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Sample records for clinical septic shock

  1. Severe sepsis and septic shock: defining the clinical problem.

    PubMed

    Opal, Steven M

    2003-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that severe sepsis/septic shock is a major problem in clinical medicine, yet the extent of the problem and its basic immunology remain poorly defined. The generation of accurate statistics about sepsis is confounded by the imprecise and highly variable terminology used to describe sepsis by clinicians around the world. The problem of sepsis is further complicated by the remarkably diverse spectrum of illness encompassed under the term 'sepsis'. Sepsis may range in severity from mild systemic inflammation without significant clinical consequences to multisystem failure in septic shock with an exceedingly high mortality rate. Sepsis connotes a clinical syndrome that may occur in any age group, in markedly different patient populations, and in response to a multitude of microbial pathogens from multiple different anatomical sites within the human body. A concerted effort has been made to standardize definitions of sepsis by the use of international committees and consensus opinions from panels of experts in sepsis research. While consensus definitions of sepsis have proven to be of value, the lack of uniformity in interpretation of these definitions continues to be problematic by clinicians and basic researchers alike. Recently, a new conceptual framework for understanding sepsis has been developed, called the PIRO concept (predisposition, infection, response and organ dysfunction). This has been conceptually modeled from the TNM classification (tumor size, nodal spread, metastases) which has been successfully used in defining treatment and prognostic indicators in clinical oncology. Further refinements in the definitions and predisposing factors of severe sepsis should improve the understanding and management of severe sepsis and septic shock in the near future.

  2. Developing a New Definition and Assessing New Clinical Criteria for Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Shankar-Hari, Manu; Phillips, Gary S.; Levy, Mitchell L.; Seymour, Christopher W.; Liu, Vincent X.; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Angus, Derek C.; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; Singer, Mervyn

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Septic shock currently refers to a state of acute circulatory failure associated with infection. Emerging biological insights and reported variation in epidemiology challenge the validity of this definition. OBJECTIVE To develop a new definition and clinical criteria for identifying septic shock in adults. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine convened a task force (19 participants) to revise current sepsis/septic shock definitions. Three sets of studies were conducted: (1) a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies in adults published between January 1, 1992, and December 25, 2015, to determine clinical criteria currently reported to identify septic shock and inform the Delphi process; (2) a Delphi study among the task force comprising 3 surveys and discussions of results from the systematic review, surveys, and cohort studies to achieve consensus on a new septic shock definition and clinical criteria; and (3) cohort studies to test variables identified by the Delphi process using Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) (2005–2010; n = 28 150), University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) (2010–2012; n = 1 309 025), and Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) (2009–2013; n = 1 847 165) electronic health record (EHR) data sets. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Evidence for and agreement on septic shock definitions and criteria. RESULTS The systematic review identified 44 studies reporting septic shock outcomes (total of 166 479 patients) from a total of 92 sepsis epidemiology studies reporting different cutoffs and combinations for blood pressure (BP), fluid resuscitation, vasopressors, serum lactate level, and base deficit to identify septic shock. The septic shock–associated crude mortality was 46.5% (95%CI, 42.7%–50.3%), with significant between-study statistical heterogeneity (I2 = 99.5%; τ2 = 182.5; P < .001). The Delphi process identified

  3. Comparison of clinical effect of dopamine and norepinephrine in the treatment of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuming; Wang, Lirui; Shi, Huijuan; Gao, Min

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to compare the clinical effect of dopamine and nor epinephrine in the treatment of septic shock. Fifty cases with septic shock were randomly divided into two groups. Patients in both two groups revived after taking effective liquid. Then dopamine was pumped into central veins of patients in the research group (group DA) in 2 μ/(kg•min) upon the conventional treatment, while nor epinephrine was pumped into patients in the control group (group NE) in 0.1 μ/(kg•min), besides conventional treatment. The improvement of haemodynamics and microcirculation perfusion indexes were compared between two groups before and after treatment, as well as the improvement of tissue oxygen metabolism. The results demonstrated that, central venous pressure (CVP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), urine volume and central venous oxygen saturation (Scv O2) in both groups before treatment was not statistically significant (P>0.05); 6 h after treatment, CVP, MAP, urine volume and Scv O2 of group NE were higher than group DA; 12h and 24h after treatment, blood lactic acid clearance of group NE was superior than group DA (P<0.05). All the above findings suggested that, both dopamine and nor epinephrine are beneficial to improve microcirculation and tissue oxygen metabolism in the treatment of septic shock, and the clinical effect of nor epinephrine was distinctly better than dopamine.

  4. [Comparison of clinical assessment and invasive evaluation of hemodynamic parameters in septic shock].

    PubMed

    Vucić, N; Pilas, V

    1995-06-01

    The authors compare, in this prospective study, the accuracy of their own clinical assessment of hemodynamic parameters and severity of disease with the findings obtained by right heart catheterization in 50 patients with septic shock. The purpose of the study was to determine whether Swan-Ganz catheter insertion was necessary in all patients with septic shock. As soon as the diagnosis was established, the value of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was estimated, as well as presence or absence of pathological uptake/supply dependency in all patients. The latter is an excellent indicator of severity of disease. The accurate assessment was noted in 27 (54%) patients (1. investigator), and in 30 (60%) patients (2. investigator). The sensitivity of detection of pathological uptake/supply dependency amounted to 53% and 65%; specificity was 73% and 79%, respectively. The therapy was altered in 21 patients (42%) after catheter insertion. The results were tested with chi2-test (p < 0.01). The findings of this study warrant catheter insertion in patients with septic shock. PMID:8649145

  5. Septic shock in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Knuppel, R A; Rao, P S; Cavanagh, D

    1984-03-01

    Septic shock in obstetric patients can be prevented by recognition of patients at risk and aggressive intervention in the warm-hypotensive phase. These patients must be monitored closely. Rarely will an obstetrical floor be capable of providing adequate monitoring of these patients; therefore, the patient should be transferred to an intensive care unit. Individualize therapy, but do not procrastinate in the surgical removal of the nidus of infection.

  6. Mortality Reduction in Septic Shock by Plasma Adsorption (ROMPA): a protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Colomina-Climent, Francisco; Giménez-Esparza, Carola; Portillo-Requena, Cristina; Allegue-Gallego, José Manuel; Galindo-Martínez, María; Mollà-Jiménez, Cristina; Antón-Pascual, José Luis; Rodríguez-Serra, Manuel; Martín-Ruíz, José Luis; Fernández-Arroyo, Pablo Juan; Blasco-Císcar, Eugenia María; Cánovas-Robles, José; Herrera-Murillo, Miguel; González-Hernández, Enrique; Sánchez-Morán, Fernando; Solera-Suárez, Manuel; Torres-Tortajada, Jesús; Nuñez-Martínez, José María; Martín-Langerwerf, David; Herrero-Gutiérrez, Eugenio; Sebastián-Muñoz, Isabel; Palazón-Bru, Antonio; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a lack of evidence in the efficacy of the coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA) to reduce the mortality rate in septic shock. To fill this gap, we have designed the ROMPA study (Mortality Reduction in Septic Shock by Plasma Adsorption) to confirm whether treatment with an adequate dose of treated plasma by CPFA could confer a clinical benefit. Methods and analysis Our study is a multicentric randomised clinical trial with a 28-day and 90-day follow-up and allocation ratio 1:1. Its aim is to clarify whether the application of high doses of CPFA (treated plasma ≥0.20 L/kg/day) in the first 3 days after randomisation, in addition to the current clinical practice, is able to reduce hospital mortality in patients with septic shock in intensive care units (ICUs) at 28 and 90 days after initiation of the therapy. The study will be performed in 10 ICUs in the Southeast of Spain which follow the same protocol in this disease (based on the Surviving Sepsis Campaign). Our trial is designed to be able to demonstrate an absolute mortality reduction of 20% (α=0.05; 1−β=0.8; n=190(95×2)). The severity of the process, ensuring the recruitment of patients with a high probability of death (50% in the control group), will be achieved through an adequate stratification by using both severity scores and classical definitions of severe sepsis/septic shock and dynamic parameters. Our centres are fully aware of the many pitfalls associated with previous medical device trials. Trying to reduce these problems, we have developed a training programme to improve the CPFA use (especially clotting problems). Ethics and dissemination The protocol was approved by the Ethics Committees of all the participant centres. The findings of the trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, as well as national and international conference presentations. Trial registration number NCT02357433; Pre-results. PMID:27406647

  7. Coagulation disorders in septic shock.

    PubMed

    Thijs, L G; de Boer, J P; de Groot, M C; Hack, C E

    1993-01-01

    Abnormalities in coagulation and fibrinolysis are frequently observed in septic shock. The most pronounced clinical manifestation is disseminated intravascular coagulation. Recent studies in human volunteers and animal models have clarified the early dynamics and route of activation of both coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways. In healthy subjects subjected to a low dose of either endotoxin or TNF an imbalance in the procoagulant and the fibrinolytic mechanisms is apparent, resulting in a procoagulant state. Also in patients with septic shock a dynamic process of coagulation and fibrinolysis is ongoing with evidence of impaired fibrinolysis. These abnormalities have prognostic significance; the extent of disturbances of coagulation and fibrinolysis is related to the development of multiple organ failure and death.

  8. Review of a large clinical series: Predicting death for patients with abdominal septic shock.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Ernst; Brause, Rüdiger; Paetz, Jürgen; Arlt, Björn

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the result of the MEDAN project that analyzes a multicenter septic shock patient data collection. The mortality prognosis based on 4 scores that are often used is compared with the prognosis of a trained neural network. We built an alarm system using the network classification results. Method. We analyzed the data of 382 patients with abdominal septic shock who were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) from 1998 to 2002. The analysis includes the calculation of daily sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA), Acute Physiological and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II, multiple-organ dysfunction score (MODS) scores for each patient and the training and testing of an appropriate neural network. Results. For our patients with abdominal septic shock, the analysis shows that it is not possible to predict their individual fate correctly on the day of admission to the ICU on the basis of any current score. However, when the trained network computes a score value below the threshold during the ICU stay, there is a high probability that the patient will die within 3 days. The trained neural network obtains the same outcome prediction performance as the best score, the SOFA score, using narrower confidence intervals and considering three variables only: systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and the number of thrombocytes. We conclude that the currently best available score for abdominal septic shock may be replaced by the output of a trained neural network with only 3 input variables. PMID:21262751

  9. Effects of Safflower Yellow on the Treatment of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jin; Wang, Ru-Rong; Kang, Yan; Liu, Jin; Zuo, Yun-Xia; Zeng, Xue-Feng; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the clinical effect of safflower yellow on the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock. Methods. 85 patients with severe sepsis and septic shock were randomly selected to receive either therapy according to the international guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock (Surviving Sepsis Campaign 2012) (control group, n = 45) or conventional therapy plus safflower yellow (study group, n = 40). The 28-day mortality and 28-day Kaplan-Meier survival curves were compared as primary outcomes. Results. The 28-day mortality from all causes and in-hospital mortality were significantly lower in the study group (50%, 17.5%) as compared to the control group (78.58%, 54.76%) (P = 0.007, all causes, P < 0.001, in-hospital), and the 28-day Kaplan-Meier survival curve was higher in the study group than in the control group (P = 0.008, all causes, P < 0.001, in-hospital, Log Rank). 72 hours after treatment, secondary outcomes including heart rate, leukocyte counts, lactate levels, and platelet counts of patients in the study group were ameliorated significantly as compared with the control group. Conclusion. This study offers a potential new strategy employing safflower yellow to more effectively treat patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. This trial is registered with identifier ChiCTR-TRC-14005196. PMID:26989426

  10. Metabolic theory of septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Pravda, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Septic shock is a life threatening condition that can develop subsequent to infection. Mortality can reach as high as 80% with over 150000 deaths yearly in the United States alone. Septic shock causes progressive failure of vital homeostatic mechanisms culminating in immunosuppression, coagulopathy and microvascular dysfunction which can lead to refractory hypotension, organ failure and death. The hypermetabolic response that accompanies a systemic inflammatory reaction places high demands upon stored nutritional resources. A crucial element that can become depleted early during the progression to septic shock is glutathione. Glutathione is chiefly responsible for supplying reducing equivalents to neutralize hydrogen peroxide, a toxic oxidizing agent that is produced during normal metabolism. Without glutathione, hydrogen peroxide can rise to toxic levels in tissues and blood where it can cause severe oxidative injury to organs and to the microvasculature. Continued exposure can result in microvascular dysfunction, capillary leakage and septic shock. It is the aim of this paper to present evidence that elevated systemic levels of hydrogen peroxide are present in septic shock victims and that it significantly contributes to the development and progression of this frequently lethal condition. PMID:24892019

  11. Vasopressor weaning in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Daniel L; Hanneman, Sandra K

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to propose optimal weaning of vasopressors in patients with septic shock. Topics discussed include pathophysiology of sepsis and septic shock, treatment guidelines for sepsis, autoregulation of blood flow, vasopressors used in septic shock, weaning recommendations, monitor alarms in the intensive care unit, and new directions in sepsis research.

  12. The Role of Complement System in Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflieh, Jean; Wei, Jiandong; Labaze, Georges; Hou, Yunfang Joan; Babarsh, Benjamin; Stutz, Helen; Lee, Haekyung; Worah, Samrat; Zhang, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Septic shock is a critical clinical condition with a high mortality rate. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms is important to develop effective therapies. Basic and clinical studies suggest that activation of complements in the common cascade, for example, complement component 3 (C3) and C5, is involved in the development of septic shock. The involvement of three upstream complement pathways in septic shock is more complicated. Both the classical and alternative pathways appear to be activated in septic shock, but the alternative pathway may be activated earlier than the classical pathway. Activation of these two pathways is essential to clear endotoxin. Recent investigations have shed light on the role of lectin complement pathway in septic shock. Published reports suggest a protective role of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) against sepsis. Our preliminary study of MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) in septic shock patients indicated that acute decrease of MASP-2 in the early phase of septic shock might correlate with in-hospital mortality. It is unknown whether excessive activation of these three upstream complement pathways may contribute to the detrimental effects in septic shock. This paper also discusses additional complement-related pathogenic mechanisms and intervention strategies for septic shock. PMID:23049598

  13. Massive Organ Inflammation in Experimental and in Clinical Meningococcal Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Hellerud, Bernt C; Olstad, Ole K; Nielsen, Erik W; Trøseid, Anne-Marie S; Skadberg, Øyvind; Thorgersen, Ebbe B; Vege, Åshild; Mollnes, Tom E; Brandtzæg, Petter

    2015-11-01

    Fulminant meningococcal sepsis is characterized by a massive growth of bacteria in the circulation, regarded as the primary inflammatory site, with no specific solid organ focus. Here we aimed to study the local inflammatory response in organs using a porcine model of fulminant meningococcal septic shock challenged with exponentially increasing doses of heat inactivated Neisseria meningitidis. The results were compared with those obtained in organs post mortem from three patients with lethal meningococcal septic shock. Nine patients with lethal pneumococcal disease and 14 patients with sudden infant death syndrome served as controls. Frozen tissue were thawed, homogenized and prepared for quantification of bacterial DNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and key inflammatory mediators were measured by ELISA in the pig material and by multiplex in the human material. In addition, gene expression assayed by Affymetrix gene expression profiling was performed in the pig study. The porcine model revealed a major influx of N. meningitidis in lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys accompanied with major production of cardinal inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8, far exceeding the amount detected in blood. Genes encoding for these mediators revealed a similar profile. By comparing the wild-type with a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) deficient meningococcal strain, we documented that LPS was the dominant group of molecules inducing organ inflammation and was required for IL-8 production. IL-10 production was predominantly stimulated by non-LPS molecules. The massive organ inflammation in the porcine model was present in the three patients dying of meningococcal shock and differed markedly from the patients with lethal pneumococcal infections and sudden infant death syndrome. In conclusion, in meningococcal sepsis, a massive local inflammatory response occurs in specific organs.

  14. Efficacy of coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA) in patients with septic shock: A multicenter randomised controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Livigni, Sergio; Bertolini, Guido; Rossi, Carlotta; Ferrari, Fiorenza; Giardino, Michele; Pozzato, Marco; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA, Bellco, Italy), to remove inflammatory mediators from blood, has been proposed as a novel treatment for septic shock. This multicenter, randomised, non-blinded trial compared CPFA with standard care in the treatment of critically ill patients with septic shock. Design Prospective, multicenter, randomised, open-label, two parallel group and superiority clinical trial. Setting 18 Italian adult, general, intensive care units (ICUs). Participants Of the planned 330 adult patients with septic shock, 192 were randomised to either have CPFA added to the standard care, or not. The external monitoring committee excluded eight ineligible patients who were erroneously included. Interventions CPFA was to be performed daily for 5 days, lasting at least 10 h/day. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary endpoint was mortality at discharge from the hospital at which the patient last stayed. Secondary endpoints were: 90-day mortality, new organ failures and ICU-free days within 30 days. Results There was no statistical difference in hospital mortality (47.3% controls, 45.1% CPFA; p=0.76), nor in secondary endpoints, namely the occurrence of new organ failures (55.9% vs 56.0%; p=0.99) or free-ICU days during the first 30 days (6.8 vs 7.5; p=0.35). The study was terminated on the grounds of futility. Several patients randomised to CPFA were subsequently found to be undertreated. An a priori planned subgroup analysis showed those receiving a CPFA dose >0.18 L/kg/day had a lower mortality compared with controls (OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.99). Conclusions CPFA did not reduce mortality in patients with septic shock, nor did it positively affect other important clinical outcomes. A subgroup analysis suggested that CPFA could reduce mortality, when a high volume of plasma is treated. Owing to the inherent potential biases of such a subgroup analysis, this result can only be viewed as a hypothesis generator and

  15. Systemic over-release of interleukin-17 in acute kidney injury after septic shock: Clinical and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Maravitsa, Panagiota; Adamopoulou, Maria; Pistiki, Aikaterini; Netea, Mihai G; Louis, Konstantinos; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J

    2016-10-01

    In order to investigate the role of T-helper 17 (Th17) cell activation in acute kidney injury (AKI) after septic shock, a two-stage approach was used. Firstly, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CD4-lymphocytes were isolated the first 24h after septic shock from 26 patients with AKI and 18 patients with chronic renal disease (CRD) without AKI and stimulated for the release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-10, IL-17, IL-22 and interferon-gamma (IFNγ). Results were compared with 15 healthy volunteers and 13 patients with uncomplicated sepsis. Secondly, a murine model of multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) complicated with AKI and bacterial gut translocation was studied, and IL-10, IL-17, IL-22 and IFNγ were measured in kidney homogenates. IL-17 was the only cytokine produced at greater quantities from PBMCs and CD4-lymphocytes of patients with septic shock and AKI than comparators. When PBMCs of patients with septic shock and AKI were ex-vivo stimulated, intracellular staining for IL-17 was greater in CD3(+)/CD4(+)/CD196(+) cells compared to patients with septic shock and CRD. IL-17 was released at greater amounts from PBMCs of non-survivors by septic shock and AKI but not of septic shock and CRD. In the murine model of MODS, a gradual decrease of IL-17, but not of IL-10, IL-22 and IFNγ, of kidney homogenates was found indicating over-consumption. These results suggest that AKI after septic shock is driven through IL-17 release by Th17 cells; this is gradually consumed in the kidney.

  16. Pathophysiology of septic shock and implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Barron, R L

    1993-11-01

    Current knowledge about the pathophysiology of septic shock is reviewed, and biotechnology-based therapies under development are discussed. Patients with septic shock begin their clinical course with leukocytosis, fever, tachycardia, tachypnea, and organ hypoperfusion; shock ensues as immunologic and vasoactive mediators produce hypotension. There are many metabolic and cardiovascular responses, and single- or multiple-organ failure is common. Patients may experience adult respiratory distress syndrome. A multitude of endogenous and exogenous factors have been linked to the pathophysiology of sepsis and septic shock, including (1) endotoxin from gram-negative bacteria, (2) peptidoglycan and exotoxins from gram-negative bacteria, (3) endotoxin-binding proteins and receptors, (4) bactericidal proteases, (5) exotoxins from gram-positive bacteria, (6) acute-phase proteins and proteases, (7) cytokines, (8) arachidonic acid metabolites, (9) complement, (10) beta-endorphin, (11) histamine, (12) stimulation of intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways and proteases, and (13) endothelium-derived factors and adhesion molecules. Molecular entities and strategies under development to combat septic shock include monoclonal antibodies to endotoxin, active immunization with lipid-A analogues, bactericidal permeability-increasing protein, interleukin inhibitors, and inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Successful treatment of septic shock will probably require a combination of agents, including antimicrobials. An ideal goal for biotechnology in the area of septic shock is to prevent invading pathogens from overstimulating the host's immune system and to systematically eliminate those pathogens. Biotechnology is opening new avenues to the treatment of septic shock.

  17. Vasopressin in sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kampmeier, T G; Rehberg, S; Westphal, M; Lange, M

    2010-10-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and its synthetic, long-acting analog terlipressin (TP) are potent alternative vasoconstrictors in the treatment of septic patients with catecholamine-refractive vasodilatatory shock. The results from one large randomized clinical trial suggest that AVP plus norepinephrine (NE) infusion is as safe and effective as treatment with NE alone in patients with septic shock. Because the desired effects of vasopressin analogs are basically related to their vasopressinergic effects via the V1a receptor, more selective V1 agonists, such as TP, may be more potent in reversing sepsis-related arterial hypotension. In this regard, recent evidence from small-scale studies suggests that continuous low-dose infusion rather than intermittent bolus injection of TP is associated with fewer side effects, such as depression of cardiac output and rebound arterial hypotension. However, because clinical data on the administration of TP in patients with sepsis are limited, it should not currently be used beyond the scope of controlled trials. The optimal time point for the initiation of therapy with vasopressin analogs has yet to be determined. While AVP and TP are commonly used as last-resort therapies in severe septic shock, some evidence supports the initiation of treatment in a less severe state of the disease.

  18. An alternate pathophysiologic paradigm of sepsis and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand

    2014-01-01

    The advent of modern antimicrobial therapy following the discovery of penicillin during the 1940s yielded remarkable improvements in case fatality rate of serious infections including septic shock. Since then, pathogens have continuously evolved under selective antimicrobial pressure resulting in a lack of significant improvement in clinical effectiveness in the antimicrobial therapy of septic shock despite ever more broad-spectrum and potent drugs. In addition, although substantial effort and money has been expended on the development novel non-antimicrobial therapies of sepsis in the past 30 years, clinical progress in this regard has been limited. This review explores the possibility that the current pathophysiologic paradigm of septic shock fails to appropriately consider the primacy of the microbial burden of infection as the primary driver of septic organ dysfunction. An alternate paradigm is offered that suggests that has substantial implications for optimizing antimicrobial therapy in septic shock. This model of disease progression suggests the key to significant improvement in the outcome of septic shock may lie, in great part, with improvements in delivery of existing antimicrobials and other anti-infectious strategies. Recognition of the role of delays in administration of antimicrobial therapy in the poor outcomes of septic shock is central to this effort. However, therapeutic strategies that improve the degree of antimicrobial cidality likely also have a crucial role. PMID:24184742

  19. Clinical course of sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock in a cohort of infected patients from ten Colombian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sepsis has several clinical stages, and mortality rates are different for each stage. Our goal was to establish the evolution and the determinants of the progression of clinical stages, from infection to septic shock, over the first week, as well as their relationship to 7-day and 28-day mortality. Methods This is a secondary analysis of a multicenter cohort of inpatients hospitalized in general wards or intensive care units (ICUs). The general estimating equations (GEE) model was used to estimate the risk of progression and the determinants of stages of infection over the first week. Cox regression with time-dependent covariates and fixed covariates was used to determine the factors related with 7-day and 28-day mortality, respectively. Results In 2681 patients we show that progression to severe sepsis and septic shock increases with intraabdominal and respiratory sources of infection [OR = 1,32; 95%IC = 1,20-1,46 and OR = 1.21, 95%CI = 1,11-1,33 respectively], as well as according to Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) [OR = 1,03; 95%CI = 1,02-1,03] and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) [OR = 1,16; 95%CI = 1,14-1,17] scores. The variables related with first-week mortality were progression to severe sepsis [HR = 2,13; 95%CI = 1,13-4,03] and septic shock [HR = 3,00; 95%CI = 1,50-5.98], respiratory source of infection [HR = 1,76; 95%IC = 1,12-2,77], APACHE II [HR = 1,07; 95% CI = 1,04-1,10] and SOFA [HR = 1,09; 95%IC = 1,04-1,15] scores. Conclusions Intraabdominal and respiratory sources of infection, independently of SOFA and APACHE II scores, increase the risk of clinical progression to more severe stages of sepsis; and these factors, together with progression of the infection itself, are the main determinants of 7-day and 28-day mortality. PMID:23883312

  20. The Effect of Early Goal-Directed Therapy on Outcome in Adult Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Patients: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing-Yuan; Chen, Qi-Hong; Liu, Song-Qiao; Pan, Chun; Xu, Xiu-Ping; Han, Ji-Bin; Xie, Jian-Feng; Huang, Ying-Zi; Guo, Feng-Mei; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) improves outcome in severe sepsis and septic shock remains unclear. We performed a meta-analysis of existing clinical trials to examine whether EGDT improved outcome in the resuscitation of adult sepsis patients compared with control care. METHODS: We searched for eligible studies using MEDLINE, Elsevier, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science databases. Studies were eligible if they compared the effects of EGDT versus control care on mortality in adult patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Two reviewers extracted data independently. Data including mortality, sample size of the patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, and resuscitation end points were extracted. Data were analyzed using methods recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager 4.2 software. Random errors were evaluated by trial sequential analysis (TSA). RESULTS: Nine studies compared EGDT with control care, and 5202 severe sepsis and septic shock patients were included. A nonsignificant trend toward reduction in the longest all-cause mortality was observed in the EGDT group compared with control care (relative risk, 0.89; 99% confidence interval, 0.74–1.07; P = 0.10). However, EGDT significantly reduced intensive care unit mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock patients (relative risk, 0.72; 99% confidence interval, 0.57–0.90; P = 0.0002). TSA indicated lack of firm evidence for a beneficial effect. CONCLUSIONS: In this meta-analysis, a nonsignificant trend toward reduction in the longest all-cause mortality in patients resuscitated with EGDT was noted. However, EGDT significantly reduced intensive care unit mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock patients. TSA indicated a lack of firm evidence for the results. More powered, randomized controlled trials are needed to determine the effects. PMID:27049857

  1. Is this septic shock? A rare case of distributive shock.

    PubMed

    Val-Flores, Luis Silva; Fior, Alberto; Santos, Ana; Reis, Luís; Bento, Luís

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of shock in a patient without significant clinical history, admitted to the intensive care unit for suspected septic shock. The patient was initially treated with fluid therapy without improvement. A hypothesis of systemic capillary leak syndrome was postulated following the confirmation of severe hypoalbuminemia, hypotension, and hemoconcentration--a combination of three symptoms typical of the disease. The authors discussed the differential diagnosis and also conducted a review of the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. PMID:25607273

  2. [Levosimendan for septic shock with takotsubo cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Schlürmann, C-N; Reinöhl, J; Kalbhenn, J

    2016-01-01

    As a stress-induced disease, takotsubo cardiomyopathy can also occur in septic syndromes; however, the hemodynamic management is fundamentally different from the treatment approaches for classical septic cardiomyopathy, as beta mimetics can increase the heart failure symptoms in takotsubo cardiomyopathy. This article reports the case of an 82-year-old female patient who presented with acute abdomen due to adhesion ileus and takotsubo cardiomyopathy, developed severe septic shock with peritonitis and could be successfully hemodynamically stabilized with levosimendan.

