with HC referral were poor PPS (P < .001) and older age (P = .003). Thus OPCC involvement resulted in markedly increased HC referrals, particularly for older patients with poor performance status.

  14. Chromogranin A as a valid marker in oncology: Clinical application or false hopes?

    PubMed Central

    Gkolfinopoulos, Stavros; Tsapakidis, Konstantinos; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Papamichael, Demetris; Kountourakis, Panteleimon

    2017-01-01

    Chromogranin A, due to its primary expression throughout the neuroendocrine system, is a widely accepted biomarker for the assessment of neuro-endocrine tumors. It has been traditionally used in the management of patients with tumors of gastro-enteropancreatic origin. Lately, it has also been implicated in various conditions and diseases, both benign and malignant. However, the paucity of data of adequate strength, as well as its relation with common physiologic conditions and its interaction with commonly prescribed medications, limit its clinical use in only a narrow spectrum. Herein, we present a thorough review to the most frequent conditions where its levels are affected, focusing specifically on its potential use as a prognostic and predictive biomarker in oncology. PMID:28396845

  15. The approaches in the care for terminal cancer patients in radiotherapy and oncology clinic, Rijeka University Hospital Center.

    PubMed

    Dobrila-Dintinjana, Renata; Redzović, Arnela; Perić, Jana; Petranović, Duska

    2013-04-01

    We sought to determine the proportion of our admitted patients in terminal phase of ilness who recieved some kind of active oncological therapy. We conducted a pilot study on the records of patients who died in the University Hospital. We assessed the percentage of mortality, a therapeutic approach in terms of treating the underlying disease, and access to palliative treatment. Of 2097 patients hospitalized in the UHC Rijeka Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology during 2010 and 2011, 44 pts died which accounts for 2.1%. The most common primary sites of cancer in patients who died in our Department were the lungs and then the breast. Ten (22.7%) patients were admitted exclusively to receive palliative care, while others (34-77.3%) were admitted for planned active chemo- and/or radiotherapy administration. Within three months before death, 18 (40.9%) patients underwent chemotherapy treatment. The number of patients hospitalized due to providing palliative care is extremely low, which could indicate a good supply of out-patient treatment of cancer patients in the terminal stage of the disease. However, concerned about the high percentage of patients who tried to provide oncology treatments in the three months before his death. The percentages referred to in their daily work is still guided by the principles of healing "to the end" and thus we plunge into the realm disthanasia.

  16. Clinical and oncological outcomes after surgical excision of pigmented villonodular synovitis at the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Korim, M T; Clarke, D R; Allen, P E; Richards, C J; Ashford, R U

    2014-06-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare benign neoplastic disease of the synovium of joints and tendon sheaths, which may be locally aggressive. It can be broadly classified into localised disease or more diffuse forms, with the latter more prone to recurrence after surgical excision. We describe our experience in the management of foot and ankle PVNS, focusing on the diffuse type. Patients with PVNS were identified from a histology database from 2000 to 2010 at the University Hospitals of Leicester. The primary aim was to determine oncological outcomes and evaluate clinical outcomes with the Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS) and the American Academy of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (AOFAS) scores. 30 patients, 16 males and 14 females with a mean age of 37±15 years, who underwent surgery, were identified. There were 22 nodular PVNS and 8 diffuse PVNS. The diffuse PVNS was more likely to be in the hindfoot (75%, 6/8), of which 50% (3/6) had osteoarthritis at presentation. The localised PVNS was mostly located in the forefoot (91%, 20/22). None of the localised PVNS had a recurrence. The surgical recurrence rate in this series was similar to the pooled recurrence rate from the literature [12.5% (1/8) compared to 12.2% (6/49)]. The mean TESS and AOFAS scores were 86 and 78, respectively. Diffuse PVNS is more likely to occur in the hindfoot and nodular PVNS is more common in the forefoot. Aggressive synovectomy alone is an effective treatment for diffuse PVNS, with good oncological and clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of Clinical Trials in a Cooperative Group Setting: The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Alan; Cheng, Steven; Crites, Joshua; Ferranti, Lori; Wu, Amy; Gray, Robert; MacDonald, Jean; Marinucci, Donna; Comis, Robert

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE We examine the processes and document the calendar time required to activate Phase II and III clinical trials by an oncology group: the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG). METHODS Setup steps were documented by: 1) interviewing ECOG headquarters and statistical center staff, and committee chairs, 2) reviewing standard operating procedure manuals, and 3) inspecting study records, documents, and emails to identify additional steps. Calendar time was collected for each major process for each study in this set. RESULTS Twenty-eight Phase III studies were activated by ECOG during the 01/2000–07/2006 study period. We examined in detail a sample of 16 of those studies. More than 481 distinct processes were required for study activation: 420 working steps, 61 major decision points, 26 processing loops, and 13 stopping points. Median calendar days to activate a trial in the Phase III subset was 783 days (median, 285 to 1542 days) from executive approval and 808 days (range, 435 to 1604 days) from initial conception of the study. Data were collected for all Phase II and Phase III trials activated and completed during this time period (n=52) for which development time represented 43.9% and 54.1% of the total trial time respectively. CONCLUSION The steps required to develop and activate a clinical trial may require as much or more time than the actual completion of a trial. The data demonstrates that to improve the activation process, research should to be directed toward streamlining both internal and external groups and processes. PMID:18519773

  18. Efficacy and learning curve of a hand-held echocardiography device in an oncology outpatient clinic: Expanding the use of echoscopic heart examination beyond cardiology.

