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Sample records for clinical optical coherence

  1. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography for Clinical Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Fujimoto, James G.; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a real-time optical imaging technique that is similar in principle to ultrasonography, but employs light instead of sound waves and allows depth-resolved images with near-microscopic resolution. Endoscopic OCT allows the evaluation of broad-field and subsurface areas and can be used ancillary to standard endoscopy, narrow band imaging, chromoendoscopy, magnification endoscopy, and confocal endomicroscopy. This review article will provide an overview of the clinical utility of endoscopic OCT in the gastrointestinal tract and of recent achievements using state-of-the-art endoscopic 3D-OCT imaging systems. PMID:26852678

  2. Applications of Optical Coherence Tomography in Pediatric Clinical Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Robert A.; Rajjoub, Raneem D.; Trimboli-Heidler, Carmelina; Waldman, Amy T.

    2015-01-01

    For nearly two centuries, the ophthalmoscope has permitted examination of the retina and optic nerve—the only axons directly visualized by the physician. The retinal ganglion cells project their axons, which travel along the innermost retina to form the optic nerve, marking the beginning of the anterior visual pathway. Both the structure and function of the visual pathway are essential components of the neurologic examination as it can be involved in numerous acquired, congenital and genetic central nervous system conditions. The development of optical coherence tomography now permits the pediatric neuroscientist to visualize and quantify the optic nerve and retinal layers with unprecedented resolution. As optical coherence tomography becomes more accessible and integrated into research and clinical care, the pediatric neuroscientist may have the opportunity to utilize and/or interpret results from this device. This review describes the basic technical features of optical coherence tomography and highlights its potential clinical and research applications in pediatric clinical neuroscience including optic nerve swelling, optic neuritis, tumors of the visual pathway, vigabatrin toxicity, nystagmus, and neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:25803824

  3. Concise Review of Optical Coherence Tomography in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Su, Min-I; Chen, Chun-Yen; Yeh, Hung-I; Wang, Kuang-Te

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel image modality with higher resolution in the catheterization laboratory. It can differentiate tissue characteristics and provide detailed information, including dissection, tissue prolapse, thrombi, and stent apposition. In this study, we comprehensively reviewed the current pros and cons of OCT clinical applications and presented our clinical experiences associated with the advantages and limitations of this new imaging modality. PMID:27471350

  4. Optical coherence tomography: potentialities in clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagaynova, Elena; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Shakhov, Andrey; Terentjeva, Anna; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Kuznetzova, Irina A.; Streltzova, Olga; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Kuranov, Roman V.; Myakov, Alex

    2004-08-01

    Clinical studies using OCT involved 2000 patients in various fields of medicine such as gastroenterology, urology, laryngology, gynecology, dermatology, stomatology, etc. Layered high-contrast images were typical for benign epithelial conditions. OCT distinguish in mucosae: epithelium, connective tissue layer, and smooth-muscle layer. Various benign processes occurring in mucosa manifest in OCT images as changes in the epithelial height, scattering properties and the course of the basement membrane. Lack of the layered structural pattern is the main criterion for dysplastic / malignant images. In clinic: OCT data may be critical for choosing a tissue site for excisional biopsy, OCT can detect tumor borders and their linear dimensions, OCT can be used to plan a resection line in operations and to control adequacy of resection, to monitor whether reparative processes are timely and adequate. OCT sensitivity of the uterine cervix, urinary bladder and larynx is 82, 98, 77%, respectively, specificity - 78, 71, 96%, diagnostic accuracy - 81, 85, 87% with significantly good agreement index of clinicians kappa - 0.65, 0.79, 0.83 (confidence intervals: 0.57-0.73; 0.71-0.88; 0.74-0.91). Error in detection of high grade dysplasia and microinvasive cancer is 21.4% in average. Additional modification of OCT (cross-polarisation OCT, OCM), development of the procedure (biotissue compression, application of chemical agents) can improve the specificity and sensitivity of traditional modality.

  5. Clinical Utility of Optical Coherence Tomography in Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zachary M; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S

    2016-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has established itself as the dominant imaging modality in the management of glaucoma and retinal diseases, providing high-resolution visualization of ocular microstructures and objective quantification of tissue thickness and change. This article reviews the history of OCT imaging with a specific focus on glaucoma. We examine the clinical utility of OCT with respect to diagnosis and progression monitoring, with additional emphasis on advances in OCT technology that continue to facilitate glaucoma research and inform clinical management strategies. PMID:27537415

  6. Clinical Applications of Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Su-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) was recently developed and has become a crucial tool in clinical practice. AS-OCT is a noncontact imaging device that provides the detailed structure of the anterior part of the eyes. In this review, the author will discuss the various clinical applications of AS-OCT, such as the normal findings, tear meniscus measurement, ocular surface disease (e.g., pterygium, pinguecula, and scleromalacia), architectural analysis after cataract surgery, post-LASIK keratectasia, Descemet's membrane detachment, evaluation of corneal graft after keratoplasty, corneal deposits (corneal dystrophies and corneal verticillata), keratitis, anterior segment tumors, and glaucoma evaluation (angle assessment, morphological analysis of the filtering bleb after trabeculectomy, or glaucoma drainage device implantation surgery). The author also presents some interesting cases demonstrated via AS-OCT. PMID:25821589

  7. Compact MEMS-based Adaptive Optics Optical Coherence Tomography for Clinical Use

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D; Olivier, S; Jones, S; Zawadzki, R; Evans, J; Choi, S; Werner, J

    2008-02-04

    We describe a compact MEMS-based adaptive optics (AO) optical coherence tomography system with improved AO performance and ease of clinical use. A typical AO system consists of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a deformable mirror that measures and corrects the ocular and system aberrations. Because of the limitation on the current deformable mirror technologies, the amount of real-time ocular-aberration compensation is restricted and small in the previous AO-OCT instruments. In this instrument, we proposed to add an optical apparatus to correct the spectacle aberrations of the patients such as myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism. This eliminated the tedious process of the trial lenses in clinical imaging. Different amount of spectacle aberration compensation was achieved by motorized stages and automated with the AO computer for ease of clinical use. In addition, the compact AO-OCT was optimized to have minimum system aberrations to reduce AO registration errors and improve AO performance.

  8. Compact MEMS-based adaptive optics: optical coherence tomography for clinical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Diana C.; Olivier, Scot S.; Jones, Steven M.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Evans, Julia W.; Choi, Stacey S.; Werner, John S.

    2008-02-01

    We describe a compact MEMS-based adaptive optics (AO) optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with improved AO performance and ease of clinical use. A typical AO system consists of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a deformable mirror that measures and corrects the ocular and system aberrations. Because of limitations on current deformable mirror technologies, the amount of real-time ocular-aberration compensation is restricted and small in previous AO-OCT instruments. In this instrument, we incorporate an optical apparatus to correct the spectacle aberrations of the patients such as myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism. This eliminates the tedious process of using trial lenses in clinical imaging. Different amount of spectacle aberration compensation was achieved by motorized stages and automated with the AO computer for ease of clinical use. In addition, the compact AO-OCT was optimized to have minimum system aberrations to reduce AO registration errors and improve AO performance.

  9. Clinical study of bladder diseases using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagainova, Elena; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Strelzova, O.; Sumin, A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Iksanov, Rashid R.

    2000-11-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), a new optical bioimaging technique was used to evaluate the state of mucosa in the urinary bladder. The state of mucosa of the bladder was evaluated in patients with prostatic adenoma (11 male patients) during the course of prostatectomy operation via a resection cytoscope. An OCT probe was inserted into the biopsy channel of a cystoscope. The sites to be imaged by OCT were determined visually and, after OCT study, underwent excisional biopsy and subsequent histological examination. Children (9 girls) were examined during diagnostic cystoscopy. Our analysis of diagnostic capabilities of OCT in urology relies on the comparison of OCT information on normal and morphologically altered tissues. OCT is able to provide objective data concerning the structure of mucosa of the bladder due to the difference in optical properties of different layers in tissue. The epithelium and the layers of connective tissue, both in norm and pathology, are clearly visualized in the tomograms. Our OCT study of healthy mucosa of the urinary bladder has demonstrated that the epithelium appears in the tomograms as an upper highly backscattering layer. An underlying optically less transparent layer, much greater in size than the previous one, corresponds to the connective tissue of the mucosa. Inside this layer, elongated poorly backscattering formations with clear contours are seen; they do not alter the longitudinal structure of the submucosal layer. These formations are blood vessels. Optical patterns characteristic of chronic inflammation are obtained. They correspond, as confirmed histologically, to liquid accumulation, cellular infiltration of mucosal layers, hypervascularization, and fibrosis. OCT information on proliferative processes, such as papillomatosis of the urinary bladder and squamous cell carcinoma, is analyzed. It is shown that OCT can reliably reveal edema of the mucous membrane of the bladder and identify the character of appearing

  10. Clinical Usefulness of Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Glaucoma and NAION

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hee; Heo, Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The development of optical coherence tomography (OCT) has changed the clinical management of ophthalmic diseases by furthering the understanding of pathogenesis, as well as improving the monitoring of their progression and assisting in quantifying the response to treatment modalities in ophthalmic diseases. Initially, the two-dimensional configuration of the optic nerve head (ONH) and the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) were the main OCT structural parameters used in clinical management of optic nerve diseases. Now, with higher resolution power and faster acquisition times, the details of ONH and the retina including the macular area can be measured using spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) with high reproducibility and increased diagnostic ability. OCT can provide structural information to improve the understanding and management of optic nerve diseases. In this review, we will briefly summarize the clinical applications of SD-OCT in glaucoma and nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, which are two representative optic nerve diseases. PMID:27689029

  11. Clinical Usefulness of Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Glaucoma and NAION.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Hee; Heo, Hwan; Park, Sang Woo

    2016-09-01

    The development of optical coherence tomography (OCT) has changed the clinical management of ophthalmic diseases by furthering the understanding of pathogenesis, as well as improving the monitoring of their progression and assisting in quantifying the response to treatment modalities in ophthalmic diseases. Initially, the two-dimensional configuration of the optic nerve head (ONH) and the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) were the main OCT structural parameters used in clinical management of optic nerve diseases. Now, with higher resolution power and faster acquisition times, the details of ONH and the retina including the macular area can be measured using spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) with high reproducibility and increased diagnostic ability. OCT can provide structural information to improve the understanding and management of optic nerve diseases. In this review, we will briefly summarize the clinical applications of SD-OCT in glaucoma and nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, which are two representative optic nerve diseases. PMID:27689029

  12. Clinical Usefulness of Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Glaucoma and NAION

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hee; Heo, Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The development of optical coherence tomography (OCT) has changed the clinical management of ophthalmic diseases by furthering the understanding of pathogenesis, as well as improving the monitoring of their progression and assisting in quantifying the response to treatment modalities in ophthalmic diseases. Initially, the two-dimensional configuration of the optic nerve head (ONH) and the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) were the main OCT structural parameters used in clinical management of optic nerve diseases. Now, with higher resolution power and faster acquisition times, the details of ONH and the retina including the macular area can be measured using spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) with high reproducibility and increased diagnostic ability. OCT can provide structural information to improve the understanding and management of optic nerve diseases. In this review, we will briefly summarize the clinical applications of SD-OCT in glaucoma and nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, which are two representative optic nerve diseases.

  13. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Tsai, Jui-che; Lin, Kun-Feng; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT) in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed. PMID:23857261

  14. Coherent optical imaging and guided interventions in breast cancer: translating technology into clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen A.; Nguyen, Freddy T.; Zysk, Adam M.; Chaney, Eric J.; Kotynek, Jan G.; Oliphant, Uretz J.; Bellafiore, Frank J.; Rowland, Kendrith M.; Johnson, Patricia A.

    2008-04-01

    Breast cancer continues to be one of the most widely diagnosed forms of cancer in women and the second leading type of cancer deaths for women. The metastatic spread and staging of breast cancer is typically evaluated through the nodal assessment of the regional lymphatic system, and often this is performed during the surgical resection of the tumor mass. The recurrence rate of breast cancer is highly dependent on several factors including the complete removal of the primary tumor during surgery, and the presence of cancer cells in involved lymph nodes. Hence, developing means to more accurately resect tumor cells, along with the tumor mass, and ensure negative surgical margins, offers the potential to impact outcomes of breast cancer. The use of diffuse optical tomography has been applied for screening optical mammography applications as an alternative to standard x-ray mammography. The use of coherence ranging and coherent optical imaging in breast tissue has also found numerous applications, including intra-operative assessment of tumor margin status during lumpectomy procedures, assessment of lymph node changes for staging metastatic spread, and for guiding needle-biopsy procedures. The development, pre-clinical testing, and translation of techniques such as low-coherence interferometry (LCI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) into clinical applications in breast cancer is demonstrated in these feasibility studies.

  15. Coherent amplified optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Rao, Bin; Chen, Zhongping

    2007-07-01

    A technique to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a high speed 1300 nm swept source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) system was demonstrated. A semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was employed in the sample arm to coherently amplify the weak light back-scattered from sample tissue without increasing laser power illuminated on the sample. The image quality improvement was visualized and quantified by imaging the anterior segment of a rabbit eye at imaging speed of 20,000 A-lines per second. The theory analysis of SNR gain is given followed by the discussion on the technologies that can further improve the SNR gain.

  16. Cancer imaging by optical coherence tomography: preclinical progress and clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Vakoc, Benjamin J; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Bouma, Brett E

    2012-05-01

    The past decade has seen dramatic technological advances in the field of optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. These advances have driven commercialization and clinical adoption in ophthalmology, cardiology and gastrointestinal cancer screening. Recently, an array of OCT-based imaging tools that have been developed for preclinical intravital cancer imaging applications has yielded exciting new capabilities to probe and to monitor cancer progression and response in vivo. Here, we review these results, forecast the future of OCT for preclinical cancer imaging and discuss its exciting potential to translate to the clinic as a tool for monitoring cancer therapy.

  17. Optical coherence tomography system requirements for clinical diagnostic middle ear imaging.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, Dan; Rainsbury, James; Brown, Jeremy; Bance, Manohar; Adamson, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Noninvasive middle ear imaging using optical coherence tomography (OCT) presents some unique challenges for real-time, clinical use in humans. We present results from a two-dimensional/three-dimensional OCT system built to assess the imaging requirements of clinical middle ear imaging, and the technical challenges associated with them. These include the need to work at a low numerical aperture, the deleterious effects of transtympanic imaging on image quality at the ossicles, sensitivity requirements for clinical fidelity of images at real-time rates, and the high dynamic-range requirements of the ear. We validated the system by imaging cadaveric specimens with simulated disorders to show the clinical applicability of the images. We also provide additional insight into the likely role of OCT in clinical otology.

  18. Clinical utility of anterior segment swept-source optical coherence tomography in glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Angmo, Dewang; Nongpiur, Monisha E.; Sharma, Reetika; Sidhu, Talvir; Sihota, Ramanjit; Dada, Tanuj

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a noninvasive imaging modality that uses low-coherence light to obtain a high-resolution cross-section of biological structures, has evolved dramatically over the years. The Swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) makes use of a single detector with a rapidly tunable laser as a light source. The Casia SS-1000 OCT is a Fourier-domain, SS-OCT designed specifically for imaging the anterior segment. This system achieves high resolution imaging of 10΅m (Axial) and 30΅m (Transverse) and high speed scanning of 30,000 A-scans per second. With a substantial improvement in scan speed, the anterior chamber angles can be imaged 360 degrees in 128 cross sections (each with 512 A-scans) in about 2.4 seconds. We summarize the clinical applications of anterior segment SS-OCT in Glaucoma. Literature search: We searched PubMed and included Medline using the phrases anterior segment optical coherence tomography in ophthalmology, swept-source OCT, use of AS-OCT in glaucoma, use of swept-source AS-OCT in glaucoma, quantitative assessment of angle, filtering bleb in AS-OCT, comparison of AS-OCT with gonioscopy and comparison of AS-OCT with UBM. Search was made for articles dating 1990 to August 2015. PMID:27013821

  19. Neuro-endovascular optical coherence tomography imaging: clinical feasibility and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Marlon S.; Su, Jianping; Heidari, Esmaeil; Linskey, Mark E.; Chen, Zhongping

    2011-03-01

    The authors report on the feasibility of clinical neuroendovascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging as well as its efficacy and safety by comparing findings with histology in animal, cadaveric and clinical studies. Catheter-based in vivo endovascular OCT imaging was carried out intracranially in four patients, three in the anterior circulation and one in the posterior circulation (vertebral artery). The neuroendovascular OCT device was delivered to the desired location using groin access and standard endovascular procedures. In vivo findings were reproduced using ex vivo OCT imaging in corresponding animal and human (cadaveric) harvested tissue segments with findings matched by histology. OCT images correlated well with the images obtained after histologic sectioning, and visualized in vivo the laminar vascular structure. Satisfactory imaging findings were obtained with no complications. Neuroendovascular OCT imaging is thus feasible for clinical use and can detect with high resolution the structure of arterial segments. Understanding OCT imaging in non-diseased arteries is important in establishing baseline findings necessary for interpreting pathologic processes. This allows neuroendovascular optical biopsies of vascular tissue to be obtained without the need for excision and processing, and potentially allows prophylactic interventions against stroke and other cerebrovascular disease before they become symptomatic.

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and MRA) Computed Tomography (CT) Scan Diagnostic Tests and Procedures Echocardiography Electrocardiogram ... Ultrasound Nuclear Stress Test Nuclear Ventriculography Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Stress ... Optical Coherence Tomography | ...

  1. Undergraduate Coherent Optics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, F. T. S.; Wang, E. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the use of a set of experiments to provide undergraduate electrical engineering students with a knowledge of the state of the art in modern coherent optics from an engineering standpoint. (CC)

  2. Clinical optical coherence tomography combined with multiphoton tomography for evaluation of several skin disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Speicher, Marco; Bückle, Rainer; Reckfort, Julia; McKenzie, Gordon; Welzel, Julia; Koehler, Martin J.; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2010-02-01

    The first clinical trial of optical coherence tomography (OCT) combined with multiphoton tomography (MPT) and dermoscopy is reported. State-of-the-art (i) OCT systems for dermatology (e.g. multibeam swept source OCT), (ii) the femtosecond laser multiphoton tomograph DermaInspectTM, and (iii) digital dermoscopes were applied to 47 patients with a diversity of skin diseases and disorders such as skin cancer, psoriasis, hemangioma, connective tissue diseases, pigmented lesions, and autoimmune bullous skin diseases. Dermoscopy, also called 'epiluminescent microscopy', provides two-dimensional color images of the skin surface. OCT imaging is based on the detection of optical reflections within the tissue measured interferometrically whereas nonlinear excitation of endogenous fluorophores and the second harmonic generation are the bases of MPT images. OCT cross sectional "wide field" image provides a typical field of view of 5 x 2 mm2 and offers fast information on the depth and the volume of the investigated lesion. In comparison, multiphoton tomography presents 0.36 x 0.36 mm2 horizontal or diagonal sections of the region of interest within seconds with submicron resolution and down to a tissue depth of 200 μm. The combination of OCT and MPT provides a synergistic optical imaging modality for early detection of skin cancer and other skin diseases.

  3. Standard resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography in clinical ophthalmic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkulmowska, Anna; Cyganek, Marta; Targowski, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Kaluzny, Jakub J.; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Fujimoto, James G.

    2005-04-01

    In this study we show clinical application of Spectral Optical Coherence Tomography (SOCT), which enables operation with 40 times higher speed than commercial Stratus OCT instrument. Using high speed SOCT instrument it is possible to collect more information and increase the quality of reconstructed cross-sectional retinal images. Two generations of compact and portable clinical SOCT instruments were constructed in Medical Physics Group at Nicolaus Copernicus University in Poland. The first SOCT instrument is a low-cost system operating with standard, 12 micrometer axial resolution and the second is high resolution system using combined superluminescent diodes light source, which enables imaging with 4.8 micrometer axial resolution. Both instruments have worked in Ophthalmology Clinic of Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz. During the study we have examined 44 patients with different pathologies of the retina including: Central Serous Chorioretinopathy (CSC), Choroidal Neovascularization (CNV), Pigment Epithelial Detachment (PED), Macular Hole, Epiretinal Membrane, Outer Retinal Infarction etc. All these pathologies were first diagnosed by classical methods (like fundus camera imaging and angiography) and then examined with the aid of SOCT system. In this contribution we present examples of SOCT cross-sectional retinal imaging of pathologic eyes measured with standard resolution. We also compare cross-sectional images of pathology obtained by standard and high resolution systems.

  4. Cardiovascular Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetsu, Taishi; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett E.; Jang, Ik-Kyung

    The potential of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for intravascular imaging and assessing the microstructure of atherosclerosis was suggested already by Huang et al. at the very beginning of OCT [1]. For ophthalmology, the eye provides a natural window for OCT to image the retinal microstructure, and OCT has rapidly become the standard imaging modality to diagnose retinal disease and assess disease progression and response to therapy [1, 2]. Intravascular imaging is more invasive by nature and requires imaging through a catheter probe. This has triggered the development of advanced fiber-optic OCT systems with compact, rotating fiber probes, to image the vessel by circumferentially scanning the luminal wall [3, 4]. In 1998, we established the first cardiac OCT research group at the Massachusetts General Hospital to explore the clinical applications of OCT. The first imaging of rabbit aorta was reported by Fujimoto et al. [5], followed by the first swine measurements in vivo by Tearney et al. [6], and finally the first assessment of coronary arteries in patients by Jang et al. [7]. The scope of this chapter is to highlight the steps taken to bring intravascular OCT from bench to bedside over the last 15 years. We will give a general description of atherosclerosis and its pathophysiology and the specific technical implementation of OCT for intravascular imaging through a fiber-optic probe. The motivation is to provide sufficient medical details to provide a basic introduction to the terminology, principles, and challenges of intracoronary imaging.

  5. High-definition optical coherence tomography - an aid to clinical practice and research in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Cao, Taige; Tey, Hong Liang

    2015-09-01

    At present, beyond clinical assessment, the diagnosis of skin diseases is primarily made histologically. However, skin biopsies have many disadvantages, including pain, scarring, risk of infection, and sampling error. With recent advances in skin imaging technology, the clinical use of imaging methods for the practical management of skin diseases has become an option. The in vivo high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) has recently been developed and commercialized (Skintell; Agfa, Belgium). Compared with conventional OCT, it has a higher resolution; compared with reflectance confocal microscopy, it has a shorter time for image acquisition as well as a greater penetration depth and a larger field of view. HD-OCT is promising but much work is still required to develop it from a research tool to a valuable adjunct for the noninvasive diagnosis of skin lesions. Substantial work has been done to identify HD-OCT features in various diseases but interpretation can be time-consuming and tedious. Projects aimed at automating these processes and improving image quality are currently under way.

  6. Clinical cross-polarization optical coherence tomography assessment of subsurface enamel below dental resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Lenton, Patricia; Rudney, Joel; Fok, Alex; Jones, Robert S

    2014-04-01

    A newly designed intraoral swept source cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) imaging system was used to examine the integrity of the subsurface enamel below resin composite restorations placed in primary teeth. CP-OCT analysis was performed using images obtained from resin composite restoration in 62 ([Formula: see text]) pediatric subjects. Clinical examination was performed by a single examiner prior to CP-OCT imaging and analysis. CP-OCT images are presented using a unique combined intensity image, where a false color scale is overlaid on the grayscale intensity image. There was a clear difference in the distribution of the mean-backscattered intensity (mR) between restorations recently placed and those possessing frank cavitation (Student's t-test, [Formula: see text]). For mR above 15.49 dB, the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 86%. The Youden index J was 0.8 above 12.3 dB where sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 80%. CP-OCT imaging may be used to confirm the subsurface marginal integrity below resin composite restorations but with careful consideration of limitations of the imaging modality. CP-OCT imaging may be a useful adjunct to clinical visual investigation to confirm that a composite margin has a sound and well-adapted interface.

  7. Optical coherency matrix tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagalwala, Kumel H.; Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.

    2015-10-01

    The coherence of an optical beam having multiple degrees of freedom (DoFs) is described by a coherency matrix G spanning these DoFs. This optical coherency matrix has not been measured in its entirety to date—even in the simplest case of two binary DoFs where G is a 4 × 4 matrix. We establish a methodical yet versatile approach—optical coherency matrix tomography—for reconstructing G that exploits the analogy between this problem in classical optics and that of tomographically reconstructing the density matrix associated with multipartite quantum states in quantum information science. Here G is reconstructed from a minimal set of linearly independent measurements, each a cascade of projective measurements for each DoF. We report the first experimental measurements of the 4 × 4 coherency matrix G associated with an electromagnetic beam in which polarization and a spatial DoF are relevant, ranging from the traditional two-point Young’s double slit to spatial parity and orbital angular momentum modes.

  8. Optical coherency matrix tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kagalwala, Kumel H.; Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.

    2015-01-01

    The coherence of an optical beam having multiple degrees of freedom (DoFs) is described by a coherency matrix G spanning these DoFs. This optical coherency matrix has not been measured in its entirety to date—even in the simplest case of two binary DoFs where G is a 4 × 4 matrix. We establish a methodical yet versatile approach—optical coherency matrix tomography—for reconstructing G that exploits the analogy between this problem in classical optics and that of tomographically reconstructing the density matrix associated with multipartite quantum states in quantum information science. Here G is reconstructed from a minimal set of linearly independent measurements, each a cascade of projective measurements for each DoF. We report the first experimental measurements of the 4 × 4 coherency matrix G associated with an electromagnetic beam in which polarization and a spatial DoF are relevant, ranging from the traditional two-point Young’s double slit to spatial parity and orbital angular momentum modes. PMID:26478452

  9. Processing to determine optical parameters of atherosclerotic disease from phantom and clinical intravascular optical coherence tomography three-dimensional pullbacks.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Ronny; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Prabhu, David; Tanaka, Kentaro; Rollins, Andrew M; Lamouche, Guy; Bisaillon, Charles-Etienne; Bezerra, Hiram G; Ray, Soumya; Wilson, David L

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) data has potential for real-time in vivo plaque classification. We developed a processing pipeline on a three-dimensional local region of support for estimation of optical properties of atherosclerotic plaques from coronary artery, IVOCT pullbacks. Using realistic coronary artery disease phantoms, we determined insignificant differences in mean and standard deviation estimates between our pullback analyses and more conventional processing of stationary acquisitions with frame averaging. There was no effect of tissue depth or oblique imaging on pullback parameter estimates. The method's performance was assessed in comparison with observer-defined standards using clinical pullback data. Values (calcium [Formula: see text], lipid [Formula: see text], and fibrous [Formula: see text]) were consistent with previous measurements obtained by other means. Using optical parameters ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]), we achieved feature space separation of plaque types and classification accuracy of [Formula: see text]. Despite the rapid [Formula: see text] motion and varying incidence angle in pullbacks, the proposed computational pipeline appears to work as well as a more standard "stationary" approach. PMID:27213167

  10. Articulated dual modality photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography probe for preclinical and clinical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyang; Zabihian, Behrooz; Weingast, Jessika; Hermann, Boris; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.; Pehamberger, Hubert; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    The combination of photoacoustic tomography (PAT) with optical coherence tomography (OCT) has seen steady progress over the past few years. With the benchtop and semi-benchtop configurations, preclinical and clinical results have been demonstrated, paving the way for wider applications using dual modality PAT/OCT systems. However, as for the most updated semi-benchtop PAT/OCT system which employs a Fabry-Perot polymer film sensor, it is restricted to only human palm imaging due to the limited flexibility of the probe. The passband limit of the polymer film sensor further restricts the OCT source selection and reduces the sensitivity of the combined OCT system. To tackle these issues, we developed an articulated PAT/OCT probe for both preclinical and clinical applications. In the probe design, the sample arm of OCT sub-system and the interrogation part of the PAT sub-system are integrated into one compact unit. The polymer film sensor has a quick release function so that before each OCT scan, the sensor can be taken off to avoid the sensitivity drop and artefacts in OCT. The holding mechanism of the sensor is also more compact compared to previous designs, permitting access to uneven surfaces of the subjects. With the help of the articulated probe and a patient chair, we are able to perform co-registered imaging on human subjects on both upper and lower extremities while they are at rest positions. An increase in performance characteristics is also achieved. Patients with skin diseases are currently being recruited to test its clinical feasibility.

  11. Automated registration and enhanced processing of clinical optical coherence tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Camino, Acner; Zhang, Miao; Dongye, Changlei; Pechauer, Alex D.; Hwang, Thomas S.; Bailey, Steven T.; Lujan, Brandon; Wilson, David J.; Huang, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Motion artifacts degrade the quality of optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). Orthogonal registration can eliminate the majority of these artifacts, but some artifacts persist in most clinical images. We evaluate an automated registration algorithm with selective merging and filtering to remove remaining artifacts and improve the quality of images. Methods A 70 kHz commercial spectral domain OCT was used to obtain 3 mm × 3 mm OCTA in 10 healthy, 5 age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and 31 diabetic retinopathy (DR) participants. Projection artifacts were removed and images were segmented into 3 inner retinal plexuses. Amplitude thresholding identified lines containing a residual artifact and correlation between neighboring lines identified distorted stripes. Then the angiograms were registered and the lines selectively merged. A vesselness filter was applied to the resulting images. The images were evaluated for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), image entropy, vessel connectivity and vessel density. Results Registration and selective merging (RSM) algorithm improved the SNR (P<0.02) compared to orthogonal registration alone. RSM with vesselness filter increased the image entropy (P<10−8) and reduced inter-subject variability (standard error ≤3%, n=10) in healthy eyes. The method improved vessel details and connectivity in OCTA of healthy, DR and neovascular AMD eyes. Conclusions This automated registration method eliminates residual motion artifacts and enhances the visualization of vessels in OCTA. PMID:27709075

  12. Future aspects of cellular and molecular research in clinical voice treatment aspects of optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Mette; Mahmood, Sanila

    2015-02-01

    Focus is upon our clinical experience in a prospective cohort study on cure of dystonia where the mode of treatment was fexofenadine tablets and local budesonide inhaler in the larynx, and in a randomized controlled trial of lifestyle change related to acid provocation of food and habits in laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). The advanced high-speed films is one new tool, another being optical coherence tomography (OCT), which should be used in the future in randomized controlled trials. We are focusing on OCT of the swallowing process in the oesophagaus and larynx as well as the vocal fold function. It can be shown on OCT how the layer of the vocal folds develop, possibly corresponding to hormonal and paediatric development. The arytenoid area in the larynx should also be focused upon with OCT in pathology. The thyroid function is related to voice and the swallowing function, both hormonally and pathoanatomically. We know too little about voice and thyroid hormones in an updated way as well as the outer anatomic supporting muscular structure of the larynx, related to thyroid immune degeneration and cysts. Also, here OCT analyses might be of value.

  13. Clinical monitoring of early caries lesions using cross polarization optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Pelzner, Roger B.

    New methods are needed for the nondestructive measurement of tooth demineralization and remineralization and to monitor the progression of incipient caries lesions (tooth decay) for effective nonsurgical intervention and to evaluate the performance of anti-caries treatments such as chemical treatments or laser irradiation. Studies have shown that optical coherence tomography (OCT) has great potential to fulfill this role, since it can be used to measure the depth and severity of early lesions with an axial resolution exceeding 10-μm. It is easy to apply in vivo and it can be used to image the convoluted topography of tooth occlusal surfaces. In this paper we present early results from two clinical studies underway to measure the effect of fluoride intervention on early lesions. CP-OCT was used to monitor early lesions on enamel and root surfaces before and after intervention with fluoride varnish. The lesion depth and internal structure were resolved for all the lesions examined and some lesions had well defined surface zones of lower reflectivity that may be indicative of arrested lesions. Changes were also noted in the structure of some of the lesions after fluoride intervention.

  14. Clinical, optical coherence tomography, and fundus autofluorescence findings in patients with intraocular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsson, Daniel; Sznage, Monika; Engelsberg, Karl; Wittström, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe clinical, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) findings in patients with intraocular tumors and determine if OCT and FAF could be helpful in the differential diagnosis and management of different choroidal tumors. Methods Forty-nine patients with untreated, macular, midperipheral, and extrapapillary intraocular tumors were included. All patients underwent ophthalmic examination: best-corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, funduscopy, and standardized B mode, and if possible A mode, ultrasonography, and OCT and FAF imaging of the surface of the intraocular tumors. Results Of the 49 patients studied, 19 had choroidal nevi, ten had indeterminate choroidal melanocytic lesions (IMLs), ten had malignant melanomas, and ten had other choroidal tumors. The choroidal nevi revealed subretinal fluid (SRF) on OCT in only 11%. FAF detected isoauto-fluorescence in 42%, hypoautofluorescence in 37%, patchy FAF pattern in 16%, and a diffuse FAF pattern in 5%. Seventy percent of patients with IML showed SRF on OCT and 20% showed tumor growth on follow-up, detected only by OCT and FAF imaging. FAF revealed a patchy pattern in 50% and a diffuse pattern in 40% of cases with IML. Ninety percent of the patients with choroidal melanoma had SRF on OCT and FAF revealed a patchy pattern in 60% and a diffuse pattern in 40%. Patients with other choroidal tumors had SRF on OCT in 30% of cases and no characteristic pattern on FAF. Conclusion Both OCT and FAF were helpful in the differential diagnosis of choroidal nevi versus IMLs, choroidal melanomas, and other choroidal tumors. Also, detailed and periodical clinical evaluation of patients with intraocular tumors using OCT and FAF imaging for the detection of both SRF and FAF patterns overlying the tumor can be useful for detection of tumor growth. PMID:27784984

  15. Phenotypic characterization of X-linked retinoschisis: Clinical, electroretinography, and optical coherence tomography variables

    PubMed Central

    Neriyanuri, Srividya; Dhandayuthapani, Sudha; Arunachalam, Jayamuruga Pandian; Raman, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To study the phenotypic characteristics of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and report the clinical, electroretinogram (ERG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) variables in Indian eyes. Design: A retrospective study. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 21 patients with retinoschisis who were genetically confirmed to have RS1 mutation were reviewed. The phenotype characterization included the age of onset, best-corrected visual acuity, refractive error, fundus findings, OCT, and ERG. Statistical Analysis Used: Data from both the eyes were used for analysis. A P < 0.05 was set as statistical significance. Data were not normally distributed (P < 0.05, Shapiro wilk); hence, nonparametric tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: All were males whose mean age of presentation was 9 years. Visual acuity was moderately impaired (median 0.6 logMAR, interquartile range: 0.47, 1) in these eyes with a hyperopic refractive error of median +1.75 Ds (interquartile range: +0.50 Ds, +4.25 Ds). About 54.7% of the eyes had both foveal and peripheral schisis, isolated foveal schisis was seen in 28.5% of the eyes, and schisis with retinal detachment was seen in 16.6% of the eyes. The inner nuclear layer was found to be commonly involved in the schisis, followed by outer nuclear and plexiform layers as evident on OCT. On ERG, a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in eyes with foveal and peripheral schisis when compared to the eyes with only foveal schisis (P < 0.05). Conclusions: XLRS has phenotypic heterogeneity as evident on OCT, ERG, and clinical findings. PMID:27609164

  16. Clinical studies of frequency domain optical coherence tomography in the coronary arteries: the first 200 patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Christopher; Adler, Desmond; Schmitt, Joseph

    2010-02-01

    We report clinical study results of three-dimensional (3D) in vivo imaging of human coronary arteries using frequency domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). At the time of this report, over 2000 patients in over 10 countries have been imaged using FD-OCT systems and disposable fiberoptic catheters developed by LightLab Imaging Inc. The first commercial versions of the systems were introduced in Europe in May 2009. The system operates at 50,000 axial lines/s, performing a 50 mm spiral pullback in 2.5 seconds with a rotational frame rate of 100 Hz. The commercial system employs a proprietary micro-cavity swept laser, allowing imaging of vessel diameters up to 10 mm. Data compiled from early studies indicate that FD-OCT is being used for post-intervention imaging of deployed coronary stents in over 40% of cases. High-resolution 3D imaging of stent geometry immediately following deployment enables detection of stent malapposition, which can increase the risk of thrombosis. Longer term follow-up imaging of stented vessels can detect thrombus formation, which can be treated pharmacologically, and excessive neointimal growth, which may require angioplasty or re-stenting. FD-OCT is also being used for pre-intervention imaging of stenotic lesions in about 60% of cases. Here FD-OCT is used to measure the minimum lumen area and to identify calcified deposits, side branches, or other vascular structures that could interfere with the stenting procedure. Overall, FD-OCT continues to be adopted at an increasing rate and has provided interventional cardiologists with a powerful tool for pre- and postintervention assessment of the coronary arteries.

  17. Optical coherence angiography

    PubMed Central

    Wylęgała, Adam; Teper, Sławomir; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Wylęgała, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Retinal vascular diseases are one of the most common causes of blindness in the developed world. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography (OCT-A) is a new noninvasive method that uses several algorithms to detect blood movement. This enables the creation of high-resolution vascular images with contrast depicting motionless tissue. Methods: This review presents the results of articles relevant to age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy (DR), and OCT-A. The OCT-A technique can successfully be used in the diagnosis of neovascularization, retinal vein occlusion (RVO) and retinal artery occlusion (RAO), vessel abnormalities and even anterior segment neovascularization. OCT-A can also be applied to compute data such as vessel density, and flow index in both superficial and deep plexuses. Results: Many studies have compared fluorescein angiography with OCT-A. Other studies have reported differences in vascular density in AMD patients and have compared them with people having healthy eyes. Although OCT-A offers rapid picture acquisition, high repeatability and resolution, it also has many drawbacks. The most common are: motion artifacts, projections from overlying vessels and limited field of view. An interesting new application is the possibility to assess changes during antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy. Another function of OCT-A is the possible application in the study of choriocapillaries in many fields of ocular pathology. Conclusion: OCT-A is a new promising method that allows the visualization of the retinal vascular network and the counting of blood flow parameters. This technique provides reliable images useful in clinical routines. PMID:27741104

  18. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography

    PubMed Central

    Adie, Steven G.; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F.; John, Renu; Sampson, David D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. PMID:21164898

  19. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Adie, Steven G; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F; John, Renu; Sampson, David D; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-12-01

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. PMID:21164898

  20. High resolution spectral optical coherence tomography for clinical imaging of the anterior segment of the eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkulmowska, Anna; Gorczynska, Iwona; Szkulmowski, Maciej; Targowski, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Kaluzny, Bartlomiej J.

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this article is to demonstrate an application of Spectral Optical Coherence Tomography SOCT for visualization of the anterior segment of the human eye. A SOCT system with an axial resolution of 4-6 μm and a lateral one of 10 μm provides tomograms composed of 3000 - 5000 A-scans when a total acquisition time of 100-250 ms is used to acquire tomograms. The quality of the images is adequate for detailed evaluation of the corneal structure and contact lens fit. Erosion of the epithelium, scars and lesions may be precisely localized. The design, shape and edge position of the contact lens, as well as other fitting relationships between the lens and the ocular surface, may be accurately assessed. The information provided by SOCT may be helpful in diagnosis, evaluation and documentation of corneal pathologies and contact lens complications.

  1. Coherent optics in students' laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senderáková, Dagmar; Mesaros, Vladimir; Drzik, Milan

    2014-12-01

    Lasers provide us with unique kind of light - coherent light. Besides being the keystone of historical interferometric measuring methods, coherent waves, now accessible in a very easy way, become a base of new optical measuring and information processing methods. Moreover, holographic recording seems today to have become a common term, even among common, not especially optically educated people. The presentation deals with our attempt to take our students' interest in the coherence of light and getting them familiar with the phenomenon, indeed.

  2. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Fujimoto, James G.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    New gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are expected to affect more than 290,200 new patients and will cause more than 144,570 deaths in the United States in 2013 [1]. When detected and treated early, the 5-year survival rate for colorectal cancer increases by a factor of 1.4 [1]. For esophageal cancer, the rate increases by a factor of 2 [1]. The majority of GI cancers begin as small lesions that are difficult to identify with conventional endoscopy. With resolutions approaching that of histopathology, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is well suited for detecting the changes in tissue microstructure associated with early GI cancers. Since the lesions are not endoscopically apparent, however, it is necessary to survey a relatively large area of the GI tract. Tissue motion is another limiting factor in the GI tract; therefore, in vivo imaging must be performed at extremely high speeds. OCT imaging can be performed using fiber optics and miniaturized lens systems, enabling endoscopic OCT inside the human body in conjunction with conventional video endoscopy. An OCT probe can be inserted through the working channel of a standard endoscope, thus enabling depth-resolved imaging of tissue microstructure in the GI tract with micron-scale resolution simultaneously with the endoscopic view (Fig. 68.1).

  3. Myopic Macular Retinoschisis in Teenagers: Clinical Characteristics and Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chuan-bin; You, Yong-sheng; Liu, Zhe; Zheng, Lin-yan; Chen, Pei-qing; Yao, Ke; Xue, An-quan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the morphological characteristics of myopic macular retinoschisis (MRS) in teenagers with high myopia, six male (9 eyes) and 3 female (4 eyes) teenagers with typical MRS identified from chart review were evaluated. All cases underwent complete ophthalmic examinations including best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), indirect ophthalmoscopy, colour fundus photography, B-type ultrasonography, axial length measurement, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The average age was 17.8 ± 1.5 years, average refractive error was −17.04 ± 3.04D, average BCVA was 0.43 ± 0.61, and average axial length was 30.42 ± 1.71 mm. Myopic macular degenerative changes (MDC) by colour fundus photographs revealed Ohno-Matsui Category 1 in 4 eyes, and Category 2 in 9 eyes. Posterior staphyloma was found in 9 eyes. SD-OCT showed outer MRS in all 13 eyes, internal limiting membrane detachment in 7 eyes, vascular microfolds in 2 eyes, and inner MRS in 1 eye. No premacular structures such as macular epiretinal membrane or partially detached posterior hyaloids were found. Our results showed that MRS rarely occurred in highly myopic teenagers, and was not accompanied by premacular structures, severe MDC, or even obvious posterior staphyloma. This finding indicates that posterior scleral expansion is probably the main cause of MRS. PMID:27294332

  4. Myopic Macular Retinoschisis in Teenagers: Clinical Characteristics and Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Findings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chuan-Bin; You, Yong-Sheng; Liu, Zhe; Zheng, Lin-Yan; Chen, Pei-Qing; Yao, Ke; Xue, An-Quan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the morphological characteristics of myopic macular retinoschisis (MRS) in teenagers with high myopia, six male (9 eyes) and 3 female (4 eyes) teenagers with typical MRS identified from chart review were evaluated. All cases underwent complete ophthalmic examinations including best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), indirect ophthalmoscopy, colour fundus photography, B-type ultrasonography, axial length measurement, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The average age was 17.8 ± 1.5 years, average refractive error was -17.04 ± 3.04D, average BCVA was 0.43 ± 0.61, and average axial length was 30.42 ± 1.71 mm. Myopic macular degenerative changes (MDC) by colour fundus photographs revealed Ohno-Matsui Category 1 in 4 eyes, and Category 2 in 9 eyes. Posterior staphyloma was found in 9 eyes. SD-OCT showed outer MRS in all 13 eyes, internal limiting membrane detachment in 7 eyes, vascular microfolds in 2 eyes, and inner MRS in 1 eye. No premacular structures such as macular epiretinal membrane or partially detached posterior hyaloids were found. Our results showed that MRS rarely occurred in highly myopic teenagers, and was not accompanied by premacular structures, severe MDC, or even obvious posterior staphyloma. This finding indicates that posterior scleral expansion is probably the main cause of MRS. PMID:27294332

  5. Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhongping; Zhang, Jun

    Noninvasive techniques for imaging in vivo blood flow are of great value to biomedical research and clinical diagnostics where many diseases have a vascular etiology or component. In ophthalmology, many diseases involve disturbances in ocular blood flow, including diabetic retinopathy, low tension glaucoma, anterior ischemic optic neuritis, and macular degeneration. Simultaneous imaging of tissue structure and blood flow could provide critical information for early diagnosis of ocular diseases.

  6. Catheters for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, M.; Ullah, H.; Hamza, M. Y.; Ikram, M.

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review article is to overview technology, clinical evidence, and future applications to date optical coherence tomography (OCT) probes to yield the diagnostic purpose. We have reviewed the designing, construction and working of different categories of OCT probes developed for optical diagnostics having a potential for non invasive and improved detection of different types of cancer as well as other neoplasm. Rotational and balloon catheters, imaging needles and hand-held, linear scanning, multichannel, micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology based, dynamic focusing, forward view imaging, and common path interferometer based probes have been discussed in details. The fiber probes have shown excellent performance for two dimensional and three dimensional higher resolution, cross-sectional imaging of interior and exterior body tissues that can be compared with histopathology to provide the information about the angiogenesis and other lesions in the tissue. The MEMS-technology based probes are found to be more suitable for three dimensional morphological imaging.

  7. Coherent communication with linear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, Mark M.; Brun, Todd A.; Dowling, Jonathan P.; Lee, Hwang

    2008-02-15

    We show how to implement several continuous-variable coherent protocols with linear optics. Noise can accumulate when implementing each coherent protocol with realistic optical devices. Our analysis bounds the level of noise accumulation. We highlight the connection between a coherent channel and a nonlocal quantum nondemolition interaction and give two new protocols that implement a coherent channel. One protocol is superior to a previous method for a nonlocal quantum nondemolition interaction because it requires fewer communication resources. We then show how continuous-variable coherent superdense coding implements two nonlocal quantum nondemolition interactions with a quantum channel and bipartite entanglement. We finally show how to implement continuous-variable coherent teleportation experimentally and provide a way to verify the correctness of its operation.

  8. Clinical cancer diagnosis using optical fiber-delivered coherent anti-stokes ramon scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang

    This thesis describes the development of a combined label-free imaging and analytical strategy for intraoperative characterization of cancer lesions using the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging (CARS) technique. A cell morphology-based analytical platform is developed to characterize CARS images and, hence, provide diagnostic information using disease-related pathology features. This strategy is validated for three different applications, including margin detection for radical prostatectomy, differential diagnosis of lung cancer, as well as detection and differentiation of breast cancer subtypes for in situ analysis of margin status during lumpectomy. As the major contribution of this thesis, the developed analytical strategy shows high accuracy and specificity for all three diseases and thus has introduced the CARS imaging technique into the field of human cancer diagnosis, which holds substantial potential for clinical translations. In addition, I have contributed a project aimed at miniaturizing the CARS imaging device into a microendoscope setup through a fiber-delivery strategy. A four-wave-mixing (FWM) background signal, which is caused by simultaneous delivery of the two CARS-generating excitation laser beams, is initially identified. A polarization-based strategy is then introduced and tested for suppression of this FWM noise. The approach shows effective suppression of the FWM signal, both on microscopic and prototype endoscopic setups, indicating the potential of developing a novel microendoscope with a compatible size for clinical use. These positive results show promise for the development of an all-fiber-based, label-free imaging and analytical platform for minimally invasive detection and diagnosis of cancers during surgery or surgical-biopsy, thus improving surgical outcomes and reducing patients' suffering.

  9. [Optical coherence tomography].

    PubMed

    von Braunmühl, T

    2015-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was introduced in the 1990s in dermatology and is nowadays established as a noninvasive high-resolution technique for the in vivo evaluation of the skin. To date several studies have been successfully demonstrated the application of OCT for various dermatological questions. The main indication for OCT in the daily practice is the noninvasive diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer such as actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. OCT has also been shown to be a valuable tool in treatment monitoring and evaluation of therapeutic success of noninvasive treatment strategies like topical immune modulators or photodynamic treatment. Other potential applications for OCT include inflammatory diseases, microbial or parasitic infestations of the skin, e.g. scabies mites or onychomycosis. In recent years high-definition OCT devices have been developed that can potentially be used for the evaluation of melanocytic lesions and, due to the higher resolution, for the visualization of intrafollicular demodex mites. Furthermore different commercially available devices offer-in addition to the cross-sectional images-a fast-generated horizontal (en face) imaging mode. With respect to resolution and penetration depth the OCT technique is taking a middle position in comparison to other noninvasive imaging devices in dermatology such as sonography and reflectance confocal microscopy. PMID:25809459

  10. [Optical coherence tomography].

    PubMed

    von Braunmühl, T

    2015-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was introduced in the 1990s in dermatology and is nowadays established as a noninvasive high-resolution technique for the in vivo evaluation of the skin. To date several studies have been successfully demonstrated the application of OCT for various dermatological questions. The main indication for OCT in the daily practice is the noninvasive diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer such as actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. OCT has also been shown to be a valuable tool in treatment monitoring and evaluation of therapeutic success of noninvasive treatment strategies like topical immune modulators or photodynamic treatment. Other potential applications for OCT include inflammatory diseases, microbial or parasitic infestations of the skin, e.g. scabies mites or onychomycosis. In recent years high-definition OCT devices have been developed that can potentially be used for the evaluation of melanocytic lesions and, due to the higher resolution, for the visualization of intrafollicular demodex mites. Furthermore different commercially available devices offer-in addition to the cross-sectional images-a fast-generated horizontal (en face) imaging mode. With respect to resolution and penetration depth the OCT technique is taking a middle position in comparison to other noninvasive imaging devices in dermatology such as sonography and reflectance confocal microscopy.

  11. Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Werkmeister, René M.; Blatter, Cedric; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has revolutionized ophthalmology. Since its introduction in the early 1990s it has continuously improved in terms of speed, resolution and sensitivity. The technique has also seen a variety of extensions aiming to assess functional aspects of the tissue in addition to morphology. One of these approaches is Doppler OCT (DOCT), which aims to visualize and quantify blood flow. Such extensions were already implemented in time domain systems, but have gained importance with the introduction of Fourier domain OCT. Nowadays phase-sensitive detection techniques are most widely used to extract blood velocity and blood flow from tissues. A common problem with the technique is that the Doppler angle is not known and several approaches have been realized to obtain absolute velocity and flow data from the retina. Additional studies are required to elucidate which of these techniques is most promising. In the recent years, however, several groups have shown that data can be obtained with high validity and reproducibility. In addition, several groups have published values for total retinal blood flow. Another promising application relates to non-invasive angiography. As compared to standard techniques such as fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography the technique offers two major advantages: no dye is required and depth resolution is required is provided. As such Doppler OCT has the potential to improve our abilities to diagnose and monitor ocular vascular diseases. PMID:24704352

  12. Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Leitgeb, Rainer A; Werkmeister, René M; Blatter, Cedric; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-07-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has revolutionized ophthalmology. Since its introduction in the early 1990s it has continuously improved in terms of speed, resolution and sensitivity. The technique has also seen a variety of extensions aiming to assess functional aspects of the tissue in addition to morphology. One of these approaches is Doppler OCT (DOCT), which aims to visualize and quantify blood flow. Such extensions were already implemented in time domain systems, but have gained importance with the introduction of Fourier domain OCT. Nowadays phase-sensitive detection techniques are most widely used to extract blood velocity and blood flow from tissues. A common problem with the technique is that the Doppler angle is not known and several approaches have been realized to obtain absolute velocity and flow data from the retina. Additional studies are required to elucidate which of these techniques is most promising. In the recent years, however, several groups have shown that data can be obtained with high validity and reproducibility. In addition, several groups have published values for total retinal blood flow. Another promising application relates to non-invasive angiography. As compared to standard techniques such as fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography the technique offers two major advantages: no dye is required and depth resolution is required is provided. As such Doppler OCT has the potential to improve our abilities to diagnose and monitor ocular vascular diseases. PMID:24704352

  13. Multi-modal adaptive optics system including fundus photography and optical coherence tomography for the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Salas, Matthias; Drexler, Wolfgang; Levecq, Xavier; Lamory, Barbara; Ritter, Markus; Prager, Sonja; Hafner, Julia; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Pircher, Michael

    2016-05-01

    We present a new compact multi-modal imaging prototype that combines an adaptive optics (AO) fundus camera with AO-optical coherence tomography (OCT) in a single instrument. The prototype allows acquiring AO fundus images with a field of view of 4°x4° and with a frame rate of 10fps. The exposure time of a single image is 10 ms. The short exposure time results in nearly motion artifact-free high resolution images of the retina. The AO-OCT mode allows acquiring volumetric data of the retina at 200kHz A-scan rate with a transverse resolution of ~4 µm and an axial resolution of ~5 µm. OCT imaging is acquired within a field of view of 2°x2° located at the central part of the AO fundus image. Recording of OCT volume data takes 0.8 seconds. The performance of the new system is tested in healthy volunteers and patients with retinal diseases.

  14. Multi-modal adaptive optics system including fundus photography and optical coherence tomography for the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Salas, Matthias; Drexler, Wolfgang; Levecq, Xavier; Lamory, Barbara; Ritter, Markus; Prager, Sonja; Hafner, Julia; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Pircher, Michael

    2016-05-01

    We present a new compact multi-modal imaging prototype that combines an adaptive optics (AO) fundus camera with AO-optical coherence tomography (OCT) in a single instrument. The prototype allows acquiring AO fundus images with a field of view of 4°x4° and with a frame rate of 10fps. The exposure time of a single image is 10 ms. The short exposure time results in nearly motion artifact-free high resolution images of the retina. The AO-OCT mode allows acquiring volumetric data of the retina at 200kHz A-scan rate with a transverse resolution of ~4 µm and an axial resolution of ~5 µm. OCT imaging is acquired within a field of view of 2°x2° located at the central part of the AO fundus image. Recording of OCT volume data takes 0.8 seconds. The performance of the new system is tested in healthy volunteers and patients with retinal diseases. PMID:27231621

  15. Multi-modal adaptive optics system including fundus photography and optical coherence tomography for the clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Matthias; Drexler, Wolfgang; Levecq, Xavier; Lamory, Barbara; Ritter, Markus; Prager, Sonja; Hafner, Julia; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Pircher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We present a new compact multi-modal imaging prototype that combines an adaptive optics (AO) fundus camera with AO-optical coherence tomography (OCT) in a single instrument. The prototype allows acquiring AO fundus images with a field of view of 4°x4° and with a frame rate of 10fps. The exposure time of a single image is 10 ms. The short exposure time results in nearly motion artifact-free high resolution images of the retina. The AO-OCT mode allows acquiring volumetric data of the retina at 200kHz A-scan rate with a transverse resolution of ~4 µm and an axial resolution of ~5 µm. OCT imaging is acquired within a field of view of 2°x2° located at the central part of the AO fundus image. Recording of OCT volume data takes 0.8 seconds. The performance of the new system is tested in healthy volunteers and patients with retinal diseases. PMID:27231621

  16. In vivo histology: optical biopsies with chemical contrast using clinical multiphoton/coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, M.; Breunig, H. G.; Kellner-Höfer, M.; Bückle, R.; Darvin, M. E.; Klemp, M.; Lademann, J.; König, K.

    2014-05-01

    The majority of existing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging systems are still huge and complicated laboratory systems and neither compact nor user-friendly nor mobile medically certified CARS systems. We have developed a new flexible multiphoton/CARS tomograph for imaging in a clinical environment. The system offers exceptional 360° flexibility with a very stable setup and enables label free ‘in vivo histology’ with chemical contrast within seconds. It can be completely operated by briefly trained non-laser experts. The imaging capability and flexibility of the novel in vivo tomograph are shown on optical biopsies with subcellular resolution and chemical contrast of patients suffering from psoriasis and squamous cell carcinoma.

  17. Clinical applications of optical coherence tomography in the posterior pole: the 2011 José Manuel Espino Lecture - Part I

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, J Fernando; Lasave, Andres F; Arias, Juan D; Serrano, Martin A; Arevalo, Fernando A

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is now a standard of care in ophthalmology and is considered essential for the diagnosis and monitoring of many retinal diseases. One of the major advances obtained with OCT was the understanding of the pathophysiology of macular holes. Non-full-thickness macular holes have been revisited because high-resolution OCT images can detect a lamellar macular defect that is not always visible clinically, and surgery has been advocated by some authors. OCT can be valuable in determining the need for and/or timing of surgical intervention on epiretinal membranes or vitreomacular traction syndrome. In addition, we can use this technology as a predictive factor in the prognosis and follow-up of the most common posterior pole pathologies. PMID:24235810

  18. Automated registration of optical coherence tomography and dermoscopy in the assessment of sub-clinical spread in basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Penney, G. P.; Richardson, T. J.; Guyot, A.; Choi, M. J.; Sheth, N.; Craythorne, E.; Robson, A.; Mallipeddi, R.

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been shown to be of clinical value in imaging basal cell carcinoma (BCC). A novel dual OCT-video imaging system, providing automated registration of OCT and dermoscopy, has been developed to assess the potential of OCT in measuring the degree of sub-clinical spread of BCC. Seventeen patients selected for Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) for BCC were recruited to the study. The extent of BCC infiltration beyond a segment of the clinically assessed pre-surgical border was evaluated using OCT. Sufficiently accurate (<0.5 mm) registration of OCT and dermoscopy images was achieved in 9 patients. The location of the OCT-assessed BCC border was also compared with that of the final surgical defect. Infiltration of BCC across the clinical border ranged from 0 mm to >2.5 mm. In addition, the OCT border lay between 0.5 mm and 2.0 mm inside the final MMS defect in those cases where this could be assessed. In one case, where the final MMS defect was over 17 mm from the clinical border, OCT showed >2.5 mm infiltration across the clinical border at the FOV limit. These results provide evidence that OCT allows more accurate assessment of sub-clinical spread of BCC than clinical observation alone. Such a capability may have clinical value in reducing the number of surgical stages in MMS for BCC. There may also be a role for OCT in aiding the selection of patients most suitable for MMS. PMID:24784842

  19. Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja

    to this technology all of which have been demonstrated in full functional hardware conceived and built during the course of this research. First, it has been demonstrated that the coherence gate created by the femtosecond laser can be coupled into a scanning optical microscope using optical design methods to include liquid lens technology that enables scanning below the surface of skin with no moving parts and at high resolution throughout a 2x2x2 mm imaging cube. Second, the integration the variable-focus liquid lens technology within a fixed-optics microscope custom optical design helped increase the working NA by an order of magnitude over the limitation imposed by the liquid lens alone. Thus, this design has enabled homogenous axial and lateral resolution at the micron-level (i.e., 2 mum) while imaging in the spectral domain, and still maintaining in vivo speeds. The latest images in biological specimens clearly demonstrate sub-cellular resolution in all dimensions throughout the imaging volume. Third, this new modality for data collection has been integrated with an automated Gabor domain image registration and fusion algorithm to provide full resolution images across the data cube in real-time. We refer to this overall OCM method as Gabor domain OCM (GD-OCM). These advantages place GD-OCM in a unique position with respect to the diagnosis of cancer, because when fully developed, it promises to enable fast and accurate screening for early symptoms that could lead to prevention. The next step for this technology is to apply it directly, in a clinical environment. This step is underway and is expected to be reported by the next generation of researchers within this group.

  20. Optical coherence tomography in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattler, Elke; Kästle, Raphaela; Welzel, Julia

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive diagnostic method that offers a view into the superficial layers of the skin in vivo in real-time. An infrared broadband light source allows the investigation of skin architecture and changes up to a depth of 1 to 2 mm with a resolution between 15 and 3 μm, depending on the system used. Thus OCT enables evaluation of skin lesions, especially nonmelanoma skin cancers and inflammatory diseases, quantification of skin changes, visualization of parasitic infestations, and examination of other indications such as the investigation of nails. OCT provides a quick and useful diagnostic imaging technique for a number of clinical questions and is a valuable addition or complement to other noninvasive imaging tools such as dermoscopy, high-frequency ultrasound, and confocal laser scan microscopy.