  3. Pancreatic injury in patients with septic shock: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chaari, Anis; Abdel Hakim, Karim; Bousselmi, Kamel; Etman, Mahmoud; El Bahr, Mohamed; El Saka, Ahmed; Hamza, Eman; Ismail, Mohamed; Khalil, Elsayed Mahmoud; Kauts, Vipin; Casey, William Francis

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are life threatening condition associated with high mortality rate in critically-ill patients. This high mortality is mainly related to the inadequacy between oxygen delivery and cellular demand leading to the onset of multiorgan dysfunction. Whether this multiorgan failure affect the pancreas is not fully investigated. In fact, pancreatic injury may occur because of ischemia, overwhelming inflammatory response, oxidative stress, cellular apoptosis and/or metabolic derangement. Increased serum amylase and/or lipase levels are common in patients with septic shock. However, imaging test rarely reveal significant pancreatic damage. Whether pancreatic dysfunction does affect the prognosis of patients with septic shock or not is still a matter of debate. In fact, only few studies with limited sample size assessed the clinical relevance of the pancreatic injury in this group of patients. In this review, we aimed to describe the epidemiology and the physiopathology of pancreatic injury in septic shock patients, to clarify whether it requires specific management and to assess its prognostic value. Our main finding is that pancreatic injury does not significantly affect the outcome in septic shock patients. Hence, increased serum pancreatic enzymes without clinical features of acute pancreatitis do not require further imaging investigations and specific therapeutic intervention. PMID:27559431

  4. Pancreatic injury in patients with septic shock: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Chaari, Anis; Abdel Hakim, Karim; Bousselmi, Kamel; Etman, Mahmoud; El Bahr, Mohamed; El Saka, Ahmed; Hamza, Eman; Ismail, Mohamed; Khalil, Elsayed Mahmoud; Kauts, Vipin; Casey, William Francis

    2016-07-15

    Sepsis and septic shock are life threatening condition associated with high mortality rate in critically-ill patients. This high mortality is mainly related to the inadequacy between oxygen delivery and cellular demand leading to the onset of multiorgan dysfunction. Whether this multiorgan failure affect the pancreas is not fully investigated. In fact, pancreatic injury may occur because of ischemia, overwhelming inflammatory response, oxidative stress, cellular apoptosis and/or metabolic derangement. Increased serum amylase and/or lipase levels are common in patients with septic shock. However, imaging test rarely reveal significant pancreatic damage. Whether pancreatic dysfunction does affect the prognosis of patients with septic shock or not is still a matter of debate. In fact, only few studies with limited sample size assessed the clinical relevance of the pancreatic injury in this group of patients. In this review, we aimed to describe the epidemiology and the physiopathology of pancreatic injury in septic shock patients, to clarify whether it requires specific management and to assess its prognostic value. Our main finding is that pancreatic injury does not significantly affect the outcome in septic shock patients. Hence, increased serum pancreatic enzymes without clinical features of acute pancreatitis do not require further imaging investigations and specific therapeutic intervention. PMID:27559431

  5. Clinical Effect of Shenfu Injection in Patients with Septic Shock: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Zijun; Lv, Zhengtao; Li, Yi; Wang, Meng; Xu, Qun; Yu, Xuezhong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To conduct a meta-analysis evaluating the efficacy of Shenfu injection for treating patients with septic shock when compared with conventional therapy. Methods. Eight databases including Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, ISI Web of Science, CNKI, Wanfang, VIP, and CBM were searched up to October 2014. Randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of Shenfu injection were identified. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, lactate, and mortality were included as outcome measurements. Results. We analyzed data from 12 randomized controlled trials involving 904 participants. Compared with conventional therapy, Shenfu injection could further increase the mean arterial pressure at 1 hour (SMD 0.38; 95% CI, 0.01–0.74) and 6 hours (SMD 0.82; 95% CI, 0.03–1.61). Shenfu injection could further normalize heart rate at 6 hours (SMD −0.90; 95% CI, −1.47–0.33) and clear serum lactate at 6 hours (SMD −0.51; 95% CI, −0.70–0.32) and 24 hours (SMD, 0.52; 95% CI, −0.77–0.26). As the endpoint of mortality was not unified, it was not meta-analyzed. Conclusions. Based on the findings in present review, Shenfu injection is more effective than conventional therapy in increasing mean arterial pressure, normalizing heart rate, clearing serum lactate, and reducing mortality. These results should be confirmed in higher level clinical trials in the future. PMID:26199638

  6. Clinical outcome and predictors of mortality in children with sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock from Rohtak, Haryana: A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Vinayak, Nikhil; Mittal, Kundan; Kaushik, Jaya Shankar; Aamir, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Information regarding early predictive factors for mortality and morbidity in sepsis is limited from developing countries. Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted to determine the clinical outcome and predictors of mortality in children with sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock. Children aged 1 month to 14 years admitted to a tertiary care pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with a diagnosis of sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock were enrolled in the study. Hemodynamic and laboratory parameters which discriminate survivors from nonsurvivors were evaluated. Results: A total of 50 patients (30 [60%] males) were enrolled in the study, of whom 21 (42%) were discharged (survivors) and rest 29 (58%) expired (nonsurvivor). Median (interquartile range) age of enrolled patients were 18 (6, 60) months. Mortality was not significantly predicted individually by any factor including age (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval [CI

  7. Clinical practice parameters for hemodynamic support of pediatric and neonatal septic shock: 2007 update from the American College of Critical Care Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, Joe; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Choong, Karen; Cornell, Tim; DeCaen, Allan; Deymann, Andreas; Doctor, Allan; Davis, Alan; Duff, John; Dugas, Marc-Andre; Duncan, Alan; Evans, Barry; Feldman, Jonathan; Felmet, Kathryn; Fisher, Gene; Frankel, Lorry; Jeffries, Howard; Greenwald, Bruce; Gutierrez, Juan; Hall, Mark; Han, Yong Y.; Hanson, James; Hazelzet, Jan; Hernan, Lynn; Kiff, Jane; Kissoon, Niranjan; Kon, Alexander; Irazusta, Jose; Lin, John; Lorts, Angie; Mariscalco, Michelle; Mehta, Renuka; Nadel, Simon; Nguyen, Trung; Nicholson, Carol; Peters, Mark; Okhuysen-Cawley, Regina; Poulton, Tom; Relves, Monica; Rodriguez, Agustin; Rozenfeld, Ranna; Schnitzler, Eduardo; Shanley, Tom; Skache, Sara; Skippen, Peter; Torres, Adalberto; von Dessauer, Bettina; Weingarten, Jacki; Yeh, Timothy; Zaritsky, Arno; Stojadinovic, Bonnie; Zimmerman, Jerry; Zuckerberg, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine calls for the use of clinical guidelines and practice parameters to promote “best practices” and to improve patient outcomes. Objective 2007 update of the 2002 American College of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Guidelines for Hemodynamic Support of Neonates and Children with Septic Shock. Participants Society of Critical Care Medicine members with special interest in neonatal and pediatric septic shock were identified from general solicitation at the Society of Critical Care Medicine Educational and Scientific Symposia (2001–2006). Methods The Pubmed/MEDLINE literature database (1966–2006) was searched using the keywords and phrases: sepsis, septicemia, septic shock, endotoxemia, persistent pulmonary hypertension, nitric oxide, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and American College of Critical Care Medicine guidelines. Best practice centers that reported best outcomes were identified and their practices examined as models of care. Using a modified Delphi method, 30 experts graded new literature. Over 30 additional experts then reviewed the updated recommendations. The document was subsequently modified until there was greater than 90% expert consensus. Results The 2002 guidelines were widely disseminated, translated into Spanish and Portuguese, and incorporated into Society of Critical Care Medicine and AHA sanctioned recommendations. Centers that implemented the 2002 guidelines reported best practice outcomes (hospital mortality 1%–3% in previously healthy, and 7%– 10% in chronically ill children). Early use of 2002 guidelines was associated with improved outcome in the community hospital emergency department (number needed to treat = 3.3) and tertiary pediatric intensive care setting (number needed to treat = 3.6); every hour that went by without guideline adherence was associated with a 1.4-fold increased mortality risk. The updated 2007 guidelines continue to recognize an increased likelihood that

  8. Clinical Effects of a Longer Duration of Polymyxin B-Immobilized Fiber Column Direct Hemoperfusion Therapy for Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Chizuru; Hara, Yoshitaka; Kuriyama, Naohide; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Nishida, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    Polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column direct hemoperfusion (PMX-DHP) therapy is widely used for the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock, and is generally performed for 2 h. Although previous studies demonstrated the efficacy of PMX-DHP therapy, it currently remains unclear whether its optimal duration is 2 h. This retrospective study analyzed 37 patients with septic shock who showed a poor clinical response to 2 h of PMX-DHP, and underwent a longer duration of this therapy. The mean duration of PMX-DHP therapy was 15.8 ± 7.9 h, and none of the patients developed adverse events, which enabled the therapy to be performed safely. The pressure catecholamine index [CAIP = catecholamine index/mean arterial pressure; catecholamine index = dopamine + dobutamine + (adrenaline + noradrenaline) × 100 μg/kg per min], as an indicator of hemodynamics, improved significantly in the survival group in the period between the start and 24 h after the end of PMX-DHP therapy (P < 0.01), and between 2 h after the start of and the end of this therapy (P < 0.05). In addition, the P/F ratio improved significantly in the group of surviving patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in the period between the start and 24 h after the end of PMX-DHP therapy (P < 0.01), and between 2 h after the start of and the end of this therapy (P < 0.01). These results suggest that a longer duration of PMX-DHP therapy can be expected to improve the hemodynamics and pulmonary oxygenation capacity of patients with severe sepsis/septic shock. Strict prospective studies are needed in the future.

  9. Novel therapies for septic shock over the past 4 decades.

    PubMed

    Suffredini, Anthony F; Munford, Robert S

    2011-07-13

    Infections that result in shock and organ failure are a major public health problem worldwide. Severe sepsis and septic shock affect patients of all ages and often complicate chronic diseases. They are the major causes of death in critical care units and contribute substantially to hospital inpatient costs. Translating the scientific advances of the last 4 decades into clinical practice has been challenging. Despite many attempts to develop new therapies, the basic elements of treatment have not changed since the 1960s. In this Grand Rounds, we summarize the results of the clinical trials conducted during the last 4 decades, discuss some lessons learned, and suggest possible directions for future investigation.

  10. Novel therapies for septic shock over the past 4 decades.

    PubMed

    Suffredini, Anthony F; Munford, Robert S

    2011-07-13

    Infections that result in shock and organ failure are a major public health problem worldwide. Severe sepsis and septic shock affect patients of all ages and often complicate chronic diseases. They are the major causes of death in critical care units and contribute substantially to hospital inpatient costs. Translating the scientific advances of the last 4 decades into clinical practice has been challenging. Despite many attempts to develop new therapies, the basic elements of treatment have not changed since the 1960s. In this Grand Rounds, we summarize the results of the clinical trials conducted during the last 4 decades, discuss some lessons learned, and suggest possible directions for future investigation. PMID:21750297

  11. The impact of serial lactate monitoring on emergency department resuscitation interventions and clinical outcomes in severe sepsis and septic shock: an observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Matthew; Holthaus, Christopher V; Fuller, Brian M

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring in the setting of critical illness must be linked to beneficial therapy to affect clinical outcome. Elevated serum lactate is associated with an increase in mortality in emergency department (ED) patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. The reduction of lactate levels toward normal during acute resuscitation is associated with improved clinical outcomes. The majority of data demonstrating the interventions used to achieve a reduction in lactate levels and the associated clinical outcomes have been obtained during protocolized randomized trials. We therefore conducted a retrospective observational cohort study of 243 adult patients with severe sepsis and septic shock to assess the interventions associated with nonprotocolized serial lactate monitoring and to assess clinical outcomes. A multivariable model was used to assess outcome differences between the serial lactate (SL) and no serial lactate (NL) cohorts. The SL group received more crystalloid resuscitation (3.6 L vs. 2.5 L; P < 0.01), central venous oxygen saturation monitoring (30% vs. 12%; P < 0.01), and central venous pressure monitoring (23.5% vs. 11.8%; P = 0.02). By day 28, a total of 31 patients in the SL group (23.5%) and 44 in the NL group (39.6%) had died. Multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the lack of serial lactate monitoring was independently associated with mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 2.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12 - 3.89; P = 0.02). The SL group also showed greater improvement in 24-h Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores (1.16 vs. 0.19; P = 0.03), decreased intensive care unit length of stay in days (4.6 vs. 6.0; P = 0.04), and more ventilator-free (19.9 vs. 16; P = 0.05) and vasopressor-free (21.6 vs. 17.9; P = 0.02) days. In the setting of routine clinical care, serial lactate monitoring is associated with an increase in crystalloid administration, resuscitation interventions, and improved clinical outcomes in ED patients with

  12. [Enteral oxygenation in complex treatment of anaerobic septic shock in postpartum woman].

    PubMed

    Belikov, V L; Zavoĭskikh, E V; Mazurok, V A; Pchel'nikov, A A; Saturnov, A V; Slivin, O A; Sulima, D L; Khantalina, G M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the clinical case demonstration is to attract the professionals' attention to the method of enteral oxygen therapy successfully used in the complex intensive therapy of septic shock in young postpartum woman.

  13. Sepsis and septic shock: a review.

    PubMed

    Chong, Josebelo; Dumont, Tiffany; Francis-Frank, Lyndave; Balaan, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are a continuum of disease resulting from a complex host response to infection. They are major health issues in the United States, causing significant financial burden to the health care system in addition to multisystem morbidity and high rates of mortality. In recent decades, landmark trials in sepsis management have demonstrated improved mortality. Although the value of protocol-driven care is currently under question, it is clear that early recognition, prompt resuscitation, and timely use of antibiotics are of utmost importance.

  14. Septic Shock Due to Biliary Stones in a Postcholecystectomy Patient.

    PubMed

    Azfar, Mohammad Feroz; Khan, Muhammad Faisal; Khursheed, Moazzum

    2015-10-01

    Septic shock leading to multi-organ failure is not uncommon. Early diagnosis to confirm the source is the distinctive attribute of sepsis management guidelines. Cholangitis as the source of sepsis can become a diagnostic dilemma in patients who have had cholecystectomy in the past. CT abdomen should be the investigation of choice in this group of patients. This report describes two postcholecystectomy patients who presented with septic shock secondary to biliary stones. The source of septic shock in both patients were biliary stones was confirmed with abdominal CT. Ultrasound abdomen failed to report biliary stones in these patients. Both improved on percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage.

  15. Bench-to-bedside review: Is there a place for epinephrine in septic shock?

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The use of epinephrine in septic shock remains controversial. Nevertheless, epinephrine is widely used around the world and the reported morbidity and mortality rates with it are no different from those observed with other vasopressors. In volunteers, epinephrine increases heart rate, mean arterial pressure and cardiac output. Epinephrine also induces hyperglycemia and hyperlactatemia. In hyperkinetic septic shock, epinephrine consistently increases arterial pressure and cardiac output in a dose dependent manner. Epinephrine transiently increases lactate levels through an increase in aerobic glycolysis. Epinephrine has no effect on splanchnic circulation in dopamine-sensitive septic shock. On the other hand, in dopamine-resistant septic shock, epinephrine has no effect on tonometric parameters but decreases fractional splanchnic blood flow with an increase in the gradient of mixed venous oxygen saturation (SVO2) and hepatic venous oxygen saturation (SHO2). In conclusion, epinephrine has predictable effects on systemic hemodynamics and is as efficient as norepinephrine in correcting hemodynamic disturbances of septic shock. Moreover, epinephrine is cheaper than other commonly used catecholamine regimens in septic shock. The clinical impact of the transient hyperlactatemia and of the splanchnic effects are not established.

  16. Advanced Hemodynamic Management in Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Wolfgang; Nierhaus, Axel; Kluge, Stefan; Reuter, Daniel A.; Wagner, Julia Y.

    2016-01-01

    In patients with sepsis and septic shock, the hemodynamic management in both early and later phases of these “organ dysfunction syndromes” is a key therapeutic component. It needs, however, to be differentiated between “early goal-directed therapy” (EGDT) as proposed for the first 6 hours of emergency department treatment by Rivers et al. in 2001 and “hemodynamic management” using advanced hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit (ICU). Recent large trials demonstrated that nowadays protocolized EGDT does not seem to be superior to “usual care” in terms of a reduction in mortality in emergency department patients with early identified septic shock who promptly receive antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation. “Hemodynamic management” comprises (a) making the diagnosis of septic shock as one differential diagnosis of circulatory shock, (b) assessing the hemodynamic status including the identification of therapeutic conflicts, and (c) guiding therapeutic interventions. We propose two algorithms for hemodynamic management using transpulmonary thermodilution-derived variables aiming to optimize the cardiocirculatory and pulmonary status in adult ICU patients with septic shock. The complexity and heterogeneity of patients with septic shock implies that individualized approaches for hemodynamic management are mandatory. Defining individual hemodynamic target values for patients with septic shock in different phases of the disease must be the focus of future studies. PMID:27703980

  17. [Current concepts on hemodynamic support and therapy in septic shock].

    PubMed

    Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Pereira, Adriano José; de Assunção, Murillo Santucci Cesar; Silva, Eliézer

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock represent a major healthcare challenge. Much of the improvement in mortality associated with septic shock is related to early recognition combined with timely fluid resuscitation and adequate antibiotics administration. The main goals of septic shock resuscitation include intravascular replenishment, maintenance of adequate perfusion pressure and oxygen delivery to tissues. To achieve those goals, fluid responsiveness evaluation and complementary interventions - i.e. vasopressors, inotropes and blood transfusion - may be necessary. This article is a literature review of the available evidence on the initial hemodynamic support of the septic shock patients presenting to the emergency room or to the intensive care unit and the main interventions available to reach those targets, focusing on fluid and vasopressor therapy, blood transfusion and inotrope administration.

  18. Current concepts on hemodynamic support and therapy in septic shock.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Pereira, Adriano José; de Assunção, Murillo Santucci Cesar; Silva, Eliézer

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock represent a major healthcare challenge. Much of the improvement in mortality associated with septic shock is related to early recognition combined with timely fluid resuscitation and adequate antibiotics administration. The main goals of septic shock resuscitation include intravascular replenishment, maintenance of adequate perfusion pressure and oxygen delivery to tissues. To achieve those goals, fluid responsiveness evaluation and complementary interventions - i.e. vasopressors, inotropes and blood transfusion - may be necessary. This article is a literature review of the available evidence on the initial hemodynamic support of the septic shock patients presenting to the emergency room or to the intensive care unit and the main interventions available to reach those targets, focusing on fluid and vasopressor therapy, blood transfusion and inotrope administration.

  19. First description of herpes simplex virus type 1 epididymo-orchitis: A new clinical form of herpes simplex virus infection during septic shock?

    PubMed

    Fromentin, Dr Mélanie; Gauzit, Remy; Gille, Benoit; Samama, Charles Marc

    2016-01-01

    Genital herpes is increasingly caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), but recurrences are less frequent than with HSV-2. Distinguishing between primary genital infection and reactivation can be difficult, but HSV-1 more often causes severe primary infections and fewer recurrences. However, as virus reactivation is common during septic shock, a severe form of HSV-1 reactivation can occur in locations other than the lungs, which remain the most common site. The case of a 79-year-old Caucasian man who presented with HSV-1 epididymo-orchitis after three episodes of severe sepsis or septic shock in the context of acute biliary necrotizing pancreatitis is described. This is the first reported case of HSV-1 epididymo-orchitis due to virus reactivation during sepsis. PMID:27672563

  20. An Elevated Percentage of Reticulated Platelet Is Associated With Increased Mortality in Septic Shock Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qin; Ren, Jianan; Hu, Dong; Jiang, Pengjun; Li, Guanwei; Anjum, Nadeem; Wang, Gefei; Gu, Guosheng; Chen, Jun; Wu, Xiuwen; Liu, Song; Li, Yuan; Zhao, Yunzhao; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Microcirculatory changes and coagulation disturbances are thought to play a key role in sepsis. Some evidence suggests that the percentage of reticulated platelets (RP%) may be a valuable and cost-effective sepsis screening parameter. This was a prospective study in surgical patients to investigate the potential value of RP% as a predictor of mortality in septic shock patients. This was a prospective study conducted in a surgical critical care center of a Chinese tertiary care hospital. Consecutive septic shock patients were enrolled at admission. Age- and sex-matched non-septic patients were recruited as control patients. RP% was determined by flow cytometry in 68 septic shock patients and 68 controls. Compared with survivors, septic patients who died presented with a significantly higher RP% (P < 0.001). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for the RP% association with mortality was 0.867 (95 % CI 0.780–0.953, P < 0.001). Kaplan–Meier survival curves showed that mortality risk was significantly different when patients were stratified based on RP% (P < 0.001). This association was preserved in a multi-logistic regression analysis that included clinical confounders (P < 0.014). This prospective study demonstrates that increased RP% identifies septic shock patients who have a high risk of death. RP% has the potential to act as a marker for patient stratification in future clinical trials. PMID:25984667

  1. Severe sepsis and septic shock in the elderly: An overview.

    PubMed

    Nasa, Prashant; Juneja, Deven; Singh, Omender

    2012-02-01

    The incidence of severe sepsis and septic shock is increasing in the older population leading to increased admissions to the intensive care units (ICUs). The elderly are predisposed to sepsis due to co-existing co-morbidities, repeated and prolonged hospitalizations, reduced immunity, functional limitations and above all due to the effects of aging itself. A lower threshold and a higher index of suspicion is required to diagnose sepsis in this patient population because the initial clinical picture may be ambiguous, and aging increases the risk of a sudden deterioration in sepsis to severe sepsis and septic shock. Management is largely based on standard international guidelines with a few modifications. Age itself is an independent risk factor for death in patients with severe sepsis, however, many patients respond well to timely and appropriate interventions. The treatment should not be limited or deferred in elderly patients with severe sepsis only on the grounds of physician prejudice, but patient and family preferences should also be taken into account as the outcomes are not dismal. Future investigations in the management of sepsis should not only target good functional recovery but also ensure social independence and quality of life after ICU discharge. PMID:24701398

  2. Mortality Prediction Model of Septic Shock Patients Based on Routinely Recorded Data.

    PubMed

    Carrara, Marta; Baselli, Giuseppe; Ferrario, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    We studied the problem of mortality prediction in two datasets, the first composed of 23 septic shock patients and the second composed of 73 septic subjects selected from the public database MIMIC-II. For each patient we derived hemodynamic variables, laboratory results, and clinical information of the first 48 hours after shock onset and we performed univariate and multivariate analyses to predict mortality in the following 7 days. The results show interesting features that individually identify significant differences between survivors and nonsurvivors and features which gain importance only when considered together with the others in a multivariate regression model. This preliminary study on two small septic shock populations represents a novel contribution towards new personalized models for an integration of multiparameter patient information to improve critical care management of shock patients.

  3. Mortality Prediction Model of Septic Shock Patients Based on Routinely Recorded Data

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Marta; Baselli, Giuseppe; Ferrario, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    We studied the problem of mortality prediction in two datasets, the first composed of 23 septic shock patients and the second composed of 73 septic subjects selected from the public database MIMIC-II. For each patient we derived hemodynamic variables, laboratory results, and clinical information of the first 48 hours after shock onset and we performed univariate and multivariate analyses to predict mortality in the following 7 days. The results show interesting features that individually identify significant differences between survivors and nonsurvivors and features which gain importance only when considered together with the others in a multivariate regression model. This preliminary study on two small septic shock populations represents a novel contribution towards new personalized models for an integration of multiparameter patient information to improve critical care management of shock patients. PMID:26557154

  4. Right ventricular dysfunction in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Dhainaut, J F; Lanore, J J; de Gournay, J M; Huyghebaert, M F; Brunet, F; Villemant, D; Monsallier, J F

    1988-01-01

    Using a rapid computerized thermodilution method, we examined the evolution of right ventricular performance in 23 patients with septic shock. Nine survived the episode of septic shock. The other 14 patients died of refractory circulatory shock. Significant right ventricular systolic dysfunction, defined as decreased ejection fraction (-39%) and right ventricular dilation (+38%) was observed in all patients with septic shock. However, in the survivors, increased right ventricular preload may prevent hemodynamic evidence of right ventricular pump failure by utilizing the Frank-Starling mechanism to maintain stroke volume. Conversely, in the nonsurvivors, right ventricular dysfunction was more prononced two days after the onset of septic shock, leading to a fall in stroke. In the last patients, a decrease in contractility appears to be the major factor accounting for decreased right ventricular performance, as evidenced by the marked increase in end-systolic volume (+27%) without significant change in pulmonary artery pressure, during the later stage of septic shock. The observed right ventricular pump failure then appears associated with an alteration in diastolic mechanical properties of this ventricle, as suggested by a leftward displacement of the individual pressure-volume curves. PMID:3403793

  5. The hemodynamics of septic shock: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Feihl, Francois; Waeber, Bernard; Liaudet, Lucas

    2013-03-01

    In the late 19th century, it was already known that severe infections could be associated with cardiovascular collapse, a fact essentially attributed to cardiac failure. A major experimental work in the rabbit, published by Romberg and Pässler in 1899, shifted attention to disturbed peripheral vascular tone as the mechanism of hypotension in these conditions. In the first half of the 20th century, great progresses were made in the pathophysiologic understanding of hemorrhagic and traumatic shocks, while researchers devoted relatively little attention to septic shock. Progress in the hemodynamic understanding of septic shock resumed with the advent of critical care units. The hyperdynamic state was recognized in the late fifties and early sixties. The present short review ends with landmark studies by Max Harry Weil, demonstrating the importance of venous pooling, and John H. Siegel, which introduced the concept of deficient peripheral utilization of oxygen, inspiring later work on the microvascular disturbances of septic shock.

  6. Practice Patterns and Outcomes Associated with Choice of Initial Vasopressor Therapy for Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Fawzy, Ashraf; Evans, Stephen R.; Walkey, Allan J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Clinical guidelines recommend norepinephrine as initial vasopressor of choice for septic shock, with dopamine suggested as an alternative vasopressor in patients at low risk for arrhythmias. We sought to determine practice patterns and outcomes associated with vasopressor selection in a large, population-based cohort of patients with septic shock that allows for assessment of outcomes in clinically important subgroups. Design We performed a retrospective cohort study to determine factors associated with choice of dopamine as compared with norepinephrine as initial vasopressor for patients with septic shock. We used propensity score matching to compare risk of hospital mortality based on initial vasopressor. We performed multiple sensitivity analyses using alternative methods to address confounding and hospital-level clustering. We investigated interaction between vasopressor selection and mortality in clinical subgroups based on arrhythmia and cardiovascular risk. Setting Enhanced administrative data (Premier, Inc) from 502 US hospitals during years 2010–2013. Subjects 61,122 patients admitted with septic shock who received dopamine or norepinephrine as initial vasopressor during the first two days of hospitalization. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results Norepinephrine (77.6%) was the most frequently used initial vasopressor during septic shock. Dopamine was preferentially selected by cardiologists, in the Southern US, at non-teaching hospitals, for older patients with more cardiovascular comorbidities, and was used less frequently over time. Patients receiving dopamine experienced greater hospital mortality (propensity matched cohort: N=38,788, 25% vs 23.7%; OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02–1.14). Sensitivity analyses showed similar results. Subgroup analyses showed no evidence for effect modification based on arrhythmia risk or underlying cardiovascular disease. Conclusions In a large population-based sample of patients with septic shock in the US

  7. Clinical management of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sharff, Katie A; Richards, Eric P; Townes, John M

    2013-06-01

    Septic arthritis is a rheumatologic emergency as joint destruction occurs rapidly and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Accurate diagnosis can be particularly challenging in patients with underlying inflammatory joint disease. This review outlines the risk factors for septic arthritis and summarizes the causative bacterial organisms. We highlight advances in antibiotic management with a focus on new drugs for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and discuss the use of adjunctive therapies for treatment of septic arthritis in adults.

  8. Immunoregulatory biological response modifiers: effect of cytokines on septic shock

    PubMed Central

    De Simone, Claudio

    1993-01-01

    Whole bacteria or bacterial components or their extracts were employed to restore or augment the immune system. Beneficial effects were attained with these agents in treating various diseases. These agents were named biological response modifiers (BRMs) because they regulated certain cellular components of the immune system. The cellular regulation induced by these BRMs was found to be due to cytokines. The cytokines were shown to act directly on the various cellular components and to provide therapeutic benefit in various autoimmune and immune deficiency diseases. Overproduction of specific cytokines however leads to a deleterious effect on the host. Overproduction of tumour necrosis factor (endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide) leads to septic shock. Bacteraemia is the leading cause of overproduction of tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Septic shock in many cases leads to death. Several monoclonal antibodies to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and anticytokines have demonstrated protection against septic shock. PMID:18475571

  9. Protocolized Care for Early Septic Shock (ProCESS) statistical analysis plan

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Francis; Yealy, Donald M; Kellum, John A; Huang, David T; Barnato, Amber E; Eaton, Tammy L; Angus, Derek C; Weissfeld, Lisa A

    2014-01-01

    Background The Protocolized Care for Early Septic Shock study is a randomised, multicentre, prospective, three-arm, parallel-group trial of alternative resuscitation strategies for early septic shock. Objective To state our analysis plan for trial data. Methods Our plan is to guide data collection and analysis using pre-existing definitions and testing, with local consensus-based efforts where needed. We examine protocolised care (two experimental approaches) and compare this to usual “wild type” care. Results Our plan is to address three aims (clinical efficacy, biology of illness and recovery, and costs and cost-effectiveness) and four hypotheses, and we specify rules for handling data and determining outcomes. Conclusion By using measures to maintain study conduct and analysis rigour, we hope to improve understanding of early septic shock resuscitation and care of patients. PMID:24289512

  10. Panayiotopoulos syndrome in a child masquerading as septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Verma, Devendra Kumar; Tayde, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS) is a benign childhood epilepsy with predominant autonomic symptoms. The syndrome can have varied presentations resulting in diagnostic dilemma. We herein describe a 3-year-old boy with PS, who had manifestations similar to septic shock. His investigations were normal and had a complete recovery. Through this case, we wish to highlight the unusual presentation of PS as septic shock. Physicians should be aware of the different ways in which this syndrome can present to ensure its early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27390462

  11. Fluid therapy for septic shock resuscitation: which fluid should be used?

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Silva, Eliézer; de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Early resuscitation of septic shock patients reduces the sepsis-related morbidity and mortality. The main goals of septic shock resuscitation include volemic expansion, maintenance of adequate tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery, guided by central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, mixed or central venous oxygen saturation and arterial lactate levels. An aggressive fluid resuscitation, possibly in association with vasopressors, inotropes and red blood cell concentrate transfusion may be necessary to achieve those hemodynamic goals. Nonetheless, even though fluid administration is one of the most common interventions offered to critically ill patients, the most appropriate type of fluid to be used remains controversial. According to recently published clinical trials, crystalloid solutions seem to be the most appropriate type of fluids for initial resuscitation of septic shock patients. Balanced crystalloids have theoretical advantages over the classic solutions, but there is not enough evidence to indicate it as first-line treatment. Additionally, when large amounts of fluids are necessary to restore the hemodynamic stability, albumin solutions may be a safe and effective alternative. Hydroxyethyl starches solutions must be avoided in septic patients due to the increased risk of acute renal failure, increased need for renal replacement therapy and increased mortality. Our objective was to present a narrative review of the literature regarding the major types of fluids and their main drawbacks in the initial resuscitation of the septic shock patients. PMID:26313437

  12. [SEPTIC SHOCK IN PATIENT WITH SEVERE HEAD TRAUMA].

    PubMed

    Sichev, A A; Tabasaransky, T Φ; Savin, I A; Gorachev, A S; Tenedieva, V D; Abramov, T A; Oshorov, A V; Polupan, A A; Mazkovsky, I V; Gavrilov, A G; Potapov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The clinical observation illustrates the role of screening of inflammatory markers and advanced hemodynamic monitoring in optimization of the treatment of the patient with severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). The level of consciousness by the Glasgow Coma Scale at admission was 5 points. From the first day of stay the patient suffered hyperthermia to 39,0° C° The diagnosis of the aspiration pneumonia was determined by radiological signs, bronchoscopy and inflammatory blood markers, C-reactive protein, leukocytosis. From the second day the constant infusion of norepinephrine was necessary to maintain mean ABP above 80 mmHg. On the 10th day the patient's condition deteriorated sharply. Developed hyperthermia to 40, 2° and cardiovascular collapse (in spite of the high level of norepinephrine support a sharp decline in ABP up to 49/20 mmHg). Invasive advanced hemodynamic PiCCO monitoring (transpulmonary thermodilution) was started Septic shock was suspected. Standard laboratory tests did not meet the criteria for septic shock. Witnessed a slight increase in CRP and procalcitonin (PCT) was within normal limits. Diagnostic search was supplemented by a study of interleukins (IL-6 and IL-2R) in the blood plasma. The significant increase in their values, was regarded as the initial manifestations of the systemic inflammatory response. Sepsis was confirmed. The extended antibiotic therapy started Continuous Veno-Venous hemofiltration was used as part of treatment of the inflammatory-toxic condition. In two days of the therapy the patient's condition has stabilized, the patient recovered consciousness in the form of opening the eyes, simple instructions. At discharge, the patient's condition according to the Glasgow outcome scale was estimated at 4 points.

  13. Recurrent septic shock in a 34-year-old woman.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shenil; Mertz, Thomas; Craig, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Room (ER) with an acute presentation of septic shock that required fluid and pressor support in the Intensive Care Unit. History revealed this was her third episode of such a presentation with asymptomatic periods in between. She responded well to medical interventions but reported persistent joint pain. Immunologic workup revealed her diagnosis.

  14. Cholangitis with septic shock caused by Raoultella planticola.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Kazuhisa; Gomi, Harumi; Miura, Yoshimasa; Sugano, Kentaro; Morisawa, Yuji

    2012-03-01

    Raoultella planticola (formerly Klebsiella planticola) is a Gram-negative bacterium that has been rarely reported in association with human infection. Here we describe a case of cholangitis complicated with septic shock caused by R. planticola in an immunocompromised patient with advanced cancer who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography to extract common bile duct stones. The infection was cleared by piperacillin-tazobactam treatment.

  15. [Role of vasopressin in septic shock : critical evaluation].

    PubMed

    Gradwohl-Matis, I; Brunauer, A; Dankl, D; Dünser, M

    2014-06-01

    Restoration of adequate tissue perfusion is the goal of resuscitation in septic shock. A growing understanding of microcirculatory dysfunction in sepsis led to a change in resuscitation practice away from targeting arterial and central venous pressures and towards tissue perfusion-guided protocols. This change in the approach to resuscitation was accompanied by a change in the role of vasoconstrictors. This review summarizes the pathophysiological and therapeutic mainstays of septic shock resuscitation and attempts to critically evaluate the scientific evidence on the use of vasopressin as a non-adrenergic vasoconstrictor in septic shock. Based on the published study results vasopressin appears to be of potential benefit in adult patients with moderate septic shock (norepinephrine requirements < 15 μg/min) and lacking signs of systemic hypoperfusion (e.g. normal arterial lactate levels). A vasopressin infusion with the sole target to increase arterial blood pressure despite the presence of systemic hypoperfusion is dangerous and can result in a critical deterioration of tissue perfusion.