    PubMed

    PéREZ DE Isla, Leopoldo Pérez; Moreno, Fernando; Garcia Saez, Jose Angel Garcia; Clavero, Matias; Moreno, Nuno; Aguado DE LA Rosa, Carlos Aguado; DE Agustin, Jose Alberto; Gomez DE Diego, Jose Juan Gomez; Cobos, Miguel Angel; Saltijeral, Adriana; Macaya, Carlos; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel

    2015-07-01

    Certain chemotherapy drugs for breast cancer may induce cardiotoxicity and these patients should be echocardiographically monitored. The performance of a focused echocardiographic evaluation (echoscopy) at the patient's location by a non-cardiologist appears to be feasible. The aim of the present study was to assess the accuracy of echoscopy performed by medical oncologists in an outpatient clinic using hand-held echocardiography devices. The study cohort comprised consecutive unselected patients who attended an oncology outpatient clinic. Two medical oncologists attended a one-week training period, which included theoretical and practical teaching by an expert cardiologist. Every subject underwent two echo examinations. The first examination was performed by an oncologist using a hand-held echo device and the second was performed by a cardiologist using a 'premium' device. Out of the 101 enrolled patients, 32 were men (31.7%) and the mean age was 56.03±16.88 years. There was a good global agreement [intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC): 0.65 for left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)]. When the results were analyzed depending on the period of time when the echo studies were performed, a clear and short learning curve was observed: LVEF started at ICC=0.58 and increased to 0.66 and 0.77 in the second and third period, respectively. There were extremely few clinically significant differences and a learning curve was also evident. In conclusion, cardiac echoscopy performed by an oncologist with a hand-held device may lead to a similar clinical management as a study performed by an expert cardiologist with a 'premium' system in patients under chemotherapy following a short training period.

  19. Towards in silico oncology: adapting a four dimensional nephroblastoma treatment model to a clinical trial case based on multi-method sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Georgiadi, Eleni Ch; Dionysiou, Dimitra D; Graf, Norbert; Stamatakos, Georgios S

    2012-11-01

    In the past decades a great progress in cancer research has been made although medical treatment is still widely based on empirically established protocols which have many limitations. Computational models address such limitations by providing insight into the complex biological mechanisms of tumor progression. A set of clinically-oriented, multiscale models of solid tumor dynamics has been developed by the In Silico Oncology Group (ISOG), Institute of Communication and Computer Systems (ICCS)-National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) to study cancer growth and response to treatment. Within this context using certain representative parameter values, tumor growth and response have been modeled under a cancer preoperative chemotherapy protocol in the framework of the SIOP 2001/GPOH clinical trial. A thorough cross-method sensitivity analysis of the model has been performed. Based on the sensitivity analysis results, a reasonable adaptation of the values of the model parameters to a real clinical case of bilateral nephroblastomatosis has been achieved. The analysis presented supports the potential of the model for the study and eventually the future design of personalized treatment schemes and/or schedules using the data obtained from in vitro experiments and clinical studies.

  20. Integration of Pathologic Findings With Clinical-Radiologic Tumor Measurements to Quantify Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0458 TITLE: Integration of Pathologic Findings with Clinical- Radiologic Tumor Measurements to Quantify Response to...2004) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Integration of Pathologic Findings with Clinical- Radiologic DAMD17-02-1-0458 Tumor Measurements to...is residual after neoadjuvant chemotherapy using standard radiologic and/or clinical measures of tumor size that are integrated with pathologic

  1. A clinical model for quality of life assessment in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Klee, M C; King, M T; Machin, D; Hansen, H H

    2000-01-01

    The pattern of symptoms experienced by cancer patients during chemotherapy is very complex. Consequently, quality of life (QOL) assessment has to be carefully planned to capture clinically relevant changes. A clinical model of changes in symptoms experienced by symptomatic metastatic patients during several courses of chemotherapy has been developed. The model differentiates cancer-related symptoms, acute side-effects, chronic side-effects and symptoms not related to cancer. The model was used to predict changes in each of these four symptom groups. Three time points were selected (post-cycle 2, pre-cycle 3, post-cycle 5) and an appropriate window around each time point was set. The model predictions were tested empirically with 56 patients with advanced ovarian cancer who completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 plus disease specific items during a six-cycle course of chemotherapy. The changes observed in the sample were in accordance with the changes predicted by the clinical model. Results from patients who did not complete the questionnaire within the specified time windows tended to dilute the findings from the group who did. A clinical model is useful in the planning of QOL assessments in order to capture clinically relevant effects. Such models also facilitate the interpretation of QOL studies, particularly when cyclic short-term effects and chronic side-effects are overlaid on disease symptoms, as is the case with chemotherapy for cancer.

  2. ENRICH: A promising oncology nurse training program to implement ASCO clinical practice guidelines on fertility for AYA cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Gwede, Clement K; Meade, Cathy; Kelvin, Joanne; Reich, Richard R; Reinecke, Joyce; Bowman, Meghan; Sehovic, Ivana; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2016-11-01

    We describe the impact of ENRICH (Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare), a web-based communication-skill-building curriculum for oncology nurses regarding AYA fertility and other reproductive health issues. Participants completed an 8-week course that incorporated didactic content, case studies, and interactive learning. Each learner completed a pre- and post-test assessing knowledge and a 6-month follow-up survey assessing learner behaviors and institutional changes. Out of 77 participants, the majority (72%) scored higher on the post-test. Fifty-four participants completed the follow-up survey: 41% reviewed current institutional practices, 20% formed a committee, and 37% gathered patient materials or financial resources (22%). Participants also reported new policies (30%), in-service education (37%), new patient education materials (26%), a patient navigator role (28%), and workplace collaborations with reproductive specialists (46%). ENRICH improved nurses' knowledge and involvement in activities addressing fertility needs of oncology patients. Our study provides a readily accessible model to prepare oncology nurses to integrate American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines and improve Quality Oncology Practice Initiative measures related to fertility. Nurses will be better prepared to discuss important survivorship issues related to fertility and reproductive health, leading to improved quality of life outcomes for AYAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Improving the Evidence Base for Treating Older Adults With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement.

    PubMed

    Hurria, Arti; Levit, Laura A; Dale, William; Mohile, Supriya G; Muss, Hyman B; Fehrenbacher, Louis; Magnuson, Allison; Lichtman, Stuart M; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Tew, William P; Postow, Michael A; Cohen, Harvey J

    2015-11-10

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convened a subcommittee to develop recommendations on improving the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer in response to a critical need identified by the Institute of Medicine. Older adults experience the majority of cancer diagnoses and deaths and make up the majority of cancer survivors. Older adults are also the fastest growing segment of the US population. However, the evidence base for treating this population is sparse, because older adults are underrepresented in clinical trials, and trials designed specifically for older adults are rare. The result is that clinicians have less evidence on how to treat older adults, who represent the majority of patients with cancer. Clinicians and patients are forced to extrapolate from trials conducted in younger, healthier populations when developing treatment plans. This has created a dearth of knowledge regarding the risk of toxicity in the average older patient and about key end points of importance to older adults. ASCO makes five recommendations to improve evidence generation in this population: (1) Use clinical trials to improve the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer, (2) leverage research designs and infrastructure for generating evidence on older adults with cancer, (3) increase US Food and Drug Administration authority to incentivize and require research involving older adults with cancer, (4) increase clinicians' recruitment of older adults with cancer to clinical trials, and (5) use journal policies to improve researchers' reporting on the age distribution and health risk profiles of research participants.