  1. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  2. 3D refraction correction and extraction of clinical parameters from spectral domain optical coherence tomography of the cornea.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingtao; Kuo, Anthony N; Izatt, Joseph A

    2010-04-26

    Capable of three-dimensional imaging of the cornea with micrometer-scale resolution, spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) offers potential advantages over Placido ring and Scheimpflug photography based systems for accurate extraction of quantitative keratometric parameters. In this work, an SDOCT scanning protocol and motion correction algorithm were implemented to minimize the effects of patient motion during data acquisition. Procedures are described for correction of image data artifacts resulting from 3D refraction of SDOCT light in the cornea and from non-idealities of the scanning system geometry performed as a pre-requisite for accurate parameter extraction. Zernike polynomial 3D reconstruction and a recursive half searching algorithm (RHSA) were implemented to extract clinical keratometric parameters including anterior and posterior radii of curvature, central cornea optical power, central corneal thickness, and thickness maps of the cornea. Accuracy and repeatability of the extracted parameters obtained using a commercial 859nm SDOCT retinal imaging system with a corneal adapter were assessed using a rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lens as a phantom target. Extraction of these parameters was performed in vivo in 3 patients and compared to commercial Placido topography and Scheimpflug photography systems. The repeatability of SDOCT central corneal power measured in vivo was 0.18 Diopters, and the difference observed between the systems averaged 0.1 Diopters between SDOCT and Scheimpflug photography, and 0.6 Diopters between SDOCT and Placido topography.

  3. Experimental generation of optical coherence lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yahong; Ponomarenko, Sergey A.; Cai, Yangjian

    2016-08-01

    We report experimental generation and measurement of recently introduced optical coherence lattices. The presented optical coherence lattice realization technique hinges on a superposition of mutually uncorrelated partially coherent Schell-model beams with tailored coherence properties. We show theoretically that information can be encoded into and, in principle, recovered from the lattice degree of coherence. Our results can find applications to image transmission and optical encryption.

  4. Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, B. Hyle; de Boer, Johannes F.

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an interferometric technique capable of noninvasive high-resolution cross-sectional imaging by measuring the intensity of light reflected from within tissue [1]. This results in a noncontact imaging modality that provides images similar in scale and geometry to histology. Just as different stains can be used to enhance the contrast in histology, various extensions of OCT allow for visualization of features not readily apparent in traditional OCT. For example, optical Doppler tomography [2] can enable depth-resolved imaging of flow by observing differences in phase between successive depth scans [3-5]. This chapter will focus on polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT), which utilizes depth-dependent changes in the polarization state of detected light to determine the light-polarization changing properties of a sample [6-11]. These properties, including birefringence, dichroism, and optic axis orientation, can be determined directly by studying the depth evolution of Stokes parameters [7-10, 12-16] or indirectly by using the changing reflected polarization states to first determine Jones or Mueller matrices [11, 17-21]. PS-OCT has been used in a wide variety of applications, including correlating burn depth with a decrease in birefringence [14], measuring the birefringence of the retinal nerve fiber layer [22, 23], and monitoring the onset and progression of caries lesions [24]. In this chapter, a discussion of polarization theory and its application to PS-OCTwill be followed by clinical uses of the technology and will conclude with mentionof more recent work and future directions of PS-OCT.

  5. Coherent optical adaptive techniques.

    PubMed

    Bridges, W B; Brunner, P T; Lazzara, S P; Nussmeier, T A; O'Meara, T R; Sanguinet, J A; Brown, W P

    1974-02-01

    The theory of multidither adaptive optical radar phased arrays is briefly reviewed as an introduction to the experimental results obtained with seven-element linear and three-element triangular array systems operating at 0.6328 microm. Atmospheric turbulence compensation and adaptive tracking capabilities are demonstrated.

  6. First clinical pilot study with intravascular polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villiger, Martin; Karanasos, Antonios; Ren, Jian; Lippok, Norman; Shishkov, Milen; Daemen, Joost; Van Mieghem, Nicolas; Diletti, Roberto; Valgimigli, Marco; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; de Jaegere, Peter; Zijlstra, Felix; van Soest, Gijs; Nadkarni, Seemantini; Regar, Evelyn; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-02-01

    Polarization sensitive (PS) OCT measures the polarization states of the light backscattered by tissue and provides measures of tissue birefringence and depolarization in addition to the structural OCT signal. Ex vivo studies have demonstrated that birefringence is increased in tissue rich in collagen and with elevated smooth muscle cell content. Preliminary data further suggests that depolarization can identify regions of macrophage infiltration, lipid, and irregularly arranged collagen fibers. These are important aspects of the mechanical integrity and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques. To evaluate the potential of PS-OCT in the clinical setting, we combined our custom PS-OCT system with commercially available OCT catheters (Fastview, Terumo Corporation) and performed a pilot study in 30 patients, scheduled to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on the grounds of stable or unstable angina. A total of 82 pullbacks in 39 vessels were performed, either in the native coronary arteries or post procedure. Comparing consecutive pullbacks of the same coronary artery, we found excellent agreement between the polarization features in the repeat pullbacks, validating the repeatability and robustness of PS-OCT in the clinical in vivo setting. In addition we observed that the birefringence and depolarization features vary significantly across lesions with identical structural OCT appearance, suggesting morphological subtypes. This first human pilot study proved the feasibility and robustness of intravascular PS-OCT. PS-OCT achieves improved tissue characterization and may help in identifying high-risk plaques, with the potential to ultimately improve risk stratification and help guiding PCI.

  7. Coherent optical methods for metallography

    SciTech Connect

    Pechersky, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous methods based on coherent optical techniques have been developed over the past two decades for nondestructive evaluation, vibration analysis and experimental mechanics. These methods have a great deal of potential for the enhancement of metallographic evaluations and for materials characterization in general. One such technique described in this paper is the determination of the material damping factors in metals. Damping loss factors as low as 10-5 were measured on bronze and aluminum specimens using a technique based on laser vibrometry. Differences between cast and wrought bronze were easily distinguishable as well as the difference between the bronze and aluminum. Other coherent optical techniques may be used to evaluate residual stresses and to locate and identify microcracking, subsurface voids and other imperfections. These techniques and others can serve as a bridge between microstructural investigations and the macroscopic behavior of materials.

  8. Coherent optical methods for metallography

    SciTech Connect

    Pechersky, M.J.

    1991-12-31

    Numerous methods based on coherent optical techniques have been developed over the past two decades for nondestructive evaluation, vibration analysis and experimental mechanics. These methods have a great deal of potential for the enhancement of metallographic evaluations and for materials characterization in general. One such technique described in this paper is the determination of the material damping factors in metals. Damping loss factors as low as 10-5 were measured on bronze and aluminum specimens using a technique based on laser vibrometry. Differences between cast and wrought bronze were easily distinguishable as well as the difference between the bronze and aluminum. Other coherent optical techniques may be used to evaluate residual stresses and to locate and identify microcracking, subsurface voids and other imperfections. These techniques and others can serve as a bridge between microstructural investigations and the macroscopic behavior of materials.

  9. Coherence Constraints and the Last Hidden Optical Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xiao-Feng; Malhotra, Tanya; Vamivakas, A. Nick; Eberly, Joseph H.

    2016-10-01

    We have discovered a new domain of optical coherence, and show that it is the third and last member of a previously unreported fundamental triad of coherences. These are unified by our derivation of a parallel triad of coherence constraints that take the form of complementarity relations. We have been able to enter this new coherence domain experimentally and we describe the novel tomographic approach devised for that purpose.

  10. Optical coherence domain reflectometry guidewire

    DOEpatents

    Colston, Billy W.; Everett, Matthew; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    A guidewire with optical sensing capabilities is based on a multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometer (OCDR), which allows it to sense location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions as it travels through the body during minimally invasive medical procedures. This information will be used both to direct the guidewire through the body by detecting vascular junctions and to evaluate the nearby tissue. The guidewire contains multiple optical fibers which couple light from the proximal to distal end. Light from the fibers at the distal end of the guidewire is directed onto interior cavity walls via small diameter optics such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes. Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers, which are multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The guidewire can also be used in nonmedical applications.

  11. The basics of intravascular optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Roleder, Tomasz; Jąkała, Jacek; Kałuża, Grzegorz L; Partyka, Łukasz; Proniewska, Klaudia; Pociask, Elżbieta; Zasada, Wojciech; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Gąsior, Zbigniew; Dudek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has opened new horizons for intravascular coronary imaging. It utilizes near-infrared light to provide a microscopic insight into the pathology of coronary arteries in vivo. Optical coherence tomography is also capable of identifying the chemical composition of atherosclerotic plaques and detecting traits of their vulnerability. At present it is the only tool to measure the thickness of the fibrous cap covering the lipid core of the atheroma, and thus it is an exceptional modality to detect plaques that are prone to rupture (thin fibrous cap atheromas). Moreover, it facilitates distinguishing between plaque rupture and plaque erosion as a cause of acute intracoronary thrombosis. Optical coherence tomography is applied to guide angioplasties of coronary lesions and to assess outcomes of percutaneous coronary interventions broadly. It identifies stent malapposition, dissections, and thrombosis with unprecedented precision. Furthermore, OCT helps to monitor vessel healing after stenting. It evaluates the coverage of stent struts by the neointima and detects in-stent neoatherosclerosis. With so much potential, new studies are warranted to determine OCT's clinical impact. The following review presents the technical background, basics of OCT image interpretation, and practical tips for adequate OCT imaging, and outlines its established and potential clinical application.

  12. Clinical use and research applications of Heidelberg retinal angiography and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography - a review.

    PubMed

    Hassenstein, Andrea; Meyer, Carsten H

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescein angiography (FA) was discovered by Nowotny and Alvis in the 1960s of the 20th century and has evolved to become the 'Gold standard' for macular diagnostics. Scanning laser imaging technology achieved enhancement of contrast and resolution. The combined Heidelberg retina angiograph (HRA2) adds novel innovative features to established fundus cameras. The principle of confocal scanning laser imaging provides a high resolution of retinal and choroidal vasculature with low light exposure providing comfort and safety for the patient. Enhanced contrast, details and image sharpness image are generated using confocality. For the visualization of the choroid an indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) is the most suitable application. The main indications for ICGA are age-related macular degeneration, choroidal polypoidal vasculopathy and choroidal haemangiomas. Simultaneous digital FA and ICGA images with three-dimensional resolution offer improved diagnosis of retinal and choroidal pathologies. High-speed ICGA dynamic imaging can identify feeder vessels and retinal choroidal anastomoses, ensuring safer treatment of choroidal neovascularization. Autofluorescence imaging and fundus reflectance imaging with blue and infrared light offer new follow-up parameters for retinal diseases. Finally, the real-time optical coherence tomography provides a new level of accuracy for assessment of the angiographic and morphological correlation. The combination of various macular diagnostic tools, such as infrared, blue reflectance, fundus autofluorescence, FA, ICGA and also spectral domain optical coherence tomography, lead to a better understanding and improved knowledge of macular diseases. PMID:19338610

  13. Optical Microangiography Based on Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Roberto; Wang, Ruikang K.

    Proper homeostasis regulation of in vivo biological systems requires microvascular blood perfusion, which is the process of delivering blood into the tissue's capillary beds. Abnormal tissue vascularization has been associated with various diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurological disorders, wounds, and inflammation. Understanding the changes in the vascular network or microangiography will have an important role in determining the causes and developing potential treatments for these diseases. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive method for imaging three-dimensional biological tissues with high resolution (~10 µm) and without requiring the use of contrast agents. In this chapter we review several techniques for using OCT to determine blood flow velocities and the vessel morphology (optical microangiography). Different techniques will be discussed with a brief explanation of their limitations. Also, methods for quantifying these images are presented, as well as the depiction of several applications.

  14. Current status of optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Inami, Shigenobu; Wang, Zuoyan; Ming-Juan, Zhang; Takano, Masamichi; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2011-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel imaging technology based on low-coherence interferometry that use near-infrared light in real-time, and allows cross-sectional in-situ visualization of the vessel wall at the microscopic level. OCT provides 10-fold higher resolution than intravascular ultrasound which is currently the most used modality for intra-coronary imaging. OCT offers the obvious advantages when characterizing precise plaque microstructure and distinguishing various type of plaques. OCT is also being assessed for its potential role in the understanding of neointimal coverage, vascular healing and the progression of atherosclerosis in coronary vasculature after stenting on the micron scale. These unique capabilities could be helpful in guiding coronary management and interventions. Recent improvement in next generation OCT technology, such as frequency-domain OCT, will allow for a simple imaging procedure, providing more useful information and complementing other modalities on both clinical and research applications for the cardiologists. PMID:24122583

  15. Optical coherence tomography investigations of ceramic lumineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Luana O.; Graça, Natalia D. R. L.; Melo, Luciana S. A.; Silva, Claudio H. V.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    Lumineers are veneer laminates used as an alternative for aesthetic dental solutions of the highest quality, but the only current means of its performance assessment is visual inspection. The objective of this study was to use the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) technique working in spectral domain to analyze in vivo in a single patient, 14 lumineers 180 days after cementation. It was possible to observe images in various kinds of changes in the cementing line and the laminate. It was concluded that the OCT is an effective and promising method to clinical evaluation of the cementing line in lumineers.

  16. Fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) for dental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, M. J., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    We have developed a hand-held fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for scanning of the oral cavity We have produced, using this scanning device, in viva cross-sectional images of hard and soft dental tissues in human volunteers Clinically relevant anatomical structures, including the gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento-enamel junction, were visible in all the images The dento-enamel junction and the alveolar bone were identifiable in approximately two thirds of the images These images represent, to our knowledge, the first in viva OCT images of human dental tissue.

  17. Optical coherence tomography of dental structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Angela; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Dichtl, Sabine; Sattmann, Harald; Moritz, Andreas; Sperr, Wolfgang; Fercher, Adolf F.

    1998-04-01

    In the past ten years Partial Coherence Interferometry (PCI) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) have been successfully developed for high precision biometry and tomography of biological tissues. OCT employs the partial coherence properties of a superluminescent diode and the Doppler principle yielding resolution and precision figures of the order of a few microns. Presently, the main application fields of this technique are biometry and imaging of ocular structures in vivo, as well as its clinical use in dermatology and endoscopic applications. This well established length measuring and imaging technique has now been applied to dentistry. First in vitro OCT images of the cemento (dentine) enamel junction of extracted sound and decayed human teeth have been recorded. These images distinguish dentine and enamel structures that are important for assessing enamel thickness and diagnosing caries. Individual optical A-Scans show that the penetration depth into enamel is considerably larger than into dentine. First polarization sensitive OCT recordings show localized changes of the polarization state of the light backscattered by dental material. Two-dimensional maps of the magnitude of the interference intensity and of the total phase difference between two orthogonal polarization states as a function of depth can reveal important structural information.

  18. Functional Optical Coherence Tomography: Principles and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jina; Brown, William; Maher, Jason R.; Levinson, Howard; Wax, Adam

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, several functional extensions of optical coherence tomography (OCT) have emerged, and this review highlights key advances in instrumentation, theoretical analysis, signal processing and clinical application of these extensions. We review five principal extensions: Doppler OCT (DOCT), polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT), optical coherence elastography (OCE), spectroscopic OCT (SOCT), and molecular imaging OCT. The former three have been further developed with studies in both ex vivo and in vivo human tissues. This review emphasizes the newer techniques of SOCT and molecular imaging OCT, which show excellent potential for clinical application but have yet to be well reviewed in the literature. SOCT elucidates tissue characteristics, such as oxygenation and carcinogenesis, by detecting wavelength-dependent absorption and scattering of light in tissues. While SOCT measures endogenous biochemical distributions, molecular imaging OCT detects exogenous molecular contrast agents. These newer advances in functional OCT broaden the potential clinical application of OCT by providing novel ways to understand tissue activity that cannot be accomplished by other current imaging methodologies. PMID:25951836

  19. Evaluation of enamel dental restoration interface by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    de Melo, L S A; de Araujo, R E; Freitas, A Z; Zezell, D; Vieira, N D; Girkin, J; Hall, A; Carvalho, M T; Gomes, A S L

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of molar dental restorations on enamel is performed using optical coherence tomography (OCT) with 10 microm resolution. Images of approximately 50 microm failure gaps in the restorations are demonstrated and the OCT images are compared with x-ray and optical microscopy pictures. The results demonstrate the potential of the technique for clinical evaluation of dental restorations.

  20. The Development, Commercialization, and Impact of Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, James; Swanson, Eric

    2016-07-01

    This review was written for the special issue of IOVS to describe the history of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and its evolution from a nonscientific, historic perspective. Optical coherence tomography has become a standard of care in ophthalmology, providing real-time information on structure and function - diagnosing disease, evaluating progression, and assessing response to therapy, as well as helping to understand disease pathogenesis and create new therapies. Optical coherence tomography also has applications in multiple clinical specialties, fundamental research, and manufacturing. We review the early history of OCT describing how research and development evolves and the important role of multidisciplinary collaboration and expertise. Optical coherence tomography had its origin in femtosecond optics, but used optical communications technologies and required advanced engineering for early OCT prototypes, clinical feasibility studies, entrepreneurship, and corporate development in order to achieve clinical acceptance and clinical impact. Critical advances were made by early career researchers, clinician scientists, engineering experts, and business leaders, which enabled OCT to have a worldwide impact on health care. We introduce the concept of an "ecosystem" consisting of research, government funding, collaboration and competition, clinical studies, innovation, entrepreneurship and industry, and impact - all of which must work synergistically. The process that we recount is long and challenging, but it is our hope that it might inspire early career professionals in science, engineering, and medicine, and that the clinical and research community will find this review of interest. PMID:27409459

  1. Dental optical coherence domain reflectometry explorer

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    2001-01-01

    A hand-held, fiber optic based dental device with optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) sensing capabilities provides a profile of optical scattering as a function of depth in the tissue at the point where the tip of the dental explorer touches the tissue. This system provides information on the internal structure of the dental tissue, which is then used to detect caries and periodontal disease. A series of profiles of optical scattering or tissue microstructure are generated by moving the explorer across the tooth or other tissue. The profiles are combined to form a cross-sectional, or optical coherence tomography (OCT), image.

  2. MOEMS optical delay line for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Om P.; Chouksey, S.; Sen, P. K.; Sen, P.; Solanki, J.; Andrews, J. T.

    2014-09-01

    Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical optical coherence tomography, a lab-on-chip for biomedical applications is designed, studied, fabricated and characterized. To fabricate the device standard PolyMUMPS processes is adopted. We report the utilization of electro-optic modulator for a fast scanning optical delay line for time domain optical coherence tomography. Design optimization are performed using Tanner EDA while simulations are performed using COMSOL. The paper summarizes various results and fabrication methodology adopted. The success of the device promises a future hand-held or endoscopic optical coherence tomography for biomedical applications.

  3. Clinical Factors Associated with Lamina Cribrosa Thickness in Patients with Glaucoma, as Measured with Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Omodaka, Kazuko; Takahashi, Seri; Matsumoto, Akiko; Maekawa, Shigeto; Kikawa, Tsutomu; Himori, Noriko; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Maruyama, Kazuichi; Kunikata, Hiroshi; Akiba, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the influence of various risk factors on thinning of the lamina cribrosa (LC), as measured with swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT; Topcon). Methods This retrospective study comprised 150 eyes of 150 patients: 22 normal subjects, 28 preperimetric glaucoma (PPG) patients, and 100 open-angle glaucoma patients. Average LC thickness was determined in a 3 x 3 mm cube scan of the optic disc, over which a 4 x 4 grid of 16 points was superimposed (interpoint distance: 175 μm), centered on the circular Bruch’s membrane opening. The borders of the LC were defined as the visible limits of the LC pores. The correlation of LC thickness with Humphrey field analyzer-measured mean deviation (MD; SITA standard 24–2), circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (cpRNFLT), the vertical cup-to-disc (C/D) ratio, and tissue mean blur rate (MBR) was determined with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. The relationship of LC thickness with age, axial length, intraocular pressure (IOP), MD, the vertical C/D ratio, central corneal thickness (CCT), and tissue MBR was determined with multiple regression analysis. Average LC thickness and the correlation between LC thickness and MD were compared in patients with the glaucomatous enlargement (GE) optic disc type and those with non-GE disc types, as classified with Nicolela’s method. Results We found that average LC thickness in the 16 grid points was significantly associated with overall LC thickness (r = 0.77, P < 0.001). The measurement time for this area was 12.4 ± 2.4 minutes. Average LC thickness in this area had a correlation coefficient of 0.57 with cpRNFLT (P < 0.001) and 0.46 (P < 0.001) with MD. Average LC thickness differed significantly between the groups (normal: 268 ± 23 μm, PPG: 248 ± 13 μm, OAG: 233 ± 20 μm). Multiple regression analysis showed that MD (β = 0.29, P = 0.013), vertical C/D ratio (β = -0.25, P = 0.020) and tissue MBR (β = 0.20, P = 0.034) were

  4. Sequential quantum teleportation of optical coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Furusawa, Akira; Loock, Peter van

    2007-09-15

    We demonstrate a sequence of two quantum teleportations of optical coherent states, combining two high-fidelity teleporters for continuous variables. In our experiment, the individual teleportation fidelities are evaluated as F{sub 1}=0.70{+-}0.02 and F{sub 2}=0.75{+-}0.02, while the fidelity between the input and the sequentially teleported states is determined as F{sup (2)}=0.57{+-}0.02. This still exceeds the optimal fidelity of one half for classical teleportation of arbitrary coherent states and almost attains the value of the first (unsequential) quantum teleportation experiment with optical coherent states.

  5. Geodesic denoising for optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrian Varnousfaderani, Ehsan; Vogl, Wolf-Dieter; Wu, Jing; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Simader, Christian; Langs, Georg; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical signal acquisition method capturing micrometer resolution, cross-sectional three-dimensional images. OCT images are used widely in ophthalmology to diagnose and monitor retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and Glaucoma. While OCT allows the visualization of retinal structures such as vessels and retinal layers, image quality and contrast is reduced by speckle noise, obfuscating small, low intensity structures and structural boundaries. Existing denoising methods for OCT images may remove clinically significant image features such as texture and boundaries of anomalies. In this paper, we propose a novel patch based denoising method, Geodesic Denoising. The method reduces noise in OCT images while preserving clinically significant, although small, pathological structures, such as fluid-filled cysts in diseased retinas. Our method selects optimal image patch distribution representations based on geodesic patch similarity to noisy samples. Patch distributions are then randomly sampled to build a set of best matching candidates for every noisy sample, and the denoised value is computed based on a geodesic weighted average of the best candidate samples. Our method is evaluated qualitatively on real pathological OCT scans and quantitatively on a proposed set of ground truth, noise free synthetic OCT scans with artificially added noise and pathologies. Experimental results show that performance of our method is comparable with state of the art denoising methods while outperforming them in preserving the critical clinically relevant structures.

  6. Molecular Imaging in Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Scott P.; Kim, Wihan; Park, Jesung; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a medical imaging technique that provides tomographic images at micron scales in three dimensions and high speeds. The addition of molecular contrast to the available morphological image holds great promise for extending OCT’s impact in clinical practice and beyond. Fundamental limitations prevent OCT from directly taking advantage of powerful molecular processes such as fluorescence emission and incoherent Raman scattering. A wide range of approaches is being researched to provide molecular contrast to OCT. Here we review those approaches with particular attention to those that derive their molecular contrast directly from modulation of the OCT signal. We also provide a brief overview of the multimodal approaches to gaining molecular contrast coincident with OCT. PMID:25821718

  7. Optical coherence tomography– 15 years in cardiology.

    PubMed

    Yonetsu, Taishi; Bouma, Brett E; Kato, Koji; Fujimoto, James G; Jang, Ik-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Since its invention in the late 1990s, intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been rapidly adopted in clinical research and, more recently, in clinical practice. Given its unprecedented resolution and high image contrast, OCT has been used to visualize plaque characteristics and to evaluate the vascular response to percutaneous coronary intervention. In particular, OCT is becoming the standard modality to evaluate in vivo plaque vulnerability, including the presence of lipid content, thin fibrous cap, or macrophage accumulation. Furthermore, OCT findings after stent implantation, such as strut apposition, neointimal hyperplasia, strut coverage, and neoatherosclerosis, are used as surrogate markers of the vascular response. New applications for OCT are being explored, such as transplant vasculopathy or non-coronary vascular imaging. Although OCT has contributed to cardiovascular research by providing a better understanding of the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease, data linking the images and clinical outcomes are lacking. Prospective data are needed to prove that the use of OCT improves patient outcomes, which is the ultimate goal of any clinical diagnostic tool. PMID:23856651

  8. Optical coherence tomography for endodontic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soest, G.; Shemesh, H.; Wu, M.-K.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.; Wesselink, P. R.

    2008-02-01

    In root canal therapy, complications frequently arise as a result of root fracture or imperfect cleaning of fins and invaginations. To date, there is no imaging method for nondestructive in vivo evaluation of the condition of the root canal, during or after treatment. There is a clinical need for a technique to detect defects before they give rise to complications. In this study we evaluate the ability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to image root canal walls, and its capacity to identify complicating factors in root canal treatment. While the potential of OCT to identify caries has been explored before, endodontic imaging has not been reported. We imaged extracted lower front teeth after endodontic preparation and correlated these images to histological sections. A 3D OCT pullback scan was made with an endoscopic rotating optical fiber probe inside the root canal. All oval canals, uncleaned fins, risk zones, and one perforation that were detected by histology were also imaged by OCT. As an example of an area where OCT has clinical potential, we present a study of vertical root fracture identification with OCT.

  9. Ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Herz, Paul R.; Hsiung, Pei-Lin; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Desai, Saleem; Pedrosa, Macos; Koski, Amanda; Schmitt, Joseph M.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2005-01-01

    Early detection of gastrointestinal cancer is essential for the patient treatment and medical care. Endoscopically guided biopsy is currently the gold standard for the diagnosis of early esophageal cancer, but can suffer from high false negative rates due to sampling errors. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging medical imaging technology which can generate high resolution, cross-sectional images of tissue in situ and in real time, without the removal of tissue specimen. Although endoscopic OCT has been used successfully to identify certain pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract, the resolution of current endoscopic OCT systems has been limited to 10 - 15 m for clinical procedures. In this study, in vivo imaging of the gastrointestinal tract is demonstrated at a three-fold higher resolution (< 5 m), using a portable, broadband, Cr4+:Forsterite laser as the optical light source. Images acquired from the esophagus, gastro-esophageal junction and colon on animal model display tissue microstructures and architectural details at high resolution, and the features observed in the OCT images are well-matched with histology. The clinical feasibility study is conducted through delivering OCT imaging catheter using standard endoscope. OCT images of normal esophagus, Barrett's esophagus, and esophageal cancers are demonstrated with distinct features. The ability of high resolution endoscopic OCT to image tissue morphology at an unprecedented resolution in vivo would facilitate the development of OCT as a potential imaging modality for early detection of neoplastic changes.

  10. Optical coherence tomography findings of bilateral foveal leukemic infiltration.

    PubMed

    Le, John Q; Braich, Puneet S; Brar, Vikram S

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 59-year-old man with a history of atypical chronic myelogenous leukemia who presented with a several-week history of decreased vision in both eyes. His clinical examination revealed bilateral foveal infiltration, which was also demonstrated on optical coherence tomography. After a failed induction with imatinib (Gleevec(®)), he was treated with omacetaxine (Synribo(®)) with an appropriate hematologic response. As his leukemia improved with chemotherapy, his retinal lesions regressed as demonstrated by serial optical coherence tomography and fundus photographs, with near complete restoration of foveal architecture. PMID:27540313

  11. Optical coherence tomography findings of bilateral foveal leukemic infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Le, John Q; Braich, Puneet S; Brar, Vikram S

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 59-year-old man with a history of atypical chronic myelogenous leukemia who presented with a several-week history of decreased vision in both eyes. His clinical examination revealed bilateral foveal infiltration, which was also demonstrated on optical coherence tomography. After a failed induction with imatinib (Gleevec®), he was treated with omacetaxine (Synribo®) with an appropriate hematologic response. As his leukemia improved with chemotherapy, his retinal lesions regressed as demonstrated by serial optical coherence tomography and fundus photographs, with near complete restoration of foveal architecture. PMID:27540313

  12. Optical Coherence Tomography in Glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisha, Fatmire; Hoffmann, Esther M.; Pfeiffer, Norbert

    Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning and optic nerve head cupping are key diagnostic features of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. The higher resolution of the recently introduced SD-OCT offers enhanced visualization and improved segmentation of the retinal layers, providing a higher accuracy in identification of subtle changes of the optic disc and RNFL thinning associated with glaucoma.

  13. Optical coherence tomography derived cut-off value of uncovered stent struts to predict adverse clinical outcomes after drug-eluting stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Won, Hoyoun; Shin, Dong-Ho; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Mintz, Gary S; Kim, Jung-Sun; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2013-08-01

    Although the presence of uncovered struts may be associated with occurrence of stent thrombosis, the impact of uncovered struts detected routinely by optical coherence tomography (OCT) on subsequent long-term clinical outcomes remains unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the cut-off value of uncovered struts that predicted adverse clinical outcomes after drug eluting stent (DES) implantation. Major safety events (MSEs, a composite occurrence of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis) were evaluated in 489 DES-treated patients (535 lesions) during the median 851 days after follow-up OCT. MSEs occurred in six patients (four definite stent thrombosis and two sudden cardiac death). The best cut-off value of percentage of uncovered struts for predicting MSE was 5.9 % using the maximal χ(2) method: area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve = 0.779, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.648-0.910, p = 0.019, a sensitivity of 83.3 % and a specificity of 70.3 %. Independent predictors for MSE were post-intervention minimal lumen diameter (odds ratio 0.019, 95 % CI = 0.001-0.513, p = 0.018) and percentage of uncovered struts ≥5.9 % (odds ratio 19.781, 95 % CI = 2.071-188.968, p = 0.010). A greater percentage of uncovered struts (the cut-off value of ≥5.9 % uncovered struts) might be significantly associated with occurrence of MSE after DES implantation. PMID:23615849

  14. Macular thickness measured by stratus optical coherence tomography in patients with diabetes type 2 and mild nonproliferative retinopathy without clinical evidence of macular edema.

    PubMed

    Pires, Isabel; Santos, Ana Rita; Nunes, Sandrina; Lobo, Conceição

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate macular thickness in eyes with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR), patients with diabetes type 2, NPDR level 20 or 35, and without evidence of clinical macular edema underwent best-corrected visual acuity assessment, color fundus photography and Stratus optical coherence tomography. Mean center point thickness (CPT) and mean central subfield (CSF) thickness were compared with those of a healthy control population. 410 eyes/patients aged 61.2 ± 8.3 years, and with glycosylated hemoglobin of 7.9 ± 1.5% were included. Mean CPT and CSF were 186.6 ± 28.4 and 215.2 ± 25 µm, respectively, significantly increased compared to healthy subjects (p < 0.001). CSF thickness was abnormally increased in 17.6% of the patients, with values within the normal range in 79.5%, and abnormally decreased in 2.9%. CPT and CSF thickness were significantly thicker in men. No systemic factors showed a significant association. A significant increase in the macular thickness was found in eyes/patients with mild NPDR without clinical macular edema; however, only 17.6% of the eyes/patients had abnormally increased values and less than 3% abnormally decreased values.

  15. Coherence evolution of partially coherent beams carrying optical vortices propagating in non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhiyuan; Tao, Rumao; Zhou, Pu; Xu, Xiaojun; Liu, Zejin

    2013-11-20

    Based on partially coherent Bessel-Gaussian beams (BGBs), the coherence evolution of the partially coherent beams carrying optical vortices in non-Kolmogorov turbulence is investigated in detail. The analytical formulas for the spatial coherence length of partially coherent BGBs with optical vortices in non-Kolmogorov turbulence have been derived by using the combination of a coherence superposition approximation of decentered Gaussian beams and the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. The influences of beam and turbulence parameters on spatial coherence are investigated by numerical examples. Numerical results reveal that the coherence of the partially coherent laser beam with vortices is independent of the optical vortices, and the spatial correlation length of the beams does not decrease monotonically during propagation in non-Kolmogorov turbulence. Within a certain propagation distance, the coherence of the partially coherent beam will improve, and the improvement of the coherence of the partially coherent beams is closely related to the beam and turbulence parameters.

  16. Audio frequency in vivo optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adie, Steven G.; Kennedy, Brendan F.; Armstrong, Julian J.; Alexandrov, Sergey A.; Sampson, David D.

    2009-05-01

    We present a new approach to optical coherence elastography (OCE), which probes the local elastic properties of tissue by using optical coherence tomography to measure the effect of an applied stimulus in the audio frequency range. We describe the approach, based on analysis of the Bessel frequency spectrum of the interferometric signal detected from scatterers undergoing periodic motion in response to an applied stimulus. We present quantitative results of sub-micron excitation at 820 Hz in a layered phantom and the first such measurements in human skin in vivo.

  17. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography at 1 MHz.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu, Omer P; Turner, Timothy L; Liu, Zhuolin; Miller, Donald T

    2014-12-01

    Image acquisition speed of optical coherence tomography (OCT) remains a fundamental barrier that limits its scientific and clinical utility. Here we demonstrate a novel multi-camera adaptive optics (AO-)OCT system for ophthalmologic use that operates at 1 million A-lines/s at a wavelength of 790 nm with 5.3 μm axial resolution in retinal tissue. Central to the spectral-domain design is a novel detection channel based on four high-speed spectrometers that receive light sequentially from a 1 × 4 optical switch assembly. Absence of moving parts enables ultra-fast (50ns) and precise switching with low insertion loss (-0.18 dB per channel). This manner of control makes use of all available light in the detection channel and avoids camera dead-time, both critical for imaging at high speeds. Additional benefit in signal-to-noise accrues from the larger numerical aperture afforded by the use of AO and yields retinal images of comparable dynamic range to that of clinical OCT. We validated system performance by a series of experiments that included imaging in both model and human eyes. We demonstrated the performance of our MHz AO-OCT system to capture detailed images of individual retinal nerve fiber bundles and cone photoreceptors. This is the fastest ophthalmic OCT system we know of in the 700 to 915 nm spectral band.

  18. Preliminary in vivo positional analysis of a posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens by optical coherence tomography and its correlation with clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cambrodí, Rafael J.; Piñero, David P.; Blanes-Mompó, Francisco J.; Ferrer-Blasco, Teresa; Cerviño, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To analyze by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography the anatomical relationship of a specific type of posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens (pIOL) implanted in cases of high to moderate myopia with the adjacent intraocular structures and to correlate it with clinical outcomes. Methods Prospective observational case series including 18 eyes with high to moderate myopia (spherical equivalent between −5.88 and −15.75 D) of 9 patients (age range, 29–49 years) undergoing bilateral Phakic Refractive Lens (PRL, Zeiss) implantation. Postoperative visual acuity, refraction, contrast sensitivity (CS), and ocular higher order aberrations (HOA) were evaluated. Furthermore, the in vivo position of the PRL was analyzed by means of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (3D OCT-1000, Topcon). Central (CENV), temporal (TEMV) and nasal vault (NASV) were measured. Correlation of these anatomical parameters with clinical data was also investigated. Mean follow-up was 47 ± 25 months. Results A statistically significant visual and refractive improvement (p < 0.01) was found postoperatively. Mean postoperative CENV, NASV, and TEMV were 157.88 ± 69.93 μm, 168.29 ± 65.02 μm, and 188.59 ± 55.99 μm, respectively. Significant difference was found between NASV and TEMV (p = 0.01). No significant correlations were found between ocular aberrometric and anatomical parameters (p ≥ 0.12). CENV, NASV and TEMV correlated significantly with 6-cycles per degree (cpd) photopic CS as well as with 18-cpd low mesopic CS (r ≥ 0.57, p ≤ 0.04). Furthermore, NASV also correlated significantly with preoperative anterior chamber depth (r = −0.65, p = 0.01). Conclusions This posterior chamber pIOL shows a trend to nasal position, with potential impact on refractive and visual outcomes, particularly in eyes with deep anterior chambers.

  19. Atherosclerosis diagnostic imaging by optical spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewko, M. D.; Choo-Smith, L. P.; Ko, A. C. T.; Smith, M. S. D.; Kohlenberg, E. M.; Bock, E. R.; Leonardi, L.; Sowa, M. G.

    2006-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is traditionally viewed as a disease of uncontrolled plaque growth leading to arterial occlusion. More recently, however, occlusion of the arterial lumen is being viewed as an acute event triggered by plaque rupture and thrombosis. An atheromatous plaque becomes vulnerable to sudden activation and/or rupture when a constellation of processes are activated by various trigger mechanisms. There is growing evidence that the vulnerability (i.e. susceptibility to rupture) and thrombogenic nature of the plaque need to be taken into account in the planning and treatment of the disease. X-ray fluoroscopy and intravascular ultrasound, the current clinical diagnostic tools are not capable of the providing a complete histological picture of the plaque region. Intravascular diagnostic imaging of coronary atherosclerotic plaques by optical means to assess plaque, patient risk and assist in planning treatment strategies represents the future in angioplasty treatment by interventional cardiologists. The techniques which will enable a clinically acceptable and reliable intravascular diagnostic platform are currently being investigated and compared to the clinical standard of histology. Currently, we are investigating the use of a number of optical and imaging techniques for biochemical analysis of arterial tissue including Raman, near infrared and fluorescence spectroscopies. Biochemical imaging will provide compositional information on collagen, elastin, lipid and thrombogenic by-products as well as gauging inflammation and tissue remodeling activity levels. To complement the functional biochemical imaging, optical coherence tomography will be provide structural morphological imaging. The synergistic combination of functional and structural imagery will provide the interventional cardiologist with a complete clinical picture of the atherosclerotic plaque region. The clinician can use this diagnostic information to plan a personalized treatment procedure based on

  20. Combined optical coherence tomography and optical coherence elastography for glomerulonephritis classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Du, Yong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Mohammadzai, Qais; Raghunathan, Raksha; Hsu, Thomas; Noorani, Shezaan; Chang, Anthony; Mohan, Chandra; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Acute Glomerulonephritis caused by anti-glomerular basement membrane disease has a high mortality due to delayed diagnosis. Thus, an accurate and early diagnosis is critical for preserving renal function. Currently, blood, urine, and tissue-based diagnoses can be time consuming, while ultrasound and CT imaging have relatively low spatial resolution. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging technique that provides superior spatial resolution (micron scale) as compared to ultrasound and CT. Pathological changes in tissue properties can be detected based on the optical metrics analyzed from the OCT signal, such as optical attenuation and speckle variance. Moreover, OCT does not rely on ionizing radiation as with CT imaging. In addition to structural changes, the elasticity of the kidney can significantly change due to nephritis. In this work, we utilized OCT to detect the difference in tissue properties between healthy and nephritic murine kidneys. Although OCT imaging could identify the diseased tissue, classification accuracy using only optical metrics was clinically inadequate. By combining optical metrics with elasticity, the classification accuracy improved from 76% to 95%. These results show that OCT combined with OCE can be potentially useful for nephritis detection.

  1. Design of endoscopic optical coherence tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Daoyin; Li, Wanhui; Wang, Yi; Chen, Xiaodong

    2006-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT), which bases on the principle of low-coherence interferometry, is an emerging cross-sectional imaging technology. With ultrahigh resolution, OCT is sensitive enough to detect early-stage tissue abnormalities associated with diseases such as early carcinoma. To detect pathologic change in gastrointestinal tract, we combine OCT with endoscopic technique. Later we call this technique as endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT). Compared with time-domain OCT imaging technique, spectral OCT eliminates depth scan in the reference arm so increases the imaging speed. Basing on spectral OCT, EOCT can realize real-time imaging. The EOCT unit is comprised of an endoscopically compatible radially scanning probe as the sample arm. In this paper the principle of spectral OCT is introduced and the crucial parameters of experimental system are discussed. Also the design of a novel probe is presented. In our experiment, a mirror is used as a sample to test the validity of this method.

  2. In Vivo Assessment of Pulmonary Arterial Wall Fibrosis by Intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A New Prognostic Marker of Adverse Clinical Follow-Up§

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Enric; Grignola, Juan C; Aguilar, Rio; Montero, María Angeles; Arredondo, Christian; Vázquez, Manuel; López-Messeguer, Manuel; Bravo, Carlos; Bouteldja, Nadia; Hidalgo, Cristina; Roman, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim is to correlate pulmonary arterial (PA) remodeling estimated by PA fibrosis in PA hypertension (PAH) with clinical follow-up. Histology of PA specimens is also performed. Methods: 19 patients, aged 54±16 (4 men), functional class II-III were studied with right heart catheterization, PA Intravascular Ultrasound and optical coherence tomography (OCT) in inferior lobe segment. PA wall fibrosis was obtained by OCT ( area of fibrosis/PA cross sectional area × 100). Patients follow-up was blind to OCT. Events were defined as mortality, lung transplantation, need of intravenous prostaglandins or onset of right ventricular failure. Results: OCT measurements showed high intra- and interobserver agreement. There was a good correlation between OCT and histology in PA fibrosis from explanted lungs. Area of fibrosis was 1.4±0.8 mm2, % fibrosis was 22.3±8. Follow-up was 3.5 years (2.5-4.5). OCT %Fib was significantly correlated with PA capacitance (r=-0.536) and with pulmonary vascular rsistance (r=0.55). Patients were divided according to the median value of PA fibrosis. There were 10 patients with a high (≥ 22%) and 9 with a low fibrosis (<22%). Events occurred in 6 (1 death, 1 lung transplantation, 2 intravenous prostaglandins, 2 right heart failure) out of 10 patients with high and in 0 out of 9 patients with low fibrosis (p<0.01). Conclusions: In PAH, the severity of PA remodeling assessed by OCT wall fibrosis was significantly predictive of severely unfavorable clinical outcome. In vivo assessment of pulmonary arterial wall fibrosis by intravascular OCT in PAH is a promising new prognostic marker of adverse clinical outcome. PMID:23730366

  3. Frequency shift by optical coherent control

    SciTech Connect

    Ignesti, Emilio; Buffa, Roberto; Fini, Lorenzo; Sali, Emiliano; Cavalieri, Stefano; Tognetti, Marco V.

    2010-02-15

    We report the experimental observation of an optically controllable shift of the central frequency of a laser pulse, using a scheme based on dynamical electromagnetically induced transparency. This is evidence of frequency shift controllable by a coherent process. Original theoretical results are in agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Imaging of the Rotator Cuff With Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Hartshorn, Timothy; Ren, Jian; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated the utility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in imaging porcine and human rotator cuff (RTC) tissue, analyzed its effectiveness in identifying clinical pathology, and correlated these findings with histologic examination. Twelve human cadaveric and 6 porcine shoulders were evaluated. Six-millimeter-wide bone sections were harvested from the proximal humerus of each specimen, with each containing the entire enthesis of the respective RTC tendon, as well as 2 cm of tendon medial to the enthesis. Only the supraspinatus tendon was evaluated in the human specimens, whereas the enthesis of multiple RTC tendons were evaluated in the porcine model. All specimens were imaged using OCT and correlated with histologic evaluation. Optical coherence tomography evaluation of macroscopically healthy tissue consistently showed an easily identifiable banding pattern (birefringence) in contrast to a disorganized, homogeneous appearance in grossly diseased tissue. Optical coherence tomography was more effective for qualitative evaluation of RTC tissue, identification of bursal-sided RTC tears, and localization of calcific deposits, whereas intrasubstance tendon delaminations and partial articular-sided tendon avulsion lesions were relatively more difficult to identify. Optical coherence tomography correlated well with histologic evaluation in all specimens. Optical coherence tomography provides high-resolution, subsurface imaging of rotator cuff tissue in real-time to a depth of up to 4 mm with excellent correlation to histology in a cadaveric model. Optical coherence tomography could be an effective adjunctive tool for the identification and localization of rotator cuff pathology. The use of OCT in arthroscopic shoulder surgery potentially provides a minimally invasive modality for qualitative assessment of rotator cuff pathology. This may allow for a decrease in soft tissue dissection, improved qualitative assessment of cuff tissue, and improved patient

  5. Dermascope guided multiple reference optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dsouza, Roshan; Subhash, Hrebesh; Neuhaus, Kai; Hogan, Josh; Wilson, Carol; Leahy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report the feasibility of integrating a novel low cost optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with a dermascope for point-of-care applications. The proposed OCT system is based on an enhanced time-domain optical coherence tomographic system, called multiple reference OCT (MR-OCT), which uses a single miniature voice coil actuator and a partial mirror for extending the axial scan range. The system can simultaneously register both the superficial dermascope image and the depth-resolved OCT sub-surface information by an interactive beam steering method. A practitioner is able to obtain the depth resolved information of the point of interest by simply using the mouse cursor. The proposed approach of combining a dermascope with a low cost OCT provides a unique powerful optical imaging modality for a range of dermatological applications. Hand-held dermascopic OCT devices would also enable point of care and remote health monitoring. PMID:25401004

  6. Classifying murine glomerulonephritis using optical coherence tomography and optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Du, Yong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Chang, Anthony; Mohan, Chandra; Larin, Kirill V

    2016-08-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis caused by antiglomerular basement membrane marked by high mortality. The primary reason for this is delayed diagnosis via blood examination, urine analysis, tissue biopsy, or ultrasound and X-ray computed tomography imaging. Blood, urine, and tissue-based diagnoses can be time consuming, while ultrasound and CT imaging have relatively low spatial resolution, with reduced sensitivity. Optical coherence tomography is a noninvasive and high-resolution imaging technique that provides superior spatial resolution (micrometer scale) as compared to ultrasound and CT. Changes in tissue properties can be detected based on the optical metrics analyzed from the OCT signals, such as optical attenuation and speckle variance. Furthermore, OCT does not rely on ionizing radiation as with CT imaging. In addition to structural changes, the elasticity of the kidney can significantly change due to nephritis. In this work, OCT has been utilized to quantify the difference in tissue properties between healthy and nephritic murine kidneys. Although OCT imaging could identify the diseased tissue, its classification accuracy is clinically inadequate. By combining optical metrics with elasticity, the classification accuracy improves from 76% to 95%. These results show that OCT combined with OCE can be a powerful tool for identifying and classifying nephritis. Therefore, the OCT/OCE method could potentially be used as a minimally invasive tool for longitudinal studies during the progression and therapy of glomerulonephritis as well as complement and, perhaps, substitute highly invasive tissue biopsies. Elastic-wave propagation in mouse healthy and nephritic kidneys.

  7. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chalam, K. V.; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases. PMID:27195091

  8. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chalam, K V; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases.

  9. Automatic three-dimensional registration of intra-vascular optical coherence tomography images for the clinical evaluation of stent implantation over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ughi, Giovanni J.; Adriaenssens, Tom; Larsson, Matilda; Dubois, Christophe; Sinnaeve, Peter; Coosemans, Mark; Desmet, Walter; D'hooghe, Jan

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade a large number of new intracoronary devices (i.e. drug-eluting stents, DES) have been developed to reduce the risks related to bare metal stent (BMS) implantation. The use of this new generation of DES has been shown to substantially reduce, compared with BMS, the occurrence of restenosis and recurrent ischemia that would necessitate a second revascularization procedure. Nevertheless, safety issues on the use of DES persist and full understanding of mechanisms of adverse clinical events is still a matter of concern and debate. Intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography (IV-OCT) is an imaging technique able to visualize the microstructure of blood vessels with an axial resolution <20 μm. Due to its very high spatial resolution, it enables detailed in-vivo assessment of implanted devices and vessel wall. Currently, the aim of several major clinical trials is to observe and quantify the vessel response to DES implantation over time. However, image analysis is currently performed manually and corresponding images, belonging to different IV-OCT acquisitions, can only be matched through a very labor intensive and subjective procedure. The aim of this study is to develop and validate a new methodology for the automatic registration of IV-OCT datasets on an image level. Hereto, we propose a landmark based rigid registration method exploiting the metallic stent framework as a feature. Such a tool would provide a better understanding of the behavior of different intracoronary devices in-vivo, giving unique insights about vessel pathophysiology and performance of new generation of intracoronary devices and different drugs.

  10. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Choroideremia

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nieraj; Jia, Yali; Gao, Simon S.; Zhang, Xinbo; Weleber, Richard G.; Huang, David; Pennesi, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Novel therapies for choroideremia, an X-linked recessive chorioretinal degeneration, demand a better understanding of the primary site(s) of cellular degeneration. Optical coherence tomography angiography allows for choriocapillaris (CC) imaging. We compared the extent of structural alterations of the CC, retinal pigment epithelium, and photoreceptors with multimodal imaging. Observations In a clinical case series conducted from September 15,2014, through February 5,2015,14 eyes of 7 male patients with choroideremia (median age, 34 years [interquartile range, 15-46 years]; age range, 13-48 years), 4 eyes of 2 women with choroideremia carrier state (both in mid-50s), and 6 eyes of 6 controls (median age, 42.5 years [interquartile range, 33-55 years]; age range, 24-55 years) underwent multimodal imaging with optical coherence tomography angiography and electroretinography. The mean (SD) macular CC density was 82.9% (13.4%) in patients with choroideremia, 93.0% (3.8%) in female carriers, and 98.2% (1.3%) in controls. The mean (SD) CC density in affected eyes was higher in regions with preserved (92.6% [5.8%]) vs absent (75.9% [12.6%]) ellipsoid zone (mean difference. 16.7%; 95% CI, 12.1% to 21.3%; P < .001). Seventeen of 18 eyes of the patients and carriers had outer retinal tubulations forming pseudopod-like extensions from islands of preserved ellipsoid zone. Outer retinal tubulations were associated with absence of underlying retinal pigment epithelium and were longer (r = −0.62; 95% CI, −0.84 to −0.19; P < .001) and more numerous (r = −0.71; 95% CI, −0.91 to −0.27; P < .001) in more severely affected eyes. Conclusions and Relevance These findings suggest that regional changes in CC density correlate with photoreceptor structural alterations in choroideremia. Although closely coupled, the results suggest that retinal pigment epithelium loss is more extensive than photoreceptor loss. PMID:27149258

  11. Optical Coherence Tomography to Assess Neurodegeneration in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Retinal spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) has emerged as a clinical and research tool in multiple sclerosis (MS) and optic neuritis (ON). This chapter summarizes a short OCT protocol as included in international consensus guidelines. The protocol was written for hands-on style such that both clinicians and OCT technicians can make use of it. The protocol is suitable for imaging of the optic nerve head and macular regions as a baseline for follow-up investigations, individual layer segmentation, and diagnostic assessment.

  12. Nanoparticle contrast agents for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, Michelle Lynn

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides real-time, objective, in-vivo, optical cross-sectional representations of the retina and optic nerve. Recent innovations in image acquisition, including the incorporation of Fourier/spectral-domain detection, have improved imaging speed, sensitivity and resolution. Still, there remain specific structures within ocular OCT images, such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which are of clinical interest but consistently have low contrast. This makes it difficult to differentiate between surrounding layers and structures. The objectives of this project were: (1) To establish a reliable method for OCT imaging of the healthy and diseased mouse eye in order to provide a platform for testing the utility of OCT contrast agents for ocular imaging, (2) To develop antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles suitable for targeting specific structures and enhancing OCT image contrast in the mouse eye, and (3) To examine the localized contrast-enhancing ability and biocompatibility of gold nanoparticle contrast agents in-vivo. Our organizing hypotheses were that nanoparticles could improve contrast by modulating the intensity of backscattered light detected by OCT and that they could be directed to ocular structures of interest using antibodies specific to cellular markers. A reproducible method for imaging the mouse retina and quantifying retinal thickness was developed and this technique was then applied to a mouse model for retinal ganglion cell loss, optic nerve crush. Gold nanorods were designed specifically to augment the backscattering OCT signal at the same wavelengths of light used in current ophthalmic OCT imaging schemes (resonant wavelength lambda = 840 nm). Anti-CD90.1 (Thy1.1) antibodies were conjugated to the gold nanorods and a protocol for characterization of the success of antibody conjugation was developed. Upon injection, the gold nanorods were found to remain in the vitreous post-injection, with many consumed by an early

  13. Coherence Phenomena in Coupled Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.

    2007-01-01

    Quantum coherence effects in atomic media such as electromagnetically-induced transparency and absorption, lasing without inversion, super-radiance and gain-assisted superluminality have become well-known in atomic physics. But these effects are not unique to atoms, nor are they uniquely quantum in nature, but rather are fundamental to systems of coherently coupled oscillators. In this talk I will review a variety of analogous photonic coherence phenomena that can occur in passive and active coupled optical resonators. Specifically, I will examine the evolution of the response that can occur upon the addition of a second resonator, to a single resonator that is side-coupled to a waveguide, as the coupling is increased, and discuss the conditions for slow and fast light propagation, coupled-resonator-induced transparency and absorption, lasing without gain, and gain-assisted superluminal pulse propagation. Finally, I will discuss the application of these systems to laser stabilization and gyroscopy.

  14. The multiparty coherent channel and its implementation with linear optics.

    PubMed

    He, Guangqiang; Liu, Taizhi; Tao, Xin

    2013-08-26

    The continuous-variable coherent (conat) channel is a useful resource for coherent communication, supporting coherent teleportation and coherent superdense coding. We extend the conat channel to multiparty conditions by proposing definitions on multiparty position-quadrature and momentum-quadrature conat channel. We additionally provide two methods to implement this channel using linear optics. One method is the multiparty version of coherent communication assisted by entanglement and classical communication (CCAECC). The other is multiparty coherent superdense coding. PMID:24105527

  15. Optical coherence tomography--a new imaging method in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Svorenova, I; Strmen, P; Olah, Z

    2010-01-01

    An improvement of examination methods in ophthalmology, technical digitalisation and knowledge of validity of examinations in various diseases contributes to early diagnostics, thereby leading to an opportunity for early treatment of eye disorders. Standard introduction of the so-called optical coherence tomography into the ophthamological clinical practice facilitated new options for a detailed analysis of pathological processes in the particular layers of the retina (Fig. 2, Ref. 5). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk. PMID:20568425

  16. Recent advances in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhihua; Wang, Chuan; Shen, Yi; Huang, Liangming; Wu, Lan; Du, Chixin

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports recent advances in spectral domain Doppler optical coherence tomography (SD-DOCT) in our group. A high speed SD-DOCT system is developed and applied to animal study and microchip evaluation. Further improvements concerning SD-DOCT are presented, those including higher-order cross-correlation for phase retrieval, transit-time analysis for velocity quantification, and orthogonal dispersive SD-OCT for depth extension.

  17. Removing autocorrelation in spectral optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-02-01

    We have developed a new algorithm and configuration for removing the autocorrelation of the object wave in spectral optical coherence tomography. The self-interferogram of the object wave is acquired synchronously with the standard interferogram of the recombined object and reference waves. The former is then subtracted from the latter after Fourier transformation. The algorithm is validated by numerical simulation and by experimental measurement of a USAF target and a feline eye.

  18. Optical coherence tomography used for jade industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shoude; Mao, Youxin; Chang, Guangming; Flueraru, Costel

    2010-11-01

    As an expensive natural stone, jade has a worldwide market. In the jade industry, the inspection and analysis basically rely on the human eye and/or experience, which cause unavoidable waste and damage of these expensive materials. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a fundamentally new type of optical sensing technology, which can perform high resolution, cross-sectional sensing of the internal structure of materials. As jade is almost translucent to infra red light, OCT becomes an ideal tool to change the traditional procedure to volume data based machine vision system. OCT can also be used for anti-counterfeit of the expensive jade ware.

  19. Optical coherence tomography guided dental drill

    DOEpatents

    DaSilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A dental drill that has one or multiple single mode fibers that can be used to image in the vicinity of the drill tip. It is valuable to image below the surface being drilled to minimize damage to vital or normal tissue. Identifying the boundary between decayed and normal enamel (or dentine) would reduce the removal of viable tissue, and identifying the nerve before getting too close with the drill could prevent nerve damage. By surrounding a drill with several optical fibers that can be used by an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) to image several millimeters ahead of the ablation surface will lead to a new and improved dental treatment device.

  20. Optical pulse shaping approaches to coherent control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Debabrata

    2003-02-01

    The last part of the twentieth century has experienced a huge resurge of activity in the field of coherent light-matter interaction, more so in attempting to exert control over such interactions. Birth of coherent control was originally spurred by the theoretical understanding of the quantum interferences that lead to energy randomization and experimental developments in ultrafast laser spectroscopy. The theoretical predictions on control of reaction channels or energy randomization processes are still more dramatic than the experimental demonstrations, though this gap between the two is consistently reducing over the recent years with realistic theoretical models and technological developments. Experimental demonstrations of arbitrary optical pulse shaping have made some of the previously impracticable theoretical predictions possible to implement. Starting with the simple laser modulation schemes to provide proof-of-the-principle demonstrations, feedback loop pulse shaping systems have been developed that can actively manipulate some atomic and molecular processes. This tremendous experimental boost of optical pulse shaping developments has prospects and implications into many more new directions, such as quantum computing and terabit/sec data communications. This review captures certain aspects and impacts of optical pulse shaping into the fast developing areas of coherent control and other related fields. Currently available reviews focus on one or the other detailed aspects of coherent control, and the reader will be referred to such details as and when necessary for issues that are dealt in brief here. We will focus on the current issues including control of intramolecular dynamics and make connections to the future concepts, such as, quantum computation, biomedical applications, etc.

  1. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography of Chorioretinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Novais, Eduardo A; Roisman, Luiz; de Oliveira, Paulo Ricardo Chaves; Louzada, Ricardo N; Cole, Emily D; Lane, Mark; Filho, Marco Bonini; Romano, André; de Oliveira Dias, João Rafael; Regatieri, Caio V; Chow, David; Belfort, Rubens; Rosenfeld, Philip; Waheed, Nadia K; Ferrara, Daniela; Duker, Jay S

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescein angiography (FA) and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) have been the gold standard for the evaluation of retinal and choroidal vasculature in the last three decades and have revolutionized the diagnosis of retinal and choroidal vascular diseases. The advantage of these imaging modalities lies in their ability to document retinal and choroidal vasculature through the dynamic assessment of contrast transit over time in the intravascular and extravascular spaces. However, disadvantages include the absence of depth resolution, blurring of details by contrast leakage, and the inability to selectively evaluate different levels of the retinal and choroidal microvasculature. In addition, these angiographic methods require intravenous dye, which may cause adverse reactions such as nausea, vomiting, and rarely, anaphylaxis. Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a noninvasive imaging technique that, in contrast to dye-based angiography, is faster and depth-resolved, allowing in some cases for more precise evaluation of the vascular plexuses of the retina and choroid. The method has been demonstrated in the assessment of various vascular diseases such as venous occlusions, diabetic retinopathy, macular neovascularization, and others. Limitations of this imaging modality include a small registered field of view and the inability to visualize leakage and dye transit over time. It is also subject to a variety of artifacts, including those generated by blinking and eye movement during image acquisition. However, more than an alternative for FA and ICGA, OCTA is bringing new insights to our understanding of retinal and choroidal vascular structure and is changing fundamental paradigms in the clinical management of pathologic conditions. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:848-861.]. PMID:27631482

  2. Catheter guided by optical coherence domain reflectometry

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew; Colston, Billy W.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    A guidance and viewing system based on multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometry is incorporated into a catheter, endoscope, or other medical device to measure the location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions at discrete points on the medical device during minimally invasive medical procedures. The information will be used both to guide the device through the body and to evaluate the tissue through which the device is being passed. Multiple optical fibers are situated along the circumference of the device. Light from the distal end of each fiber is directed onto the interior cavity walls via small diameter optics (such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes). Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers and multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The system may also be implemented in a nonmedical inspection device.