  16. Management of sepsis and septic shock in infants and children.

    PubMed

    von Rosenstiel, N; von Rosenstiel, I; Adam, D

    2001-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock constitute an important cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Thus, the systemic response to infection and its management remains a major challenge in clinical medicine. Apart from antibiotic administration, the majority of available therapies are limited to supportive strategies, although considerable efforts are being undertaken to devise innovative approaches that modulate host inflammatory responses. In suspected sepsis, 2 or 3 days' empiric antibiotic therapy should begin immediately after cultures have been obtained without awaiting results. Antibiotics should be re-evaluated when the results of the cultures and susceptibility tests are available. The initial antibiotic (combination) is determined by the likely causative agent, susceptibility patterns within a specific institution, CNS penetration, toxicity, and the patient's hepatic and renal function. The likely offending micro-organism in turn depends primarily on the patient's age, coexistence of any premorbid condition leading to impaired immune response, and the presenting signs and symptoms. Close attention to cardiovascular, respiratory, fluid and electrolyte, haematological, renal and metabolic/nutritional support is essential to optimise outcome. Fluid resuscitation is of utmost importance to overcome hypovolaemia on the basis of a diffuse capillary leak. Monitoring and normalisation of the heart rate is essential. In case of nonresponse to fluid resuscitation, inotropic and vasoactive agents are commonly used to increase cardiac output, maintain adequate blood pressure and enhance oxygen delivery to the tissue. Because respiratory distress syndrome is seen in about 40% of critically ill children with septic shock, increased inspired oxygen is essential. To provide optimal relief from respiratory muscle fatigue and facilitate the provision of positive airway pressure, early intubation and mechanical ventilation should be considered. Renal support is

  17. Early alterations of B cells in patients with septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction It has recently been proposed that B lymphocytes are involved in sepsis pathogenesis. The goal of this study is to investigate potential abnormalities in a subset distribution and activation of circulating B lymphocytes in patients with septic shock. Methods This observational prospective study was conducted in a medical-surgical ICU. All patients with septic shock were eligible for inclusion. B-cell phenotypes (CD19+CD69+, CD19+CD23+, CD19+CD5+, CD19+CD80, CD19+CD86+, CD19+CD40 and CD19+CD95+) were assessed by quantitative flow cytometry upon admission to the ICU and 3, 7, 14 and 28 d later. Results Fifty-two patients were included. Thirty-six healthy volunteers matched for age and sex were used as controls. The patients had lymphopenia that was maintained during 28 d of follow-up. In patients with septic shock who died, the percentage of CD19+CD23+ was lower during the 7 d of follow-up than it was in survival patients. Moreover, the percentage of CD80+ and CD95+ expression on B cells was higher in patients who died than in survivors. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that a CD19+CD23+ value of 64.6% at ICU admission enabled discrimination between survivors and nonsurvivors with a sensitivity of 90.9% and a specificity of 80.0% (P = 0.0001). Conclusions Patients with septic shock who survive and those who don't have different patterns of abnormalities in circulating B lymphocytes. At ICU admission, a low percentage of CD23+ and a high of CD80+ and CD95+ on B cells were associated with increased mortality of patients with septic shock. Moreover, a drop in circulating B cells persisted during 28 d of ICU follow-up. PMID:23721745

  18. Increased survival of cirrhotic patients with septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The overall outcome of septic shock has been recently improved. We sought to determine whether this survival gain extends to the high-risk subgroup of patients with cirrhosis. Methods Cirrhotic patients with septic shock admitted to a medical intensive care unit (ICU) during two consecutive periods (1997-2004 and 2005-2010) were retrospectively studied. Results Forty-seven and 42 cirrhotic patients presented with septic shock in 1997-2004 and 2005-2010, respectively. The recent period differed from the previous one by implementation of adjuvant treatments of septic shock including albumin infusion as fluid volume therapy, low-dose glucocorticoids, and intensive insulin therapy. ICU and hospital survival markedly improved over time (40% in 2005-2010 vs. 17% in 1997-2004, P = 0.02 and 29% in 2005-2010 vs. 6% in 1997-2004, P = 0.009, respectively). Furthermore, this survival gain in the latter period was sustained for 6 months (survival rate 24% in 2005-2010 vs. 6% in 1997-2004, P = 0.06). After adjustment with age, the liver disease stage (Child-Pugh score), and the critical illness severity score (SOFA score), ICU admission between 2005 and 2010 remained an independent favorable prognostic factor (odds ratio (OR) 0.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02-0.4, P = 0.004). The stage of the underlying liver disease was also independently associated with hospital mortality (Child-Pugh score: OR 1.42 per point, 95% CI 1.06-1.9, P = 0.018). Conclusions In the light of advances in management of both cirrhosis and septic shock, survival of such patients substantially increased over recent years. The stage of the underlying liver disease and the related therapeutic options should be included in the decision-making process for ICU admission. PMID:23601847

  19. Clinical management of septic arthritis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, André; Francoz, David

    2014-03-01

    Synovial fluid, ultrasound, and radiographic imaging are common diagnostic tools for septic arthritis. Mycoplasma septic arthritis is suspected in calves with clinical signs of otitis and pneumonia. Commonly affected joints are carpus, stifle, and tarsus. Treatment strategy must include long-term antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, and joint lavage. Knowledge of communication and boundaries for commonly affected joints is essential to perform joint lavage and arthrotomy.

  20. The epidemiology of septic shock in French intensive care units: the prospective multicenter cohort EPISS study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction To provide up-to-date information on the prognostic factors associated with 28-day mortality in a cohort of septic shock patients in intensive care units (ICUs). Methods Prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study in ICUs from 14 French general (non-academic) and university teaching hospitals. All consecutive patients with septic shock admitted between November 2009 and March 2011 were eligible for inclusion. We prospectively recorded data regarding patient characteristics, infection, severity of illness, life support therapy, and discharge. Results Among 10,941 patients admitted to participating ICUs between October 2009 and September 2011, 1,495 (13.7%) patients presented inclusion criteria for septic shock and were included. Invasive mechanical ventilation was needed in 83.9% (n = 1248), inotropes in 27.7% (n = 412), continuous renal replacement therapy in 32.5% (n = 484), and hemodialysis in 19.6% (n = 291). Mortality at 28 days was 42% (n = 625). Variables associated with time to mortality, right-censored at day 28: age (for each additional 10 years) (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.29; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20-1.38), immunosuppression (HR = 1.63; 95%CI: 1.37-1.96), Knaus class C/D score versus class A/B score (HR = 1.36; 95%CI:1.14-1.62) and Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (HR = 1.24 for each additional point; 95%CI: 1.21-1.27). Patients with septic shock and renal/urinary tract infection had a significantly longer time to mortality (HR = 0.56; 95%CI: 0.42-0.75). Conclusion Our observational data of consecutive patients from real-life practice confirm that septic shock is common and carries high mortality in general ICU populations. Our results are in contrast with the clinical trial setting, and could be useful for healthcare planning and clinical study design. PMID:23561510

  1. Prospective Testing and Redesign of a Temporal Biomarker Based Risk Model for Patients With Septic Shock: Implications for Septic Shock Biology

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hector R.; Cvijanovich, Natalie Z.; Anas, Nick; Allen, Geoffrey L.; Thomas, Neal J.; Bigham, Michael T.; Weiss, Scott L.; Fitzgerald, Julie; Checchia, Paul A.; Meyer, Keith; Quasney, Michael; Hall, Mark; Gedeit, Rainer; Freishtat, Robert J.; Nowak, Jeffrey; Raj, Shekhar S.; Gertz, Shira; Howard, Kelli; Harmon, Kelli; Lahni, Patrick; Frank, Erin; Hart, Kimberly W.; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal version of the pediatric sepsis biomarker risk model (tPERSEVERE) estimates the risk of a complicated course in children with septic shock based on biomarker changes from days 1 to 3 of septic shock. We validated tPERSEVERE performance in a prospective cohort, with an a priori plan to redesign tPERSEVERE if it did not perform well. Biomarkers were measured in the validation cohort (n = 168) and study subjects were classified according to tPERSEVERE. To redesign tPERSEVERE, the validation cohort and the original derivation cohort (n = 299) were combined and randomly allocated to training (n = 374) and test (n = 93) sets. tPERSEVERE was redesigned using the training set and CART methodology. tPERSEVERE performed poorly in the validation cohort, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.58–0.75). Failure analysis revealed potential confounders related to clinical characteristics. The redesigned tPERSEVERE model had an AUC of 0.83 (0.79–0.87) and a sensitivity of 93% (68–97) for estimating the risk of a complicated course. Similar performance was seen in the test set. The classification tree segregated patients into two broad endotypes of septic shock characterized by either excessive inflammation or immune suppression. PMID:26844289

  2. [Our experience in Fournier's gangrene with severe septic shock].

    PubMed

    Lukász, Péter; Ecsedy, Gábor; Lovay, Zoltán; Nagy, István; Kári, Dániel; Vörös, Attila; Ender, Ferenc

    2014-06-01

    Fournier's gangrene is a rare, rapidly progressing necrotizing fasciitis, which involves the genital area and perineum, progresses towards the thighs and abdominal wall through fascial plains. In our surgical department we treated seven patients with Fournier's gangrene between 2007 and 2011. Early diagnosis, immediate radical surgical debridement, necrosectomy, appropriate antibiotics and intensive care are all required and necessary for the successful treatment. Despite appropriate therapy, two patients were lost in septic shock.

  3. Septic arthritis and subsequent fatal septic shock caused by Vibrio vulnificus infection.

    PubMed

    Emamifar, Amir; Asmussen Andreasen, Rikke; Skaarup Andersen, Nanna; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2015-11-24

    Vibrio vulnificus is a rare but potential fatal bacterium that can cause severe infections. Wound infections, primary sepsis and gastroenteritis are the most common clinical features. Septic arthritis caused by V. vulnificus is an atypical presentation that has been reported in only two case reports; however, it has not been previously noted in Denmark. The authors report a case of septic arthritis caused by V. vulnificus in an immunocompromised patient. The disease progressed to severe sepsis and subsequent death within 10 h of admission.

  4. Continuous cardiac output measurement by un-calibrated pulse wave analysis and pulmonary artery catheter in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Ganter, Michael T; Alhashemi, Jamal A; Al-Shabasy, Adel M; Schmid, Ursina M; Schott, Peter; Shalabi, Sanaa A; Badri, Ahmed M; Hartnack, Sonja; Hofer, Christoph K

    2016-02-01

    Septic shock is a serious medical condition. With increased concerns about invasive techniques, a number of non-invasive and semi-invasive devices measuring cardiac output (CO) have become commercially available. The aim of the present study was to determine the accuracy, precision and trending abilities of the FloTrac and the continuous pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution technique determining CO in septic shock patients. Consecutive septic shock patients were included in two centres and CO was measured every 4 h up to 48 h by FloTrac (APCO) and by pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) using the continuous (CCO) and intermittent (ICO) technique. Forty-seven septic shock patients with 326 matched sets of APCO, CCO and ICO data were available for analysis. Bland and Altman analysis revealed a mean bias ±2 SD of 0.0 ± 2.14 L min(-1) for APCO-ICO (%error = 34.5 %) and 0.23 ± 2.55 L min(-1) for CCO-ICO (%error = 40.4 %). Trend analysis showed a concordance of 85 and 81 % for APCO and CCO, respectively. In contrast to CCO, APCO was influenced by systemic vascular resistance and by mean arterial pressure. In septic shock patients, APCO measurements assessed by FloTrac but also the established CCO measurements using the PAC did not meet the currently accepted statistical criteria indicating acceptable clinical performance.

  5. Beta-lactam dosing in critically ill patients with septic shock and continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although early and appropriate antibiotic therapy remains the most important intervention for successful treatment of septic shock, data guiding optimization of beta-lactam prescription in critically ill patients prescribed with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) are still limited. Being small hydrophilic molecules, beta-lactams are likely to be cleared by CRRT to a significant extent. As a result, additional variability may be introduced to the per se variable antibiotic concentrations in critically ill patients. This article aims to describe the current clinical scenario for beta-lactam dosing in critically ill patients with septic shock and CRRT, to highlight the sources of variability among the different studies that reduce extrapolation to clinical practice, and to identify the opportunities for future research and improvement in this field. Three frequently prescribed beta-lactams (meropenem, piperacillin and ceftriaxone) were chosen for review. Our findings showed that present dosing recommendations are based on studies with drawbacks limiting their applicability in the clinical setting. In general, current antibiotic dosing regimens for CRRT follow a one-size-fits-all fashion despite emerging clinical data suggesting that drug clearance is partially dependent on CRRT modality and intensity. Moreover, some studies pool data from heterogeneous populations with CRRT that may exhibit different pharmacokinetics (for example, admission diagnoses different to septic shock, such as trauma), which also limit their extrapolation to critically ill patients with septic shock. Finally, there is still no consensus regarding the %T>MIC (percentage of dosing interval when concentration of the antibiotic is above the minimum inhibitory concentration of the pathogen) value that should be chosen as the pharmacodynamic target for antibiotic therapy in patients with septic shock and CRRT. For empirically optimized dosing, during the first day a loading dose is required

  6. Vasopressors for the Treatment of Septic Shock: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Avni, Tomer; Lador, Adi; Lev, Shaul; Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Grossman, Alon

    2015-01-01

    Objective International guidelines recommend dopamine or norepinephrine as first-line vasopressor agents in septic shock. Phenylephrine, epinephrine, vasopressin and terlipressin are considered second-line agents. Our objective was to assess the evidence for the efficiency and safety of all vasopressors in septic shock. Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched electronic database of MEDLINE, CENTRAL, LILACS and conference proceedings up to June 2014. We included randomized controlled trials comparing different vasopressors for the treatment of adult patients with septic shock. Primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Other clinical and hemodynamic measurements were extracted as secondary outcomes. Risk ratios (RR) and mean differences with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were pooled. Results Thirty-two trials (3,544 patients) were included. Compared to dopamine (866 patients, 450 events), norepinephrine (832 patients, 376 events) was associated with decreased all-cause mortality, RR 0.89 (95% CI 0.81-0.98), corresponding to an absolute risk reduction of 11% and number needed to treat of 9. Norepinephrine was associated with lower risk for major adverse events and cardiac arrhythmias compared to dopamine. No other mortality benefit was demonstrated for the comparisons of norepinephrine to epinephrine, phenylephrine and vasopressin / terlipressin. Hemodynamic data were similar between the different vasopressors, with some advantage for norepinephrine in central venous pressure, urinary output and blood lactate levels. Conclusions Evidence suggests a survival benefit, better hemodynamic profile and reduced adverse events rate for norepinephrine over dopamine. Norepinephrine should be regarded as the first line vasopressor in the treatment of septic shock. PMID:26237037

  7. The value of immune modulating parameters in predicting the progression from peritonitis to septic shock.

    PubMed

    Katja, B; Hartmut, K; Pawel, M; Stefan, B; Kox, W J; Spies, C D

    2001-02-01

    Intra-abdominal infection is one of the major causes of septic shock and multiple organ failure. To date, what causes the disease's progression remains unclear and therefore the relevance of immune modulating therapies remains speculative. The primary outcome measure of this study was to investigate immune modulating mediators at the onset of peritonitis before the development of subsequent septic shock. The secondary outcome measure was to investigate the usefulness of these immune parameters in predicting progression from peritonitis to septic shock. Fifty-eight peritonitis patients were included in this study: 14 patients subsequently developed septic shock. All patients were examined on "diagnosis of peritonitis" (<4 h within establishment of diagnosis), during "early septic shock" (<12 h following the onset of septic shock), and once again during "late septic shock" (within 72-98 h following the onset of septic shock). The immune modulating parameters tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), the soluble TNF-alpha receptors I and II (sTNF-alpha RI and sTNF-alpha RII), interleukines (IL) -1beta, -6, -8, and -10, and the adhesions molecules endothelial-leukocyte-adhesion-molecule (E-Selectin), intercellular-adhesion-molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular-adhesion-molecule-1 (VCAM-1), in addition to nitrate and nitrite, were determined. In the peritonitis group with subsequent septic shock, TNF-alpha, sTNF-alpha RI + RII IL-1beta, IL-8, IL-10, and nitrate were significantly increased before the onset of septic shock. TNF-alpha had an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) of 0.84 and was reliable in predicting the progression from peritonitis to septic shock. The AUC of the other immune modulating parameters, despite being significantly elevated, ranged from 0.71 to 0.76. The AUC of the conventional laboratory markers such as leukocytes and C-reactive protein ranged from 0.64 to 0.68. In peritonitis that progressed to septic shock, an early

  8. How to choose the therapeutic goals to improve tissue perfusion in septic shock

    PubMed Central

    de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Bravim, Bruno de Arruda; Silva, Eliézer

    2015-01-01

    The early recognition and treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock is the key to a successful outcome. The longer the delay in starting treatment, the worse the prognosis due to persistent tissue hypoperfusion and consequent development and worsening of organ dysfunction. One of the main mechanisms responsible for the development of cellular dysfunction is tissue hypoxia. The adjustments necessary for adequate tissue blood flow and therefore of oxygen supply to metabolic demand according to the assessment of the cardiac index and oxygen extraction rate should be performed during resuscitation period, especially in high complexity patients. New technologies, easily handled at the bedside, and new studies that directly assess the impact of macro-hemodynamic parameter optimization on microcirculation and in the clinical outcome of septic patients, are needed. PMID:26313438

  9. Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with purulent meningitis and septic shock: A case from mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yun; Wong, Chi-Chun; Lai, San-Chuan; Lin, Zheng-Hua; Zheng, Wei-Liang; Zhao, Hui; Pan, Kong-Han; Chen, Shu-Jie; Si, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of invasive liver abscess syndrome due to Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) with metastatic meningitis and septic shock. A previously healthy, 55-year-old female patient developed fever, liver abscess, septic shock, purulent meningitis and metastatic hydrocephalus. Upon admission, the clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging examinations were compatible with a diagnosis of K. pneumoniae primary liver abscess. Her distal metastasis infection involved meningitis and hydrocephalus, which could flare abruptly and be life threatening. Even with early adequate drainage and antibiotic therapy, the patient’s condition deteriorated and she ultimately died. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of K. pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with septic meningitis reported in mainland China. Our findings reflect the need for a better understanding of the epidemiology, risk factors, complications, comorbid medical conditions and treatment of this disease. PMID:26973425

  10. Beyond the guidelines of paediatric septic shock: A focused review.

    PubMed

    Temsah, Mohamad-Hani

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock continue to cause major morbidity and mortality among children, especially in the resource-limited areas. Guidelines that focus on these entities, such as "Surviving Sepsis" and "Paediatric Advanced Life Support" guidelines, are revised and updated on regular basis to incorporate new evidence based medicine. There is ongoing need to review these updated guidelines, and address potentially best available solutions for adapting them into suitable practical steps for paediatricians worldwide, especially those working in resource-limited areas. The available recommendations may help to improve sepsis management in middle- and low-income countries; however, guidelines must be wisely implemented according to the available resources, with follow up auditing to ensure appropriate implementation.

  11. Endotoxin Elimination in Patients with Septic Shock: An Observation Study.

    PubMed

    Adamik, Barbara; Zielinski, Stanislaw; Smiechowicz, Jakub; Kübler, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of endotoxin elimination with an adsorption column in patients with septic shock and endotoxemia. The elimination therapy was guided by a new bedside method of measuring endotoxin activity (EA). Intensive care unit (ICU) patients with septic shock and suspected Gram-negative infection were consecutively added to the study group within the first 24 h. Endotoxin elimination was performed using hemoperfusion with the Alteco LPS Adsorber. The primary endpoint was improvement in organ function within the first 24 h of treatment. A secondary objective was to assess the usefulness of a new method of measuring EA to help guide endotoxin elimination therapy. Out of 64 patients 18 had a high baseline EA [0.70 EA units (0.66-0.77)]. Those patients had endotoxin elimination treatment in addition to conventional medical therapy. At 24 h after endotoxin elimination, the EA had decreased to 0.56 EA units (0.43-0.77), (p = 0.005); MAP increased from 69 (62-80) to 80 mm Hg (68-88), (p = 0.002), and noradrenaline use decreased from 0.28 (0.15-0.80) to 0.1 μg/kg/min (0.00-0.70) at the same time (p = 0.04). The SOFA score had decreased from 11 (9-15) to 9 (7-14) points 24 h after endotoxin elimination (p = 0.01) with a median delta SOFA -2 points. Endotoxin elimination did not have a significant effect on the ICU length of stay or ICU mortality. Effective endotoxin elimination resulted in a significant improvement in hemodynamic parameters and of organ function. The application of the EA assay was useful for the bedside monitoring of endotoxemia in critically ill ICU patients.

  12. [Septic shock following platelet transfusion contaminated with Citrobacter koseri in a child with postchemotherapy febrile neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Tichit, R; Saumet, L; Marchandin, H; Haouy, S; Latry, P; Sirvent, N

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial transfusion risk is currently the greatest infectious risk of blood transfusion. We report the case of a child with postchemotherapy febrile neutropenia who presented septic shock following platelet transfusion contaminated with Citrobacter koseri. The life-threatening development could have been avoided by strict compliance with good clinical practice. The stability of mortality rates due to adverse effects of bacterial proliferation during platelet transfusions in France since 1994 calls for optimization of all preventive measures throughout the transfusion chain and perfect knowledge of transfusion rules by medical staff and care givers.

  13. The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3)

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Mervyn; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Seymour, Christopher Warren; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Annane, Djillali; Bauer, Michael; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Bernard, Gordon R.; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Levy, Mitchell M.; Marshall, John C.; Martin, Greg S.; Opal, Steven M.; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; van der Poll, Tom; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Angus, Derek C.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Definitions of sepsis and septic shock were last revised in 2001. Considerable advances have since been made into the pathobiology (changes in organ function, morphology, cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, and circulation), management, and epidemiology of sepsis, suggesting the need for reexamination. OBJECTIVE To evaluate and, as needed, update definitions for sepsis and septic shock. PROCESS A task force (n = 19) with expertise in sepsis pathobiology, clinical trials, and epidemiology was convened by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine. Definitions and clinical criteria were generated through meetings, Delphi processes, analysis of electronic health record databases, and voting, followed by circulation to international professional societies, requesting peer review and endorsement (by 31 societies listed in the Acknowledgment). KEY FINDINGS FROMEVIDENCE SYNTHESIS Limitations of previous definitions included an excessive focus on inflammation, the misleading model that sepsis follows a continuum through severe sepsis to shock, and inadequate specificity and sensitivity of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria. Multiple definitions and terminologies are currently in use for sepsis, septic shock, and organ dysfunction, leading to discrepancies in reported incidence and observed mortality. The task force concluded the term severe sepsis was redundant. RECOMMENDATIONS Sepsis should be defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. For clinical operationalization, organ dysfunction can be represented by an increase in the Sequential [Sepsis-related] Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score of 2 points or more, which is associated with an in-hospital mortality greater than 10%. Septic shock should be defined as a subset of sepsis in which particularly profound circulatory, cellular, and metabolic abnormalities are associated with a

  14. Glibenclamide dose response in patients with septic shock: effects on norepinephrine requirements, cardiopulmonary performance, and global oxygen transport.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Andrea; Lange, Matthias; Ertmer, Christian; Broeking, Katrin; Van Aken, Hugo; Orecchioni, Alessandra; Rocco, Monica; Bachetoni, Alessandra; Traber, Daniel L; Landoni, Giovanni; Pietropaoli, Paolo; Westphal, Martin

    2007-11-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels are important regulators of arterial vascular smooth muscle tone and are implicated in the pathophysiology of catecholamine tachyphylaxis in septic shock. The present study was designed as a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, clinical pilot study to determine whether different doses of glibenclamide have any effects on norepinephrine requirements, cardiopulmonary hemodynamics, and global oxygen transport in patients with septic shock. We enrolled 30 patients with septic shock requiring invasive hemodynamic monitoring and norepinephrine infusion of 0.5 microg.kg-1.min-1 or greater to maintain MAP between 65 and 75 mmHg. In addition to standard therapy, patients were randomized to receive either 10, 20, or 30 mg of enteral glibenclamide. Systemic hemodynamics, global oxygen transport including arterial lactate concentrations, gas exchange, plasma glucose concentrations, and electrolytes were determined at baseline and after 3, 6, and 12 h after administration of the study drug. Glibenclamide decreased plasma glucose concentrations in a dose-dependent manner but failed to reduce norepinephrine requirements. None of the doses had any effects on cardiopulmonary hemodynamics, global oxygen transport, gas exchange, or electrolytes. These data suggest that oral glibenclamide in doses from 10 to 30 mg fails to counteract arterial hypotension and thus to reduce norepinephrine requirements in catecholamine-dependent human septic shock.

  15. Effectiveness of anisodamine for the treatment of critically ill patients with septic shock (ACIdoSIS study): study protocol for randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiancang; Shang, You; Wang, Xin’an; Yin, Rui; Zhu, Zhenhua; Chen, Wensen; Tian, Xin; Yu, Yuetian; Zuo, Xiangrong; Chen, Kun; Ji, Xuqing; Ni, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    Background Septic shock is an important contributor of mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU). Although strenuous effort has been made to improve its outcome, the mortality rate is only marginally decreased. The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of anisodamine in the treatment of septic shock, in the hope that the drug will provide alternatives to the treatment of septic shock. Methods The study is a multi-center randomized controlled clinical trial. Study population will include critically ill patients with septic shock requiring vasopressor use. Blocked randomization was performed where anisodamine and control treatments were allocated at random in a ratio of 1:1 in blocks of sizes 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 to 354 subjects. Interim analysis will be performed. The primary study end point is the hospital mortality, and other secondary study endpoints include ICU mortality, length of stay in ICU and hospital, organ failure free days. Adverse events including new onset psychosis, urinary retention, significant hypotension and tachycardia will be reported. Discussion The study will provide new insight into the treatment of septic shock and can help to reduce mortality rate of septic shock. Trial registration NCT02442440 (https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/). PMID:26605292

  16. Septic shock: recognizing and managing this life-threatening condition in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Adam M

    2015-04-01

    Septic shock is a relatively rare but life-threatening condition in pediatric patients that can often be difficult to recognize in the emergency department. Once recognized, the emphasis of therapy is to reverse deficits in cellular respiration by increasing oxygen and other substrate delivery to tissue beds. Providing oxygen, improving tissue perfusion through augmentation of cardiac output, and administering antibiotics in a timely manner have all been shown to significantly improve outcomes in children with septic shock. Goal-directed therapy is relatively straightforward, emphasizes the need for effective surveillance and timely recognition of this disease process, and has the potential to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. This review discusses how to identify specific populations at the greatest risk for septic shock, lays out the essential components of goal-directed therapy, examines potential pitfalls in management, and distinguishes additional ways that emergency clinicians can avoid the devastating consequences of septic shock in pediatric patients. PMID:25898437

  17. Septic shock: recognizing and managing this life-threatening condition in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Adam M

    2015-04-01

    Septic shock is a relatively rare but life-threatening condition in pediatric patients that can often be difficult to recognize in the emergency department. Once recognized, the emphasis of therapy is to reverse deficits in cellular respiration by increasing oxygen and other substrate delivery to tissue beds. Providing oxygen, improving tissue perfusion through augmentation of cardiac output, and administering antibiotics in a timely manner have all been shown to significantly improve outcomes in children with septic shock. Goal-directed therapy is relatively straightforward, emphasizes the need for effective surveillance and timely recognition of this disease process, and has the potential to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. This review discusses how to identify specific populations at the greatest risk for septic shock, lays out the essential components of goal-directed therapy, examines potential pitfalls in management, and distinguishes additional ways that emergency clinicians can avoid the devastating consequences of septic shock in pediatric patients.

  18. Ascorbate-dependent vasopressor synthesis: a rationale for vitamin C administration in severe sepsis and septic shock?

    PubMed

    Carr, Anitra C; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Fowler, Alpha A; Natarajan, Ramesh

    2015-11-27

    Severe systemic inflammatory response to infection results in severe sepsis and septic shock, which are the leading causes of death in critically ill patients. Septic shock is characterised by refractory hypotension and is typically managed by fluid resuscitation and administration of catecholamine vasopressors such as norepinephrine. Vasopressin can also be administered to raise mean arterial pressure or decrease the norepinephrine dose. Endogenous norepinephrine and vasopressin are synthesised by the copper-containing enzymes dopamine β-hydroxylase and peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase, respectively. Both of these enzymes require ascorbate as a cofactor for optimal activity. Patients with severe sepsis present with hypovitaminosis C, and pre-clinical and clinical studies have indicated that administration of high-dose ascorbate decreases the levels of pro-inflammatory biomarkers, attenuates organ dysfunction and improves haemodynamic parameters. It is conceivable that administration of ascorbate to septic patients with hypovitaminosis C could improve endogenous vasopressor synthesis and thus ameliorate the requirement for exogenously administered vasopressors. Ascorbate-dependent vasopressor synthesis represents a currently underexplored biochemical mechanism by which ascorbate could act as an adjuvant therapy for severe sepsis and septic shock.

  19. Beneficial and side effects of arginine vasopressin and terlipressin for septic shock.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xudong; Zhu, Yu; Zhen, Danyang; Chen, Xiao Ming; Yue, Wu; Liu, Liangming; Li, Tao

    2015-05-15

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and its analog, terlipressin (TP), were all demonstrated beneficial for septic shock. What advantages and disadvantages that AVP and TP have for septic shock as well as the mechanism, however, are not completely known. With cecal ligation and puncture-induced septic shock rats and lipopolysaccharide-induced septic shock rabbits, we systematically compared the beneficial and side effects of AVP and TP, in septic shock and the sex difference, and investigated their relationship to Rho kinase and calcium sensitivity. The results indicated that low dose of TP (2.6 μg/kg/h) in combination with norepinephrine (NE) improving vascular reactivity and animal survival were superior to a small dose of AVP (0.03 U/kg/h) in septic shock rats and rabbits. This improving effect of AVP and TP on vascular reactivity was closely related to the activation of Rho-kinase and Rho-kinase-mediating vascular calcium sensitization. A small dose of TP did not result in hyponatremia, did not increase blood bilirubin and decrease platelet count, whereas AVP did. Animal survival and vascular reactivity in female rats after TP or AVP administration were slightly better than male rats, while there were no significant differences. It was suggested that a small dose of TP has better beneficial effect and less side effects on septic shock than AVP. AVP and TP improving vascular reactivity is closely related to Rho-kinase activation and calcium sensitivity improvement. TP or plus NE may be more appropriate for early emergency care for severe septic shock than AVP.