  4. Systemic Therapy for Stage IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Nasser; Johnson, David; Temin, Sarah; Baker, Sherman; Brahmer, Julie; Ellis, Peter M; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Hesketh, Paul J; Jaiyesimi, Ishmael; Leighl, Natasha B; Riely, Gregory J; Schiller, Joan H; Schneider, Bryan J; Smith, Thomas J; Tashbar, Joan; Biermann, William A; Masters, Gregory

    2017-08-14

    Purpose Provide evidence-based recommendations updating the 2015 ASCO guideline on systemic therapy for patients with stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods The ASCO NSCLC Expert Panel made recommendations based on a systematic review of randomized controlled trials from February 2014 to December 2016 plus the Cancer Care Ontario Program in Evidence-Based Care's update of a previous ASCO search. Results This guideline update reflects changes in evidence since the previous guideline update. Fourteen randomized controlled trials provide the evidence base; earlier phase trials also informed recommendation development. Recommendations New or revised recommendations include the following. Regarding first-line treatment for patients with non-squamous cell carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma (without positive markers, eg, EGFR/ALK /ROS1), if the patient has high programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression, pembrolizumab should be used alone; if the patient has low PD-L1 expression, clinicians should offer standard chemotherapy. All other clinical scenarios follow 2015 recommendations. Regarding second-line treatment in patients who received first-line chemotherapy, without prior immune checkpoint therapy, if NSCLC tumor is positive for PD-L1 expression, clinicians should use single-agent nivolumab, pembrolizumab, or atezolizumab; if tumor has negative or unknown PD-L1 expression, clinicians should use nivolumab or atezolizumab. All immune checkpoint therapy is recommended alone plus in the absence of contraindications. For patients who received a prior first-line immune checkpoint inhibitor, clinicians should offer standard chemotherapy. For patients who cannot receive immune checkpoint inhibitor after chemotherapy, docetaxel is recommended; in patients with nonsquamous NSCLC, pemetrexed is recommended. In patients with a sensitizing EGFR mutation, disease progression after first-line epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, and

  5. A Phase 3 Trial of 2 Years of Androgen Suppression and Radiation Therapy With or Without Adjuvant Chemotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Final Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Phase 3 Randomized Trial NRG Oncology RTOG 9902

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Seth A.; Hunt, Daniel; Sartor, A. Oliver; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Gomella, Leonard; Grignon, David; Rajan, Raghu; Kerlin, Kevin J.; Jones, Christopher U.; Dobelbower, Michael; Shipley, William U.; Zeitzer, Kenneth; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Donavanik, Viroon; Rotman, Marvin; Hartford, Alan C.; Michalski, Jeffrey; Seider, Michael; Kim, Harold; and others

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Long-term (LT) androgen suppression (AS) with radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment of high-risk, localized prostate cancer (PCa). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9902 was a randomized trial testing the hypothesis that adjuvant combination chemotherapy (CT) with paclitaxel, estramustine, and oral etoposide plus LT AS plus RT would improve overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Patients with high-risk PCa (prostate-specific antigen 20-100 ng/mL and Gleason score [GS] ≥7 or clinical stage ≥T2 and GS ≥8) were randomized to RT and AS (AS + RT) alone or with adjuvant CT (AS + RT + CT). CT was given as four 21-day cycles, delivered beginning 28 days after 70.2 Gy of RT. AS was given as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone for 24 months, beginning 2 months before RT plus an oral antiandrogen for 4 months before and during RT. The study was designed based on a 6% improvement in OS from 79% to 85% at 5 years, with 90% power and a 2-sided alpha of 0.05. Results: A total of 397 patients (380 eligible) were randomized. The patients had high-risk PCa, 68% with GS 8 to 10 and 34% T3 to T4 tumors, and median prostate-specific antigen of 22.6 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.2 years. The trial closed early because of excess thromboembolic toxicity in the CT arm. The 10-year results for all randomized patients revealed no significant difference between the AS + RT and AS + RT + CT arms in OS (65% vs 63%; P=.81), biochemical failure (58% vs 54%; P=.82), local progression (11% vs 7%; P=.09), distant metastases (16% vs 14%; P=.42), or disease-free survival (22% vs 26%; P=.61). Conclusions: NRG Oncology RTOG 9902 showed no significant differences in OS, biochemical failure, local progression, distant metastases, or disease-free survival with the addition of adjuvant CT to LT AS + RT. The trial results provide valuable data regarding the natural history of high-risk PCa treated with LT AS + RT and have implications for

  6. New developments in clinical oncology: the interdependence of bench and bedside.

    PubMed

    Antman, K H

    1991-09-15

    Efforts to diminish the overall morbidity and mortality of malignancy have required a variety of strategies and a balanced national research agenda. The design of curative regimens against leukemia, lymphomas, testis cancer, and childhood malignancies is a tribute to the interactions between laboratory and clinical scientists. Laboratory models illustrated the importance of dose and the need for combinations to avoid the emergence of drug resistance in heterogeneous tumors. In addressing the incurability of common epithelial cancers in adults once disseminated, again laboratory models suggested that regimens which produced responses in advanced disease might be curative in patients with micro-metastases. Such proved to be the case in adjuvant therapy for breast cancer involving lymph nodes and for osteogenic sarcoma. Recent studies have extended this strategy to less advanced breast cancer and to locally advanced colon cancer. Lung cancer has required a different strategy. A coalition has developed to support the strongest possible public position against smoking. For the first time lung cancer incidence has leveled off in white males. Women and minorities continue to be a major target for smoking cessation programs. While large randomized trials are expensive (and to some scientists, unexciting), they are our most reliable means of detecting treatment differences of 10 to 15%. Because lung, breast, and colon cancer kill almost 250,000 Americans each year, such "small" differences represent thousands of Americans. There are also a number of interesting current studies that may impact in the longer term on the care of patients with cancer. Research of three different groups of investigators has recently converged. Over the past 3 decades several groups of basic laboratory investigators had been studying and cloning hematopoietic growth factors. Large randomized trials now confirm that myelosuppression after intensive chemotherapy can be substantially ameliorated