  3. Engineering of Nanoscale Contrast Agents for Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Andrew Y; Jayagopal, Ashwath

    2014-01-30

    Optical coherence tomography has emerged as valuable imaging modalityin ophthalmology and other fields by enabling high-resolution three-dimensional imaging of tissue. In this paper, we review recent progress in the field of contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography (OCT). We discuss exogenous and endogenous sources of OCT contrast, focusing on their use with standard OCT systems as well as emerging OCT-based imaging modalities. We include advances in the processing of OCT data that generate improved tissue contrast, including spectroscopic OCT (SOCT), as well as work utilizing secondary light sources and/or detection mechanisms to create and detect enhanced contrast, including photothermal OCT (PTOCT) and photoacoustic OCT (PAOCT). Finally, we conclude with a discussion of the translational potential of these developments as well as barriers to their clinical use.

  4. Dynamic spectral-domain optical coherence elastography for tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xing; Adie, Steven G; John, Renu; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-06-21

    A dynamic spectral-domain optical coherence elastography (OCE) imaging technique is reported. In this technique, audio-frequency compressive vibrations are generated by a piezoelectric stack as external excitation, and strain rates in the sample are calculated and mapped quantitatively using phase-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. At different driving frequencies, this technique provides contrast between sample regions with different mechanical properties, and thus is used to mechanically characterize tissue. We present images of a three-layer silicone tissue phantom and rat tumor tissue ex vivo, based on quantitative strain rate. Both acquisition speed and processing speed are improved dramatically compared with previous OCE imaging techniques. With high resolution, high acquisition speed, and the ability to characterize the mechanical properties of tissue, this OCE technique has potential use in non-destructive volumetric imaging and clinical applications. PMID:20588552

  5. Dental diagnostics using optical coherence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Nathel, H.; Colston, B.; Armitage, G.

    1994-11-15

    Optical radiation can be used for diagnostic purposes in oral medicine. However, due to the turbid, amorphous, and inhomogeneous nature of dental tissue conventional techniques used to transilluminate materials are not well suited to dental tissues. Optical coherence techniques either in the time- of frequency-domain offer the capabilities of discriminating scattered from unscattered light, thus allowing for imaging through turbid tissue. Currently, using optical time-domain reflectometry we are able to discriminate specular from diffuse reflections occurring at tissue boundaries. We have determined the specular reflectivity of enamel and dentin to be approximately 6.6 x 10{sup -5} and 1.3 x 10{sup -6}, respectively. Implications to periodontal imaging will be discussed.

  6. Concept of coherence of learning physical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Elisa M.; Jaen, Mirta; de Cudmani, Leonor C.

    1995-10-01

    The aim of the actual paper is to enhance achievements of the text 'Optica Fisica Basica: estructurada alrededor del concepto de coherencia luminosa' (in English 'Basic Physical Optics centered in the concept of coherence'). We consider that this book is a very worth tool when one has to learn or to teach some fundamental concepts of physical optics. It is well known that the topics of physical optics present not easy understanding for students. Even more they also present some difficulties for the teachers when they have to introduce them to the class. First, we think that different phenomena like diffraction and polarization could be well understood if the starting point is a deep comprehension of the concept of interference of light and, associated with this, the fundamental and nothing intuitive concept of coherence of the light. In the reference text the authors propose the use of expression 'stable interference pattern of no uniform intensity' instead of 'pattern of interference' and 'average pattern of uniform untested' instead of 'lack of interference' to make reference that light always interfere but just under restrictive conditions it can be got temporal and spatial stability of the pattern. Another idea we want to stand out is that the ability to observe a 'stable interference pattern of no uniform intensity' is associated not only with the coherence of the source but also with the dimensions of the experimental system and with the temporal and spatial characteristics of the detector used - human eye, photographic film, etc. The proposal is well support by quantitative relations. With an alternate model: a train of waves with a finite length of coherence, it is possible to get range of validity of models, to decide when a source could be considered a 'point' or 'monochromatic' or 'remote', an 'infinite' wave or a train of waves, etc. Using this concept it is possible to achieve a better understanding of phenomena like the polarization of light. Here, it

  7. Optics for coherent X-ray applications

    PubMed Central

    Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Mimura, Hidekazu; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Tanaka, Takashi; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tamasaku, Kenji; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Goto, Shunji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Developments of X-ray optics for full utilization of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs) are presented. The expected performance of DLSRs is introduced using the design parameters of SPring-8 II. To develop optical elements applicable to manipulation of coherent X-rays, advanced technologies on precise processing and metrology were invented. With propagation-based coherent X-rays at the 1 km beamline of SPring-8, a beryllium window fabricated with the physical-vapour-deposition method was found to have ideal speckle-free properties. The elastic emission machining method was utilized for developing reflective mirrors without distortion of the wavefronts. The method was further applied to production of diffraction-limited focusing mirrors generating the smallest spot size in the sub-10 nm regime. To enable production of ultra-intense nanobeams at DLSRs, a low-vibration cooling system for a high-heat-load monochromator and advanced diagnostic systems to characterize X-ray beam properties precisely were developed. Finally, new experimental schemes for combinative nano-analysis and spectroscopy realised with novel X-ray optics are discussed. PMID:25177986

  8. Spectral fusing Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Meemon, Panomsak; Widjaja, Joewono; Rolland, Jannick P

    2016-02-01

    Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy (GD-OCM) is one of many variations of optical coherence tomography (OCT) techniques that aims for invariant high resolution across a 3D field of view by utilizing the ability to dynamically refocus the imaging optics in the sample arm. GD-OCM acquires multiple cross-sectional images at different focus positions of the objective lens, and then fuses them to obtain an invariant high-resolution 3D image of the sample, which comes with the intrinsic drawback of a longer processing time as compared to conventional Fourier domain OCT. Here, we report on an alternative Gabor fusing algorithm, the spectral-fusion technique, which directly processes each acquired spectrum and combines them prior to the Fourier transformation to obtain a depth profile. The implementation of the spectral-fusion algorithm is presented and its performance is compared to that of the prior GD-OCM spatial-fusion approach. The spectral-fusion approach shows twice the speed of the spatial-fusion approach for a spectrum size of less than 2000 point sampling, which is a commonly used spectrum size in OCT imaging, including GD-OCM.

  9. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Fovea Plana.

    PubMed

    Dolz-Marco, Rosa; Phasukkijwatana, Nopasak; Sarraf, David; Freund, K Bailey

    2016-07-01

    Fovea plana is characterized by the anatomical absence of the foveal pit in eyes with normal visual function. The authors have analyzed three cases of idiopathic fovea plana with optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). As previously reported, the authors found the absence of a foveal avascular zone in all cases with OCTA; however, a preserved fusion of both the superficial and the deep capillary plexuses was found around the foveal center. This novel observation cannot be detected with conventional dye-based angiography, in which the deep capillary plexus is not visualized. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:670-673.].

  10. MEMS scanning micromirror for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Strathman, Matthew; Liu, Yunbo; Keeler, Ethan G; Song, Mingli; Baran, Utku; Xi, Jiefeng; Sun, Ming-Ting; Wang, Ruikang; Li, Xingde; Lin, Lih Y

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an endoscopic-inspired imaging system employing a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) micromirror scanner to achieve beam scanning for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Miniaturization of a scanning mirror using MEMS technology can allow a fully functional imaging probe to be contained in a package sufficiently small for utilization in a working channel of a standard gastroesophageal endoscope. This work employs advanced image processing techniques to enhance the images acquired using the MEMS scanner to correct non-idealities in mirror performance. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  11. Multi-Scale Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Michael Christopher

    An optical modality capable of quantitative, label-free, high-speed and high-resolution imaging across spatiotemporal scales coupled with sophisticated software for image reconstruction and quantitative analyses would be of great utility to scientists and engineers in the medical and life sciences fields. Currently, a combination of optical imaging techniques and software packages are needed to address the list of capabilities described previously. Optical coherence tomography is an optical imaging technique based on low coherence interferometry capable of measuring light backscattered from the sample at micrometer-level resolutions over millimeter-level penetration depths in biological tissue. Phase-sensitive extensions of OCT enable the functional assessment of biological tissue samples as well as the structural examination of samples down to the single-cell level. This dissertation describes the development and application of high-speed real-time multi-functional spectral-domain OCT (MF-SD-OCT) for structural and functional examination of biological samples across spatiotemporal scales. A discussion of the development of a GPU-accelerated high-speed MF-SD-OCT imaging system accompanied by demonstrations of the performance enhancements due to the GPU are presented initially. Next, the development of MF-SD-OCT-based quantitative methods for the structural and functional assessment and characterization and classification of biological tissue samples is discussed. The utility of these methods is demonstrated through structural, functional and optical characterization and classification of peripheral nerve and muscle tissue. The dissertation concludes with a discussion of the improvements made to spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy (SD-OCPM) to enable dynamic live cell imaging and the application of dynamic live cell SD-OCPM for morphological visualization of cheek epithelial cells and examination of functionally stimulated morphological changes in

  12. Coherent Nonlinear Optical Imaging: Beyond Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Wei; Freudiger, Christian W.; Lu, Sijia; Xie, X. Sunney

    2012-01-01

    The quest for ultrahigh detection sensitivity with spectroscopic contrasts other than fluorescence has led to various novel approaches to optical microscopy of biological systems. Coherent nonlinear optical imaging, especially the recently developed nonlinear dissipation microscopy, including stimulated Raman scattering and two photon absorption, and pump-probe microscopy, including stimulated emission, excited state absorption and ground state depletion, provide distinct and powerful image contrasts for non-fluorescent species. Thanks to high-frequency modulation transfer scheme, they exhibit superb detection sensitivity. By directly interrogating vibrational and/or electronic energy levels of molecules, they offer high molecular specificity. Here we review the underlying principles, excitation and detection schemes, as well as exemplary biomedical applications of this emerging class of molecular imaging techniques. PMID:21453061

  13. Nanoparticles displacement analysis using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    StrÄ kowski, Marcin R.; Kraszewski, Maciej; StrÄ kowska, Paulina

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a versatile optical method for cross-sectional and 3D imaging of biological and non-biological objects. Here we are going to present the application of polarization sensitive spectroscopic OCT system (PS-SOCT) for quantitative measurements of materials containing nanoparticles. The PS-SOCT combines the polarization sensitive analysis with time-frequency analysis. In this contribution the benefits of using the combination of timefrequency and polarization sensitive analysis are being expressed. The usefulness of PS-SOCT for nanoparticles evaluation is going to be tested on nanocomposite materials with TiO2 nanoparticles. The OCT measurements results have been compared with SEM examination of the PMMA matrix with nanoparticles. The experiment has proven that by the use of polarization sensitive and spectroscopic OCT the nanoparticles dispersion and size can be evaluated.

  14. Birefringence insensitive optical coherence domain reflectometry system

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Davis, Joseph G.

    2002-01-01

    A birefringence insensitive fiber optic optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) system is provided containing non-polarization maintaining (non-PM) fiber in the sample arm and the reference arm without suffering from signal degradation caused by birefringence. The use of non-PM fiber significantly reduces the cost of the OCDR system and provides a disposable or multiplexed section of the sample arm. The dispersion in the reference arm and sample arm of the OCDR system are matched to achieve high resolution imaging. This system is useful in medical applications or for non-medical in situ probes. The disposable section of non-PM fiber in the sample arm can be conveniently replaced when contaminated by a sample or a patient.

  15. Optical coherence tomography for painting diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arecchi, T.; Bellini, M.; Corsi, C.; Fontana, R.; Materazzi, M.; Pezzati, L.; Tortora, A.

    2005-06-01

    In the last few years many non-destructive techniques have entered the field of painting conservation, and most of them are routinely applied to study and monitoring the painting status. Among them optical techniques are by now widely diffused and extremely well received because of their effectiveness and safety, nevertheless none of them is suitable for a quantitative characterization of varnish. One of the most important and often controversial stages of painting restoration is the surface cleaning process up to now being carried out without any tool to measure the actual varnish thickness but microscope observation of micro-detach. In this work we present an application of Optical Coherence Tomography to non-destructive diagnostics of artwork: the potentiality of this technique is demonstrated by measuring the thickness of the varnish layer in a fragment of a nineteenth-century oil painting.

  16. Polarization-sensitive interleaved optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lian; Marvdashti, Tahereh; Ellerbee, Audrey K

    2015-05-18

    We introduce a new strategy for single-mode fiber based polarization-sensitive (PS-) optical coherence tomography (OCT) using orthogonally polarized optical frequency combs (OFC) in the sample arm. The two OFCs are tuned to be interleaved in the spectral domain, permitting simultaneous measurement of both polarization states from the same spatial region C close to the location of zero pathlength delay. The two polarization states of the beam in the sample arm are demultiplexed by interpolation after performing wavelength stabilization via a two-mirror calibration method. The system uses Jones matrix methods to measure quantitatively the round-trip phase retardation B-scans in the sample. A glass plate and quarter-wave plate were measured to validate the accuracy of the birefringence measurement. Further, we demonstrated the potential of this system for biomedical applications by measurement of chicken breast muscle. PMID:26074618

  17. Snapshot Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, Ashley

    Optical coherence tomography systems are used to image the retina in 3D to allow ophthalmologists diagnose ocular disease. These systems yield large data sets that are often labor-intensive to analyze and require significant expertise in order to draw conclusions, especially when used over time to monitor disease progression. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) instantly acquires depth profiles at a single location with a broadband source. These systems require mechanical scanning to generate two- or three-dimensional images. Instead of mechanically scanning, a beamlet array was used to permit multiple depth measurements on the retina with a single snapshot using a 3x 3 beamlet array. This multi-channel system was designed, assembled, and tested using a 1 x 2 beamlet lens array instead of a 3 x 3 beamlet array as a proof of concept prototype. The source was a superluminescent diode centered at 840nm with a 45nm bandwidth. Theoretical axial resolution was 6.92um and depth of focus was 3.45mm. Glass samples of varying thickness ranging from 0.18mm to 1.14mm were measured with the system to validate that correct depth profiles can be acquired for each channel. The results demonstrated the prototype system performed as expected, and is ready to be modified for in vivo applicability.

  18. Dark-field optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pache, C.; Villiger, M. L.; Lasser, T.

    2010-02-01

    Many solutions have been proposed to produce phase quantitative images of biological cell samples. Among these, Spectral Domain Phase Microscopy combines the fast imaging speed and high sensitivity of Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) in the Fourier domain with the high phase stability of common-path interferometry. We report on a new illumination scheme for OCM that enhances the sensitivity for backscattered light and detects the weak sample signal, otherwise buried by the signal from specular reflection. With the use of a Bessel-like beam, a dark-field configuration was realized. Sensitivity measurements for three different illumination configurations were performed to compare our method to standard OCM and extended focus OCM. Using a well-defined scattering and reflecting object, we demonstrated an attenuation of -40 dB of the DC-component and a relative gain of 30 dB for scattered light, compared to standard OCM. In a second step, we applied this technique, referred to as dark-field Optical Coherence Microscopy (dfOCM), to living cells. Chinese hamster ovarian cells were applied in a drop of medium on a coverslide. The cells of ~15 μm in diameter and even internal cell structures were visualized in the acquired tomograms.

  19. Optical Coherence Tomography in a Needle Format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenser, Dirk; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Sampson, David D.

    In this chapter, we review the technology and applications of needle probes for optical coherence tomography (OCT). Needle probes are miniaturized fiber-optic probes that can be mounted inside hypodermic needles, allowing them to be inserted deep into the body during OCT imaging. This overcomes the very limited imaging depth of OCT of only 2-3 mm in biological tissue, enabling access to deep-tissue locations that are beyond the reach of free-space optical scan heads or catheters. This chapter provides an in-depth review of the current state-of-the art in needle probe technology, including optical design and fabrication, scan mechanisms (including three-dimensional scanning), and integration into OCT systems. It also provides an overview of emerging applications of this fascinating new imaging tool in areas such as cancer diagnosis, pulmonary imaging, imaging of the eye and imaging of the brain. Finally, two case studies are presented, illustrating needle-based OCT imaging in breast cancer and lungs.

  20. Optical-fiber-based Mueller optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Shuliang; Yu, Wurong; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V

    2003-07-15

    An optical-fiber-based multichannel polarization-sensitive Mueller optical coherence tomography (OCT) system was built to acquire the Jones or Mueller matrix of a scattering medium, such as biological tissue. For the first time to our knowledge, fiber-based polarization-sensitive OCT was dynamically calibrated to eliminate the polarization distortion caused by the single-mode optical fiber in the sample arm, thereby overcoming a key technical impediment to the application of optical fibers in this technology. The round-trip Jones matrix of the sampling fiber was acquired from the reflecting surface of the sample for each depth scan (A scan) with our OCT system. A new rigorous algorithm was then used to retrieve the calibrated polarization properties of the sample. This algorithm was validated with experimental data. The skin of a rat was imaged with this fiber-based system.

  1. Epiretinal membrane: optical coherence tomography-based diagnosis and classification

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, William; Prospero Ponce, Claudia M; Agarwal, Daniel R; Gelman, Rachel; Christoforidis, John B

    2016-01-01

    Epiretinal membrane (ERM) is a disorder of the vitreomacular interface characterized by symptoms of decreased visual acuity and metamorphopsia. The diagnosis and classification of ERM has traditionally been based on clinical examination findings. However, modern optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be more sensitive than clinical examination for the diagnosis of ERM. Furthermore, OCT-derived findings, such as central foveal thickness and inner segment ellipsoid band integrity, have shown clinical relevance in the setting of ERM. To date, no OCT-based ERM classification scheme has been widely accepted for use in clinical practice and investigation. Herein, we review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and classification of ERMs and propose an OCT-based ERM classification system. PMID:27099458

  2. Optical coherence tomography: its role in daily dermatological practice.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Lutz; Reinhold, Uwe; Bierhoff, Erhard; Dirschka, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, tomographic imaging technique which generates high-resolution in-vivo images up to mid-dermal layers. Due to continuous technological improvements, OCT is moving from research projects into daily dermatological practice. It can complement other imaging methods like high-frequency ultrasound or confocal microscopy. There is a wide variety of indications for OCT. In addition to aiding in the diagnosis and clinical monitoring of inflammatory dermatoses, OCT is a very useful and feasible technique in dermato-oncology.

  3. Automated choroidal neovascularization detection algorithm for optical coherence tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Gao, Simon S.; Bailey, Steven T.; Huang, David; Li, Dengwang; Jia, Yali

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography has recently been used to visualize choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in participants with age-related macular degeneration. Identification and quantification of CNV area is important clinically for disease assessment. An automated algorithm for CNV area detection is presented in this article. It relies on denoising and a saliency detection model to overcome issues such as projection artifacts and the heterogeneity of CNV. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations were performed on scans of 7 participants. Results from the algorithm agreed well with manual delineation of CNV area. PMID:26417524

  4. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina using optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Jones, S M; Chen, D C; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S; Laut, S P; Werner, J S

    2006-01-05

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sees the human retina sharply with adaptive optics. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina at micrometer-scale resolution is possible by enhancing Fourier-domain optical-coherence tomography with adaptive optics, which compensate for the eye's optical aberrations.

  5. Optical coherence tomography: technology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shoude; Mao, Youxin; Flueraru, Costel; Sherif, Sherif

    2008-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has recently emerged as a powerful optical imaging instrument and technology. OCT performs high resolution, cross-sectional tomographic imaging of the internal structure in 3D materials including biological tissues. Advantages of OCT vs. other imaging systems are: 1) High resolution: enables greater visualization of defects. (OCT: 5-10 microns, ultrasound: 150 microns. High resolution CT: 300 microns. MRI: 1,000 microns). 2) Noninvasive, non-contact: increase ease of use. 3) Fiber-optics delivery: allows OCT to be used in catheters and endoscopes. (Fiber diameter is normally 125 microns). 4) High speed: enables high-resolution 3D imaging. 5) Potential for additional information: polarization contrast and spectroscopic information can be obtained concurrently yielding new information of the testing tissues. 6) Use of non-harmful radiation. In this paper, we shortly review the technologies of OCT and present our works in design and implementation of fiber based OCT systems and full-field OCT systems, including high performance swept source, fibre probe, hardware, software design as well as system configurations. The applications of OCT involving in medical imaging, industrial inspection, information storage and retrieval, as well as biometrics and document security are also briefly introduced and demonstrated.

  6. Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutin, Mikhail; Wang, Xu-Ming; Gutin, Olga

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an advanced method of noninvasive infrared imaging of tissues in depth. Heretofore, commercial OCT systems for 3D imaging have been designed principally for external ophthalmological examination. As explained below, such systems have been based on a one-dimensional OCT principle, and in the operation of such a system, 3D imaging is accomplished partly by means of a combination of electronic scanning along the optical (Z) axis and mechanical scanning along the two axes (X and Y) orthogonal to the optical axis. In 3D OCT, 3D imaging involves a form of electronic scanning (without mechanical scanning) along all three axes. Consequently, the need for mechanical adjustment is minimal and the mechanism used to position the OCT probe can be correspondingly more compact. A 3D OCT system also includes a probe of improved design and utilizes advanced signal- processing techniques. Improvements in performance over prior OCT systems include finer resolution, greater speed, and greater depth of field.

  7. Dynamic light scattering optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jonghwan; Wu, Weicheng; Jiang, James Y.; Zhu, Bo; Boas, David A.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce an integration of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) for high-resolution 3D imaging of heterogeneous diffusion and flow. DLS analyzes fluctuations in light scattered by particles to measure diffusion or flow of the particles, and OCT uses coherence gating to collect light only scattered from a small volume for high-resolution structural imaging. Therefore, the integration of DLS and OCT enables high-resolution 3D imaging of diffusion and flow. We derived a theory under the assumption that static and moving particles are mixed within the OCT resolution volume and the moving particles can exhibit either diffusive or translational motion. Based on this theory, we developed a fitting algorithm to estimate dynamic parameters including the axial and transverse velocities and the diffusion coefficient. We validated DLS-OCT measurements of diffusion and flow through numerical simulations and phantom experiments. As an example application, we performed DLS-OCT imaging of the living animal brain, resulting in 3D maps of the absolute and axial velocities, the diffusion coefficient, and the coefficient of determination. PMID:23037374

  8. Quantitative contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winetraub, Yonatan; SoRelle, Elliott D.; Liba, Orly; de la Zerda, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a model to accurately quantify the signals produced by exogenous scattering agents used for contrast-enhanced Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). This model predicts distinct concentration-dependent signal trends that arise from the underlying physics of OCT detection. Accordingly, we show that real scattering particles can be described as simplified ideal scatterers with modified scattering intensity and concentration. The relation between OCT signal and particle concentration is approximately linear at concentrations lower than 0.8 particle per imaging voxel. However, at higher concentrations, interference effects cause signal to increase with a square root dependence on the number of particles within a voxel. Finally, high particle concentrations cause enough light attenuation to saturate the detected signal. Predictions were validated by comparison with measured OCT signals from gold nanorods (GNRs) prepared in water at concentrations ranging over five orders of magnitude (50 fM to 5 nM). In addition, we validated that our model accurately predicts the signal responses of GNRs in highly heterogeneous scattering environments including whole blood and living animals. By enabling particle quantification, this work provides a valuable tool for current and future contrast-enhanced in vivo OCT studies. More generally, the model described herein may inform the interpretation of detected signals in modalities that rely on coherence-based detection or are susceptible to interference effects.

  9. Optical coherence tomography examination of hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wei; Huang, Zheng; Xu, Jianshu; Yang, Hongqin; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Human hair is a keratinous tissue composed mostly of flexible keratin, which can form a complex architecture consisting of distinct compartments or units (e.g. hair bulb, inner root sheath, shaft). Variations in hair shaft morphology can reflect ethnical diversity, but may also indicate internal diseases, nutritional deficiency, or hair and scalp disorders. Hair shaft abnormalities in cross section and diameter, as well as ultramorphological characterization and follicle shapes, might be visualized non-invasively by high-speed 2D and 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT). In this study, swept source OCT (ThorLabs) was used to examine human hair. Preliminary results showed that the high-speed OCT was a suitable and promising tool for non-invasive analysis of hair conditions.

  10. The Choroid and Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Taha; Altınışık, Muhammet; Koytak, İbrahim Arif; Özdemir, Mehmet Hakan

    2016-01-01

    The choroid is the most vascular tissue in the eye and it plays an important role in the pathophysiology of various common chorioretinal diseases such as central serous retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and degenerative myopia. Quantitative assessment of the choroid has been quite challenging with traditional imaging modalities such as indocyanine green angiography and ultrasonography due to limited resolution and repeatability. With the advent of optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology, detailed visualization of the choroid in vivo is now possible. Measurements of choroidal thickness have also enabled new directions in research to study normal and pathological processes within the choroid. The aim of the present study is to review the current literature on choroidal imaging using OCT. PMID:27800255

  11. Vascular interventions with optical coherence reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neet, John M.

    2003-07-01

    There have been many innovations and technological advancements in balloon angioplasty since its introduction in the late 1970's, but percutaneous intervention on a totally occluded artery is still a challenge to the vascular interventionalist. Catheter-based intervention that avoids an invasive surgical procedure is a clear and desired advantage for the patient. A total occlusion challenges the interventionalist because the path of the artery can not be seen in the occluded vessel since the flow of the radiopaque contrast media is blocked. Optical coherence reflectometry techniques have been shown to be able to differentiate between artery wall and occlusive materials allowing the lumen of the blocked artery to be seen inside the occlusion. Light emitting diodes are a critical component of these systems making them technologically possible and economically feasible.

  12. Optical coherence tomography for diagnosing periodontal disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Everett, Matthew J.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Otis, Linda L.; Nathel, Howard

    1997-05-01

    We have, in this preliminary study, investigated the use of optical coherence tomography for diagnosis of periodontal disease. We took in vitro OCT images of the dental and periodontal tissues from a young pig and compared them to histological sections. These images distinguish tooth and soft tissue relationships that are important in diagnosing and assessing periodontal disease. We have imaged the attachment of gingiva to the tooth surface and located the cemento-enamel junction. This junction is an important reference point for defining attachment level in the diagnosis of periodontal disease. the boundary between enamel and dentin is also visible for most of the length of the anatomical crown, allowing quantitation of enamel thickness and character.

  13. En-face optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.; Rosen, Richard B.; Rogers, John A.; Dobre, George M.; Cucu, Radu G.; Jackson, David A.; Dunne, Shane; Amaechi, Bennett T.

    2003-10-01

    A review is presented of the developments in Kent in the field of optical coherence tomography (OCT) based instrumentation. Original versatile imaging systems have been devised which allow operation in different regimes under software control. Using such systems, B-scan and C-scan images are demonstrated from retina, anterior chamber, skin and teeth. The systems developed in Kent employ the flying spot concept, i.e. they use en-face scanning of the beam across the target. This has opened the possibility of providing simultaneous en-face OCT and confocal images (C-scans). Application of a standalone OCT/confocal system for investigating the retina in eyes with pathology, the anterior chamber, skin and teeth is demonstrated.

  14. Optical Coherence Tomography in Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Youbo; Yang, Ying; Wang, Ruikang K.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    Tissue engineering holds the promise for a therapeutic solution in regenerative medicine. The primary goal of tissue engineering is the development of physiologically functional and biocompatible tissues/organs being implanted for the repair and replacement of damaged or diseased ones. Given the complexity in the developing processes of engineered tissues, which involves multi-dimensional interactions among cells of different types, three-dimensionally constructed scaffolds, and actively intervening bioreactors, a capable real-time imaging tool is critically required for expanding our knowledge about the developing process of desired tissues or organs. It has been recognized that optical coherence tomography (OCT), an emerging noninvasive imaging technique that provides high spatial resolution (up to the cellular level) and three-dimensional imaging capability, is a promising investigative tool for tissue engineering. This chapter discusses the existing and potential applications of OCT in tissue engineering. Example OCT investigations of the three major components of tissue engineering, i.e., cells, scaffolds, and bioreactors are overviewed. Imaging examples of OCT and its enabling functions and variants, e.g., Doppler OCT, polarization-sensitive OCT, optical coherence microscopy are emphasized. Remaining challenges in the application of OCT to tissue engineering are discussed, and the prospective solutions including the combination of OCT with other high-contrast and high-resolution modalities such as two-photon fluorescence microscopy are suggested as well. It is expected that OCT, along with its functional variants, will make important contributions toward revealing the complex cellular dynamics in engineered tissues as well as help us culture demanding tissue/organ implants that will advance regenerative medicine.

  15. Optical coherence tomography of the prostate nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitchian, Shahab

    Preservation of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery is critical in preserving a man's ability to have spontaneous erections following surgery. These microscopic nerves course along the surface of the prostate within a few millimeters of the prostate capsule, and they vary in size and location from one patient to another, making preservation of the nerves difficult during dissection and removal of a cancerous prostate gland. These observations may explain in part the wide variability in reported sexual potency rates (9--86%) following prostate cancer surgery. Any technology capable of providing improved identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery would be of great assistance in improving sexual function after surgery, and result in direct patient benefit. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive optical imaging technique capable of performing high-resolution cross-sectional in vivo and in situ imaging of microstructures in biological tissues. OCT imaging of the cavernous nerves in the rat and human prostate has recently been demonstrated. However, improvements in the OCT system and the quality of the images for identification of the cavernous nerves is necessary before clinical use. The following chapters describe complementary approaches to improving identification and imaging of the cavernous nerves during OCT of the prostate gland. After the introduction to OCT imaging of the prostate gland, the optimal wavelength for deep imaging of the prostate is studied in Chapter 2. An oblique-incidence single point measurement technique using a normal-detector scanning system was implemented to determine the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, mua and m's , of fresh canine prostate tissue, ex vivo, from the diffuse reflectance profile of near-IR light as a function of source-detector distance. The effective attenuation coefficient, mueff, and the Optical Penetration Depth (OPD) were

  16. Optical coherence photoacoustic microscopy: accomplishing optical coherence tomography and photoacoustic microscopy with a single light source

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We developed optical coherence photoacoustic microscopy (OC-PAM) to demonstrate that the functions of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) can be achieved simultaneously by using a single illuminating light source. We used a pulsed broadband laser centered at 580 nm and detected the absorbed photons through photoacoustic detection and the back-scattered photons with an interferometer. In OC-PAM, each laser pulse generates both one OCT A-line and one PAM A-line simultaneously; as a result, the two imaging modalities are intrinsically co-registered in the lateral directions. In vivo images of the mouse ear were acquired to demonstrate the capabilities of OC-PAM. PMID:22502553

  17. Measuring the optical characteristics of medulloblastoma with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Barry; Skowron, Patryk; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Kyan, Matthew; Garzia, Livia; Sun, Cuiru; Taylor, Michael D.; Yang, Victor X.D.

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Standard treatment consists of surgical resection, followed by radiation and high-dose chemotherapy. Despite these efforts, recurrence is common, leading to reduced patient survival. Even with successful treatment, there are often severe long-term neurologic impacts on the developing nervous system. We present two quantitative techniques that use a high-resolution optical imaging modality: optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure refractive index, and the optical attenuation coefficient. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate OCT analysis of medulloblastoma. Refractive index and optical attenuation coefficient were able to differentiate between normal brain tissue and medulloblastoma in mouse models. More specifically, optical attenuation coefficient imaging of normal cerebellum displayed layers of grey matter and white matter, which were indistinguishable in the structural OCT image. The morphology of the tumor was distinct in the optical attenuation coefficient imaging. These inherent properties may be useful during neurosurgical intervention to better delineate tumor boundaries and minimize resection of normal tissue. PMID:25909030

  18. Intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging of coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Costopoulos, Charis; Brown, Adam J; Teng, Zhongzhao; Hoole, Stephen P; West, Nick E J; Samady, Habib; Bennett, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Invasive imaging modalities, in particular intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT), have become established tools for the in vivo study of coronary atherosclerosis. Their use in clinical studies has confirmed histopathological observations that certain important plaque features, such as thin fibrous caps and large lipid cores, are associated with plaque rupture, the precipitating event for the majority of myocardial infarctions. Serial imaging studies have also successfully been used for the evaluation of potential disease modifying pharmacological agents. Recent prospective IVUS studies have confirmed specific baseline imaging features associated with subsequent adverse clinical outcomes, although absolute event rates were too low for clinical utility. Development of hybrid IVUS-OCT imaging or integration of novel techniques, including near-infrared spectroscopy, plaque structural and endothelial shear stress, have great potential to improve our current ability to identify and stratify atheromatous plaques at risk of rupture.

  19. Quantum computation with optical coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, T.C.; Gilchrist, A.; Milburn, G.J.; Munro, W.J.; Glancy, S.

    2003-10-01

    We show that quantum computation circuits using coherent states as the logical qubits can be constructed from simple linear networks, conditional photon measurements, and 'small' coherent superposition resource states.

  20. Spectral/Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Johannes F.

    Optical coherence tomography is a low-coherence interferometric method for imaging of biological tissue [1, 2]. For more than a decade after its inception between 1988 and 1991, the dominant implementation has been time domain OCT (TD-OCT), in which the length of a reference arm is rapidly scanned. The first spectral or Fourier domain OCT (SD/FD-OCT) implementation was reported in 1995 [3]. In SD-OCT the reference arm is kept stationary, and the depth information is obtained by a Fourier transform of the spectrally resolved interference fringes in the detection arm of a Michelson interferometer. This approach has provided a significant advantage in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which despite reports as early as 1997 [4, 5] has taken about half a decade to be recognized fully by the OCT community in 2003 [6-8]. The first demonstration of SD-OCT for in vivo retinal imaging in 2002 [9] was followed by a full realization of the sensitivity advantage by video rate in vivo retinal imaging [10], including high-speed 3-D volumetric imaging [11], ultrahigh-resolution video rate imaging [12, 13], and Doppler blood flow determination in the human retina [14, 15]. The superior sensitivity of SD-OCT, combined with the lack of need for a fast mechanical scanning mechanism, has opened up the possibility of much faster scanning without loss of image quality and provided a paradigm shift from point sampling to volumetric mapping of biological tissue in vivo. The technology has been particularly promising for ophthalmology [16, 17]. In this chapter, the principles and system design considerations of SD-OCT will be discussed in more detail.

  1. Feature space optical coherence tomography based micro-angiography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Anqi; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-01-01

    Current optical coherence tomography (OCT) based micro-angiography is prone to noise that arises from static background. This work presents a novel feature space based optical micro-angiography (OMAG) method (fsOMAG) that can effectively differentiate flow signal from static background in the feature space. fsOMAG consists of two steps. In the first step a classification map is generated that provides criterion for classification in the second step to extract functional blood flow from experimental data set. The performance of fsOMAG is examined through phantom experiments and in-vivo human retinal imaging, and compared with the existing OMAG. The results indicate its potential for clinical applications. PMID:26137391

  2. Conical scan polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa; Matcher, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    We report on a new articular cartilage imaging technique with potential for clinical arthroscopic use, by supplementing the variable-incidence-angle polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography method previously developed by us with a conical beam scan protocol. The technique is validated on bovine tendon by comparing experimental data with simulated data generated using the extended Jones matrix calculus. A unique capability of this new optical technique is that it can locate the “brushing direction” of collagen fibers in articular cartilage, which is structural information that extends beyond established methods such as split-line photography or birefringent fast-axis measurement in that it is uniquely defined over the full azimuthal-angle range of (-π, + π). The mapping of this direction over the cartilage surface may offer insights into the optimal design of tissue-engineering scaffolds for cartilage repair. PMID:24688811

  3. Ex vivo imaging of human thyroid pathology using integrated optical coherence tomography and optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yihong; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Cohen, David W.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) for imaging of benign and malignant thyroid lesions ex vivo using intrinsic optical contrast. 34 thyroid gland specimens are imaged from 17 patients, covering a spectrum of pathology ranging from normal thyroid to benign disease/neoplasms (multinodular colloid goiter, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and follicular adenoma) and malignant thyroid tumors (papillary carcinoma and medullary carcinoma). Imaging is performed using an integrated OCT and OCM system, with <4 μm axial resolution (OCT and OCM), and 14 μm (OCT) and <2 μm (OCM) transverse resolution. The system allows seamless switching between low and high magnifications in a way similar to traditional microscopy. Good correspondence is observed between optical images and histological sections. Characteristic features that suggest malignant lesions, such as complex papillary architecture, microfollicules, psammomatous calcifications, or replacement of normal follicular architecture with sheets/nests of tumor cells, can be identified from OCT and OCM images and are clearly differentiable from normal or benign thyroid tissues. With further development of needle-based imaging probes, OCT and OCM could be promising techniques to use for the screening of thyroid nodules and to improve the diagnostic specificity of fine needle aspiration evaluation.

  4. Ultrathin lensed fiber-optic probe for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y; Wang, Y; Belfield, K D; Liu, X

    2016-06-01

    We investigated and validated a novel method to develop ultrathin lensed fiber-optic (LFO) probes for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. We made the LFO probe by attaching a segment of no core fiber (NCF) to the distal end of a single mode fiber (SMF) and generating a curved surface at the tip of the NCF using the electric arc of a fusion splicer. The novel fabrication approach enabled us to control the length of the NCF and the radius of the fiber lens independently. By strategically choosing these two parameters, the LFO probe could achieve a broad range of working distance and depth of focus for different OCT applications. A probe with 125μm diameter and lateral resolution up to 10μm was demonstrated. The low-cost, disposable and robust LFO probe is expected to have great potential for interstitial OCT imaging.

  5. Ultrathin lensed fiber-optic probe for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y; Wang, Y; Belfield, K D; Liu, X

    2016-06-01

    We investigated and validated a novel method to develop ultrathin lensed fiber-optic (LFO) probes for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. We made the LFO probe by attaching a segment of no core fiber (NCF) to the distal end of a single mode fiber (SMF) and generating a curved surface at the tip of the NCF using the electric arc of a fusion splicer. The novel fabrication approach enabled us to control the length of the NCF and the radius of the fiber lens independently. By strategically choosing these two parameters, the LFO probe could achieve a broad range of working distance and depth of focus for different OCT applications. A probe with 125μm diameter and lateral resolution up to 10μm was demonstrated. The low-cost, disposable and robust LFO probe is expected to have great potential for interstitial OCT imaging. PMID:27375934

  6. Ultrathin lensed fiber-optic probe for optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Y.; Wang, Y.; Belfield, K. D.; Liu, X.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated and validated a novel method to develop ultrathin lensed fiber-optic (LFO) probes for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. We made the LFO probe by attaching a segment of no core fiber (NCF) to the distal end of a single mode fiber (SMF) and generating a curved surface at the tip of the NCF using the electric arc of a fusion splicer. The novel fabrication approach enabled us to control the length of the NCF and the radius of the fiber lens independently. By strategically choosing these two parameters, the LFO probe could achieve a broad range of working distance and depth of focus for different OCT applications. A probe with 125μm diameter and lateral resolution up to 10μm was demonstrated. The low-cost, disposable and robust LFO probe is expected to have great potential for interstitial OCT imaging. PMID:27375934

  7. Integrated optical coherence tomography and optical coherence microscopy imaging of human pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yihong; Aquirre, Aaron D.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Cohen, David W.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-02-01

    Excisional biopsy is the current gold standard for disease diagnosis; however, it requires a relatively long processing time and it may also suffer from unacceptable false negative rates due to sampling errors. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising imaging technique that provide real-time, high resolution and three-dimensional (3D) images of tissue morphology. Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is an extension of OCT, combining both the coherence gating and the confocal gating techniques. OCM imaging achieves cellular resolution with deeper imaging depth compared to confocal microscopy. An integrated OCT/OCM imaging system can provide co-registered multiscale imaging of tissue morphology. 3D-OCT provides architectural information with a large field of view and can be used to find regions of interest; while OCM provides high magnification to enable cellular imaging. The integrated OCT/OCM system has an axial resolution of <4um and transverse resolutions of 14um and <2um for OCT and OCM, respectively. In this study, a wide range of human pathologic specimens, including colon (58), thyroid (43), breast (34), and kidney (19), were imaged with OCT and OCM within 2 to 6 hours after excision. The images were compared with H & E histology to identify characteristic features useful for disease diagnosis. The feasibility of visualizing human pathology using integrated OCT/OCM was demonstrated in the pathology laboratory settings.

  8. Fiber optic-based optical coherence tomography (OCT) for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Otis, Linda L.

    1998-09-01

    We have developed a hand-held fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for scanning of the oral cavity. We have produced, using this scanning device, in vivo cross-sectional images of hard and soft dental tissues in human volunteers. Clinically relevant anatomical structures, including the gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento- enamel junction, were visible in all the images. The cemento- enamel junction and the alveolar bone were identified in approximately two thirds of the images. These images represent, or our knowledge, the first in vivo OCT images of human dental tissue.

  9. Speckle texture analysis of optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Lu, Zenghai; Smith, Louise E.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2010-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging technique based on the low coherence interferometry, in which signals are obtained based on the coherent addition of the back reflected light from the sample. Applying computational methods and automated algorithms towards the classification of OCT images allows a further step towards enhancing the clinical applications of OCT. One attempt towards classification could be achieved by statistically analyzing the texture of the noisy granular patterns - speckles that make the OCT images. An attempt has been made to quantify the scattering effects based on the speckle texture patterns the scatterers produce. Statistical inference is drawn from the textural analysis of the features based on the spatial intensity distribution on the agar phantoms with different concentration of Intralipid solutions. This preliminary study conducted on agar-Intralipid solution has showed us that it is possible to differentiate between different types of scatterers based on the speckle texture studies. The texture analysis has also been extended in an attempt to identify the invasion of melanoma cell into tissue engineered skin. However using the same approach of texture analysis, we have not obtained satisfactory results for carrying on with the computer-based identification of the invasion of the melanoma in the tissue engineered skin, the reason for which has to be further studied and investigated upon.

  10. The Application of Optical Coherence Tomography in Musculoskeletal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rashidifard, Christopher; Vercollone, Christopher; Martin, Scott; Liu, Bin; Brezinski, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Many musculoskeletal disorders (MDs) are associated with irreversible bone and cartilage damage; this is particularly true for osteoarthritis (OA). Therefore, a clinical need exists for modalities which can detect OA and other MDs at early stages. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an infrared-based imaging, currently FDA approved in cardiology and ophthalmology, which has a resolution greater than 10 microns and acquisition rate of 120 frames/second. It has shown feasibility for imaging early OA, identifying changes prior to cartilage thinning both in vitro and in vivo in patients and in OA animal models. In addition, OCT has shown an ability to identify early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and guide tendon repair, but has the potential for an even greater impact. Clinical trials in OA are currently underway, as well as in several other MDs. PMID:23424683

  11. Spectralis optical coherence tomography findings in Welder's maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mahindrakar, Aniruddha; Toshniwal, Svetlana; Doongerwala, M I; Anthony, Hansel

    2013-01-01

    Welder's maculopathy is a form of photochemical damage to the retina and is typically characterized by involvement of the outer retinal layers. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) imaging was performed in three eyes of two patients with clinical findings suggestive of Welder's maculopathy in occupational welders. A faceted foveal lesion characterized clinical examination and the SD-OCT line scans images showed a distinct discontinuity of the photoreceptor inner and outer segment (IS/OS) junction. The external limiting membrane (ELM) and the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) layer remained intact at the site of IS/OS defect. SD-OCT imaging offers a noninvasive way of evaluating the microstructural changes at the fovea in Welder's maculopathy. PMID:23760453

  12. Optical Coherence Tomography for nanoparticles quantitative characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojanowski, Michał; Kraszewski, Maciej; StrÄ kowski, Marcin R.; Pluciński, Jerzy

    2015-08-01

    The unique features of nanocomposite materials depend on the type and size of nanoparticles, as well as their placement in the composite matrices. Therefore the nanocomposites manufacturing process requires inline control over certain parameters of nanoparticles such as dispersion and concentration. Keeping track of nanoparticles parameters inside a matrix is currently a difficult task due to lack of a fast, reliable and cost effective way of measurement that can be used for large volume samples. For this purpose the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has been used. OCT is an optical measurement method, which is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique. It is capable of creating tomographic images of inner structure by gathering depth related backscattered signal from scattering particles. In addition, it can analyse, in a single shot, area of the centimetre range with resolution up to single micrometres. Still to increase OCT measurement capabilities we are using additional system extensions such as Spectroscopic OCT (SOCT). With such addition, we are able to measure depth related parameters such as scattering spectra and intensity of backscattered signal. Those parameters allow us to quantitatively estimate nanoparticles concentration. Gaining those, information allows to calculate volume concentration of nanoparticles. In addition, we analyse metallic oxides nanoparticles. To fully characterize nanoparticles it is necessary to find and differentiate those that are single particles from agglomerated ones. In this contribution we present our research results on using the LCI based measurement techniques for evaluation of materials with nanoparticles. The laboratory system and signal processing algorithms are going to be shown in order to express the usefulness of this method for inline constant monitoring of the nanocomposite material fabrication.

  13. Motion contrast using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingler, Jeffrey Paul

    Diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases like age-related macular degeneration is very important for treatment of the disease as well as the development of future treatments. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical interference technique which can measure the three-dimensional structural information of the reflecting layers within a sample. In retinal imaging, OCT is used as the primary diagnostic tool for structural abnormalities such as retinal holes and detachments. The contrast within the images of this technique is based upon reflectivity changes from different regions of the retina. This thesis demonstrates the developments of methods used to produce additional contrast to the structural OCT images based on the tiny fluctuations of motion experienced by the mobile scatterers within a sample. Motion contrast was observed for motions smaller than 50 nm in images of a variety of samples. Initial contrast method demonstrations used Brownian motion differences to separate regions of a mobile Intralipid solution from a static agarose gel, chosen in concentration to minimize reflectivity contrast. Zebrafish embryos in the range of 3-4 days post fertilization were imaged using several motion contrast methods to determine the capabilities of identifying regions of vascular flow. Vasculature identification was demonstrated in zebrafish for blood vessels of all orientations as small as 10 microns in diameter. Mouse retinal imaging utilized the same motion contrast methods to determine the contrast capabilities for motions associated with vasculature within the retina. Improved contrast imaging techniques demonstrated comparable images to fluorescein angiography, the gold standard of retinal vascular imaging. Future studies can improve the demonstrated contrast analysis techniques and apply them towards human retinal motion contrast imaging for ophthalmic diagnostic purposes.

  14. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  15. Nano-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Sergey A; Subhash, Hrebesh M; Zam, Azhar; Leahy, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Depth resolved label-free detection of structural changes with nanoscale sensitivity is an outstanding problem in the biological and physical sciences and has significant applications in both the fundamental research and healthcare diagnostics arenas. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel label-free depth resolved sensing technique based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect structural changes at the nanoscale. Structural components of the 3D object, spectrally encoded in the remitted light, are transformed from the Fourier domain into each voxel of the 3D OCT image without compromising sensitivity. Spatial distribution of the nanoscale structural changes in the depth direction is visualized in just a single OCT scan. This label free approach provides new possibilities for depth resolved study of pathogenic and physiologically relevant molecules in the body with high sensitivity and specificity. It offers a powerful opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Experimental results show the ability of the approach to differentiate structural changes of 30 nm in nanosphere aggregates, located at different depths, from a single OCT scan, and structural changes less than 30 nm in time from two OCT scans. Application for visualization of the structure of human skin in vivo is also demonstrated. PMID:24595392

  16. Optical coherence tomography in diagnosing cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetzova, Irina A.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Kachalina, Tatiana S.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Myakov, Alexey V.; Iksanov, Rashid R.; Feldchtein, Felix I.

    2000-05-01

    Cervical cancer remains one of the most significant problem in oncogynecology. It tends towards treatment approaches that provide termination of pathological processes along with preservation of the patient's life quality. There is a need in earlier and more accurate diagnosis of pathological states, objective assessment of physiological processes, and adequate monitoring of the course of treatment. In our previous publications we have reported unique capabilities of the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) to image in vivo the mucosa structure of the cervix and to monitor various physiological and pathological alterations. In this report, we present results of OCT application to diagnose different stages of cervical cancer and to control its treatment at early stages. We have performed OCT-colposcopy in 11 female patients with cervical cancer to derive OCT criteria of this disease, to provide exact demarcation of a pathological area, and to determine a real size of a tumor. We have found that, in general, borders of a tumor, defined visually and detected with OCT by violation of the basement membrane in exocervix, do not coincide. The mismatch depends on a stage of cancer and can be as much as several millimeters. This information is especially important for evaluation of linear dimension of tumors with 3 - 5 mm invasion and also for differential diagnosis between the T1 and T2 stages with cancer extension onto vagina.

  17. Attenuation compensation for optical coherence tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shoude; Flueraru, Costel; Mao, Youxin; Sherif, Sherif

    2009-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive technique that provides micrometer-scale imaging of tissue. As most biological tissues are considered turbid, it causes attenuation of the OCT signal and limits the depth penetration. Although a few algorithms had been developed to compensate the attenuation, almost all of them need to extract the scattering parameters before doing the compensation procedure. Because the real biological samples are anisotropic and multilayer-like structure, it is not time-efficient to model and solve these scattering parameters. This paper introduces a new method to compensate the OCT signal attenuation in depth. By analyzing the input signal, a compensation function is adaptively derived for each A-scan line, which can be used effectively to compensate the energy loss in the large sections and enhance the details in the deep, dark-like areas. Three bio-samples, a piece of onion, a Poecilia Wingei fish and a piece of rabbit abdominal aorta, were used to test our method. OCT images obtained by a swept-source OCT system were processed by the proposed method. Results show the visualization of structures in OCT images has been evidently improved, especially in deep region.

  18. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, M J; Sathyam, U S; Colston, B W; DaSilva, L B; Fried, D; Ragadio, J N; Featherstone, J D B

    1999-05-12

    This study demonstrates the potential of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for non-invasive in vivo detection and characterization of early, incipient caries lesions. PS-OCT generates cross-sectional images of biological tissue while measuring the effect of the tissue on the polarization state of incident light. Clear discrimination between regions of normal and demineralized enamel is first shown in PS-OCT images of bovine enamel blocks containing well-characterized artificial lesions. High-resolution, cross-sectional images of extracted human teeth are then generated that clearly discriminate between the normal and carious regions on both the smooth and occlusal surfaces. Regions of the teeth that appeared to be demineralized in the PS-OCT images were verified using histological thin sections examined under polarized light microscopy. The PS-OCT system discriminates between normal and carious regions by measuring the polarization state of the back-scattered 1310 nm light, which is affected by the state of demineralization of the enamel. Demineralization of enamel increases the scattereing coefficient, thus depolarizing the incident light. This study shows that PS-OCT has great potential for the detection, characterization, and monitoring of incipient caries lesions.

  19. Anterior Eye Imaging with Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, David; Li, Yan; Tang, Maolong

    The development of corneal and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology has advanced rapidly in recently years. The scan geometry and imaging wavelength are both important choices to make in designing anterior segment OCT systems. Rectangular scan geometry offers the least image distortion and is now used in most anterior OCT systems. The wavelength of OCT light source affects resolution and penetration. An optimal choice of the OCT imaging wavelength (840, 1,050, or 1,310 nm) depends on the application of interest. Newer generation Fourier-domain OCT technology can provide scan speed 100-1000 times faster than the time-domain technology. Various commercial anterior OCT systems are available on the market. A wide spectrum of diagnostic and surgical applications using anterior segment OCT had been investigated, including mapping of corneal and epithelial thicknesses, keratoconus screening, measuring corneal refractive power, corneal surgery planning and evaluation in LASIK, intracorneal ring implantation, assessment of angle closure glaucoma, anterior chamber biometry and intraocular lens implants, intraocular lens power calculation, and eye bank donor cornea screening.

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography of Optic Disc Perfusion in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yali; Wei, Eric; Wang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Xinbo; Morrison, John C.; Parikh, Mansi; Lombardi, Lori H.; Gattey, Devin M.; Armour, Rebecca L.; Edmunds, Beth; Kraus, Martin F.; Fujimoto, James G.; Huang, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare optic disc perfusion between normal and glaucoma subjects using optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography and detect optic disc perfusion changes in glaucoma. Design Observational, cross-sectional study. Participants Twenty-four normal subjects and 11 glaucoma patients were included. Methods One eye of each subject was scanned by a high-speed 1050 nm wavelength swept-source OCT instrument. The split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography algorithm (SSADA) was used to compute three-dimensional optic disc angiography. A disc flow index was computed from four registered scans. Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) was used to measure disc rim area, and stereo photography was used to evaluate cup/disc ratios. Wide field OCT scans over the discs were used to measure retinal nerve fiber layer (NFL) thickness. Main Outcome Measurements Variability was assessed by coefficient of variation (CV). Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by sensitivity and specificity. Comparisons between glaucoma and normal groups were analyzed by Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Correlations between disc flow index, structural assessments, and visual field (VF) parameters were assessed by linear regression. Results In normal discs, a dense microvascular network was visible on OCT angiography. This network was visibly attenuated in glaucoma subjects. The intra-visit repeatability, inter-visit reproducibility, and normal population variability of the optic disc flow index were 1.2%, 4.2%, and 5.0% CV respectively. The disc flow index was reduced by 25% in the glaucoma group (p = 0.003). Sensitivity and specificity were both 100% using an optimized cutoff. The flow index was highly correlated with VF pattern standard deviation (R2 = 0.752, p = 0.001). These correlations were significant even after accounting for age, cup/disc area ratio, NFL, and rim area. Conclusions OCT angiography, generated by the new SSADA algorithm, repeatably measures optic disc perfusion. OCT

  1. Coherent combination of slab-coupled optical waveguide lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Robin K.; Chann, Bien; Missaggia, Leo J.; Augst, Steven J.; Connors, Michael K.; Turner, George W.; Sanchez-Rubio, Antonio; Donnelly, Joseph P.; Hostetler, John L.; Miester, Carl; Dorsch, Friedhelm

    2009-02-01

    A long-standing challenge for semiconductor lasers is scaling the optical power and brightness of many diode lasers by coherent beam combination. Because single-mode semiconductor lasers have limited power available from a single element, there is a strong motivation to coherently combine the outputs of many elements for applications including industrial lasers for materials processing, free space optical communications, and defense. Despite the fact that such a coherently-combined source is potentially the most efficient laser, coherent combination of semiconductor lasers is generally considered to be difficult, since precise phase control is required between elements. We describe our approach to coherent combination of semiconductor lasers. The Slab-Coupled Optical Waveguide Laser (SCOWL), invented at Lincoln Laboratory, is used as the single-mode diode laser element for coherent combination. With a 10-element SCOWL array, coherently combined output power as high as 7 W in continuous wave using an external cavity has been demonstrated, which is the highest output level achieved using a coherent array of semiconductor lasers. We are currently working on a related approach to scale the coherent power up to 100 W.

  2. Observation of Coherent Optical Transition Radiation in the LCLS Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Loosy, H.; Akre, R.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Miahnahri, A.; Molloy, S.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; /SLAC /Stanford

    2008-09-18

    The beam diagnostics in the linac for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray FEL project at SLAC includes optical transition radiation (OTR) screens for measurements of transverse and longitudinal beam properties. We report on observations of coherent light emission from the OTR screens (COTR) at visible wavelengths from the uncompressed and compressed electron beam at various stages in the accelerator.

  3. COHERENCE: On the ability of cells to distinguish the coherence of optical radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budagovsky, A. V.

    2005-04-01

    The role of coherent optical radiation in photoregulatory processes caused by chemiluminescence of living cells is discussed. The effect of low and highly coherent quasi-monochromatic light on a dynamic 'host—parasite' system is studied. It is shown that plant organisms can distinguish the statistical order of irradiation. A significant increase in the functional activity was observed only for cells that were completely located within the coherence volume of the electromagnetic field. It is concluded that the cell size in living organisms is the discrimination threshold of the statistical properties of radiation and may serve as a specific biological measure of coherence.

  4. Macular spectral domain optical coherence tomography findings in Tanzanian endemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kisimbi, John; Shalchi, Zaid; Mahroo, Omar A; Mhina, Celina; Sanyiwa, Anna J; Mabey, Denise; Mohamed, Moin; Plant, Gordon T

    2013-11-01

    Bilateral optic neuropathy in Dar es Salaam is now considered endemic and is estimated to affect 0.3-2.4% of young adults. The condition is characterized by a subacute bilateral loss of central vision of unknown aetiology. Findings of spectral domain optical coherence tomography have not previously been reported for these patients. All patients diagnosed with endemic optic neuropathy over a 2-year period at the Muhimbili National Hospital underwent spectral domain optical coherence tomography macular imaging. Scans were graded qualitatively for severity of retinal nerve fibre layer loss as well as the presence of microcystic macular changes, which have not previously been described in this condition. Of the 128 patients included (54.7% male; median age 20 years), severe retinal nerve fibre layer loss was found in 185 eyes (74.0%). There was full concordance in retinal nerve fibre layer thickness between the two eyes in 113 (91.1%) patients. Microcystic macular spaces were found in 16 (12.5%) patients and were bilateral in nine (7.0%) individuals. These changes were typically more prominent in the nasal than the temporal macula, predominantly involving the inner nuclear layer, and often occurred in an annular configuration that was evident on en face infra-red imaging, though not discernible on colour fundus photography or clinically. All patients with microcystic macular changes had severe thinning of the retinal nerve fibre layer (P = 0.02). Four patients in whom cystic spaces were demonstrated had sequential scans, and there was no detectable alteration in the configuration of these changes over a period of up to 16 months. This is the first study to document optical coherence tomography findings in endemic optic neuropathy. We have observed symmetrical severe loss of the caeco-central projection (papillomacular bundle) with otherwise well-preserved macular architecture. Also, we have observed microcystic retinal changes in a significant proportion of patients

  5. Optical Coherence Tomography in Pulmonary Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgu, Septimiu Dan; Brenner, Matthew; Chen, Zhongping; Suter, Melissa J.

    Advances in pulmonary diagnostics and therapeutics offer a major potential for optical imaging applications both in clinical practice and research settings. Complexities of pulmonary structures and function have restricted widespread OCT investigations and clinical applications, but these will likely be overcome by developments in OCT technology [1]. Some factors that have limited adaptation of OCT into the pulmonary setting in the past have been the shallow depth of penetration, resolution limitations, relatively slow access times, need to examine large surface areas with numerous branching airways, motion artifacts, as well as a need for development of practical imaging probes to reach the relevant locations in a minimally invasive way. Considerable recent engineering and analytical advances in OCT technology [2-8] have already overcome several of these obstacles and will enable much more extensive investigations into the role for structural and functional pulmonary OCT imaging [1].

  6. Optical probe using eccentric optics for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Iwaya, Mitsuharu; Watanabe, Yuuki; Sato, Manabu

    2007-03-01

    We propose and demonstrate an OCT optical probe using eccentric optics. This probe enabled both forward imaging and side imaging by dividing a circular scanning area into two semicircular scanning areas using an external motor to rotate the flexible tube. The outer diameter of the probe was 2.6 mm, and its rigid portion length was 10 mm. The lateral resolution was 23 μm, and the eccentric radius was 1.1 mm. The circumferential length in scanning was 6.9 mm, and the working distance was 5 mm. OCT images of 1.5 mm × 6.9 mm (in tissue, axial × circumference), including forward image and side image, were measured with the axial resolution of 19 μm in air and a frame rate of one frame per second. The epidermis, dermis, and sweat gland of in vivo human ventral finger tips were observed.