  20. Coupled plasma filtration adsorption in experimental peritonitis-induced septic shock.

    PubMed

    Sykora, Roman; Chvojka, Jiri; Krouzecky, Ales; Radej, Jaroslav; Kuncova, Jitka; Varnerova, Veronika; Karvunidis, Thomas; Novak, Ivan; Matejovic, Martin

    2009-05-01

    The coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA) was developed as an adsorptive hemopurification method aimed at nonselective removal of circulating soluble mediators potentially involved in the pathogenesis of sepsis. We hypothesized that this nonselective hemopurification could protect from detrimental consequences of long-term, volume-resuscitated porcine septic shock. In 16 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented pigs, the hyperdynamic septic shock secondary to peritonitis was induced by intraperitoneally inoculating feces and maintained for 22 h with fluid resuscitation and norepinephrine infusion as needed to maintain MAP above 65 mmHg. After 12 h of peritonitis, animals were randomized to receive either supportive treatment (control, n = 8) or CPFA treatment (CPFA, n = 8). Systemic, hepatosplanchnic, and renal hemodynamics; oxygen exchange; energy metabolism (lactate/pyruvate and ketone body ratios); ileal mucosal and renal cortex microcirculation; systemic inflammation (TNF-alpha, IL-6); nitrosative/oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, nitrates + nitrites); and endothelial/coagulation dysfunction (asymmetric dimethylarginine, von Willebrand factor, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, platelet count) were assessed before and 12, 18, and 22 h of peritonitis. Coupled plasma filtration adsorption neither delayed the development of hypotension nor reduced the dose of norepinephrine. The treatment failed to attenuate sepsis-induced alterations in microcirculation, surrogate markers of cellular energetics, endothelial injury, and systemic inflammation. Similarly, CPFA did not protect from lung and liver dysfunction and even aggravated sepsis-induced disturbances in coagulation and oxidative/nitrosative stress. In this porcine model of septic shock, the early treatment with CPFA was not capable of reversing the sepsis-induced disturbances in various biological pathways and organ systems. Both the efficacy and safety of this method

  1. Mortality prediction in patients with severe septic shock: a pilot study using a target metabolomics approach.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Manuela; Cambiaghi, Alice; Brunelli, Laura; Giordano, Silvia; Caironi, Pietro; Guatteri, Luca; Raimondi, Ferdinando; Gattinoni, Luciano; Latini, Roberto; Masson, Serge; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Pastorelli, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Septic shock remains a major problem in Intensive Care Unit, with high lethality and high-risk second lines treatments. In this preliminary retrospective investigation we examined plasma metabolome and clinical features in a subset of 20 patients with severe septic shock (SOFA score >8), enrolled in the multicenter Albumin Italian Outcome Sepsis study (ALBIOS, NCT00707122). Our purpose was to evaluate the changes of circulating metabolites in relation to mortality as a pilot study to be extended in a larger cohort. Patients were analyzed according to their 28-days and 90-days mortality. Metabolites were measured using a targeted mass spectrometry-based quantitative metabolomic approach that included acylcarnitines, aminoacids, biogenic amines, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and sugars. Data-mining techniques were applied to evaluate the association of metabolites with mortality. Low unsaturated long-chain phosphatidylcholines and lysophosphatidylcholines species were associated with long-term survival (90-days) together with circulating kynurenine. Moreover, a decrease of these glycerophospholipids was associated to the event at 28-days and 90-days in combination with clinical variables such as cardiovascular SOFA score (28-day mortality model) or renal replacement therapy (90-day mortality model). Early changes in the plasma levels of both lipid species and kynurenine associated with mortality have potential implications for early intervention and discovering new target therapy. PMID:26847922

  2. The Role of Mannose-Binding Lectin in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    De Pascale, Gennaro; Cutuli, Salvatore Lucio; Pennisi, Mariano Alberto; Antonelli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are a primary cause of death in patients in intensive care unit (ICU). Investigations upon genetic susceptibility profile to systemic complications during severe infections are a field of increasing scientific interest. Particularly when adaptive immune system is compromised or immature, innate immunity plays a key role in the immediate defense against invasive pathogens. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a serum protein that recognizes a wide range of pathogenic microorganisms and activates complement cascade via the antibody-independent pathway. More than 30% of humans harbor mutations in MBL gene (MBL2) resulting in reduced plasmatic levels and activity. Increased risk of infection acquisition has been largely documented in MBL-deficient patients, but the real impact of this form of innate immunosuppression upon clinical outcome is not clear. In critically ill patients higher incidence and worse prognosis of severe sepsis/septic shock appear to be associated with low-producers haplotypes. However an excess of MBL activation might be also harmful due to the possibility of an unbalanced proinflammatory response and an additional host injury. Strategies of replacement therapies in critically ill patients with severe infections are under investigation but still far to be applied in clinical practice. PMID:24223476

  3. Mortality prediction in patients with severe septic shock: a pilot study using a target metabolomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, Manuela; Cambiaghi, Alice; Brunelli, Laura; Giordano, Silvia; Caironi, Pietro; Guatteri, Luca; Raimondi, Ferdinando; Gattinoni, Luciano; Latini, Roberto; Masson, Serge; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Pastorelli, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Septic shock remains a major problem in Intensive Care Unit, with high lethality and high-risk second lines treatments. In this preliminary retrospective investigation we examined plasma metabolome and clinical features in a subset of 20 patients with severe septic shock (SOFA score >8), enrolled in the multicenter Albumin Italian Outcome Sepsis study (ALBIOS, NCT00707122). Our purpose was to evaluate the changes of circulating metabolites in relation to mortality as a pilot study to be extended in a larger cohort. Patients were analyzed according to their 28-days and 90-days mortality. Metabolites were measured using a targeted mass spectrometry-based quantitative metabolomic approach that included acylcarnitines, aminoacids, biogenic amines, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and sugars. Data-mining techniques were applied to evaluate the association of metabolites with mortality. Low unsaturated long-chain phosphatidylcholines and lysophosphatidylcholines species were associated with long-term survival (90-days) together with circulating kynurenine. Moreover, a decrease of these glycerophospholipids was associated to the event at 28-days and 90-days in combination with clinical variables such as cardiovascular SOFA score (28-day mortality model) or renal replacement therapy (90-day mortality model). Early changes in the plasma levels of both lipid species and kynurenine associated with mortality have potential implications for early intervention and discovering new target therapy. PMID:26847922

  4. Hepatic Perfusion Alterations in Septic Shock Patients: Impact of Early Goal-directed Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-Wen; Xie, Jian-Feng; Liu, Ai-Ran; Huang, Ying-Zi; Guo, Feng-Mei; Yang, Cong-Shan; Yang, Yi; Qiu, Hai-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) has become an important therapeutic management in early salvage stage of septic shock. However, splenic organs possibly remained hypoperfused and hypoxic despite fluid resuscitation. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of EGDT on hepatic perfusion in septic shock patients. Methods: A prospective observational study was carried out in early septic shock patients who were admitted to Intensive Care Unit within 24 h after onset and who met all four elements of the EGDT criteria after treatment with the standard EGDT procedure within 6 h between December 1, 2012 and November 30, 2013. The hemodynamic data were recorded, and oxygen metabolism and hepatic functions were monitored. An indocyanine green clearance test was applied to detect the hepatic perfusion. The patients’ characteristics were compared before treatment (T0), immediately after EGDT (T1), and 24 h after EGDT (T2). This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.org, NCT02060773. Results: Twenty-one patients were included in the study; however, the hepatic perfusion data were not included in the analysis for two patients; therefore, 19 patients were eligible for the study. Hemodynamics data, as monitored by pulse-indicator continuous cardiac output, were obtained from 16 patients. There were no significant differences in indocyanine green plasma disappearance rate (ICG-PDR) and 15-min retention rate (R15) at T0 (11.9 ± 5.0%/min and 20.0 ± 13.2%), T1 (11.4 ± 5.1%/min and 23.6 ± 14.9%), and T2 (11.0 ± 4.5%/min and 23.7 ± 15.3%) (all P > 0.05). Both of the alterations of ICG-PDR and R15 showed no differences at T0, T1, and T2 in the patients of different subgroups that achieved different resuscitation goal numbers when elected (P > 0.05). Conclusion: There were no hepatic perfusion improvements after EGDT in the early phase of patients with septic shock. Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02060773 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02060773

  5. Increasing doses of pentoxifylline as a continuous infusion in canine septic shock.

    PubMed

    Quezado, Z M; Hoffman, W D; Banks, S M; Danner, R L; Eichacker, P Q; Susla, G M; Natanson, C

    1999-01-01

    We investigated effects of pentoxifylline during septic shock. Two-year-old (10-12 kg), purpose-bred beagles were infected i.p. with Escherichia coli 0111:B4 (1.2-1.5 x 10(9) colony-forming units per kilogram b.wt.) in a fibrin clot and then immediately treated with one of five doses of pentoxifylline (0.5-20 mg. kg-1. h-1 i.v.) as a 36-h continuous infusion or placebo. All animals received antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. Pentoxifylline levels increased in a dose-dependent manner during (p =.001) and were undetectable 12 h after stopping the infusion. During infusion of pentoxifylline at all doses, there were increases (p =.003), and once the infusion was stopped, there were decreases (p =.049) in endotoxin levels compared with controls. After clot implantation, at all pentoxifylline doses there was a significant increase in tumor necrosis factor levels, compared with controls (p =.025). The relative risk of death was significantly increased with pentoxifylline therapy in a dose-dependent fashion (20 >/= 10 >/= 5.0 >/= 1.0 >/= 0.5 mg. kg-1, p =.008). One hypothesis consistent with these data is that high pentoxifylline levels slowed endotoxin clearance, resulting in high levels of endotoxemia and increased proinflammatory mediator release and death. Pentoxifylline, used as a long-term continuous infusion as is commonly done clinically, can be harmful during Gram-negative septic shock.

  6. Septic versus non-septic acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: characteristics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Marília Galvão; Dantas, João Gabriel Athayde de Oliveira; Levi, Talita Machado; Rocha, Mário de Seixas; de Souza, Sérgio Pinto; Boa-Sorte, Ney; de Moura, Carlos Geraldo Guerreiro; Cruz, Constança Margarida Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury. Methods This study evaluated an open cohort of 117 critically ill patients with acute kidney injury who were consecutively admitted to an intensive care unit, excluding patients with a history of advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, kidney transplantation, hospitalization or death in a period shorter than 24 hours. The presence of sepsis and in-hospital death were the exposure and primary variables in this study, respectively. A confounding analysis was performed using logistic regression. Results No significant differences were found between the mean ages of the groups with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury [65.30±21.27 years versus 66.35±12.82 years, respectively; p=0.75]. In the septic and non-septic acute kidney injury groups, a predominance of females (57.4% versus 52.4%, respectively; p=0.49) and Afro-descendants (81.5% versus 76.2%, respectively; p=0.49) was observed. Compared with the non-septic patients, the patients with sepsis had a higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [21.73±7.26 versus 15.75±5.98; p<0.001)] and a higher mean water balance (p=0.001). Arterial hypertension (p=0.01) and heart failure (p<0.001) were more common in the non-septic patients. Septic acute kidney injury was associated with a greater number of patients who required dialysis (p=0.001) and a greater number of deaths (p<0.001); however, renal function recovery was more common in this group (p=0.01). Sepsis (OR: 3.88; 95%CI: 1.51-10.00) and an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score >18.5 (OR: 9.77; 95%CI: 3.73-25.58) were associated with death in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Sepsis was an independent predictor of death. Significant differences were found between the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic versus non-septic acute kidney

  7. Decreased HLA-DR antigen-associated invariant chain (CD74) mRNA expression predicts mortality after septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Septic syndromes remain the leading cause of mortality in intensive care units (ICU). Septic patients rapidly develop immune dysfunctions, the intensity and duration of which have been linked with deleterious outcomes. Decreased mRNA expressions of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-related genes have been reported after sepsis. We investigated whether their mRNA levels in whole blood could predict mortality in septic shock patients. Methods A total of 93 septic shock patients were included. On the third day after shock, the mRNA expressions of five MHC class II-related genes (CD74, HLA-DRA, HLA-DMB, HLA-DMA, CIITA) were measured by qRT-PCR and monocyte human leukocyte antigen-DR (mHLA-DR) by flow cytometry. Results A significant correlation was found among MHC class II related gene expressions. Among mRNA markers, the best prognostic value was obtained for CD74 (HLA-DR antigen-associated invariant chain). For this parameter, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated (AUC = 0.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.55 to 0.79; P = 0.01) as well as the optimal cut-off value. After stratification based on this threshold, survival curves showed that a decreased CD74 mRNA level was associated with increased mortality after septic shock (Log rank test, P = 0.0043, Hazard Ratio = 3.0, 95% CI: 1.4 to 6.5). Importantly, this association remained significant after multivariate logistic regression analysis including usual clinical confounders (that is, severity scores, P = 0.026, Odds Ratio = 3.4, 95% CI: 1.2 to 9.8). Conclusion Decreased CD74 mRNA expression significantly predicts 28-day mortality after septic shock. After validation in a larger multicentric study, this biomarker could become a robust predictor of death in septic patients. PMID:24321376

  8. New criteria for selecting the proper antimicrobial chemotherapy for severe sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Periti, P; Mazzei, T

    1999-07-01

    The mortality rate resulting from severe bacterial sepsis, particularly that associated with shock, still approaches 50% in spite of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and optimum supportive care. Bacterial endotoxins that are part of the cell wall are one of the cofactors in the pathogenesis of sepsis and septic shock and are often induced by antimicrobial chemotherapy even if it is administered rationally. Not all antimicrobial agents are equally capable of inducing septic shock; this is dependant on their mechanism of action rather than on the causative pathogen species. The quantity of endotoxin released depends on the drug dose and whether filaments or spheroplast formation predominates. Some antibiotics such as carbapenems, ceftriaxone, cefepime, glycopeptides, aminoglycosides and quinolones do not have the propensity to provoke septic shock because their rapid bactericidal activity induces mainly spheroplast or fragile spheroplast-like bacterial forms.

  9. Pharmacological modulation of procoagulant microparticles improves haemodynamic dysfunction during septic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Boisramé-Helms, Julie; Delabranche, Xavier; Degirmenci, Su-Emmanuelle; Zobairi, Fatiha; Berger, Asael; Meyer, Grégory; Burban, Mélanie; Mostefai, Hadj-Ahmed; Levy, Bruno; Toti, Florence; Meziani, Ferhat

    2014-01-01

    Circulating microparticles play a pro-inflammatory and procoagulant detrimental role in the vascular dysfunction of septic shock. It was the objective of this study to investigate mechanisms by which a pharmacological modulation of microparticles could affect vascular dysfunction in a rat model of septic shock. Septic or sham rats were treated by activated protein C (aPC) and resuscitated during 4 hours. Their microparticles were harvested and inoculated to another set of healthy recipient rats. Haemodynamic parameters were monitored, circulating total procoagulant microparticles assessed by prothrombinase assay, and their cell origin characterised. Mesenteric resistance arteries, aorta and heart were harvested for western blotting analysis. We found that a) the amount and phenotype of circulating microparticles were altered in septic rats with an enhanced endothelial, leucocyte and platelet contribution; b) aPC treatment significantly reduced the generation of leucocyte microparticles and norepinephrine requirements to reach the mean arterial pressure target in septic rats; c) Microparticles from untreated septic rats, but not from aPC-treated ones, significantly reduced the healthy recipients' mean arterial pressure; d) Microparticle thromboxane content and aPC activity were significantly increased in aPC-treated septic rats. In inoculated naïve recipients, microparticles from aPC-treated septic rats prompted reduced NF-κB and cyclooxygenase-2 arterial activation, blunted the generation of pro-inflammatory iNOS and secondarily increased platelet and endothelial microparticles. In conclusion, in this septic shock model, increased circulating levels of procoagulant microparticles led to negative haemodynamic outcomes. Pharmacological treatment by aPC modified the cell origin and levels of circulating microparticles, thereby limiting vascular inflammation and favouring haemodynamic improvement.

  10. Early initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy in the management of septic shock: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The use of low-dose steroid therapy in the management of septic shock has been extensively studied. However, the association between the timing of low-dose steroid therapy and the outcome has not been evaluated. Therefore, we evaluated whether early initiation of low-dose steroid therapy is associated with mortality in patients with septic shock. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 178 patients who received low-dose corticosteroid therapy for septic shock between January 2008 and December 2009. Time-dependent Cox regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors in the association between the time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy and in-hospital mortality. Results The study population consisted of 107 men and 71 women with a median age of 66 (interquartile range, 54 to 71) years. The 28-day mortality was 44% and low-dose corticosteroid therapy was initiated within a median of 8.5 (3.8 to 19.1) hours after onset of septic shock-related hypotension. Median time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was significantly shorter in survivors than in non-survivors (6.5 hours versus 10.4 hours; P = 0.0135). The mortality rates increased significantly with increasing quintiles of time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy (P = 0.0107 for trend). Other factors associated with 28-day mortality were higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) 3 (P < 0.0001) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores (P = 0.0007), dose of vasopressor at the time of initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy (P < 0.0001), need for mechanical ventilation (P = 0.0001) and renal replacement therapy (P < 0.0001), while the impaired adrenal reserve did not affect 28-day mortality (81% versus 82%; P = 0.8679). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, the time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was still significantly associated with 28-day mortality (adjusted odds

  11. Protective effect of pentoxifylline plus thalidomide against septic shock in mice

    PubMed Central

    ARRIETA, OSCAR; ORTIZ-REYES, ARACELI; REMBAO, DANIEL; CALVILLO, MINERVA; RIVERA, ERIKA; SOTELO, JULIO

    1999-01-01

    Mortality caused by septic shock in experimental animals is reduced by thalidomide, an inhibitor of tumour necrosis factor α. Another drug that could act on the pathopysiological mechanisms of septic shock is pentoxifylline, an inhibitor of platelet aggregation that increases the flexibility of the erythrocyte membrane and has fibrinolytic activity. We studied the effect of pentoxifylline alone and combined with thalidomide in septic shock; 97 NIH mice were injected with lipopolysaccharides of Salmonella abortus equi and D galactosamine. Animals were separated in 4 groups; group A (n = 20) was used as control, group B (n = 15) received thalidomide 50 mg/kg, group C (n = 20) received pentoxifylline 40 mg/kg, and group D (n = 15) received thalidomide plus pentoxifylline. Mortality was recorded every hour. Additionally, 5 animals from each group were sacrificed 8 h after the induction of septic shock for histological analysis of heart, lung, brain, kidney, small intestine, adrenal glands and liver. Microscopic findings were rated as absent, mild, moderate and severe damage. In control animals histological analysis showed intense haemorrhage and necrosis in all organs studied. When compared with controls, treatment with pentoxifylline plus thalidomide reduced mortality (P < 0.03). The tissue damage was less severe in animals from the groups that received pentoxifylline or pentoxifylline plus thalidomide (P < 0.05). Pentoxifylline seems to potentiate the beneficial effects of thalidomide, reducing mortality and attenuating the pathological changes produced by septic shock. PMID:10365082

  12. The hemodynamics of human septic shock relate to circulating innate immunity factors.

    PubMed

    Hartemink, Koen J; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2010-01-01

    The role of innate immunity, e.g., complement activation and cytokine release in the hemodynamic alterations in the course of human septic shock is largely unknown. We prospectively studied 14 consecutive septic shock patients with a pulmonary artery catheter in place. For 3 days after admission, hemodynamic variables and plasma levels of C3a, a product of complement activation, and interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were measured 6-hourly. Doses of vasoactive drugs were recorded. Of the 14 patients, 8 died in the ICU. Patients had a hyperdynamic circulation with tachycardia, mild hypotension, increased cardiac index, peripheral vasodilation and myocardial depression. C3a, IL-6 and TNF-α plasma levels were supranormal in 123 of 138 (89%), 132 of 138 (96%) and 83 of 111 (75%) measurements, respectively. Independently of blood culture results, treatment with vasoactive drugs and outcome, mean arterial blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance index were lower when IL-6 levels were higher and left ventricular function was less depressed when C3a levels were higher in the course of septic shock. The TNF-α levels did not invariably relate to peripheral vascular and myocardial function parameters. Our serial observations suggest that, in human septic shock, peripheral vasodilation is most strongly and independently, of all inflammatory factors, associated with IL-6 release, whereas complement activation partly offsets the myocardial depression of the syndrome. Innate immunity factors may thus differ in their contribution to the course of hemodynamic abnormalities of septic shock.

  13. Septic Shock in Advanced Age: Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Altered Molecular Signatures in Neutrophil Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Vieira da Silva Pellegrina, Diogo; Severino, Patricia; Vieira Barbeiro, Hermes; Maziero Andreghetto, Flávia; Tadeu Velasco, Irineu; Possolo de Souza, Heraldo; Machado, Marcel Cerqueira César; Reis, Eduardo Moraes; Pinheiro da Silva, Fabiano

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the highest causes of mortality in hospitalized people and a common complication in both surgical and clinical patients admitted to hospital for non-infectious reasons. Sepsis is especially common in older people and its incidence is likely to increase substantially as a population ages. Despite its increased prevalence and mortality in older people, immune responses in the elderly during septic shock appear similar to that in younger patients. The purpose of this study was to conduct a genome-wide gene expression analysis of circulating neutrophils from old and young septic patients to better understand how aged individuals respond to severe infectious insult. We detected several genes whose expression could be used to differentiate immune responses of the elderly from those of young people, including genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction and TGF-β signaling, among others. Our results identify major molecular pathways that are particularly affected in the elderly during sepsis, which might have a pivotal role in worsening clinical outcomes compared with young people with sepsis. PMID:26047321

  14. Intraosseous and intravenous administration of antibiotics yields comparable plasma concentrations during experimental septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, G; Larsson, A; Lipcsey, M; Michalek, J; Eriksson, M

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate whether comparable antibiotic concentrations could be reached with intraosseous and intravenous administration during septic shock. Methods In this randomized, prospective experimental study conducted at an animal research laboratory at the University Hospital of Uppsala, eight anesthetized pigs, weighing 21.2 to 29.1 kg (mean: 25.2 ± 2.3 kg), received endotoxin infusion at 4 μg/kg/h for 6 h. At the onset of clinical shock, alternatively after 3 h of endotoxemia, they received 75 mg/kg of cefotaxime and 7 mg/kg of gentamicin either in a proximal tibial intraosseous catheter or in a peripheral intravenous catheter. Mixed venous samples were taken after 5, 15, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min and analyzed for antibiotic concentrations. Results For both antibiotics, plasma concentrations after intraosseous and intravenous administration followed similar curves throughout the observation period, and peak concentrations were comparable. Mean concentration area under the curve (AUC mg × h/l) for cefotaxime was 108.1 ± 19.5 after intraosseous and 116.5 ± 11.1 after intravenous administration; ratio 0.93, (95% CI 0.71–1.19). Mean AUC for gentamicin was 28.1 ± 6.8 for intraosseous and 32.2 ± 3.5 for intravenous administration; ratio 0.87 (95% CI 0.62–1.19). Conclusions In this porcine septic shock model, intraosseous and intravenous administration of gentamicin and cefotaxime yielded comparable concentrations. In an emergency, intraosseous administration of these antibiotics may be considered in severe infections when venous access is difficult. PMID:25557933

  15. Efficacy and Safety of Esmolol in Treatment of Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Ting; Long, Yun; Liu, Da-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have suggested that β1-receptor blockers benefit septic shock patients. This study aimed to determine whether β1-receptor blockers benefit tissue perfusion in sepsis and to identify parameters to reduce the risk of this drug in sepsis. Methods: Consecutive septic shock patients were recruited from the Intensive Care Unit of Peking Union Medical College Hospital within 48 h of diagnosis. All patients were hemodynamically stable and satisfactorily sedated with a heart rate (HR) ≥100 beats/min. Esmolol therapy achieved the target HR of 10–15% lower than the baseline HR. Clinical and physiological data of patients were collected prospectively within 1 h prior to esmolol therapy and 2 h after achieving the targeted HR. Results: Sixty-three patients were recruited. After esmolol therapy, blood pressure was unaltered, whereas stroke volume (SV) was increased compared with before esmolol therapy (43.6 ± 22.7 vs. 49.9 ± 23.7 ml, t = −2.3, P = 0.047). Tissue perfusion, including lactate levels (1.4 ± 0.8 vs. 1.1 ± 0.6 mmol/L, t = 2.6, P = 0.015) and the central venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide difference (5.6 ± 3.3 vs. 4.3 ± 2.2 mmHg, t = 2.6 P = 0.016), was also significantly decreased after esmolol therapy. For patients with increased SV (n = 42), cardiac efficiency improved, and esmolol therapy had a lower risk for a decrease in cardiac output (CO). Therefore, pretreatment cardiac systolic and diastolic parameters with (n = 42)/without (n = 21) an increase in SV were compared. Mitral lateral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSElat) in patients with increased SV was significantly higher than that in those without increased SV (1.3 ± 0.3 vs. 1.1 ± 0.2 cm, t = 2.4, P = 0.034). Conclusions: SV of septic shock patients is increased following esmolol therapy. Although CO is also decreased with HR, tissue perfusion is not worse. MAPSElat can be used to predict an increase in SV before esmolol use. Trial Registration: Clinical

  16. Revisiting the loading dose of amikacin for patients with severe sepsis and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been proposed that doses of amikacin of >15 mg/kg should be used in conditions associated with an increased volume of distribution (Vd), such as severe sepsis and septic shock. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether 25 mg/kg (total body weight) of amikacin is an adequate loading dose for these patients. Methods This was an open, prospective, multicenter study in four Belgian intensive care units (ICUs). All consecutive patients with a diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock, in whom amikacin treatment was indicated, were included in the study. Results In 74 patients, serum samples were collected before (t = 0 h) and 1 hour (peak), 1 hour 30 minutes, 4 hours 30 minutes, 8 hours, and 24 hours after the first dose of amikacin. Blood amikacin levels were measured by using a validated fluorescence polarization immunoassay method, and an open two-compartment model with first-order elimination was fitted to concentrations-versus-time data for amikacin (WinNonlin). In 52 (70%) patients, peak serum concentrations were >64 μg/ml, which corresponds to 8 times the clinical minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoints defined by EUCAST for Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (S<8, R>16 μg/ml). Vd was 0.41 (0.29 to 0.51) L/kg; elimination half-life, 4.6 (3.2 to 7.8) hours; and total clearance, 1.98 (1.28 to 3.54) ml/min/kg. No correlation was found between the amikacin peak and any clinical or hemodynamic variable. Conclusions As patients with severe sepsis and septic shock have an increased Vd, a first dose of ≥ 25 mg/kg (total body weight) of amikacin is required to reach therapeutic peak concentrations. However, even with this higher amikacin dose, the peak concentration remained below therapeutic target levels in about one third of these patients. Optimizing aminoglycoside therapy should be achieved by tight serum-concentration monitoring because of the wide interindividual variability of pharmacokinetic

  17. High-volume hemofiltration reduces the expression of myocardial tumor necrosis factor-alpha in septic shock pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Zhang, Ping; Cheng, Xiuju; Chen, Jianghua

    2013-02-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in myocardium correlates with the severity of cardiac dysfunction in septic shock. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of high-volume hemofiltration (HVHF) on the expression of TNF-α in myocardium in septic shock pigs. Sixteen male Landrace pigs weighing 31 ± 5 kg were randomly assigned to control group (n = 4), septic shock group (n = 6), and HVHF group (septic shock + HVHF, n = 6). All animals were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. After baseline examinations, septic shock group and HVHF group underwent induction of peritonitis. One hour later, the animals in HVHF group received treatment with HVHF and the treatment was continued for 12 h. As the control of HVHF group, the animals in septic shock group received the same support but hemofiltration. Twelve hours after HVHF therapy, all the animals were sacrificed. TNF-α and nitric oxide (NO) levels in both circulation and myocardium were measured. Compared with those of septic shock animals, the levels of cardiac output, stroke volume, and mean arterial pressure were better maintained in HVHF group. The expression of TNF-α in myocardium in HVHF group was lower than that in septic shock group (44.17 ± 18.70 vs. 92.50 ± 33.89 pg/mg protein, P = 0.015). The difference of TNF-α in circulation between HVHF group and septic shock group was no significance at different time. However, circulating NO in HVHF group was lower than that in septic shock group. These results suggest that HVHF improves hemodynamics and heart dysfunction in septic shock pigs, which may be attributed to reduction of TNF-α in myocardium but not in circulation.

  18. Interplay of complement and cytokines in the pathogenesis of septic shock.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J P; Wolbink, G J; Thijs, L G; Baars, J W; Wagstaff, J; Hack, C E

    1992-01-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome that is usually induced by bacterial infections. It is generally assumed that the syndrome results from an excessive triggering of endogenous inflammatory mediators by the invading microorganisms. These mediators include substances released by activated monocytes, macrophages, endothelial cells and neutrophils such as cytokines, reactive oxygen species and proteases, as well as activation products of coagulation, fibrinolysis, contact and complement systems. Recent studies have suggested that cytokines and complement activation products may have overlapping biological activities. In addition, multiple interactions in vitro as well as in vivo between cytokines and complement have been described. Here we will review some of these recent studies and will discuss their relevance for the pathogenesis of sepsis and septic shock.

  19. Effects of corticotropin-releasing hormone on proopiomelanocortin derivatives and monocytic HLA-DR expression in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Matejec, Reginald; Kayser, Friederike; Schmal, Frauke; Uhle, Florian; Bödeker, Rolf-Hasso; Maxeiner, Hagen; Kolbe, Julia Anna

    2013-09-01

    Little is known about interactions between immune and neuro-endocrine systems in patients with septic shock. We therefore evaluated whether the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and/or proopiomelanocortin (POMC) derivatives [ACTH, β-endorphin (β-END), β-lipotropin (β-LPH), α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) or N-acetyl-β-END (Nac-β-END)] have any influences on monocyte deactivation as a major factor of immunosuppression under septic shock conditions. Sixteen patients with septic shock were enrolled in a double-blind, cross-over and placebo controlled clinical study; 0.5μg/(kgbodyweighth) CRH (or placebo) were intravenously administered for 24h. Using flow cytometry we investigated the immunosuppression in patients as far as related to the loss of leukocyte surface antigen-DR expression on circulating monocytes (mHLA-DR). ACTH, β-END immunoreacive material (IRM), β-LPH IRM, α-MSH and Nac-β-END IRM as well as TNF-α and mHLA-DR expression were determined before, during and after treatment with CRH (or placebo). A significant correlation between plasma concentration of α-MSH and mHLA-DR expression and an inverse correlation between mHLA-DR expression and TNF-α plasma level were found. Additionally, a significant increase of mHLA-DR expression was observed 16h after starting the CRH infusion; 8h later, the mHLA-DR expression had decreased again. Our results indicate that the up-regulation of mHLA-DR expression after CRH infusion is not dependent on the release of POMC derivatives. From the correlation between plasma concentration of α-MSH and mHLA-DR expression, we conclude that in patients with septic shock the down-regulation of mHAL-DR expression is accompanied by the loss of monocytic release of α-MSH into the cardiovascular compartment. PMID:23891702

  20. Plesiomonas shigelloides Septic Shock Leading to Death of Postsplenectomy Patient with Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although Plesiomonas shigelloides, a water-borne bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family, usually causes self-limiting gastroenteritis with diarrhea, several cases of sepsis have been reported. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with hemochromatosis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and asplenia via splenectomy who developed septic shock caused by P. shigelloides complicated by respiratory failure, renal failure, liver failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Early aggressive antimicrobial therapy and resuscitation measures were unsuccessful and the patient passed away. We kindly suggest clinicians to implement early diagnosis of septic shock, empirical coverage with antibiotics, and prompt volume resuscitation based on the high mortality rate of P. shigelloides bacteremia.

  1. Strongyloidiasis: an unusual cause of septic shock with pneumonia and enteropathy in western countries.

    PubMed

    Montini, Florent; Grenouillet, Frederic; Capellier, Gilles; Piton, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of invasive strongyloidiasis in a patient from the French Antilles who had been living in France for many years, with no history of immunosuppression, and who was hospitalised in the intensive care unit for septic shock with multimicrobial hypoxaemia pneumonia and exudative enteropathy. Initiation of systemic corticosteroid therapy for septic shock seems to have precipitated onset of the parasitic infection, with recurrence of hypoxaemic pneumonia complicated by hypoxic cardiac arrest. The diagnosis was confirmed after roundworm larvae were found on bronchoalveolar lavage. Treatment with ivermectin was initiated, but the patient died in a context of postanoxic encephalopathy. PMID:25819827

  2. Plesiomonas shigelloides Septic Shock Leading to Death of Postsplenectomy Patient with Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although Plesiomonas shigelloides, a water-borne bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family, usually causes self-limiting gastroenteritis with diarrhea, several cases of sepsis have been reported. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with hemochromatosis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and asplenia via splenectomy who developed septic shock caused by P. shigelloides complicated by respiratory failure, renal failure, liver failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Early aggressive antimicrobial therapy and resuscitation measures were unsuccessful and the patient passed away. We kindly suggest clinicians to implement early diagnosis of septic shock, empirical coverage with antibiotics, and prompt volume resuscitation based on the high mortality rate of P. shigelloides bacteremia. PMID:27610253

  3. Plesiomonas shigelloides Septic Shock Leading to Death of Postsplenectomy Patient with Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Samannodi, Mohammed; Zhao, Andrew; Nemshah, Yaser; Shiley, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Although Plesiomonas shigelloides, a water-borne bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family, usually causes self-limiting gastroenteritis with diarrhea, several cases of sepsis have been reported. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with hemochromatosis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and asplenia via splenectomy who developed septic shock caused by P. shigelloides complicated by respiratory failure, renal failure, liver failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Early aggressive antimicrobial therapy and resuscitation measures were unsuccessful and the patient passed away. We kindly suggest clinicians to implement early diagnosis of septic shock, empirical coverage with antibiotics, and prompt volume resuscitation based on the high mortality rate of P. shigelloides bacteremia.