  7. Ovarian cancer clinical trial endpoints: Society of Gynecologic Oncology white paper

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Thomas J.; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Brady, Mark F.; Coleman, Robert L.; Einstein, Mark H.; Monk, Bradley J.; Mannel, Robert S.; Thigpen, J. Tate; Umpierre, Sharee A.; Villella, Jeannine A.; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the value of multiple clinical endpoints in the unique setting of ovarian cancer. Methods A clinical trial workgroup was established by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology to develop a consensus statement via multiple conference calls, meetings and white paper drafts. Results Clinical trial endpoints have profound effects on late phase clinical trial design, result interpretation, drug development, and regulatory approval of therapeutics. Selection of the optimal clinical trial endpoint is particularly provocative in ovarian cancer where long overall survival (OS) is observed. The lack of new regulatory approvals and the lack of harmony between regulatory bodies globally for ovarian cancer therapeutics are of concern. The advantages and disadvantages of the numerous endpoints available are herein discussed within the unique context of ovarian cancer where both crossover and post-progression therapies potentially uncouple surrogacy between progression-free survival (PFS) and OS, the two most widely supported and utilized endpoints. The roles of patient reported outcomes (PRO) and health related quality of life (HRQoL) are discussed, but even these widely supported parameters are affected by the unique characteristics of ovarian cancer where a significant percentage of patients may be asymptomatic. Original data regarding the endpoint preferences of ovarian cancer advocates is presented. Conclusions Endpoint selection in ovarian cancer clinical trials should reflect the impact on disease burden and unique characteristics of the treatment cohort while reflecting true patient benefit. Both OS and PFS have led to regulatory approvals and are clinically important. OS remains the most objective and accepted endpoint because it is least vulnerable to bias; however, the feasibility of OS in ovarian cancer is compromised by the requirement for large trial size, prolonged time-line for final analysis, and potential for unintended loss of treatment effect

  8. Analysis of Clinical and Molecular Factors Impacting Oncologic Outcomes in Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Christina L.; May, Caitlin D.; Watson, Kelsey L.; Al Sannaa, Ghadah A.; Dineen, Sean P.; Feig, Rachel; Landers, Sharon; Ingram, Davis R.; Wang, Wei-Lien; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh; Feig, Barry; Hunt, Kelly K.; Cormier, Janice N.; Lazar, Alexander; Torres, Keila E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas (UPS) present a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Identification of prognostic molecular markers is required for the discovery of novel treatment approaches. The aim of this study was to correlate clinicopathologic variables, expression of tyrosine kinase receptors, and markers of cell cycle progression and survival with oncologic outcomes. Methods A tissue microarray containing 208 primary UPS samples was analyzed by immunohistochemistry for protein markers and in situ hybridization for microRNA. Staining results were correlated with clinicopathologic features and oncologic outcomes. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to assess associations between expression of protein markers, mi-RNA and outcome. Results At a median follow-up of 3.9 years (9 years for survivors), 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 63%. Clinical variables associated with improved DSS included age < 61 years, tumor size < 10 cm, margin-negative resection and sporadic-tumor status. At the protein level, loss of cyclin D1 (p=0.06), pEGFR (p=0.023), pIGF-1R (p=0.022), and PTEN (p<0.001) and overexpression of AXL (p=0.015) were associated with reduced DSS on univariate analysis. Ki67, PCNA and pEGFR were more highly expressed in sporadic UPS than radiation-associated (RA-UPS) while RA-UPS samples expressed higher levels of both phosphorylated and total IGF-1R. Discussion Cyclin D1, AXL and PTEN are associated with cancer-specific outcomes and warrant further investigation in UPS. The differences in protein expression in sporadic versus RA-UPS may indicate that the activated molecular signaling nodes may be different for each specific histology and could also explain the aggressive phenotype seen in RA-UPS when compared to the sporadic lesions. PMID:26847678

  9. Pain in clinical oncology: patient satisfaction with management of cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Antón, A; Montalar, J; Carulla, J; Jara, C; Batista, N; Camps, C; Cassinello, J; Sanz-Ortiz, J; Díaz-Rubio, E; Martínez, C; Ledesma, F; Zubillaga, E

    2012-03-01

    Despite effective analgesic therapy, inadequate pain control is frequently perceived by patients and caregivers. To assess satisfaction with management of pain in cancer patients. Between January and May 2007, a cross-sectional multicentre study was conducted in 64 Medical Oncology Departments throughout Spain. A total of 525 outpatients with oncological diseases completed a questionnaire with demographic data, characteristics and intensity of pain, and perceptions and attitudes towards pain management at the time of a routine clinical visit. Physicians also completed a questionnaire with tumour-related and treatment-related data. Cluster analysis was used to classify patients into three groups (satisfied, neither satisfied nor dissatisfied or neutral, dissatisfied) according to pain intensity and satisfaction with treatment. Patients satisfied with their analgesic treatment (33%) had lower pain intensities and, when regularly asked about their pain, considered their physicians to be more involved in their treatment. Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied patients (neutral) (44%) had higher mean pain intensities. Two-thirds of them achieved marked relief of their pain and also thought that physicians were aware of their situation. Dissatisfied patients (23%) had moderate to severe pain intensities, and said that they were asked less frequently about their pain, and thought that their physicians were less involved in their analgesic treatment. Physician-patient communication and information provided to patients are essential aspects of patient perceptions and attitudes towards control of cancer-related pain. Pain is seen as a condition that may be controlled but affects the capacity to lead a normal life. © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  10. Use of liposomal doxorubicin for adjuvant chemotherapy of breast cancer in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Ding, Xian-Feng; Shen, Jian-Yu; Zhang, Xi-Ping; Ding, Xiao-Wen; Xu, Bin