  7. Advances of optical coherence tomography in myopia and pathologic myopia.

    PubMed

    Ng, D S C; Cheung, C Y L; Luk, F O; Mohamed, S; Brelen, M E; Yam, J C S; Tsang, C W; Lai, T Y Y

    2016-07-01

    The natural course of high-axial myopia is variable and the development of pathologic myopia is not fully understood. Advancements in optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology have revealed peculiar intraocular structures in highly myopic eyes and unprecedented pathologies that cause visual impairment. New OCT findings include posterior precortical vitreous pocket and precursor stages of posterior vitreous detachment; peripapillary intrachoroidal cavitation; morphological patterns of scleral inner curvature and dome-shaped macula. Swept source OCT is capable of imaging deeper layers in the posterior pole for investigation of optic nerve pits, stretched and thinned lamina cribrosa, elongated dural attachment at posterior scleral canal, and enlargement of retrobulbar subarachnoid spaces. This has therefore enabled further evaluation of various visual field defects in high myopia and the pathogenesis of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. OCT has many potential clinical uses in managing visual impairing conditions in pathologic myopia. Understanding how retinal nerve fibers are redistributed in axial elongation will allow the development of auto-segmentation software for diagnosis and monitoring progression of glaucoma. OCT is indispensable in the diagnosis of various conditions associated with myopic traction maculopathy and monitoring of post-surgical outcomes. In addition, OCT is commonly used in the multimodal imaging assessment of myopic choroidal neovascularization. Biometry and topography of the retinal layers and choroid will soon be validated for the classification of myopic maculopathy for utilization in epidemiological studies as well as clinical trials. PMID:27055674

  8. All-optical processing in coherent nonlinear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oron, Dan; Dudovich, Nirit; Silberberg, Yaron

    2004-08-01

    In spectroscopy, the fingerprint of a substance is usually comprised of a sequence of spectral lines with characteristic frequencies and strengths. Identification of substances often involves postprocessing, where the measured spectrum is compared with tabulated fingerprint spectra. Here we suggest a scheme for nonlinear spectroscopy, where, through coherent control of the nonlinear process, the information from the entire spectrum can be practically collected into a single coherent entity. We apply this for all-optical analysis of coherent Raman spectra and demonstrate enhanced detection and effective background suppression using coherent processing.

  9. Nano-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergey A.; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Zam, Azhar; Leahy, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Depth resolved label-free detection of structural changes with nanoscale sensitivity is an outstanding problem in the biological and physical sciences and has significant applications in both the fundamental research and healthcare diagnostics arenas. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel label-free depth resolved sensing technique based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect structural changes at the nanoscale. Structural components of the 3D object, spectrally encoded in the remitted light, are transformed from the Fourier domain into each voxel of the 3D OCT image without compromising sensitivity. Spatial distribution of the nanoscale structural changes in the depth direction is visualized in just a single OCT scan. This label free approach provides new possibilities for depth resolved study of pathogenic and physiologically relevant molecules in the body with high sensitivity and specificity. It offers a powerful opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Experimental results show the ability of the approach to differentiate structural changes of 30 nm in nanosphere aggregates, located at different depths, from a single OCT scan, and structural changes less than 30 nm in time from two OCT scans. Application for visualization of the structure of human skin in vivo is also demonstrated.Depth resolved label-free detection of structural changes with nanoscale sensitivity is an outstanding problem in the biological and physical sciences and has significant applications in both the fundamental research and healthcare diagnostics arenas. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel label-free depth resolved sensing technique based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect structural changes at the nanoscale. Structural components of the 3D object, spectrally encoded in the remitted light, are transformed from the Fourier domain into each voxel of the 3D OCT image without compromising sensitivity. Spatial distribution of the nanoscale

  10. Optical coherence tomography in differential diagnosis of skin pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkova, Natalia D.; Petrova, Galina P.; Derpaluk, Elena; Nikulin, Nikolai K.; Snopova, Ludmila; Chumakov, Yuri; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Kuranov, Roman V.

    2000-05-01

    The capabilities of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for imaging in vivo of optical patterns of pathomorphological processes in the skin and use of their optical patterns in clinical practice for differential diagnosis of dermatoses are presented. Images of skin tissue 0.8 - 1.5 mm deep were acquired with a resolution of 5, 12 and 20 micrometer using three compact fiber OCT devices developed at the Institute of Applied Physics RAS. The acquisition time of images of skin regions 2 - 6 mm in length was 2 - 4 s. The OCT capabilities were analyzed based on the study of 50 patients with different dermatoses. OCT images were interpreted by comparing with parallel histology. It is shown that OCT can detect in vivo optical patterns of morphological alterations in such general papulous dermatoses as lichen ruber planus and psoriasis, a capability that can be used in differential diagnosis of these diseases. Most informative are OCT images obtained with a resolution of 5 micrometer. The results of our study demonstrate the practical importance of OCT imaging for diagnosis of different dermatoses. OCT is noninvasive and, therefore, makes it possible to perform frequent multifocal examination of skin without any adverse effects.

  11. Spatial-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langevin, L.; Gay, D.; Piché, M.

    2008-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique invented in 1991 and allowing the observation of biological tissues with millimeter depth of penetration and a few micrometer resolution. In the standard time-domain OCT setup (TD-OCT), a broadband light source is used with a Michelson interferometer where one of the mirrors is replaced by the sample (which is mechanically moved transversally during data acquisition) while the other is axially vibrating. By analyzing the temporal signal at the exit of the interferometer, a high resolution tomographic cut of the sample can be obtained. A number of new OCT setups have been proposed since 1991 in order to improve the data acquisition speed. In particular, Fourier-domain OCT (FD-OCT) has allowed in vivo observation of samples by eliminating the necessity of the axial motion of the reference mirror in the setup. We propose in this paper new OCT setups having the same potential without requiring numerical treatment of the signal (as it is the case in FD-OCT). Because those setups are such that the axial information of the sample becomes linearly distributed at different points of space in an interference pattern, we call them spatial-domain OCT setups (SD-OCT). SD-OCT setups use a tilted mirror in a Michelson interferometer to produce an interference pattern which is imaged on a CCD detector. The pattern contains all the information on the sample and is obtained without mechanical motion or numerical treatment of the recorded signal. In order to validate the proposed scheme, prototypes of the setups have been made in the laboratories of COPL at Laval University; biological samples such as onion peels and phloem of trees have been tested in order to produce their tomographic images. Comparisons of some of our results with those from a commercial setup with the same samples had notably confirmed the capacity of ours prototypes to effectively image biological samples.

  12. Diagnosing Lung Carcinomas with Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Lida P.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Lanuti, Michael; Miller, Alyssa J.; Mark, Eugene J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Lung carcinoma diagnosis on tissue biopsy can be challenging because of insufficient tumor and lack of architectural information. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution imaging modality that visualizes tissue microarchitecture in volumes orders of magnitude larger than biopsy. It has been proposed that OCT could potentially replace tissue biopsy. Objectives: We aim to determine whether OCT could replace histology in diagnosing lung carcinomas. We develop and validate OCT interpretation criteria for common primary lung carcinomas: adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and poorly differentiated carcinoma. Methods: A total of 82 ex vivo tumor samples were included in a blinded assessment with 3 independent readers. Readers were trained on the OCT criteria, and applied these criteria to diagnose adenocarcinoma, SCC, or poorly differentiated carcinoma in an OCT validation dataset. After a 7-month period, the readers repeated the training and validation dataset interpretation. An independent pathologist reviewed corresponding histology. Measurements and Main Results: The average accuracy achieved by the readers was 82.6% (range, 73.7–94.7%). The sensitivity and specificity for adenocarcinoma were 80.3% (65.7–91.4%) and 88.6% (80.5–97.6%), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for SCC were 83.3% (70.0–100.0%) and 87.0% (75.0–96.5%), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for poorly differentiated carcinoma were 85.7% (81.0–95.2%) and 97.6% (92.9–100.0%), respectively. Conclusions: Although these results are encouraging, they indicate that OCT cannot replace histology in the diagnosis of lung carcinomas. However, OCT has potential to aid in diagnosing lung carcinomas as a complement to tissue biopsy, particularly when insufficient tissue is available for pathology assessment. PMID:25562183

  13. En-face optical coherence tomography revival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradu, Adrian; Kapinchev, Konstantin; Barnes, Frederick; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2016-03-01

    Quite recently, we introduced a novel Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) method, termed as Master Slave OCT (MS-OCT), especially to deliver en-face images. MS-OCT operates like a time domain OCT, selecting signal from a selected depth only while scanning the laser beam across the sample. Time domain OCT allows real time production of an en-face image, although relatively slowly. As a major advance, the Master Slave method allows collection of signals from any number of depths, as required by the user. MS-OCT is an OCT method that does not require resampling of data and can be used to deliver en-face images from several depths simultaneously. However, as the MS-OCT method requires important computational resources, the number of multiple depth en-face images produced in real-time is limited. Here, we demonstrate that taking advantage of the parallel processing feature of the MS-OCT technology by harnessing the capabilities of graphics processing units (GPU)s, information from 384 depth positions is acquired in one raster with real time display of 40 en-face OCT images. These exhibit comparable resolution and sensitivity to the images produced using the traditional Fourier domain based method. The GPU facilitates versatile real time selection of parameters, such as the depth positions of the 40 images out of a set of 384 depth locations, as well as their axial resolution. Here, we present in parallel with the 40 en-face OCT images of a human tooth, a confocal microscopy lookalike image, together with two B-scan OCT images along rectangular directions.

  14. Spontaneous Coronary Dissection: "Live Flash" Optical Coherence Tomography Guided Angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Bento, Angela Pimenta; Fernandes, Renato Gil Dos Santos Pinto; Neves, David Cintra Henriques Silva; Patrício, Lino Manuel Ribeiro; de Aguiar, José Eduardo Chambel

    2016-01-01

    Optical Coherence tomography (OCT) is a light-based imaging modality which shows tremendous potential in the setting of coronary imaging. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an infrequent cause of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The diagnosis of SCAD is made mainly with invasive coronary angiography, although adjunctive imaging modalities such as computed tomography angiography, IVUS, and OCT may increase the diagnostic yield. The authors describe a clinical case of a young woman admitted with the diagnosis of ACS. The ACS was caused by SCAD detected in the coronary angiography and the angioplasty was guided by OCT. OCT use in the setting of SCAD has been already described and the true innovation in this case was this unique use of OCT. The guidance of angioplasty with live and short images was very useful as it allowed clearly identifying the position of the guidewires at any given moment without the use of prohibitive amounts of contrast. PMID:26989520

  15. The Use of Optical Coherence Tomography in Intraoperative Ophthalmic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Paul; Migacz, Justin; O’Connell, Rachelle; Maldonado, Ramiro S.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has transformed diagnostic ophthalmic imaging but until recently has been limited to the clinic setting. The development of spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT), with its improved speed and resolution, along with the development of a handheld OCT scanner, enabled portable imaging of patients unable to sit in a conventional tabletop scanner. This handheld SD-OCT unit has proven useful in examinations under anesthesia and, more recently, in intraoperative imaging of preoperative and postoperative manipulations. Recently, several groups have pioneered the development of novel OCT modalities, such as microscope-mounted OCT systems. Although still immature, the development of these systems is directed toward real-time imaging of surgical maneuvers in the intraoperative setting. This article reviews intraoperative imaging of the posterior and anterior segment using the handheld SD-OCT and recent advances toward real-time microscope-mounted intrasurgical imaging. PMID:21790116

  16. Optical Coherence Tomography and Raman Spectroscopy of the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J W; Zawadzki, R J; Liu, R; Chan, J; Lane, S; Werner, J S

    2009-01-16

    Imaging the structure and correlating it with the biochemical content of the retina holds promise for fundamental research and for clinical applications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is commonly used to image the 3D structure of the retina and while the added functionality of biochemical analysis afforded by Raman scattering could provide critical molecular signatures for clinicians and researchers, there are many technical challenges to combining these imaging modalities. We present an ex vivo OCT microscope combined with Raman spectroscopy capable of collecting morphological and molecular information about a sample simultaneously. The combined instrument will be used to investigate remaining technical challenges to combine these imaging modalities, such as the laser power levels needed to achieve a Raman signal above the noise level without damaging the sample.

  17. Molecular Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography: A Review¶

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Changhuei

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the current state of research on the use of molecular contrast agents in optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging techniques. After a brief discussion of the basic principle of OCT and the importance of incorporating molecular contrast agent usage into this imaging modality, we shall present an overview of the different molecular contrast OCT (MCOCT) methods that have been developed thus far. We will then discuss several important practical issues that define the possible range of contrast agent choice, the design criteria for engineered molecular contrast agent and the implementability of a given MCOCT method for clinical or biological applications. We will conclude by outlining a few areas of pursuit that deserve a greater degree of research and development. PMID:15588122

  18. Characterization of eosinophilic esophagitis murine models using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Noti, Mario; Wojno, Elia D. Tait; Artis, David; Zhou, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies using murine models are critical for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying immune-mediated disorders such as Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). In this study, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of providing three-dimensional images with axial and transverse resolutions of 5 µm and 10 µm, respectively, was utilized to obtain esophageal images from a murine model of EoE-like disease ex vivo. Structural changes in the esophagus of wild-type (Tslpr+/+) and mutant (Tslpr−/−) mice with EoE-like disease were quantitatively evaluated and food impaction sites in the esophagus of diseased mice were monitored using OCT. Here, the capability of OCT as a label-free imaging tool devoid of tissue-processing artifacts to effectively characterize murine EoE-like disease models has been demonstrated. PMID:24575353

  19. Automated volumetric segmentation of retinal fluid on optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Miao; Pechauer, Alex D.; Liu, Liang; Hwang, Thomas S.; Wilson, David J.; Li, Dengwang; Jia, Yali

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel automated volumetric segmentation method to detect and quantify retinal fluid on optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fuzzy level set method was introduced for identifying the boundaries of fluid filled regions on B-scans (x and y-axes) and C-scans (z-axis). The boundaries identified from three types of scans were combined to generate a comprehensive volumetric segmentation of retinal fluid. Then, artefactual fluid regions were removed using morphological characteristics and by identifying vascular shadowing with OCT angiography obtained from the same scan. The accuracy of retinal fluid detection and quantification was evaluated on 10 eyes with diabetic macular edema. Automated segmentation had good agreement with manual segmentation qualitatively and quantitatively. The fluid map can be integrated with OCT angiogram for intuitive clinical evaluation. PMID:27446676

  20. Statistical analysis of motion contrast in optical coherence tomography angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuxuan; Guo, Li; Pan, Cong; Lu, Tongtong; Hong, Tianyu; Ding, Zhihua; Li, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (Angio-OCT), mainly based on the temporal dynamics of OCT scattering signals, has found a range of potential applications in clinical and scientific research. Based on the model of random phasor sums, temporal statistics of the complex-valued OCT signals are mathematically described. Statistical distributions of the amplitude differential and complex differential Angio-OCT signals are derived. The theories are validated through the flow phantom and live animal experiments. Using the model developed, the origin of the motion contrast in Angio-OCT is mathematically explained, and the implications in the improvement of motion contrast are further discussed, including threshold determination and its residual classification error, averaging method, and scanning protocol. The proposed mathematical model of Angio-OCT signals can aid in the optimal design of the system and associated algorithms.

  1. Triggered optical coherence tomography for capturing rapid periodic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ernest W.; Kobler, James B.; Yun, Seok H.

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative cross-sectional imaging of vocal folds during phonation is potentially useful for diagnosis and treatments of laryngeal disorders. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful technique, but its relatively low frame rates makes it challenging to visualize rapidly vibrating tissues. Here, we demonstrate a novel method based on triggered laser scanning to capture 4-dimensional (4D) images of samples in motu at audio frequencies over 100 Hz. As proof-of-concept experiments, we applied this technique to imaging the oscillations of biopolymer gels on acoustic vibrators and aerodynamically driven vibrations of the vocal fold in an ex vivo calf larynx model. Our results suggest that triggered 4D OCT may be useful in understanding and assessing the function of vocal folds and developing novel treatments in research and clinical settings.

  2. Spontaneous Coronary Dissection: "Live Flash" Optical Coherence Tomography Guided Angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Bento, Angela Pimenta; Fernandes, Renato Gil Dos Santos Pinto; Neves, David Cintra Henriques Silva; Patrício, Lino Manuel Ribeiro; de Aguiar, José Eduardo Chambel

    2016-01-01

    Optical Coherence tomography (OCT) is a light-based imaging modality which shows tremendous potential in the setting of coronary imaging. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an infrequent cause of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The diagnosis of SCAD is made mainly with invasive coronary angiography, although adjunctive imaging modalities such as computed tomography angiography, IVUS, and OCT may increase the diagnostic yield. The authors describe a clinical case of a young woman admitted with the diagnosis of ACS. The ACS was caused by SCAD detected in the coronary angiography and the angioplasty was guided by OCT. OCT use in the setting of SCAD has been already described and the true innovation in this case was this unique use of OCT. The guidance of angioplasty with live and short images was very useful as it allowed clearly identifying the position of the guidewires at any given moment without the use of prohibitive amounts of contrast.

  3. Imaging port wine stains by fiber optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shiyong; Gu, Ying; Xue, Ping; Guo, Jin; Shen, Tingmei; Wang, Tianshi; Huang, Naiyan; Zhang, Li; Qiu, Haixia; Yu, Xin; Wei, Xunbin

    2010-05-01

    We develop a fiber optical coherence tomography (OCT) system in the clinical utility of imaging port wine stains (PWS). We use our OCT system on 41 patients with PWS to document the difference between PWS skin and contralateral normal skin. The system, which operates at 4 frames/s with axial and transverse resolutions of 10 and 9 μm, respectively, in the skin tissue, can clearly distinguish the dilated dermal blood vessels from normal tissue. We present OCT images of patients with PWS and normal human skin. We obtain the structural parameters, including epidermal thickness and diameter and depth of dilated blood vessels. We demonstrate that OCT may be a useful tool for the noninvasive imaging of PWS. It may help determine the photosensitizer dose and laser parameters in photodynamic therapy for treating port wine stains.

  4. Single shot line-field optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Schill, Alexander; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Li, Jiasong; Han, Zhaolong; Raghunathan, Raksha; Kazemi, Tina; Nair, Achuth; Hsu, Thomas; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Elastic wave imaging optical coherence elastography (EWI-OCE) is an emerging technique that can quantify local biomechanical properties of tissues. However, long acquisition times make this technique unfeasible for clinical use. Here, we demonstrate a noncontact single shot line-field OCE technique using a line-field interferometer and an air-pulse delivery system. The spatial-temporal elastic wave propagation profile was acquired in a single shot and used to quantify the elastic wave group velocity in tissue. Results on tissue-mimicking phantoms and chicken breast muscle agreed well with mechanical compression testing, demonstrating that the presented method can effectively reduce the OCE acquisition time to a few milliseconds in biological application.

  5. Multiscale imaging of human thyroid pathologies using integrated optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yihong; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Cohen, David W.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-02-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) for imaging of benign and malignant thyroid lesions ex vivo using intrinsic optical contrast. Thirty four thyroid gland specimens were imaged from 17 patients, covering a spectrum of pathology, ranging from normal thyroid to neoplasia and benign disease. The integrated OCT and OCM imaging system allows seamlessly switching between low and high magnifications, in a way similar to traditional microscopy. Good correspondence was observed between optical images and histological sections. The results provide a basis for interpretation of future OCT and OCM images of the thyroid tissues and suggest the possibility of future in vivo evaluation of thyroid pathology.

  6. Optical coherence tomography of the pulmonary arteries: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Elisabete; Baptista, Rui; Calisto, João; Faria, Henrique; Monteiro, Pedro; Pan, Manuel; Pêgo, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging technique extensively used for visualizing the coronary circulation, where it assists clinical decision-making. Along with the new interventional procedures being introduced for pulmonary vascular disease, there is an increasing need for intravascular imaging of the pulmonary arteries. Additionally, measurements of the wall thickness of the pulmonary arteries of patients with various types of pulmonary hypertension (PH) may provide relevant diagnostic and prognostic information. The aim of this review is to summarize all the available evidence on the use of OCT for imaging the pulmonary bed and to describe a simple protocol for OCT image acquisition. We conducted a systematic review of the literature using electronic reference databases through February 2015 (MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Web of Knowledge, and references cited in other studies) and the search terms "optical coherence tomography," "pulmonary hypertension," and "pulmonary arteries." Studies in which OCT was used to image the pulmonary vessels were considered for inclusion. We identified 14 studies reporting OCT imaging data from the pulmonary arteries. OCT was able to identify intravascular thrombi in patients with chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH), and an increase in vessel wall thickness was found in most patients with PH, compared with the controls. OCT has also been reported to be useful for the selection of balloon size in the setting of balloon pulmonary angioplasty for CTEPH. The main limitations include lack of standardization, little data on outcomes, cost, and the technical limitations involved in visualizing small-diameter (<1mm) pulmonary vessels. OCT has become a potential tool for the in vivo study of vascular changes in the pulmonary arteries, and may provide additional information in the assessment of patients with PH. Prospective high-quality studies assessing the safety, validity, and clinical impact of OCT imaging for pulmonary vessels

  7. Development of Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui

    Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) is a high-speed, high-resolution, and noninvasive imaging technique that can obtain cross-sectional images of light scattering medium, such as biomedical tissues. In this thesis, I report three novel methods in FD-OCT technique including common-path endoscopic FD-OCT, streak-mode FD-OCT, and Doppler streak-mode FD-OCT. Finally, I apply the streak mode FD-OCT to ultrahigh-speed, noninvasive, live imaging of embryonic chick hearts. An extension of conventional FD-OCT technique is endoscopic FD-OCT, which can access internal organs by utilizing a miniaturized catheter design. However, its image signal suffers from the bending of the endoscopic catheter. To address this problem, a common-path endoscopic FD-OCT system was developed to avoid the polarization mismatch. Consequently, the OCT images were immune to the catheter bending. In addition, a Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) motor was integrated into the miniaturized probe to achieve circumferential scanning within lumen samples. In conventional FD-OCT, the imaging speed is limited by the slow line-scan rate of the camera. We developed the streak-mode FD-OCT technique, in which an area-scan camera is used instead of a line-scan camera to record the FD-OCT spectrum. Using this technique, high temporal resolution of 1000--2000 cross-sectional images of the sample were obtained in one second. Doppler FD-OCT is a functional extension of FD-OCT technique, which can measure the flow velocity within biomedical tissues. However, conventional techniques are not available to measure high speed flow due to slow imaging speed, phase wrapping, and fringe wash out issues. Based on the streak mode FD-OCT, a novel Doppler technique was developed that addressed these problems. It has been well established that cardiac dynamics play an important role in the early development of an embryonic heart. However, the mechanism by which cardiac dynamics affect the development of a

  8. A Method of Assembling Compact Coherent Fiber-Optic Bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan; Liu, Duncan; Levine, Bruce Martin; Shao, Michael; Wallace, James

    2007-01-01

    A method of assembling coherent fiber-optic bundles in which all the fibers are packed together as closely as possible is undergoing development. The method is based, straightforwardly, on the established concept of hexagonal close packing; hence, the development efforts are focused on fixtures and techniques for practical implementation of hexagonal close packing of parallel optical fibers.

  9. Handheld probes and galvanometer scanning for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, V.-F.; Dobre, G.; Demian, D.; Cernat, R.; Sinescu, C.; Topala, F. I.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Hutiu, Gh.; Bradu, A.; Rolland, J. P.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    As part of the ongoing effort of the biomedical imaging community to move Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) systems from the lab to the clinical environment and produce OCT systems appropriate for multiple types of investigations in a medical department, handheld probes equipped with different types of scanners need to be developed. These allow different areas of a patient's body to be investigated using OCT with the same system and even without changing the patient's position. This paper reviews first the state of the art regarding OCT handheld probes. Novel probes with a uni-dimensional (1D) galvanometer-based scanner (GS) developed in our groups are presented. Their advantages and limitations are discussed. Aspects regarding the use of galvoscanners with regard to Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are pointed out, in relationship with our studies on optimal scanning functions of galvanometer devices in OCT. These scanning functions are briefly discussed with regard to their main parameters: profile, theoretical duty cycle, scan frequency, and scan amplitude. The optical design of the galvoscanner and refractive optics combination in the probe head, optimized for various applications, is considered. Perspectives of the field are pointed out in the final part of the paper.

  10. Amplifier Noise Based Optical Steganography with Coherent Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ben; Chang, Matthew P.; Caldwell, Naomi R.; Caldwell, Myles E.; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2014-12-01

    We summarize the principle and experimental setup of optical steganography based on amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise. Using ASE noise as the signal carrier, optical steganography effectively hides a stealth channel in both the time domain and the frequency domain. Coherent detection is used at the receiver of the stealth channel. Because ASE noise has short coherence length and random phase, it only interferes with itself within a very short range. Coherent detection requires the stealth transmitter and stealth receiver to precisely match the optical delay,which generates a large key space for the stealth channel. Several methods to further improve optical steganography, signal to noise ratio, compatibility with the public channel, and applications of the stealth channel are also summarized in this review paper.

  11. Coherent control of optical polarization effects in metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyedmohammad A; Plum, Eric; Shi, Jinhui; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2015-01-01

    Processing of photonic information usually relies on electronics. Aiming to avoid the conversion between photonic and electronic signals, modulation of light with light based on optical nonlinearity has become a major research field and coherent optical effects on the nanoscale are emerging as new means of handling and distributing signals. Here we demonstrate that in slabs of linear material of sub-wavelength thickness optical manifestations of birefringence and optical activity (linear and circular birefringence and dichroism) can be controlled by a wave coherent with the wave probing the polarization effect. We demonstrate this in proof-of-principle experiments for chiral and anisotropic microwave metamaterials, where we show that the large parameter space of polarization characteristics may be accessed at will by coherent control. Such control can be exerted at arbitrarily low intensities, thus arguably allowing for fast handling of electromagnetic signals without facing thermal management and energy challenges. PMID:25755071

  12. Master/slave interferometry - ideal tool for coherence revival swept source optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Bradu, Adrian; Rivet, Sylvain; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that the master slave (MS) interferometry method can significantly simplify the practice of coherence revival swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique. Previous implementations of the coherence revival technique required considerable resources on dispersion compensation and data resampling. The total tolerance of the MS method to nonlinear tuning, to dispersion in the interferometer and to dispersion due to the laser cavity, makes the MS ideally suited to the practice of coherence revival. In addition, enhanced versatility is allowed by the MS method in displaying shorter axial range images than that determined by the digital sampling of the data. This brings an immediate improvement in the speed of displaying cross-sectional images at high rates without the need of extra hardware such as graphics processing units or field programmable gate arrays. The long axial range of the coherence revival regime is proven with images of the anterior segment of healthy human volunteers. PMID:27446682

  13. Master/slave interferometry – ideal tool for coherence revival swept source optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bradu, Adrian; Rivet, Sylvain; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that the master slave (MS) interferometry method can significantly simplify the practice of coherence revival swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique. Previous implementations of the coherence revival technique required considerable resources on dispersion compensation and data resampling. The total tolerance of the MS method to nonlinear tuning, to dispersion in the interferometer and to dispersion due to the laser cavity, makes the MS ideally suited to the practice of coherence revival. In addition, enhanced versatility is allowed by the MS method in displaying shorter axial range images than that determined by the digital sampling of the data. This brings an immediate improvement in the speed of displaying cross-sectional images at high rates without the need of extra hardware such as graphics processing units or field programmable gate arrays. The long axial range of the coherence revival regime is proven with images of the anterior segment of healthy human volunteers. PMID:27446682

  14. Master/slave interferometry - ideal tool for coherence revival swept source optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Bradu, Adrian; Rivet, Sylvain; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that the master slave (MS) interferometry method can significantly simplify the practice of coherence revival swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique. Previous implementations of the coherence revival technique required considerable resources on dispersion compensation and data resampling. The total tolerance of the MS method to nonlinear tuning, to dispersion in the interferometer and to dispersion due to the laser cavity, makes the MS ideally suited to the practice of coherence revival. In addition, enhanced versatility is allowed by the MS method in displaying shorter axial range images than that determined by the digital sampling of the data. This brings an immediate improvement in the speed of displaying cross-sectional images at high rates without the need of extra hardware such as graphics processing units or field programmable gate arrays. The long axial range of the coherence revival regime is proven with images of the anterior segment of healthy human volunteers.

  15. Coherence analysis of optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave interference.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jesse

    2006-06-01

    I analyze the coherence of optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) interference. With a simple model modified from the classical coherence theory, I successfully derive the relationships among the frequency bandwidth, coherence length, and coherence time of the practical optical source, and the contrast of the beat signal in optical FMCW interference. PMID:16724123

  16. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging of subretinal bands associated with chronic retinal detachments

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Nikisha; Kuriyan, Ajay E; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-01-01

    We report three patients with subretinal bands associated with retinal detachment in chronic retinal detachments who underwent successful retinal reattachment. Subretinal bands before and after surgery can be identified on clinical examination and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Removal of subretinal bands is not mandatory to achieve retinal reattachment. PMID:27099457

  17. Early Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Findings in Unilateral Acute Idiopathic Maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Nicolo, Massimo; Rosa, Raffaella; Musetti, Donatella; Musolino, Maria; Traverso, Carlo Enrico

    2016-02-01

    Unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy (UAIM) is a rare disorder presenting in young people with an acute onset of unilateral central visual loss often associated with a prodromal flu-like illness. The authors present the early anatomical findings of a 35-year-old man clinically diagnosed with UAIM using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) and SS-OCT angiography.

  18. Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography and Vascular Perfusion Map Findings in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Li, Daniel Q; Golding, John; Choudhry, Netan

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a highly prevalent chronic sleep disorder associated with considerable systemic and ophthalmic consequences. The authors present the retinal vascular findings of a visually asymptomatic 56-year-old man clinically diagnosed with OSA using swept-source optical coherence tomography and vascular perfusion mapping. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:880-884.]. PMID:27631487

  19. Manually operated low-coherence interferometer for optical information hiding.

    PubMed

    Otaka, M; Yamamoto, H; Hayasaki, Y

    2006-10-01

    A low-coherence interferometer for optical information hiding that ensures security of an optical image by hiding the image behind a light-scattering medium is demonstrated. The interferometer has a distinctive feature in that modulation of the optical-path difference between the object and reference arms is performed with a manual operation. The main advantage of the operation method is the absence of expensive optomechanical parts in the interferometer.

  20. Polarization sensitive optical low-coherence reflectometry for blood glucose monitoring in human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, Jitendra; Choudhary, Om Prakash; Sen, P.; Andrews, J. T.

    2013-07-01

    A device based on polarization sensitive optical low-coherence reflectometry is developed to monitor blood glucose levels in human subjects. The device was initially tested with tissue phantom. The measurements with human subjects for various glucose concentration levels are found to be linearly dependent on the ellipticity obtainable from the home-made phase-sensitive optical low-coherence reflectometry device. The linearity obtained between glucose concentration and ellipticity are explained with theoretical calculations using Mie theory. A comparison of results with standard clinical methods establishes the utility of the present device for non-invasive glucose monitoring.

  1. Evaluation of Optical Coherence Tomography as a Means of Identifying Earlier Stage Basal Cell Carcinomas while Reducing the Use of Diagnostic Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Michelle; Feldman, Eleanor; Bienenfeld, Amanda; Bieber, Amy K.; Ellis, Jeffery; Alapati, Usha; Lebwohl, Mark; Siegel, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of optical coherence tomography for basal cell carcinoma and the proportion of biopsies that could be avoided if optical coherence tomography is used to rule-in surgery. Design: Multicenter, prospective, observational study. Setting: Dermatology clinics. Participants: Consecutive patients with clinically challenging pink lesions suspicious for basal cell carcinoma. Measurements: Clinical, dermoscopic, and optical coherence tomography images were obtained for all subjects. At each stage, the clinician made a diagnosis (pathology + subtype if applicable), and assessed his/her own confidence in the diagnosis. Results: Optical coherence tomography significantly (p<0.01) improved sensitivity and specificity over clinical or dermoscopic evaluation. The percentage of correct diagnoses was 57.4 percent (clinical), 69.6 percent (dermoscopy), and 87.8 percent (optical coherence tomography). Optical coherence tomography significantly increased the certainty of diagnosis; clinicians indicated they were certain (>95% confident) in 17 percent of lesions examined clinically, in 38.6 percent examined with dermoscopy, and in 70 percent examined with optical coherence tomography. With the use of optical coherence tomography in the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma, more than 1 in 3 patients could avoid a diagnostic biopsy. Conclusion: In a population of clinically challenging lesions, optical coherence tomography improved diagnostic certainty by a factor of four over clinical examination alone and improved diagnostic accuracy by 50 percent (57-88%). The addition of optical coherence tomography to other standard assessments can improve the false-positive rate and give a high degree of certainty for ruling in a positive diagnosis for basal cell carcinoma. A reduction of 36 percent in overall biopsies could be achieved by sending high certainty basal cell carcinoma positive optical coherence tomography diagnoses straight to surgery. PMID

  2. Integral ceramic superstructure evaluation using time domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Bradu, Adrian; Topala, Florin I.; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive low coherence interferometry technique that includes several technologies (and the corresponding devices and components), such as illumination and detection, interferometry, scanning, adaptive optics, microscopy and endoscopy. From its large area of applications, we consider in this paper a critical aspect in dentistry - to be investigated with a Time Domain (TD) OCT system. The clinical situation of an edentulous mandible is considered; it can be solved by inserting 2 to 6 implants. On these implants a mesostructure will be manufactured and on it a superstructure is needed. This superstructure can be integral ceramic; in this case materials defects could be trapped inside the ceramic layers and those defects could lead to fractures of the entire superstructure. In this paper we demonstrate that a TD-OCT imaging system has the potential to properly evaluate the presence of the defects inside the ceramic layers and those defects can be fixed before inserting the prosthesis inside the oral cavity. Three integral ceramic superstructures were developed by using a CAD/CAM technology. After the milling, the ceramic layers were applied on the core. All the three samples were evaluated by a TD-OCT system working at 1300 nm. For two of the superstructures evaluated, no defects were found in the most stressed areas. The third superstructure presented four ceramic defects in the mentioned areas. Because of those defects the superstructure may fracture. The integral ceramic prosthesis was send back to the dental laboratory to fix the problems related to the material defects found. Thus, TD-OCT proved to be a valuable method for diagnosing the ceramic defects inside the integral ceramic superstructures in order to prevent fractures at this level.

  3. Accuracy of optical navigation systems for automatic head surgery: optical tracking versus optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Díaz, Jesús; Riva, Mauro H.; Majdani, Omid; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    The choice of a navigation system highly depends on the medical intervention and its accuracy demands. The most commonly used systems for image guided surgery (IGS) are based on optical and magnetic tracking systems. This paper compares two optical systems in terms of accuracy: state of the art triangulation-based optical tracking (OT) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). We use an experimental setup with a combined OCT and cutting laser, and an external OT. We simulate a robotic assisted surgical intervention, including planning, navigation, and processing, and compare the accuracies reached at a specific target with each navigation system.

  4. Optical injection enables coherence resonance in quantum-dot lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, D.; Aust, R.; Lingnau, B.; Schöll, E.; Lüdge, K.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate that optically injected semiconductor quantum-dot lasers operated in the frequency-locked regime exhibit the counterintuitive effect of coherence resonance, i.e., the regularity of noise-induced spiking is a non-monotonic function of the spontaneous emission noise, and it is optimally correlated at a non-zero value of the noise intensity. We uncover the mechanism of coherence resonance from a microscopically based model of the quantum-dot laser structure, and show that it is related to excitability under optical injection and to a saddle-node infinite period (SNIPER) bifurcation occurring for small injection strength at the border of the frequency locking regime. By a model reduction we argue that the phenomenon of coherence resonance is generic for a wide class of optically injected lasers.

  5. Coherent Amplification of Ultrafast Molecular Dynamics in an Optical Oscillator.

    PubMed

    Aharonovich, Igal; Pe'er, Avi

    2016-02-19

    Optical oscillators present a powerful optimization mechanism. The inherent competition for the gain resources between possible modes of oscillation entails the prevalence of the most efficient single mode. We harness this "ultrafast" coherent feedback to optimize an optical field in time, and show that, when an optical oscillator based on a molecular gain medium is synchronously pumped by ultrashort pulses, a temporally coherent multimode field can develop that optimally dumps a general, dynamically evolving vibrational wave packet, into a single vibrational target state. Measuring the emitted field opens a new window to visualization and control of fast molecular dynamics. The realization of such a coherent oscillator with hot alkali dimers appears within experimental reach.

  6. Polarization sensitive optical coherence microscopy for brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Akkin, Taner; Magnain, Caroline; Wang, Ruopeng; Dubb, Jay; Kostis, William J; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Cramer, Avilash; Sakadžić, Sava; Boas, David

    2016-05-15

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) have demonstrated the ability to investigate cyto- and myelo-architecture in the brain. Polarization-sensitive OCT provides sensitivity to additional contrast mechanisms, specifically the birefringence of myelination and, therefore, is advantageous for investigating white matter fiber tracts. In this Letter, we developed a polarization-sensitive optical coherence microscope (PS-OCM) with a 3.5 μm axial and 1.3 μm transverse resolution to investigate fiber organization and orientation at a finer scale than previously demonstrated with PS-OCT. In a reconstructed mouse brain section, we showed that at the focal depths of 20-70 μm, the PS-OCM reliably identifies the neuronal fibers and quantifies the in-plane orientation. PMID:27176965

  7. En-face polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucu, Radu G.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.; Rosen, Richard B.; Boxer, Aaron B.; Jackson, David A.

    2003-10-01

    We report the first (to the best of out knowledge) en face polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) system. The transverse raster scanning of the target is achieved using a pair of galvo-scanner mirrors. The set-up is based on incoherent detection in two optical and electronic channels and employs balanced detection to reduce the excess photon noise generated by the low coherence source (superluminescent diode). The outputs of the two channels are processed using software to provide a polarisation insensitive (pure reflectivity) image and a birefringence retardation map. Images from ex vivo (human tooth) and in vivo targets (human retina) have been acquired. Particulars of en face optical coherence tomography imaging of birefringent tissue are discussed.

  8. Advanced integrated spectrometer designs for miniaturized optical coherence tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akca, B. I.; Považay, B.; Chang, L.; Alex, A.; Wörhoff, K.; de Ridder, R. M.; Drexler, W.; Pollnau, M.

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has enabled clinical applications that revolutionized in vivo medical diagnostics. Nevertheless, its current limitations owing to cost, size, complexity, and the need for accurate alignment must be overcome by radically novel approaches. Exploiting integrated optics, the central components of a spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) system can be integrated on a chip. Arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) spectrometers with their high spectral resolution and compactness are excellent candidates for on-chip SD-OCT systems. However, specific design-related issues of AWG spectrometers limit the performance of on-chip SD-OCT systems. Here we present advanced AWG designs which could overcome the limitations arising from free spectral range, polarization dependency, and curved focal plane of the AWG spectrometers. Using these advanced AWG designs in an SD-OCT system can provide not only better overall performance but also some unique aspects that a commercial system does not have. Additionally, a partially integrated OCT system comprising an AWG spectrometer and an integrated beam splitter, as well as the in vivo imaging using this system are demonstrated.

  9. Optical coherence tomography: imaging architect for dermal microdialysis in psoriasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, M.-L.; O'Connor, W.; Ramsay, B.; Guihen, E.; Ho, W. L.; Leahy, M. J.

    2011-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used as part of a ground breaking translational study to shed some light on one of the worlds most prevalent autoimmune diseases; psoriasis. The work successfully integrates the fields of optical imaging, biochemistry and dermatology in conducting a dermal microdialysis (DMD) trial for quantitative histamine assessment amongst a group of psoriasis sufferers. The DMD process involves temporary insertion of microscopic hollow tubes into a layer of skin to measure the levels of histamine and other important biological molecules in psoriasis. For comparison purposes, DMD catheters were implanted into healthy, peri-lesional and lesional skin regions. The catheters' entry and exit points and their precise locations in the epidermal layer of the skin were confirmed using OCT thus obtaining high resolution, wide-field images of the affected skin as well as catheter placement whilst local microdialysis enabled a tissue chemistry profile to be obtained from these three skin regions including histamine, a local immune system activator known to contribute towards itch and inflammation. Together these tools offer a synergistic approach in the clinical assessment of the disease. In addition, OCT delivered a non-invasive and rapid method for analyzing the affected skin architecture.

  10. Costas loop analysis for coherent optical receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, T. G.

    1986-03-01

    A homodyne Costas loop receiver is analyzed taking both shot and laser phase noise sources into acount. The reciever performance is compared with that of a heterodyne receiver using an electrical Costas loop and that of a coherent receiver using a pilot carrier phase-locked loop. It is shown that, to avoid large performance penalties, beat linewidth to bit-rate ratios smaller than 0.05 percent and 0.5 percent are needed for PSK homodyne and heterodyne systems, respectively.

  11. Propagation of optical coherence lattices in the turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianlong; Yu, Jiayi; Cai, Yangjian; Ponomarenko, Sergey A

    2016-09-15

    We explore the propagation of recently introduced optical coherence lattices (OCLs) in the turbulent atmosphere. We show that the lattice intensity profile and the spatial degree of coherence will display periodicity reciprocity over long propagation distances even though the lattices are affected by the turbulence. The lattice periodicity reciprocity has been previously conjectured to be advantageous for free-space information transfer and optical communications. We then show how one can increase the distance over which the lattice periodicity reciprocity is preserved in the turbulent atmosphere by engineering input lattice beam parameters. We also show that the OCLs have scintillation indices lower than those of Gaussian beams. PMID:27628352

  12. Experimental Demonstration of Spectral Intensity Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ryczkowski, Piotr; Turunen, Jari; Friberg, Ari T.; Genty, Goëry

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally spectral-domain intensity optical coherence tomography using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with balanced detection. We show that the technique allows for a point spread function with reduced full-width at half maximum compared to conventional optical coherence tomography. The method further provides benefits similar to those of chirped-pulse interferometry in terms of dispersion cancellation but only requires a broadband incoherent source and standard detectors. The measurements are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. Finally, we propose an approach that enables the elimination of potential artefacts arising from multiple interfaces. PMID:26916668

  13. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3d vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.B.; Simonson, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic of coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  14. Optical coherence tomography for imaging the vulnerable plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tearney, Guillermo J.; Jang, Ik-Kyung; Bouma, Brett E.

    2006-03-01

    While our understanding of vulnerable coronary plaque is still at an early stage, the concept that certain types of plaques predispose patients to developing an acute myocardial infarction continues to be at the forefront of cardiology research. Intracoronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been developed to both identify and study these lesions due to its distinct resolution advantage over other imaging modalities. We review clinical research conducted at the Massachusetts General Hospital over the past five years to develop, validate, and utilize this technology to improve our understanding of vulnerable plaque. Our results show that intracoronary OCT may be safely conducted in patients and that it provides abundant information regarding plaque microscopic morphology, which is essential to the identification and study of high-risk lesions. Even though many basic biological, clinical, and technological challenges must be addressed prior to widespread use of this technology, the unique capabilities of OCT ensure that it will have a prominent role in shaping the future of cardiology.

  15. Three dimensional optical coherence tomography imaging: advantages and advances.

    PubMed

    Gabriele, Michelle L; Wollstein, Gadi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Xu, Juan; Kim, Jongsick; Kagemann, Larry; Folio, Lindsey S; Schuman, Joel S

    2010-11-01

    Three dimensional (3D) ophthalmic imaging using optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized assessment of the eye, the retina in particular. Recent technological improvements have made the acquisition of 3D-OCT datasets feasible. However, while volumetric data can improve disease diagnosis and follow-up, novel image analysis techniques are now necessary in order to process the dense 3D-OCT dataset. Fundamental software improvements include methods for correcting subject eye motion, segmenting structures or volumes of interest, extracting relevant data post hoc and signal averaging to improve delineation of retinal layers. In addition, innovative methods for image display, such as C-mode sectioning, provide a unique viewing perspective and may improve interpretation of OCT images of pathologic structures. While all of these methods are being developed, most remain in an immature state. This review describes the current status of 3D-OCT scanning and interpretation, and discusses the need for standardization of clinical protocols as well as the potential benefits of 3D-OCT scanning that could come when software methods for fully exploiting these rich datasets are available clinically. The implications of new image analysis approaches include improved reproducibility of measurements garnered from 3D-OCT, which may then help improve disease discrimination and progression detection. In addition, 3D-OCT offers the potential for preoperative surgical planning and intraoperative surgical guidance.

  16. Current and future potential of retinal optical coherence tomography in multiple sclerosis with and without optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Balk, Lisanne J; Petzold, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disorder characterized by inflammation and neuroaxonal degeneration. The latter is held responsible for the irreversible disability in patients with MS. The eye is a unique window into the brain. With the advent of optical coherence tomography, accurate quantification of retinal layer thickness has become feasible. Neuroaxonal degeneration affecting the retinal layers is structurally and functionally related to pathology in the visual pathways, which is most severe following MS optic neuritis. This is relevant to recognize because MS optic neuritis may mask the subtle thinning of retinal layers associated with global CNS atrophy, which is also related to more global loss of neurological function. Taken together, optical coherence tomography stands at the brink of becoming a validated imaging biomarker for monitoring neurodegeneration in MS and to provide end points for clinical trials.

  17. Optical coherence tomography based microangiography: A tool good for dermatology applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruikang K.; Baran, Utku; Choi, Woo J.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) based microangiography (OMAG) is a new imaging technique enabling the visualization of blood flow within microcirculatory tissue beds in vivo with high resolution. In this talk, the concept and advantages of OMAG will be discussed and its potential clinical applications in the dermatology will be shown, demonstrating its usefulness in the clinical monitoring and therapeutic treatment of various skin pathologies, e.g. acne, port wine stain and wound healing.

  18. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-09-07

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems.

  19. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J.; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems.

  20. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems. PMID:27599635

  1. Optical refractive synchronization: linewidth coherency analysis and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, James R.

    1999-11-01

    The direction of this paper is to describe the various analytical tools and measurement techniques used at SilkRoad to evalute the transmission-laser cavity control and optical beam train going into the electro optical modulator and subsequently into the otpical transmission fiber. The measurement values for the line width and the coherent length of the laser beam,and the subsequent Laguerre orders that are generated in the electro-optical modulator, are critical to the operation of the SilkRoad Optical Refractive Synchronization transmission technique. We begin the paper with the various analytical techniques that are used to calculate the line width and the coherency length. Following the analytical model, we describe the various measurement techniques and the subsequent data that results from our experiments.

  2. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J.; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems. PMID:27599635

  3. Interconnection of polarization properties and coherence of optical fields.

    PubMed

    Zenkova, Claudia Yu

    2014-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental approaches to diagnosing internal spin and orbital optical flows and the corresponding optical forces caused by these flows are offered. These approaches are based on the investigation of the motion of the particles tested in the formed optical field. The dependence of the above-mentioned forces upon the size and optical properties of the particles is demonstrated. The possibility of using kinematic values defining the motion dynamics of particles of the Rayleigh light scattering mechanism to make a quantitative assessment of the degree of coherence of mutually orthogonal waves that are linearly polarized in the incidence plane is demonstrated. The feasibility of using the above mentioned approach, its shortcomings, and its advantages over the interfering method for estimating the degree of coherence are analyzed.

  4. Coherent multidimensional optical spectra measured using incoherent light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Daniel B.; Arpin, Paul C.; McClure, Scott D.; Ulness, Darin J.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2013-08-01

    Four-wave mixing measurements can reveal spectral and dynamics information that is hidden in linear spectra by the interactions among light-absorbing molecules and with their environment. Coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy is an important variant of four-wave mixing because it resolves a map of interactions and correlations between absorption bands. Previous coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy measurements have used femtosecond pulses with great success, and it may seem that femtosecond pulses are necessary for such measurements. Here we present coherent two-dimensional electronic spectra measured using incoherent light. The spectra of model molecular systems using broadband spectrally incoherent light are similar but not identical to those expected from measurements using femtosecond pulses. Specifically, the spectra show particular sensitivity to long-lived intermediates such as photoisomers. The results will motivate the design of similar experiments in spectral ranges where femtosecond pulses are difficult to produce.

  5. Precision spectral manipulation: A demonstration using a coherent optical memory

    SciTech Connect

    Sparkes, B. M.; Cairns, C.; Hosseini, M.; Higginbottom, D.; Campbell, G. T.; Lam, P. K.; Buchler, B. C.

    2014-12-04

    The ability to coherently spectrally manipulate quantum information has the potential to improve qubit rates across quantum channels and find applications in optical quantum computing. Here we present experiments that use a multi-element solenoid combined with the three-level gradient echo memory scheme to perform precision spectral manipulation of optical pulses. If applied in a quantum information network, these operations would enable frequency-based multiplexing of qubits.

  6. Correlation of endoscopic optical coherence tomography with histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Volker; Rollins, Andrew M.; Willis, Joseph; Sivak, Michael J., Jr.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2000-04-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive optical imaging technique that allows high-resolution cross- sectional imaging of tissue microstructure. We have recently developed a system for endoscopic OCT (EOCT) to examine the gastrointestinal tract of humans in vivo. Compared to endoscopic ultrasonic devices it offers a higher resolution and does not require coupling gels or fluids. EOCT may lead to a versatile tool for biopsy site selection or optical biopsy itself. The EOCT unit is comprised of an interferometer unit with a high speed scanning reference arm and an endoscopically compatible radially scanning probe as the sample arm. Fast data acquisition allows real-time display. Temporal averaging for speckle reduction and a transformation to correct nonlinear scanning were included in the EOCT control software, both in real-time. During in vivo clinical trials, we have observe the structure of the mucosa and submucosa in several gastrointestinal organs as well as glands, blood vessels, pits, villi and crypts. The purpose of this study was to correlate images acquired in vitro with EOCT to corresponding histological sections. EOCT images were obtained on fresh specimens, which were then fixed in formalin and submitted for standard histology. Tissues examined were normal specimens, which were then fixed in formalin and submitted for standard histology. Tissues examined were normal specimens of stomach, ileum, colon and rectum. It was shown that he thickness of the mucosa correlates well with the first bright layer in EOCT. The R2-value was determined to be 0.69. The submucosa and the muscularis propria could be identified. Furthermore, we were able to show the effect of pressure on the tissue on the visible details in the EOCT images.

  7. The potential of optical coherence tomography in meniscal tear characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hang-yin; Guo, Shuguang; Thieman, Kelley M.; Wise, Brent T.; Pozzi, Antonio; Xie, Huikai; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2009-02-01

    Meniscal tear is one of the most common knee injuries leading to pain and discomfort. Partial and total meniscectomies have been widely used to treat the avascular meniscal injuries in which tears do not heal spontaneously. However, the meniscectomies would cause an alteration of the tibiofemoral contact mechanics resulting in progressive osteoarthritis (OA). To mitigate the progression of OA, maximal preservation of meniscal tissue is recommended. The clinical challenge is deciding which meniscal tears are amenable to repair and which part of damaged tissues should be removed. Current diagnosis techniques such as arthroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging can provide macrostructural information of menisci, but the microstructural changes that occur prior to the observable meniscal tears cannot be identified by these techniques. Serving as a nondestructive optical biopsy, optical coherence tomography (OCT), a newly developed imaging modality, can provide high resolution, cross-sectional images of tissues and has been shown its capabilty in arthroscopic evaulation of articular cartilage. Our research was to demonstrate the potential of using OCT for nondestructive characterization of the histopathology of different types of meniscal tears from clinical cases in dogs, providing a fundamental understanding of the failure mechanism of meniscal tears. First, cross-sectional images of torn canine menisci obtained from the OCT and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) were be compared. By studying the organization of collegan fibrils in torn menisci from the SEM images, the feasibility of using OCT to characterize the organization of collegan fibrils was elucidated. Moreover, the crack size of meniscal tears was quantatitively measured from the OCT images. Changes in the crack size of the tear may be useful for understanding the failure mechanism of meniscal tears.

  8. Coherence optimization of vertical-cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Michael; Wen, Pengyue; Gross, Matthias; Kibar, Osman; Esener, Sadik C.

    2002-06-01

    Vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers (VCSOAs) are attractive devices for use in coherent optical amplification, especially where 2-D amplifier arrays are required. However, the coherence preservation quality of a VCSOA depends strongly on the bias condition, resonant wavelength mismatch, and the optical input power level. We characterize the coherence degree of a VCSOA as a function of these parameters by measuring interference fringe visibility with an interferometer. The dominant factors influencing the contrast of the fringes are the ratio of coherent, stimulated emission photons to amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) photons, and the spectral distortion of the amplified signal. Mostly, the overall gain and the saturation characteristic of the amplifier determine the ratio of stimulated emission to ASE. The spectral distortion of the signal is due to the narrow gain window of the VCSOA, but the effect significantly degrades the visibility only for relatively large wavelength mismatch from the gain peak. Analytic expressions may be used to identify the optimal bias current and optical input power to maximize the amplifier gain and visibility of the interference.

  9. Compact low-cost detection electronics for optical coherence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akcay, A. C.; Lee, K. S.; Furenlid, L. R.; Costa, M. A.; Rolland, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    A compact and low-cost detection electronics scheme for optical coherence imaging is demonstrated. The performance of the designed electronics is analyzed in comparison to a commercial lock-in amplifier of equal bandwidth. Images of a fresh-onion sample are presented for each detection configuration. PMID:26617422

  10. Optical Coherence Tomography: History, Current Status, and Laboratory Work

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Michelle L.; Wollstein, Gadi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Kagemann, Larry; Xu, Juan; Folio, Lindsey S.

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has become widespread in ophthalmology over the past 15 years, because of its ability to visualize ocular structures at high resolution. This article reviews the history of OCT imaging of the eye, its current status, and the laboratory work that is driving the future of the technology. PMID:21493951

  11. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography and microperimetry in foveal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Pal, Swakshyar Saumya; Gella, Laxmi; Sharma, Tarun; Raman, Rajiv

    2011-01-01

    A case of foveal hypoplasia associated with ocular albinism with anatomic and functional changes by various techniques using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), microperimeter and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope is described. This case highlights the importance of microperimeter in detecting the functional abnormalities of vision and SD-OCT in identifying the retinal laminar abnormalities in foveal hypoplasia. PMID:22011499

  12. Design and testing of prototype handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Demian, Dorin; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Cernat, Ramona; Topala, Florin Ionel; Hutiu, Gheorghe; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-08-01

    Three simple and low-cost configurations of handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography have been developed. Their design and testing for dentistry applications are presented. The first two configurations were built exclusively from available off-the-shelf optomechanical components, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the first designs of this type. The third configuration includes these components in an optimized and ergonomic probe. All the designs are presented in detail to allow for their duplication in any laboratory with a minimum effort, for applications that range from educational to high-end clinical investigations. Requirements that have to be fulfilled to achieve configurations which are reliable, ergonomic-for clinical environments, and easy to build are presented. While a range of applications is possible for the prototypes developed, in this study the handheld probes are tested ex vivo with a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system built in-house, for dental constructs. A previous testing with a swept source optical coherence tomography system has also been performed both in vivo and ex vivo for ear, nose, and throat-in a medical environment. The applications use the capability of optical coherence tomography to achieve real-time, high-resolution, non-contact, and non-destructive interferometric investigations with micrometer resolutions and millimeter penetration depth inside the sample. In this study, testing the quality of the material of one of the most used types of dental prosthesis, metalo-ceramic is thus demonstrated.

  13. Design and testing of prototype handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Demian, Dorin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Cernat, Ramona; Topala, Florin Ionel; Hutiu, Gheorghe; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-01-01

    Three simple and low-cost configurations of handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography have been developed. Their design and testing for dentistry applications are presented. The first two configurations were built exclusively from available off-the-shelf optomechanical components, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the first designs of this type. The third configuration includes these components in an optimized and ergonomic probe. All the designs are presented in detail to allow for their duplication in any laboratory with a minimum effort, for applications that range from educational to high-end clinical investigations. Requirements that have to be fulfilled to achieve configurations which are reliable, ergonomic—for clinical environments, and easy to build are presented. While a range of applications is possible for the prototypes developed, in this study the handheld probes are tested ex vivo with a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system built in-house, for dental constructs. A previous testing with a swept source optical coherence tomography system has also been performed both in vivo and ex vivo for ear, nose, and throat—in a medical environment. The applications use the capability of optical coherence tomography to achieve real-time, high-resolution, non-contact, and non-destructive interferometric investigations with micrometer resolutions and millimeter penetration depth inside the sample. In this study, testing the quality of the material of one of the most used types of dental prosthesis, metalo-ceramic is thus demonstrated. PMID:25107512

  14. Design and testing of prototype handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Demian, Dorin; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Cernat, Ramona; Topala, Florin Ionel; Hutiu, Gheorghe; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-08-01

    Three simple and low-cost configurations of handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography have been developed. Their design and testing for dentistry applications are presented. The first two configurations were built exclusively from available off-the-shelf optomechanical components, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the first designs of this type. The third configuration includes these components in an optimized and ergonomic probe. All the designs are presented in detail to allow for their duplication in any laboratory with a minimum effort, for applications that range from educational to high-end clinical investigations. Requirements that have to be fulfilled to achieve configurations which are reliable, ergonomic-for clinical environments, and easy to build are presented. While a range of applications is possible for the prototypes developed, in this study the handheld probes are tested ex vivo with a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system built in-house, for dental constructs. A previous testing with a swept source optical coherence tomography system has also been performed both in vivo and ex vivo for ear, nose, and throat-in a medical environment. The applications use the capability of optical coherence tomography to achieve real-time, high-resolution, non-contact, and non-destructive interferometric investigations with micrometer resolutions and millimeter penetration depth inside the sample. In this study, testing the quality of the material of one of the most used types of dental prosthesis, metalo-ceramic is thus demonstrated. PMID:25107512

  15. All fiber optics circular-state swept source polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hermann; Kao, Meng-Chun; Lai, Chih-Ming; Huang, Jyun-Cin; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2014-02-01

    A swept source (SS)-based circular-state (CS) polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) constructed entirely with polarization-maintaining fiber optics components is proposed with the experimental verification. By means of the proposed calibration scheme, bulk quarter-wave plates can be replaced by fiber optics polarization controllers to, therefore, realize an all-fiber optics CS SSPS-OCT. We also present a numerical dispersion compensation method, which can not only enhance the axial resolution, but also improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the images. We demonstrate that this compact and portable CS SSPS-OCT system with an accuracy comparable to bulk optics systems requires less stringent lens alignment and can possibly serve as a technology to realize PS-OCT instrument for clinical applications (e.g., endoscopy). The largest deviations in the phase retardation (PR) and fast-axis (FA) angle due to sample probe in the linear scanning and a rotation angle smaller than 65 deg were of the same order as those in stationary probe setups. The influence of fiber bending on the measured PR and FA is also investigated. The largest deviations of the PR were 3.5 deg and the measured FA change by ~12 to 21 deg. Finally, in vivo imaging of the human fingertip and nail was successfully demonstrated with a linear scanning probe.