  4. Plesiomonas shigelloides Septic Shock Leading to Death of Postsplenectomy Patient with Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Samannodi, Mohammed; Zhao, Andrew; Nemshah, Yaser; Shiley, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Although Plesiomonas shigelloides, a water-borne bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family, usually causes self-limiting gastroenteritis with diarrhea, several cases of sepsis have been reported. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with hemochromatosis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and asplenia via splenectomy who developed septic shock caused by P. shigelloides complicated by respiratory failure, renal failure, liver failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Early aggressive antimicrobial therapy and resuscitation measures were unsuccessful and the patient passed away. We kindly suggest clinicians to implement early diagnosis of septic shock, empirical coverage with antibiotics, and prompt volume resuscitation based on the high mortality rate of P. shigelloides bacteremia. PMID:27610253

  5. Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein in septic shock: effect of polymyxin B-immobilized fiber hemoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tsukasa; Sugaya, Takeshi; Koide, Hikaru

    2009-05-01

    We aimed to determine retrospectively whether urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) levels are altered in patients with septic shock or severe sepsis without shock and whether polymyxin B-immobilized fiber (PMX-F) hemoperfusion affects these levels. Forty patients with septic shock, 20 patients with severe sepsis without shock, 20 acute renal failure (ARF) patients without septic shock (mean serum creatinine, 2.8 mg/dL), and 30 healthy volunteers were included in this study. Polymyxin B-immobilized fiber hemoperfusion was performed twice in 40 patients. In addition, 10 patients with septic shock without PMX-F treatment (conventional treatment) were also enrolled in this study. Their families did not choose PMX-F treatment. Thus, their informed consents to perform PMX-F treatment were not obtained. Septic shock or severe sepsis was defined by the American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine Consensus Conference Committee. Patients with septic shock were eligible for inclusion in the study if they had a definable source of infection and/or positive blood cultures. Patients with cardiogenic or hemorrhagic shock were excluded from the study. The patients were not randomly allocated to receive PMX-F treatment. Urinary and serum L-FABP levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Plasma endotoxin levels in patients with septic shock were significantly higher than those in patients with severe sepsis (P < 0.05), patients with ARF (P < 0.001), and healthy subjects (P < 0.001). Urinary L-FABP levels in patients with septic shock were significantly higher than those in patients with severe sepsis without shock (P < 0.001), patients with ARF (P < 0.001), and healthy subjects (P < 0.001), whereas serum L-FABP levels showed no significant differences between patients with septic shock, patients with severe sepsis, patients with ARF, and healthy subjects. Urinary L-FABP was not correlated with serum L-FABP. Twenty

  6. The peroxynitrite catalyst WW-85 improves pulmonary function in ovine septic shock.

    PubMed

    Maybauer, Dirk M; Maybauer, Marc O; Szabó, Csaba; Cox, Robert A; Westphal, Martin; Kiss, Levente; Horvath, Eszter M; Traber, Lillian D; Hawkins, Hal K; Salzman, Andrew L; Southan, Garry J; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel L

    2011-02-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is associated with excessive production of nitric oxide (NO·) and superoxide (O2), forming peroxynitrite, which in turn, acts as a terminal mediator of cellular injury by producing cell necrosis and apoptosis. We examined the effect of the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, WW-85, in a sheep model of acute lung injury and septic shock. Eighteen sheep were operatively prepared and randomly allocated to the sham, control, or WW-85 group (n = 6 each). After a tracheotomy, acute lung injury was produced in the control and WW-85 groups by insufflation of four sets of 12 breaths of cotton smoke. Then, a 30-mL suspension of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria (containing 2 - 5 × 10¹¹ colony-forming units) was instilled into the lungs according to an established protocol. The sham group received only the vehicle (30 mL saline). The sheep were studied in awake state for 24 h and ventilated with 100% oxygen. WW-85 was administered 1 h after injury as bolus infusion (0.1 mg/kg), followed by a continuous infusion of 0.02 mg·kg⁻¹·h⁻¹ until the end of the 24-h experimental period. Compared with injured but untreated controls, WW-85-treated animals had significantly improved gas exchange, reductions in airway obstruction, shunt formation, lung myeloperoxidase concentrations, lung malondialdehyde concentrations, lung 3-nitrotyrosine concentrations, and plasma nitrate-to-nitrite levels. Animals treated with WW-85 exhibited less microvascular leakage and improvements in pulmonary function. These results provide evidence that blockade of the nitric oxide-peroxynitrite pathway improves disturbances from septic shock, as demonstrated in a clinically relevant ovine experimental model.

  7. Immunostimulation using granulocyte- and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Schefold, Joerg C

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is associated with failure of multiple organs, including failure of the immune system. The resulting 'sepsis-associated immunosuppression' resembles a state of immunological anergy that is characterized by repeated 'infectious hits', prolonged multiple-organ failure, and death. As a consequence, adjunctive treatment approaches using measures of immunostimulation with colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) were tested in animal experiments and clinical trials. Herein, data from randomized clinical trials will be discussed in the context of a recently published meta-analysis investigating the effects of granulocyte- and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.

  8. [Septic shock in ICU: advanced therapeutics, immunoparalysis and genomics. State of the art].

    PubMed

    Arriagada S, Daniela; Donoso F, Alejandro; Cruces R, Pablo; Díaz R, Franco

    2014-08-01

    New and important concepts have emerged for the advanced management of the child with septic shock in the recent decades. Attending physicians in the Pediatric intensive care unit must be fully aware of them to improve patient care in the critical care unit. It should be considered the use of immune therapy only in selected groups of patients. Continuous renal replacement therapies are well tolerated and their early use prevents deleterious fluid overload. Removal of inflammatory mediators by using high volume hemofiltration may play a role in hyperdynamic septic patients. The use of plasmapheresis is recommended in patients with thrombocytopenia-associated multiple organ failure. Extracorporeal support use should be considered in those with refractory septic shock despite goals directed therapy. The immunoparalysis has been associated with nosocomial infections and late mortality. The information from genetic markers may allow early intervention and preventive genomics-based medicine.

  9. Septic shock caused by Sphingomonas paucimobilis bacteremia in a patient with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Al-Anazi, K A; Abu Jafar, S; Al-Jasser, A M; Al-Shangeeti, A; Chaudri, N A; Al Jurf, M D; Al-Mohareb, F I

    2008-04-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis is an aerobic gram-negative bacillus that causes a variety of infections in healthy as well as in immunocompromised individuals. The organism is usually susceptible to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, aminoglycosides, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and carbapenems. However, resistance to penicillins and the first-generation cephalosporins is commonly encountered. Reported here is a patient with acute myeloid leukemia who developed S. paucimobilis bacteremia complicated by septic shock just before receiving an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT) at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in Riyadh. The septic episode was successfully treated in the intensive care unit. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of septic shock caused by S. paucimobilis bacteremia in a hematopoietic SCT recipient.

  10. Mortality Risk Factors for Patients with Septic Shock after Implementation of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moo Hyun; Jeong, Woo Yong; Jung, In Young; Oh, Dong Hyun; Kim, Yong Chan; Kim, Eun Jin; Jeong, Su Jin; Ku, Nam Su; Kim, June Myung

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic shock remains a leading cause of death, despite advances in critical care management. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) has reduced morbidity and mortality. This study evaluated risk factors for mortality in patients with septic shock who received treatment following the SSC bundles. Materials and Methods This retrospective cohort study included patients with septic shock who received treatments following SSC bundles in an urban emergency department between November 2007 and November 2011. Primary and secondary endpoints were all-cause 7- and 28-day mortality. Results Among 436 patients, 7- and 28-day mortality rates were 7.11% (31/436) and 14% (61/436), respectively. In multivariate analysis, high lactate level (odds ratio [OR], 1.286; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.016–1.627; P=0.036) and low estimated glomerular filtration rate (OR, 0.953; 95% CI, 0.913–0.996; P=0.032) were independent risk factors for 7-day mortality. Risk factors for 28-day mortality were high lactate level (OR, 1.346; 95% CI, 1.083–1.673; P=0.008) and high Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (OR, 1.153; 95% CI, 1.029–1.293; P=0.014). Conclusion The risk of mortality of septic shock patients remains high in patients with high lactate levels and acute kidney injury. PMID:27659434

  11. Systemic Embolism and Septic Shock Complicated Left Atrial Myxoma: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Trimeche, B.; Bouraoui, H.; Garbaa, R.; Mahdhaoui, A.; Ben Rhomdane, M.; Ernez-Hajri, S.; Jeridi, G.

    2009-01-01

    Myxoma is the most common primary tumor of the heart. The rarity of infected cardiac myxomas leads to numerous diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. We present a case of infected left atrial myxoma caused by methicillin-sensible Staphylococcus aureus in a 48-year-old woman complicated by systemic embolism and septic shock. PMID:20204064

  12. Impact of methylene blue in addition to norepinephrine on the intestinal microcirculation in experimental septic shock.

    PubMed

    Nantais, Jordan; Dumbarton, Tristan C; Farah, Nizam; Maxan, Alexander; Zhou, Juan; Minor, Samuel; Lehmann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB) has been used with some success as a treatment for the vasoplegia of vasopressor-refractory septic shock. The putative mechanism of action of MB is the inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide within the microvasculature and improved responsiveness to endogenous catecholamines (norepinephrine (NE)). However, to date, no study has demonstrated the microcirculatory effect of methylene blue in septic shock. The objective of this randomized, controlled, animal study was to show, in an experimentally-induced, septic shock model in rats, the effects of MB and NE on global hemodynamics and the microcirculation. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was drastically reduced following bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) administration in animals not receiving vasopressors. Only the combination of NE + MB restored MAP to control levels by the end of the three hour experiment. Intravital microscopy of the microcirculation was performed in the terminal ileum in order to examine functional capillary density in intestinal muscle layers and the mucosa, as well as leukocyte activation in venules (rolling, adhesion to the endothelium). Untreated LPS animals showed a significant increase in leukocyte adhesion and a decrease in capillary perfusion in the intestinal microcirculation. In groups receiving NE or NE+MB, we observed a significant decrease in leukocyte adhesion and improved functional capillary density, indicating that microvasculature function was improved. This study suggests that methylene blue may be able to improve hemodynamics while preserving microvascular function in septic shock.

  13. Early goal-directed therapy in treatment of pediatric septic shock.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Cláudio Flauzino

    2010-09-01

    In the whole world, around 29,000 children younger than 5 years die every day, and sepsis is the most common cause of death. Whereas in adult patients vasomotor paralysis represents the predominant cause of mortality, death in pediatric sepsis is associated with severe hypovolemia and low cardiac output. The purpose of this article was to review the recent evidence on early treatment of pediatric severe sepsis and septic shock. Although current American College of Critical Care Medicine-Pediatric Advanced Life Support guidelines represent best practice, stronger evidences are lacking to confirm the components of these recommendations. Retrospective studies showed, at the same time, the positive effects arising from the utilization of American College of Critical Care Medicine-Pediatric Advanced Life Support guidelines and the existing barriers to its implementation. And one randomized control trial paralleled the results observed in adult patients and revealed that early goal-directed therapy in children is one of the few therapeutic interventions that proved to be beneficial in septic shock treatment. Early goal-directed therapy in pediatric septic shock is a successful method to optimize and parameterize treatment, but there is still a long way to turn septic shock resuscitation simpler and more widely spread.

  14. [Septic shock Fusobacterium necrophorum from origin gynecological at complicated an acute respiratory distress syndrome: a variant of Lemierre's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Huynh-Moynot, Sophie; Commandeur, Diane; Danguy des Déserts, Marc; Drouillard, Isabelle; Leguen, Patrick; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a female patient of 47 years old who presents in a state of septic shock with acute insufficient respiratory complicated with syndrome of acute respiratory distress, together with a list of abdominal pain and polyarthralgia too. In her case of medical history, it is retained that she has had a intra-uterine device since 6 years without medical follow up. The initial thoraco-abdomino-pelvic scan shows a left ovarian vein thrombosis, as well as the opaqueness alveolus diffused interstitiel bilaterally and an aspect of ileitis. The IUD is taken off because of sudden occuring of purulent leucorrhoea. This results in a clinical and paraclinical improvement, whereas aminopenicillin was administered to the patient since 1 week. The microbiological blood test allows to put in evidence Fusobacterium necrophorum found in a blood culture and is sensitive to the amoxicilline-acide clavulanique and metronidazole. Isolation of this bacteria, classically found in Lemierre's syndrome, allowed to explain the multilfocalization of the symtoms and the list of pain. The whole concerns about a variant of Lemierre's syndrom: a state of septic shock secondary then caused by the anaerobic Gram negative bacilli, which is a commensal bacteria of the female genital tractus, complicated of septic emboli typical.

  15. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations when treating patients with sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Peter; Belpaire, Frans M; Buylaert, Walter A

    2002-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are accompanied by profound changes in the organism that may alter both the pharmacokinetics and the pharmacodynamics of drugs. This review elaborates on the mechanisms by which sepsis-induced pathophysiological changes may influence pharmacological processes. Drug absorption following intramuscular, subcutaneous, transdermal and oral administration may be reduced due to a decreased perfusion of muscles, skin and splanchnic organs. Compromised tissue perfusion may also affect drug distribution, resulting in a decrease of distribution volume. On the other hand, the increase in capillary permeability and interstitial oedema during sepsis and septic shock may enhance drug distribution. Changes in plasma protein binding, body water, tissue mass and pH may also affect drug distribution. For basic drugs that are bound to the acute phase reactant alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein, the increase in plasma concentration of this protein will result in a decreased distribution volume. The opposite may be observed for drugs that are extensively bound to albumin, as the latter protein decreases during septic conditions. For many drugs, the liver is the main organ for metabolism. The determinants of hepatic clearance of drugs are liver blood flow, drug binding in plasma and the activity of the metabolic enzymes; each of these may be influenced by sepsis and septic shock. For high extraction drugs, clearance is mainly flow-dependent, and sepsis-induced liver hypoperfusion may result in a decreased clearance. For low extraction drugs, clearance is determined by the degree of plasma binding and the activity of the metabolic enzymes. Oxidative metabolism via the cytochrome P450 enzyme system is an important clearance mechanism for many drugs, and has been shown to be markedly affected in septic conditions, resulting in decreased drug clearance. The kidneys are an important excretion pathway for many drugs. Renal failure, which often accompanies sepsis and septic

  16. Mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase participates in septic shock myocardial depression by nitric oxide overproduction and mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ce; Yi, Chenju; Wang, Huiping; Bruce, Iain C; Xia, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether mitochondrial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) is involved in septic shock myocardial depression. The cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) method was used to induce septic shock. There was a significant depression of hemodynamic parameters recorded in the septic shock stage. After using nonselective NOS inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), inducible NOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AMG), and neuronal NOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), depression of the parameters was partly attenuated. Nitric oxide production in isolated cardiac mitochondria increased obviously in the CLP-septic shock stage, L-NAME and 7-NI both decreased NO production significantly. Nitrite/nitrate (NOx) production in the septic shock stage was much greater than those in the corresponding sham groups, and NOx production in the cytosol by inducible NOS was greater. Treatment with AMG suppressed NOx production in the cytosol by iNOS, whereas treatment with 7-NI decreased NOx production in the mitochondria. Mitochondrial NOS expression increased significantly in the septic shock stage, and its overexpression was attenuated using 7-NI. There was no significant decrease in the mitochondrial permeability transition pore measurement in the CLP-septic shock group, whereas a significant decrease was observed in those treated with L-NAME or 7-NI. These results indicate that overexpression of mitochondrial NOS is involved in myocardial depression. PMID:21993446

  17. Serum concentrations of vitamin D and organ dysfunction in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Fernanda Sampaio; Freitas, Flavio Geraldo Resende; Bafi, Antonio Tonete; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes; Machado, Flavia Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the serum concentrations of vitamin D and their variations in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock and in control subjects upon admission and after 7 days of hospitalization in the intensive care unit and to correlate these concentrations with the severity of organ dysfunction. Methods This case-control, prospective, observational study involved patients aged > 18 years with severe sepsis or septic shock paired with a control group. Serum vitamin D concentrations were measured at inclusion (D0) and on the seventh day after inclusion (D7). Severe deficiency was defined as vitamin D levels < 10ng/ml, deficiency as levels between 10 and 20ng/ml, insufficiency as levels between 20 and 30ng/ml, and sufficiency as levels ≥ 30ng/mL. We considered a change to a higher ranking, together with a 50% increase in the absolute concentration, to represent an improvement. Results We included 51 patients (26 with septic shock and 25 controls). The prevalence of vitamin D concentration ≤ 30ng/ml was 98%. There was no correlation between the serum concentration of vitamin D at D0 and the SOFA score at D0 or D7 either in the general population or in the group with septic shock. Patients with improvement in vitamin D deficiency had an improved SOFA score at D7 (p = 0.013). Conclusion In the population studied, patients with septic shock showed improvement in the serum concentrations of vitamin D on the seventh day compared with the controls. We also found a correlation between higher vitamin D concentrations and a greater decrease in the severity of organ dysfunction. PMID:26761476

  18. Association of Kidney Tissue Barrier Disrupture and Renal Dysfunction in Resuscitated Murine Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Stenzel, Tatjana; Weidgang, Clair; Wagner, Katja; Wagner, Florian; Gröger, Michael; Weber, Sandra; Stahl, Bettina; Wachter, Ulrich; Vogt, Josef; Calzia, Enrico; Denk, Stephanie; Georgieff, Michael; Huber-Lang, Markus; Radermacher, Peter; McCook, Oscar

    2016-10-01

    Septic shock-related kidney failure is characterized by almost normal morphological appearance upon pathological examination. Endothelial barrier disrupture has been suggested to be of crucial importance for septic shock-induced organ dysfunction. Therefore, in murine resuscitated cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced septic shock, we tested the hypothesis whether there is a direct relationship between the kidney endothelial barrier injury and renal dysfunction. Anesthetized mice underwent CLP, and 15 h later, were anesthetized again and surgically instrumented for a 5-h period of intensive care comprising lung-protective mechanical ventilation, fluid resuscitation, continuous i.v. norepinephrine to maintain target hemodynamics, and measurement of creatinine clearance (CrCl). Animals were stratified according to low or high CrCl. Nitrotyrosine formation, expression of the inducible isoform of the nitric oxide synthase, and blood cytokine (tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, interleukin-10) and chemokine (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, keratinocyte-derived chemokine) levels were significantly higher in animals with low CrCl. When plotted against CrCl and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels, extravascular albumin accumulation, and tissue expression of the vascular endothelial growth factor and angiopoietin-1 showed significant mathematical relationships related to kidney (dys)function. Preservation of the constitutive expression of the hydrogen sulfide producing enzyme cystathione-γ-lyase was associated with maintenance of organ function. The direct quantitative relation between microvascular leakage and kidney (dys)function may provide a missing link between near-normal tissue morphology and septic shock-related renal failure, thus further highlighting the important role of vascular integrity in septic shock-related renal failure.

  19. Polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column hemoperfusion therapy for septic shock.

    PubMed

    Mitaka, Chieko; Tomita, Makoto

    2011-10-01

    Endotoxin, an outer membrane component of gram-negative bacteria, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of septic shock. Endotoxin adsorption therapy by polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column hemoperfusion (PMX) has been used for the treatment of septic shock patients in Japan since 1994. The covalent binding of polymyxin B onto the surface of the polystyrene-based carrier fiber in PMX inactivates the endotoxin in the blood without exerting toxicity. This study was performed as a systematic review to evaluate the efficacy and mechanism of PMX treatment in patients with septic shock. The PubMed database and references from identified articles were used to search and review the literature relating to the efficacy and mechanism of PMX treatment in patients with septic shock. Polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column hemoperfusion adsorbed monocytes, activated neutrophils, and anandamide, as well as endotoxin through direct covalent bond, hydrophobic and ionic interactions, and hydrodynamics, and reduced the blood concentrations of inflammatory cytokines, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and adhesion molecules. Polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column hemoperfusion increased blood pressure and reduced the dosage requirements for vasopressive/inotropic agents. The meta-analysis showed that PMX treatment had beneficial effects on the hemodynamics, pulmonary oxygenation, and mortality. These beneficial effects may be attributable to the direct adsorption of endotoxin, monocytes, activated neutrophils, and anandamide, as well as indirect decrease in inflammatory cytokines and other mediators. Polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column hemoperfusion treatment has additional effects on reducing endothelial damage, proapoptotic activity, and immunosuppression. Further studies will be needed to confirm the efficacy and mechanism of PMX treatment in septic shock.

  20. Upregulation of the pro-apoptotic genes BID and FAS in septic shock patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Lymphocyte apoptosis has been suggested to play a central role in sepsis pathophysiology, and studies in animal models demonstrated that blocking this pathway improves outcome. However, no routine biomarkers of apoptosis are so far available in patients. Thus, the aim of our study was to assess the different biomarkers of apoptosis putatively usable on a routine basis in septic shock. Methods Thirteen septic shock patients (sampled twice between days 1 to 2 and days 3 to 5 after diagnosis of shock) and 15 sex-matched and age-matched healthy controls were prospectively enrolled. Apoptosis was measured in lymphocyte subpopulations using flow cytometry (Annexin-V binding, activated caspase-3 and Bcl-2 expressions). Representative pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic gene expressions were assessed by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Monocyte HLA-DR expression and lymphocyte subpopulation cell counts were measured as markers of sepsis-induced immune dysfunctions. To test for statistical significance, the Mann-Whitney U test was used with correction by the number of tests performed. Results Flow cytometric measurements of apoptosis in septic shock patients showed an increased Annexin-V binding on CD4+ T cells and an increased active caspase-3 expression on B cells only at days 3 to 5 (sixfold change and twofold change, respectively). Gene expression analysis showed an increased BCL-XL mRNA and an upregulation of the pro-apoptotic genes BID and FAS in septic shock patients (10-fold change and fivefold change, respectively) compared with healthy controls. Conclusions The present study highlights the difficulties encountered in monitoring apoptosis on a routine basis in septic patients, whereas in the same sampling conditions and on the same patients, HLA-DR expression and lymphocyte subpopulation cell counts showed characteristics described in the literature. However, pro-apoptotic genes BID and FAS appear to constitute promising apoptosis markers in our

  1. Genetic variation in heat shock protein 70 is associated with septic shock: narrowing the association to a specific haplotype.

    PubMed

    Kee, C; Cheong, K Y; Pham, K; Waterer, G W; Temple, S E L

    2008-12-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) plays a major role in immune responses. Polymorphisms within the gene have been associated with development of septic shock. This study refines the region of the HSP70 gene associated with development of septic shock and confirms its functionality. Subjects (n = 31) were grouped into one of three haplotypes based on their HSPA1B-179C>T and HSPA1B1267A>G genotypes. Mononuclear cells from these subjects were stimulated with heat-killed bacteria (10(7 )colony-forming units/mL Escherichia coli or Streptococcus pneumoniae) for 8 and 21 h. HSP70 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) mRNA and protein levels were measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and ELISA, respectively. The HSPA1B-179*C:1267*A haplotype was associated with significantly lower levels of HSPA1B mRNA and protein and higher production of TNF mRNA and protein compared to the other haplotypes. Induction of HSP70 was TNF independent. These results suggest that the HSPA1B-179C>T:1267A>G haplotype is functional and may explain the association of the HSP70 gene with development of septic shock.

  2. Ion transport in circulatory and/or septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Sayeed, M.M.

    1987-05-01

    This review surveys investigations of membrane ion transport in animals in hemorrhagic, endotoxic, or bacteremic shock. The focus of the review is on ion transport studies in the skeletal muscle and liver. Skeletal muscle Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ transport alterations have been shown during the induction of shock via hemorrhage, endotoxin, or live Gram-negative bacteria in the rodent, canine, and primate species. These alterations include impairment of active cellular K/sup +/ accumulation, increased permeability to /sup 24/Na/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/, and membrane depolarization. The ion transport alterations in the skeletal muscle are compatible with movement of extracellular fluid into the intracellular compartment. Such fluid movements can potentially lead to decreases in circulating plasma volume and thus to circulatory deficits in shock. Studies in the liver of rats subjected to hemorrhagic or endotoxic shock indicated the failure of electrogenic Na/sup +/ pump. Although the hepatic cellular membrane permeability to Na/sup +/ relative to permeability to K/sup +/ appeared unaltered in hemorrhagic shock, endotoxic shock caused an increase in permeability to Na/sup +/. Hepatic cellular /sup 45/Ca/sup +/ regulation also appeared to be adversely affected during endotoxic shock. Alterations in hepatic Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ transport and Ca/sup +/ regulation could contribute to impairment in hepatic glucose production during shock. Although mechanisms of altered membrane ion transport during shock states remain unknown, such changes could occur prior to any substantial loss of cellular metabolic energy.

  3. Pulmonary extraction of biogenic amines during septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, M.D.; Kohler, J.; Gould, S.; Moseley, P.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of live Escherichia coli on the pulmonary extraction of the biogenic amines /sup 14/C 5-hydroxytryptamine, (5-HT) and /sup 3/H-epinephrine was investigated. The labeled isotopes were injected into a central venous catheter and collected from an aortic catheter. One hundred per cent of the labeled epinephrine was recovered in the control and septic state. Only 32.8 +/- 3.6% SEM of the 5-hydroxytryptamine was recovered before sepsis and 42.5 +/- 4.9% SEM after sepsis. During sepsis, mean arterial pressure fell to 58 mm Hg from 121 mm Hg. Pulmonary shunt increased from .7 +/- .05 SEM to .33 +/- .09 SEM.

  4. Use of a novel hemoadsorption device for cytokine removal as adjuvant therapy in a patient with septic shock with multi-organ dysfunction: A case study.

    PubMed

    Basu, Reshma; Pathak, Sunjay; Goyal, Jyoti; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Goel, Rati B; Barwal, Anil

    2014-12-01

    CytoSorb(®) (CytoSorbents Corporation, USA) is a novel sorbent hemoadsorption device for cytokine removal. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical use of CytoSorb(®) in the management of patient with septic shock. We used this device as an adjuvant to stabilize a young patient with multi-organ failure and severe sepsis with septic shock. A 36-year-old female patient was hospitalized with the complaints of malaise, general body ache, and breathing difficulty and had a medical history of diabetes mellitus type II, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, hypothyroidism and morbid obesity. She was diagnosed to have septic shock with multi-organ dysfunction (MODS) and a low perfusion state. CytoSorb(®) hemoadsorption column was used as an attempt at blood purification. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation score, MODS score, and sequential organ failure assessment score were measured before and after the device application. CytoSorb application as an adjuvant therapy could be considered in septic shock.

  5. Hemodynamic management of septic shock: is it time for "individualized goal-directed hemodynamic therapy" and for specifically targeting the microcirculation?

    PubMed

    Saugel, Bernd; Trepte, Constantin J; Heckel, Kai; Wagner, Julia Y; Reuter, Daniel A

    2015-06-01

    Septic shock is a life-threatening condition in both critically ill medical patients and surgical patients during the perioperative phase. In septic shock, specific alterations in global cardiovascular dynamics (i.e., the macrocirculation) and in the microcirculatory blood flow (i.e., the microcirculation) have been described. However, the presence and degree of microcirculatory failure are in part independent from systemic macrohemodynamic variables. Macrocirculatory and microcirculatory failure can independently induce organ dysfunction. We review current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for the assessment and optimization of both the macrocirculation and the microcirculation in septic shock. There are various technologies for the determination of macrocirculatory hemodynamic variables. We discuss the data on early goal-directed therapy for the resuscitation of the macrocirculation. In addition, we describe the concept of "individualized goal-directed hemodynamic therapy." Technologies to assess the local microcirculation are also available. However, adequate resuscitation goals for the optimization of the microcirculation still need to be defined. At present, we are not ready to specifically monitor and target the microcirculation in clinical routine outside studies. In the future, concepts for an integrative approach for individualized hemodynamic management of the macrocirculation and in parallel the microcirculation might constitute a huge opportunity to define additional resuscitation end points in septic shock.

  6. A case of Lemierre's syndrome with septic shock and complicated parapneumonic effusions requiring intrapleural fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Croft, Daniel P; Philippo, Sean M; Prasad, Paritosh

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, which can lead to severe systemic illness. We report a case of an otherwise healthy 26-year-old man who suffered from pharyngitis followed by septic shock requiring intubation and vasopressor support from Fusobacterium necrophorum bacteremia. The septic emboli to his lungs caused complicated bilateral parapneumonic effusions, which recurred after initial drainage. He required bilateral chest tubes and intrapleural tPA to successfully drain his effusions. His fever curve and overall condition improved with the resolution of his effusions and after a 33-day hospitalization, he recovered without significant disability. The severity of his illness and difficult to manage complicated parapneumonic effusions were the unique facets of this case. Using an evidence-based approach of tPA and DNase for complicated parapneumonic effusions in Lemierre's syndrome can be safe and effective. PMID:26744664

  7. Traumatic hemorrhage of occult phaeochromocytoma in a patient with septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Moazzam, Mohammad Shahnawaz; Ahmed, Syed Moied; Bano, Shahjahan

    2010-01-01

    Phaeochromocytoma can have a variety of presentations; however, traumatic hemorrhage into a phaeochromocytoma is a very rare presentation. Diagnosing and managing a critically ill, septic patient with a Phaeochromocytoma can be very challenging. We report a case of 53 years old man with a previously undiagnosed Phaeochromocytoma, who presented initially with bowel perforation following an assault. Following a laparotomy for bowel resection and anastomosis, whilst on the intensive care unit, he developed paroxysmal severe hypertension overlying septic shock. Phaeochromocytoma was confirmed using a computed tomography scan and urinary assay of metanephrine and catecholamines. We managed the haemodynamic instability using labetalol and noradrenaline infusions. As his septic state improved he was convention therapy and following control of his symptoms over the next few weeks, he underwent an uncomplicated right sided adrenalectomy. He made a full recovery. PMID:20930983

  8. Early Fluid Resuscitation and High Volume Hemofiltration Decrease Septic Shock Progression in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ping; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Xue, Lu; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of early fluid resuscitation (EFR) combined with high volume hemofiltration (HVHF) on the cardiopulmonary function and removal of inflammatory mediators in a septic shock swine model. Eighteen swine were randomized into three groups: control (n = 6) (extracorporeal circulating blood only), continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 25 mL/Kg/h), and HVHF (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 85 mL/Kg/h). The septic shock model was established by intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharides (50 µg/kg/h). Hemodynamic parameters (arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume variability, left ventricular contractility, systemic vascular resistance, and central venous pressure), vasoactive drug parameters (dose and time of norepinephrine and hourly fluid intake), pulmonary function (partial oxygen pressure and vascular permeability), and cytokines (interleukin-6 and interleukin-10) were observed. Treatment resulted in significant changes at 4–6 h. HVHF was beneficial, as shown by the dose of vasoactive drugs, fluid intake volume, left ventricular contractility index, and partial oxygen pressure. Both CRRT and HVHF groups showed improved removal of inflammatory mediators compared with controls. In conclusion, EFR combined with HVHF improved septic shock in this swine model. The combination decreased shock progression, reduced the need for vasoactive drugs, and alleviated the damage to cardiopulmonary functions. PMID:26543849

  9. Early Fluid Resuscitation and High Volume Hemofiltration Decrease Septic Shock Progression in Swine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Xue, Lu; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of early fluid resuscitation (EFR) combined with high volume hemofiltration (HVHF) on the cardiopulmonary function and removal of inflammatory mediators in a septic shock swine model. Eighteen swine were randomized into three groups: control (n = 6) (extracorporeal circulating blood only), continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 25 mL/Kg/h), and HVHF (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 85 mL/Kg/h). The septic shock model was established by intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharides (50 µg/kg/h). Hemodynamic parameters (arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume variability, left ventricular contractility, systemic vascular resistance, and central venous pressure), vasoactive drug parameters (dose and time of norepinephrine and hourly fluid intake), pulmonary function (partial oxygen pressure and vascular permeability), and cytokines (interleukin-6 and interleukin-10) were observed. Treatment resulted in significant changes at 4-6 h. HVHF was beneficial, as shown by the dose of vasoactive drugs, fluid intake volume, left ventricular contractility index, and partial oxygen pressure. Both CRRT and HVHF groups showed improved removal of inflammatory mediators compared with controls. In conclusion, EFR combined with HVHF improved septic shock in this swine model. The combination decreased shock progression, reduced the need for vasoactive drugs, and alleviated the damage to cardiopulmonary functions.

  10. Terlipressin as rescue therapy for intractable hypotension due to septic shock in children.

    PubMed

    Matok, Ilan; Vard, Amir; Efrati, Ori; Rubinshtein, Marina; Vishne, Tali; Leibovitch, Leah; Adam, Miriam; Barzilay, Zohar; Paret, Gideon

    2005-04-01

    Intractable hypotension due to septic shock is associated with high mortality rates in critically ill children worldwide. The use of terlipressin (triglycyl-lysine-vasopressin), an analog of vasopressin with a longer duration of action, recently emerged as a treatment of hypotension not responsive to vasopressors and inotropes. This was a retrospective study set in an 18-bed pediatric critical care department in a tertiary care children's hospital. We reviewed the files of all children with septic shock who were treated with terlipressin between January 2003 and February 2004. Fourteen children (mean age, 5.6 years; range, 4 days to 17.7 years) were treated with terlipressin in 16 septic shock episodes. Significant improvements in respiratory and hemodynamic indices were noted shortly after treatment. Mean arterial blood pressure increased significantly from 54 +/- 3 to 72 +/- 5 mmHg 10 min after terlipressin administration (P = 0.001). Heart rate decreased from 153.0 +/- 6.5 beats/min to 138.0 +/- 7.5 beats/min 12 h after treatment onset (P = 0.003). Epinephrine infusion was decreased or stopped in eight patients after terlipressin administration. Urine output increased from 1.6 +/- 0.5 mL/kg/h to 4.3 +/- 1.2 mL/kg/h 1 h after treatment onset (P = 0.011). PaO2 increased from 95.1 +/- 12.3 mmHg to 110.1 +/- 20.5 mmHg, and the oxygenation index decreased from 10.2 +/- 2.2 to 9.2 +/- 1.7. Terlipressin treatment of hypotension due to septic shock was successful in eight out of 16 episodes. Six of the 14 patients with poor prognosis for survival recovered. We conclude that terlipressin improves hemodynamic indices and renal function in critically ill children. Terlipressin should be considered as a rescue therapy in intractable shock not responsive to catecholamines in children.