    Breast cancer is one of the malignant tumors with the highest morbidity and mortality. It is helpful to reduce the rate of tumor recurrence and metastasis by treating breast cancer with adjuvant chemotherapy, so as to increase the cure rate or survival of patients. In recent years, liposomes have been regarded as a kind of new carrier for targeted drugs. Being effective for enhancing drug efficacy and reducing side effects, they have been widely used for developing anticancer drugs. As a kind of anthracycline with high anticancer activity, doxorubicin can treat or alleviate a variety of malignant tumors effectively when it is used on its own or in combination with other anticancer drugs. Although liposomal doxorubicin has been extensively used in the adjuvant chemotherapy of breast cancer, its exact therapeutic efficacy and side effects have not been definitely proven. Various clinical studies have adopted different combined regimes, dosages, and staging, so their findings differ to certain extent. This paper reviews the clinical application of liposomal doxorubicin in the adjuvant chemotherapy of breast cancer and illustrates therapeutic effects and side effects of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and non-PLD (NPLD) in clinical research, in order to discuss the strategies for applying these drugs in such adjuvant chemotherapy, looking forward to providing references for related research and clinical treatment in terms of dosage, staging, combined regimes, and analysis methods and so on.

  11. Use of liposomal doxorubicin for adjuvant chemotherapy of breast cancer in clinical practice*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Ding, Xian-feng; Shen, Jian-yu; Zhang, Xi-ping; Ding, Xiao-wen; Xu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the malignant tumors with the highest morbidity and mortality. It is helpful to reduce the rate of tumor recurrence and metastasis by treating breast cancer with adjuvant chemotherapy, so as to increase the cure rate or survival of patients. In recent years, liposomes have been regarded as a kind of new carrier for targeted drugs. Being effective for enhancing drug efficacy and reducing side effects, they have been widely used for developing anticancer drugs. As a kind of anthracycline with high anticancer activity, doxorubicin can treat or alleviate a variety of malignant tumors effectively when it is used on its own or in combination with other anticancer drugs. Although liposomal doxorubicin has been extensively used in the adjuvant chemotherapy of breast cancer, its exact therapeutic efficacy and side effects have not been definitely proven. Various clinical studies have adopted different combined regimes, dosages, and staging, so their findings differ to certain extent. This paper reviews the clinical application of liposomal doxorubicin in the adjuvant chemotherapy of breast cancer and illustrates therapeutic effects and side effects of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and non-PLD (NPLD) in clinical research, in order to discuss the strategies for applying these drugs in such adjuvant chemotherapy, looking forward to providing references for related research and clinical treatment in terms of dosage, staging, combined regimes, and analysis methods and so on. PMID:28070993

  12. Differences in Funding Sources of Phase III Oncology Clinical Trials by Treatment Modality and Cancer Type.

    PubMed

    Jairam, Vikram; Yu, James B; Aneja, Sanjay; Wilson, Lynn D; Lloyd, Shane

    2017-06-01

    Given the limited resources available to conduct clinical trials, it is important to understand how trial sponsorship differs among different therapeutic modalities and cancer types and to consider the ramifications of these differences. We searched clinicaltrials.gov for a cross-sectional register of active, phase III, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) studying treatment-related endpoints such as survival and recurrence for the 24 most prevalent malignancies. We classified the RCTs into 7 categories of therapeutic modality: (1) chemotherapy/other cancer-directed drugs, (2) targeted therapy, (3) surgery, (4) radiation therapy (RT), (5) RT with other modalities, (6) multimodality therapy without RT, and (7) other. RCTs were categorized as being funded by one or more of the following groups: (1) government, (2) hospital/university, (3) industry, and (4) other. χ analysis was performed to detect differences in funding source distribution between modalities and cancer types. The percentage of multimodality trials (5%) and radiation RCTs (4%) funded by industry was less than that for chemotherapy (32%, P<0.01) or targeted therapy (48%, P<0.01). Trials studying targeted therapy were less likely to have hospital/university funding than any of the other modalities (P<0.01 in each comparison). Trials of chemotherapy were more likely to be funded by industry if they also studied targeted therapy (P<0.01). RCTs studying targeted therapies are more likely to be funded by industry than trials studying multimodality therapy or radiation. The impact of industry funding versus institutional or governmental sources of funding for cancer research is unclear and requires further study.

  13. American Society of Clinical Oncology technology assessment on breast cancer risk reduction strategies: tamoxifen and raloxifene.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, R T; Collyar, D E; Somerfield, M R; Pfister, D G

    1999-06-01

    To conduct an evidence-based technology assessment to determine whether tamoxifen and raloxifene as breast cancer risk-reduction strategies are appropriate for broad-based conventional use in clinical practice. Tamoxifen and raloxifene. Outcomes of interest include breast cancer incidence, breast cancer-specific survival, overall survival, and net health benefits. A comprehensive, formal literature review was conducted for tamoxifen and raloxifene on the following topics: breast cancer risk reduction; tamoxifen side effects and toxicity, including endometrial cancer risk; tamoxifen influences on nonmalignant diseases, including coronary heart disease and osteoporosis; and decision making by women at risk for breast cancer. Testimony was collected from invited experts and interested parties. More weight was given to publications that described randomized trials. BENEFITS/HARMS/COSTS: The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Working Group acknowledges that a woman's decision regarding breast cancer risk-reduction strategies will depend on the importance and weight attributed to the information provided regarding both cancer and non-cancer-related risks. For women with a defined 5-year projected risk of breast cancer of >/= 1.66%, tamoxifen (at 20 mg/d for up to 5 years) may be offered to reduce their risk. It is premature to recommend raloxifene use to lower the risk of developing breast cancer outside of a clinical trial setting. On the basis of available information, use of raloxifene should currently be reserved for its approved indication to prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women. Conclusions are based on single-agent use of the drugs. At the present time, the effect of using tamoxifen or raloxifene with other medications (such as hormone replacement therapy), or using tamoxifen and raloxifene in combination or sequentially, has not been studied adequately. The continuing use of placebo-controlled trials in other risk-reduction trials highlights the