  16. Optical clearing of melanoma in vivo: characterization by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Pires, Layla; Demidov, Valentin; Vitkin, I Alex; Bagnato, Vanderlei; Kurachi, Cristina; Wilson, Brian C

    2016-08-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer, with significant risk of fatality. Due to its pigmentation, light-based imaging and treatment techniques are limited to near the tumor surface, which is inadequate, for example, to evaluate the microvascular density that is associated with prognosis. White-light diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and near-infrared optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to evaluate the effect of a topically applied optical clearing agent (OCA) in melanoma in vivo and to image the microvascular network. DRS was performed using a contact fiber optic probe in the range from 450 to 650 nm. OCT imaging was performed using a swept-source system at 1310 nm. The OCT image data were processed using speckle variance and depth-encoded algorithms. Diffuse reflectance signals decreased with clearing, dropping by ∼ 90% after 45 min. OCT was able to image the microvasculature in the pigmented melanoma tissue with good spatial resolution up to a depth of ∼ 300 μm without the use of OCA; improved contrast resolution was achieved with optical clearing to a depth of ∼ 750 μm in tumor. These findings are relevant to potential clinical applications in melanoma, such as assessing prognosis and treatment responses. Optical clearing may also facilitate the use of light-based treatments such as photodynamic therapy. PMID:27300502

  17. Coherent DWDM technology for high speed optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Ross

    2011-10-01

    The introduction of coherent digital optical transmission enables a new generation of high speed optical data transport and fiber impairment mitigation. An initial implementation of 40 Gb/s coherent systems using Dual Polarization Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (DP-QPSK) is already being installed in carrier networks. New systems running at 100 Gb/s DP-QPSK data rate are in development and early technology lab and field trial phase. Significant investment in the 100 Gb/s ecosystem (optical components, ASICs, transponders and systems) bodes well for commercial application in 2012 and beyond. Following in the footsteps of other telecommunications fields such as wireless and DSL, we can expect coherent optical transmission to evolve from QPSK to higher order modulations schemes such as Mary PSK and/or QAM. This will be an interesting area of research in coming years and poses significant challenges in terms of electro-optic, DSP, ADC/DAC design and fiber nonlinearity mitigation to reach practical implementation ready for real network deployments.

  18. Optical coherence elastography for tissue characterization: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V

    2015-04-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) represents the frontier of optical elasticity imaging techniques and focuses on the micro-scale assessment of tissue biomechanics in 3D that is hard to achieve with traditional elastographic methods. Benefit from the advancement of optical coherence tomography, and driven by the increasing requirements in nondestructive biomechanical characterization, this emerging technique recently has experienced a rapid development. In this paper, we start with the description of the mechanical contrast that has been employed by OCE and review the state-of-the-art techniques based on the reported applications and discuss the current technical challenges, emphasizing the unique role of OCE in tissue mechanical characterization. The position of OCE among other elastography techniques.

  19. Imaging of dental implant osseointegration using optical coherent tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, I.; Reisen, P.

    2009-02-01

    Investigation of initial implant stability with different dental implant designs is an important task to obtain good quality dental implants. Failure of a dental implant is often related to failure to osseointegrate correctly. Optical Coherent Tomography is a competitive non-invasive method of osseointegration investigation. FD-OCT with Swept Source was used to obtain 3-D image of the peri-implant tissue (soft and hard) in the case of mandible fixed screw. 1350 nm centered laser source give better images than 850 nm laser source for hard tissue imaging. Present work suggests that Optical Coherent Tomography is a proper technique to obtain the image of the contact tissue-metal screw. OCT images are useful to evaluate optical properties of bone tissues.

  20. Characterization of the dental pulp using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, C. M. F.; Carvalho, M. T.; Araujo, R. E.; Freitas, A. Z.; Zezell, D. M.; Gomes, A. S. L.

    2006-02-01

    The inner structure of teeth, i.e. the root canal anatomy, is very complex. However a good knowledge of endodontic architecture is the first step towards successful endodontic treatment. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful technique to generate images of hard and soft tissue. Its images show dependency on the optical properties of the tissue under analysis. Changes in the scattering and absorption of tissues can be observed through the OCT images. In this work, we used optical coherence tomography to perform in vitro studies of the inner structure of the first molar of albino rats (Rattus norvegicus). Focusing on the pulp chamber and in the root canal, we compare the images generated with the OCT technique to the histology. We are analyzing the feasibility of OCT to help on the diagnostic of endodontic diseases.

  1. Optical coherence elastography for tissue characterization: a review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) represents the frontier of optical elasticity imaging techniques and focuses on the micro-scale assessment of tissue biomechanics in 3D that is hard to achieve with traditional elastographic methods. Benefit from the advancement of optical coherence tomography, and driven by the increasing requirements in nondestructive biomechanical characterization, this emerging technique recently has experienced a rapid development. In this paper, we start with the description of the mechanical contrast that has been employed by OCE and review the state-of-the-art techniques based on the reported applications and discuss the current technical challenges, emphasizing the unique role of OCE in tissue mechanical characterization. The position of OCE among other elastography techniques. PMID:25412100

  2. Acousto-optic image processing in coherent light

    SciTech Connect

    Balakshy, V I; Voloshinov, V B

    2005-01-31

    The results of recent studies on coherent acousto-optic image processing performed at the chair of physics of oscillations at the Department of Physics of Moscow State University are reported. It is shown that this processing method is based on the filtration of the spatial spectrum of an optical signal in an acousto-optic cell. The main attention is paid to the analysis of the dependence of the transfer function of the cell on the crystal cut, geometry of acousto-optic interaction, and acoustic-wave parameters. It is shown that an acousto-optic cell allows the image differentiation and integration as well as the visualisation of phase objects. The results of experiments and computer simulation are presented which illustrate the possibilities of acousto-optic image processing. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Fourier phase in Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Uttam, Shikhar; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Phase of an electromagnetic wave propagating through a sample-of-interest is well understood in the context of quantitative phase imaging in transmission-mode microscopy. In the past decade, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography has been used to extend quantitative phase imaging to the reflection-mode. Unlike transmission-mode electromagnetic phase, however, the origin and characteristics of reflection-mode Fourier phase are poorly understood, especially in samples with a slowly varying refractive index. In this paper, the general theory of Fourier phase from first principles is presented, and it is shown that Fourier phase is a joint estimate of subresolution offset and mean spatial frequency of the coherence-gated sample refractive index. It is also shown that both spectral-domain phase microscopy and depth-resolved spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy are special cases of this general theory. Analytical expressions are provided for both, and simulations are presented to explain and support the theoretical results. These results are further used to show how Fourier phase allows the estimation of an axial mean spatial frequency profile of the sample, along with depth-resolved characterization of localized optical density change and sample heterogeneity. Finally, a Fourier phase-based explanation of Doppler optical coherence tomography is also provided. PMID:26831383

  4. Optical coherence tomography use in the diagnosis of enamel defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Azri, Khalifa; Melita, Lucia N.; Strange, Adam P.; Festy, Frederic; Al-Jawad, Maisoon; Cook, Richard; Parekh, Susan; Bozec, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) affects the permanent incisors and molars, whose undermineralized matrix is evidenced by lesions ranging from white to yellow/brown opacities to crumbling enamel lesions incapable of withstanding normal occlusal forces and function. Diagnosing the condition involves clinical and radiographic examination of these teeth, with known limitations in determining the depth extent of the enamel defects in particular. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging hard and soft tissue imaging technique, which was investigated as a new potential diagnostic method in dentistry. A comparison between the diagnostic potential of the conventional methods and OCT was conducted. Compared to conventional imaging methods, OCT gave more information on the structure of the enamel defects as well as the depth extent of the defects into the enamel structure. Different types of enamel defects were compared, each type presenting a unique identifiable pattern when imaged using OCT. Additionally, advanced methods of OCT image analysis including backscattered light intensity profile analysis and enface reconstruction were performed. Both methods confirmed the potential of OCT in enamel defects diagnosis. In conclusion, OCT imaging enabled the identification of the type of enamel defect and the determination of the extent of the enamel defects in MIH with the advantage of being a radiation free diagnostic technique.

  5. Intraoperative Evaluation of Breast Tumor Margins with Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Freddy T.; Zysk, Adam M.; Chaney, Eric J.; Kotynek, Jan G.; Oliphant, Uretz J.; Bellafiore, Frank J.; Rowland, Kendrith M.; Johnson, Patricia A.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    As breast cancer screening rates increase, smaller and more numerous lesions are being identified earlier, leading to more breast-conserving surgical procedures. Achieving a clean surgical margin represents a technical challenge with important clinical implications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is introduced as an intraoperative high-resolution imaging technique that assesses surgical breast tumor margins by providing real-time microscopic images up to 2 mm beneath the tissue surface. In a study of 37 patients split between training and study groups, OCT images covering 1 cm2 regions were acquired from surgical margins of lumpectomy specimens, registered with ink, and correlated with corresponding histological sections. A 17 patient training set used to establish standard imaging protocols and OCT evaluation criteria demonstrated that areas of higher scattering tissue with a heterogeneous pattern were indicative of tumor cells and tumor tissue, in contrast to lower scattering adipocytes found in normal breast tissue. The remaining 20 patients were enrolled into the feasibility study. Of these lumpectomy specimens, 11 were identified with a positive or close surgical margin and 9 were identified with a negative margin under OCT. Based on histological findings, 9 true positives, 9 true negatives, 2 false positives, and 0 false negatives were found, yielding a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 82%. These results demonstrate the potential of OCT as a real-time method for intraoperative margin assessment in breast conserving surgeries. PMID:19910294

  6. Retinal Imaging of Infants on Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vinekar, Anand; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Jayadev, Chaitra; Maldonado, Ramiro S.; Bauer, Noel; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral domain coherence tomography (SD OCT) has become an important tool in the management of pediatric retinal diseases. It is a noncontact imaging device that provides detailed assessment of the microanatomy and pathology of the infant retina with a short acquisition time allowing office examination without the requirement of anesthesia. Our understanding of the development and maturation of the infant fovea has been enhanced by SD OCT allowing an in vivo assessment that correlates with histopathology. This has helped us understand the critical correlation of foveal development with visual potential in the first year of life and beyond. In this review, we summarize the recent literature on the clinical applications of SD OCT in studying the pathoanatomy of the infant macula, its ability to detect subclinical features, and its correlation with disease and vision. Retinopathy of prematurity and macular edema have been discussed in detail. The review also summarizes the current status of SD OCT in other infant retinal conditions, imaging the optic nerve, the choroid, and the retinal nerve fibre in infants and children, and suggests future areas of research. PMID:26221606

  7. Marginal integrity evaluation of dental composite using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Adrian-Tudor; Cojocariu, Andreea-Codruta; Antal, Anca Adriana; Topala, Florin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2016-03-01

    In clinical dental practice it is often difficult or even impossible to distinguish and control interfacial adhesive defects from adhesive restorations using visual inspection or other traditional diagnostic methods. Nonetheless, non-invasive biomedical imaging methods like Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) may provide a better view in this diagnostic outline. The aim of this study is to explore evaluations of the marginal adaptation of class I resin composites restorations using Time Domain (TD) OCT. Posterior human teeth have been chosen for this study. The teeth were stored in 0.9% physiological saline solution prior to use. A classical round-shaped class I cavity was prepared and cavities were restored with Charisma Diamond composite by Heraeus Kulzer and using a system of etch and rinse boding. The specimens were subjected to water storage and then to thermo-cycling. Three dimensional (3-D) scans of the restoration were obtained using a TD-OCT system centered at a 1300 nm wavelength. Open marginal adaptation at the interfaces and gaps inside the composite resins materials were identified using the proposed method. In conclusion, OCT has numerous advantages which justify its use for in vitro, as well as for in vivo studies. It can therefore be considered for non-invasive and fast detection of gaps at the restoration interface.

  8. Shear wave elastography using phase sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Huang, Zhihong; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Wong, Emily Y.; Arnal, Bastien; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high spatial resolution and sensitivity that are ideal for imaging the cornea and lens. Quantifying the biomechanical properties of these tissues could add clinically valuable information. Thus, we propose a dynamic elastography method combining OCT detection and a mechanical actuator to map the shear modulus of soft tissues. We used a piezoelectric actuator driven in the kHz range and we used phase-sensitive OCT (PhS-OCT) to track the resulting shear waves at an equivalent frame rate of 47 kHz. We mapped the shear wave speed of anesthetized mice cornea using monochromatic excitations. We found a significant difference between a group of knock-out (3.92 +/- 0.35 m/s, N=4) and wild-type mice (5.04 +/- 0.51 m/s, N=3). These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of using PhS-OCT to perform in vivo shear wave elastography of the cornea. We then implemented a shear pulse compression approach on ex vivo human cornea. For that purpose, frequency- modulated excitations were used and the resulting displacement field was digitally compressed in a short broadband pulse with a 7 dB gain in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  9. Ultrahigh speed endoscopic optical coherence tomography for gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Ahsen, Osman O.; Liang, Kaicheng; Giacomelli, Michael G.; Potsaid, Benjamin M.; Tao, Yuankai K.; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Figueiredo, Marisa; Huang, Qin; Cable, Alex E.; Fujimoto, James; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ultrahigh speed endoscopic swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for clinical gastroenterology using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and micromotor imaging catheter. The system had a 600 kHz axial scan rate and 8 µm axial resolution in tissue. Imaging was performed with a 3.2 mm diameter imaging catheter at 400 frames per second with a 12 µm spot size. Three-dimensional OCT (3D-OCT) imaging was performed in patients with a cross section of pathologies undergoing upper and lower endoscopy. The use of distally actuated imaging catheters enabled OCT imaging with more flexibility, such as volumetric imaging in the small intestine and the assessment of hiatal hernia using retroflex imaging. The high rotational scanning stability of the micromotor enabled 3D volumetric imaging with micron scale volumetric accuracy for both en face OCT and cross-sectional imaging, as well as OCT angiography (OCTA) for 3D visualization of subsurface microvasculature. The ability to perform both structural and functional 3D OCT imaging in the GI tract with microscopic accuracy should enable a wide range of studies and enhance the sensitivity and specificity of OCT for detecting pathology. PMID:25574446

  10. Optical coherence tomography use in the diagnosis of enamel defects.

    PubMed

    Al-Azri, Khalifa; Melita, Lucia N; Strange, Adam P; Festy, Frederic; Al-Jawad, Maisoon; Cook, Richard; Parekh, Susan; Bozec, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) affects the permanent incisors and molars, whose undermineralized matrix is evidenced by lesions ranging from white to yellow/brown opacities to crumbling enamel lesions incapable of withstanding normal occlusal forces and function. Diagnosing the condition involves clinical and radiographic examination of these teeth, with known limitations in determining the depth extent of the enamel defects in particular. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging hard and soft tissue imaging technique, which was investigated as a new potential diagnostic method in dentistry. A comparison between the diagnostic potential of the conventional methods and OCT was conducted. Compared to conventional imaging methods, OCT gave more information on the structure of the enamel defects as well as the depth extent of the defects into the enamel structure. Different types of enamel defects were compared, each type presenting a unique identifiable pattern when imaged using OCT. Additionally, advanced methods of OCT image analysis including backscattered light intensity profile analysis and enface reconstruction were performed. Both methods confirmed the potential of OCT in enamel defects diagnosis. In conclusion, OCT imaging enabled the identification of the type of enamel defect and the determination of the extent of the enamel defects in MIH with the advantage of being a radiation free diagnostic technique. PMID:26968386

  11. Diagnosis of oral submucous fibrosis with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Wang, Yih-Ming; Yang, C. C.

    2009-09-01

    The epithelium (EP) thickness and the standard deviation (SD) of A-mode scan intensity in the laminar propria (LP) layer are used as effective indicators for the diagnosis of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) based on the noninvasive clinical scanning of a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system of ~6 μm in axial resolution (in tissue) and 103 dB in sensitivity. Compared with the corresponding parameters in healthy oral mucosal mucosa, in OSF mucosa, the EP thickness becomes smaller and the SD of A-mode scan intensity in the LP layer (LP SD) also becomes smaller. The LP SD can also be used for effectively differentiating OSF (small LP SD) from lesion (large LP SD). This application is particularly useful in the case of a lesion without a clear surface feature. Meanwhile, the use of the SD of A-mode scan intensity in the EP layer (EP SD) can further help in differentiating OSF (medium EP SD) from healthy oral mucosal (small EP SD) and lesion (large EP SD) conditions. Compared with the conventional method of maximum mouth opening measurement, the use of the proposed OCT scanning results can be a more effective technique for OSF diagnosis.

  12. Tissue thickness calculation in ocular optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Caneiro, David; Read, Scott A.; Vincent, Stephen J.; Collins, Michael J.; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Thickness measurements derived from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the eye are a fundamental clinical and research metric, since they provide valuable information regarding the eye’s anatomical and physiological characteristics, and can assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of numerous ocular conditions. Despite the importance of these measurements, limited attention has been given to the methods used to estimate thickness in OCT images of the eye. Most current studies employing OCT use an axial thickness metric, but there is evidence that axial thickness measures may be biased by tilt and curvature of the image. In this paper, standard axial thickness calculations are compared with a variety of alternative metrics for estimating tissue thickness. These methods were tested on a data set of wide-field chorio-retinal OCT scans (field of view (FOV) 60° x 25°) to examine their performance across a wide region of interest and to demonstrate the potential effect of curvature of the posterior segment of the eye on the thickness estimates. Similarly, the effect of image tilt was systematically examined with the same range of proposed metrics. The results demonstrate that image tilt and curvature of the posterior segment can affect axial tissue thickness calculations, while alternative metrics, which are not biased by these effects, should be considered. This study demonstrates the need to consider alternative methods to calculate tissue thickness in order to avoid measurement error due to image tilt and curvature. PMID:26977367

  13. Heartbeat OCT: in vivo intravascular megahertz-optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianshi; Pfeiffer, Tom; Regar, Evelyn; Wieser, Wolfgang; van Beusekom, Heleen; Lancee, Charles T.; Springeling, Geert; Krabbendam, Ilona; van der Steen, Antonius F.W.; Huber, Robert; van Soest, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac motion artifacts, non-uniform rotational distortion and undersampling affect the image quality and the diagnostic impact of intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT). In this study we demonstrate how these limitations of IV-OCT can be addressed by using an imaging system that we called “Heartbeat OCT”, combining a fast Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser, fast pullback, and a micromotor actuated catheter, designed to examine a coronary vessel in less than one cardiac cycle. We acquired in vivo data sets of two coronary arteries in a porcine heart with both Heartbeat OCT, working at 2.88 MHz A-line rate, 4000 frames/s and 100 mm/s pullback speed, and with a commercial system. The in vivo results show that Heartbeat OCT provides faithfully rendered, motion-artifact free, fully sampled vessel wall architecture, unlike the conventional IV-OCT data. We present the Heartbeat OCT system in full technical detail and discuss the steps needed for clinical translation of the technology. PMID:26713214

  14. Polarization Effects in Optical Coherence Tomography of Various Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Johannes F.; Srinivas, Shyam M.; Park, B. Hyle; Pham, Tuan H.; Chen, Zhongping; Milner, Thomas E.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) was used to obtain spatially resolved ex vivo images of polarization changes in skeletal muscle, bone, skin and brain. Through coherent detection of two orthogonal polarization states of the signal formed by interference of light reflected from the biological sample and a mirror in the reference arm of a Michelson interferometer, the depth resolved change in polarization was measured. Inasmuch as any fibrous structure will influence the polarization of light, PS-OCT is a potentially powerful technique investigating tissue structural properties. In addition, the effects of single polarization state detection on OCT image formation is demonstrated. PMID:25774083

  15. Coherence multiplexing of fiber-optic interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, J. L.; Wentworth, R. H.; Kim, B. Y.; Shaw, H. J.; Youngquist, R. C.

    1985-10-01

    The technique of coherence multiplexing (CM) several optical signals into a single-mode fiber, using a short coherence length continuous wave light source, is presented. Three CM configurations, referred to as the 'series', 'extrinsic-reference ladder', and 'intrinsic-reference ladder', are described together with the design configurations. Theoretical predictions of noise level made for a CM system with one sensor agree well with experimental results obtained for the reference system. It is believed that the phase-induced intensity noise, an intrinsic factor in a system with few sensors, could be greatly reduced by using a broad-band source, such as a superluminescent diode.

  16. Time-domain optical coherence tomography with digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massatsch, Pia; Charrière, Florian; Cuche, Etienne; Marquet, Pierre; Depeursinge, Christian D.

    2005-04-01

    We show that digital holography can be combined easily with optical coherence tomography approach. Varying the reference path length is the means used to acquire a series of holograms at different depths, providing after reconstruction images of slices at different depths in the specimen thanks to the short-coherence length of light source. A metallic object, covered by a 150-µm-thick onion cell, is imaged with high resolution. Applications in ophthalmology are shown: structures of the anterior eye, the cornea, and the iris, are studied on enucleated porcine eyes. Tomographic images of the iris border close to the pupil were obtained 165 µm underneath the eye surface.

  17. GPU-based computational adaptive optics for volumetric optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Han; Mulligan, Jeffrey A.; Untracht, Gavrielle R.; Zhang, Xihao; Adie, Steven G.

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that measures reflectance from within biological tissues. Current higher-NA optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technologies with near cellular resolution have limitations on volumetric imaging capabilities due to the trade-offs between resolution vs. depth-of-field and sensitivity to aberrations. Such trade-offs can be addressed using computational adaptive optics (CAO), which corrects aberration computationally for all depths based on the complex optical field measured by OCT. However, due to the large size of datasets plus the computational complexity of CAO and OCT algorithms, it is a challenge to achieve high-resolution 3D-OCM reconstructions at speeds suitable for clinical and research OCM imaging. In recent years, real-time OCT reconstruction incorporating both dispersion and defocus correction has been achieved through parallel computing on graphics processing units (GPUs). We add to these methods by implementing depth-dependent aberration correction for volumetric OCM using plane-by-plane phase deconvolution. Following both defocus and aberration correction, our reconstruction algorithm achieved depth-independent transverse resolution of 2.8 um, equal to the diffraction-limited focal plane resolution. We have translated the CAO algorithm to a CUDA code implementation and tested the speed of the software in real-time using two GPUs - NVIDIA Quadro K600 and Geforce TITAN Z. For a data volume containing 4096×256×256 voxels, our system's processing speed can keep up with the 60 kHz acquisition rate of the line-scan camera, and takes 1.09 seconds to simultaneously update the CAO correction for 3 en face planes at user-selectable depths.

  18. Repeatability and reproducibility of optic nerve head perfusion measurements using optical coherence tomography angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Bojikian, Karine D.; Xin, Chen; Wen, Joanne C.; Gupta, Divakar; Zhang, Qinqin; Mudumbai, Raghu C.; Johnstone, Murray A.; Chen, Philip P.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) has increasingly become a clinically useful technique in ophthalmic imaging. We evaluate the repeatability and reproducibility of blood perfusion in the optic nerve head (ONH) measured using optical microangiography (OMAG)-based OCTA. Ten eyes from 10 healthy volunteers are recruited and scanned three times with a 68-kHz Cirrus HD-OCT 5000-based OMAG prototype system (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc., Dublin, California) centered at the ONH involving two separate visits within six weeks. Vascular images are generated with OMAG processing by detecting the differences in OCT signals between consecutive B-scans acquired at the same retina location. ONH perfusion is quantified as flux, vessel area density, and normalized flux within the ONH for the prelaminar, lamina cribrosa, and the full ONH. Coefficient of variation (CV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) are used to evaluate intravisit and intervisit repeatability, and interobserver reproducibility. ONH perfusion measurements show high repeatability [CV≤3.7% (intravisit) and ≤5.2% (intervisit)] and interobserver reproducibility (ICC≤0.966) in all three layers by three metrics. OCTA provides a noninvasive method to visualize and quantify ONH perfusion in human eyes with excellent repeatability and reproducibility, which may add additional insight into ONH perfusion in clinical practice.

  19. Quantitative optical coherence elastography based on fiber-optic probe for in situ measurement of tissue mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yi; Wang, Yahui; Xu, Yiqing; Chandra, Namas; Haorah, James; Hubbi, Basil; Pfister, Bryan J; Liu, Xuan

    2016-02-01

    We developed a miniature quantitative optical coherence elastography (qOCE) instrument with an integrated Fabry-Perot force sensor, for in situ elasticity measurement of biological tissue. The technique has great potential for biomechanics modeling and clinical diagnosis. We designed the fiber-optic qOCE probe that was used to exert a compressive force to deform tissue at the tip of the probe. Using the space-division multiplexed optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal detected by a spectral domain OCT engine, we were able to quantify the probe deformation that was proportional to the force applied, and to quantify the tissue deformation corresponding to the external stimulus. Simultaneous measurement of force and displacement allowed us to extract Young's modulus of biological tissue. We experimentally calibrated our qOCE instrument, and validated its effectiveness on tissue mimicking phantoms and biological tissues.

  20. Quantitative optical coherence elastography based on fiber-optic probe for in situ measurement of tissue mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yi; Wang, Yahui; Xu, Yiqing; Chandra, Namas; Haorah, James; Hubbi, Basil; Pfister, Bryan J; Liu, Xuan

    2016-02-01

    We developed a miniature quantitative optical coherence elastography (qOCE) instrument with an integrated Fabry-Perot force sensor, for in situ elasticity measurement of biological tissue. The technique has great potential for biomechanics modeling and clinical diagnosis. We designed the fiber-optic qOCE probe that was used to exert a compressive force to deform tissue at the tip of the probe. Using the space-division multiplexed optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal detected by a spectral domain OCT engine, we were able to quantify the probe deformation that was proportional to the force applied, and to quantify the tissue deformation corresponding to the external stimulus. Simultaneous measurement of force and displacement allowed us to extract Young's modulus of biological tissue. We experimentally calibrated our qOCE instrument, and validated its effectiveness on tissue mimicking phantoms and biological tissues. PMID:26977372

  1. Quantitative optical coherence elastography based on fiber-optic probe for in situ measurement of tissue mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yi; Wang, Yahui; Xu, Yiqing; Chandra, Namas; Haorah, James; Hubbi, Basil; Pfister, Bryan J.; Liu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    We developed a miniature quantitative optical coherence elastography (qOCE) instrument with an integrated Fabry-Perot force sensor, for in situ elasticity measurement of biological tissue. The technique has great potential for biomechanics modeling and clinical diagnosis. We designed the fiber-optic qOCE probe that was used to exert a compressive force to deform tissue at the tip of the probe. Using the space-division multiplexed optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal detected by a spectral domain OCT engine, we were able to quantify the probe deformation that was proportional to the force applied, and to quantify the tissue deformation corresponding to the external stimulus. Simultaneous measurement of force and displacement allowed us to extract Young’s modulus of biological tissue. We experimentally calibrated our qOCE instrument, and validated its effectiveness on tissue mimicking phantoms and biological tissues. PMID:26977372

  2. Study of Optical Phase Lock Loops and the Applications in Coherent Beam Combining and Coherence Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wei

    Optical Phase-Lock loops (OPLLs) have potential applications in phase coherent optics including frequency synthesis, clock distribution and recovery, jitter and noise reduction, etc. However, most implemented OPLLs are based on solid state lasers, fiber lasers, or specially designed semiconductor lasers, whose bulky size and high cost inhibit the applications of OPLLs. Semiconductor lasers have the advantages of low cost, small size, and high efficiency. In this thesis, I report on a study of OPLLs using commercial SCLs, and explore their novel applications in coherent beam combining and coherence cloning. In chapter 1-3, I will first introduce the theory of OPLLs and presents the experimental study of OPLLs made of different commercial SCLs. To improve the performance of OPLLs, electronic compensations using filter designs are also discussed and studied. In chapter 4-5, I will study the application of OPLLs in coherent beam combining. Using OPLLs, an array of slave lasers can be phase locked to the same master laser at the same frequency, their outputs can then be coherently combined. The phase variations of the element beams due to the optical path-length variations in fibers can be further corrected for by using multi-level OPLLs. This approach eliminates the use of the optical phase/frequency shifters conventionally required in a coherent beam combining system. In the proof of principle experiment, we have combined two lasers with a combining efficiency of 94% using the filled-aperture combining configuration. Furthermore, I will discuss the scalability of a cascaded filled-aperture combining system for the combination of a large number of lasers. OPLLs can also be used to reduce the phase noise of SCLs by locking them to a low noise master laser. In chapter 6, I will describe the theory of coherence cloning using OPLLs and present the experimental measurements of the linewidths and frequency noises of a low noise fiber laser, a free-running and locked slave

  3. Development and Application of Multifunctional Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Zhongwei

    Microcirculation refers to the functions of capillaries and the neighboring lymphatic vessels. It plays a vital role in the pathophysiology of disorders in many clinical areas including cardiology, dermatology, neurology and ophthalmology, and so forth. It is crucial to develop imaging technologies that can provide both qualitative and quantitative information as to how microcirculation responds to certain injury and/or disease, and its treatment. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive optical imaging technique for high-resolution cross-sectional imaging of specimens, with many applications in clinical medicine. Current state-of-the-art OCT systems operate in the Fourier domain, using either a broadband light source with a spectrometer, known as spectral domain OCT (SDOCT), or a rapidly tunable laser, known as swept source OCT (SSOCT). The current Fourier domain OCT systems have dramatically improvement in sensitivity, resolution and speed compared to time domain OCT. In addition to the improvement in the OCT system hardware, different methods for functional measurements of tissue beds have been developed and demonstrated. This includes but not limited to, i) Phase-resolved Doppler OCT for quantifying the blood flow, ii) OCT angiography for visualization of microvasculature, iii) Polarization sensitive OCT for measuring the intrinsic optical property/ birefringence of tissue, iv) spectroscopic OCT for measuring blood oxygenation, etc. Functional OCT can provide important clinical information that is not available in the typical intensity based structural OCT images. Among these functional OCT modalities, Doppler OCT and OCT angiography attract great interests as they show high capability for in vivo study of microvascular pathology. By analyzing the Doppler effect of a flowing particle on light frequency, Doppler OCT allows the quantification of the blood flow speed and blood flow rate. The most popular approach for Doppler OCT is achieved through

  4. Spectrally encoded common-path fiber-optic-based parallel optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kye-Sung; Hur, Hwan; Sung, Ha-Young; Kim, I Jong; Kim, Geon-Hee

    2016-09-15

    We demonstrate a fiber-optic-based parallel optical coherence tomography (OCT) using spectrally encoded extended illumination with a common-path handheld probe, where the flexibility and robustness of the system are significantly improved, which is critical in the clinical environment. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first parallel OCT based on fiber optics including a fiber coupler with a sensitivity of 94 dB, which is comparable to that of point-scanning OCT. We also investigated the effect of the phase stability of the fiber-based interferometry on the parallel OCT system by comparing the common-path OCT with two-arm OCT. Using the homemade common-path handheld probe based on a Mirau interferometer, the phase stability was 32 times better than that of the two-arm OCT. The axial resolution of the common-path OCT was measured as 5.1±0.3  μm. To demonstrate the in vivo imaging performance of the fiber-optic-based parallel OCT, human skin was imaged. PMID:27628367

  5. In vivo imaging of human photoreceptor mosaic with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kevin S K; Jian, Yifan; Cua, Michelle; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2015-02-01

    Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (WSAO-OCT) is a novel imaging technique for in vivo high-resolution depth-resolved imaging that mitigates some of the challenges encountered with the use of sensor-based adaptive optics designs. This technique replaces the Hartmann Shack wavefront sensor used to measure aberrations with a depth-resolved image-driven optimization algorithm, with the metric based on the OCT volumes acquired in real-time. The custom-built ultrahigh-speed GPU processing platform and fast modal optimization algorithm presented in this paper was essential in enabling real-time, in vivo imaging of human retinas with wavefront sensorless AO correction. WSAO-OCT is especially advantageous for developing a clinical high-resolution retinal imaging system as it enables the use of a compact, low-cost and robust lens-based adaptive optics design. In this report, we describe our WSAO-OCT system for imaging the human photoreceptor mosaic in vivo. We validated our system performance by imaging the retina at several eccentricities, and demonstrated the improvement in photoreceptor visibility with WSAO compensation.

  6. In vivo imaging of human photoreceptor mosaic with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kevin S. K.; Jian, Yifan; Cua, Michelle; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2015-01-01

    Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (WSAO-OCT) is a novel imaging technique for in vivo high-resolution depth-resolved imaging that mitigates some of the challenges encountered with the use of sensor-based adaptive optics designs. This technique replaces the Hartmann Shack wavefront sensor used to measure aberrations with a depth-resolved image-driven optimization algorithm, with the metric based on the OCT volumes acquired in real-time. The custom-built ultrahigh-speed GPU processing platform and fast modal optimization algorithm presented in this paper was essential in enabling real-time, in vivo imaging of human retinas with wavefront sensorless AO correction. WSAO-OCT is especially advantageous for developing a clinical high-resolution retinal imaging system as it enables the use of a compact, low-cost and robust lens-based adaptive optics design. In this report, we describe our WSAO-OCT system for imaging the human photoreceptor mosaic in vivo. We validated our system performance by imaging the retina at several eccentricities, and demonstrated the improvement in photoreceptor visibility with WSAO compensation. PMID:25780747

  7. Spectrally encoded common-path fiber-optic-based parallel optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kye-Sung; Hur, Hwan; Sung, Ha-Young; Kim, I Jong; Kim, Geon-Hee

    2016-09-15

    We demonstrate a fiber-optic-based parallel optical coherence tomography (OCT) using spectrally encoded extended illumination with a common-path handheld probe, where the flexibility and robustness of the system are significantly improved, which is critical in the clinical environment. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first parallel OCT based on fiber optics including a fiber coupler with a sensitivity of 94 dB, which is comparable to that of point-scanning OCT. We also investigated the effect of the phase stability of the fiber-based interferometry on the parallel OCT system by comparing the common-path OCT with two-arm OCT. Using the homemade common-path handheld probe based on a Mirau interferometer, the phase stability was 32 times better than that of the two-arm OCT. The axial resolution of the common-path OCT was measured as 5.1±0.3  μm. To demonstrate the in vivo imaging performance of the fiber-optic-based parallel OCT, human skin was imaged.

  8. Fundus Autofluorescence, Optical Coherence Tomography, and Electroretinogram Findings in Choroidal Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, John C.; Kim, David Y.; Chou, Chai Lin; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To describe fundus autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography, and electroretinogram findings in choroidal sclerosis. Methods Retrospective case series. Eight eyes of four patients with choroidal sclerosis were evaluated with fundus autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography, and electroretinogram testing. Results In all eight eyes, fundus autofluorescence imaging revealed hypofluorescent placoid lesions corresponding to areas of chorioretinal atrophy seen on stereo biomicroscopy. Prominent hyperfluorescent linear markings underlying regions of atrophic disease were observed in all eyes, likely representative of normal choroidal vessel autofluorescence. In two eyes, fundus autofluorescence revealed punctate hypofluorescent lesions in the fovea that were not visualized on biomicroscopy. In one eye, fundus autofluorescence identified a central island of preserved retinal pigment epithelium that was not appreciated on ophthalmoscopic examination. Optical coherence imaging was significant for loss of choroidal fine tubular structures, retinal pigment epithelium, and outer nuclear layer in regions of chorioretinal atrophy. Full-field electroretinogram testing demonstrated generalized rod-cone dysfunction in all patients with a lower b- to a- wave ratio in two patients. Conclusion Fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography are noninvasive diagnostic adjunct that can aid in the diagnosis of choroidal sclerosis. Fundus autofluorescence may be a more sensitive marker of disease extent and progression than clinical exam alone. Electroretinogram testing can result in an electronegative maximal response. PMID:20224472

  9. Optical coherence tomography: a new method to assess aneurysm healing

    PubMed Central

    Thorell, William E.; Chow, Michael M.; Prayson, Richard A.; Shure, Mark A.; Jeon, Sung W.; Huang, David; Zeynalov, Emil; Woo, Henry H.; Rasmussen, Peter A.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Masaryk, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Object Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage affects approximately 10/100,000 people per year. Endovascular coil embolization is used increasingly to treat cerebral aneurysms and its safety and durability is rapidly developing. The long-term durability of coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms remains in question; patients treated using this modality require multiple follow-up angiography studies and occasional repeated treatments. Methods Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging modality that uses backscattered light to produce high-resolution tomography of optically accessible biological tissues such as the eye, luminal surface of blood vessels, and gastrointestinal tract. Vascular OCT probes in the form of imaging microwires are presently available—although not Food and Drug Administration–approved—and may be adapted for use in the cerebral circulation. In this study the authors describe the initial use of OCT to make visible the neck of aneurysms created in a canine model and treated with coil embolization. Optical coherence tomography images demonstrate changes that correlate with the histological findings of healing at the aneurysm neck and thus may be capable of demonstrating human cerebral aneurysm healing. Conclusions Optical coherence tomography may obviate the need for subsequent follow-up angiography studies as well as aid in the understanding of endovascular tissue healing. Data in this study demonstrate that further investigation of in vivo imaging with such probes is warranted. PMID:15739565

  10. Probing myocardium biomechanics using quantitative optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shang; Lopez, Andrew L.; Morikawa, Yuka; Tao, Ge; Li, Jiasong; Larina, Irina V.; Martin, James F.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    We present a quantitative optical coherence elastographic method for noncontact assessment of the myocardium elasticity. The method is based on shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (SWI-OCT), where a focused air-puff system is used to induce localized tissue deformation through a low-pressure short-duration air stream and a phase-sensitive OCT system is utilized to monitor the propagation of the induced tissue displacement with nanoscale sensitivity. The 1-D scanning of M-mode OCT imaging and the application of optical phase retrieval and mapping techniques enable the reconstruction and visualization of 2-D depth-resolved shear wave propagation in tissue with ultra-high frame rate. The feasibility of this method in quantitative elasticity measurement is demonstrated on tissue-mimicking phantoms with the estimated Young's modulus compared with uniaxial compression tests. We also performed pilot experiments on ex vivo mouse cardiac muscle tissues with normal and genetically altered cardiomyocytes. Our results indicate this noncontact quantitative optical coherence elastographic method can be a useful tool for the cardiac muscle research and studies.

  11. Trends in optical coherence tomography applied to medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-01-01

    The number of publications on optical coherence tomography (OCT) continues to double every three years. Traditionally applied to imaging the eye, OCT is now being extended to fields outside ophthalmology and optometry. Widening its applicability, progress in the core engine of the technology, and impact on development of novel optical sources, make OCT a very active and rapidly evolving field. Trends in the developments of different specific devices, such as optical sources, optical configurations and signal processing will be presented. Encompassing studies on both the configurations as well as on signal processing themes, current research in Kent looks at combining spectral domain with time domain imaging for long axial range and simultaneous imaging at several depths. Results of the collaborative work of the Applied Optics Group in Kent with organisers of this conference will be presented, with reference to 3D monitoring of abfraction.

  12. Gabor-based fusion technique for Optical Coherence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Jannick P; Meemon, Panomsak; Murali, Supraja; Thompson, Kevin P; Lee, Kye-sung

    2010-02-15

    We recently reported on an Optical Coherence Microscopy technique, whose innovation intrinsically builds on a recently reported - 2 microm invariant lateral resolution by design throughout a 2 mm cubic full-field of view - liquid-lens-based dynamic focusing optical probe [Murali et al., Optics Letters 34, 145-147, 2009]. We shall report in this paper on the image acquisition enabled by this optical probe when combined with an automatic data fusion method developed and described here to produce an in-focus high resolution image throughout the imaging depth of the sample. An African frog tadpole (Xenopus laevis) was imaged with the novel probe and the Gabor-based fusion technique, demonstrating subcellular resolution in a 0.5 mm (lateral) x 0.5 mm (axial) without the need, for the first time, for x-y translation stages, depth scanning, high-cost adaptive optics, or manual intervention. In vivo images of human skin are also presented.

  13. Novel catheter enabling simultaneous radiofrequency ablation and optical coherence reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, D.; Lloret, Juan; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; Rubio-Guivernau, J. L.; Margallo-Balbás, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    A novel radiofrequency ablation catheter has been developed with integrated custom designed optics, enabling real-time monitoring of radiofrequency ablation procedures through polarization-sensitive optical coherence reflectometry. The optics allow for proper tissue illumination through a view-port machined in the catheter tip, thus providing lesion depth control over the RF ablation treatment. The system was verified in an in-vitro model of swine myocardium. Optical performance and thermal stability was confirmed after more than 25 procedures, without any damage to the optical assembly induced by thermal stress or material degradation. The use of this catheter in RF ablation treatments may make possible to assess lesion depth during therapy, thus translating into a reduction of potential complications on the procedure. PMID:26417499

  14. Optical Coherence Tomography for Online Guidance of Complex Coronary Interventions.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Kunihiro; Guagliumi, Giulio

    2016-09-23

    Decision making on lesion preparation and stent/scaffold optimization are cornerstones of patient outcome. Intravascular imaging recently emerged as a critical modality to achieve better results of stent/scaffold implantation and superior clinical outcomes compared with coronary angiography alone. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a light-based intravascular imaging modality with high frame rate in acquisition and very high speed pullback, can interrogate the target vessel in a couple of seconds, and immediately display a pristine longitudinal lumen contour with automatic detection of lesion severity, site and lumen/stent areas. Further, OCT provides pivotal information on sites of calcium, with accurate measurements of the minimum distance from the lumen, a major determinant of stent/scaffold underexpansion, malapposition and eccentricity. Finally, to guide the PCI procedure using OCT without operator misjudgment, a real-time point-to-point correspondence between angiographic and OCT images has been recently created. Co-registration of OCT with angiography with direct tableside control of acquisition and analysis enables the operator to plan and map optimal stent/scaffold implantation. To prove the clinical relevance of OCT-guided PCI, simple, standardized interventional planning, including pre- and postprocedural automatic lumen detection metrics, has to be translated into effective treatment flow algorithms. A similar OCT algorithm is being tested in the ongoing prospective, randomized, multicenter ILUMIEN III study, to demonstrate that OCT-guided stent placement is superior to angiography-guided and non-inferior to IVUS-guided stent implantation. (Circ J 2016; 80: 2063-2072). PMID:27616595

  15. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography in Urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yingtian; Waltzer, Wayne; Ye, Zhangqun

    Clinical statistics has shown a stable prevalence of bladder cancer in recent years, which by far remains among the most common types of malignancy in the USA. With smoking as the most well-established risk factor, bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer occurrences in male population [1]. In the year of 2014, an estimated 74,690 new cases are expected to occur with estimated 15,580 deaths. Bladder cancer often refers to transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) as it originates primarily from the epithelial cell layer (i.e., urothelium) of the bladder. Unlike prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for prostate cancer screening, there is currently no effective screening technique approved or recommended for the population at average risk [2-5]. As a result, hematuria (i.e., blood in the urine) is often the first clinical symptom of bladder cancer. Fortunately, urinary bladder is more accessible than prostate glands endoscopically; thus cytology following white-light cystoscopy has been the gold standard for current clinical detection of bladder cancer. This is important because bladder cancer if diagnosed prior to muscle invasion (e.g., superficial or at

  16. The use of optical coherence tomography in maxillofacial surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Obaidi, Mohammed; Tandon, Rahul; Tiwana, Paul

    2015-02-01

    The ever-evolving medical field continues to trend toward less invasive approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of pathological conditions. Basic sciences research has allowed for improved technologies that are translated to the clinical sciences. Similarly, advancements in imaging modalities continue to improve and their applications become more varied. As such, surgeons and pathologists are able to depend on smaller samples for tissue diagnosis of pathological disease, where once large sections of tissue were needed. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a high-resolution imaging technique, has been used extensively in different medical fields to improve diagnostic yield. Its use in dental fields, particularly in oral and maxillofacial surgery, remains limited. Our goal is to assess the use of OCT for improving soft tissue analysis and diagnosis, particularly for its applications in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Optical coherence tomography is a modality that uses an optical signal using safe near-infrared light which is reflected off the sub-surface structures. This allows for high-resolution cross-sectional images of the tissue morphology to be obtained. Ophthalmologists have been using OCT to obtain images of the retina to assess for age-related macular degeneration. More recently, OCT has been used by Interventional Cardiology to image coronary arteries, and assess plaque thickness and morphology. This technology is now being investigated in several medical fields as a form of optical biopsy, providing in situ images with high-resolution morphology of tissues. We are particularly interested in its use on epithelial tissues, and therefore performed a literature review on the use of OCT for assessing epithelium. Evaluation of histologically-diagnosed actinic keratosis, for example, was found to correlate well with the imaging discrepancies found on OCT; and the in vivo assessment of atypical keratinocytes was firmly established. Additionally

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Wei; Qi, Xin; Wang, Hui; Rollins, Andrew M.

    Researchers have long been exploring OCT as a diagnostic tool for the early epithelial dysplastic changes in the gastrointestinal tract. One reason is that the subsurface microscopic changes are within the depth-penetrating and detail-resolving capability of OCT. However, endoscopically imaging a large lumen (i.e. esophagus and colon) has been challenging. In this chapter, the key technologies to overcome the obstacles are introduced: 1) Rapid imaging acquisition based on spectral-domain OCT technology; 2) Miniature scanning probe and balloon-based catheter for volumetric imaging; and 3) Image reconstruction and computer-aided diagnosis algorithms. Animal and clinical studies based on these technologies will be presented.

  18. Video-rate three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubscher, Markus; Ducros, Mathieu; Karamata, Boris; Lasser, Theo; Salathe, Rene

    2002-05-01

    Most current optical coherence tomography systems provide two-dimensional cross-sectional or en face images. Successive adjacent images have to be acquired to reconstruct three-dimensional objects, which can be time consuming. Here we demonstrate three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D OCT) at video rate. A 58 by 58 smart-pixel detector array was employed. A sample volume of 210x210x80 m3 (corresponding to 58x58x58 voxels) was imaged at 25 Hz. The longitudinal and transverse resolutions are 3 m and 9 m respectively. The sensitivity of the system was 76 dB. Video rate 3D OCT is illustrated by movies of a strand of hair undergoing fast thermal damage.

  19. Coherent control of plasmonic nanoantennas using optical eigenmodes

    PubMed Central

    Kosmeier, Sebastian; De Luca, Anna Chiara; Zolotovskaya, Svetlana; Di Falco, Andrea; Dholakia, Kishan; Mazilu, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The last decade has seen subwavelength focusing of the electromagnetic field in the proximity of nanoplasmonic structures with various designs. However, a shared issue is the spatial confinement of the field, which is mostly inflexible and limited to fixed locations determined by the geometry of the nanostructures, which hampers many applications. Here, we coherently address numerically and experimentally single and multiple plasmonic nanostructures chosen from a given array, resorting to the principle of optical eigenmodes. By decomposing the light field into optical eigenmodes, specifically tailored to the nanostructure, we create a subwavelength, selective and dynamic control of the incident light. The coherent control of plasmonic nanoantennas using this approach shows an almost zero crosstalk. This approach is applicable even in the presence of large transmission aberrations, such as present in holographic diffusers and multimode fibres. The method presents a paradigm shift for the addressing of plasmonic nanostructures by light. PMID:23657743

  20. Parametric imaging of viscoelasticity using optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, Philip; McLaughlin, Robert A; Sampson, David D; Kennedy, Brendan F

    2015-03-21

    We demonstrate imaging of soft tissue viscoelasticity using optical coherence elastography. Viscoelastic creep deformation is induced in tissue using step-like compressive loading and the resulting time-varying deformation is measured using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography. From a series of co-located B-scans, we estimate the local strain rate as a function of time, and parameterize it using a four-parameter Kelvin-Voigt model of viscoelastic creep. The estimated viscoelastic strain and time constant are used to visualize viscoelastic creep in 2D, dual-parameter viscoelastograms. We demonstrate our technique on six silicone tissue-simulating phantoms spanning a range of viscoelastic parameters. As an example in soft tissue, we report viscoelastic contrast between muscle and connective tissue in fresh, ex vivo rat gastrocnemius muscle and mouse abdominal transection. Imaging viscoelastic creep deformation has the potential to provide complementary contrast to existing imaging modalities, and may provide greater insight into disease pathology.

  1. Combined Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography and Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Utzinger, Urs

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) are promising modalities for tissue characterization in human patients and animal models. OCT detects coherently backscattered light, whereas LIF detects fluorescence emission of endogenous biochemicals, such as reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), collagen, and fluorescent proteins, or exogenous substances such as cyanine dyes. Given the complementary mechanisms of contrast for OCT and LIF, the combination of the two modalities could potentially provide more sensitive and specific detection of disease than either modality alone. Sample probes for both OCT and LIF can be implemented using small diameter optical fibers, suggesting a particular synergy for endoscopic applications. In this chapter, the mechanisms of contrast and diagnostic capability for both OCT and LIF are briefly examined. Evidence of complementary capability is described. Example published combined OCT-LIF systems are reviewed, one successful commercial instrument is discussed, and example applications are provided.

  2. Optical Field Shaping with Broadband Coherent Raman Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Alexei; Wang, Kai; Zhi, Miaochan; Bahari, Aysan; Shutova, Mariia; Zhdanova, Alexandra

    2016-05-01

    We work toward developing a novel light source capable of producing sub-cycle optical waveforms with prescribed temporal and spatial shapes. Our Raman-based technique utilizes highly coherent molecular motion to modulate light and produce a broadband spectrum of mutually coherent sidebands. The total bandwidth of our source spans infrared, visible, and ultraviolet spectral regions, generating bursts of light synchronized with respect to molecular oscillations. Controlled spectral and temporal shaping of the resultant waveform allows arbitrary ultrafast, potentially non-sinusoidal, field synthesis. Our use of spatial light modulators to shape the transverse beam profiles adds another dimension to the laser field engineering. These are steps toward production of space- and time-tailored sub-cycle optical fields. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. PHY-1307153) and the Welch Foundation (Grant No. A-1547).

  3. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images using digital filtering

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Aydogan; Bilenca, Alberto; Desjardins, Adrien E.; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2009-01-01

    Speckle noise is a ubiquitous artifact that limits the interpretation of optical coherence tomography images. Here we apply various speckle-reduction digital filters to optical coherence tomography images and compare their performance. Our results indicate that shift-invariant, nonorthogonal wavelet-transform-based filters together with enhanced Lee and adaptive Wiener filters can significantly reduce speckle and increase the signal-to-noise ratio, while preserving strong edges. The speckle reduction capabilities of these filters are also compared with speckle reduction from incoherent angular compounding. Our results suggest that by using these digital filters, the number of individual angles required to attain a certain level of speckle reduction can be decreased. PMID:17728812

  4. One specific velocity color mapping using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Proskurin, Sergey G; Potlov, Anton Yu; Frolov, Sergej V

    2015-05-01

    Depth resolved coherence gating along with Doppler shift detection of the carrier frequency is used for one predetermined velocity mapping in different flows. Bidirectional rapid scanning optical delay of optical coherence tomography system is applied in the reference arm. Tilted capillary entry is used as a hydrodynamic phantom to model a sign-variable flow with complex geometry. Structural and one specific velocity images are obtained from the scanning interferometer signal processing in the frequency domain using analog and digital filtering. A standard structural image is decomposed into three parts: stationary object, and positive and negative velocity distributions. The latter two show equivelocity maps of the flow. The final image is represented as the complexation of the three.

  5. Optical coherence elastography: current status and future applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Standish, Beau; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2011-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has several advantages over other imaging modalities, such as angiography and ultrasound, due to its inherently high in vivo resolution, which allows for the identification of morphological tissue structures. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) benefits from the superior spatial resolution of OCT and has promising applications, including cancer diagnosis and the detailed characterization of arterial wall biomechanics, both of which are based on the elastic properties of the tissue under investigation. We present OCE principles based on techniques associated with static and dynamic tissue excitation, and their corresponding elastogram image-reconstruction algorithms are reviewed. OCE techniques, including the development of intravascular- or catheter-based OCE, are in their early stages of development but show great promise for surgical oncology or intravascular cardiology applications.

  6. Automated optic-nerve-head analysis using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Manish D.; Harman, Jonathan W.; Kim, Robert; Kirschbaum, Alan R.; Pedersen, Per; Everett, Matthew J.; Wei, Jay

    2002-06-01

    The early identification of glaucomatous development is extremely important for treatment of glaucoma. Analysis of optic-nerve-head features may play a crucial role for early glaucoma diagnostics. Here we propose a critical parameter, viz., nerve tissue area, which may prove to be extremely useful for detection of glaucoma in early stages. We report a novel and robust algorithm for OCT-based automatic, objective extraction of critical optic-nerve-head features such as optic disc, nerve tissue area, and optic cup for the first time.

  7. Multiple scattering and intensity fluctuations in optical coherent tomography of randomly inhomogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmin, V. L. Meglinski, I. V.

    2007-08-15

    An expression for signal intensity fluctuations in optical coherent tomography has been obtained for the first time in the framework of the theory of the multiple scattering of low-coherent optical radiation in a random medium. The contribution of the multiple scattering of low-coherent radiation backscattered from a randomly inhomogeneous layer, as well as the speckles of the interference component in optical coherent tomography, has been calculated.

  8. Towards using spectral domain optical coherence tomography for dental wear monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mǎrcǎuteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topalǎ, Florin I.; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that fast spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging systems have the potential to monitor the evolution of pathological dental wear. On 10 caries free teeth, four levels of artificially defects similar to those observed in the clinic were created. After every level of induced defect, OCT scanning was performed. B-scans were acquired and 3D reconstructions were generated.

  9. Strong electronic correlation effects in coherent multidimensional nonlinear optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karadimitriou, M E; Kavousanaki, E G; Dani, K M; Fromer, N A; Perakis, I E

    2011-05-12

    We discuss a many-body theory of the coherent ultrafast nonlinear optical response of systems with a strongly correlated electronic ground state that responds unadiabatically to photoexcitation. We introduce a truncation of quantum kinetic density matrix equations of motion that does not rely on an expansion in terms of the interactions and thus applies to strongly correlated systems. For this we expand in terms of the optical field, separate out contributions to the time-evolved many-body state due to correlated and uncorrelated multiple optical transitions, and use "Hubbard operator" density matrices to describe the exact dynamics of the individual contributions within a subspace of strongly coupled states, including "pure dephasing". Our purpose is to develop a quantum mechanical tool capable of exploring how, by coherently photoexciting selected modes, one can trigger nonlinear dynamics of strongly coupled degrees of freedom. Such dynamics could lead to photoinduced phase transitions. We apply our theory to the nonlinear response of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a magnetic field. We coherently photoexcite the two lowest Landau level (LL) excitations using three time-delayed optical pulses. We identify some striking temporal and spectral features due to dynamical coupling of the two LLs facilitated by inter-Landau-level magnetoplasmon and magnetoroton excitations and compare to three-pulse four-wave-mixing (FWM) experiments. We show that these features depend sensitively on the dynamics of four-particle correlations between an electron-hole pair and a magnetoplasmon/magnetoroton, reminiscent of exciton-exciton correlations in undoped semiconductors. Our results shed light into unexplored coherent dynamics and relaxation of the quantum Hall system (QHS) and can provide new insight into non-equilibrium co-operative phenomena in strongly correlated systems.

  10. Optical coherence tomography based microangiography findings in hydroxychloroquine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kam, Jason; Zhang, Qinqin; Lin, Jason; Liu, Jin; Wang, Ruikang K; Rezaei, Kasra

    2016-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography based microangiography (OMAG) is a new, non-invasive imaging modality capable of providing three dimentional (3D) retinal and choroidal microvascular maps without a need for exogenous dye. In this study, we evaluated the retinal and choroidal microvascular architecture of the macula in a patient with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) toxicity using OMAG. Detailed microvascular information of the retina and the underlying choroid showed loss of parafoveal outer retinal vasculature with sparing of the central fovea vasculature. PMID:27190770

  11. Phase control of HF chemical lasers for coherent optical recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, C P; Smith, P L

    1979-05-01

    A servo system for phase-locking two HF chemical lasers has been designed and simulated. A steady-state phase error is achieved that is adequate for coherent optical recombination. The results are based on the measured frequency drift of a small HF chemical laser and the measured frequency response of a piezoelectric transducer (PZT) mirror driver. A major innovation is the use of rate feedback with a laser Doppler sensor to extend the useful frequency response of the PZT driver.

  12. Autocorrelation optical coherence tomography for glucose quantification in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, H.; Gilanie, G.; Hussain, F.; Ahmad, E.

    2015-12-01

    We report a new method for glucose monitoring in blood tissue based on the autocorrelation function (ACF) analysis in Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). We have determined the changes in OCT monitoring signals’ depth to characterize the modulations in ACFs for quantitative measurements of glucose concentrations in blood. We found that an increase in the concentration of glucose in blood results in decreased OCT monitoring signal due to the increase in the refractive index of the media.

  13. Optical fibre resonator rotation sensor using a low coherence source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadiroushan, M.; Giles, I. P.; Youngquist, R. C.

    1987-03-01

    A resonator-type rotation sensor using a low coherence is presented. While the system uses phase modulation techniques similar to those of the conventional optical fiber gyroscope, it relies on multiple loop transitions to enhance system sensitivity. The theoretical rotation sensitivity is 2.7 times greater than that of the conventional phase-modulated Sagnac interferometer. Consideration is given to the phase-induced intensity noise in the system.

  14. Imaging tamoxifen retinopathy using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Caramoy, Albert; Scholz, Paula; Fauser, Sascha; Kirchhof, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    A case of tamoxifen retinopathy examined with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is presented. The typical refractile deposits are located between ganglion cell layer and inner plexiform layer in SD-OCT. A defect on the outer retinal layer with disruption of the photoreceptor layer with sharp edges is seen. The still attached posterior hyaloids gives evidence of other pathomechanism involved in the outer retinal defect than that of macular hole, as suggested in the literature.

  15. High-resolution parallel optical coherence tomography in scattering samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubscher, M.; Ducros, Mathieu G.; Karamata, Boris; Bourquin, Stephane; Lasser, Theo

    2001-11-01

    Parallel optical coherence tomography in scattering samples is demonstrated using a 58 by 58 smart-pixel detector array. A femtosecond mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser in combination with a free space Michelson interferometer was employed to achieve 4micrometers longitudinal resolution and 9mm transverse resolution on a 260x260 micrometers 2 field of view. We imaged a resolution target covered by an intralipid solution with different scattering coefficients as well as onion cells.

  16. Coherent optical determination of the leaf angle distribution of corn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T. (Principal Investigator); Pihlman, M.

    1981-01-01

    A coherent optical technique for the diffraction analysis of an image is presented. Developments in radar remote sensing shows a need to understand plant geometry and its relationship to plant moisture, soil moisture, and the radar backscattering coefficient. A corn plant changes its leaf angle distribution, as a function of time, from a uniform distribution to one that is strongly vertical. It is shown that plant and soil moisture may have an effect on plant geometry.

  17. Optical coherence tomography-based micro-particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Mujat, Mircea; Ferguson, R Daniel; Iftimia, Nicusor; Hammer, Daniel X; Nedyalkov, Ivaylo; Wosnik, Martin; Legner, Hartmut

    2013-11-15

    We present a new application of optical coherence tomography (OCT), widely used in biomedical imaging, to flow analysis in near-wall hydrodynamics for marine research. This unique capability, called OCT micro-particle image velocimetry, provides a high-resolution view of microscopic flow phenomena and measurement of flow statistics within the first millimeter of a boundary layer. The technique is demonstrated in a small flow cuvette and in a water tunnel.