  11. Ensuring animal welfare while meeting scientific aims using a murine pneumonia model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Huet, Olivier; Ramsey, Debbie; Miljavec, Sandra; Jenney, Adam; Aubron, Cecile; Aprico, Andrea; Stefanovic, Nada; Balkau, Beverley; Head, Geoff A; de Haan, Judy B; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P F

    2013-06-01

    With animal models, death as an intentional end point is ethically unacceptable. However, in the study of septic shock, death is still considered the only relevant end point. We defined eight humane end points into four stages of severity (from healthy to moribund) and used to design a clinically relevant scoring tool, termed "the mouse clinical assessment score for sepsis" (M-CASS). The M-CASS was used to enable a consistent approach to the assessment of disease severity. This allowed an ethical and objective assessment of disease after which euthanasia was performed, instead of worsening suffering. The M-CASS displayed a high internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.97) with a high level of agreement and an intraclass correlation coefficient equal to 0.91. The plasma levels of cytokines and markers of oxidative stress were all associated with the M-CASS score (Kruskal-Wallis test, P < 0.05). The M-CASS allows tracking of disease progression and animal welfare requirements.

  12. Ensuring animal welfare while meeting scientific aims using a murine pneumonia model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Huet, Olivier; Ramsey, Debbie; Miljavec, Sandra; Jenney, Adam; Aubron, Cecile; Aprico, Andrea; Stefanovic, Nada; Balkau, Beverley; Head, Geoff A; de Haan, Judy B; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P F

    2013-06-01

    With animal models, death as an intentional end point is ethically unacceptable. However, in the study of septic shock, death is still considered the only relevant end point. We defined eight humane end points into four stages of severity (from healthy to moribund) and used to design a clinically relevant scoring tool, termed "the mouse clinical assessment score for sepsis" (M-CASS). The M-CASS was used to enable a consistent approach to the assessment of disease severity. This allowed an ethical and objective assessment of disease after which euthanasia was performed, instead of worsening suffering. The M-CASS displayed a high internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.97) with a high level of agreement and an intraclass correlation coefficient equal to 0.91. The plasma levels of cytokines and markers of oxidative stress were all associated with the M-CASS score (Kruskal-Wallis test, P < 0.05). The M-CASS allows tracking of disease progression and animal welfare requirements. PMID:23603767

  13. Nitric oxide and septic shock. From bench to bedside.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, S J; Rosen, H

    1998-01-01

    Refractory hypotension with end-organ hypoperfusion is an ominous feature of inflammatory shock. In the past fifteen years, nitric oxide (a diffusible, short-lived product of arginine metabolism) has been found to be an important regulatory molecule in several areas of metabolism, including vascular tone control. Vascular endothelial cells constitutively produce low levels of nitric oxide that regulate blood pressure by mediating adjacent smooth-muscle relaxation. In an inflammatory shock state, cytokines, like interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, induce a separate, high-output form of the enzyme that synthesizes nitric oxide in both endothelial and smooth-muscle cells. The ensuing high rates of nitric oxide formation result in extensive smooth-muscle relaxation, pressor refractory vasodilation, and--ultimately--shock. The concept of the pathogenesis of inflammatory shock explains many limitations of current therapies and may foster the development of new interventions to mitigate the effects of nitric oxide overproduction in this syndrome. PMID:9549416

  14. Incidence and mortality of sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock in intensive care unit patients with candidemia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kevin; Schorr, Christa; Reboli, Annette C; Zanotti, Sergio; Tsigrelis, Constantine

    2015-08-01

    In this incidence study, of 16 074 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) from 1/1/2003 to 7/31/2011, 161 cases of candidemia were identified. The incidence of sepsis (27%), severe sepsis (31%), and septic shock (40%) was remarkably high in these cases of candidemia, as was the all-cause in-hospital mortality for sepsis (30%), severe sepsis (44%), and septic shock (65%).

  15. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... several kinds of shock. Hypovolemic shock happens when you lose a lot of blood or fluids. Causes include internal or external bleeding, dehydration, burns, and severe vomiting and/or diarrhea. Septic shock is caused by ...

  16. Short-term effects of phenylephrine on systemic and regional hemodynamics in patients with septic shock: a crossover pilot study.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Andrea; Lange, Matthias; Ertmer, Christian; Dünser, Martin; Rehberg, Sebastian; Bachetoni, Alessandra; D'Alessandro, Marladomenica; Van Aken, Hugo; Guarracino, Fabio; Pietropaoli, Paolo; Traber, Daniel L; Westphal, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Clinical studies evaluating the use of phenylephrine in septic shock are lacking. The present study was designed as a prospective, crossover pilot study to compare the effects of norepinephrine (NE) and phenylephrine on systemic and regional hemodynamics in patients with catecholamine-dependent septic shock. In 15 septic shock patients, NE (0.82 +/- 0.689 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) was replaced with phenylephrine (4.39 +/- 5.23 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) titrated to maintain MAP between 65 and 75 mmHg. After 8 h of phenylephrine infusion treatment was switched back to NE. Data from right heart catheterization, acid-base balance, thermo-dye dilution catheter, gastric tonometry, and renal function were obtained before, during, and after replacing NE with phenylephrine. Variables of systemic hemodynamics, global oxygen transport, and acid-base balance remained unchanged after replacing NE with phenylephrine except for a significant decrease in heart rate (phenylephrine, 89 +/- 18 vs. NE, 93 +/- 18 bpm; P < 0.05). However, plasma disappearance rate (phenylephrine, 13.5 +/- 7.1 vs. NE, 16.4 +/- 8.7% x min(-1)) and clearance of indocyanine green (phenylephrine, 330 +/- 197 vs. NE, 380 +/- 227 mL x min(-1) x m(-2)), as well as creatinine clearance (phenylephrine, 81.3 +/- 78.4 vs. NE, 94.3 +/- 93.5 mL x min(-1)) were significantly decreased by phenylephrine infusion (each P < 0.05). In addition, phenylephrine increased arterial lactate concentrations as compared with NE infusion (1.7 +/- 1.0 vs. 1.4 +/- 1.1 mM; P < 0.05). After switching back to NE, all variables returned to values obtained before phenylephrine infusion except creatinine clearance and gastric tonometry values. Our results suggest that for the same MAP, phenylephrine causes a more pronounced hepatosplanchnic vasoconstriction as compared with NE.

  17. Relationship of plasma leptin to plasma cytokines and human survivalin sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Arnalich, F; López, J; Codoceo, R; Jim nez, M; Madero, R; Montiel, C

    1999-09-01

    Leptin production is increased in rodents by administration of endotoxin or cytokines. To investigate whether circulating leptin is related to cytokine release and survival in human sepsis, plasma concentrations of leptin, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, soluble TNF receptor type I, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), and the inflammatory modulator IL-10 were measured as soon as severe sepsis (n=28) or septic shock (n=14) developed and every 6 h for 24 h. Patients with sepsis or septic shock had leptin concentrations 2.3- and 4.2-fold greater, respectively, than the control group. There was an independent association for leptin with IL-1ra and IL-10 in both patient groups. By discriminant analysis, leptin and IL-6 were independent predictors of death. These findings suggest that increases in leptin levels may be a host defense mechanism during sepsis.

  18. Current understanding in source control management in septic shock patients: a review

    PubMed Central

    Encina, Belen; Ramirez-Estrada, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Antibiotics, fluid resuscitation support of vital organ function and source control are the cornerstones for the treatment of these patients. Source control measures include all those actions taken in the process of care to control the foci of infection and to restore optimal function of the site of infection. Source control represents the multidisciplinary team required in order to optimize critical care for septic shock patients. In the last decade an increase interest on fluids, vasopressors, antibiotics, and organ support techniques in all aspects whether time, dose and type of any of those have been described. However information of source control measures involving minimal invasion and new techniques, time of action and outcome without it, is scarce. In this review the authors resumes new information, recommendations and future directions on this matter when facing the more common types of infections. PMID:27713888

  19. Exchange Transfusion in the Treatment of Neonatal Septic Shock: A Ten-Year Experience in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Pugni, Lorenza; Ronchi, Andrea; Bizzarri, Bianca; Consonni, Dario; Pietrasanta, Carlo; Ghirardi, Beatrice; Fumagalli, Monica; Ghirardello, Stefano; Mosca, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Septic shock, occurring in about 1% of neonates hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), is a major cause of death in the neonatal period. In the 1980s and 90s, exchange transfusion (ET) was reported by some authors to be effective in the treatment of neonatal sepsis and septic shock. The main aim of this retrospective study was to compare the mortality rate of neonates with septic shock treated only with standard care therapy (ScT group) with the mortality rate of those treated with ScT and ET (ET group). All neonates with septic shock admitted to our NICU from 2005 to 2015 were included in the study. Overall, 101/9030 (1.1%) neonates had septic shock. Fifty neonates out of 101 (49.5%) received one or more ETs. The mortality rate was 36% in the ET group and 51% in the ScT group (p = 0.16). At multivariate logistic regression analysis, controlling for potentially confounding factors significantly associated with death (gestational age, serum lactate, inotropic drugs, oligoanuria), ET showed a marked protective effect (Odds Ratio 0.21, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.06–0.71; p = 0.01). The lack of observed adverse events should encourage the use of this procedure in the treatment of neonates with septic shock. PMID:27171076

  20. Septic Shock Secondary to a Urinary Tract Infection with Pediococcus Pentosaceus.

    PubMed

    Han, Amneet; Mehta, Jeet; Pauly, Rebecca R

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a urinary tract infection secondary to Pediococcus pentosaceus causing septic shock and acute kidney injury in a 70-year-old male. We demonstrate successful treatment with a 10-day course of piperacillin/tazobactam. Recently, Pediococci have been found to be the cause of opportunistic infections in humans. This has posed a challenge to treating infections caused by this species because it has been found to be resistant to multiple antibiotics, including glycopeptides. PMID:27443041

  1. Cardiopulmonary Arrest and Resuscitation in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Research Model.

    PubMed

    Chalkias, Athanasios; Spyropoulos, Vaios; Koutsovasilis, Anastasios; Papalois, Apostolos; Kouskouni, Evaggelia; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2015-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock is challenging and usually unsuccessful. The aim of the present study is to describe our swine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation in severe sepsis and septic shock. In this prospective randomized animal study, 10 healthy female Landrace-Large White pigs with an average weight of 20 ± 1 kg (aged 19 - 21 weeks) were the study subjects. Septicemia was induced by an intravenous infusion of a bolus of 20-mL bacterial suspension in 2 min, followed by a continuous infusion during the rest of the experiment. After septic shock was confirmed, the animals were left untreated until cardiac arrest occurred. All animals developed pulseless electrical activity between the fifth and sixth hours of septicemia, whereas five (50%) of 10 animals were successfully resuscitated. Coronary perfusion pressure was statistically significantly different between surviving and nonsurviving animals. We found a statistically significant correlation between mean arterial pressure and unsuccessful resuscitation (P = 0.046), whereas there was no difference in end-tidal carbon dioxide (23.05 ± 1.73 vs. 23.56 ± 1.70; P = 0.735) between animals with return of spontaneous circulation and nonsurviving animals. During the 45-min postresuscitation monitoring, we noted a significant decrease in hemodynamic parameters, although oxygenation indices and lactate clearance were constantly increased (P = 0.001). This successful basic swine model was for the first time developed and may prove extremely useful in future studies on the periarrest period in severe sepsis and septic shock.

  2. Effect of high-dose Ascorbic acid on vasopressor's requirement in septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Zabet, Mohadeseh Hosseini; Mohammadi, Mostafa; Ramezani, Masoud; Khalili, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Effects of ascorbic acid on hemodynamic parameters of septic shock were evaluated in nonsurgical critically ill patients in limited previous studies. In this study, the effect of high-dose ascorbic acid on vasopressor drug requirement was evaluated in surgical critically ill patients with septic shock. Methods: Patients with septic shock who required a vasopressor drug to maintain mean arterial pressure >65 mmHg were assigned to receive either 25 mg/kg intravenous ascorbic acid every 6 h or matching placebo for 72 h. Vasopressor dose and duration were considered as the primary outcomes. Duration of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay and 28-day mortality has been defined as secondary outcomes. Findings: During the study period, 28 patients (14 in each group) completed the trial. Mean dose of norepinephrine during the study period (7.44 ± 3.65 vs. 13.79 ± 6.48 mcg/min, P = 0.004) and duration of norepinephrine administration (49.64 ± 25.67 vs. 71.57 ± 1.60 h, P = 0.007) were significantly lower in the ascorbic acid than the placebo group. No statistically significant difference was detected between the groups regarding the length of ICU stay. However, 28-day mortality was significantly lower in the ascorbic acid than the placebo group (14.28% vs. 64.28%, respectively; P = 0.009). Conclusion: High-dose ascorbic acid may be considered as an effective and safe adjuvant therapy in surgical critically ill patients with septic shock. The most effective dose of ascorbic acid and the best time for its administration should be determined in future studies. PMID:27162802

  3. Oxygen challenge test in septic shock patients: prognostic value and influence of respiratory status.

    PubMed

    Mari, Arnaud; Vallée, Fabrice; Bedel, Jérome; Riu, Béatrice; Ruiz, Jean; Sanchez-Verlaan, Pascale; Geeraerts, Thomas; Génestal, Michèle; Silva, Stein; Fourcade, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Transcutaneous oxygen pressure (PtcO2) value in response to an increase of FiO2 or oxygen challenge test (OCT) in ventilated patients has been reported to be related to peripheral perfusion and outcome during septic shock. However, patients with sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome could demonstrate compromised arterial oxygenation with OCT impairment decoupled to circulatory failure. The aims of this study were to confirm the prognostic value of OCT and to explore the influence of respiratory status on OCT results. This was a prospective study set in an intensive care unit of a tertiary teaching hospital. Fifty-six mechanically ventilated patients with septic shock criteria were studied. Transcutaneous oxygen pressure was measured at baseline and after OCT, at intensive care unit admittance (T0), and 24 h later (T24). Survival at day 28 and hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were analyzed and compared according to outcome and respiratory status. Central hemodynamic parameters or static transcutaneous data did not differ between survivors and nonsurvivors at enrollment. The OCT was statistically different at T24 according to outcome (P < 0.001), but sensitivity was low (53%). Moreover, patients with low OCT results at T24 exhibited more severe respiratory failure (P < 0.01). The OCT at T24 is related to outcome but is influenced by the severity of respiratory failure. Our results suggest considering with caution hemodynamic management based on OCT in septic shock patients with altered pulmonary function.

  4. Inflammation, myocardial dysfunction, and mortality in children with septic shock: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Fabio; Manso, Paulo H; Silveira, Vanessa S; Cunha, Fernando Q; de Castro, Margaret; Carlotti, Ana P C P

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to investigate whether nuclear factor kappa-B activation, as evaluated by gene expression of its inhibitor (I-κBα) and cytokine serum levels, was associated with myocardial dysfunction and mortality in children with septic shock. Twenty children with septic shock were prospectively enrolled and grouped according to ejection fraction (EF) <45% (group 1) or EF ≥45% (group 2) on the first day after admission to the pediatric intensive care unit. No interventions were made. In the first day, patients from group 1 (n = 6) exhibited significantly greater tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-10 plasma levels. However, I-κBα gene expression was not different in both groups. Mortality and number of complications were significantly greater in group 1. Patients who died had greater plasma concentrations of TNF-α. In conclusion, TNF-α and IL-10 are involved in myocardial dysfunction accompanying septic shock in children, and TNF-α is associated with mortality.

  5. Use of insulin to decrease septic shock-induced myocardial depression in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Levenbrown, Yosef; Penfil, Scott; Rodriguez, Elena; Zhu, Yan; Hossain, Jobayer; Bhat, A Majeed; Hesek, Anne; O'Neil, Karen B; Tobin, Kelly; Shaffer, Thomas H

    2013-12-01

    Insulin is known to attenuate septic shock-induced myocardial depression. Possible mechanisms include an anti-inflammatory or inotropic effect of insulin. The objective of this study was to determine whether the mechanism of action of insulin in attenuating septic shock-induced myocardial depression is through an immunomodulatory effect. Fourteen pigs were assigned to one of two groups. Both groups received a 4-h infusion of lipopolysaccharide endotoxin from Escherichia coli 0111:B4. Group 2 additionally received insulin at 1.5 U/kg/h with infusions of D50 normal saline and KCl to maintain normal serum glucose and potassium levels. Cardiac function was measured with shortening fraction using transthoracic echocardiogram. Plasma TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels were obtained every 30 min. Postmortem cytokine analysis and histomorphology were performed on the heart tissue. Although insulin attenuated septic shock-induced myocardial depression, this was not due to an anti-inflammatory effect and, therefore, likely resulted from an inotropic effect of insulin.

  6. Pattern of Brain Injury in the Acute Setting of Human Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sepsis-associated brain dysfunction has been linked to white matter lesions (leukoencephalopathy) and ischemic stroke. Our objective was to assess the prevalence of brain lesions in septic shock patients requiring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for an acute neurologic change. Method Seventy-one septic shock patients were included in a prospective observational study. Patients underwent daily neurological examination. Brain MRI was obtained in patients who developed focal neurological deficit, seizure, coma, or delirium. Electroencephalogy was performed in case of coma, delirium, or seizure. Leukoencephalopathy was graded and considered present when white matter lesions were either confluent or diffuse. Patient outcome was evaluated at 6 months with the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Results We included 71 patients with median age of 65 years (56 to 76) and SAPS II at admission of 49 (38 to 60). MRI was indicated on focal neurological sign in 13 (18%), seizure in 7 (10%), coma in 33 (46%), and delirium in 35 (49%). MRI was normal in 37 patients (52%) and showed cerebral infarcts in 21 (29%), leukoencephalopathy in 15 (21%), and mixed lesions in 6 (8%). EEG malignant pattern was more frequent in patients with ischemic stroke or leukoencephalopathy. Ischemic stroke was independently associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), focal neurologic signs, increased mortality, and worse GOS at 6 months. Conclusions Brain MRI in septic shock patients who developed acute brain dysfunction can reveal leukoencephalopathy and ischemic stroke, which is associated with DIC and increased mortality. PMID:24047502

  7. [Role of the kallikrein-kininogen-kinin system in the inflammatory reaction and septic shock].

    PubMed

    Hulot, M; Ers, P; Damas, J; Adam, A

    1984-01-01

    Kinins, which are vasodilatory, permeability-increasing, pain-producing polypeptides, are formed from inactive precursors: kininogens. Their actions make kinins a particularly powerful potential pro-inflammatory factor. However the absence of specific antagonists has so far made it impossible to ascribe them a definite role in inflammation. Two studies of experimental endotoxemia in burns patients, septicemia and septic shock have demonstrated the following facts: activation occurs of specific ( pKK ) and non-specific (plasminogen-plasmin system) kininogenases , K-HMW and K-LMW levels are significantly decreased. Kininogen consumption corresponds to increased BDK production. This would therefore appear to be one of the humoral factors responsible for haemodynamic changes. Though measurement of kininogen levels is still a painstaking process, the development of chromogenic substrates has made pKK and KK measurement simple and fast. Once they have been validated physico-pathologically in a large number of patients, such assays should take their place among the diagnostic weapons of clinical biology at the disposal of clinicians.

  8. Epinephrine kinetics in septic shock--a means to understand variable catecholamine efficiency?

    PubMed

    Calzia, Enrico; Georgieff, Michael; Huber-Lang, Markus; Radermacher, Peter

    2009-01-01

    It is well-established that the hemodynamic response to infusing catecholamines, the most frequently applied drugs for circulatory support during shock states, may vary markedly within and between individuals. In this context it is striking that only scarce data are available on the pharmacokinetics of catecholamines in critically ill patients. Furthermore, the existing literature comprises fairly equivocal observations. Abboud and colleagues now report that, in patients with septic shock, epinephrine kinetics are linear and its clearance directly depends on body weight and is inversely related to the severity of the disease. The authors conclude that the endogenous adrenal axis hormones do not assume any additional importance.

  9. The Role of ACTH and Corticosteroids for Sepsis and Septic Shock: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Annane, Djillali

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a common disorder associated with high morbidity and mortality. It is now defined as an abnormal host response to infection, resulting in life-threatening dysfunction of organs. There is evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments in various animal models and in patients that endotoxin or sepsis may directly and indirectly alter the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal response to severe infection. These alterations may include necrosis or hemorrhage or inflammatory mediator-mediated decreased ACTH synthesis, steroidogenesis, cortisol delivery to tissues, clearance from plasma, and decreased sensitivity of tissues to cortisol. Disruption of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis may translate in patients with sepsis into cardiovascular and other organ dysfunction, and eventually an increase in the risk of death. Exogenous administration of corticosteroids at moderate dose, i.e., <400 mg of hydrocortisone or equivalent for >96 h, may help reversing sepsis-associated shock and organ dysfunction. Corticosteroids may also shorten the duration of stay in the ICU. Except for increased blood glucose and sodium levels, treatment with corticosteroids was rather well tolerated in the context of clinical trials. The benefit of treatment on survival remains controversial. Based on available randomized controlled trials, the likelihood of survival benefit is greater in septic shock versus sepsis patients, in sepsis with acute respiratory distress syndrome or with community-acquired pneumonia versus patients without these conditions, and in patients with a blunted cortisol response to 250 μg of ACTH test versus those with normal response. PMID:27379022

  10. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Pediatric Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Scott L.; Selak, Mary A.; Tuluc, Florin; Villarroel, Jose Perales; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Becker, Lance B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mitochondrial dysfunction in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been linked to immune dysregulation and organ failure in adult sepsis but pediatric data are limited. We hypothesized that pediatric septic shock patients exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction within PBMCs which in turn correlates with global organ injury. Design Prospective observational study. Setting Academic pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Patients Thirteen pediatric patients with septic shock and ≥2 organ failures and 11 PICU controls without sepsis or organ failure. Interventions Ex vivo measurements of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and membrane potential (ΔΨm) were performed in intact PBMCs on day 1–2 and day 5–7 of septic illness and in controls. The Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction (PELOD) score, inotrope score, and organ failure-free days were determined from medical records. Measurements and Main Results Spare respiratory capacity (SRC), an index of bioenergetic reserve, was lower in septic PBMCs on day 1–2 (median 1.81, IQR 0.52–2.09 pmol O2/s/106 cells) compared to controls (5.55, 2.80–7.21; p=0.03). SRC normalized by day 5–7. Septic patients on day 1–2 exhibited a higher ratio of LEAK to maximal respiration than controls (17% versus <1%, p=0.047) with normalization by day 5–7 (1%, p=0.008), suggesting mitochondrial uncoupling early in sepsis. However, septic PBMCs exhibited no differences in basal or ATP-linked oxygen consumption or ΔΨm. Oxygen consumption did not correlate with PELOD, inotrope score, or organ failure-free days (all p>0.05). While there was a weak overall association between ΔΨm on day 1–2 and organ failure-free days (Spearman’s ρ=0.56, p=0.06), septic patients with normal organ function by day 7 exhibited higher ΔΨm on day 1–2 compared to patients with organ failure for >7 days (p=0.04). Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction was present in PBMCs in pediatric sepsis, evidenced by decreased bioenergetic

  11. A Case of Septic Shock caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans in an Immunocompetent Female Patient after Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for a Ureteral Stone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Yon; Park, In Young; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Jin Seo; Kang, Goeun; Kim, Jae Seok

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans can cause various types of infections, but its infection in humans is rare. A. xylosoxidans has been reported as a rare etiological agent of infections including primary bacteremia, catheter-related bloodstream infection, endocarditis, otitis, and pneumonia, particularly in immunocompromised hosts. We encountered a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 52-year-old, immunocompetent woman with no underlying disease, who received extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy to remove a left upper ureteral stone. She was treated with antibiotics to which the organism was susceptible but died as a result of septic shock. PMID:27104016

  12. Pressor Response to Noradrenaline in the Setting of Septic Shock: Anything New under the Sun—Dexmedetomidine, Clonidine? A Minireview

    PubMed Central

    Géloën, A.; Pichot, C.; Leroy, S.; Julien, C.; Ghignone, M.; May, C. N.; Quintin, L.

    2015-01-01

    Progress over the last 50 years has led to a decline in mortality from ≈70% to ≈20% in the best series of patients with septic shock. Nevertheless, refractory septic shock still carries a mortality close to 100%. In the best series, the mortality appears related to multiple organ failure linked to comorbidities and/or an intense inflammatory response: shortening the period that the subject is exposed to circulatory instability may further lower mortality. Treatment aims at reestablishing circulation within a “central” compartment (i.e., brain, heart, and lung) but fails to reestablish a disorganized microcirculation or an adequate response to noradrenaline, the most widely used vasopressor. Indeed, steroids, nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, or donors have not achieved overwhelming acceptance in the setting of septic shock. Counterintuitively, α2-adrenoceptor agonists were shown to reduce noradrenaline requirements in two cases of human septic shock. This has been replicated in rat and sheep models of sepsis. In addition, some data show that α2-adrenoceptor agonists lead to an improvement in the microcirculation. Evidence-based documentation of the effects of alpha-2 agonists is needed in the setting of human septic shock. PMID:26783533

  13. Platelets protect from septic shock by inhibiting macrophage-dependent inflammation via the cyclooxygenase 1 signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Binggang; Zhang, Guoying; Guo, Ling; Li, Xiang-An; Morris, Andrew J; Daugherty, Alan; Whiteheart, Sidney W; Smyth, Susan S; Li, Zhenyu

    2013-01-01

    Although it has long been known that patients with sepsis often have thrombocytopenia and that septic patients with severe thrombocytopenia have a poor prognosis and higher mortality, the role of platelets in the pathogenesis of sepsis is poorly understood. Here we report a protective role of platelets in septic shock. We show that experimental thrombocytopenia induced by intraperitoneal injection of an anti-glycoprotein Ibα monoclonal antibody increases mortality and aggravates organ failure, whereas transfusion of platelets reduces mortality in lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia and a bacterial infusion mouse sepsis model. Plasma concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 are elevated by thrombocytopenia and decreased by platelet transfusion in septic mice. Furthermore, we identify that platelets protect from septic shock by inhibiting macrophage-dependent inflammation via the COX1/PGE₂/EP4-dependent pathway. Thus, these findings demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for platelets in septic shock and suggest that platelet transfusion may be effective in treating severely septic patients.

  14. Diagnostic potential of endotoxin scattering photometry for sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tomoharu; Obata, Toru; Sonoda, Hiromichi; Akabori, Hiroya; Miyake, Tohru; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Tabata, Takahisa; Eguchi, Yutaka; Tani, Tohru

    2013-12-01

    Endotoxin scattering photometry (ESP) is a novel Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay that uses a laser light-scattering particle-counting method. In the present study, we compared ESP, standard turbidimetric LAL assay, and procalcitonin assay for the evaluation of sepsis after emergency gastrointestinal surgery. A total of 174 samples were collected from 40 adult patients undergoing emergency gastrointestinal surgery and 10 patients with colorectal cancer undergoing elective surgery as nonseptic controls. Plasma endotoxin levels were measured with ESP and turbidimetric LAL assay, and plasma procalcitonin levels were assessed with a standard procalcitonin assay. Plasma endotoxin and procalcitonin levels increased corresponding to the degree of sepsis. Endotoxin scattering photometry significantly discriminated between patients with or without septic shock: sensitivity, 81.1%; specificity, 76.6%; positive predictive value, 48.4%; negative predictive value, 93.8%; and accuracy, 77.6%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for septic shock with the ESP assay (endotoxin cutoff value, 23.8 pg/mL) was 0.8532 ± 0.0301 (95% confidence interval, 0.7841-0.9030; P < 0.0001). The predictive power of ESP was superior to that of turbidimetric assay (difference, 0.1965 ± 0.0588; 95% confidence interval, 0.0812-0.3117; P = 0.0008). There was no significant difference in predictive power between ESP and procalcitonin assay. Endotoxin scattering photometry also discriminated between patients with and without sepsis. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that ESP had the best predictive power for diagnosing sepsis. In conclusion, compared with turbidimetric LAL assay, ESP more sensitively detected plasma endotoxin and significantly discriminated between sepsis and septic shock in patients undergoing gastrointestinal emergency surgery.

  15. Thenar oxygen saturation and invasive oxygen delivery measurements in critically ill patients in early septic shock.

    PubMed

    Mesquida, Jaume; Gruartmoner, Guillem; Martínez, Maria Luisa; Masip, Jordi; Sabatier, Caroline; Espinal, Cristina; Artigas, Antonio; Baigorri, Francisco

    2011-05-01

    This prospective study was aimed to test the hypothesis that tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation (StO₂) measured noninvasively using near-infrared spectroscopy is a reliable indicator of global oxygen delivery (DO₂) measured invasively using a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) in patients with septic shock. The study setting was a 26-bed medical-surgical intensive care unit at a university hospital. Subjects were adult patients in septic shock who required PAC hemodynamic monitoring for resuscitation. Interventions included transient ischemic challenge on the forearm. After blood pressure normalization, hemodynamic and oximetric PAC variables and, simultaneously, steady-state StO₂ and its changes from ischemic challenge (deoxygenation and reoxygenation rates) were measured. Fifteen patients were studied. All the patients had a mean arterial pressure above 65 mmHg. The DO₂ index (iDO₂) range in the studied population was 215 to 674 mL O₂/min per m. The mean mixed venous oxygen saturation value was 61% ± 10%, mean cardiac index was 3.4 ± 0.9 L/min per m, and blood lactate level was 4.6 ± 2.7 mmol/L. Steady-state StO₂ significantly correlated with iDO₂, arterial and venous O₂ content, and O₂ extraction ratio. A StO₂ cutoff value of 75% predicted iDO₂ below 450, with a sensitivity of 0.9 and a specificity of 0.9. In patients in septic shock and normalized MAP, low StO₂ reflects extremely low iDO₂. Steady-state StO₂ does not correlate with moderately low iDO₂, indicating poor sensitivity of StO₂ to rule out hypoperfusion.