  14. Controversies on the management of clinical situations with low therapeutic effectiveness in oncology.

    PubMed

    Expósito, José; Bretón, Juan José; Domínguez, Carmen; Pons, Joana

    2010-07-01

    Clinical scenarios associated with low therapeutic effectiveness (LTE) are especially complex and highly relevant in oncology. The objective was to test a methodological framework for creating consensual clinical recommendations for routine practice. The study was in three phases from Mars 2006 to January 2008: 1) Definition of LTE situations; 2) Preparation by 10 experts of a panel of LTE situations in cancers of breast, lung, head and neck, colon and rectum and brain; and 3) Development of a consensus on each situation and its optimal treatment by gathering agreement and disagreements (two-round Delphi method) from 68 practicing oncologists in Andalusian Community. Three major and three minor criteria were established for an LTE situation, defined when at least one major or two minor criteria were met. The expert group proposed 48 possible LTE clinical scenarios for breast (n = 7), lung (10), brain (11), head and neck (11) and colorectal cancers (9). Sixty-eight oncologists agreed to participate in the study; the response rate was 79% (from 34 medical and 17 radiation oncologists) In the first round (definition), maximum agreement was obtained with the LTE definition of 10 of the 48 scenarios; in the second round (treatment options), maximum agreement was obtained on the treatment of 3 of these 10 scenarios. Oncologists reached low levels of agreement on the definition of an LTE situation and on its treatment recommendations. This study proposes an approach to the improvement of cancer management in situations of high uncertainty.

  15. The Landscape of Clinical Trials Evaluating the Theranostic Role of PET Imaging in Oncology: Insights from an Analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov Database

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Lv, Jia-Wei; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Ying; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Mao, Yan-Ping; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    In the war on cancer marked by personalized medicine, positron emission tomography (PET)-based theranostic strategy is playing an increasingly important role. Well-designed clinical trials are of great significance for validating the PET applications and ensuring evidence-based cancer care. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive landscape of the characteristics of PET clinical trials using the substantial resource of ClinicalTrials.gov database. We identified 25,599 oncology trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov in the last ten-year period (October 2005-September 2015). They were systematically reviewed to validate classification into 519 PET trials and 25,080 other oncology trials used for comparison. We found that PET trials were predominantly phase 1-2 studies (86.2%) and were more likely to be single-arm (78.9% vs. 57.9%, P <0.001) using non-randomized assignment (90.1% vs. 66.7%, P <0.001) than other oncology trials. Furthermore, PET trials were small in scale, generally enrolling fewer than 100 participants (20.3% vs. 25.7% for other oncology trials, P = 0.014), which might be too small to detect a significant theranostic effect. The funding support from industry or National Institutes of Health shrunk over time (both decreased by about 5%), and PET trials were more likely to be conducted in only one region lacking international collaboration (97.0% vs. 89.3% for other oncology trials, P <0.001). These findings raise concerns that clinical trials evaluating PET imaging in oncology are not receiving the attention or efforts necessary to generate high-quality evidence. Advancing the clinical application of PET imaging will require a concerted effort to improve the quality of trials. PMID:28042342

  16. The Landscape of Clinical Trials Evaluating the Theranostic Role of PET Imaging in Oncology: Insights from an Analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov Database.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Lv, Jia-Wei; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Ying; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Mao, Yan-Ping; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    In the war on cancer marked by personalized medicine, positron emission tomography (PET)-based theranostic strategy is playing an increasingly important role. Well-designed clinical trials are of great significance for validating the PET applications and ensuring evidence-based cancer care. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive landscape of the characteristics of PET clinical trials using the substantial resource of ClinicalTrials.gov database. We identified 25,599 oncology trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov in the last ten-year period (October 2005-September 2015). They were systematically reviewed to validate classification into 519 PET trials and 25,080 other oncology trials used for comparison. We found that PET trials were predominantly phase 1-2 studies (86.2%) and were more likely to be single-arm (78.9% vs. 57.9%, P <0.001) using non-randomized assignment (90.1% vs. 66.7%, P <0.001) than other oncology trials. Furthermore, PET trials were small in scale, generally enrolling fewer than 100 participants (20.3% vs. 25.7% for other oncology trials, P = 0.014), which might be too small to detect a significant theranostic effect. The funding support from industry or National Institutes of Health shrunk over time (both decreased by about 5%), and PET trials were more likely to be conducted in only one region lacking international collaboration (97.0% vs. 89.3% for other oncology trials, P <0.001). These findings raise concerns that clinical trials evaluating PET imaging in oncology are not receiving the attention or efforts necessary to generate high-quality evidence. Advancing the clinical application of PET imaging will require a concerted effort to improve the quality of trials.

  17. Management and Care of Women With Invasive Cervical Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Resource-Stratified Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Linus T.; Temin, Sarah; Camacho, Rolando; Dueñas-Gonzalez, Alfonso; Feldman, Sarah; Gultekin, Murat; Gupta, Vandana; Horton, Susan; Jacob, Graciela; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; Lishimpi, Kennedy; Nakisige, Carolyn; Nam, Joo-Hyun; Ngan, Hextan Yuen Sheung; Small, William; Thomas, Gillian; Berek, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based, resource-stratified global recommendations to clinicians and policymakers on the management and palliative care of women diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer. Methods ASCO convened a multidisciplinary, multinational panel of cancer control, medical and radiation oncology, health economic, obstetric and gynecologic, and palliative care experts to produce recommendations reflecting resource-tiered settings. A systematic review of literature from 1966 to 2015 failed to yield sufficiently strong quality evidence to support basic- and limited-resource setting recommendations; a formal consensus-based process was used to develop recommendations. A modified ADAPTE process was also used to adapt recommendations from existing guidelines. Results Five existing sets of guidelines were identified and reviewed, and adapted recommendations form the evidence base. Eight systematic reviews, along with cost-effectiveness analyses, provided indirect evidence to inform the consensus process, which resulted in agreement of 75% or greater. Recommendations Clinicians and planners should strive to provide access to the most effective evidence-based antitumor and palliative care interventions. If a woman cannot access these within her own or neighboring country or region, she may need to be treated with lower-tier modalities, depending on capacity and resources for surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and supportive and palliative care. For women with early-stage cervical cancer in basic settings, cone biopsy or extrafascial hysterectomy may be performed. Fertility-sparing procedures or modified radical or radical hysterectomy may be additional options in nonbasic settings. Combinations of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy (including brachytherapy) should be used for women with stage IB to IVA disease, depending on available resources. Pain control is a vital component of palliative care. Additional information is available at www