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography as a Tool for Ocular Dynamics Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Siedlecki, Damian; Kowalik, Waldemar; Kasprzak, Henryk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of the study is to demonstrate that the ocular dynamics of the anterior chamber of the eye can be estimated quantitatively by means of optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods. A commercial high speed, high resolution optical coherence tomographer was used. The sequences of tomographic images of the iridocorneal angle of three subjects were captured and each image from the sequence was processed in MATLAB environment in order to detect and identify the contours of the cornea and iris. The data on pulsatile displacements of the cornea and iris and the changes of the depth of the gap between them were retrieved from the sequences. Finally, the spectral analysis of the changes of these parameters was performed. Results. The results of the temporal and spectral analysis manifest the ocular microfluctuation that might be associated with breathing (manifested by 0.25 Hz peak in the power spectra), heart rate (1–1.5 Hz peak), and ocular hemodynamics (3.75–4.5 Hz peak). Conclusions. This paper shows that the optical coherence tomography can be used as a tool for noninvasive estimation of the ocular dynamics of the anterior segment of the eye, but its usability in diagnostics of the ocular hemodynamics needs further investigations. PMID:26557659

  19. Development of a nonlinear optical measurement-4 coherent imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaojun; Song, Yinglin; Gu, Jihua; Yang, Junyi; Shui, Min; Hou, Dengke; Zhu, Zongjie

    2009-07-01

    After the nonlinear optical phenomena were discovered, people began to research the techniques to detect the optical nonlinearities of materials. In this paper, a new optical nonlinear measurement technique-4f coherent imaging system is recommended. The system has many advantages: single shot real-time measurement, simple experimental apparatus, high sensitivity, being able to detect the magnitude and sign of both nonlinear absorption and refraction at the same time, low requirement of beam spatial distribution, and so on. This paper introduces the theory of the 4f system and makes a detailed review and expounds development and application of the 4f coherent image system. The nerve of the experiment is improving the phase diaphragm. The shape of the diaphragm from the double-slits to the small rectangular object, and transition to a circular aperture, finally forming a circular phase diaphragm, which is a circular aperture in the center add a phase object. Following these diaphragm changes, the sensitivity of the system is greatly improved. The latest developments of the system are series-wound double 4f coherent imaging technique and the time-resolved pump-probe system based on NIT-PO. The time-resolved pump-probe system based on NIT-PO can be used to measure the dynamic characteristics of excited states nonlinear absorption and refraction.

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography for Brain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    Recently, there has been growing interest in using OCT for brain imaging. A feasibility study of OCT for guiding deep brain probes has found that OCT can differentiate the white matter and gray matter because the white matter tends to have a higher peak reflectivity and steeper attenuation rate compared to gray matter. In vivo 3D visualization of the layered organization of a rat olfactory bulb with OCT has been demonstrated. OCT has been used for single myelin fiber imaging in living rodents without labeling. The refractive index in the rat somatosensory cortex has also been measured with OCT. In addition, functional extension of OCT, such as Doppler-OCT (D-OCT), polarization sensitive-OCT (PS-OCT), and phase-resolved-OCT (PR-OCT), can image and quantify physiological parameters in addition to the morphological structure image. Based on the scattering changes during neural activity, OCT has been used to measure the functional activation in neuronal tissues. PS-OCT, which combines polarization sensitive detection with OCT to determine tissue birefringence, has been used for the localization of nerve fiber bundles and the mapping of micrometer-scale fiber pathways in the brain. D-OCT, also named optical Doppler tomography (ODT), combines the Doppler principle with OCT to obtain high resolution tomographic images of moving constituents in highly scattering biological tissues. D-OCT has been successfully used to image cortical blood flow and map the blood vessel network for brain research. In this chapter, the principle and technology of OCT and D-OCT are reviewed and examples of potential applications are described.

  1. Three-dimensional multifunctional optical coherence tomography for skin imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, En; Makita, Shuichi; Hong, Young-Joo; Kasaragod, Deepa; Sasaoka, Tomoko; Yamanari, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Satoshi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) visualizes cross-sectional microstructures of biological tissues. Recent developments of multifunctional OCT (MF-OCT) provides multiple optical contrasts which can reveal currently unknown tissue properties. In this contribution we demonstrate multifunctional OCT specially designed for dermatological investigation. And by utilizing it to measure four different body parts of in vivo human skin, three-dimensional scattering OCT, OCT angiography, polarization uniformity tomography, and local birefringence tomography images were obtained by a single scan. They respectively contrast the structure and morphology, vasculature, melanin content and collagen traits of the tissue.

  2. Evaluation of whole blood coagulation process by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangqun; Lin, Jia

    2010-11-01

    This study was to investigate the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to evaluate whole blood coagulation process. Attenuation coefficients and 1/e light penetration depth (D1/e) against time of human whole blood during in vitro clot formation under static were measured from the OCT profiles of reflectance vs depth. The results obtained clearly showed that the optical parameters are able to identify three stages during the in vitro blood clotting process. It is concluded that D1/e measured by OCT is a potential parameter to quantify and follow the liquid-gel transition of blood during clotting.

  3. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; et al

    2015-04-22

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  4. Integrated optical modulators and switches using coherent perfect loss.

    PubMed

    Grote, Richard R; Driscoll, Jeffrey B; Osgood, Richard M

    2013-08-15

    We propose a new type of amplitude modulator for integrated optics based on phase-controllable coherent perfect loss (CPL) from a resonant cavity. Temporal coupled-mode theory is employed to derive a simple set of equations that describe the device operation, and finite-difference time-domain simulations are used to verify these equations. Two examples of CPL modulators are described with this formalism: a ring resonator and a 1D photonic crystal cavity. We show that internal resonator loss, and thus critical coupling, are not strict requirements for CPL operation. These devices are simple to design and can act as compact switches and modulators for integrated optics. PMID:24104632

  5. Jones Matrix Based Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuno, Yoshiaki; Ju, Myeong-Jin; Hong, Young Joo; Makita, Shuichi; Lim, Yiheng; Yamanari, Masahiro

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is an extension of OCT and is capable of measuring the polarization properties of biological tissues, such as phase retardation, diattenuation, and optic-axis orientation. It is known that several types of biological tissues possess microscopic fibrous structures including collagen fibers and nerve fibers. Since these microscopic structures are smaller than the resolution of OCT, standard OCT is not capable of assessing them. However, these microscopic structures are known to possess birefringence, and PS-OCT is capable of assessing these microscopic tissue properties by measuring its polarization property.

  6. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; Milathianaki, Despina; Polzin, Wayne; Ratner, Daniel; Tavella, Franz; Vetter, Sharon; Welch, Marc; White, William E.; Fry, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS. PMID:25931064

  7. Variable-time-delay optical coherent transient signal processing.

    PubMed

    Merkel, K D; Babbitt, W R; Anderson, K E; Wagner, K H

    1999-10-15

    A technique is proposed and experimentally demonstrated that achieves simultaneous optical pattern waveform storage and programmable time delay for continuous real-time signal processing by use of optical coherent transient technology. We achieve variable-time-delay and broadband signal processing by frequency shifting of two chirped programming pulses, the chirp rate of one being twice that of the other, without using brief reference pulses and without changing the timing of the programming sequence. We demonstrate the technique experimentally in Tm(3+): YAG at 5 K for 40-MHz chirps by performing temporal signal convolution with true-time delays that vary over a 250-ns range.

  8. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Minitti, Michael P; Robinson, Joseph S; Coffee, Ryan N; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C; Miahnahri, Alan; Milathianaki, Despina; Polzin, Wayne; Ratner, Daniel; Tavella, Franz; Vetter, Sharon; Welch, Marc; White, William E; Fry, Alan R

    2015-05-01

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump-probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump-probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  9. The diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. H.; Du, Y.

    2016-06-01

    We have attempted to explore the intrinsic differences in the optical properties of the nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and normal tissue by optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT imaging of normal tissue provided three layers of epithelium, lamina propria, and the brighter interface of basement membrane; while carcinomas disrupted the layered construction embedded in signal-poor images. The morphologies were consistent with histological findings. Sensitivity and specificity were 90% and 100%, respectively. This pilot study demonstrates that NPC could be diagnosed by visualization, which implies that OCT might be potentially used to differentiate normal from NPC tissue in the early stage as an invasive biopsy.

  10. Parameter estimation of atherosclerotic tissue optical properties from three-dimensional intravascular optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Shalev, Ronny; Prabhu, David; Tanaka, Kentaro; Rollins, Andrew M.; Costa, Marco; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We developed robust, three-dimensional methods, as opposed to traditional A-line analysis, for estimating the optical properties of calcified, fibrotic, and lipid atherosclerotic plaques from in vivo coronary artery intravascular optical coherence tomography clinical pullbacks. We estimated attenuation μt and backscattered intensity I0 from small volumes of interest annotated by experts in 35 pullbacks. Some results were as follows: noise reduction filtering was desirable, parallel line (PL) methods outperformed individual line methods, root mean square error was the best goodness-of-fit, and α-trimmed PL (α-T-PL) was the best overall method. Estimates of μt were calcified (3.84±0.95  mm−1), fibrotic (2.15±1.08  mm−1), and lipid (9.99±2.37  mm−1), similar to those in the literature, and tissue classification from optical properties alone was promising. PMID:26158087

  11. Optical coherence tomography as film thickness measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manallah, Aissa; Bouafia, Mohamed; Meguellati, Said

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful optical method, noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic method. Although it is usually used for medical examinations, particularly in ocular exploration; it can also be used in optical metrology as measure technique. In this work, we use OCT to measure thicknesses of films. In OCT, depth profiles are constructed by measuring the time delay of back reflected light by interferometry measurements. Frequency in k-space is proportional to optical path difference. Then the reflectivity profile is obtained by a Fourier transformation, and the difference between two successive peaks of the resulting spectrum gives the film thickness. Several films, food-type, of different thicknesses were investigated and the results were very accurate.

  12. Effectiveness of adaptive optics system in satellite-to-ground coherent optical communication.

    PubMed

    Jian, Huang; Ke, Deng; Chao, Liu; Peng, Zhang; Dagang, Jiang; Zhoushi, Yao

    2014-06-30

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems can suppress the signal fade induced by atmospheric turbulence in satellite-to-ground coherent optical communication. The lower bound of the signal fade under AO compensation was investigated by analyzing the pattern of aberration modes for a one-stage imaging AO system. The distribution of the root mean square of the residual aberration is discussed on the basis of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the residual aberration of the AO system. The effectiveness of the AO system for improving the performance of coherent optical communication is presented in terms of the bit error rate and system availability.

  13. Optical Coherence Tomography in Kidney Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Peter M.; Wierwille, Jeremiah; Chen, Yu

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with both high mortality rates and an enormous economic burden [1]. The preferred treatment option for ESRD that can extend patients' lives and improve their quality of life is kidney transplantation. However, organ shortages continue to pose a major problem in kidney transplantation. Most kidneys for transplantation come from heart-beating cadavers. Although non-heart-beating cadavers represent a potentially large pool of donor kidneys, these kidneys are not often used due to the unknown extent of damage to the renal tubules (i.e., acute tubular necrosis or "ATN") induced by ischemia (i.e., lack of blood flow). Also, ischemic insult suffered by kidneys awaiting transplantation frequently causes ATN that leads to varying degrees of delayed graft function (DGF) after transplantation. Finally, ATN represents a significant risk for eventual graft and patient survival [2, 3] and can be difficult to discern from rejection. In present clinical practice, there is no reliable real-time test to determine the viability of donor kidneys and whether or not donor kidneys might exhibit ATN. Therefore, there is a critical need for an objective and reliable real-time test to predict ATN to use these organs safely and utilize the donor pool optimally. In this review, we provided preliminary data indicating that OCT can be used to predict the post-transplant function of kidneys used in transplantation.

  14. Low-power coherent and noncoherent light in clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipa, Ciprian; Pascu, Mihail-Lucian; Stanciulescu, Viorica; Mayerzedt, Claudia; Vlaiculescu, Mihaela

    1996-11-01

    In order to find out the comparative clinical effects of coherent and noncoherent low power light, we divided 74 patients with sciatics in three groups, treated with the same energy dose, as follows: A group: with IR continuous diode laser; B group: with noncoherent IR diode; C group: with placebo laser. The positive results were 66.66 percent for A group, 52.00 percent for B group and 36.36 percent for C group. We conclude, after these preliminary results, that coherent low power light has superior clinical efficacy versus noncoherent light and placebo laser, when used the same energy dose.

  15. Editorial . Quantum fluctuations and coherence in optical and atomic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschner, Jürgen; Gatti, Alessandra; Maître, Agnès; Morigi, Giovanna

    2003-03-01

    From simple interference fringes, over molecular wave packets, to nonlinear optical patterns - the fundamental interaction between light and matter leads to the formation of structures in many areas of atomic and optical physics. Sophisticated technology in experimental quantum optics, as well as modern computational tools available to theorists, have led to spectacular achievements in the investigation of quantum structures. This special issue is dedicated to recent developments in this area. It presents a selection of examples where quantum dynamics, fluctuations, and coherence generate structures in time or in space or where such structures are observed experimentally. The examples range from coherence phenomena in condensed matter, over atoms in optical structures, entanglement in light and matter, to quantum patterns in nonlinear optics and quantum imaging. The combination of such seemingly diverse subjects formed the basis of a successful European TMR network, "Quantum Structures" (visit http://cnqo.phys.strath.ac.uk/~gianluca/QSTRUCT/). This special issue partly re.ects the results and collaborations of the network, going however well beyond its scope by including contributions from a global community and from many related topics which were not addressed directly in the network. The aim of this issue is to present side by side these di.erent topics, all of which are loosely summarized under quantum structures, to highlight their common aspects, their di.erences, and the progress which resulted from the mutual exchange of results, methods, and knowledge. To guide the reader, we have organized the articles into subsections which follow a rough division into structures in material systems and structures in optical .elds. Nevertheless, in the following introduction we point out connections between the contributions which go beyond these usual criteria, thus highlighting the truly interdisciplinary nature of quantum structures. Much of the progress in atom optics

  16. Corneal Pachymetry Mapping with High-speed Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Shekhar, Raj; Huang, David

    2006-01-01

    Objective To map corneal thickness before and after LASIK with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Design Cross-sectional observational study. Participants Forty-two eyes of 21 normal subjects undergoing LASIK. Methods A high-speed (2000 axial scans/second) 1.3-μm-wavelength corneal and anterior segment OCT prototype was used for corneal scanning. The scan pattern consisted of 10-mm radial lines on 8 meridians centered on the vertex reflection. The entire scan pattern of 1024 a-scans was acquired in 0.5 seconds. We developed automated computer processing for 3-dimensional corneal reconstruction and measurement. Corneal thickness was measured normal to the anterior surface and presented as color pachymetry maps and zonal statistics. The maps were divided into a central zone (<2 mm) and 3 annular areas (pericentral, 2–5 mm; transitional, 5–7 mm; peripheral, 7–10 mm), which were further divided into quadrantal zones. The average, minimum, and maximum corneal thicknesses were computed for zones within the 7-mm diameter. Optical coherence tomography and ultrasound pachymetry were measured 3 times at the preoperative and 3-month postoperative visits. Reproducibility was assessed by the pooled standard deviations (SDs) of the repeated measurements. Main Outcome Measures Optical coherence tomography pachymetric map and zonal statistic, and ultrasound pachymetry. Results Before LASIK, central corneal thicknesses (CCTs) were 546.9±29.4 μm (mean ± SD) for OCT and 553.3±33.0 μm for ultrasound. After LASIK, CCTs were 513.7±44.5 μm for OCT and 498±46.6 μm for ultrasound. Optical coherence tomography and ultrasound CCT were highly correlated (Pearson correlation r = 0.97 before LASIK and 0.98 afterwards). Optical coherence tomography CCT was slightly less than ultrasound CCT before surgery (mean difference, −6.4 μm; 95% limits of agreement, −23.2 to 10.4 μm) but slightly greater after LASIK (15.7 μm; −1.6 to 33 μm). These differences were statistically

  17. Imaging of dental material by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dichtl, Sabine; Baumgartner, Angela; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Moritz, Andreas; Wernisch, Johann; Robl, Barbara; Sattmann, Harald; Leitgeb, Rainer; Sperr, Wolfgang; Fercher, Adolf F.

    1999-05-01

    Partial coherence interferometry (PCI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are noninvasive and noncontact techniques for high precision biometry and for obtaining cross- sectional images of biologic structures. OCT was initially introduced to depict the transparent tissue of the eye. It is based on interferometry employing the partial coherence properties of a light source with high spatial coherence ut short coherence length to image structures with a resolution of the order of a few microns. Recently this technique has been modified for cross section al imaging of dental and periodontal tissues. In vitro and in vivo OCT images have been recorded, which distinguish enamel, cemento and dentin structures and provide detailed structural information on clinical abnormalities. In contrast to convention OCT, where the magnitude of backscattered light as a function of depth is imaged, polarization sensitive OCT uses backscattered light to image the magnitude of the birefringence in the sample as a function of depth. First polarization sensitive OCT recordings show, that changes in the mineralization status of enamel or dentin caused by caries or non-caries lesions can result in changes of the polarization state of the light backscattered by dental material. Therefore polarization sensitive OCT might provide a new diagnostic imaging modality in clinical and research dentistry.

  18. Particle-Tracking Microrheology Using Micro-Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kengyeh K; Mojahed, Diana; Fernandez, Courtney M; Li, Yao; Liu, Linbo; Wilsterman, Eric J; Diephuis, Bradford; Birket, Susan E; Bowers, Hannah; Martin Solomon, G; Schuster, Benjamin S; Hanes, Justin; Rowe, Steven M; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2016-09-01

    Clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF) result from an increase in the viscosity of the mucus secreted by epithelial cells that line the airways. Particle-tracking microrheology (PTM) is a widely accepted means of determining the viscoelastic properties of CF mucus, providing an improved understanding of this disease as well as an avenue to assess the efficacies of pharmacologic therapies aimed at decreasing mucus viscosity. Among its advantages, PTM allows the measurement of small volumes, which was recently utilized for an in situ study of CF mucus formed by airway cell cultures. Typically, particle tracks are obtained from fluorescence microscopy video images, although this limits one's ability to distinguish particles by depth in a heterogeneous environment. Here, by performing PTM with high-resolution micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT), we were able to characterize the viscoelastic properties of mucus, which enables simultaneous measurement of rheology with mucociliary transport parameters that we previously determined using μOCT. We obtained an accurate characterization of dextran solutions and observed a statistically significant difference in the viscosities of mucus secreted by normal and CF human airway cell cultures. We further characterized the effects of noise and imaging parameters on the sensitivity of μOCT-PTM by performing theoretical and numerical analyses, which show that our system can accurately quantify viscosities over the range that is characteristic of CF mucus. As a sensitive rheometry technique that requires very small fluid quantities, μOCT-PTM could also be generally applied to interrogate the viscosity of biological media such as blood or the vitreous humor of the eye in situ.

  19. Optical coherence tomography using the Niris system in otolaryngology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Marc; Armstrong, William B.; Djalilian, Hamid R.; Crumley, Roger L.; Kim, Jason H.; Nguyen, Quoc A.; Foulad, Allen I.; Ghasri, Pedram E.; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2009-02-01

    Objectives: To determine the feasibility and accuracy of the Niris Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) system in imaging of the mucosal abnormalities of the head and neck. The Niris system is the first commercially available OCT device for applications outside ophthalmology. Methods: We obtained OCT images of benign, premalignant and malignant lesions throughout the head and neck, using the Niris OCT imaging system (Imalux, Cleveland, OH). This imaging system has a tissue penetration depth of approximately 1-2mm, a scanning range of 2mm and a spatial depth resolution of approximately 10-20μm. Imaging was performed in the outpatient setting and in the operating room using a flexible probe. Results: High-resolution cross-sectional images from the oral cavity, nasal cavity, ears and larynx showed distinct layers and structures such as mucosa layer, basal membrane and lamina propria, were clearly identified. In the pathology images disruption of the basal membrane was clearly shown. Device set-up took approximately 5 minutes and the image acquisition was rapid. The system can be operated by the person performing the exam. Conclusions: The Niris system is non invasive and easy to incorporate into the operating room and the clinic. It requires minimal set-up and requires only one person to operate. The unique ability of the OCT offers high-resolution images showing the microanatomy of different sites. OCT imaging with the Niris device potentially offers an efficient, quick and reliable imaging modality in guiding surgical biopsies, intra-operative decision making, and therapeutic options for different otolaryngologic pathologies and premalignant disease.

  20. Detection of dermal systemic sclerosis using noncontact optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Du, Yong; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Raghunathan, Raksha; Hsu, Thomas; Noorani, Shezaan; Hicks, M. John; Mohan, Chandra; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease that results in excessive accumulation of collagen in the skin and internal organs. Overall, SSc is a rare disorder, but has a high mortality, particularly in last decade of life. To improve the survival rate, an accurate and early diagnosis is crucial. Currently, the modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS) is the gold standard for evaluating SSc progression based on clinical palpation at 17 sites on the body. However, this procedure can be time consuming, and the assessed score may be biased by the experience of the clinician, causing inter- and intraobserver variabilities. Moreover, the instrinsic elasticity of skin may further bias the mRSS assessment in the early stages of SSc, such as oedematous. To overcome these limitations, there is a need for a rapid, accurate, and objective assessment technique. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is a novel, rapidly emerging technique, which can assess mechanical contrast in tissues with micrometer spatial resolution. In this work, we demonstrate the first use of OCE to assess the mechanical properties of control and SSc-like diseased skin non-invasively. A focused air-pulse induced an elastic wave in the skin, which was detected by a home-built OCE system. The elastic wave propagated significantly faster in SSc skin compared to healthy skin. The Young's modulus of the SSc skin was significantly higher than that of normal skin (P<0.05). Thus, OCE was able to objectively differentiate healthy and fibrotic skin completely noninvasively and is a promising and potentially useful new technology for quantifying skin involvement in SSc.

  1. Particle-Tracking Microrheology Using Micro-Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kengyeh K; Mojahed, Diana; Fernandez, Courtney M; Li, Yao; Liu, Linbo; Wilsterman, Eric J; Diephuis, Bradford; Birket, Susan E; Bowers, Hannah; Martin Solomon, G; Schuster, Benjamin S; Hanes, Justin; Rowe, Steven M; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2016-09-01

    Clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF) result from an increase in the viscosity of the mucus secreted by epithelial cells that line the airways. Particle-tracking microrheology (PTM) is a widely accepted means of determining the viscoelastic properties of CF mucus, providing an improved understanding of this disease as well as an avenue to assess the efficacies of pharmacologic therapies aimed at decreasing mucus viscosity. Among its advantages, PTM allows the measurement of small volumes, which was recently utilized for an in situ study of CF mucus formed by airway cell cultures. Typically, particle tracks are obtained from fluorescence microscopy video images, although this limits one's ability to distinguish particles by depth in a heterogeneous environment. Here, by performing PTM with high-resolution micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT), we were able to characterize the viscoelastic properties of mucus, which enables simultaneous measurement of rheology with mucociliary transport parameters that we previously determined using μOCT. We obtained an accurate characterization of dextran solutions and observed a statistically significant difference in the viscosities of mucus secreted by normal and CF human airway cell cultures. We further characterized the effects of noise and imaging parameters on the sensitivity of μOCT-PTM by performing theoretical and numerical analyses, which show that our system can accurately quantify viscosities over the range that is characteristic of CF mucus. As a sensitive rheometry technique that requires very small fluid quantities, μOCT-PTM could also be generally applied to interrogate the viscosity of biological media such as blood or the vitreous humor of the eye in situ. PMID:27602733

  2. Measurement of ciliary beat frequency using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Bryan T.; Chen, Jason J.; Jing, Joseph; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J.F.

    2015-01-01

    1. Introduction Measuring ciliary beat frequency (CBF) is a technical challenge and difficult to perform in vivo. Doppler optical coherence tomography (D-OCT) is a mesoscopic non-contact imaging modality that provides high-resolution tomographic images and detects micromotion simultaneously in living tissues. Here we use D-OCT to measure CBF in ex vivo tissue as the first step toward translating this technology to clinical use. 2. Methods Fresh ex vivo samples of rabbit tracheal mucosa were imaged using both D-OCT and phase-contrast microscopy (n = 5). The D-OCT system was designed and built to specification in our lab (1310 nm swept source vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL), 6 μm axial resolution). The samples were placed in culture and incubated at 37°C. A fast Fourier transform was performed on the D-OCT signal recorded on the surface of the samples to gauge CBF. High-speed digital video of the epithelium recorded via phase-contrast microscopy was analyzed to confirm the CBF measurements. 3. Results The D-OCT system detected Doppler signal at the epithelial layer of ex vivo rabbit tracheal samples suggestive of ciliary motion. CBF was measured at 9.36 ± 1.22 Hz using D-OCT and 9.08 ± 0.48 Hz using phase-contrast microscopy. No significant differences were found between the two methods (p ≫ 0.05). 4. Conclusions D-OCT allows for the quantitative measurement of CBF without the need to resolve individual cilia. Furthermore, D-OCT technology can be incorporated into endoscopic platforms that allow clinicians to readily measure CBF in the office and provide a direct measurement of mucosal health. PMID:26136399

  3. High-resolution full-field spatial coherence gated optical tomography using monochromatic light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vishal; Nandy, Sreyankar; Singh Mehta, Dalip

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate dispersion free, high-resolution full-field spatial coherence gated optical tomography using spatially incoherent monochromatic light source. Spatial coherence properties of light source were synthesized by means of combining a static diffuser and vibrating multi mode fiber bundle. Due to low spatial coherence of light source, the axial resolution of the system was achieved similar to that of conventional optical coherence tomography which utilizes low temporal coherence. Experimental results of fringe visibility versus optical path difference are presented for varying numerical apertures objective lenses. High resolution optically sectioned images of multilayer onion skin, and red blood cells are presented.

  4. Development and Application of Multifunctional Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Zhongwei

    Microcirculation refers to the functions of capillaries and the neighboring lymphatic vessels. It plays a vital role in the pathophysiology of disorders in many clinical areas including cardiology, dermatology, neurology and ophthalmology, and so forth. It is crucial to develop imaging technologies that can provide both qualitative and quantitative information as to how microcirculation responds to certain injury and/or disease, and its treatment. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive optical imaging technique for high-resolution cross-sectional imaging of specimens, with many applications in clinical medicine. Current state-of-the-art OCT systems operate in the Fourier domain, using either a broadband light source with a spectrometer, known as spectral domain OCT (SDOCT), or a rapidly tunable laser, known as swept source OCT (SSOCT). The current Fourier domain OCT systems have dramatically improvement in sensitivity, resolution and speed compared to time domain OCT. In addition to the improvement in the OCT system hardware, different methods for functional measurements of tissue beds have been developed and demonstrated. This includes but not limited to, i) Phase-resolved Doppler OCT for quantifying the blood flow, ii) OCT angiography for visualization of microvasculature, iii) Polarization sensitive OCT for measuring the intrinsic optical property/ birefringence of tissue, iv) spectroscopic OCT for measuring blood oxygenation, etc. Functional OCT can provide important clinical information that is not available in the typical intensity based structural OCT images. Among these functional OCT modalities, Doppler OCT and OCT angiography attract great interests as they show high capability for in vivo study of microvascular pathology. By analyzing the Doppler effect of a flowing particle on light frequency, Doppler OCT allows the quantification of the blood flow speed and blood flow rate. The most popular approach for Doppler OCT is achieved through

  5. Dynamics and Coherence of Cold Atoms in Atom Optics Billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunzweig, Tzahi

    This thesis describes basic experimental research of dynamics and loss of hyperfine-states-coherence of ultra-cold atoms in atom-optics billiards. Ultra-cold atoms trapped in an optical-dipole trap and prepared in a coherent superposition of their hyperfine split ground-states, decohere as they interact with the environment. Here we realized microwave spectroscopy as a tool to study dynamics of ensembles of trapped atoms, with a controlled environment. First, we demonstrated that under the special conditions of a dark optical trap, Ramsey spectroscopy can be interpreted as Loschmidt echo (or fidelity), which is a measure of evolution of hyperfine coherence as a function of time. The detuning of the trapping laser is used to change the "perturbation", which causes a decay in the Ramsey fringe contrast. However, revivals of fringe contrast are observed in contrast to the predictions of random matrix theory. We suggest these system specific revivals originate from dynamical resonances in the fidelity. To minimize inhomogeneous effects we used a microwave echo spectroscopy technique. We measured the coherence properties of the system under different perturbation strengths. Two different regimes were observed: First, a perturbative regime in which the decay of echo coherence is non-monotonic and partial revivals of coherence were observed. These revivals are more pronounced in traps with mixed dynamics as compared to traps where the dynamics is fully chaotic. Next, for stronger perturbations, the decay becomes monotonic and independent of the strength of the perturbation. In this regime no clear distinction can be made between chaotic traps and traps with mixed dynamics. Next, by using compensating techniques to minimize the inherent trap perturbations, and application of artificial, tailored perturbations we showed that the decay of coherence is closely related to the symmetry properties of the perturbations. We considered two generic perturbations: speckle

  6. Adaptive optics retinal imaging: emerging clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Godara, Pooja; Dubis, Adam M; Roorda, Austin; Duncan, Jacque L; Carroll, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    The human retina is a uniquely accessible tissue. Tools like scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and spectral domain-optical coherence tomography provide clinicians with remarkably clear pictures of the living retina. Although the anterior optics of the eye permit such non-invasive visualization of the retina and associated pathology, the same optics induce significant aberrations that obviate cellular-resolution imaging in most cases. Adaptive optics (AO) imaging systems use active optical elements to compensate for aberrations in the optical path between the object and the camera. When applied to the human eye, AO allows direct visualization of individual rod and cone photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, and white blood cells. AO imaging has changed the way vision scientists and ophthalmologists see the retina, helping to clarify our understanding of retinal structure, function, and the etiology of various retinal pathologies. Here, we review some of the advances that were made possible with AO imaging of the human retina and discuss applications and future prospects for clinical imaging.

  7. Design of coherent receiver optical front end for unamplified applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Malouin, Christian; Schmidt, Theodore J

    2012-01-30

    Advanced modulation schemes together with coherent detection and digital signal processing has enabled the next generation high-bandwidth optical communication systems. One of the key advantages of coherent detection is its superior receiver sensitivity compared to direct detection receivers due to the gain provided by the local oscillator (LO). In unamplified applications, such as metro and edge networks, the ultimate receiver sensitivity is dictated by the amount of shot noise, thermal noise, and the residual beating of the local oscillator with relative intensity noise (LO-RIN). We show that the best sensitivity is achieved when the thermal noise is balanced with the residual LO-RIN beat noise, which results in an optimum LO power. The impact of thermal noise from the transimpedance amplifier (TIA), the RIN from the LO, and the common mode rejection ratio (CMRR) from a balanced photodiode are individually analyzed via analytical models and compared to numerical simulations. The analytical model results match well with those of the numerical simulations, providing a simplified method to quantify the impact of receiver design tradeoffs. For a practical 100 Gb/s integrated coherent receiver with 7% FEC overhead, we show that an optimum receiver sensitivity of -33 dBm can be achieved at GFEC cliff of 8.55E-5 if the LO power is optimized at 11 dBm. We also discuss a potential method to monitor the imperfections of a balanced and integrated coherent receiver.

  8. Integrated intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) - ultrasound (US) imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiechen; Yang, Hao-Chung; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Hu, Changhong; Zhang, Jun; Shung, K. Kirk; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) are considered two complementary imaging techniques in the detection and diagnosis of atherosclerosis. OCT permits visualization of micron-scale features of atherosclerosis plaque, and IVUS offers full imaging depth of vessel wall. Under the guidance of IVUS, minimal amount of flushing agent will be needed to obtain OCT imaging of the interested area. We report on a dual-modality optical coherence tomography (OCT) - ultrasound (US) system for intravascular imaging. To the best of our knowledge, we have developed the first integrated OCT-US probe that combines OCT optical components with an ultrasound transducer. The OCT optical components mainly consist of a single mode fiber, a gradient index (GRIN) lens for light beam focusing, and a right-angled prism for reflecting light into biological tissue. A 40MHz PZT-5H side-viewing ultrasound transducer was fabricated to obtain the ultrasound image. These components were integrated into a single probe, enabling both OCT and ultrasound imaging at the same time. In vitro OCT and ultrasound images of a rabbit aorta were obtained using this dual-modality imaging system. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an OCT-US system for intravascular imaging which is expected to have a prominent impact on early detection and characterization of atherosclerosis.

  9. Optical low-coherence tomography of bronchial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamford, Karl J.; James, Stephen W.; Barr, Hugh; Tatam, Ralph P.

    1999-12-01

    An optical fiber based low coherence interferometer for measuring the Epithelium thickness of Bronchial tissue, for early diagnosis of Carcinoma in situ, is presented. Previous simulation of laser induced fluorescence using an electromagnetic scattering model has extracted the relative permittivity value for the Submucosa and Epithelium layers indicating a difference of up to 0.14. The optical system presented here uses a low coherence source operating at 840 nm with a bandwidth of 30 nm, coupled into single mode optical fiber. A Fizeau cavity is formed between the fiber end and the tissue under investigation. A remote processing interferometer is used to monitor changes in permittivity between the different tissue layers. An initial experiment has demonstrated a sensitivity measurement of 40 dB for a permittivity difference measurement of 0.61. Preliminary results have shown that the discontinuity between the Bronchial Epithelium layer and its surrounding medium can be identified allowing the thickness of the Epithelium layer to be measured to an accuracy of 20 micrometers . Since interferometric noise contributions are only significant within the processing interferometer, the fiber optic Fizeau interferometer technique is a strong candidate for the development of an endoscope for the early detection of cancer within Gastrointestinal and Respiratory tracts.

  10. Invited Article: A compact optically coherent fiber frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, L C; Deschênes, J-D; Sonderhouse, L; Swann, W C; Khader, I H; Baumann, E; Newbury, N R; Coddington, I

    2015-08-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and performance of a self-referenced, optically coherent frequency comb. The system robustness is derived from a combination of an optics package based on polarization-maintaining fiber, saturable absorbers for mode-locking, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) detection of the control signals, and digital feedback control for frequency stabilization. The output is phase-coherent over a 1-2 μm octave-spanning spectrum with a pulse repetition rate of ∼200 MHz and a residual pulse-to-pulse timing jitter <3 fs well within the requirements of most frequency-comb applications. Digital control enables phase coherent operation for over 90 h, critical for phase-sensitive applications such as timekeeping. We show that this phase-slip free operation follows the fundamental limit set by the SNR of the control signals. Performance metrics from three nearly identical combs are presented. This laptop-sized comb should enable a wide-range of applications beyond the laboratory.

  11. Invited Article: A compact optically coherent fiber frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, L. C.; Deschênes, J.-D.; Sonderhouse, L.; Swann, W. C.; Khader, I. H.; Baumann, E.; Newbury, N. R.; Coddington, I.

    2015-08-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and performance of a self-referenced, optically coherent frequency comb. The system robustness is derived from a combination of an optics package based on polarization-maintaining fiber, saturable absorbers for mode-locking, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) detection of the control signals, and digital feedback control for frequency stabilization. The output is phase-coherent over a 1-2 μm octave-spanning spectrum with a pulse repetition rate of ˜200 MHz and a residual pulse-to-pulse timing jitter <3 fs well within the requirements of most frequency-comb applications. Digital control enables phase coherent operation for over 90 h, critical for phase-sensitive applications such as timekeeping. We show that this phase-slip free operation follows the fundamental limit set by the SNR of the control signals. Performance metrics from three nearly identical combs are presented. This laptop-sized comb should enable a wide-range of applications beyond the laboratory.

  12. Phase resolved digital signal processing in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Johannes F.; Tripathi, Renu; Park, Boris H.; Nassif, Nader

    2002-06-01

    We present phase resolved digital signal processing techniques for Optical Coherence Tomography to correct for the non Gaussian shape of source spectra and for Group Delay Dispersion (GDD). A broadband source centered at 820 nm was synthesized by combining the spectra of two superluminescent diodes to improve axial image resolution in an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Spectral shaping was used to reduce the side lobes (ringing) in the axial point spread function due to the non-Gaussian shape of the spectra. Images of onion cells taken with each individual source and the combined sources, respectively, show the improved resolution and quality enhancement in a turbid biological sample. An OCT system operating at 1310 nm was used to demonstrate that the broadening effect of group delay dispersion (GDD) on the coherence function could be eliminated completely by introducing a quadratic phase shift in the Fourier domain of the interferometric signal. The technique is demonstrated by images of human skin grafts with group delay dispersion mismatch between sample and reference arm before and after digital processing.

  13. High speed all optical shear wave imaging optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Wei, Wei; Shen, Tueng; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) is a non-invasive testing modality that maps the mechanical property of soft tissues with high sensitivity and spatial resolution using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT). Shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) is a leading technique that relies on the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative elastography. Previous shear wave imaging OCT techniques are based on repeated M-B scans, which have several drawbacks such as long acquisition time and repeated wave stimulations. Recent developments of Fourier domain mode-locked high-speed swept-source OCT system has enabled enough speed to perform KHz B-scan rate OCT imaging. Here we propose ultra-high speed, single shot shear wave imaging to capture single-shot transient shear wave propagation to perform SW-OCE. The frame rate of shear wave imaging is 16 kHz, at A-line rate of ~1.62 MHz, which allows the detection of high-frequency shear wave of up to 8 kHz. The shear wave is generated photothermal-acoustically, by ultra-violet pulsed laser, which requires no contact to OCE subjects, while launching high frequency shear waves that carries rich localized elasticity information. The image acquisition and processing can be performed at video-rate, which enables real-time 3D elastography. SW-OCE measurements are demonstrated on tissue-mimicking phantoms and porcine ocular tissue. This approach opens up the feasibility to perform real-time 3D SW-OCE in clinical applications, to obtain high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  14. Swept-source anatomic optical coherence elastography of porcine trachea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Ruofei; Price, Hillel; Mitran, Sorin; Zdanski, Carlton; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative endoscopic imaging is at the vanguard of novel techniques in the assessment upper airway obstruction. Anatomic optical coherence tomography (aOCT) has the potential to provide the geometry of the airway lumen with high-resolution and in 4 dimensions. By coupling aOCT with measurements of pressure, optical coherence elastography (OCE) can be performed to characterize airway wall stiffness. This can aid in identifying regions of dynamic collapse as well as informing computational fluid dynamics modeling to aid in surgical decision-making. Toward this end, here we report on an anatomic optical coherence tomography (aOCT) system powered by a wavelength-swept laser source. The system employs a fiber-optic catheter with outer diameter of 0.82 mm deployed via the bore of a commercial, flexible bronchoscope. Helical scans are performed to measure the airway geometry and to quantify the cross-sectional-area (CSA) of the airway. We report on a preliminary validation of aOCT for elastography, in which aOCT-derived CSA was obtained as a function of pressure to estimate airway wall compliance. Experiments performed on a Latex rubber tube resulted in a compliance measurement of 0.68+/-0.02 mm2/cmH2O, with R2=0.98 over the pressure range from 10 to 40 cmH2O. Next, ex vivo porcine trachea was studied, resulting in a measured compliance from 1.06+/-0.12 to 3.34+/-0.44 mm2/cmH2O, (R2>0.81). The linearity of the data confirms the elastic nature of the airway. The compliance values are within the same order-of-magnitude as previous measurements of human upper airways, suggesting that this system is capable of assessing airway wall compliance in future human studies.

  15. PREFACE: XVIII International Youth Scientific School "Coherent Optics and Optical Spectroscopy"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salakhov, M. Kh; Samartsev, V. V.; Gainutdinov, R. Kh

    2015-05-01

    Kazan Federal University has held the annual International Youth School "Coherent Optics and Optical Spectroscopy" since 1997. The choice of the topic is not accidental. Kazan is the home of photon echo which was predicted at Kazan Physical-Technical Institute in 1963 by Prof. U.G. Kopvil'em and V.R. Nagibarov and observed in Columbia University by N.A. Kurnit, I.D. Abella, and S.R. Hartmann in 1964. Since then, photon echo has become a powerful tool of coherent optical spectroscopy and optical information processing, which have been developed here in Kazan in close collaboration between Kazan Physical-Technical Institute and Kazan Federal University. The main subjects of the XVIII International Youth School are: Nonlinear and coherent optics; Atomic and molecular spectroscopy; Coherent laser spectroscopy; Problems of quantum optics; Quantum theory of radiation; and Nanophotonics and Scanning Probe Microscopy. The unchallenged organizers of that school are Kazan Federal University and Kazan E.K. Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute. The rector of the School is Professor Myakzyum Salakhov, and the vice-rector is Professor Vitaly Samartsev. The International Youth Scientific School "Coherent Optics and Optical Spectroscopy" follows the global pattern of comprehensive studies of matter properties and their interaction with electromagnetic fields. Since 1997 more than 100 famous scientists from the USA, Germany, Ukraine, Belarus and Russia have given plenary lecture presentations. Here over 1000 young scientists had an opportunity to participate in lively discussions about the latest scientific news. Many young people have submitted interesting reports on photonics, quantum electronics, laser physics, quantum optics, traditional optical and laser spectroscopy, non-linear optics, material science and nanotechnology. Here we are publishing the fullsize papers prepared from the most interesting lectures and reports selected by the Program Committee of the School. The

  16. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography of the Peripapillary Retina in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang; Jia, Yali; Takusagawa, Hana L.; Pechauer, Alex D.; Edmunds, Beth; Lombardi, Lorinna; Davis, Ellen; Morrison, John C.; Huang, David

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Vascular factors may have important roles in the pathophysiology of glaucoma. A practical method for the clinical evaluation of ocular perfusion is needed to improve glaucoma management. OBJECTIVE To detect peripapillary retinal perfusion in glaucomatous eyes compared with normal eyes using optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective observational study performed from July 24, 2013, to April 17, 2014. Participants were recruited and tested at Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University. In total, 12 glaucomatous eyes and 12 age-matched normal eyes were analyzed. The optic disc region was imaged twice using a 3 × 3-mm scan by a 70-kHz, 840-nm-wavelength spectral OCT system. The split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography algorithm was used. Peripapillary flow index was calculated as the mean decorrelation value in the peripapillary region, defined as a 700-μm-wide elliptical annulus around the disc. Peripapillary vessel density was the percentage area occupied by vessels. The data statistical analysis was performed from October 30, 2013, to May 30, 2014. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Variability was assessed by the coefficient of variation. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the 2 groups of eyes. Correlations between vascular and visual field variables were assessed by linear regression analysis. RESULTS In 12 normal eyes, a dense microvascular network around the disc was visible on OCT angiography. In 12 glaucomatous eyes, this network was visibly attenuated globally and focally. In normal eyes, between-visit reproducibilities of peripapillary flow index and peripapillary vessel density were 4.3% and 2.7% of the coefficient of variation, respectively, while the population variabilities of peripapillary flow index and peripapillary vessel density were 8.2% and 3.0% of the coefficient of variation, respectively. Peripapillary flow index and peripapillary vessel density in

  17. Early detection of tooth wear by en-face optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mărcăuteanu, Corina; Negrutiu, Meda; Sinescu, Cosmin; Demjan, Eniko; Hughes, Mike; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2009-02-01

    Excessive dental wear (pathological attrition and/or abfractions) is a frequent complication in bruxing patients. The parafunction causes heavy occlusal loads. The aim of this study is the early detection and monitoring of occlusal overload in bruxing patients. En-face optical coherence tomography was used for investigating and imaging of several extracted tooth, with a normal morphology, derived from patients with active bruxism and from subjects without parafunction. We found a characteristic pattern of enamel cracks in patients with first degree bruxism and with a normal tooth morphology. We conclude that the en-face optical coherence tomography is a promising non-invasive alternative technique for the early detection of occlusal overload, before it becomes clinically evident as tooth wear.

  18. Automated segmentation of intramacular layers in Fourier domain optical coherence tomography structural images from normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xusheng; Yousefi, Siavash; An, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Segmentation of optical coherence tomography (OCT) cross-sectional structural images is important for assisting ophthalmologists in clinical decision making in terms of both diagnosis and treatment. We present an automatic approach for segmenting intramacular layers in Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) images using a searching strategy based on locally weighted gradient extrema, coupled with an error-removing technique based on statistical error estimation. A two-step denoising preprocess in different directions is also employed to suppress random speckle noise while preserving the layer boundary as intact as possible. The algorithms are tested on the FD-OCT volume images obtained from four normal subjects, which successfully identify the boundaries of seven physiological layers, consistent with the results based on manual determination of macular OCT images. PMID:22559689

  19. New variational image decomposition model for simultaneously denoising and segmenting optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jinming; Tench, Christopher; Gottlob, Irene; Proudlock, Frank; Bai, Li

    2015-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging plays an important role in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of diseases of the human retina. Automated analysis of optical coherence tomography images is a challenging task as the images are inherently noisy. In this paper, a novel variational image decomposition model is proposed to decompose an OCT image into three components: the first component is the original image but with the noise completely removed; the second contains the set of edges representing the retinal layer boundaries present in the image; and the third is an image of noise, or in image decomposition terms, the texture, or oscillatory patterns of the original image. In addition, a fast Fourier transform based split Bregman algorithm is developed to improve computational efficiency of solving the proposed model. Extensive experiments are conducted on both synthesised and real OCT images to demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms the state-of-the-art speckle noise reduction methods and leads to accurate retinal layer segmentation.

  20. Linear optical coherence tomography system with extended measurement range.

    PubMed

    Koch, Peter; Hellemanns, Volker; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2006-10-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sensors traditionally use scanning optical delay lines with moving parts and a single detector. OCT systems with a linear detector array (linear OCT or L-OCT) are simple and robust, but a detector with approximately 10,000 pixels is needed for an imaging depth of 2mm, which is necessary for most biomedical applications. We present a new optical setup for L-OCT with an increased measurement range. An additional grating performs a reduction of the spatial frequencies of the fringe pattern on the detector without loss in the signal-to-noise ratio, so the signal can be sampled with a minimal number of pixels. The theory for this approach is addressed and the first measurements are presented. PMID:16969410

  1. Integrated intravascular optical coherence tomography ultrasound imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiechen; Yang, Hao-Chung; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Qifa; Hu, Changhong; Shung, K. Kirk; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-01-01

    We report on a dual-modality optical coherence tomography (OCT) ultrasound (US) system for intravascular imaging. To the best of our knowledge, we have developed the first integrated OCT-US probe that combines OCT optical components with an US transducer. The OCT optical components mainly consist of a single-mode fiber, a gradient index lens for light-beam focusing, and a right-angled prism for reflecting light into biological tissue. A 40-MHz piezoelectric transducer (PZT-5H) side-viewing US transducer was fabricated to obtain the US image. These components were integrated into a single probe, enabling both OCT and US imaging at the same time. In vitro OCT and ultrasound images of a rabbit aorta were obtained using this dual-modality imaging system. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an OCT-US system for intravascular imaging, which is expected to have a prominent impact on early detection and characterization of atherosclerosis.

  2. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3D vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.B.; Gallman, P.G.; Slotwinski, A.R.; Wagner, K.; Weaver, S.; Xu, Jieping

    1996-12-31

    This CLVS will provide a substantial advance in high speed computer vision performance to support robotic Environmental Management (EM) operations. This 3D system employs a compact fiber optic based scanner and operator at a 128 x 128 pixel frame at one frame per second with a range resolution of 1 mm over its 1.5 meter working range. Using acousto-optic deflectors, the scanner is completely randomly addressable. This can provide live 3D monitoring for situations where it is necessary to update once per second. This can be used for decontamination and decommissioning operations in which robotic systems are altering the scene such as in waste removal, surface scarafacing, or equipment disassembly and removal. The fiber- optic coherent laser radar based system is immune to variations in lighting, color, or surface shading, which have plagued the reliability of existing 3D vision systems, while providing substantially superior range resolution.

  3. Agreement of angle closure assessments between gonioscopy, anterior segment optical coherence tomography and spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Elton Lik Tong; Yong, Vernon Khet Yau; Lim, Boon Ang; Sia, Stelson; Wong, Elizabeth Poh Ying; Yip, Leonard Wei Leon

    2015-01-01

    AIM To determine angle closure agreements between gonioscopy and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT), as well as gonioscopy and spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT). A secondary objective was to quantify inter-observer agreements of AS-OCT and SD-OCT assessments. METHODS Seventeen consecutive subjects (33 eyes) were recruited from the study hospital's Glaucoma clinic. Gonioscopy was performed by a glaucomatologist masked to OCT results. OCT images were read independently by 2 other glaucomatologists masked to gonioscopy findings as well as each other's analyses of OCT images. RESULTS Totally 84.8% and 45.5% of scleral spurs were visualized in AS-OCT and SD-OCT images respectively (P<0.01). The agreement for angle closure between AS-OCT and gonioscopy was fair at k=0.31 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.03-0.59) and k=0.35 (95% CI: 0.07-0.63) for reader 1 and 2 respectively. The agreement for angle closure between SD-OCT and gonioscopy was fair at k=0.21 (95% CI: 0.07-0.49) and slight at k=0.17 (95% CI: 0.08-0.42) for reader 1 and 2 respectively. The inter-reader agreement for angle closure in AS-OCT images was moderate at 0.51 (95% CI: 0.13-0.88). The inter-reader agreement for angle closure in SD-OCT images was slight at 0.18 (95% CI: 0.08-0.45). CONCLUSION Significant proportion of scleral spurs were not visualised with SD-OCT imaging resulting in weaker inter-reader agreements. Identifying other angle landmarks in SD-OCT images will allow more consistent angle closure assessments. Gonioscopy and OCT imaging do not always agree in angle closure assessments but have their own advantages, and should be used together and not exclusively. PMID:25938053

  4. Quantifying three-dimensional optic axis using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao J.; Black, Adam J.; Wang, Hui; Akkin, Taner

    2016-07-01

    The optic axis of birefringent samples indicates the direction of optical anisotropy, which should be described in three-dimensional (3-D) space. We present a method to quantify the complete 3-D optic axis orientation calculated from in-plane optic axis measurements from a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system. The in-plane axis orientations with different illumination angles allow the calculation of the necessary polar angle. The method then provides the information to produce the actual birefringence. The method and results from a biological sample are presented.

  5. Coherent and noncoherent low-power diodes in clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipa, Ciprian; Pascu, Mihail-Lucian; Stanciulescu, Viorica; Vlaiculescu, Mihaela; Ionescu, Elena; Bordea, Daniel

    1997-05-01

    Clinical efficacy of the low power laser (LPL) in medical treatments is still not well established. In a double blind, placebo controlled study, we tried to find out first which type of LPL is more efficient, and second if coherence is an important character for clinical efficacy. We treated 1228 patients having different rheumatic diseases, with low power diode, used as follows: A group: IR coherent diode, continuous emission, 3 mW power; B group: IR coherent diode, pulsed emission, output power about 3 mW; C group: IR noncoherent diode continuous emission 9 mW power; D group: both IR diode lasers (continuous or pulsed) and HeNe laser, continuous emission, 2 mW power; E group: placebo laser as control group. The energy dose used for every group was the same, as well as the clinical protocols. The positive results were: 66.16% for A group; 64.06% for B group; 48.87% for C group; 76.66% for D group, and 39.07% for E group. Finally, we showed that LPL is really efficient in the treatment of some rheumatic diseases, especially when red and IR diode laser were used in combination. The type of emission (continuous or pulsed) is not important, but coherence is obviously necessary for clinical efficacy.

  6. Biological elements carry out optical tasks in coherent imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, P.; Bianco, V.; Paturzo, M.; Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Merola, F.; Marchesano, V.

    2016-03-01

    We show how biological elements, like live bacteria species and Red Blood Cells (RBCs) can accomplish optical functionalities in DH systems. Turbid media allow coherent microscopy despite the strong light scattering these provoke, acting on light just as moving diffusers. Furthermore, a turbid medium can have positive effects on a coherent imaging system, providing resolution enhancement and mimicking the action of noise decorrelation devices, thus yielding an image quality significantly higher than the quality achievable through a transparent medium in similar recording conditions. Besides, suspended RBCs are demonstrated to behave as controllable liquid micro-lenses, opening new possibilities in biophotonics for endoscopy imaging purposes, as well as telemedicine for point-of-care diagnostics in developing countries and low-resource settings.

  7. Ultrahigh-resolution full-field optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Arnaud; Grieve, Kate; Moneron, Gael; Lecaque, Romain; Vabre, Laurent; Boccara, Claude

    2004-05-10

    We have developed a white-light interference microscope for ultrahigh-resolution full-field optical coherence tomography of biological media. The experimental setup is based on a Linnik-type interferometer illuminated by a tungsten halogen lamp. En face tomographic images are calculated by a combination of interferometric images recorded by a high-speed CCD camera. Spatial resolution of 1.8 microm x 0.9 microm (transverse x axial) is achieved owing to the extremely short coherence length of the source, the compensation of dispersion mismatch in the interferometer arms, and the use of relatively high-numerical-aperture microscope objectives. A shot-noise-limited detection sensitivity of 90 dB is obtained in an acquisition time per image of 4 s. Subcellular-level images of plant, animal, and human tissues are presented. PMID:15143811

  8. Coherent-incoherent phenomena in nonlinear optics and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dylov, Dmitry V.

    While the majority of modern experimentation in optics and optical technology relies on pure and highly coherent sources, the light encountered in nature is of inferior quality. The low-quality, or noisy, light creates problems in nonlinear signal processing, as the random, multi-mode distribution inhibits phase matching and wave mixing. In this dissertation, we will discover new incoherent phenomena using nonlinear optics and characterize many fundamental, and useful, features pertinent to waves with inferior coherence. The first part of the thesis will be devoted to a new theory describing the nonlinear propagation of statistical light. The essence of the theory is to represent incoherent light as a gas of particles (speckles) that can interact collectively via nonlinearity, effectively forming a photonic plasma. We carried out a set of basic plasma-like experiments in optics and showed that this representation is valid and promising. Experiments were conducted using a nonlinear photorefractive crystal and basic phenomena such as modulation and bump-on-tail instabilities, optical turbulence, etc., were observed. In the second part of the thesis, we will apply this plasma formalism to the recovery and amplification of weak, noise-hidden images. The signal fidelity will be shown to improve by exploiting signal-noise interaction in the nonlinear medium. This new, dynamical type of stochastic resonance (a process in which signal can grow at expense of the noise) is treated as an equivalent beam-plasma instability, allowing an analytical characterization of the resonance as a function of coupling strength, noise statistics, modal content of the signal and wavelength. The theory also suggests an exponential limit to the amount of information transmissible in nonlinear communications systems. The results link the fields of optics, plasma and information theory, and pave the way for a variety of nonlinear, instability-driven imaging techniques.

  9. In vivo optical microscopy of peripheral nerve myelination with polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Francis P.; Wang, Yan; Rodriguez, Carissa L. R.; Randolph, Mark A.; Rust, Esther A. Z.; Winograd, Jonathan M.; de Boer, Johannes F.; Park, B. Hyle

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Assessing nerve integrity and myelination after injury is necessary to provide insight for treatment strategies aimed at restoring neuromuscular function. Currently, this is largely done with electrical analysis, which lacks direct quantitative information. In vivo optical imaging with sufficient imaging depth and resolution could be used to assess the nerve microarchitecture. In this study, we examine the use of polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) to quantitatively assess the sciatic nerve microenvironment through measurements of birefringence after applying a nerve crush injury in a rat model. Initial loss of function and subsequent recovery were demonstrated by calculating the sciatic function index (SFI). We found that the PS-OCT phase retardation slope, which is proportional to birefringence, increased monotonically with the SFI. Additionally, histomorphometric analysis of the myelin thickness and g-ratio shows that the PS-OCT slope is a good indicator of myelin health and recovery after injury. These results demonstrate that PS-OCT is capable of providing nondestructive and quantitative assessment of nerve health after injury and shows promise for continued use both clinically and experimentally in neuroscience. PMID:25858593

  10. In vivo optical microscopy of peripheral nerve myelination with polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Henry, Francis P; Wang, Yan; Rodriguez, Carissa L R; Randolph, Mark A; Rust, Esther A Z; Winograd, Jonathan M; de Boer, Johannes F; Park, B Hyle

    2015-04-01

    Assessing nerve integrity and myelination after injury is necessary to provide insight for treatment strategies aimed at restoring neuromuscular function. Currently, this is largely done with electrical analysis, which lacks direct quantitative information. In vivo optical imaging with sufficient imaging depth and resolution could be used to assess the nerve microarchitecture. In this study, we examine the use of polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) to quantitatively assess the sciatic nerve microenvironment through measurements of birefringence after applying a nerve crush injury in a rat model. Initial loss of function and subsequent recovery were demonstrated by calculating the sciatic function index (SFI). We found that the PS-OCT phase retardation slope, which is proportional to birefringence, increased monotonically with the SFI. Additionally, histomorphometric analysis of the myelin thickness and g-ratio shows that the PS-OCT slope is a good indicator of myelin health and recovery after injury. These results demonstrate that PS-OCT is capable of providing nondestructive and quantitative assessment of nerve health after injury and shows promise for continued use both clinically and experimentally in neuroscience. PMID:25858593

  11. Spatial characterization of corneal biomechanical properties with optical coherence elastography after UV cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Twa, Michael D.; Li, Jiasong; Vantipalli, Srilatha; Singh, Manmohan; Aglyamov, Salavat; Emelianov, Stanislav; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-01-01

    Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) is a clinical treatment for keratoconus that structurally reinforces degenerating ocular tissue, thereby limiting disease progression. Clinical outcomes would benefit from noninvasive methods to assess tissue material properties in affected individuals. Regional variations in tissue properties were quantified before and after CXL in rabbit eyes using optical coherence elastography (OCE) imaging. Low-amplitude (<1µm) elastic waves were generated using micro air-pulse stimulation and the resulting wave amplitude and speed were measured using phase-stabilized swept-source OCE. OCE imaging following CXL treatment demonstrates increased corneal stiffness through faster elastic wave propagation speeds and lower wave amplitudes. PMID:24877005

  12. Simultaneous multiple-depths en-face optical coherence tomography using multiple signal excitation of acousto-optic deflectors.

    PubMed

    Zurauskas, Mantas; Rogers, John; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2013-01-28

    We present a novel low-coherence interferometer configuration, equipped with acousto-optic deflectors that can be used to simultaneously acquire up to eight time domain optical coherence tomography en-face images. The capabilities of the configuration are evaluated in terms of depth resolution, signal to noise ratio and crosstalk. Then the configuration is employed to demonstrate simultaneous en-face optical coherence tomography imaging at five different depths in a specimen of armadillidium vulgare. PMID:23389175

  13. Imaging Coronary Atherosclerosis and Vulnerable Plaques with Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tearney, Guillermo J.; Jang, Ik-Kyung; Kashiwagi, Manubu; Bouma, Brett E.

    Intracoronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an invasive microscopic imaging technology that has been developed for the identification of vulnerable plaque. OCT acquires cross-sectional images of tissue reflectance and, since it may be implemented through an optical fiber probe, it is readily adaptable to coronary catheters for insertion into coronary arteries and circumferential imaging of arterial pathology. The first investigation of vascular optical coherence tomography ex vivo demonstrated the potential of this technique to identify arterial microstructure. Subsequent development of OCT technology enabled image acquisition at rates sufficient for intracoronary imaging in human patients. In this chapter, we review studies conducted with this technology at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Results from these studies show that a wide variety of microscopic features, including those associated with TCFAs, can be identified by OCT imaging both ex vivo and in living human patients. These findings suggest that this technology will play an important role in improving our understanding of coronary artery disease, guiding local therapy, and decreasing themortality of AMI.

  14. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography applied to intervertebral disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matcher, Stephen J.; Winlove, Peter; Gangnus, Sergei V.

    2003-07-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) is a powerful new optical imaging modality that is sensitive to the birefringence properties of tissues. It thus has potential applications in studying the large-scale ordering of collagen fibers within connective tisues and changes related to pathology. As a tissue for study by PSOCT, intervertebral disk respresents an interesting system as the collagen organization is believed to show pronounced variations with depth, on a spatial scale of about 100 μm. We have used a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system to measure the birefringence properties of bovine caudal intervertebral disk and compared this with equine flexor tendon. The result for equine tendon, δ = (3.0 +/- 0.5)x10-3 at 1.3 μm, is in broad agreement with values reported for bovine tendon, while bovine intervertebral disk displays a birefringence of about half this, δ = 1.2 x 10-3 at 1.3 μm. While tendon appears to show a uniform fast-axis over 0.8 mm depth, intervertebral disk shows image contrast at all orientations relative to a linearly polarized input beam, suggesting a variation in fast-axis orientation with depth. These initial results suggest that PSOCT could be a useful tool to study collagen organization within this tissue and its variation with applied load and disease.

  15. Miniature endoscopic optical coherence tomography for calculus detection.

    PubMed

    Kao, Meng-Chun; Lin, Chun-Li; Kung, Che-Yen; Huang, Yi-Fung; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2015-08-20

    The effective treatment of periodontitis involves the detection and removal of subgingival dental calculus. However, subgingival calculus is more difficult to detect than supragingival calculus because it is firmly attached to root surfaces within periodontal pockets. To achieve a smooth root surface, clinicians often remove excessive amounts of root structure because of decreased visibility. In addition, enamel pearl, a rare type of ectopic enamel formation on the root surface, can easily be confused with dental calculus in the subgingival environment. In this study, we developed a fiber-probe swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) technique and combined it with the quantitative measurement of an optical parameter [standard deviation (SD) of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) intensity] to differentiate subgingival calculus from sound enamel, including enamel pearl. Two-dimensional circumferential images were constructed by rotating the miniprobe (0.9 mm diameter) while acquiring image lines, and the adjacent lines in each rotation were stacked to generate a three-dimensional volume. In OCT images, compared to sound enamel and enamel pearls, dental calculus showed significant differences (P<0.001) in SD values. Finally, the receiver operating characteristic curve had a high capacity (area under the curve=0.934) for discriminating between healthy regions (including enamel pearl) and dental calculus. PMID:26368780

  16. Functional Doppler optical coherence tomography for cortical blood flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingfeng; Liu, Gangjun; Nguyen, Elaine; Choi, Bernard; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-02-01

    Optical methods have been widely used in basic neuroscience research to study the cerebral blood flow dynamics in order to overcome the low spatial resolution associated with magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. Although laser Doppler imaging and laser speckle imaging can map out en face cortical hemodynamics and columns, depth resolution is not available. Two-photon microscopy has been used for mapping cortical activity. However, flow measurement requires fluorescent dye injection, which can be problematic. The noninvasive and high resolution tomographic capabilities of optical coherence tomography make it a promising technique for mapping depth resolved cortical blood flow. Here, we present a functional Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging modality for quantitative evaluation of cortical blood flow in a mouse model. Fast, repeated, Doppler OCT scans across a vessel of interest were performed to record flow dynamic information with a high temporal resolution of the cardiac cycles. Spectral Doppler analysis of continuous Doppler images demonstrates how the velocity components and longitudinally projected flow-volume-rate change over time, thereby providing complementary temporal flow information to the spatially distributed flow information of Doppler OCT. The proposed functional Doppler OCT imaging modality can be used to diagnose vessel stenosis/blockage or monitor blood flow changes due to pharmacological agents/neuronal activities. Non-invasive in-vivo mice experiments were performed to verify the capabilities of function Doppler OCT.

  17. Compressive sensing optical coherence tomography using randomly accessible lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harfouche, Mark; Satyan, Naresh; Vasilyev, Arseny; Yariv, Amnon

    2014-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel a compressive sensing swept source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) system that enables high speed images to be taken while maintaining the high resolution offered from a large bandwidth sweep. Conventional SSOCT systems sweep the optical frequency of a laser ω(t) to determine the depth of the reflectors at a given lateral location. A scatterer located at delay τ appears as a sinusoid cos (ω(t)τ ) at the photodetector. The finite optical chirp rate and the speed of analog to digital and digital to analog converters limit the acquisition rate of an axial scan. The proposed acquisition modality enables much faster image acquisition rates by interrogating the beat signal at randomly selected optical frequencies while preserving resolution and depth of field. The system utilizes a randomly accessible laser, a modulated grating Y-branch laser, to sample the interference pattern from a scene at randomly selected optical frequencies over an optical bandwidth of 5 THz , corresponding to a resolution of 30 μm in air. The depth profile is then reconstructed using an l1 minimization algorithm with a LASSO constraint. Signal-dependent noise sources, shot noise and phase noise, are analyzed and taken into consideration during the recovery. Redundant dictionaries are used to improve the reconstruction of the depth profile. A compression by a factor of 10 for sparse targets up to a depth of 15 mm in noisy environments is shown.

  18. Coherent control of optical information with matter wave dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Naomi S; Garner, Sean R; Hau, Lene Vestergaard

    2007-02-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been achieved in manipulating matter with light, and light with matter. Resonant laser fields interacting with cold, dense atom clouds provide a particularly rich system. Such light fields interact strongly with the internal electrons of the atoms, and couple directly to external atomic motion through recoil momenta imparted when photons are absorbed and emitted. Ultraslow light propagation in Bose-Einstein condensates represents an extreme example of resonant light manipulation using cold atoms. Here we demonstrate that a slow light pulse can be stopped and stored in one Bose-Einstein condensate and subsequently revived from a totally different condensate, 160 mum away; information is transferred through conversion of the optical pulse into a travelling matter wave. In the presence of an optical coupling field, a probe laser pulse is first injected into one of the condensates where it is spatially compressed to a length much shorter than the coherent extent of the condensate. The coupling field is then turned off, leaving the atoms in the first condensate in quantum superposition states that comprise a stationary component and a recoiling component in a different internal state. The amplitude and phase of the spatially localized light pulse are imprinted on the recoiling part of the wavefunction, which moves towards the second condensate. When this 'messenger' atom pulse is embedded in the second condensate, the system is re-illuminated with the coupling laser. The probe light is driven back on and the messenger pulse is coherently added to the matter field of the second condensate by way of slow-light-mediated atomic matter-wave amplification. The revived light pulse records the relative amplitude and phase between the recoiling atomic imprint and the revival condensate. Our results provide a dramatic demonstration of coherent optical information processing with matter wave dynamics. Such quantum control may find

  19. Preliminary study of digital image correlation based optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Vuong, Barry; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Victor

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) provides deformation or material properties mapping of soft tissue, which is important for morphological and pathological studies of the tissue. An OCE technique is developed based on digital image correlation. System calibration and measurement error evaluation are performed. The displacement measurement of 0.6 μm to over 100 μm was obtained through a phantom experiment. The capability of this OCE technique for differentiation of stiffness was evaluated by imaging a two-components phantom. OCE imaging of an aneurysm sample shows promising results for characterization of composites of aneurismal wall in the future.

  20. Assessment of Coronary Plaque Vulnerability with Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Shiro; Soeda, Tsunenari; Sugawara, Yu; Ueda, Tomoya; Watanabe, Makoto; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Several catheter-based imaging modalities have been developed over the past 2 decades for visualizing the morphological features of coronary atherosclerotic plaques that are susceptible to future development of serious cardiovascular events. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new high-resolution intracoronary imaging modality based on near-infrared interferometry, and it has been shown to be able to identify various components of atheromatous plaques. In this review, we examine the histopathology of vulnerable plaques as a target for imaging technology, and discuss the evidence of OCT in identifying vulnerable atherosclerotic lesions in patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:27122761

  1. Spectroscopy by joint spectral and time domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkulmowski, Maciej; Tamborski, Szymon; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2015-03-01

    We present the methodology for spectroscopic examination of absorbing media being the combination of Spectral Optical Coherence Tomography and Fourier Transform Spectroscopy. The method bases on the joint Spectral and Time OCT computational scheme and simplifies data analysis procedure as compared to the mostly used windowing-based Spectroscopic OCT methods. The proposed experimental setup is self-calibrating in terms of wavelength-pixel assignment. The performance of the method in measuring absorption spectrum was checked with the use of the reflecting phantom filled with the absorbing agent (indocyanine green). The results show quantitative accordance with the controlled exact results provided by the reference method.

  2. One step geometrical calibration method for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Díaz, Jesús; Stritzel, Jenny; Rahlves, Maik; Majdani, Omid; Reithmeier, Eduard; Ortmaier, Tobias; Roth, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel one-step calibration methodology for geometrical distortion correction for optical coherence tomography (OCT). A calibration standard especially designed for OCT is introduced, which consists of an array of inverse pyramidal structures. The use of multiple landmarks situated on four different height levels on the pyramids allow performing a 3D geometrical calibration. The calibration procedure itself is based on a parametric model of the OCT beam propagation. It is validated by experimental results and enables the reduction of systematic errors by more than one order of magnitude. In future, our results can improve OCT image reconstruction and interpretation for medical applications such as real time monitoring of surgery.

  3. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman scattering with reflective optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antcliff, R. R.; Jarrett, O., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to the implementation of a novel reflective optics configuration in which the lens normally employed for focusing and crossing the input laser beams in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is replaced by a spherical mirror, allowing large crossing angles to be obtained with a single focusing device and permitting the laser generation and collection equipment to be located on one side of the sample region. The experimental results obtained demonstrate the feasibility of mirror-based CARS in remote combustion diagnostics.

  4. Dental calculus image based on optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Wang, Chun-Yang; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the dental calculus was characterized and imaged by means of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT). The refractive indices of enamel, dentin, cementum and calculus were measured as 1.625+/-0.024, 1.534+/-0.029, 1.570+/-0.021 and 1.896+/-0.085, respectively. The dental calculus lead strong scattering property and thus the region can be identified under enamel with SSOCT imaging. An extracted human tooth with calculus was covered by gingiva tissue as in vitro sample for SSOCT imaging.

  5. Detecting apoptosis using dynamic light scattering with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Golnaz; Mariampillai, Adrian; Yang, Victor X. D.; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2011-07-01

    A dynamic light scattering technique is implemented using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure the change in intracellular motion as cells undergo apoptosis. Acute myeloid leukemia cells were treated with cisplatin and imaged at a frame rate of 166 Hz using a 1300 nm swept-source OCT system at various times over a period of 48 h. Time correlation analysis of the speckle intensities indicated a significant increase in intracellular motion 24 h after treatment. This rise in intracellular motion correlated with histological findings of irregularly shaped and fragmented cells indicative of cell membrane blebbing and fragmentation.

  6. Primate retina imaging with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducros, Mathieu G.; Marsack, Jason D.; Rylander, H. Grady; Thomsen, Sharon L.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2001-12-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) is applied to determine the depth-resolved polarization state of light backreflected from the eye. The birefringence of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) was observed and measured from PSOCT images recorded postmortem in a Rhesus monkey. An image-processing algorithm was developed to identify birefringent regions in acquired PSOCT retinal images and automatically determine the thickness of the RNFL. Values of the RNFL thickness determined from histology and PSOCT were compared. PSOCT may provide a new method to determine RNFL thickness and birefringence for glaucoma diagnostics.

  7. Dark-field circular depolarization optical coherence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kalpesh; Zhang, Pengfei; Yeo, Eugenia Li Ling; Kah, James Chen Yong; Chen, Nanguang

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a widely used structural imaging modality. To extend its application in molecular imaging, gold nanorods are widely used as contrast agents for OCM. However, they very often offer limited sensitivity as a result of poor signal to background ratio. Here we experimentally demonstrate that a novel OCM implementation based on dark-field circular depolarization detection can efficiently detect circularly depolarized signal from gold nanorods and at the same time efficiently suppress the background signals. This results into a significant improvement in signal to background ratio. PMID:24049689

  8. Combined two-photon microscopy and angiographic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bumju; Wang, Tae Jun; Li, Qingyun; Nam, Jutaek; Hwang, Sekyu; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Kim, Ki Hean

    2013-08-01

    A combined two-photon microscopy (TPM) and angiographic optical coherence tomography (OCT) is developed, which can provide molecular, cellular, structural, and vascular information of tissue specimens in vivo. This combined system is implemented by adding an OCT vasculature visualization method to the previous combined TPM and OCT, and then is applied to in vivo tissue imaging. Two animal models, a mouse brain cranial window model and a mouse ear cancer model, are used. Both molecular, cellular information at local regions of tissues, and structural, vascular information at relatively larger regions are visualized in the same sections. In vivo tissue microenvironments are better elucidated by the combined TPM and angiographic OCT.

  9. Combined two-photon microscopy and angiographic optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bumju; Wang, Tae Jun; Li, Qingyun; Nam, Jutaek; Hwang, Sekyu; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Kim, Ki Hean

    2013-08-01

    A combined two-photon microscopy (TPM) and angiographic optical coherence tomography (OCT) is developed, which can provide molecular, cellular, structural, and vascular information of tissue specimens in vivo. This combined system is implemented by adding an OCT vasculature visualization method to the previous combined TPM and OCT, and then is applied to in vivo tissue imaging. Two animal models, a mouse brain cranial window model and a mouse ear cancer model, are used. Both molecular, cellular information at local regions of tissues, and structural, vascular information at relatively larger regions are visualized in the same sections. In vivo tissue microenvironments are better elucidated by the combined TPM and angiographic OCT.

  10. Doppler-based lateral motion tracking for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Nicolás; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Kalkman, Jeroen

    2012-06-15

    Nonuniform lateral scanning of the probe beam in optical coherence tomography produces imaging artifacts and leads to a morphologically inaccurate representation of the sample. Here, we demonstrate a solution to this problem, which is based on the Doppler shift carried by the complex-valued depth-resolved scattering amplitude. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of Doppler flow velocity measurements in underlying flow channels while laterally scanning the imaging probe over large surfaces with arbitrary and varying velocity. Finally, we performed centimeters-long hand-held B-mode imaging of skin in vivo.

  11. Ultrasound-enhanced optical coherence tomography: improved penetration and resolution

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chuanyong; Liu, Bin; Brezinski, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing penetration remains one of the most important issues in optical coherence tomography (OCT) research, which we achieved with a parallel ultrasound beam. In addition to qualitative improvements of tissue imaging, quantitative improvements in resolution of up to 28%±2% was noted. At lower frequencies and energies the improvement occurred primarily by altering the detection of multiply scattered light (photon–phonon interaction), which was substantially greater in solids than in liquids (even though the liquid had the higher scattering coefficient). In conclusion, the use of an ultrasound beam with OCT appears the most effective means to date for increasing imaging penetration. PMID:18382493

  12. Optical coherence tomography for glucose monitoring in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Hafeez; Hussain, Fayyaz; Ikram, Masroor

    2015-08-01

    In this review, we have discussed the potential application of the emerging imaging modality, i.e., optical coherence tomography (OCT) for glucose monitoring in biological tissues. OCT provides monitoring of glucose diffusion in different fibrous tissues like in sclera by determining the permeability rate with acceptable accuracy both in type 1 and in type 2 diabetes. The maximum precision of glucose measurement in Intralipid suspensions, for example, with the OCT technique yields the accuracy up to 4.4 mM for 10 % Intralipid and 2.2 mM for 3 % Intralipid.

  13. Application of optical coherence tomography based microangiography for cerebral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Utku; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Requirements of in vivo rodent brain imaging are hard to satisfy using traditional technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging and two-photon microscopy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging tool that can easily reach at high speeds and provide high resolution volumetric images with a relatively large field of view for rodent brain imaging. Here, we provide the overview of recent developments of functional OCT based imaging techniques for neuroscience applications on rodents. Moreover, a summary of OCT-based microangiography (OMAG) studies for stroke and traumatic brain injury cases on rodents are provided.

  14. Optical coherence tomography in art diagnostics and restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Targowski, P.; Rouba, B.; Góra, M.; Tymińska-Widmer, L.; Marczak, J.; Kowalczyk, A.

    2008-07-01

    An overview of the technique of optical coherence tomography (OCT) is presented, and a spectral OCT instrument especially designed for art diagnostics is described. The applicability of OCT to the stratigraphy of oil paintings is discussed with emphasis on examination of the artist’s signature. For the first time, OCT tomograms of stained glass are presented and discussed. The utilisation of Spectral OCT in real-time monitoring of varnish ablation is discussed with examples of ablation, melting and evaporation, and exfoliation of the varnish layer provided, for the first time.

  15. Optical coherence tomography imaging of ocular and periocular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Carlos A; Plesec, Thomas; Singh, Arun D

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become pivotal in the practice of ophthalmology. Similar to other ophthalmic subspecialties, ophthalmic oncology has also incorporated OCT into practice. Anterior segment OCT (AS-OCT), ultra-high resolution OCT (UHR-OCT), spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) and enhanced depth imaging OCT (EDI-OCT), have all been described to be helpful in the diagnosis, treatment planning and monitoring response of ocular and periocular tumours. Herein we discuss the role of OCT including the advantages and limitations of its use in the setting of common intraocular and adnexal tumours. PMID:24599420

  16. Modulation of optical spatial coherence by surface plasmon polaritons.

    PubMed

    Divitt, Shawn; Frimmer, Martin; Visser, Taco D; Novotny, Lukas

    2016-07-01

    The interference pattern observed in Young's double-slit experiment is intimately related to the statistical correlations of the waves emitted by the slits. As the waves in the slits become more correlated, the visibility of the interference pattern increases. Here, we experimentally modulate the statistical correlations between the optical fields emitted by a pair of slits in a metal film. The interaction between the slits is mediated by surface plasmon polaritons and can be tuned by the slit separation, which allows us to either increase or decrease the spatial coherence of the emerging fields relative to that of the incoming fields.

  17. Requirement of optical coherence for continuous-variable quantum teleportation.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, T; Sanders, B C

    2001-08-13

    We show that the sender and the receiver each require coherent devices in order to achieve unconditional continuous variable quantum teleportation (CVQT), and this requirement cannot be achieved with conventional laser sources, linear optics, ideal photon detectors, and perfect Fock state sources. The appearance of successful CVQT in recent experiments is due to interpreting the measurement record fallaciously in terms of one preferred ensemble (or decomposition) of the correct density matrix describing the state. Our analysis is unrelated to technical problems such as laser phase drift or finite squeezing bandwidth.

  18. Capturing the vital vascular fingerprint with optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    2013-08-01

    Using fingerprints as a method to identify an individual has been accepted in forensics since the nineteenth century, and the fingerprint has become one of the most widely used biometric characteristics. Most of the modern fingerprint recognition systems are based on the print pattern of the finger surface and are not robust against spoof attaching. We demonstrate a novel vital vascular fingerprint system using Doppler optical coherence tomography that provides highly sensitive and reliable personal identification. Because the system is based on blood flow, which only exists in a livng person, the technique is robust against spoof attaching.

  19. The Effect of Optic Disc Center Displacement on Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Measurement Determined by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Uhm, Ki Bang; Sung, Kyung Rim; Kang, Min Ho; Cho, Hee Yoon; Seong, Mincheol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of optic disc center displacement on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) measurement determined by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods The optic disc center was manipulated at 1-pixel intervals in horizontal, vertical, and diagonal directions. According to the manipulated optic disc center location, the RNFL thickness data were resampled: (1) at a 3.46-mm diameter circle; and (2) between a 2.5-mm diameter circle and 5.4-mm square. Error was calculated between the original and resampled RNFL measurements. The tolerable error threshold of the optic disc center displacement was determined by considering test-retest variability of SD-OCT. The unreliable zone was defined as an area with 10% or more variability. Results The maximum tolerable error thresholds of optic disc center displacement on the RNFL thickness map were distributed from 0.042 to 0.09 mm in 8 directions. The threshold shape was vertically elongated. Clinically important unreliable zones were located: (1) at superior and inferior region in the vertical displacement; (2) at inferotemporal region in the horizontal displacement, and (3) at superotemporal or inferotemporal region in the diagonal displacement. The unreliable zone pattern and threshold limit varied according to the direction of optic disc displacement. Conclusions Optic disc center displacement had a considerable impact on whole RNFL thickness measurements. Understanding the effect of optic disc center displacement could contribute to reliable RNFL measurements. PMID:27783663

  20. Development of fibre optic broadband sources at 1 μm region for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifanov, Irina; Berendt, Martin O.; Salcedo, José R.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.; Lobo Ribeiro, António B.

    2008-09-01

    Recent developments on broadband optical sources emitting at 1050 nm wavelength for medical applications, in particular optical coherence tomography (OCT), have revealed enhanced depth penetration into the choroid, reduced scattering losses and improved image performances in eyes with turbid media, when compared to the most commercial used semiconductor optical source technology at 820 nm. In this paper, we present our study of fibre optic broadband sources (BBS) at 1 micron region, based on the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from rare-earth doped silica fibres for the integration into OCT systems. The target specifications for this type of sources are: 1050 nm central emission wavelength, with spectral width of ~70 nm, tens of miliwatts of output power and smoothly shaped output spectra. Several combinations of rare-earth doped optical fibres integrated into different fibre optic configurations have been tested. Optical bandwidth optimization and spectral shaping using different fibre optic techniques are presented and their autocorrelation function compared.

  1. Beyond Readability: Investigating Coherence of Clinical Text for Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, Scott; Dalrymple, Prudence; Keselman, Alla

    2011-01-01

    Background A basic tenet of consumer health informatics is that understandable health resources empower the public. Text comprehension holds great promise for helping to characterize consumer problems in understanding health texts. The need for efficient ways to assess consumer-oriented health texts and the availability of computationally supported tools led us to explore the effect of various text characteristics on readers’ understanding of health texts, as well as to develop novel approaches to assessing these characteristics. Objective The goal of this study was to compare the impact of two different approaches to enhancing readability, and three interventions, on individuals’ comprehension of short, complex passages of health text. Methods Participants were 80 university staff, faculty, or students. Each participant was asked to “retell” the content of two health texts: one a clinical trial in the domain of diabetes mellitus, and the other typical Visit Notes. These texts were transformed for the intervention arms of the study. Two interventions provided terminology support via (1) standard dictionary or (2) contextualized vocabulary definitions. The third intervention provided coherence improvement. We assessed participants’ comprehension of the clinical texts through propositional analysis, an open-ended questionnaire, and analysis of the number of errors made. Results For the clinical trial text, the effect of text condition was not significant in any of the comparisons, suggesting no differences in recall, despite the varying levels of support (P = .84). For the Visit Note, however, the difference in the median total propositions recalled between the Coherent and the (Original + Dictionary) conditions was significant (P = .04). This suggests that participants in the Coherent condition recalled more of the original Visit Notes content than did participants in the Original and the Dictionary conditions combined. However, no difference was seen

  2. Spectral estimation optical coherence tomography for axial super-resolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Cui, Dongyao; Yu, Xiaojun; Liu, Linbo

    2015-10-01

    The depth reflectivity profile of Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) is estimated from the inverse Fourier transform of the spectral interference signals (interferograms). As a result, the axial resolution is fundamentally limited by the coherence length of the light source. We demonstrate that using the autoregressive spectral estimation technique instead of the inverse Fourier transform, to analyze the spectral interferograms can improve the axial resolution. We name this method spectral estimation OCT (SE-OCT). SE-OCT breaks the coherence length limitation and improves the axial resolution by a factor of up to 4.7 compared with FD-OCT. Furthermore, SE-OCT provides complete sidelobe suppression in the depth point-spread function, further improving the image quality. We demonstrate that these technical advances enables clear identification of corneal endothelium anatomical details ex vivo that cannot be identified using the corresponding FD-OCT. Given that SE-OCT can be implemented in the FD-OCT devices without any hardware changes, the new capabilities provided by SE-OCT are likely to offer immediate improvements to the diagnosis and management of diseases based on OCT imaging.

  3. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging in optic disk pit associated with outer retinal dehiscence

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chee Wai; Wong, Doric; Mathur, Ranjana

    2014-01-01

    A 37-year-old Bangladeshi male presented with an inferotemporal optic disk pit and serous macular detachment in the left eye. Imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed a multilayer macular schisis pattern with a small subfoveal outer retinal dehiscence. This case illustrates a rare phenotype of optic disk maculopathy with macular schisis and a small outer retinal layer dehiscence. Spectral domain OCT was a useful adjunct in delineating the retinal layers in optic disk pit maculopathy, and revealed a small area of outer retinal layer dehiscence that could only have been detected on high-resolution OCT. PMID:25349471

  4. Optical coherence tomography image enhancement by using gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce-de-Leon, Y. R.; Lopez-Rios, J. A.; Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Alcalá Ochoa, N.

    2011-08-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an imaging technique to get cross-sectional images with resolutions of a few microns and deep penetration in tissue of some millimeters. For many years OCT has been applied to analyze different human tissues like eyes, skin, teeth, urinary bladders, gastrointestinal, respiratory or genitourinary tracts and recently breast cancer tissues have been studied. Many of these tissues are composed specially of lipids and collagen, proteins which cause multiple light scattering (MLS) reducing significantly the optical depth and the contrast of OCT imaging. So, one of the big challenges of this technique is to acquire images with good contrast. Gold nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit interesting optical properties due to its plasmon resonance frequency. Optical absorbance is strong when gold NPs have dimension under 50 nm, but over this size optical scattering becomes dominant. In this work we show the preliminary results of the use of gold NPs as a contrast medium to enhance the OCT images quality. Our experimental results show which type of particles (morphology and size) present the best enhancement in the region of 1325 nm which corresponds to the central wavelength source excitation. All our experiments were carried out with a commercial OCT (thorlabs) system and our NPs were tested in water and gel phantoms.

  5. Compact adaptive optic-optical coherence tomography system

    DOEpatents

    Olivier, Scot S.; Chen, Diana C.; Jones, Steven M.; McNary, Sean M.

    2012-02-28

    Badal Optometer and rotating cylinders are inserted in the AO-OCT to correct large spectacle aberrations such as myopia, hyperopic and astigmatism for ease of clinical use and reduction. Spherical mirrors in the sets of the telescope are rotated orthogonally to reduce aberrations and beam displacement caused by the scanners. This produces greatly reduced AO registration errors and improved AO performance to enable high order aberration correction in a patient eyes.

  6. Compact adaptive optic-optical coherence tomography system

    DOEpatents

    Olivier, Scot S.; Chen, Diana C.; Jones, Steven M.; McNary, Sean M.

    2011-05-17

    Badal Optometer and rotating cylinders are inserted in the AO-OCT to correct large spectacle aberrations such as myopia, hyperopic and astigmatism for ease of clinical use and reduction. Spherical mirrors in the sets of the telescope are rotated orthogonally to reduce aberrations and beam displacement caused by the scanners. This produces greatly reduced AO registration errors and improved AO performance to enable high order aberration correction in a patient eyes.

  7. Cutting Edge of Traumatic Maculopathy with Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Sílvia; Campos, António; Campos, Joana; Neves, Arminda; Beselga, Diana; Fernandes, Cristina; Castro Sousa, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews clinically relevant data regarding traumatic maculopathy (TM), frequently observed in clinical practice, especially due to sport or traffic accident injuries. It is characterized by transient gray-whitish retinal coloration and reduction of visual acuity (VA) with closed, blunt object globe trauma of their prior. It may be limited to the posterior pole (Berlin’s edema), or peripheral areas of the retina. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) provides detail insight using high resolution cross-sectional tomographs of the ocular tissue. It is a potent non-invasive tool for the clinician to follow-up. Clinicians are, thereby empowered with a tool that enables evaluation of the retinal status and allows for prediction of the prognosis. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography supports the idea that the major site of injury is in the photoreceptor and layers of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Depending on the severity of the trauma, SD-OCT may reveal differential optical densities of intraretinal spaces ranging from disappearance of the thin hyporeflective optical space in mild lesions, or areas of disruption of the inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junction and hyperreflectivity of the overlying retina, pigment disorders and retinal atrophy, in more severe cases. The prognosis for recovery of vision is generally good, and improvement occurs within 3-4 weeks. PMID:26060831

  8. Multidimensional coherent optical spectroscopy of semiconductor nanostructures: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardin, Gaël

    2016-02-01

    Multidimensional coherent optical spectroscopy (MDCS) is an elegant and versatile tool to measure the ultrafast nonlinear optical response of materials. Of particular interest for semiconductor nanostructures, MDCS enables the separation of homogeneous and inhomogeneous linewidths, reveals the nature of coupling between resonances, and is able to identify the signatures of many-body interactions. As an extension of transient four-wave mixing (FWM) experiments, MDCS can be implemented in various geometries, in which different strategies can be used to isolate the FWM signal and measure its phase. I review and compare different practical implementations of MDCS experiments adapted to the study of semiconductor materials. The power of MDCS is illustrated by discussing experimental results obtained on semiconductor nanostructures such as quantum dots, quantum wells, microcavities, and layered semiconductors.

  9. Coherent nuclear resonant optics for third generation synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.; Homma, H.; Kentjana, M.

    1992-06-01

    The insertion-device-based, third-generation, synchrotron radiation sources now under construction in Europe, the USA, and Japan bring new opportunities and challenges in the design and manufacture of x-ray optics. These high brightness sources provide new opportunities to overcome some of the outstanding problems associated with nuclear resonant monochromatization of synchrotron radiation. New methods such as polarizing monochromators, and zone plates provide alternative methods for production of {mu}eV-neV resolution in the hard x-ray regime. The design principles, and characterization, and performance of crystal monochromators and of nuclear coherent scattering optics, including Grazing Incidence Anti Reflection (GIAR) films, multilayers, zone plates, as well as single crystals are discussed.

  10. Nanoshells as an optical coherence tomography contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Halas, Naomi J.; West, Jennifer L.; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2004-07-01

    Nanoshells are a layered dielectric core/metal shell composite nanostructure with an optical resonance geometrically tunable through the visible and near infrared. Due to their small size, ability to generate a strong backscattering signal, and potential for surface modification, they may be an ideal in vivo optical coherence tomography contrast agent. We performed a pilot study to assess their capabilities. Images of a cuvette filled with dilute nanoshells, 2 μm polystyrene microspheres, or a combination were obtained. When compared to microspheres, images of the nanoshells where much brighter and attenuation of the bottom cuvette interface less. Injection of micropheres into the tail vein of mice and hamsters caused a noticeable brightening of OCT images of the dorsal skin. These pilot studies indicate that nanoshells may be an excellent OCT contrast agent; work is continuing to determine optimum nanoshell parameters and applications.

  11. Feasibility study of an optically coherent telescope array in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical methods of image construction which can be used to produce very high angular resolution images at optical wavelengths of astronomical objects from an orbiting array of telescopes are discussed and a concept is presented for a phase-coherent optical telescope array which may be deployed by space shuttle in the 1990's. The system would start as a four-element linear array with a 12 m baseline. The initial module is a minimum redundant array with a photon-counting collecting area three times larger than space telescope and a one dimensional resolution of better than 0.01 arc seconds in the visible range. Later additions to the array would build up facility capability. The advantages of a VLBI observatory in space are considered as well as apertures for the telescopes.

  12. Digital holographic optical coherence imaging of tumor tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kwan; Turek, John J.; Nolte, David D.

    2006-02-01

    Holographic Optical Coherence Imaging (OCI) uses spatial heterodyne detection in direct analogy with the temporal heterodyne detection of time-domain OCT. The spatial demodulator can be a sensitive dynamic holographic film or can be a CCD array placed directly at the hologram plane. We show that a digital hologram captured at the Fourier plane requires only a simple 2D inverse FFT of the digital hologram to compute the real image and its conjugate. Our recording on the optical Fourier plane has an advantage for diffuse targets because the intensity distribution of diffuse targets is relatively uniform at the Fourier plane and hence uses the full dynamic range of CCD camera. We applied this technique to human liver tumor spheroids and produced depth-resolved images to depth of 1.4 mm.

  13. Monte Carlo Simulations of Arterial Imaging with Optical Coherence Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P.; Estabrook, K.; Everett, M.; London, R.A.; Maitland, D.; Zimmerman, G.; Colston, B.; da Silva, L.; Sathyam, U.

    2000-02-01

    The laser-tissue interaction code LATIS [London et al., Appl. Optics 36, 9068 ( 1998)] is used to analyze photon scattering histories representative of optical coherence tomography (OCT) experiment performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Monte Carlo photonics with Henyey-Greenstein anisotropic scattering is implemented and used to simulate signal discrimination of intravascular structure. An analytic model is developed and used to obtain a scaling law relation for optimization of the OCT signal and to validate Monte Carlo photonics. The appropriateness of the Henyey-Greenstein phase function is studied by direct comparison with more detailed Mie scattering theory using an ensemble of spherical dielectric scatterers. Modest differences are found between the two prescriptions for describing photon angular scattering in tissue. In particular, the Mie scattering phase functions provide less overall reflectance signal but more signal contrast compared to the Henyey-Greenstein formulation.

  14. Coherent Semiconductor Laser Systems For Optical Intersatellite Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerset, R. J.; Fletcher, G. D.

    1990-04-01

    Semiconductor laser based optical intersatellite links are attractive for use in both DRS type applications, and as links in the existing satellite-based telecommunications networks (for example between EUTELSAT SMS and INTELSAT IBS business services satellites). Initial ISL experiments will demonstrate direct detection systems using intensity modulation. Coherent systems offer significant improvements over these: the use of frequency shift keying modulation and heterodyne receivers provide significantly improved system sensitivities, which will allow practical systems with reliable laser sources (50 mW CW), and small optical telescopes (20 cm diameter). The SILEX ADD-ON CHANNEL is intended to demonstrate the potential of such systems within the framework of the ESA SILEX program.

  15. Imaging of oral pathological tissue using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canjau, Silvana; Todea, Carmen; Sinescu, Cosmin; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Topala, Florin I.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) constitutes 90% of oral cancer. Early detection is a cornerstone to improve survival. Interaction of light with tissues may highlight changes in tissue structure and metabolism. We propose optical coherence tomography (OCT), as a non-invasive diagnosis method, being a new high-resolution optical technique that permits tri-dimensional (3-D), real-time imaging of near surface abnormalities in complex tissues. In this study half of the excisional biopsy was directed to the pathologist and the other half was assigned for OCT investigation. Histopathology validated the results. Areas of OSCC of the buccal mucosa were identified in the OCT images. The elements obserced included extensive epithelial down-growth, the disruption of the basement membrane, with areas of erosion, an epithelial layer that was highly variable in thickness and invasion into the sub-epithelial layers. Therefore, OCT appears to be a highly promising imaging modality.

  16. Optical coherence tomography: a potential tool to predict premature rupture of fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    Micili, Serap C; Valter, Markus; Oflaz, Hakan; Ozogul, Candan; Linder, Peter; Föckler, Nicole; Artmann, Gerhard M; Digel, Ilya; Artmann, Aysegul T

    2013-04-01

    A fundamental question addressed in this study was the feasibility of preterm birth prediction based on a noncontact investigation of fetal membranes in situ. Although the phenomena of preterm birth and the premature rupture of the fetal membrane are well known, currently, there are no diagnostic tools for their prediction. The aim of this study was to assess whether optical coherence tomography could be used for clinical investigations of high-risk pregnancies. The thickness of fetal membranes was measured in parallel by optical coherence tomography and histological techniques for the following types of birth: normal births, preterm births without premature ruptures and births at full term with premature rupture of membrane. Our study revealed that the membrane thickness correlates with the birth type. Normal births membranes were statistically significantly thicker than those belonging to the other two groups. Thus, in spite of almost equal duration of gestation of the normal births and the births at full term with premature rupture, the corresponding membrane thicknesses differed. This difference is possibly related to previously reported water accumulation in the membranes. The optical coherence tomography results were encouraging, suggesting that this technology could be used in future to predict and distinguish between different kinds of births.

  17. 3D Human cartilage surface characterization by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Nicolai; Riedel, Jörn; Schmitt, Robert; Tingart, Markus; Truhn, Daniel; Pufe, Thomas; Jahr, Holger; Nebelung, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of cartilage degeneration is of high clinical interest. Loss of surface integrity is considered one of the earliest and most reliable signs of degeneration, but cannot currently be evaluated objectively. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an arthroscopically available light-based non-destructive real-time imaging technology that allows imaging at micrometre resolutions to millimetre depths. As OCT-based surface evaluation standards remain to be defined, the present study investigated the diagnostic potential of 3D surface profile parameters in the comprehensive evaluation of cartilage degeneration. To this end, 45 cartilage samples of different degenerative grades were obtained from total knee replacements (2 males, 10 females; mean age 63.8 years), cut to standard size and imaged using a spectral-domain OCT device (Thorlabs, Germany). 3D OCT datasets of 8  ×  8, 4  ×  4 and 1  ×  1 mm (width  ×  length) were obtained and pre-processed (image adjustments, morphological filtering). Subsequent automated surface identification algorithms were used to obtain the 3D primary profiles, which were then filtered and processed using established algorithms employing ISO standards. The 3D surface profile thus obtained was used to calculate a set of 21 3D surface profile parameters, i.e. height (e.g. Sa), functional (e.g. Sk), hybrid (e.g. Sdq) and segmentation-related parameters (e.g. Spd). Samples underwent reference histological assessment according to the Degenerative Joint Disease classification. Statistical analyses included calculation of Spearman’s rho and assessment of inter-group differences using the Kruskal Wallis test. Overall, the majority of 3D surface profile parameters revealed significant degeneration-dependent differences and correlations with the exception of severe end-stage degeneration and were of distinct diagnostic value in the assessment of surface integrity. None of the 3D

  18. Phase-coherent all-optical frequency division by three

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Klein, Marvin E.; Meyn, Jan-Peter; Wallenstein, Richard; Gross, Petra; Boller, Klaus-Jochen

    2003-01-01

    The properties of all-optical phase-coherent frequency division by 3, based on a self-phase-locked continuous-wave (cw) optical parametric oscillator (OPO), are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The frequency to be divided is provided by a diode laser master-oscillator power-amplifier system operated at a wavelength of 812 nm and used as the pump source of the OPO. Optical self-phase-locking of the OPO signal and idler waves is achieved by mutual injection locking of the signal wave and the intracavity frequency-doubled idler wave. The OPO process and the second-harmonic generation of the idler wave are simultaneously phase matched through quasi-phase-matching using two periodically poled sections of different period manufactured within the same LiNbO{sub 3} crystal. An optical self-phase-locking range of up to 1 MHz is experimentally observed. The phase coherence of frequency division by three is measured via the phase stability of an interference pattern formed by the input and output waves of the OPO. The fractional frequency instability of the divider is measured to be smaller than 7.6x10{sup -14} for a measurement time of 10 s (resolution limited). The self-phase-locking characteristics of the cw OPO are theoretically investigated by analytically solving the coupled field equations in the steady-state regime. For the experimental parameters of the OPO, the calculations predict a locking range of 1.3 MHz and a fractional frequency instability of 1.6x10{sup -15}, in good agreement with the experimental results.

  19. Depth profilometry via multiplexed optical high-coherence interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander; Behr, Bradford B; Hajian, Arsen R

    2015-01-01

    Depth Profilometry involves the measurement of the depth profile of objects, and has significant potential for various industrial applications that benefit from non-destructive sub-surface profiling such as defect detection, corrosion assessment, and dental assessment to name a few. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of depth profilometry using an Multiplexed Optical High-coherence Interferometry MOHI instrument. The MOHI instrument utilizes the spatial coherence of a laser and the interferometric properties of light to probe the reflectivity as a function of depth of a sample. The axial and lateral resolutions, as well as imaging depth, are decoupled in the MOHI instrument. The MOHI instrument is capable of multiplexing interferometric measurements into 480 one-dimensional interferograms at a location on the sample and is built with axial and lateral resolutions of 40 μm at a maximum imaging depth of 700 μm. Preliminary results, where a piece of sand-blasted aluminum, an NBK7 glass piece, and an optical phantom were successfully probed using the MOHI instrument to produce depth profiles, demonstrate the feasibility of such an instrument for performing depth profilometry. PMID:25803289

  20. Digital image correlation-based optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Standish, Beau; Vuong, Barry; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Victor

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) provides deformation or material properties, mapping of soft tissue. We aim to develop a robust speckle tracking OCE technique with improved resolution and accuracy. A digital image correlation (DIC)-based OCE technique was developed by combining an advanced DIC algorithm with optical coherence tomography (OCT). System calibration and measurement error evaluation demonstrated that this DIC-based OCE technique had a resolution of ˜0.6 μm displacement and <0.5% strain measurement in the axial scan direction. The measured displacement ranged from 0.6 to 150 μm, obtained via phantom imaging. The capability of the DIC-based OCE technique, for differentiation of stiffness, was evaluated by imaging a candle gel phantom with an irregularly shaped stiff inclusion. OCE imaging of a chicken breast sample differentiated the fat, membrane, and muscle layers. Strain elastograms of an aneurysm sample showed heterogeneity of the tissue and clear contrast between the adventitia and media. These promising results demonstrated the capability of the DIC-based OCE for the characterization of the various components of the tissue sample. Further improvement of the system will be conducted to make this OCE technique a practical tool for measuring and differentiating material properties of soft tissue.

  1. Digital image correlation-based optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cuiru; Standish, Beau; Vuong, Barry; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Victor

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) provides deformation or material properties, mapping of soft tissue. We aim to develop a robust speckle tracking OCE technique with improved resolution and accuracy. A digital image correlation (DIC)-based OCE technique was developed by combining an advanced DIC algorithm with optical coherence tomography (OCT). System calibration and measurement error evaluation demonstrated that this DIC-based OCE technique had a resolution of ~0.6 μm displacement and <0.5% strain measurement in the axial scan direction. The measured displacement ranged from 0.6 to 150 μm, obtained via phantom imaging. The capability of the DIC-based OCE technique, for differentiation of stiffness, was evaluated by imaging a candle gel phantom with an irregularly shaped stiff inclusion. OCE imaging of a chicken breast sample differentiated the fat, membrane, and muscle layers. Strain elastograms of an aneurysm sample showed heterogeneity of the tissue and clear contrast between the adventitia and media. These promising results demonstrated the capability of the DIC-based OCE for the characterization of the various components of the tissue sample. Further improvement of the system will be conducted to make this OCE technique a practical tool for measuring and differentiating material properties of soft tissue. PMID:24346855

  2. Parallel multithread computing for spectroscopic analysis in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojanowski, Michal; Kraszewski, Maciej; Strakowski, Marcin; Pluciński, Jerzy

    2014-05-01

    Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (SOCT) is an extension of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). It allows gathering spectroscopic information from individual scattering points inside the sample. It is based on time-frequency analysis of interferometric signals. Such analysis requires calculating hundreds of Fourier transforms while performing a single A-scan. Additionally, further processing of acquired spectroscopic information is needed. This significantly increases the time of required computations. During last years, application of graphical processing units (GPU's) was proposed to reduce computation time in OCT by using parallel computing algorithms. GPU technology can be also used to speed-up signal processing in SOCT. However, parallel algorithms used in classical OCT need to be revised because of different character of analyzed data. The classical OCT requires processing of long, independent interferometric signals for obtaining subsequent A-scans. The difference with SOCT is that it requires processing of multiple, shorter signals, which differ only in a small part of samples. We have developed new algorithms for parallel signal processing for usage in SOCT, implemented with NVIDIA CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture). We present details of the algorithms and performance tests for analyzing data from in-house SD-OCT system. We also give a brief discussion about usefulness of developed algorithm. Presented algorithms might be useful for researchers working on OCT, as they allow to reduce computation time and are step toward real-time signal processing of SOCT data.

  3. Optical coherence tomography visualizes neurons in human entorhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Magnain, Caroline; Augustinack, Jean C.; Konukoglu, Ender; Frosch, Matthew P.; Sakadžić, Sava; Varjabedian, Ani; Garcia, Nathalie; Wedeen, Van J.; Boas, David A.; Fischl, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The cytoarchitecture of the human brain is of great interest in diverse fields: neuroanatomy, neurology, neuroscience, and neuropathology. Traditional histology is a method that has been historically used to assess cell and fiber content in the ex vivo human brain. However, this technique suffers from significant distortions. We used a previously demonstrated optical coherence microscopy technique to image individual neurons in several square millimeters of en-face tissue blocks from layer II of the human entorhinal cortex, over 50  μm in depth. The same slices were then sectioned and stained for Nissl substance. We registered the optical coherence tomography (OCT) images with the corresponding Nissl stained slices using a nonlinear transformation. The neurons were then segmented in both images and we quantified the overlap. We show that OCT images contain information about neurons that is comparable to what can be obtained from Nissl staining, and thus can be used to assess the cytoarchitecture of the ex vivo human brain with minimal distortion. With the future integration of a vibratome into the OCT imaging rig, this technique can be scaled up to obtain undistorted volumetric data of centimeter cube tissue blocks in the near term, and entire human hemispheres in the future. PMID:25741528

  4. Depth Profilometry via Multiplexed Optical High-Coherence Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander; Behr, Bradford B.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2015-01-01

    Depth Profilometry involves the measurement of the depth profile of objects, and has significant potential for various industrial applications that benefit from non-destructive sub-surface profiling such as defect detection, corrosion assessment, and dental assessment to name a few. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of depth profilometry using an Multiplexed Optical High-coherence Interferometry MOHI instrument. The MOHI instrument utilizes the spatial coherence of a laser and the interferometric properties of light to probe the reflectivity as a function of depth of a sample. The axial and lateral resolutions, as well as imaging depth, are decoupled in the MOHI instrument. The MOHI instrument is capable of multiplexing interferometric measurements into 480 one-dimensional interferograms at a location on the sample and is built with axial and lateral resolutions of 40 μm at a maximum imaging depth of 700 μm. Preliminary results, where a piece of sand-blasted aluminum, an NBK7 glass piece, and an optical phantom were successfully probed using the MOHI instrument to produce depth profiles, demonstrate the feasibility of such an instrument for performing depth profilometry. PMID:25803289

  5. Vascular wall stress during intravascular optical coherence tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Yang, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Biomechanical properties of arterial wall is crucial for understanding the changes in the cardiovascular system. Catheters are used during intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) imaging. The presence of a catheter alters the flow field, pressure distribution and frictional resistance to flow in an artery. In this paper, we first study the transmural stress distribution of the catheterized vessel. COMSOL (COMSOL 4.4) was used to simulate the blood flow induced deformation in a catheterized vessel. Blood is modeled as an incompressible Newtonian fluid. Stress distribution from an three-layer vascular model with an eccentric catheter are simulated, which provides a general idea about the distribution of the displacement and the stress. Optical coherence elastography techniques were then applied to porcine carotid artery samples to look at the deformation status of the vascular wall during saline or water injection. Preliminary simulation results show nonuniform stress distribution in the circumferential direction of the eccentrically catheterized vascular model. Three strain rate methods were tested for intravascular OCE application. The tissue Doppler method has the potential to be further developed to image the vascular wall biomechnical properties in vivo. Although results in this study are not validated quantitatively, the experiments and methods may be valuable for intravascular OCE studies, which may provide important information for cardiovascular disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Cell death monitoring using quantitative optical coherence tomography methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Golnaz; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C.; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2011-03-01

    Cell death is characterized by a series of predictable morphological changes, which modify the light scattering properties of cells. We present a multi-parametric approach to detecting changes in subcellular morphology related to cell death using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Optical coherence tomography data were acquired from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells undergoing apoptosis over a period of 48 hours. Integrated backscatter (IB) and spectral slope (SS) were computed from OCT backscatter spectra and statistical parameters were extracted from a generalized gamma (GG) distribution fit to OCT signal intensity histograms. The IB increased by 2-fold over 48 hours with significant increases observed as early as 4 hours. The SS increased in steepness by 2.5-fold with significant changes at 12 hours, while the GG parameters were sensitive to apoptotic changes at 24 to 48 hours. Histology slides indicated nuclear condensation and fragmentation at 24 hours, suggesting the late scattering changes could be related to nuclear structure. A second series of measurements from AML cells treated with cisplatin, colchicine or ionizing radiation suggested that the GG parameters could potentially differentiate between modes of cell death. Distinct cellular morphology was observed in histology slides obtained from cells treated under each condition.

  7. High-definition optical coherence tomography of melanocytic skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Gambichler, Thilo; Plura, Iris; Schmid-Wendtner, Monika; Valavanis, Konstantinos; Kulichova, Daniela; Stücker, Markus; Pljakic, Azem; Berking, Carola; Maier, Tanja

    2015-08-01

    High-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) scanners have recently been developed. We assessed micromorphological HD-OCT correlates of benign naevi (BN) and malignant melanoma (MM). 28 BN and 20 MM were studied using HD-OCT and histology. Epidermal honeycomb/cobblestone pattern, regular junctional cell nests, and edged papillae are more often observed in BN, whereas fusion of rete ridges, pagetoid cells and junctional and/or dermal nests with atypical cells are more frequently seen in MM. A high overlap of HD-OCT features in BN and MM was observed and in 20% of MM we did not find evidence for malignancy in OCT images at all. Using HD-OCT it is possible to visualize architectural and cellular alterations of melanocytic skin lesions. The overlap of HD-OCT features seen in BN and MM and the absence of suspicious HD-OCT features in some MM represents an important limitation of HD-OCT affecting the sensitivity of HD-OCT in diagnosing MM. High-definition optical coherence tomography and the corresponding vertically sectioned histology of a compound naevus. PMID:25237005

  8. Optical tractography of the mouse heart using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanbo; Yao, Gang

    2013-01-01

    We developed a method to image myocardial fiber architecture in the mouse heart using a Jones matrix-based polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) system. The "cross-helical" laminar structure of myocardial fibers can be clearly visualized using this technology. The obtained myocardial fiber organization agrees well with existing knowledge acquired using conventional histology and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Modern fibre-optic coherent lidars for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Chris

    2015-10-01

    This paper surveys some growth areas in optical sensing that exploit near-IR coherent laser sources and fibreoptic hardware from the telecoms industry. Advances in component availability and performance are promising benefits in several military and commercial applications. Previous work has emphasised Doppler wind speed measurements and wind / turbulence profiling for air safety, with recent sharp increases in numbers of lidar units sold and installed, and with wider recognition that different lidar / radar wavebands can and should complement each other. These advances are also enabling fields such as microDoppler measurement of sub-wavelength vibrations and acoustic waves, including non-lineof- sight acoustic sensing in challenging environments. To shed light on these different applications we review some fundamentals of coherent detection, measurement probe volume, and parameter estimation - starting with familiar similarities and differences between "radar" and "laser radar". The consequences of changing the operating wavelength by three or four orders of magnitude - from millimetric or centimetric radar to a typical fibre-optic lidar working near 1.5 μm - need regular review, partly because of continuing advances in telecoms technology and computing. Modern fibre-optic lidars tend to be less complicated, more reliable, and cheaper than their predecessors; and they more closely obey the textbook principles of easily adjusted and aligned Gaussian beams. The behaviours of noises and signals, and the appropriate processing strategies, are as expected different for the different wavelengths and applications. For example, the effective probe volumes are easily varied (e.g. by translating a fibre facet) through six or eight orders of magnitude; as the average number of contributing scatterers varies, from <<1 through ~1 to >>1, we should review any assumptions about "many" scatterers and Gaussian statistics. Finally, some much older but still relevant scientific

  10. Optical coherence microscopy of mouse cortical vasculature surrounding implanted electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Lozzi, Andrea; Abliz, Erkinay; Greenbaum, Noah; Turner, Kevin P.; Pfefer, T. Joshua; Agrawal, Anant; Krauthamer, Victor; Welle, Cristin G.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) provides real-time, in-vivo, three-dimensional, isotropic micron-resolution structural and functional characterization of tissue, cells, and other biological targets. Optical coherence angiography (OCA) also provides visualization and quantification of vascular flow via speckle-based or phase-resolved techniques. Performance assessment of neuroprosthetic systems, which allow direct thought control of limb prostheses, may be aided by OCA. In particular, there is a need to examine the underlying mechanisms of chronic functional degradation of implanted electrodes. Angiogenesis, capillary network remodeling, and changes in flow velocity are potential indicators of tissue changes that may be associated with waning electrode performance. The overall goal of this investigation is to quantify longitudinal changes in vascular morphology and capillary flow around neural electrodes chronically implanted in mice. We built a 1315-nm OCM system to image vessels in neocortical tissue in a cohort of mice. An optical window was implanted on the skull over the primary motor cortex above a penetrating shank-style microelectrode array. The mice were imaged bi-weekly to generate vascular maps of the region surrounding the implanted microelectrode array. Acute effects of window and electrode implantation included vessel dilation and profusion of vessels in the superficial layer of the cortex (0-200 μm). In deeper layers surrounding the electrode, no qualitative differences were seen in this early phase. These measurements establish a baseline vascular tissue response from the cortical window preparation and lay the ground work for future longitudinal studies to test the hypothesis that vascular changes will be associated with chronic electrode degradation.

  11. Coherent detection and digital signal processing for fiber optic communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Ezra

    The drive towards higher spectral efficiency in optical fiber systems has generated renewed interest in coherent detection. We review different detection methods, including noncoherent, differentially coherent, and coherent detection, as well as hybrid detection methods. We compare the modulation methods that are enabled and their respective performances in a linear regime. An important system parameter is the number of degrees of freedom (DOF) utilized in transmission. Polarization-multiplexed quadrature-amplitude modulation maximizes spectral efficiency and power efficiency as it uses all four available DOF contained in the two field quadratures in the two polarizations. Dual-polarization homodyne or heterodyne downconversion are linear processes that can fully recover the received signal field in these four DOF. When downconverted signals are sampled at the Nyquist rate, compensation of transmission impairments can be performed using digital signal processing (DSP). Software based receivers benefit from the robustness of DSP, flexibility in design, and ease of adaptation to time-varying channels. Linear impairments, including chromatic dispersion (CD) and polarization-mode dispersion (PMD), can be compensated quasi-exactly using finite impulse response filters. In practical systems, sampling the received signal at 3/2 times the symbol rate is sufficient to enable an arbitrary amount of CD and PMD to be compensated for a sufficiently long equalizer whose tap length scales linearly with transmission distance. Depending on the transmitted constellation and the target bit error rate, the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) should have around 5 to 6 bits of resolution. Digital coherent receivers are naturally suited for the implementation of feedforward carrier recovery, which has superior linewidth tolerance than phase-locked loops, and does not suffer from feedback delay constraints. Differential bit encoding can be used to prevent catastrophic receiver failure due

  12. Defining Field Cancerization of the Skin Using Noninvasive Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging to Detect and Monitor Actinic Keratosis in Ingenol Mebutate 0.015%- Treated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Michelle; Feldman, Eleanor; Bieber, Amy; Bienenfeld, Amanda; Nandanan, Naveen; Siegel, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the ability of optical coherence tomography to detect clinical and subclinical actinic keratoses confirmed by histopathology. The efficacy of ingenol mebutate treatment of actinic keratosis was also evaluated using optical coherence tomography, and correlation of treatment efficacy with severity of local skin reactions was determined. Design: Single-arm, open-label, split-face study. Setting: Hospital outpatient clinic. Participants: Male subjects (N=30) with seven actinic keratoses. Measurements: A suspected actinic keratosis and the normal-appearing, perilesional skin were imaged, biopsied for histopathologic analysis, and the results compared with the clinical and a blinded optical coherence tomography diagnosis. Treatment with ingenol mebutate gel 0.015% was randomly administered to three clinically suspected actinic keratoses and the perilesional skin; three additional, suspected actinic keratoses lesions and perilesional areas were left untreated. Clinical and optical coherence tomography images were obtained for all lesions. Severity of local skin reactions was recorded to evaluate the relationship between local skin reaction and treatment effect. Results: Optical coherence tomography analysis had a 100-percent (28/28) correlation with the clinical diagnosis of actinic keratosis and detected 16 of 22 (73%) histopathologically confirmed subclinical lesions from perilesional skin sites. By optical coherence tomography assessment, the clearance rate for clinically observed lesions was 76 percent for ingenol mebutate-treated areas versus 11 percent for untreated areas; the clearance rate for treated subclinical lesions was 88 percent versus 43 percent for untreated areas. Clearance rates did not vary with the severity of the local response. Conclusion: Optical coherence tomography is effective at detecting clinical and subclinical actinic keratoses and monitoring their response to treatment. PMID:27386042

  13. Frequency-time coherence for all-optical sampling without optical pulse source

    PubMed Central

    Preußler, Stefan; Raoof Mehrpoor, Gilda; Schneider, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Sampling is the first step to convert an analogue optical signal into a digital electrical signal. The latter can be further processed and analysed by well-known electrical signal processing methods. Optical pulse sources like mode-locked lasers are commonly incorporated for all-optical sampling, but have several drawbacks. A novel approach for a simple all-optical sampling is to utilise the frequency-time coherence of each signal. The method is based on only using two coupled modulators driven with an electrical sine wave. Since no optical source is required, a simple integration in appropriate platforms, such as Silicon Photonics might be possible. The presented method grants all-optical sampling with electrically tunable bandwidth, repetition rate and time shift. PMID:27687495

  14. Frequency-time coherence for all-optical sampling without optical pulse source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preußler, Stefan; Raoof Mehrpoor, Gilda; Schneider, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Sampling is the first step to convert an analogue optical signal into a digital electrical signal. The latter can be further processed and analysed by well-known electrical signal processing methods. Optical pulse sources like mode-locked lasers are commonly incorporated for all-optical sampling, but have several drawbacks. A novel approach for a simple all-optical sampling is to utilise the frequency-time coherence of each signal. The method is based on only using two coupled modulators driven with an electrical sine wave. Since no optical source is required, a simple integration in appropriate platforms, such as Silicon Photonics might be possible. The presented method grants all-optical sampling with electrically tunable bandwidth, repetition rate and time shift.

  15. T-2 in Coherent Optics: Collision, Dephasing Time, or Reciprocal Linewidth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettel, Stephen J.; Lempicki, Alexander

    1979-01-01

    Discusses how the frequency domain (line widths) and time domain (coherent optical transients) are related to the concept of transverse relaxation time in the study of high resolution optical spectroscopy. (HM)

  16. High-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    DOEpatents

    Olivier, Scot S.; Werner, John S.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Laut, Sophie P.; Jones, Steven M.

    2010-09-07

    This invention permits retinal images to be acquired at high speed and with unprecedented resolution in three dimensions (4.times.4.times.6 .mu.m). The instrument achieves high lateral resolution by using adaptive optics to correct optical aberrations of the human eye in real time. High axial resolution and high speed are made possible by the use of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Using this system, we have demonstrated the ability to image microscopic blood vessels and the cone photoreceptor mosaic.