  16. Hypertonic fluid administration in patients with septic shock: a prospective randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    van Haren, Frank M P; Sleigh, James; Boerma, E Christiaan; La Pine, Mary; Bahr, Mohamed; Pickkers, Peter; van der Hoeven, Johannes G

    2012-03-01

    We assessed the short-term effects of hypertonic fluid versus isotonic fluid administration in patients with septic shock. This was a double-blind, prospective randomized controlled trial in a 15-bed intensive care unit. Twenty-four patients with septic shock were randomized to receive 250 mL 7.2% NaCl/6% hydroxyethyl starch (HT group) or 500 mL 6% hydroxyethyl starch (IT group). Hemodynamic measurements included mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), central venous pressure, stroke volume index, stroke volume variation, intrathoracic blood volume index, gastric tonometry, and sublingual microcirculatory flow as assessed by sidestream dark field imaging. Systolic tissue Doppler imaging velocities of the medial mitral annulus were measured using echocardiography to assess left ventricular contractility. Log transformation of the ratio MAP divided by the norepinephrine infusion rate (log MAP/NE) quantified the combined effect on both parameters. Compared with the IT group, hypertonic solution treatment resulted in an improvement in log MAP/NE (P = 0.008), as well as an increase in systolic tissue Doppler imaging velocities (P = 0.03) and stroke volume index (P = 0.017). No differences between the groups were found for preload parameters (central venous pressure, stroke volume variation, intrathoracic blood volume index) or for afterload parameters (systemic vascular resistance index, MAP). Hypertonic solution treatment decreased the need for ongoing fluid resuscitation (P = 0.046). No differences between groups were observed regarding tonometry or the sublingual microvascular variables. In patients with septic shock, hypertonic fluid administration did not promote gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion or sublingual microcirculatory blood flow in comparison to isotonic fluid. Independent of changes in preload or afterload, hypertonic fluid administration improved the cardiac contractility and vascular tone compared with isotonic fluid. The need for ongoing fluid

  17. Levosimendan Versus Dobutamine in Myocardial Injury Patients with Septic Shock: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jian-biao; Hu, Ma-hong; Lai, Zhi-zhen; Ji, Chun-lian; Xu, Xiu-juan; Zhang, Geng; Tian, Shuyuan

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate the effect of levosimendan on biomarkers of myocardial injury and systemic hemodynamics in patients with septic shock. Material/Methods After achieving normovolemia and a mean arterial pressure of at least 65 mmHg, 38 septic shock patients with low cardiac output (left ventricular ejective fraction), LEVF ≤45%) were randomly divided into two groups: levosimendan dobutamine. Patients in the levosimendan and dobutamine groups were maintained with intravenous infusion of levosimendan (0.2 μg/kg/minute) and dobutamine (5 μg/kg/minute) for 24 hours respectively. During treatment we monitored hemodynamics and LVEF, and measured levels of heart-type fatty acid binding protein (HFABP), troponin I (TNI), and brain natriuretic peptide(BNP). In addition, the length of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) stay, hospital stay, and 28-day mortality were compared between the two groups. Results The levosimendan group and the dobutamine group were well matched with respect to age (years, 55.4±1 7.5 versus 50.2±13.6) and gender (males, 68.4% versus 57.9%). Levosimendan-treated patients had higher stroke volume index (SVI), cardiac index (CI), LVEF, and left ventricular stroke work index (LVSWI), and lower extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) compared to dobutamine-treated patients (p<0.05). HFABP, TNI, and BNP in the levosimendan group were less than in the dobutamine group (p<0.05). There was no difference in the mechanical ventilation time, length of stay in ICU and hospital, and 28-day mortality between the two groups. Conclusions Compared with dobutamine, levosimendan reduces biomarkers of myocardial injury and improves systemic hemodynamics in patients with septic shock. However, it does not reduce the days on mechanical ventilation, length of stay in ICU and hospital, or 28-day mortality. PMID:27138236

  18. Mitochondrial changes in platelets are not related to those in skeletal muscle during human septic shock.

    PubMed

    Protti, Alessandro; Fortunato, Francesco; Caspani, Maria L; Pluderi, Mauro; Lucchini, Valeria; Grimoldi, Nadia; Solimeno, Luigi P; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Ciscato, Patrizia; Zella, Samis M A; Moggio, Maurizio; Comi, Giacomo P; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Platelets can serve as general markers of mitochondrial (dys)function during several human diseases. Whether this holds true even during sepsis is unknown. Using spectrophotometry, we measured mitochondrial respiratory chain biochemistry in platelets and triceps brachii muscle of thirty patients with septic shock (within 24 hours from admission to Intensive Care) and ten surgical controls (during surgery). Results were expressed relative to citrate synthase (CS) activity, a marker of mitochondrial density. Patients with septic shock had lower nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (NADH)/CS (p = 0.015), complex I/CS (p = 0.018), complex I and III/CS (p<0.001) and complex IV/CS (p = 0.012) activities in platelets but higher complex I/CS activity (p = 0.021) in triceps brachii muscle than controls. Overall, NADH/CS (r2 = 0.00; p = 0.683) complex I/CS (r(2) = 0.05; p = 0.173), complex I and III/CS (r(2) = 0.01; p = 0.485), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)/CS (r(2) = 0.00; p = 0.884), complex II and III/CS (r(2) = 0.00; p = 0.927) and complex IV/CS (r(2) = 0.00; p = 0.906) activities in platelets were not associated with those in triceps brachii muscle. In conclusion, several respiratory chain enzymes were variably inhibited in platelets, but not in triceps brachii muscle, of patients with septic shock. Sepsis-induced mitochondrial changes in platelets do not reflect those in other organs.

  19. Effects of dopamine, norepinephrine and dobutamine on gastric mucosal pH of septic shock patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yifen; Zhang, Ning; Wu, Yifu; Zheng, Yanping; You, Xiaoen; Cao, Zhuo; Xu, Yaqi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of different vasoactive drugs on the pH [intracellular pH (pHi)] of gastric mucosa in patients with septic shock was evaluated in the present study. According to the vasoactive drugs applied, 48 patients with septic shock were divided into 3 groups: A, B and C, with 16 cases each. Cases of group A were treated with dopamine, those of group B with norepinephrine while those of group C were treated with norepinephrine plus dobutamine. The changes of pH of gastric mucosa were observed before treatment (baseline) and 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after treatment, and the hemodynamic indicators were observed before treatment (baseline) and 6 h after administration. The gastric mucosal pH was not significantly different between two of the three groups before treatment (each at P>0.05). The gastric mucosal pH of group A did not change 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after treatment with drugs compared with the baseline (all at P>0.05), while the gastric mucosal pH in groups B and C were each statistically higher at the time points of 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after treatment with drugs compared with the respective baselines (all at P<0.05). Following treatment with drugs, the gastric mucosal pH of group C at all the time points of 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after treatment were significantly higher than those of groups A and B at the same time points after treatment, while there were some statistical differences between groups A and B at these time points (6, 12, 24 and 48 h after treatment; P<0.05). The hemodynamic indicators of the patients before treatment were not significantly different between two of the three groups (all at P>0.05). Compared with the baseline values, the mean arterial pressure and the cardiac index of each group after treatment were significantly increased, the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and the central venous pressure of groups B and C significantly increased (all at P<0.05) and the heart rate of group A was significantly increased (P<0.05). In conclusion, the

  20. Hospital-Based Acute Care Use in Survivors of Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ortego, Alexandra; Gaieski, David F.; Fuchs, Barry D.; Jones, Tiffanie; Halpern, Scott D.; Small, Dylan S.; Sante, S. Cham; Drumheller, Byron; Christie, Jason D.; Mikkelsen, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Septic shock is associated with increased long-term morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about the use of hospital-based acute care in survivors after hospital discharge. The objectives of the study were to examine the frequency, timing, causes, and risk factors associated with Emergency Department (ED) visits and hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary, academic hospital in the United States. Patients Patients admitted with septic shock (serum lactate ≥ 4 mmol/L or refractory hypotension) and discharged alive to a non-hospice setting between 2007 and 2010. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results The co-primary outcomes were all-cause hospital readmission and ED visits (treat-and-release encounters) within 30 days to any of the three health system hospitals. Of 269 at-risk survivors, 63 (23.4%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 18.2, 28.5) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge and another 12 (4.5%, 95% CI: 2.3, 7.7) returned to the ED for a treat-and-release visit. Readmissions occurred within 15 days of discharge in 75% of cases and were more likely in oncology patients (p=0.001) and patients with a longer hospital length of stay (p=0.04). Readmissions were frequently due to another life-threatening condition and resulted in death or discharge to hospice in 16% of cases. The reasons for readmission were deemed potentially related to the index septic shock hospitalization in 78% (49/63) of cases. The most common cause was infection-related, accounting for 46% of all 30-day readmissions, followed by cardiovascular or thromboembolic events (18%). Conclusions The use of hospital-based acute care appeared to be common in septic shock survivors. Encounters often led to readmission within 15 days of discharge, were frequently due to another acute condition, and appeared to result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Given the potential public health implications of

  1. Renal blood flow and acute kidney injury in septic shock: an arduous conflict that smolders intrarenally?

    PubMed

    Honore, Patrick M; Jacobs, Rita; De Waele, Elisabeth; Diltoer, Marc; Spapen, Herbert D

    2016-07-01

    Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (SAKI) is traditionally viewed as a process driven by a reduced blood flow and prone to benefit from vasopressive support. In ovine hyperdynamic septic shock, Lankadeva et al. report a significant and flow-independent intrarenal perfusion and oxygenation "mismatch" jeopardizing the renal medulla that was aggravated by norepinephrine. Medullary and urinary oxygenation changed in parallel, suggesting that urinary oxygenation may act as a biomarker to predict SAKI. PMID:27312443

  2. [Systematic medical record review in Skåne. Diagnostic codes were often wrong in severe sepsis and septic shock].

    PubMed

    Johansson, Daniel; Ekström, Helena; Beronius, Ellen; Rasmussen, Magnus

    2015-09-14

    The reliability of official registers of diagnosis depends on proper adherence to guidelines for diagnosis and diagnosis coding. Such guidelines for severe sepsis and septic shock have changed over the years, reflecting improved knowledge of these serious conditions. In order to investigate the compliance to current Swedish guidelines for diagnosis and coding of severe sepsis and septic shock, we studied the medical records from 300 patients with Escherichia coli bacteremia and 300 patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Our study showed that out of 161 patients who fulfilled the criteria for either severe sepsis or septic shock, only 29 (18%) received an accurate diagnosis code. Thus, severe sepsis appears to be underappreciated in official registers of diagnosis in Sweden. It is important to improve the adherence to the present diagnosis guidelines in order for the registers to be reliable.

  3. Influenza A/H1N1 septic shock in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus. A case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Immunocompromised patients, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) sufferers have an increased risk of mortality, following influenza infection. In the recent pandemic, influenza A H1NI virus caused 18449 deaths, mainly because of adult respiratory distress syndrome or bacterial co-infections. Case Presentation In this case report, an SLE patient with viral-induced septic shock, without overt pulmonary involvement, is discussed. The patient was administered oseltamivir and supportive treatment, including wide-spectrum antibiotics, vasopressors and steroids, according to the guidelines proposed for bacterial sepsis and septic shock. She finally survived and experienced a lupus flare soon after intensive care unit (ICU) discharge. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first case to report severe septic shock from influenza A/H1N1 virus, without overt pulmonary involvement. PMID:22206235

  4. Facilitating the transition from physiology to hospital wards through an interdisciplinary case study of septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to develop clinical reasoning, medical students must be able to integrate knowledge across traditional subject boundaries and multiple disciplines. At least two dimensions of integration have been identified: horizontal integration, bringing together different disciplines in considering a topic; and vertical integration, bridging basic science and clinical practice. Much attention has been focused on curriculum overhauls, but our approach is to facilitate horizontal and vertical integration on a smaller scale through an interdisciplinary case study discussion and then to assess its utility. Methods An interdisciplinary case study discussion about a critically ill patient was implemented at the end of an organ system-based, basic sciences module at New York University School of Medicine. Three clinical specialists—a cardiologist, a pulmonologist, and a nephrologist—jointly led a discussion about a complex patient in the intensive care unit with multiple medical problems secondary to septic shock. The discussion emphasized the physiologic underpinnings behind the patient’s presentation and the physiologic considerations across the various systems in determining proper treatment. The discussion also highlighted the interdependence between the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems, which were initially presented in separate units. After the session students were given a brief, anonymous three-question free-response questionnaire in which they were asked to evaluate and freely comment on the exercise. Results Students not only took away physiological principles but also gained an appreciation for various thematic lessons for bringing basic science to the bedside, especially horizontal and vertical integration. The response of the participants was overwhelmingly positive with many indicating that the exercise integrated the material across organ systems, and strengthened their appreciation of the role of physiology in understanding

  5. High pentraxin 3 level predicts septic shock and bacteremia at the onset of febrile neutropenia after intensive chemotherapy of hematologic patients

    PubMed Central

    Vänskä, Matti; Koivula, Irma; Hämäläinen, Sari; Pulkki, Kari; Nousiainen, Tapio; Jantunen, Esa; Juutilainen, Auni

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated pentraxin 3 as a marker for complications of neutropenic fever in 100 hematologic patients receiving intensive chemotherapy. Pentraxin 3 and C-reactive protein were measured at fever onset and then daily to day 3. Bacteremia was observed in 19 patients and septic shock in 5 patients (three deaths). In comparison to C-reactive protein, pentraxin 3 achieved its maximum more rapidly. Pentraxin 3 correlated not only with the same day C-reactive protein but also with the next day C-reactive protein. High pentraxin 3 on day 0 was associated with the development of septic shock (P=0.009) and bacteremia (P=0.046). The non-survivors had constantly high pentraxin 3 levels. To conclude, pentraxin 3 is an early predictor of complications in hematologic patients with neutropenic fever. High level of pentraxin 3 predicts septic shock and bacteremia already at the onset of febrile neutropenia. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00781040.) PMID:21880642

  6. Procalcitonin determined at emergency department as an early indicator of progression to septic shock in patient with sepsis associated with ureteral calculi

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young Hwii; Ji, Yoon Seob; Park, Sin-Youl; Kim, Su Jin; Song, Phil Hyun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: To investigate the role of initial procalcitonin (PCT) level as an early predictor of septic shock for the patient with sepsis induced by acute pyelonephritis (APN) secondary to ureteral calculi. Materials and Methods: The data from 49 consecutive patients who met criteria of sepsis due to APN following ureteral stone were collected and divided into two groups: with (n=15) or without (n=34) septic shock. The clinical variables including PCT level for this outcome were retrospectively compared by univariate analysis, followed by multivariable logistic regression model. Results: All subjects had hydronephrosis, and were hospitalized with the mean of 11.8 days (3–42 days). The mean size of the ureteral stones was 7.5mm (3–30mm), and 57% were located in upper ureter. At univariate analysis, patients with septic shock were significantly older, a higher proportion had hypertension, lower platelet count and serum albumin level, higher CRP and PCT level, and higher positive blood culture rate. Multivariate models indicated that lower platelet count and higher PCT level are independent risk factors (p=0.043 and 0.046, respectively). In ROC curve, the AUC was significantly wider in PCT (0.929), compared with the platelet count (0.822, p=0.004). At the cut-off of 0.52ng/mL, the sensitivity and specificity were 86.7% and 85.3%. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated elevated initial PCT levels as an early independent predictor to progress into septic shock in patients with sepsis associated with ureteral calculi. PMID:27256181

  7. “Immunonutrition” Has Failed to Improve Peritonitis-Induced Septic Shock in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Boisramé-Helms, Julie; Meyer, Grégory; Degirmenci, Su Emmanuelle; Burban, Mélanie; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Cynober, Luc; De Bandt, Jean-Pascal; Hasselmann, Michel; Meziani, Ferhat

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunonutrition in sepsis, including n-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) or L-arginine supplementation, is a controversial issue that has yielded a great number of studies for the last thirty-five years, and the conclusions regarding the quantity and quality of this support in patients are deceiving. The aim of the present experimental study is to investigate the effects of a pretreatment with enteral nutrition enriched with n-3 PUFAs or L-arginine on vascular dysfunctions, inflammation and oxidative stress during septic shock in rats. Design Rats were fed with enteral Peptamen® HN (HN group), Peptamen® AF containing n-3 PUFAs (AF group) or Peptamen® AF enriched with L-arginine (AFA group). On day 4, peritonitis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was performed. Rats were resuscitated (H18) once septic shock was established. After a 4-hour resuscitation, vessels and organs were harvested to assess inflammation, superoxide anion, nitric oxide and prostacyclin levels. Ex-vivo vascular reactivity was also performed. Results Compared to CLP-AF or CLP-HN groups, 47.6% of CLP-AFA rats died before the beginning of hemodynamic measurements (vs. 8.0% and 20.0% respectively, p<0.05). AF and AFA rats required significantly increased norepinephrine infusion rates to reach the mean arterial pressure objective, compared to CLP-HN rats. Both CLP-AF and CLP-AFA reduced mesenteric resistance arterial contractility, decreased vascular oxidative stress, but increased NF-κB (0.40±0.15 in CLP-AF and 0.69±0.06 in CLP-AFA vs. 0.09±0.03 in SHAM rats and 0.30±0.06 in CLP-HN, ß-actin ratio, p<0.05) and pIκB expression (0.60±0.03 in CLP-AF and 0.94±0.15 in CLP-AFA vs. 0.04±0.01 in SHAM rats and 0.56±0.07 in CLP-HN, ß-actin ratio, p<0.05), nitric oxide and prostacyclin production in septic rats. Conclusions Although n-3 PUFAs or L-arginine supplementation exhibited an antioxidant effect, it worsened the septic shock-induced vascular dysfunction. Furthermore

  8. A Selective V1A Receptor Agonist, Selepressin, Is Superior to Arginine Vasopressin and to Norepinephrine in Ovine Septic Shock*

    PubMed Central

    He, Xinrong; Su, Fuhong; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Laporte, Régent; Kjølbye, Anne Louise; Zhang, Jing; Xie, Keliang; Moussa, Mouhamed Djahoum; Reinheimer, Torsten Michael

    2016-01-01

    interleukin-6 and nitrite/nitrate levels. Selepressin-treated animals survived longer than the other animals. Conclusions: In this clinically relevant model, selepressin, a selective V1A receptor agonist, was superior to arginine vasopressin and to norepinephrine in the treatment of septic shock, especially when administered early. PMID:26496451

  9. Anthrapyrazolone analogues intercept inflammatory JNK signals to moderate endotoxin induced septic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Karothu Durga; Trinath, Jamma; Biswas, Ansuman; Sekar, Kanagaraj; Balaji, Kithiganahalli N.; Guru Row, Tayur N.

    2014-11-01

    Severe sepsis or septic shock is one of the rising causes for mortality worldwide representing nearly 10% of intensive care unit admissions. Susceptibility to sepsis is identified to be mediated by innate pattern recognition receptors and responsive signaling pathways of the host. The c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK)-mediated signaling events play critical role in bacterial infection triggered multi-organ failure, cardiac dysfunction and mortality. In the context of kinase specificities, an extensive library of anthrapyrazolone analogues has been investigated for the selective inhibition of c-JNK and thereby to gain control over the inflammation associated risks. In our comprehensive biochemical characterization, it is observed that alkyl and halogen substitution on the periphery of anthrapyrazolone increases the binding potency of the inhibitors specifically towards JNK. Further, it is demonstrated that hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions generated by these small molecules effectively block endotoxin-induced inflammatory genes expression in in vitro and septic shock in vivo, in a mouse model, with remarkable efficacies. Altogether, the obtained results rationalize the significance of the diversity oriented synthesis of small molecules for selective inhibition of JNK and their potential in the treatment of severe sepsis.

  10. Red cell distribution width and early mortality in elderly patients with severe sepsis and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sejin; Lee, Kyoungmi; Kim, Inbyung; Jung, Siyoung; Kim, Moon-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of red cell distribution width (RDW) with 30-day mortality in elderly patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Methods Patients were recruited from a single tertiary emergency department. Patients with age over 65 years were selected. The main outcome was 30-day mortality. Potential confounders as Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score along with initial vital signs were collected. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of 30-day mortality. The discriminative ability of RDW for 30-day mortality was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results Overall, 458 patients were included. Univariate analysis showed that patients’ survival was significantly associated with sites of infection, comorbidities, and severity scores. In the multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, the RDW was an independent predictor of 30-day mortality (hazards ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 1.17; P<0.001). Conclusion In this study, initial RDW values were significantly associated with 30-day mortality in older patients hospitalized with severe sepsis and septic shock.

  11. Receptors, Mediators, and Mechanisms Involved in Bacterial Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Van Amersfoort, Edwin S.; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Kuiper, Johan

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis and septic shock result from the overproduction of inflammatory mediators as a consequence of the interaction of the immune system with bacteria and bacterial wall constituents in the body. Bacterial cell wall constituents such as lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycans, and lipoteichoic acid are particularly responsible for the deleterious effects of bacteria. These constituents interact in the body with a large number of proteins and receptors, and this interaction determines the eventual inflammatory effect of the compounds. Within the circulation bacterial constituents interact with proteins such as plasma lipoproteins and lipopolysaccharide binding protein. The interaction of the bacterial constituents with receptors on the surface of mononuclear cells is mainly responsible for the induction of proinflammatory mediators by the bacterial constituents. The role of individual receptors such as the toll-like receptors and CD14 in the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules is discussed in detail. In addition, the roles of a number of other receptors that bind bacterial compounds such as scavenger receptors and their modulating role in inflammation are described. Finally, the therapies for the treatment of bacterial sepsis and septic shock are discussed in relation to the action of the aforementioned receptors and proteins. PMID:12857774

  12. Septic Shock Induced by Bacterial Prostatitis with Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a Posttransplantation Patient.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofan; Chen, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection is a common complication after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). Morganella morganii is ubiquitous Gram-negative facultative anaerobe, which may cause many kinds of opportunistic infection. Herein we report a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with frequent urination, urgency, and mild pain that comes and goes low in the abdomen and around the anus. The patient had a medical history of chronic prostatitis for 4 years. He received HLA-matched sibling allo-HSCT because of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma 29 months ago. The routine examination of prostatic fluid showed increased leukocytes and the culture of prostatic fluid showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient developed chills and fever 18 hours after examination. Both urine culture and blood culture showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy and septic shock management. Taken together, Morganella morganii should be considered a possible pathogen when immunocompromised patients develop prostatitis. Also, prostatic massage could be a possible trigger of septic shock induced by Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a posttransplantation patient.

  13. Septic Shock Induced by Bacterial Prostatitis with Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a Posttransplantation Patient.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofan; Chen, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection is a common complication after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). Morganella morganii is ubiquitous Gram-negative facultative anaerobe, which may cause many kinds of opportunistic infection. Herein we report a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with frequent urination, urgency, and mild pain that comes and goes low in the abdomen and around the anus. The patient had a medical history of chronic prostatitis for 4 years. He received HLA-matched sibling allo-HSCT because of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma 29 months ago. The routine examination of prostatic fluid showed increased leukocytes and the culture of prostatic fluid showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient developed chills and fever 18 hours after examination. Both urine culture and blood culture showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy and septic shock management. Taken together, Morganella morganii should be considered a possible pathogen when immunocompromised patients develop prostatitis. Also, prostatic massage could be a possible trigger of septic shock induced by Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a posttransplantation patient. PMID:26798544

  14. Iron chelates bind nitric oxide and decrease mortality in an experimental model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kazmierski, W M; Wolberg, G; Wilson, J G; Smith, S R; Williams, D S; Thorp, H H; Molina, L

    1996-08-20

    The hydroxamic acid siderophore ferrioxamine B [FeIII(HDFB)+] and the iron complex of diethylenetri-aminepentaacetic acid [FeIII(DTPA)2-] protected mice against death by septic shock induced by Corynebacterium parvum + lipopolysaccharide. Although FeIII(DTPA)2- was somewhat more effective than FeIII(HDFB)+, the iron-free ligand H4DFB+ was significantly more effective than DTPA. The hydroxamic acid chelator has a much higher iron affinity than the amine carboxylate, allowing for more efficient formation of the FeIII(HDFB)+ complex upon administration of the iron-free ligand. Electrochemical studies show that FeIII(DTPA)2- binds NO stoichiometrically upon reduction to iron(II) at biologically relevant potentials to form a stable NO adduct. In contrast, FeIII(HDFB)+ is a stable and efficient electrocatalyst for the reduction of NO to N2O at biologically relevant potentials. These results suggest that the mechanism of protection against death by septic shock involves NO scavenging and that particularly effective drugs that operate a low dosages may be designed based on the principle of redox catalysis. These complexes constitute a new family of drugs that rely on the special ability of transition metals to activate small molecules. In addition, the wealth of information available on siderophore chemistry and biology provides an intellectual platform for further development. PMID:8799167

  15. A high angiopoietin-2/angiopoietin-1 ratio is associated with a high risk of septic shock in patients with febrile neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Endothelial barrier breakdown is a hallmark of septic shock, and proteins that physiologically regulate endothelial barrier integrity are emerging as promising biomarkers of septic shock development. Patients with cancer and febrile neutropenia (FN) present a higher risk of sepsis complications, such as septic shock. Nonetheless, these patients are normally excluded or under-represented in sepsis biomarker studies. The aim of our study was to validate the measurement of a panel of microvascular permeability modulators as biomarkers of septic shock development in cancer patients with chemotherapy-associated FN. Methods This was a prospective study of diagnostic accuracy, performed in two distinct in-patient units of a university hospital. Levels of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and angiopoietin (Ang) 1 and 2 were measured after the onset of neutropenic fever, in conditions designed to mimic the real-world use of a sepsis biomarker, based on our local practice. Patients were categorized based on the development of septic shock by 28 days as an outcome. Results A total of 99 consecutive patients were evaluated in the study, of which 20 developed septic shock and 79 were classified as non-complicated FN. VEGF-A and sFlt-1 levels were similar between both outcome groups. In contrast, Ang-2 concentrations were increased in patients with septic shock, whereas an inverse finding was observed for Ang-1, resulting in a higher Ang-2/Ang-1 ratio in patients with septic shock (5.29, range 0.58 to 57.14) compared to non-complicated FN (1.99, range 0.06 to 64.62; P = 0.01). After multivariate analysis, the Ang-2/Ang-1 ratio remained an independent factor for septic shock development and 28-day mortality. Conclusions A high Ang-2/Ang-1 ratio can predict the development of septic shock in cancer patients with febrile neutropenia. PMID:23915833

  16. Septic shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... and (rarely) viruses may also cause the condition. Toxins released by the bacteria or fungi may cause ... body has a strong inflammatory response to the toxins that may contribute to organ damage. Risk factors ...

  17. A multiplex cytokine score for the prediction of disease severity in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Jun; Tang, Yong-Min; Song, Hua; Yang, Shi-Long; Xu, Wei-Qun; Shi, Shu-Wen; Zhao, Ning; Liao, Chan

    2013-11-01

    Although many inflammatory cytokines are prognostic in sepsis, the utility of cytokines in evaluating disease severity in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with septic shock was rarely studied. On the other hand, a single particular cytokine is far from ideal in guiding therapeutic intervention, but combination of multiple biomarkers improves the accuracy. In this prospective observational study, 111 episodes of septic shock in pediatric hematology/oncology patients were enrolled from 2006 through 2012. Blood samples were taken for inflammatory cytokine measurement by cytometric bead array (CBA) technology at the initial onset of septic shock. Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 were significantly elevated in majority of patients, while tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were markedly increased in patients with high pediatric index of mortality 2 (PIM2) score and non-survivors. All the four cytokines paralleled the PIM2 score and differentially correlated with hemodynamic disorder and fatal outcomes. The pediatric multiplex cytokine score (PMCS), which integrated the four cytokines into one score system, was related to hemodynamic disorder and mortality as well, but showed more powerful prediction ability than each of the four cytokines. PMCS was an independent predictive factor for fatal outcome, presenting similar discriminative power with PIM2, with accuracy of 0.83 (95% CI, 0.71-0.94). In conclusion, this study develops a cytokine scoring system based on CBA technique, which performs well in disease severity and fatality prediction in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with septic shock. PMID:24051223

  18. Implementing ACCM critical care guidelines for septic shock management in a Cuban pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Cartaya, José M; Rovira, Luis E; Segredo, Yamilet; Alvarez, Idalys; Acevedo, Yoandra; Moya, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Sepsis is the most common direct cause of death worldwide and septic shock the syndrome's most serious complication. In 2002, the pediatric intensive care unit of the José Luis Miranda Pediatric University Hospital in Santa Clara (Villa Clara Province), Cuba, began implementing the recently published guidelines of the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) for management of pediatric and neonatal septic shock, observing a drop in case fatality from 34.6% to 19% between the years 2003 and 2007. ACCM updated these Guidelines in 2007. OBJECTIVE Describe experiences with the use of the 2007 ACCM updated Guidelines and discuss their possible impact in reducing case fatality. METHODS Between 2008 and 2010, a study was conducted of 280 children and adolescents, from newborns through 18 years, admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with a diagnosis of septic shock. The diagnostic and therapeutic criteria used were those recommended in the ACCM's 2007 updated Guidelines. The dependent variable was case fatality. Independent variables were age, sex, comorbidity or prior chronic disease, origin and course of sepsis, hemodynamic state, blood glucose level, hyperglycemia, organ dysfunction, volume of fluid therapy administered, use of mechanical ventilation and therapeutic response. RESULTS In the 3-year period, 28-day case fatality was 11.1% (31/280). A total of 45 patients had comorbidities, with 14 deaths and a case fatality rate of 31.1% vs. 7.2% (17/235) in previously healthy patients. Cold shock with a hemodynamic state of low cardiac output and high systemic vascular resistance predominated (68.9%), with low cardiac output and low systemic vascular resistance the least common type (12.5%), but the one with highest case fatality (34.4%). Hyperglycemia was present in 39.6% of patients, with 15.3% case fatality; case fatality was higher (25.6%) when hyperglycemia was in the 10-15.9 mmol/L range. Fluid therapy of 40-100 mL/kg was administered

  19. Arginine infusion in patients with septic shock increases nitric oxide production without haemodynamic instability.

    PubMed

    Luiking, Yvette C; Poeze, Martijn; Deutz, Nicolaas E

    2015-01-01

    Arginine deficiency in sepsis may impair nitric oxide (NO) production for local perfusion and add to the catabolic state. In contrast, excessive NO production has been related to global haemodynamic instability. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the dose-response effect of intravenous arginine supplementation in post-absorptive patients with septic shock on arginine-NO and protein metabolism and on global and regional haemodynamics. Eight critically ill patients with a diagnosis of septic shock participated in this short-term (8 h) dose-response study. L-Arginine-HCl was continuously infused [intravenously (IV)] in three stepwise-increasing doses (33, 66 and 99 μmol·kg-1·h-1). Whole-body arginine-NO and protein metabolism were measured using stable isotope techniques, and baseline values were compared with healthy controls. Global and regional haemodynamic parameters were continuously recorded during the study. Upon infusion, plasma arginine increased from 48±7 to 189±23 μmol·l-1 (means±S.D.; P<0.0001). This coincided with increased de novo arginine (P<0.0001) and increased NO production (P<0.05). Sepsis patients demonstrated elevated protein breakdown at baseline (P<0.001 compared with healthy controls), whereas protein breakdown and synthesis both decreased during arginine infusion (P<0.0001). Mean arterial and pulmonary pressure and gastric mucosal-arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide difference (Pr-aCO2) gap did not alter during arginine infusion (P>0.05), whereas stroke volume (SV) increased (P<0.05) and arterial lactate decreased (P<0.05). In conclusion, a 4-fold increase in plasma arginine with intravenous arginine infusion in sepsis stimulates de novo arginine and NO production and reduces whole-body protein breakdown. These potential beneficial metabolic effects occurred without negative alterations in haemodynamic parameters, although improvement in regional perfusion could not be demonstrated in the eight

  20. Relative adrenal insufficiency as a predictor of disease severity and mortality in severe septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Dalegrave, Daniele; Silva, Rafael Lockshin; Becker, Maicon; Gehrke, Lísia Varella; Friedman, Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate if cortisol responses to 250 µg of intravenously administered adrenocorticotropic hormone are related to disease severity and, hence, mortality. Methods This is a retrospective study in a medical-surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital. We studied 69 consecutive patients with septic shock over a 1-yr period; these patients underwent a short 250-µg adrenocorticotropic hormone test because they exhibited >6 hours of progressive hemodynamic instability requiring repeated fluid challenges and vasopressor treatment to maintain blood pressure. The test was performed by intravenously injecting 250 µg of synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone and measuring cortisol immediately before injection, 30 minutes post-injection and 60 minutes post-injection. Results The mean APACHE II score was 22±7. The intensive care unit mortality rate at day 28 was 55%. Median baseline cortisol levels (19 [11-27] µg/dL versus 24 [18-34] µg/dL, p=0.047) and median baseline cortisol/albumin ratios (7.6 [4.6-12.3] versus 13.9 [8.8-18.5]; p=0.01) were lower in survivors than in non-survivors. Responders and non-responders had similar baseline clinical data and outcomes. The variables that were significantly correlated with outcome based on the area under the ROC curves (AUC) were APACHE II (AUC=0.67 [0.535 to 0.781]), baseline cortisol (µg/dl) (AUC=0.662 [0.536 to 0.773], peak cortisol (µg/dl) (AUC=0.642 [0.515 to 0.755]) and baseline cortisol/albumin (AUC=0.75 [0.621 to 0.849]). Conclusions Increased basal cortisol is associated with mortality and disease severity. Cortisol responses upon adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation were not related to outcome. The cortisol/albumin ratio does not predict unfavorable outcomes better than total cortisol levels or help to improve the accuracy of the adrenocorticotropic hormone test. PMID:23917934

  1. Derivation of Urine Output Thresholds That Identify a Very High Risk of AKI in Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Leedahl, David D.; Schramm, Garrett E.; Dierkhising, Ross A.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Chawla, Lakhmir S.; Kashani, Kianoush B.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives To promote early detection of AKI, recently proposed pretest probability models combine sub–Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) AKI criteria with baseline AKI risk. The primary objective of this study was to determine sub-KDIGO thresholds that identify patients with septic shock at highest risk for AKI. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was a retrospective analysis of 390 adult patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary, academic medical center with septic shock between January 2008 and December 2010. Hourly urine output was collected from the time of septic shock recognition (hour 0) to hour 96, urine catheter removal, or ICU discharge (whichever occurred first). All available serum creatinine (SCr) measurements were collected until hour 96. The AKI pretest probability model was assessed during the first 12 hours of resuscitation and included the initial episode of oliguria, increase from baseline to peak SCr level, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III score in a multivariable receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. The primary outcome was the incidence of stage II or III (stage II+) AKI defined by KDIGO criteria. Secondary outcomes included the need for RRT and 28-day mortality. Results Ninety-eight (25%) patients developed stage II+ AKI after septic shock recognition. APACHE III score and increase in SCr level in the first 12 hours were not statistically associated with stage II+ AKI in multivariable ROC analysis. Consecutive oliguria for 3 hours had fair predictive ability for achieving stage II+ AKI criteria (area under ROC curve, 0.73; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.68 to 0.78), and oliguria for 5 hours demonstrated optimal accuracy (82%; 95% CI, 79% to 86%). Conclusions Three to 5 hours of consecutive oliguria in patients with septic shock may provide a valuable measure of AKI risk. Further validation to support this finding is

  2. A longer duration of polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column hemoperfusion improves pulmonary oxygenation in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Mitaka, Chieko; Tsuchida, Naoki; Kawada, Kenrou; Nakajima, Yasuaki; Imai, Takasuke; Sasaki, Sei

    2009-11-01

    Endotoxin plays an important role in the pathogenesis of septic shock. Exposure of endothelial cells to endotoxin activates endothelial cells and increases the surface expression of adhesion molecules, markers of endothelial damage in organ dysfunction. Endotoxin adsorption therapy by polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column (PMX) hemoperfusion has been used for the treatment of septic shock patients. In this study, we measured plasma concentrations of endotoxin and soluble adhesion molecules in septic shock patients before and after the PMX treatment then observed on the relationships between actual duration of use and various outcomes. Sixteen patients with septic shock were studied. The 28-day mortality rate was 50%. The elevated plasma concentrations of endotoxin decreased after the PMX treatment in the survivors but not in the nonsurvivors. The norepinephrine dose and plasma concentrations of soluble endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 significantly (P < 0.05) decreased in the PMX greater-than-2-h (prolonged) group than in the PMX 2-h (conventional) group (-17.8 +/- 14.6 vs. -1.8 +/- 2.7 microg/min, -143.0 +/- 111.0 vs. 0 +/- 2.8 ng/mL, and -126.2 +/- 144.9 vs. 16.5 +/- 108.1 ng/mL, respectively). Changes in the PaO2-FiO2 ratio and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score were significantly (P < 0.05) more improved in the PMX greater-than-2-h group than in the PMX 2-h group (75.4 +/- 80.7 vs. 1.2 +/- 49.2 and -0.8 +/- 1.8 vs. 2.2 +/- 1.9 torr, respectively). We thus suggest that a longer duration of PMX treatment may improve the pulmonary oxygenation associated with decreased adhesion molecules in septic shock.