  18. Clinical Cancer Advances 2005: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Roy S; Bajorin, Dean F; Bleiberg, Harry; Blum, Diane; Hao, Desirée; Johnson, Bruce E; Ozols, Robert F; Demetri, George D; Ganz, Patricia A; Kris, Mark G; Levin, Bernard; Markman, Maurie; Raghavan, Derek; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Vokes, Everett E; Winn, Rodger J; Mayer, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    This year, for the first time, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances 2005: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant clinical research presented or published over the past year across all cancer types. ASCO embarked on this project to provide the public, patients, policymakers, and physicians with an accessible summary of the year's most important research advances. While not intended to serve as a comprehensive review, this report provides a year-end snapshot of research that will have the greatest impact on patient care. As you will read, there is much good news from the front lines of cancer research. These pages report on new chemotherapy regimens that sharply reduce the risk of recurrence for very common cancers; the "coming of age" of targeted cancer therapies; promising studies of drugs to prevent cancer; and improvements in quality of life for people living with the disease, among many other advances. Survival rates for cancer are on the rise, increasing from 50% to 64% over the last 30 years. Cancer still exacts an enormous toll, however. Nearly 1.4 million Americans will be diagnosed this year, and some 570,000 will die of the disease. Clearly, more research is needed to find effective therapies for the most stubborn cancer types and stages. We need to know more about the long-term effects of newer, more targeted cancer therapies, some of which need to be taken over long periods of time. And we need to devote far greater attention to tracking and improving the care of the nearly 10 million cancer survivors in the United States today. Despite these and other challenges, the message of this report is one of hope. Through the dedicated, persistent pursuit of clinical research and participation in clinical trials by people with cancer, we steadily uncover new and better ways of treating, diagnosing, and preventing a disease that touches the

  19. Ecological analysis of the first generation of community clinical oncology programs.

    PubMed Central

    Schopler, J H

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. An ecological framework is proposed for assessing factors important to consider in allocating funds to promote sound performance of interorganizational programs. DATA SOURCE/STUDY SETTING. This framework is used to examine the first generation of Community Clinical Oncology Programs (CCOPs) funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) from 1983-1986 to coordinate clinical research activity at the local level. The research reported is based on secondary data collected for the Community Cancer Care Evaluation at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center. STUDY DESIGN. A repeated measures design was used to analyze differences in the level and patterns of CCOP productivity, a measure of the number of patients enrolled on NCI-approved Phase III trials. The predictive dimensions include (1) measures of environmental inputs (population density, organizational dominance, professional support, NCI funding); (2) measures of organizational inputs (number of hospitals, number of staff, number of physicians, NCI experience, clinical research experience); and (3) structural measures (functional specialization, administrative concentration). Predicted relationships were assessed using general linear models procedures. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Data obtained from NCI files were supplemented by interviews with NCI personnel and published statistics. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Funding level, clinical research experience, and number of staff are the most important predictors of patient enrollment. Clinical research experience has a positive relationship with patient enrollment and a negative association with changes in enrollment. The reversal is explained by the influence of the CCOPs that had the greatest amount of clinical research experience at the beginning of the program. CONCLUSIONS. The ecological approach provides a useful framework for understanding factors that should be considered in funding interorganizational programs and promoting their development. Most

  20. Nurse-led outpatient clinics in oncology care - Patient satisfaction, information and continuity of care.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Catharina Bau; Gustafsson, Eva; Johansson, Hemming; Bergenmar, Mia

    2015-12-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate patients' satisfaction with nurse-led clinics, patients' perception of received information and associations between continuity of care and satisfaction with information. Questionnaires on patient satisfaction were sent to consecutive samples of patients after they attended a nurse-led clinic at the Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital in 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2013. Patients' perceptions of received information were evaluated in 2011 and 2013, by the EORTC QLQ-INFO25. Data on registered continuity of care were retrieved from the patients' medical record. A total of 962 patients responded (79%) to one of the four surveys. Patients' satisfaction with nurse-led clinics was stable over time. More than 90% rated nurses' interpersonal manners and the care at the clinic as "good", the waiting time as "acceptable", and the length of appointments as "sufficient". Over 90% responded that it was important to meet the same nurse and 62% reported they actually did so and 52% stated they were assigned a named nurse navigator. More than 75% rated the information at their latest visit at a nurse-led clinic as "completely" sufficient. However, 48% expressed wish for more information "during the current disease". No statistical significant associations were found between "satisfaction with information" and continuity of care. Patients' satisfaction with nurse-led clinics was stable over time with generally high figures with the exception for continuity of care and information, areas in which improvements are needed. The wide variety in information needs might require a person-centred approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and treatment in patients with cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update.

    PubMed

    Lyman, Gary H; Khorana, Alok A; Kuderer, Nicole M; Lee, Agnes Y; Arcelus, Juan Ignacio; Balaban, Edward P; Clarke, Jeffrey M; Flowers, Christopher R; Francis, Charles W; Gates, Leigh E; Kakkar, Ajay K; Key, Nigel S; Levine, Mark N; Liebman, Howard A; Tempero, Margaret A; Wong, Sandra L; Prestrud, Ann Alexis; Falanga, Anna

    2013-06-10

    To provide recommendations about prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with cancer. Prophylaxis in the outpatient, inpatient, and perioperative settings was considered, as were treatment and use of anticoagulation as a cancer-directed therapy. A systematic review of the literature published from December 2007 to December 2012 was completed in MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library. An Update Committee reviewed evidence to determine which recommendations required revision. Forty-two publications met eligibility criteria, including 16 systematic reviews and 24 randomized controlled trials. Most hospitalized patients with cancer require thromboprophylaxis throughout hospitalization. Thromboprophylaxis is not routinely recommended for outpatients with cancer. It may be considered for selected high-risk patients. Patients with multiple myeloma receiving antiangiogenesis agents with chemotherapy and/or dexamethasone should receive prophylaxis with either low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or low-dose aspirin. Patients undergoing major cancer surgery should receive prophylaxis, starting before surgery and continuing for at least 7 to 10 days. Extending prophylaxis up to 4 weeks should be considered in those with high-risk features. LMWH is recommended for the initial 5 to 10 days of treatment for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism as well as for long-term (6 months) secondary prophylaxis. Use of novel oral anticoagulants is not currently recommended for patients with malignancy and VTE. Anticoagulation should not be used for cancer treatment in the absence of other indications. Patients with cancer should be periodically assessed for VTE risk. Oncology professionals should provide patient education about the signs and symptoms of VTE.