  17. Quantitative assessment of hyaline cartilage elasticity during optical clearing using optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Han, Zhaolong; Wu, Chen; Wang, Shang; Idugboe, Rita; Raghunathan, Raksha; Zakharov, Valery P.; Sobol, Emil N.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Twa, Michael; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    We report the first study on using optical coherence elastography (OCE) to quantitatively monitor the elasticity change of the hyaline cartilage during the optical clearing administrated by glucose solution. The measurement of the elasticity is verified using uniaxial compression test, demonstrating the feasibility of using OCE to quantify the Young's modulus of the cartilage tissue. As the results, we found that the stiffness of the hyaline cartilage increases during the optical clearing of the tissue. This study might be potentially useful for the early detection of osteoarthritis disease.

  18. Three-dimensional optic axis determination using variable-incidence-angle polarization-optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadezhda; Gangnus, Sergei V.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-08-01

    Polarization optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) is a powerful technique to nondestructively map the retardance and fast-axis orientation of birefringent biological tissues. Previous studies have concentrated on the case where the optic axis lies on the plane of the surface. We describe a method to determine the polar angle of the optic axis of a uniaxial birefringent tissue by making PSOCT measurements with a number of incident illumination directions. The method is validated on equine flexor tendon, yielding a variability of 4% for the true birefringence and 3% for the polar angle. We use the method to map the polar angle of fibers in the transitional region of equine cartilage.

  19. The application of diffractive optical elements in the optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, D. I.; Tsyganok, E. A.

    2016-04-01

    The article investigates the possibility of using diffractive optical elements on an example of the kinoform in the optical coherence tomography (OCT). The article gives a brief overview of modern methods of research in the OCT, the expediency of development hyperchromatic lenses for spectral OCT systems. The authors made the aberration analysis of diffractive optical element (DOE), conducted a review of its application, and the DOE proposed to use in the example of a kinoform as the main force component of the hyperchromatic lens. In conclusion, the article provides examples of developed hybrid lenses for two spectral ranges, lens transmittance analysis and the assessment of their adaptability.

  20. Optical coherence tomography aspect of crystalline macular dystrophy in Sjögren-Larsson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhallil, Salima; Chraibi, Fouad; Andalloussi, Idriss Benatiya; Tahri, Hicham

    2012-10-01

    Sjögren-Larsson syndrome is an autosomal-recessive disease caused by a deficiency of the microsomal fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme. The syndrome is defined by congenital ichthyosis, spasticity, mental retardation and ocular features. We report the case of a 10-year-old boy presenting with bilateral visual impairment and photophobia. Fundus examination showed a mark of yellow-white refractile, perifoveal crystals in each eye. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) detected focal reflective structures corresponding to clinically visible intraretinal crystals and macular macrocystoids space. This case is presented to highlight the ocular findings and to evaluate the contribution of OCT in the study of the fovea anatomic changes.

  1. Measurement of the refractive index of human teeth by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhuo; Yao, X. Steve; Yao, Hui; Liang, Yan; Liu, Tiegen; Li, Yanni; Wang, Guanhua; Lan, Shoufeng

    2009-05-01

    We describe a novel method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the accurate measurement of the refractive index of in vitro human teeth. We obtain the refractive indices of enamel, dentin, and cementum to be 1.631+/-0.007, 1.540+/-0.013, and 1.582+/-0.010, respectively. The profile of the refractive index is readily obtained via an OCT B scan across a tooth. This method can be used to study the refractive index changes caused by dental decay and therefore has great potential for the clinical diagnosis of early dental caries.

  2. Potential of optical coherence tomography for early diagnosis of oral malignancies

    PubMed Central

    DeCoro, Michael; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2014-01-01

    With nearly 1,500,000 new patients diagnosed every year in the USA, cancer poses a considerable challenge to healthcare today. Oral cancer is responsible for a sizeable portion of deaths due to cancer, primarily because it is diagnosed at a late stage when the prognosis is poor. Current methods for diagnosing oral cancer need to be augmented by better early detection, monitoring and screening modalities. A new approach is needed that provides real-time, accurate, noninvasive diagnosis. The results of early clinical trials using in vivo optical coherence tomography for the diagnosis of oral dysplasia and malignancy are encouraging. PMID:20214513

  3. Real-time in vivo imaging of dental tissue by means of optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Roland; Haller, Bernd; Hauger, Christoph

    2003-11-01

    We have carried out real-time in vivo and in vitro imaging of human dental tissue in a clinical setting by means of optical coherence tomography (OCT). We have used a compact, commercial prototype OCT system applying for the first time a surgical microscope as a beam delivery system for investigations of dental tissue. We have imaged demineralised tissue, caries lesions, restored teeth and oral mucosa and demonstrate the detection of changes in tissue microstructure. We discuss the details of this system and its potential and limitations with respect to dental applications.

  4. Quantification of choroidal neovascularization vessel length using optical coherence tomography angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Simon S.; Liu, Li; Bailey, Steven T.; Flaxel, Christina J.; Huang, David; Li, Dengwang; Jia, Yali

    2016-07-01

    Quantification of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) as visualized by optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) may have importance clinically when diagnosing or tracking disease. Here, we present an automated algorithm to quantify the vessel skeleton of CNV as vessel length. Initial segmentation of the CNV on en face angiograms was achieved using saliency-based detection and thresholding. A level set method was then used to refine vessel edges. Finally, a skeleton algorithm was applied to identify vessel centerlines. The algorithm was tested on nine OCTA scans from participants with CNV and comparisons of the algorithm's output to manual delineation showed good agreement.

  5. In vivo quantification of cochlin in glaucomatous DBA/2J mice using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianhua; Aljohani, Ayman; Carreon, Teresia; Gregori, Giovanni; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K.

    2015-01-01

    The expression of cochlin in the trabecular meshwork (TM) precedes the clinical glaucoma symptoms in DBA/2J mice. The ability to quantify cochlin in the local tissue (TM) offers potential diagnostic and prognostic values. We present two (spectroscopic and magnetomotive) optical coherence tomography (OCT) approaches for in vivo cochlin quantification in a periodic manner. The cochlin-antibody OCT signal remains stable for up to 24 hours as seen at 3.5 hours after injection allowing for repeated quantification in the living mouse eyes. PMID:26047051

  6. Quantitative Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging of the Ocular Anterior Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNabb, Ryan Palmer

    Clinical imaging within ophthalmology has had transformative effects on ocular health over the last century. Imaging has guided clinicians in their pharmaceutical and surgical treatments of macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataracts and numerous other pathologies. Many of the imaging techniques currently used are photography based and are limited to imaging the surface of ocular structures. This limitation forces clinicians to make assumptions about the underlying tissue which may reduce the efficacy of their diagnoses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging modality that has been widely adopted within the field of ophthalmology in the last 15 years. As an optical imaging technique, OCT utilizes low-coherence interferometry to produce micron-scale three-dimensional datasets of a tissue's structure. Much of the human body consists of tissues that significantly scatter and attenuate optical signals limiting the imaging depth of OCT in those tissues to only 1-2mm. However, the ocular anterior segment is unique among human tissue in that it is primarily transparent or translucent. This allows for relatively deep imaging of tissue structure with OCT and is no longer limited by the optical scattering properties of the tissue. This goal of this work is to develop methods utilizing OCT that offer the potential to reduce the assumptions made by clinicians in their evaluations of their patients' ocular anterior segments. We achieved this by first developing a method to reduce the effects of patient motion during OCT volume acquisitions allowing for accurate, three dimensional measurements of corneal shape. Having accurate corneal shape measurements then allowed us to determine corneal spherical and astigmatic refractive contribution in a given individual. This was then validated in a clinical study that showed OCT better measured refractive change due to surgery than other clinical devices. Additionally, a method was developed to combine

  7. Optical modeling of sunlight by using partially coherent sources in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Alaibakhsh, Hamzeh; Darvish, Ghafar

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the effects of coherent and partially coherent sources in optical modeling of organic solar cells. Two different organic solar cells are investigated: one without substrate and the other with a millimeter-sized glass substrate. The coherent light absorption is calculated with rigorous coupled-wave analysis. The result of this method is convolved with a distribution function to calculate the partially coherent light absorption. We propose a new formulation to accurately model sunlight as a set of partially coherent sources. In the structure with glass substrate, the accurate sunlight modeling results in the elimination of coherent effects in the thick substrate, but the coherency in other layers is not affected. Using partially coherent sources instead of coherent sources for simulations with sunlight results in a smoother absorption spectrum, but the change in the absorption efficiency is negligible. PMID:26974647

  8. Cancellation of coherent synchrotron radiation kicks with optics balance.

    PubMed

    Di Mitri, S; Cornacchia, M; Spampinati, S

    2013-01-01

    Minimizing transverse emittance is essential in linear accelerators designed to deliver very high brightness electron beams. Emission of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), as a contributing factor to emittance degradation, is an important phenomenon to this respect. A manner in which to cancel this perturbation by imposing certain symmetric conditions on the electron transport system has been suggested.We first expand on this idea by quantitatively relating the beam Courant-Snyder parameters to the emittance growth and by providing a general scheme of CSR suppression with asymmetric optics, provided it is properly balanced along the line. We present the first experimental evidence of this cancellation with the resultant optics balance of multiple CSR kicks: the transverse emittance of a 500 pC, sub-picosecond, high brightness electron beam is being preserved after the passage through the achromatic transfer line of the FERMI@Elettra free electron laser, and emittance growth is observed when the optics balance is intentionally broken. We finally show the agreement between the theoretical model and the experimental results. This study holds the promise of compact dispersive lines with relatively large bending angles, thus reducing costs for future electron facilities.

  9. Optical Coherence Tomography in Patients with Chiari I Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Perrini, Paolo; Miccoli, Mario; Baggiani, Angelo; Nardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims. To evaluate optic nerve head with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) in patients with Chiari I malformation (CMI) compared to healthy controls. Methods. Cross-sectional study. OCT of the optic nerve head of 22 patients with CMI and 22 healthy controls was quantitatively analyzed. The healthy controls were matched for age and sex with the study population. Mean retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness was calculated for both eyes; the mean thickness value was also registered for each quadrant and for each subfield of the four quadrants. Results. CMI patients showed a reduction of the RNFL thickness in both eyes. This reduction was more statistically significant (P < 0.05) for the inferior quadrant in the right eye and in each quadrant than nasal one in the left eye. Conclusion. A distress of the retinal nerve fibers could explain the observed reduction of the RNFL thickness in patients with CMI; in our series the reduction of the RNFL thickness seems lower when CMI is associated with syringomyelia. PMID:25815335

  10. Quasiparticle Representation of Coherent Nonlinear Optical Signals of Multiexcitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingerhut, Benjamin; Bennet, Kochise; Roslyak, Oleksiy; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-03-01

    Elementary excitations of many-Fermion systems can be described within the quasiparticle approach which is widely used in the calculation of transport and optical properties of metals, semiconductors, molecular aggregates and strongly correlated quantum materials. The excitations are then viewed as independent harmonic oscillators where the many-body interactions between the oscillators are mapped into anharmonicities. We present a Green's function approach based on coboson algebra for calculating nonlinear optical signals and apply it onwards the study of two and three exciton states. The method only requires the diagonalization of the single exciton manifold and avoids equations of motion of multi-exciton manifolds. Using coboson algebra many body effects are recast in terms of tetradic exciton-exciton interactions: Coulomb scattering and Pauli exchange. The physical space of Fermions is recovered by singular-value decomposition of the over-complete coboson basis set. The approach is used to calculate third and fifth order quantum coherence optical signals that directly probe correlations in two- and three exciton states and their projections on the two and single exciton manifold.

  11. Coherent ultra dense wavelength division multiplexing passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahpari, Ali; Ferreira, Ricardo; Ribeiro, Vitor; Sousa, Artur; Ziaie, Somayeh; Tavares, Ana; Vujicic, Zoran; Guiomar, Fernando P.; Reis, Jacklyn D.; Pinto, Armando N.; Teixeira, António

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we firstly review the progress in ultra-dense wavelength division multiplexing passive optical network (UDWDM-PON), by making use of the key attributes of this technology in the context of optical access and metro networks. Besides the inherit properties of coherent technology, we explore different modulation formats and pulse shaping. The performance is experimentally demonstrated through a 12 × 10 Gb/s bidirectional UDWDM-PON over hybrid 80 km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) and optical wireless link. High density, 6.25 GHz grid, Nyquist shaped 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16QAM) and digital frequency shifting are some of the properties exploited together in the tests. Also, bidirectional transmission in fiber, relevant in the context, is analyzed in terms of nonlinear and back-reflection effects on receiver sensitivity. In addition, as a basis for the discussion on market readiness, we experimentally demonstrate real-time detection of a Nyquist-shaped quaternary phase-shift keying (QPSK) signal using simple 8-bit digital signal processing (DSP) on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA).

  12. Micro-optical coherence tomography of the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Janani S; Batts, Shelley A; Chu, Kengyeh K; Sahin, Mehmet I; Leung, Hui Min; Tearney, Guillermo J; Stankovic, Konstantina M

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian cochlea has historically resisted attempts at high-resolution, non-invasive imaging due to its small size, complex three-dimensional structure, and embedded location within the temporal bone. As a result, little is known about the relationship between an individual's cochlear pathology and hearing function, and otologists must rely on physiological testing and imaging methods that offer limited resolution to obtain information about the inner ear prior to performing surgery. Micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT) is a non-invasive, low-coherence interferometric imaging technique capable of resolving cellular-level anatomic structures. To determine whether μOCT is capable of resolving mammalian intracochlear anatomy, fixed guinea pig inner ears were imaged as whole temporal bones with cochlea in situ. Anatomical structures such as the tunnel of Corti, space of Nuel, modiolus, scalae, and cell groupings were visualized, in addition to individual cell types such as neuronal fibers, hair cells, and supporting cells. Visualization of these structures, via volumetrically-reconstructed image stacks and endoscopic perspective videos, represents an improvement over previous efforts using conventional OCT. These are the first μOCT images of mammalian cochlear anatomy, and they demonstrate μOCT's potential utility as an imaging tool in otology research. PMID:27633610

  13. Micro-optical coherence tomography of the mammalian cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Janani S.; Batts, Shelley A.; Chu, Kengyeh K.; Sahin, Mehmet I.; Leung, Hui Min; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Stankovic, Konstantina M.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian cochlea has historically resisted attempts at high-resolution, non-invasive imaging due to its small size, complex three-dimensional structure, and embedded location within the temporal bone. As a result, little is known about the relationship between an individual’s cochlear pathology and hearing function, and otologists must rely on physiological testing and imaging methods that offer limited resolution to obtain information about the inner ear prior to performing surgery. Micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT) is a non-invasive, low-coherence interferometric imaging technique capable of resolving cellular-level anatomic structures. To determine whether μOCT is capable of resolving mammalian intracochlear anatomy, fixed guinea pig inner ears were imaged as whole temporal bones with cochlea in situ. Anatomical structures such as the tunnel of Corti, space of Nuel, modiolus, scalae, and cell groupings were visualized, in addition to individual cell types such as neuronal fibers, hair cells, and supporting cells. Visualization of these structures, via volumetrically-reconstructed image stacks and endoscopic perspective videos, represents an improvement over previous efforts using conventional OCT. These are the first μOCT images of mammalian cochlear anatomy, and they demonstrate μOCT’s potential utility as an imaging tool in otology research. PMID:27633610

  14. Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography and Fundus Autofluorescence Evaluation of Torpedo Maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Akshay S; Flaxel, Christina J; Pennesi, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence findings in a case of torpedo maculopathy. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography revealed loss or disruption of the retinal pigment epithelium and overlying disruption of the outer neurosensory retina. Fundus autofluorescence revealed reduced fundus autofluorescence of the lesion surrounded by a rim of increased fundus autofluorescence. PMID:26484432

  15. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence evaluation of torpedo maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Akshay S; Flaxel, Christina J; Pennesi, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence findings in a case of torpedo maculopathy. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography revealed loss or disruption of the retinal pigment epithelium and overlying disruption of the outer neurosensory retina. Fundus autofluorescence revealed reduced fundus autofluorescence of the lesion surrounded by a rim of increased fundus autofluorescence. PMID:25751084

  16. Improving resolution of optical coherence tomography for imaging of microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Kai; Lu, Hui; Wang, James H.; Wang, Michael R.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-frame superresolution technique has been used to improve the lateral resolution of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for imaging of 3D microstructures. By adjusting the voltages applied to ? and ? galvanometer scanners in the measurement arm, small lateral imaging positional shifts have been introduced among different C-scans. Utilizing the extracted ?-? plane en face image frames from these specially offset C-scan image sets at the same axial position, we have reconstructed the lateral high resolution image by the efficient multi-frame superresolution technique. To further improve the image quality, we applied the latest K-SVD and bilateral total variation denoising algorithms to the raw SD-OCT lateral images before and along with the superresolution processing, respectively. The performance of the SD-OCT of improved lateral resolution is demonstrated by 3D imaging a microstructure fabricated by photolithography and a double-layer microfluidic device.

  17. Improved Detection Sensitivity of Line-Scanning Optical Coherence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Huang, Shu-Wei; Zhou, Chao; Potsaid, Benjamin; Fujimoto, James G

    2012-05-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a promising technology for high-resolution cellular-level imaging in human tissues. Line-scanning OCM is a new form of OCM that utilizes line-field illumination for parallel detection. In this study, we demonstrate improved detection sensitivity by using an achromatic design for line-field generation. This system operates at 830-nm wavelength with 82-nm bandwidth. The measured axial resolution is 3.9 μm in air (corresponding to ~2.9 μm in tissue), and the transverse resolutions are 2.1 μm along the line-field illumination direction and 1.7 μm perpendicular to line illumination direction. The measured sensitivity is 98 dB with 25 line averages, resulting in an imaging speed of ~2 frames/s (516 lines/s). Real-time, cellular-level imaging of scattering tissues is demonstrated using human-colon specimens.

  18. Longitudinal Imaging of Heart Development With Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has great potential for deciphering the role of mechanics in normal and abnormal heart development. OCT images tissue microstructure and blood flow deep into the tissue (1–2mm) at high spatiotemporal resolutions allowing unprecedented images of the developing heart. Here, we review the advancement of OCT technology to image heart development and report some of our recent findings utilizing OCT imaging under environmental control for longitudinal imaging. Precise control of the environment is absolutely required in longitudinal studies that follow the growth of the embryo or studies comparing normal versus perturbed heart development to obtain meaningful in vivo results. These types of studies are essential to tease out the influence of cardiac dynamics on molecular expression and their role in the progression of congenital heart defects. PMID:26236147

  19. Virtual histology of the human heart using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Moazami, Nader; Rollins, Andrew M.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2009-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows for the visualization of micron-scale structures within nontransparent biological tissues. For the first time, we demonstrate the use of OCT in identifying components of the cardiac conduction system and other structures in the explanted human heart. Reconstructions of cardiac structures up to 2 mm below the tissue surface were achieved and validated with Masson Trichrome histology in atrial, ventricular, sinoatrial nodal, and atrioventricular nodal preparations. The high spatial resolution of OCT provides visualization of cardiac fibers within the myocardium, as well as elements of the cardiac conduction system; however, a limiting factor remains its depth penetration, demonstrated to be ~2 mm in cardiac tissues. Despite its currently limited imaging depth, the use of OCT to identify the structural determinants of both normal and abnormal function in the intact human heart is critical in its development as a potential aid to intracardiac arrhythmia diagnosis and therapy.

  20. Optical coherence tomography-based freeze-drying microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mujat, Mircea; Greco, Kristyn; Galbally-Kinney, Kristin L.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Iftimia, Nicusor; Mulhall, Phillip; Sharma, Puneet; Pikal, Michael J.; Kessler, William J.

    2011-01-01

    A new type of freeze-drying microscope based upon time-domain optical coherence tomography is presented here (OCT-FDM). The microscope allows for real-time, in situ 3D imaging of pharmaceutical formulations in vials relevant for manufacturing processes with a lateral resolution of <7 μm and an axial resolution of <5 μm. Correlation of volumetric structural imaging with product temperature measured during the freeze-drying cycle allowed investigation of structural changes in the product and determination of the temperature at which the freeze-dried cake collapses. This critical temperature is the most important parameter in designing freeze-drying processes of pharmaceutical products. PMID:22254168

  1. Imaging of mouse embryonic eye development using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Saba H.; Kasiraj, Alyssa; Larina, Irina V.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2010-02-01

    Congenital abnormalities are often caused by genetic disorders which alter the normal development of the eye. Embryonic eye imaging in mouse model is important for understanding of normal and abnormal eye development and can contribute to prevention and treatment of eye defects in humans. In this study, we used Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography (SS-OCT) to image eye structure in mouse embryos at 12.5 to 17.5 days post coitus (dpc). The imaging depth of the OCT allowed us to visualize the whole eye globe at these stages. Different ocular tissues including lens, cornea, eyelids, and hyaloid vasculature were visualized. These results suggest that OCT imaging is a useful tool to study embryonic eye development in the mouse model.

  2. High-dimensional modulation for coherent optical communications systems.

    PubMed

    Millar, David S; Koike-Akino, Toshiaki; Arık, Sercan Ö; Kojima, Keisuke; Parsons, Kieran; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Sugihara, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we examine the performance of several modulation formats in more than four dimensions for coherent optical communications systems. We compare two high-dimensional modulation design methodologies based on spherical cutting of lattices and block coding of a 'base constellation' of binary phase shift keying (BPSK) on each dimension. The performances of modulation formats generated with these methodologies is analyzed in the asymptotic signal-to-noise ratio regime and for an additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel. We then study the application of both types of high-dimensional modulation formats to standard single-mode fiber (SSMF) transmission systems. For modulation with spectral efficiencies comparable to dual-polarization (DP-) BPSK, polarization-switched quaternary phase shift keying (PS-QPSK) and DP-QPSK, we demonstrate SNR gains of up to 3 dB, 0.9 dB and 1 dB respectively, at a BER of 10(-3).

  3. Optical coherence tomography with plasmon resonant nanorods of gold.

    PubMed

    Troutman, Timothy S; Barton, Jennifer K; Romanowski, Marek

    2007-06-01

    We explored plasmon resonant nanorods of gold as a contrast agent for optical coherence tomography (OCT). Nanorod suspensions were generated through wet chemical synthesis and characterized with spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, and OCT. Polyacrylamide-based phantoms were generated with appropriate scattering and anisotropy coefficients (30 cm(-1) and 0.89, respectively) to image distribution of the contrast agent in an environment similar to that of tissue. The observed signal was dependent on whether the plasmon resonance peak overlapped the source bandwidth of the OCT, confirming the resonant character of enhancement. Gold nanorods with plasmon resonance wavelengths overlapping the OCT source yielded a signal-to-background ratio of 4.5 dB, relative to the tissue phantom. Strategies for OCT imaging with nanorods are discussed.

  4. Optical coherence tomography with plasmon resonant nanorods of gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troutman, Timothy S.; Barton, Jennifer K.; Romanowski, Marek

    2007-06-01

    We explored plasmon resonant nanorods of gold as a contrast agent for optical coherence tomography (OCT). Nanorod suspensions were generated through wet chemical synthesis and characterized with spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, and OCT. Polyacrylamide-based phantoms were generated with appropriate scattering and anisotropy coefficients (30 cm-1 and 0.89, respectively) to image distribution of the contrast agent in an environment similar to that of tissue. The observed signal was dependent on whether the plasmon resonance peak overlapped the source bandwidth of the OCT, confirming the resonant character of enhancement. Gold nanorods with plasmon resonance wavelengths overlapping the OCT source yielded a signal-to-background ratio of 4.5 dB, relative to the tissue phantom. Strategies for OCT imaging with nanorods are discussed.

  5. Optical coherence Doppler tomography for quantitative cerebral blood flow imaging

    PubMed Central

    You, Jiang; Du, Congwu; Volkow, Nora D.; Pan, Yingtian

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence Doppler tomography (ODT) is a promising neurotechnique that permits 3D imaging of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) network; however, quantitative CBF velocity (CBFv) imaging remains challenging. Here we present a simple phase summation method to enhance slow capillary flow detection sensitivity without sacrificing dynamic range for fast flow and vessel tracking to improve angle correction for absolute CBFv quantification. Flow phantom validation indicated that the CBFv quantification accuracy increased from 15% to 91% and the coefficient of variation (CV) decreased 9.3-fold; in vivo mouse brain validation showed that CV decreased 4.4-/10.8- fold for venular/arteriolar flows. ODT was able to identify cocaine-elicited microischemia and quantify CBFv disruption in branch vessels and capillaries that otherwise would have not been possible. PMID:25401033

  6. Real-time inverse scattering for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2007-02-01

    We have developed and implemented a system which can acquire, process, and display the inverse scattering solution for optical coherence tomography (OCT) in real-time at frame rates of 2.25 fps for 512 X 1024 images. Frames which previously required 60 s, now take under 500 ms, an improvement in processing speed by a factor of over 120 times. An efficient routine was designed which requires two interpolations of the columns, one one-dimensional real-to-complex fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the columns, and two two-dimensional FFTs. The limits to speed are now reliant on the parallelizability of the processing hardware. Our system provides quantitatively meaningful structural information from previously indistinguishable scattering intensities and provides proof of feasibility for future real-time systems.

  7. Split-spectrum phase-gradient optical coherence tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gangjun; Jia, Yali; Pechauer, Alex D; Chandwani, Rahul; Huang, David

    2016-08-01

    A phase gradient angiography (PGA) method is proposed for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This method allows the use of phase information to map the microvasculature in tissue without the correction of bulk motion and laser trigger jitter induced phase artifacts. PGA can also be combined with the amplitude/intensity to improve the performance. Split-spectrum technique can further increase the signal to noise ratio by more than two times. In-vivo imaging of human retinal circulation is shown with a 70 kHz, 840 nm spectral domain OCT system and a 200 kHz, 1050 nm swept source OCT system. Four different OCT angiography methods are compared. The best performance was achieved with split-spectrum amplitude and phase-gradient angiography. PMID:27570689

  8. Split-spectrum phase-gradient optical coherence tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gangjun; Jia, Yali; Pechauer, Alex D.; Chandwani, Rahul; Huang, David

    2016-01-01

    A phase gradient angiography (PGA) method is proposed for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This method allows the use of phase information to map the microvasculature in tissue without the correction of bulk motion and laser trigger jitter induced phase artifacts. PGA can also be combined with the amplitude/intensity to improve the performance. Split-spectrum technique can further increase the signal to noise ratio by more than two times. In-vivo imaging of human retinal circulation is shown with a 70 kHz, 840 nm spectral domain OCT system and a 200 kHz, 1050 nm swept source OCT system. Four different OCT angiography methods are compared. The best performance was achieved with split-spectrum amplitude and phase-gradient angiography. PMID:27570689

  9. Evaluation of microfluidic channels with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, J.; Prykäri, T.; Alarousu, E.; Lauri, J.; Myllylä, R.

    2010-11-01

    Application of time domain, ultra high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) in evaluation of microfluidic channels is demonstrated. Presented study was done using experimental UHR-OCT device based on a Kerr-lens mode locked Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser, a photonic crystal fibre and modified, free-space Michelson interferometer. To show potential of the technique, microfluidic chip fabricated by VTT Center for Printed Intelligence (Oulu, Finland) was measured. Ability for full volumetric reconstruction in non-contact manner enabled complete characterization of closed entity of a microfluidic channel without contamination and harm for the sample. Measurement, occurring problems, and methods of postprocessing for raw data are described. Results present completely resolved physical structure of the channel, its spatial dimensions, draft angles and evaluation of lamination quality.

  10. Scalable multiplexing for parallel imaging with interleaved optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Yoon; Marvdashti, Tahereh; Duan, Lian; Khan, Saara A.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate highly parallel imaging with interleaved optical coherence tomography (iOCT) using an in-house-fabricated, air-spaced virtually-imaged phased array (VIPA). The air-spaced VIPA performs spectral encoding of the interferograms from multiple lateral points within a single sweep of the source and allows us to tune and balance several imaging parameters: number of multiplexed points, ranging depth, and sensitivity. In addition to a thorough discussion of the parameters and operating principles of the VIPA, we experimentally demonstrate the effect of different VIPA designs on the multiplexing potential of iOCT. Using a 200-kHz light source, we achieve an effective A-scan rate of 3.2-MHz by multiplexing 16 lateral points onto a single wavelength sweep. The improved sensitivity of this system is demonstrated for 3D imaging of biological samples such as a human finger and a fruit fly. PMID:25401031

  11. Snapshot 3D optical coherence tomography system using image mappingspectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuc-Uyen; Pierce, Mark C; Higgins, Laura; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S

    2013-01-01

    A snapshot 3-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography system was developed using Image MappingSpectrometry. This system can give depth information (Z) at different spatial positions (XY) withinone camera integration time to potentially reduce motion artifact and enhance throughput. Thecurrent (x,y,λ) datacube of (85×356×117) provides a 3Dvisualization of sample with 400 μm depth and 13.4μm in transverse resolution. Axial resolution of 16.0μm can also be achieved in this proof-of-concept system. We present ananalysis of the theoretical constraints which will guide development of future systems withincreased imaging depth and improved axial and lateral resolutions. PMID:23736629

  12. Megahertz streak-mode Fourier domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Yun, Julie X; Yuan, Xiaocong; Goodwin, Richard; Markwald, Roger R; Gao, Bruce Z

    2011-06-01

    Here we present an ultrahigh-speed Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) that records the OCT spectrum in streak mode with a high-speed area scan camera, which allows higher OCT imaging speed than can be achieved with a line-scan camera. Unlike parallel OCT techniques that also use area scan cameras, the conventional single-mode fiber-based point-scanning mechanism is retained to provide a confocal gate that rejects multiply scattered photons from the sample. When using a 1000 Hz resonant scanner as the streak scanner, 1,016,000 A-scans have been obtained in 1 s. This method's effectiveness has been demonstrated by recording in vivo OCT-image sequences of embryonic chick hearts at 1000 frames/s. In addition, 2-megahertz OCT data have been obtained with another high speed camera.

  13. Indications of Optical Coherence Tomography in Keratoplasties: Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Nesi, Thiago Trindade; Leite, Daniel Amorim; Rocha, Fábio Medina; Tanure, Marco Antônio; Reis, Pedro Paulo; Rodrigues, Eduardo Büchele; Campos, Mauro Silveira de Queiroz

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the anterior segment, in particular corneal OCT, has become a reliable tool for the cornea specialist, as it provides the acquisition of digital images at high resolution with a noncontact technology. In penetrating or lamellar keratoplasties, OCT can be used to assess central corneal thickness and pachymetry maps, as well as precise measurements of deep stromal opacities, thereby guiding the surgeon to choose the best treatment option. OCT has also been used to evaluate the keratoplasty postoperative period, for early identification of possible complications, such as secondary glaucoma or donor disc detachments in endothelial keratoplasties. Intraoperatively, OCT can be used to assess stromal bed regularity and transparency in anterior lamellar surgeries, especially for those techniques in which a bare Descemet's membrane is the goal. The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss the role of OCT as a diagnostic tool in various types of keratoplasties. PMID:23119147

  14. Raman spectra and optical coherent tomography images of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva-Luna, A. E.; Castro-Ramos, J.; Vazquez-Montiel, S.; Flores-Gil, A.; Delgado-Atencio, J. A.; Vazquez-Villa, A.

    2011-03-01

    The optical coherence tomography images are useful to see the internal profile and the structure of material samples. In this work, OCT images were recorded in 10 volunteers with different skin tone which were related to Raman spectra. The areas where we obtained OCT images and Raman spectra were a) index finger nail, b) between index finger and middle finger, c) middle finger tip, d) half of middle finger, e) the thumb finger tip and f) between index finger and thumb, areas measured were for the purpose of finding extracellular fluids with contain triglycerides, cholesterol and glucose that are reported in the literature. The excitation wavelength used for this work was 785 nm, a spectrometer of 6 cm-1 resolution. The spectral region used ranges from 300 to 1800 cm-1. We use an OCT with 930 nm of Central Wavelength, 1.6 mm of Image Depth, 6 mm of image width and 6.2 μm of axial resolution.

  15. Detecting early stage osteoarthritis by optical coherence tomography?

    PubMed Central

    Jahr, Holger; Brill, Nicolai; Nebelung, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common chronic disease of our joints, manifested by a dynamically increasing degeneration of hyaline articular cartilage (AC). While currently no therapy can reverse this process, the few available treatment options are hampered by the inability of early diagnosis. Loss of cartilage surface, or extracellular matrix (ECM), integrity is considered the earliest sign of OA. Despite the increasing number of imaging modalities surprisingly few imaging biomarkers exist. In this narrative review, recent developments in optical coherence tomography are critically evaluated for their potential to assess different aspects of AC quality as biomarkers of OA. Special attention is paid to imaging surface irregularities, ECM organization and the evaluation of posttraumatic injuries by light-based modalities. PMID:26862954

  16. Toward an automated method for optical coherence tomography characterization.

    PubMed

    Strupler, Mathias; Beckley, Amber M; Benboujja, Fouzi; Dubois, Sylvain; Noiseux, Isabelle; Mermut, Ozzy; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Boudoux, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in biomedical applications, robust yet simple methods for calibrating and benchmarking a system are needed. We present here a procedure based on a calibration object complemented with an algorithm that analyzes three-dimensional OCT datasets to retrieve key characteristics of an OCT system. The calibration object combines state-of-the-art tissue phantom material with a diamond-turned aluminum multisegment mirror. This method is capable of determining rapidly volumetric field-of-view, axial resolution, and image curvature. Moreover, as the phantom material mimics biological tissue, the system’s signal and noise levels can be evaluated in conditions close to biological experiments. We believe this method could improve OCT quantitative data analysis and help OCT data comparison for longitudinal or multicenter studies. PMID:26720874

  17. Volumetric (3D) compressive sensing spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Daguang; Huang, Yong; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we proposed a novel three-dimensional compressive sensing (CS) approach for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) volumetric image acquisition and reconstruction. Instead of taking a spectral volume whose size is the same as that of the volumetric image, our method uses a sub set of the original spectral volume that is under-sampled in all three dimensions, which reduces the amount of spectral measurements to less than 20% of that required by the Shan-non/Nyquist theory. The 3D image is recovered from the under-sampled spectral data dimension-by-dimension using the proposed three-step CS reconstruction strategy. Experimental results show that our method can significantly reduce the sampling rate required for a volumetric SD OCT image while preserving the image quality. PMID:25426320

  18. Optical coherence tomography for vulnerability assessment of sandstone.

    PubMed

    Bemand, Elizabeth; Liang, Haida

    2013-05-10

    Sandstone is an important cultural heritage material, in both architectural and natural settings, such as neolithic rock art panels. The majority of deterioration effects in porous materials such as sandstone are influenced by the presence and movement of water through the material. The presence of water within the porous network of a material results in changes in the optical coherence tomography signal intensity that can be used to monitor the wetting front of water penetration of dry porous materials at various depths. The technique is able to detect wetting front velocities from 1 cm s(-1) to 10(-6) cm s(-1), covering the full range of hydraulic conductivities likely to occur in natural sandstones from pervious to impervious.

  19. Toward an automated method for optical coherence tomography characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, Mathias; Beckley, Amber M.; Benboujja, Fouzi; Dubois, Sylvain; Noiseux, Isabelle; Mermut, Ozzy; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Boudoux, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    With the increasing use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in biomedical applications, robust yet simple methods for calibrating and benchmarking a system are needed. We present here a procedure based on a calibration object complemented with an algorithm that analyzes three-dimensional OCT datasets to retrieve key characteristics of an OCT system. The calibration object combines state-of-the-art tissue phantom material with a diamond-turned aluminum multisegment mirror. This method is capable of determining rapidly volumetric field-of-view, axial resolution, and image curvature. Moreover, as the phantom material mimics biological tissue, the system's signal and noise levels can be evaluated in conditions close to biological experiments. We believe this method could improve OCT quantitative data analysis and help OCT data comparison for longitudinal or multicenter studies.

  20. Optical coherence tomography with plasmon resonant nanorods of gold.

    PubMed

    Troutman, Timothy S; Barton, Jennifer K; Romanowski, Marek

    2007-06-01

    We explored plasmon resonant nanorods of gold as a contrast agent for optical coherence tomography (OCT). Nanorod suspensions were generated through wet chemical synthesis and characterized with spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, and OCT. Polyacrylamide-based phantoms were generated with appropriate scattering and anisotropy coefficients (30 cm(-1) and 0.89, respectively) to image distribution of the contrast agent in an environment similar to that of tissue. The observed signal was dependent on whether the plasmon resonance peak overlapped the source bandwidth of the OCT, confirming the resonant character of enhancement. Gold nanorods with plasmon resonance wavelengths overlapping the OCT source yielded a signal-to-background ratio of 4.5 dB, relative to the tissue phantom. Strategies for OCT imaging with nanorods are discussed. PMID:17546147

  1. Automated algorithm for breast tissue differentiation in optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mujat, Mircea; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Hammer, Daniel X.; Gittins, Christopher; Iftimia, Nicusor

    2010-01-01

    An automated algorithm for differentiating breast tissue types based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) data is presented. Eight parameters are derived from the OCT reflectivity profiles and their means and covariance matrices are calculated for each tissue type from a training set (48 samples) selected based on histological examination. A quadratic discrimination score is then used to assess the samples from a validation set. The algorithm results for a set of 89 breast tissue samples were correlated with the histological findings, yielding specificity and sensitivity of 0.88. If further perfected to work in real time and yield even higher sensitivity and specificity, this algorithm would be a valuable tool for biopsy guidance and could significantly increase procedure reliability by reducing both the number of nondiagnostic aspirates and the number of false negatives. PMID:19566332

  2. Optical coherence tomography to evaluate coronary stent implantation and complications.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Umair; Thondapu, Vikas; Ul Haq, Muhammad Asrar; Foin, Nicolas; Jang, Ik-Kyung; Barlis, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Coronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) is now an established imaging technique in many catheterization laboratories worldwide. With its near-histological view of the vessel wall and lumen interface, it offers unprecedented imaging quality to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, plaque vulnerability, and vascular biology. Not only is OCT used to accurately detect atherosclerotic plaque and optimize stent position, but it can further characterize plaque composition, quantify stent apposition, and assess stent tissue coverage. Given that its resolution of 15 μm is well above that of angiography and intravascular ultrasound, OCT has become the invasive imaging method of choice to examine the interaction between stents and the vessel wall. This review focuses on the application of OCT to examine coronary stents, the mechanisms of stent complications, and future directions of OCT-guided intervention. PMID:26247272

  3. 4D embryonic cardiography using gated optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, M. W.; Rothenberg, F.; Roy, D.; Nikolski, V. P.; Hu, Z.; Watanabe, M.; Wilson, D. L.; Efimov, I. R.; Rollins, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous imaging of very early embryonic heart structure and function has technical limitations of spatial and temporal resolution. We have developed a gated technique using optical coherence tomography (OCT) that can rapidly image beating embryonic hearts in four-dimensions (4D), at high spatial resolution (10-15 μm), and with a depth penetration of 1.5 - 2.0 mm that is suitable for the study of early embryonic hearts. We acquired data from paced, excised, embryonic chicken and mouse hearts using gated sampling and employed image processing techniques to visualize the hearts in 4D and measure physiologic parameters such as cardiac volume, ejection fraction, and wall thickness. This technique is being developed to longitudinally investigate the physiology of intact embryonic hearts and events that lead to congenital heart defects.

  4. Microvascular contrast enhancement in optical coherence tomography using microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadi, Homa; Demidov, Valentin; Karshafian, Raffi; Douplik, Alexandre; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2016-07-01

    Gas microbubbles (MBs) are investigated as intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) contrast agents. Agar + intralipid scattering tissue phantoms with two embedded microtubes were fabricated to model vascular blood flow. One was filled with human blood, and the other with a mixture of human blood + MB. Swept-source structural and speckle variance (sv) OCT images, as well as speckle decorrelation times, were evaluated under both no-flow and varying flow conditions. Faster decorrelation times and higher structural and svOCT image contrasts were detected in the presence of MB in all experiments. The effects were largest in the svOCT imaging mode, and uniformly diminished with increasing flow velocity. These findings suggest the feasibility of utilizing MB for tissue hemodynamic investigations and for microvasculature contrast enhancement in OCT angiography.

  5. Volumetric (3D) compressive sensing spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Daguang; Huang, Yong; Kang, Jin U

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we proposed a novel three-dimensional compressive sensing (CS) approach for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) volumetric image acquisition and reconstruction. Instead of taking a spectral volume whose size is the same as that of the volumetric image, our method uses a sub set of the original spectral volume that is under-sampled in all three dimensions, which reduces the amount of spectral measurements to less than 20% of that required by the Shan-non/Nyquist theory. The 3D image is recovered from the under-sampled spectral data dimension-by-dimension using the proposed three-step CS reconstruction strategy. Experimental results show that our method can significantly reduce the sampling rate required for a volumetric SD OCT image while preserving the image quality.

  6. Noncontact phase-sensitive dynamic optical coherence elastography at megahertz rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-Hao; Li, Jiasong; Schill, Alexander; Nair, Achuth; Kistenev, Yury V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic optical coherence elastography (OCE) techniques have shown great promise at quantitatively obtaining the biomechanical properties of tissue. However, the majority of these techniques have required multiple temporal OCT acquisitions (M-B mode) and corresponding excitations, which lead to clinically unfeasible acquisition times and potential tissue damage. Furthermore, the large data sets and extended laser exposures hinder their translation to the clinic, where patient discomfort and safety are critical criteria. In this work we demonstrate noncontact true kilohertz frame-rate dynamic optical coherence elastography by directly imaging a focused air-pulse induced elastic wave with a home-built phase-sensitive OCE system based on a 4X buffered Fourier Domain Mode Locked swept source laser with an A-scan rate of ~1.5 MHz. The elastic wave was imaged at a frame rate of ~7.3 kHz using only a single excitation. In contrast to previous techniques, successive B-scans were acquired over the measurement region (B-M mode) in this work. The feasibility of this method was validated by quantifying the elasticity of tissue-mimicking agar phantoms as well as porcine corneas ex vivo at different intraocular pressures. The results demonstrate that this method can acquire a depth-resolved elastogram in milliseconds. The reduced data set enabled a rapid elasticity assessment, and the ultra-fast acquisition speed allowed for a clinically safe laser exposure to the cornea.

  7. Heidelberg Spectralis Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography: Technical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Coscas, Gabriel; Lupidi, Marco; Coscas, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) is a promising new method for visualizing the retinal vasculature and choroidal vascular layers in the macular area and provides depth-resolved functional information on blood flow in these vessels. OCT-A is based on the concept that in a static eye the only moving structure in the fundus of the eye is blood flowing through the vessels. Contrast is generated based on the difference between moving cells in the vasculature and the static surrounding tissue. Artifacts can arise due to scan positioning errors caused by normal ocular microsaccades. In order to avoid artifacts, a sequence of OCT B-scans in the exact same retinal location must be taken to detect flow. Active eye-tracking (TruTrack™) using the simultaneous acquisition of fundus and optical coherence tomography (OCT) images presents a very reliable method of acquiring OCT volume scans without motion artifacts and helps significantly improve signal-to-noise ratio. This system also allows the use of a full spectrum amplitude decorrelation algorithm that produces clear differentiation between blood flow and static tissue without sacrificing the axial resolution of OCT images. Accuracy in layer segmentation, which requires high-resolution OCT B-scans, is crucial for producing reliable OCT-A images. This can be achieved through automated or manual layer segmentation. During OCT scan acquisition, the effect of axial motion (e.g. a patient moving towards the camera) is compensated for by geometric alignment of successive B-scans before analyzing temporal changes.

  8. Optical coherent sensor for monitoring and measurement of engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łukaszewski, Dariusz; Sałbut, Leszek; Dziuban, Jan A.

    2010-05-01

    Among many coherent optical methods one should distinguished Grating Interferometry (GI) which allows accurate in-plane displacement measurements and Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry (DSPI) used for in-plane and out-of-plane measurements. Development of sensors based on both methods mentioned above as complementary ones will provide user universal group of sensors from which depending on measurement requirements such as measuring range, object surface profile and measurement conditions the most appropriate can be chosen. In-plane displacement measurements are of interested of different branches of industry - from micro (i.e.: characterization of MEMS or MOEMS) to civil engineering (i.e.: Structural Health Monitoring systems). In the paper the new optical coherent sensor for in-plane displacement and strain measurements is presented. The sensor combines GI and DSPI methods in one device which can be used for testing of objects with different types of surfaces. GI requires the specimen grating attached at the surface but provides very good measurement accuracy however DSPI can be applied for testing of objects with rough surfaces but due to higher noise gives lower accuracy. The sensor can work in three modes: as GI only, DSPI only and both GI and DSPI simultaneously. The third mode can by useful when the specimen grating is attached on the part of object under test only. In the paper the theoretical background of the sensor is presented. For confirmation of GI/DSPI sensor possibilities the specially designed demonstrator is described and the exemplary results obtained during its laboratory tests are shown. Successful application of proposed sensor is possible due to its miniaturization, simplicity of operation by user (compact structure and automation of measurement procedure) and low cost. The last mentioned condition will be possible due to low cost replication techniques with usage of silicon technology.

  9. Monitoring changes of optical attenuation coefficients of acupuncture points during laser acupuncture by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Wang, Yuhua; Zheng, Liqin; Xie, Shusen

    2010-11-01

    The physical properties of acupuncture point were important to discover the mechanism of acupuncture meridian. In this paper, we used an optical coherence tomography to monitor in vivo the changes of optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point during laser irradiation on Yangxi acupuncture point. The optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point were obtained by fitting the raw data according to the Beer-Lambert's law. The experimental results showed that the optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point decreased during the laser acupuncture, in contrast to a barely changed result in that of non-acupuncture point. The significant change of optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point indicated that there was a correlation between Hegu and Yangxi acupuncture points to some extent.

  10. Fourier optics analysis of phase-mask-based path-length-multiplexed optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yin, Biwei; Dwelle, Jordan; Wang, Bingqing; Wang, Tianyi; Feldman, Marc D; Rylander, Henry G; Milner, Thomas E

    2015-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging technique that constructs a depth-resolved image by measuring the optical path-length difference between broadband light backscattered from a sample and a reference surface. For many OCT sample arm optical configurations, sample illumination and backscattered light detection share a common path. When a phase mask is placed in the sample path, features in the detected signal are observed, which suggests that an analysis of a generic common path OCT imaging system is warranted. In this study, we present a Fourier optics analysis using a Fresnel diffraction approximation of an OCT system with a path-length-multiplexing element (PME) inserted in the sample arm optics. The analysis may be generalized for most phase-mask-based OCT systems. A radial-angle-diverse PME is analyzed in detail, and the point spread function, coherent transfer function, sensitivity of backscattering angular diversity detection, and signal formation in terms of sample spatial frequency are simulated and discussed. The analysis reveals important imaging features and application limitations of OCT imaging systems with a phase mask in the sample path optics.

  11. Characterization of automotive paint by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Wang, Chengming; Sun, Zhenwen; Mei, Hongcheng; Huang, Wei; Xu, Lei; Xie, Lanchi; Guo, Jingjing; Yan, Yuwen; Li, Zhihui; Xu, Xiaojing; Xue, Ping; Liu, Ningning

    2016-09-01

    Automotive paint is common trace evidence that plays a significant role in many vehicle-related criminal cases. However, the conventional methods of obtaining tomographic images tend to damage the samples. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel method to obtain high-resolution and cross-sectional images of the automotive paints in a non-destructive, and high-speed manner. In this study, OCT was applied to image and analyze the automotive paint, using scanning electron microscope (SEM) as reference. Eight automotive paint samples of different brands were examined. The images of multi-layer structures provided by OCT system with 5μm depth resolution were consistent with those by SEM. To distinguish different paints with similar visual appearance, we extracted internal structural features from the images using peak analysis and optical attenuation fit. Six characterized parameters were found to distinguish the samples including the optical path length (OPL) of base coat, the optical attenuation coefficient (OAC) of base coat, the OPL of clear coat, the back-scattering ratio (BSR) of clear coat and base coat, the OPL of primer surfacer, and the BSR of base coat and primer. Statistical differences were evaluated by an independent t-test with p<0.05. OCT was applied to analyze repainted paint as well. Three-dimensional OCT reconstruction of the paints was also implemented to create en face (transverse section) images for morphology examination and comparison. These results suggest that OCT imaging can provide additional new features for analyzing the automotive paints and thereby may be a promising supplement to traditional methods. Meanwhile, the OCT system is favorable for achieving in-situ and real-time examination at the scene of crime.

  12. Characterization of automotive paint by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Wang, Chengming; Sun, Zhenwen; Mei, Hongcheng; Huang, Wei; Xu, Lei; Xie, Lanchi; Guo, Jingjing; Yan, Yuwen; Li, Zhihui; Xu, Xiaojing; Xue, Ping; Liu, Ningning

    2016-09-01

    Automotive paint is common trace evidence that plays a significant role in many vehicle-related criminal cases. However, the conventional methods of obtaining tomographic images tend to damage the samples. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel method to obtain high-resolution and cross-sectional images of the automotive paints in a non-destructive, and high-speed manner. In this study, OCT was applied to image and analyze the automotive paint, using scanning electron microscope (SEM) as reference. Eight automotive paint samples of different brands were examined. The images of multi-layer structures provided by OCT system with 5μm depth resolution were consistent with those by SEM. To distinguish different paints with similar visual appearance, we extracted internal structural features from the images using peak analysis and optical attenuation fit. Six characterized parameters were found to distinguish the samples including the optical path length (OPL) of base coat, the optical attenuation coefficient (OAC) of base coat, the OPL of clear coat, the back-scattering ratio (BSR) of clear coat and base coat, the OPL of primer surfacer, and the BSR of base coat and primer. Statistical differences were evaluated by an independent t-test with p<0.05. OCT was applied to analyze repainted paint as well. Three-dimensional OCT reconstruction of the paints was also implemented to create en face (transverse section) images for morphology examination and comparison. These results suggest that OCT imaging can provide additional new features for analyzing the automotive paints and thereby may be a promising supplement to traditional methods. Meanwhile, the OCT system is favorable for achieving in-situ and real-time examination at the scene of crime. PMID:27341546

  13. Editorial . Quantum fluctuations and coherence in optical and atomic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschner, Jürgen; Gatti, Alessandra; Maître, Agnès; Morigi, Giovanna

    2003-03-01

    From simple interference fringes, over molecular wave packets, to nonlinear optical patterns - the fundamental interaction between light and matter leads to the formation of structures in many areas of atomic and optical physics. Sophisticated technology in experimental quantum optics, as well as modern computational tools available to theorists, have led to spectacular achievements in the investigation of quantum structures. This special issue is dedicated to recent developments in this area. It presents a selection of examples where quantum dynamics, fluctuations, and coherence generate structures in time or in space or where such structures are observed experimentally. The examples range from coherence phenomena in condensed matter, over atoms in optical structures, entanglement in light and matter, to quantum patterns in nonlinear optics and quantum imaging. The combination of such seemingly diverse subjects formed the basis of a successful European TMR network, "Quantum Structures" (visit http://cnqo.phys.strath.ac.uk/~gianluca/QSTRUCT/). This special issue partly re.ects the results and collaborations of the network, going however well beyond its scope by including contributions from a global community and from many related topics which were not addressed directly in the network. The aim of this issue is to present side by side these di.erent topics, all of which are loosely summarized under quantum structures, to highlight their common aspects, their di.erences, and the progress which resulted from the mutual exchange of results, methods, and knowledge. To guide the reader, we have organized the articles into subsections which follow a rough division into structures in material systems and structures in optical .elds. Nevertheless, in the following introduction we point out connections between the contributions which go beyond these usual criteria, thus highlighting the truly interdisciplinary nature of quantum structures. Much of the progress in atom optics

  14. Neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis: Seeing differences through optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, JL; de Seze, J; Lana-Peixoto, M; Palace, J; Waldman, A; Schippling, S; Tenembaum, S; Banwell, B; Greenberg, B; Levy, M; Fujihara, K; Chan, KH; Kim, HJ; Asgari, N; Sato, DK; Saiz, A; Wuerfel, J; Zimmermann, H; Green, A; Villoslada, P

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that preferentially targets the optic nerves and spinal cord. The clinical presentation may suggest multiple sclerosis (MS), but a highly specific serum autoantibody against the astrocytic water channel aquaporin-4 present in up to 80% of NMO patients enables distinction from MS. Optic neuritis may occur in either condition resulting in neuro-anatomical retinal changes. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become a useful tool for analyzing retinal damage both in MS and NMO. Numerous studies showed that optic neuritis in NMO typically results in more severe retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and ganglion cell layer thinning and more frequent development of microcystic macular edema than in MS. Furthermore, while patients’ RNFL thinning also occurs in the absence of optic neuritis in MS, subclinical damage seems to be rare in NMO. Thus, OCT might be useful in differentiating NMO from MS and serve as an outcome parameter in clinical studies. PMID:25662342

  15. Noise-immune complex correlation for optical coherence angiography based on standard and Jones matrix optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Shuichi; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Hong, Young-Joo; Miura, Masahiro; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a complex correlation mapping algorithm for optical coherence angiography (cmOCA). The proposed algorithm avoids the signal-to-noise ratio dependence and exhibits low noise in vasculature imaging. The complex correlation coefficient of the signals, rather than that of the measured data are estimated, and two-step averaging is introduced. Algorithms of motion artifact removal based on non perfusing tissue detection using correlation are developed. The algorithms are implemented with Jones-matrix OCT. Simultaneous imaging of pigmented tissue and vasculature is also achieved using degree of polarization uniformity imaging with cmOCA. An application of cmOCA to in vivo posterior human eyes is presented to demonstrate that high-contrast images of patients’ eyes can be obtained. PMID:27446673

  16. Noninvasive monitoring of photodynamic therapy on skin neoplastic lesions using the optical attenuation coefficient measured by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulart, Viviane P.; dos Santos, Moisés O.; Latrive, Anne; Freitas, Anderson Z.; Correa, Luciana; Zezell, Denise M.

    2015-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become a promising alternative for treatment of skin lesions such as squamous cell carcinoma. We propose a method to monitor the effects of PDT in a noninvasive way by using the optical attenuation coefficient (OAC) calculated from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. We conducted a study on mice with chemically induced neoplastic lesions and performed PDT on these lesions using homemade photosensitizers. The response of neoplastic lesions to therapy was monitored using, at the same time, macroscopic clinical visualization, histopathological analysis, OCT imaging, and OCT-based attenuation coefficient measurement. Results with all four modalities demonstrated a positive response to treatment. The attenuation coefficient was found to be 1.4 higher in skin lesions than in healthy tissue and it decreased after therapy. This study shows that the OAC is a potential tool to noninvasively assess the evolution of skin neoplastic lesions with time after treatment.

  17. Optical coherence tomography in guided surgery of GI cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagaynova, Elena V.; Abelevich, Alexander I.; Zagaynov, Vladimir E.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Denisenko, Arkady N.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Kutis, Irina S.

    2005-04-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a new high spatial resolution, real-time optical imaging modality, known from prior pilot studies for its high sensitivity to invasive cancer. We reported our results in an OCT feasibility study for accurate determination of the proximal border for esophageal carcinoma and the distal border for rectal carcinoma. The OCT study enrolled 19 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma and 24 patients with distal esophageal carcinoma (14 squamous cell carcinomas, 10 adenocarcinomas). During pre-surgery planning endoscopy we performed in vivo OCT imaging of the tumor border at four dial clock axes (12, 3, 6 and 9 o"clock). The OCT border then was marked by an electrocoagulator, or by a methylene blue tattoo. A cold biopsy (from the esophagus) was performed at visual and OCT borders and compared with visual and OCT readings. 27 post-surgery excised specimens were analyzed. OCT borders matched the histopathology in 94% cases in the rectum and 83.3% in the esophagus. In the cases of a mismatch between the OCT and histology borders, a deep tumor invasion occurred in the muscle layer (esophagus, rectum). Because of its high sensitivity to mucosal cancer, OCT can be used for pre-surgery planning and surgery guidance of the proximal border for esophageal carcinoma and the distal border for rectal carcinoma. However, deep invasion in the rectum or esophageal wall has to be controlled by alternative diagnostic modalities.

  18. Monte Carlo Investigation of Optical Coherence Tomography Retinal Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Siyu; Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Backman, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) oximetry explores the possibility to measure retinal hemoglobin oxygen saturation level (sO2). We investigated the accuracy of OCT retinal oximetry using Monte Carlo simulation in a commonly-used four-layer retinal model. After we determined the appropriate number of simulated photon packets, we studied the effects of blood vessel diameter, signal sampling position, physiological sO2 level, and the blood packing factor on the accuracy of sO2 estimation in OCT retinal oximetry. The simulation results showed that a packing factor between 0.2 and 0.4 yields a reasonably accurate estimation of sO2 within a 5% error tolerance, which is independent of vessel diameter and sampling position, when visible-light illumination is used in OCT. We further explored the optimal optical spectral range for OCT retinal oximetry. The simulation results suggest that visible spectral range around 560 nm is better suited than near-infrared spectral range around 800 nm for OCT oximetry to warrant accurate measurements. PMID:25955984

  19. Morphological phenotyping of mouse hearts using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cua, Michelle; Lin, Eric; Lee, Ling; Sheng, Xiaoye; Wong, Kevin S. K.; Tibbits, Glen F.; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2014-11-01

    Transgenic mouse models have been instrumental in the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms behind many genetically based cardiovascular diseases such as Marfan syndrome (MFS). However, the characterization of their cardiac morphology has been hampered by the small size of the mouse heart. In this report, we adapted optical coherence tomography (OCT) for imaging fixed adult mouse hearts, and applied tools from computational anatomy to perform morphometric analyses. The hearts were first optically cleared and imaged from multiple perspectives. The acquired volumes were then corrected for refractive distortions, and registered and stitched together to form a single, high-resolution OCT volume of the whole heart. From this volume, various structures such as the valves and myofibril bundles were visualized. The volumetric nature of our dataset also allowed parameters such as wall thickness, ventricular wall masses, and luminal volumes to be extracted. Finally, we applied the entire acquisition and processing pipeline in a preliminary study comparing the cardiac morphology of wild-type mice and a transgenic mouse model of MFS.

  20. Application of optical coherence tomography to automated contact lens metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Bryan R.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2010-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a nondestructive imaging modality with the potential to make quantitative spatial measurements. OCT's noncontact nature, sensitivity to small refractive index mismatches, and micron-scale resolution make it attractive for contact lens metrology, specifically, measuring prism. Prism is defined as the maximum difference in thickness of the contact lens, measured over a full 360 deg of rotation, at a fixed distance from the contact lens edge. We develop and test a novel algorithm that automatically analyzes OCT images and calculates prism. Images are obtained using a Thorlabs OCT930SR OCT system. The OCT probe is fastened to an automated rotation stage that rotates 360 deg in small increments (typically 10 deg) to acquire OCT images of the edge of the contact lens around the entire circumference. The images are 1.6 mm in optical depth (512 pixels) and 2 mm wide (1000 pixels). Several sets of images are successfully analyzed. The prism measured for a toric lens is 42 μm, which is in line with design parameters. Thickness measurements are repeatable with a standard deviation of 0.5 μm and maximum range of 1.8 μm over ten image sets. This work demonstrates the possibility of using OCT to perform nondestructive contact lens metrology.