  2. Extended RAS Gene Mutation Testing in Metastatic Colorectal Carcinoma to Predict Response to Anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Monoclonal Antibody Therapy: American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion Update 2015.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Carmen J; Rumble, R Bryan; Hamilton, Stanley R; Mangu, Pamela B; Roach, Nancy; Hantel, Alexander; Schilsky, Richard L

    2016-01-10

    An American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion (PCO) offers timely clinical direction after publication or presentation of potentially practice-changing data from major studies. This PCO update addresses the utility of extended RAS gene mutation testing in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) to detect resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) therapy. Recent results from phase II and III clinical trials in mCRC demonstrate that patients whose tumors harbor RAS mutations in exons 2 (codons 12 and 13), 3 (codons 59 and 61), and 4 (codons 117 and 146) are unlikely to benefit from therapy with MoAbs directed against EGFR, when used as monotherapy or combined with chemotherapy. In addition to the evidence reviewed in the original PCO, 11 systematic reviews with meta-analyses, two retrospective analyses, and two health technology assessments based on a systematic review were obtained. These evaluated the outcomes for patients with mCRC with no mutation detected or presence of mutation in additional exons in KRAS and NRAS. PCO: All patients with mCRC who are candidates for anti-EGFR antibody therapy should have their tumor tested in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified laboratory for mutations in both KRAS and NRAS exons 2 (codons 12 and 13), 3 (codons 59 and 61), and 4 (codons 117 and 146). The weight of current evidence indicates that anti-EGFR MoAb therapy should only be considered for treatment of patients whose tumor is determined to not have mutations detected after such extended RAS testing. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. Nanotechnology in Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. PMID:25113769

  4. Phase II Study of Accelerated High-Dose Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Limited Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0239

    SciTech Connect

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Paulus, Rebecca; Ettinger, David S.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Sause, William T.; Curran, Walter J.; Choy, Hak

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether high-dose thoracic radiation given twice daily during cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy for limited small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC) improves survival, acute esophagitis, and local control rates relative to findings from Intergroup trial 0096 (47%, 27%, and 64%). Patients and Methods: Patients were accrued over a 3-year period from 22 US and Canadian institutions. Patients with LSCLC and good performance status were given thoracic radiation to 61.2 Gy over 5 weeks (daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 1-22, then twice-daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 23-33). Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} IV) was given on day 1 and etoposide (120 mg/m{sup 2} IV) on days 1-3 and days 22-24, followed by 2 cycles of cisplatin plus etoposide alone. Patients who achieved complete response were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. Endpoints included overall and progression-free survival; severe esophagitis (Common Toxicity Criteria v 2.0) and treatment-related fatalities; response (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors); and local control. Results: Seventy-two patients were accrued from June 2003 through May 2006; 71 were evaluable (median age 63 years; 52% female; 58% Zubrod 0). Median survival time was 19 months; at 2 years, the overall survival rate was 36.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.6%-47.7%), and progression-free survival 19.7% (95% CI 11.4%-29.6%). Thirteen patients (18%) experienced severe acute esophagitis, and 2 (3%) died of treatment-related causes; 41% achieved complete response, 39% partial response, 10% stable disease, and 6% progressive disease. The local control rate was 73%. Forty-three patients (61%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusions: The overall survival rate did not reach the projected goal; however, rates of esophagitis were lower, and local control higher, than projected. This treatment strategy is now one of three arms of a prospective trial of chemoradiation for LSCLC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0538

  5. Clinical Cancer Advances 2013: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jyoti D; Krilov, Lada; Adams, Sylvia; Aghajanian, Carol; Basch, Ethan; Brose, Marcia S; Carroll, William L; de Lima, Marcos; Gilbert, Mark R; Kris, Mark G; Marshall, John L; Masters, Gregory A; O'Day, Steven J; Polite, Blasé; Schwartz, Gary K; Sharma, Sunil; Thompson, Ian; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Roth, Bruce J

    2014-01-10

    Since its founding in 1964, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has been committed to improving cancer outcomes through research and the delivery of quality care. Research is the bedrock of discovering better treatments--providing hope to the millions of individuals who face a cancer diagnosis each year. The studies featured in "Clinical Cancer Advances 2013: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology" represent the invaluable contributions of thousands of patients who participate in clinical trials and the scientists who conduct basic and clinical research. The insights described in this report, such as how cancers hide from the immune system and why cancers may become resistant to targeted drugs, enable us to envision a future in which cancer will be even more controllable and preventable. The scientific process is thoughtful, deliberate, and sometimes slow, but each advance, while helping patients, now also points toward new research questions and unexplored opportunities. Both dramatic and subtle breakthroughs occur so that progress against cancer typically builds over many years. Success requires vision, persistence, and a long-term commitment to supporting cancer research and training. Our nation's longstanding investment in federally funded cancer research has contributed significantly to a growing array of effective new treatments and a much deeper understanding of the drivers of cancer. But despite this progress, our position as a world leader in advancing medical knowledge and our ability to attract the most promising and talented investigators are now threatened by an acute problem: Federal funding for cancer research has steadily eroded over the past decade, and only 15% of the ever-shrinking budget is actually spent on clinical trials. This dismal reality threatens the pace of progress against cancer and undermines our ability to address the continuing needs of our patients. Despi