  3. Derangements of coagulation and fibrinolysis in critically ill patients with sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Vervloet, M G; Thijs, L G; Hack, C E

    1998-01-01

    In patients with sepsis and septic shock, both coagulation and fibrinolysis are activated frequently leading to the syndrome of diffuse intravascular coagulation (DIC). The different mechanisms leading to abnormalities in coagulation and fibrinolysis are discussed in detail. The coagulation and fibrinolytic system appear to be influenced by the septic process largely independently, leading to a procoagulant imbalance between these systems. Coagulation is initiated by mediator-induced expression of tissue factor and is associated with consumption of the natural coagulation inhibitors antithrombin III, protein C, and protein S. As a result, high plasma levels of thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) can be found. The effects on fibrinolysis are dominated by (highly) increased levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), leading to inadequate fibrinolysis. Although levels of plasminogen activator antigen are increased, its activity is almost completely inhibited by PAI-1. The resulting effects predispose to a procoagulant state, with widespread fibrin deposition, which may be an important mechanism contributing to multiple organ failure. A thorough understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the DIC-syndrome is a prerequisite for a rational approach and future therapy for this severe complication of sepsis.

  4. Circulating high sensitivity troponin T in severe sepsis and septic shock: distribution, associated factors, and relation to outcome

    PubMed Central

    Røsjø, Helge; Varpula, Marjut; Hagve, Tor-Arne; Karlsson, Sari; Ruokonen, Esko; Pettilä, Ville

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess the clinical utility of a recently developed highly sensitive cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) assay for providing prognostic information on patients with sepsis. Methods cTnT levels were measured by the novel hs-cTnT assay at two time points (inclusion and 72 h thereafter) in a subgroup of patients from the FINNSEPSIS study and associations with clinical outcomes were examined. Results for the hs-cTnT assay were compared to those of the established fourth-generation cTnT assay. Results cTnT measured by the fourth-generation and hs-cTnT assay was detectable in 124 (60%) and 207 (100%) patients, respectively, on inclusion in this study. hs-cTnT levels on inclusion correlated with several indices of risk in sepsis, including the simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores. The level of hs-cTnT on inclusion was higher in hospital non-survivors (n = 47) than survivors (n = 160) (median 0.054 [Q1–3, 0.022–0.227] versus 0.035 [0.015–0.111] μg/L, P = 0.047), but hs-cTnT level was not an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. hs-cTnT levels on inclusion were also higher in patients with septic shock during the hospitalization (0.044 [0.024–0.171] versus 0.033 [0.012–0.103] μg/L, P = 0.03), while this was not the case for the fourth-generation cTnT assay or NT-proBNP levels. Conclusions Circulating hs-cTnT is present in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, associates with disease severity and survival, but does not add to SAPS II score for prediction of mortality. hs-cTnT measurement could still have a role in sepsis as an early marker of shock. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-010-2051-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20938765

  5. Septic shock during platelet transfusion in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Haesebaert, Julie; Bénet, Thomas; Michallet, Mauricette; Vanhems, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Although rare, transfusion-associated bacterial contamination (TABC) is nowadays the main risk associated with platelet concentrate (PC) transfusion. Consequences vary from spontaneously resolving symptoms to severe sepsis and death. In this report we have summarised a case of bacterial contamination and sepsis during PC transfusion in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia. Fifteen minutes after the PC transfusion began, she developed chills and rapidly worsened to septic shock. The episode was managed appropriately. The patient's blood cultures and PC unit cultures grew Escherichia coli. The microbiological susceptibilities of isolates from the patient and platelet bag were identical. No other source of E coli was found. Donor and blood products issued from the same donation investigations were negative. The causality between sepsis and PC transfusion might be difficult to confirm. As no method is available in daily practice to eliminate TABC risk, physicians should always consider TABC by immediately stopping the transfusion and conducting appropriate investigations. PMID:24172770

  6. Septic shock caused by Elizabethkingia meningoseptica: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jung, Su Hyeon; Lee, Boeun; Mirrakhimov, Aibek E; Hussain, Nasir

    2013-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman, resident of a nursing home presented with complaints of fever for 1 day. Initial history, physical examination and laboratory tests were consistent with the diagnosis of systemic inflammatory response syndrome; blood culture from peripheral and central perm catheter were sent. Patient was started on empiric antibiotics and aggressive hydration. Blood cultures from peripheral access and central perm catheter grew Elisabethkingia meningoseptica on the second day. Patient was transferred to the intensive care unit for septic shock where patient needed vasopressors. Antibiotics were switched to intravenous trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, perm catheter was removed and catheter tip culture was sent. Catheter tip grew E meningoseptica (45 colony forming units). Patient showed excellent treatment response to intravenous trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and was weaned off pressors on day 4 with uneventful stay afterwards.

  7. Glucose–insulin–potassium infusion in sepsis and septic shock: no hard evidence yet

    PubMed Central

    van der Horst, Iwan CC; Ligtenberg, Jack JM; Bilo, Henk JG; Zijlstra, Felix; Gans, Rijk OB

    2003-01-01

    There is no hard evidence yet for a positive effect of glucose–insulin–potassium infusion in sepsis, septic shock or burn patients. Each individual element of the glucose–insulin–potassium regimen, and eventually euglycaemia, should theoretically be beneficial. At present, evidence exists only for reduced mortality with strict metabolic treatment (i.e. blood glucose levels of 4.4–6.1 mmol/l) in critically ill patients admitted to surgical intensive care units, and for better metabolic regulation (i.e. blood glucose levels of 7.0–10.0 mmol/l) in patients with hyperglycaemia and/or diabetes mellitus, and in patients without signs of heart failure (i.e. Killip class I) during acute myocardial infarction. PMID:12617733

  8. Iron potentiates nitric oxide scavenging by dithiocarbamates in tissue of septic shock mice.

    PubMed

    Komarov, A M; Mak, I T; Weglicki, W B

    1997-10-24

    Vanin and co-workers (Kubrina et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1176 (1993) 240-244; Mikoyan et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1269 (1995) 19-24) reported that short term (30 min) iron (Fe) exposure potentiates nitric oxide (NO) production in tissues of septic shock mice, based on increased formation of NO complex by diethyldithiocarbamate (DETC). We have reexamined the effect of Fe administration in mice treated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and have not found any changes in nitrosylhemoglobin (HbNO) or (NOs- + NO3-) levels in blood 30 min after Fe-citrate complex injection. However, Fe-citrate promotes NO complex formation by iron-dependent NO traps: DETC, pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) and N-methyl-D-glucamine dithiocarbamate (MGD), when given simultaneously at 6 h after LPS. Rather than potentiation of NO production, our data support that short-term iron treatment (30 min) enhances in vivo spin trapping ability of dithiocarbamate. PMID:9375797

  9. Soluble Heparan Sulfate in Serum of Septic Shock Patients Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Murine Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lukas; Peters, Carsten; Schmitz, Susanne; Moellmann, Julia; Martincuks, Antons; Heussen, Nicole; Lehrke, Michael; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Marx, Gernot; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    The heart is one of the most frequently affected organs in sepsis. Recent studies focused on lipopolysaccharide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction; however myocardial dysfunction is not restricted to gram-negative bacterial sepsis. The purpose of this study was to investigate circulating heparan sulfate (HS) as an endogenous danger associated molecule causing cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis. We used an in vitro model with native sera (SsP) and sera eliminated from HS (HS-free), both of septic shock patients, to stimulate murine cardiomyocytes. As determined by extracellular flux analyzing, SsP increased basal mitochondrial respiration, but reduced maximum mitochondrial respiration, compared with unstimulated cells (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively). Cells stimulated with HS-free serum revealed unaltered basal and maximum mitochondrial respiration, compared with unstimulated cells (P = 0.1174 and P = 0.8992, respectively). Cellular ATP-level were decreased in SsP-stimulated cells but unaltered in cells stimulated with HS-free serum compared with unstimulated cells (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.1593, respectively). Live-cell imaging revealed an increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in cells stimulated with SsP compared with cells stimulated with HS-free serum (P < 0.0001). Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα and PPARγ) and their co-activators PGC-1α, which regulate mitochondrial function, were studied using PCR. Cells stimulated with SsP showed downregulated PPARs and PGC-1α mRNA-levels compared with HS-free serum (P = 0.0082, P = 0.0128, and P = 0.0185, respectively). Blocking Toll-like receptor 4 revealed an inhibition of HS-dependent downregulation of PPARs and PGC-1α (all P < 0.0001). In conclusion, circulating HS in serum of septic shock patients cause cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that HS may be targets of therapeutics in septic

  10. Effect of mode of hydrocortisone administration on glycemic control in patients with septic shock: a prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Loisa, Pekka; Parviainen, Ilkka; Tenhunen, Jyrki; Hovilehto, Seppo; Ruokonen, Esko

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Low-dose hydrocortisone treatment is widely accepted therapy for the treatment of vasopressor-dependent septic shock. The question of whether corticosteroids should be given to septic shock patients by continuous or by bolus infusion is still unanswered. Hydrocortisone induces hyperglycemia and it is possible that continuous hydrocortisone infusion would reduce the fluctuations in blood glucose levels and that tight blood glucose control could be better achieved with this approach. Methods In this prospective randomized study, we compared the blood glucose profiles, insulin requirements, amount of nursing workload needed, and shock reversal in 48 septic shock patients who received hydrocortisone treatment either by bolus or by continuous infusion with equivalent dose (200 mg/day). Duration of hydrocortisone treatment was five days. Results The mean blood glucose levels were similar in the two groups, but the number of hyperglycemic episodes was significantly higher in those patients who received bolus therapy (15.7 ± 8.5 versus 10.5 ± 8.6 episodes per patient, p = 0.039). Also, more changes in insulin infusion rate were needed to maintain strict normoglycemia in the bolus group (4.7 ± 2.2 versus 3.4 ± 1.9 adjustments per patient per day, p = 0.038). Hypoglycemic episodes were rare in both groups. No difference was seen in shock reversal. Conclusion Strict normoglycemia is more easily achieved if the hydrocortisone therapy is given to septic shock patients by continuous infusion. This approach also reduces nursing workload needed to maintain tight blood glucose control. Trial Registration Number ISRCTN98820688 PMID:17306016

  11. Cardiac Troponin Is a Predictor of Septic Shock Mortality in Cancer Patients in an Emergency Department: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi; Qdaisat, Aiham; Hu, Zhihuang; Wagar, Elizabeth A.; Reyes-Gibby, Cielito; Meng, Qing H.; Yeung, Sai-Ching J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic shock may be associated with myocardial damage; however, the prognostic value of cardiac enzymes in cancer patients with septic shock is unknown. In this study, we evaluated the prognostic significance of cardiac enzymes in combination with established prognostic factors in predicting the 7-day mortality rate of patients with septic shock, and we constructed a new scoring system, Septic Oncologic Patients in Emergency Department (SOPED), which includes cardiac enzymes, to predict 7-day mortality rates. Methods and Findings We performed a retrospective cohort study of 375 adult cancer patients with septic shock who visited the emergency department of a comprehensive cancer center between 01/01/2004 and 12/31/2013. The 7-day and 28-day mortality rates were 19.7% and 37.6%, respectively. The creatine kinase myocardial band fraction and troponin-I were significantly higher in patients who died in ≤7 days and ≤28 days than in those who did not. In Cox regression models, troponin-I >0.05 ng/mL plus Predisposition, Infection, Response, and Organ Failure (PIRO2011) or Mortality in Emergency Department Sepsis (MEDS) score was a significant predictor of survival for ≤7 days. With our new SOPED scoring system, the receiver operating characteristic area under the curve was 0.836, higher than those for PIRO2011 and MEDS. Conclusions Troponin-I >0.05 ng/mL was an important predictor of short-term mortality (≤7 days). The SOPED scoring system, which incorporated troponin-I, was more prognostically accurate than were other scores for 7-day mortality. Large multicenter studies are needed to verify our results and prospectively validate the prognostic performance of the SOPED score. PMID:27077648

  12. Identification of CD177 as the most dysregulated parameter in a microarray study of purified neutrophils from septic shock patients.

    PubMed

    Demaret, Julie; Venet, Fabienne; Plassais, Jonathan; Cazalis, Marie-Angélique; Vallin, Hélène; Friggeri, Arnaud; Lepape, Alain; Rimmelé, Thomas; Textoris, Julien; Monneret, Guillaume

    2016-10-01

    Sepsis represents the host's systemic inflammatory response to an infection. In this condition, immune response associates a marked inflammatory response and the delayed development of severe dysfunctions affecting both innate and adaptive responses. As neutrophils are the first line of defense against infection, they are central to the pathophysiology of sepsis in first hours. Nevertheless, their role during immunosuppression phase remains elusive. The main objective of the current work was to perform a transcriptomic study on purified neutrophils from septic shock patients (n=9) so as to identify genes that are differentially expressed during the first week after disease onset both (3-4 and 6-8days) versus healthy donors. Then, 45 septic shock patients were prospectively enrolled to confirm results at the protein level using flow cytometry. Twenty healthy volunteers (HV) were also included for the whole study. By comparing the transcriptome of purified neutrophils, we identified 364 up-regulated and 328 down-regulated genes differentially expressed. Of them, CD177 mRNA, coding for an activation molecule in chemotaxis, had the highest fold change modulation between patients and HV. This increase was then confirmed at the protein level. There was a constant subset of neutrophils that did not express CD177. However, when positive, septic neutrophils presented with significantly increased CD177 expression. Of note, no association between CD177 overexpression and features of immunosuppression has been highlighted. In addition, this up-regulation was negatively correlated with a decreased expression of CD10, a characteristic of immature myeloid cells. In conclusion, in this exploratory work, we shed light on the increased CD177 mRNA and protein expressions in circulating neutrophils after septic shock. Considering the potential dual roles of CD177 neutrophil (i.e., maturation/chemotaxis), negatively correlated in this study, its participation in septic shock

  13. [The role of bacterial endotoxins, receptors and cytokines in the pathogenesis of septic (endotoxin) shock].

    PubMed

    Lazarov, S; Balutsov, M; Ianev, E

    2000-01-01

    Sepsis, resistant to therapy, results in the development of septic (endotoxin) shock. The latter is caused by the endotoxins of different Gram-negative bacteria. Endotoxin (bacterial lipopdisacharide--LPS) interacts with cells through specific membrane or plasma soluble endotoxin receptors (sCD14, mlD14, LBP, CD13/CD14, CD16, CD116/CD18, L-selectin, etc.). Endotoxin interaction with the mCD14 receptor of the monocytes, macrophages and the neutrophils results in the production of a number of proinflammatory cytokines--tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), interleukines 1 and 6 (IL-1 and IL-6, etc), antiinflammatory cytokines--interleukines 10 and 12 (IL-10 and IL-12), cell adhesion molecules (P-selectin, E-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, etc.) and inducible enzymes: inducible NO synthase (iNOS), inducible phospholipase A2 (cPL-A2), inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2). All pathologic processes in the structure and function of human body during endotoxin shock are a result of the disbalance of a number of mediators with a proinflammatory and antiinflammatory effects.

  14. Clostridium sordellii as a Cause of Fatal Septic Shock in a Child with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beyers, Rebekah; Baldwin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii is a toxin producing ubiquitous gram-positive anaerobe, mainly associated with trauma, soft tissue skin infections, and gynecologic infection. We report a unique case of a new strain of Clostridium sordellii (not present in the Center for Disease Control (CDC) database) infection induced toxic shock syndrome in a previously healthy two-year-old male with colitis-related hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The patient presented with dehydration, vomiting, and bloody diarrhea. He was transferred to the pediatric critical care unit (PICU) for initiation of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Due to increased edema and intolerance of PD, he was transitioned to hemodialysis through a femoral vascular catheter. He subsequently developed severe septic shock with persistent leukocytosis and hypotension, resulting in subsequent death. Stool culture confirmed Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli 0157:H7. A blood culture was positively identified for Clostridium sordellii. Clostridium sordelli is rarely reported in children; to our knowledge this is the first case described in a pediatric patient with HUS. PMID:24891968

  15. Use of venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide tension difference to guide resuscitation therapy in septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Mallat, Jihad; Lemyze, Malcolm; Tronchon, Laurent; Vallet, Benoît; Thevenin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The mixed venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide (CO2) tension difference [P (v-a) CO2] is the difference between carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) in mixed venous blood (sampled from a pulmonary artery catheter) and the PCO2 in arterial blood. P (v-a) CO2 depends on the cardiac output and the global CO2 production, and on the complex relationship between PCO2 and CO2 content. Experimental and clinical studies support the evidence that P (v-a) CO2 cannot serve as an indicator of tissue hypoxia, and should be regarded as an indicator of the adequacy of venous blood to wash out the total CO2 generated by the peripheral tissues. P (v-a) CO2 can be replaced by the central venous-to-arterial CO2 difference (ΔPCO2), which is calculated from simultaneous sampling of central venous blood from a central vein catheter and arterial blood and, therefore, more easy to obtain at the bedside. Determining the ΔPCO2 during the resuscitation of septic shock patients might be useful when deciding when to continue resuscitation despite a central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) > 70% associated with elevated blood lactate levels. Because high blood lactate levels is not a discriminatory factor in determining the source of that stress, an increased ΔPCO2 (> 6 mmHg) could be used to identify patients who still remain inadequately resuscitated. Monitoring the ΔPCO2 from the beginning of the reanimation of septic shock patients might be a valuable means to evaluate the adequacy of cardiac output in tissue perfusion and, thus, guiding the therapy. In this respect, it can aid to titrate inotropes to adjust oxygen delivery to CO2 production, or to choose between hemoglobin correction or fluid/inotrope infusion in patients with a too low ScvO2 related to metabolic demand. The combination of P (v-a) CO2 or ΔPCO2 with oxygen-derived parameters through the calculation of the P (v-a) CO2 or ΔPCO2/arteriovenous oxygen content difference ratio can detect the presence of global anaerobic metabolism

  16. Use of venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide tension difference to guide resuscitation therapy in septic shock.

    PubMed

    Mallat, Jihad; Lemyze, Malcolm; Tronchon, Laurent; Vallet, Benoît; Thevenin, Didier

    2016-02-01

    The mixed venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide (CO2) tension difference [P (v-a) CO2] is the difference between carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) in mixed venous blood (sampled from a pulmonary artery catheter) and the PCO2 in arterial blood. P (v-a) CO2 depends on the cardiac output and the global CO2 production, and on the complex relationship between PCO2 and CO2 content. Experimental and clinical studies support the evidence that P (v-a) CO2 cannot serve as an indicator of tissue hypoxia, and should be regarded as an indicator of the adequacy of venous blood to wash out the total CO2 generated by the peripheral tissues. P (v-a) CO2 can be replaced by the central venous-to-arterial CO2 difference (ΔPCO2), which is calculated from simultaneous sampling of central venous blood from a central vein catheter and arterial blood and, therefore, more easy to obtain at the bedside. Determining the ΔPCO2 during the resuscitation of septic shock patients might be useful when deciding when to continue resuscitation despite a central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) > 70% associated with elevated blood lactate levels. Because high blood lactate levels is not a discriminatory factor in determining the source of that stress, an increased ΔPCO2 (> 6 mmHg) could be used to identify patients who still remain inadequately resuscitated. Monitoring the ΔPCO2 from the beginning of the reanimation of septic shock patients might be a valuable means to evaluate the adequacy of cardiac output in tissue perfusion and, thus, guiding the therapy. In this respect, it can aid to titrate inotropes to adjust oxygen delivery to CO2 production, or to choose between hemoglobin correction or fluid/inotrope infusion in patients with a too low ScvO2 related to metabolic demand. The combination of P (v-a) CO2 or ΔPCO2 with oxygen-derived parameters through the calculation of the P (v-a) CO2 or ΔPCO2/arteriovenous oxygen content difference ratio can detect the presence of global anaerobic metabolism.

  17. [Septic shock due to a community acquired Clostridium difficile infection. A case study and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bermejo, C; Maseda, E; Salgado, P; Gabilondo, G; Gilsanz, F

    2014-04-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection has changed in the past decade. The incidence rate of community acquired cases has increased in patients with no typical risk factors. We present a patient who was diagnosed with community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection who presented with acute abdominal pain, and subsequently developed acute renal failure and septic shock. We describe the diagnosis, treatment and outcome and brief review of the literature.

  18. Comparative analysis of survival between elderly and non-elderly severe sepsis and septic shock resuscitated patients

    PubMed Central

    Palomba, Henrique; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Silva, Eliézer; Pardini, Andreia; de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare outcomes between elderly (≥65 years old) and non-elderly (<65 years old) resuscitated severe sepsis and septic shock patients and determine predictors of death among elderly patients. Methods Retrospective cohort study including 848 severe sepsis and septic shock patients admitted to the intensive care unit between January 2006 and March 2012. Results Elderly patients accounted for 62.6% (531/848) and non-elderly patients for 37.4% (317/848). Elderly patients had a higher APACHE II score [22 (18-28) versus 19 (15-24); p<0.001], compared to non-elderly patients, although the number of organ dysfunctions did not differ between the groups. No significant differences were found in 28-day and in-hospital mortality rates between elderly and non-elderly patients. The length of hospital stay was higher in elderly compared to non-elderly patients admitted with severe sepsis and septic shock [18 (10-41) versus 14 (8-29) days, respectively; p=0.0001]. Predictors of death among elderly patients included age, site of diagnosis, APACHE II score, need for mechanical ventilation and vasopressors. Conclusion In this study population early resuscitation of elderly patients was not associated with increased in-hospital mortality. Prospective studies addressing the long-term impact on functional status and quality of life are necessary. PMID:26313436

  19. Overexpression of GTP cyclohydrolase 1 feedback regulatory protein is protective in a murine model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Starr, Anna; Sand, Claire A; Heikal, Lamia; Kelly, Peter D; Spina, Domenico; Crabtree, Mark; Channon, Keith M; Leiper, James M; Nandi, Manasi

    2014-11-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase contributes toward refractory hypotension, impaired microvascular perfusion, and end-organ damage in septic shock patients. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential NOS cofactor. GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) is the rate-limiting enzyme for BH4 biosynthesis. Under inflammatory conditions, GCH1 activity and hence BH4 levels are increased, supporting pathological NOS activity. GCH1 activity can be controlled through allosteric interactions with GCH1 feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). We investigated whether overexpression of GFRP can regulate BH4 and NO production and attenuate cardiovascular dysfunction in sepsis. Sepsis was induced in mice conditionally overexpressing GFRP and wild-type littermates by cecal ligation and puncture. Blood pressure was monitored by radiotelemetry, and mesenteric blood flow was quantified by laser speckle contrast imaging. Blood biochemistry data were obtained using an iSTAT analyzer, and BH4 levels were measured in plasma and tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography. Increased BH4 and NO production and hypotension were observed in all mice, but the extents of these pathophysiological changes were attenuated in GFRP OE mice. Perturbations in blood biochemistry were similarly attenuated in GFRP OE compared with wild-type controls. These results suggest that GFRP overexpression regulates GCH1 activity during septic shock, which in turn limits BH4 bioavailability for iNOS. We conclude that the GCH1-GFRP axis is a critical regulator of BH4 and NO production and the cardiovascular derangements that occur in septic shock.

  20. Activation of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation in children with meningococcal septic shock.

    PubMed

    Wuillemin, W A; Fijnvandraat, K; Derkx, B H; Peters, M; Vreede, W; ten Cate, H; Hack, C E

    1995-12-01

    Meningococcal septic shock (MSS) is complicated by activation of coagulation, fibrinolytic, and complement systems. We studied the contact system of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation in thirteen children with MSS. Activation was assessed upon admittance to the intensive care unit and 48 h thereafter, based on the measurement of factor XII- (FXII), prekallikrein- and factor XI (FXI) antigen levels, as well as on the detection of FXIa-FXIa inhibitor, FXIIa-C1-inhibitor, and kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complexes, respectively. Levels of FXII, prekallikrein and FXI were reduced to about 50% in all patients on admission, and were significantly higher 48 h later. FXIIa-C1-inhibitor complexes were elevated in 7 patients, and kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complexes in 2 patients. FXIa-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes were elevated in all patients, FXIa-C1-inhibitor complexes in nine, and FXIa-antithrombin III complexes in one patient. We conclude that patients with MSS have activation of the contact system, which may contribute to activation of coagulation, and thus to morbidity and mortality.

  1. Initial Emergency Department Diagnosis and Management of Adult Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Severe sepsis is a medical emergency affecting up to 18 million individuals world wide, with an annual incidence of 750,000 in North America alone. Mortality ranges between 28-50% of those individuals stricken by severe sepsis. Sepsis is a time critical illness, requiring early identification and prompt intervention in order to improve outcomes. This observation has led to increased awareness and education in the field of Emergency Medicine; it has also led to the implementation of critical interventions early in the course of patient management, specifically Early-Goal Directed Therapy, and rapid administration of appropriate antimicrobials. This review begins with a brief summary of the pathophysiology of sepsis, and then addresses the fundamental clinical aspects of ED identification and resuscitation of the septic patient. PMID:22737991

  2. Early goal-directed therapy in severe sepsis and septic shock: insights and comparisons to ProCESS, ProMISe, and ARISE.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H Bryant; Jaehne, Anja Kathrin; Jayaprakash, Namita; Semler, Matthew W; Hegab, Sara; Yataco, Angel Coz; Tatem, Geneva; Salem, Dhafer; Moore, Steven; Boka, Kamran; Gill, Jasreen Kaur; Gardner-Gray, Jayna; Pflaum, Jacqueline; Domecq, Juan Pablo; Hurst, Gina; Belsky, Justin B; Fowkes, Raymond; Elkin, Ronald B; Simpson, Steven Q; Falk, Jay L; Singer, Daniel J; Rivers, Emanuel P

    2016-01-01

    Prior to 2001 there was no standard for early management of severe sepsis and septic shock in the emergency department. In the presence of standard or usual care, the prevailing mortality was over 40-50 %. In response, a systems-based approach, similar to that in acute myocardial infarction, stroke and trauma, called early goal-directed therapy was compared to standard care and this clinical trial resulted in a significant mortality reduction. Since the publication of that trial, similar outcome benefits have been reported in over 70 observational and randomized controlled studies comprising over 70,000 patients. As a result, early goal-directed therapy was largely incorporated into the first 6 hours of sepsis management (resuscitation bundle) adopted by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign and disseminated internationally as the standard of care for early sepsis management. Recently a trio of trials (ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMISe), while reporting an all-time low sepsis mortality, question the continued need for all of the elements of early goal-directed therapy or the need for protocolized care for patients with severe and septic shock. A review of the early hemodynamic pathogenesis, historical development, and definition of early goal-directed therapy, comparing trial conduction methodology and the changing landscape of sepsis mortality, are essential for an appropriate interpretation of these trials and their conclusions. PMID:27364620

  3. Early goal-directed therapy in severe sepsis and septic shock: insights and comparisons to ProCESS, ProMISe, and ARISE.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H Bryant; Jaehne, Anja Kathrin; Jayaprakash, Namita; Semler, Matthew W; Hegab, Sara; Yataco, Angel Coz; Tatem, Geneva; Salem, Dhafer; Moore, Steven; Boka, Kamran; Gill, Jasreen Kaur; Gardner-Gray, Jayna; Pflaum, Jacqueline; Domecq, Juan Pablo; Hurst, Gina; Belsky, Justin B; Fowkes, Raymond; Elkin, Ronald B; Simpson, Steven Q; Falk, Jay L; Singer, Daniel J; Rivers, Emanuel P

    2016-07-01

    Prior to 2001 there was no standard for early management of severe sepsis and septic shock in the emergency department. In the presence of standard or usual care, the prevailing mortality was over 40-50 %. In response, a systems-based approach, similar to that in acute myocardial infarction, stroke and trauma, called early goal-directed therapy was compared to standard care and this clinical trial resulted in a significant mortality reduction. Since the publication of that trial, similar outcome benefits have been reported in over 70 observational and randomized controlled studies comprising over 70,000 patients. As a result, early goal-directed therapy was largely incorporated into the first 6 hours of sepsis management (resuscitation bundle) adopted by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign and disseminated internationally as the standard of care for early sepsis management. Recently a trio of trials (ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMISe), while reporting an all-time low sepsis mortality, question the continued need for all of the elements of early goal-directed therapy or the need for protocolized care for patients with severe and septic shock. A review of the early hemodynamic pathogenesis, historical development, and definition of early goal-directed therapy, comparing trial conduction methodology and the changing landscape of sepsis mortality, are essential for an appropriate interpretation of these trials and their conclusions.

  4. Oxymatrine protects against myocardial injury via inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 signaling in rat septic shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minghao; Wang, Xiuyu; Wang, Xiumei; Hou, Xiaolin; Teng, Peng; Jiang, Yideng; Zhang, Linna; Yang, Xiaoling; Tian, Jue; Li, Guizhong; Cao, Jun; Xu, Hua; Li, Yunhong; Wang, Yin

    2013-04-01

    Oxymatrine (OMT), an alkaloid extracted from Sophora japonica (kushen), is used to treat inflammatory diseases and various types of cancer in traditional Chinese medicine. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the anti‑inflammatory activity of OMT remain poorly understood. The present study explored the protective effect of OMT on myocardial injury in rats with septic shock by inhibiting the activation of the janus kinase‑signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway. OMT treatment was found to significantly inhibit the activation of JAK2 and STAT3 in myocardial tissue. It also attenuated the expression of pro‑inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin‑1β and tumor necrosis factor‑α. In addition, OMT exhibited anti‑inflammatory properties as heart function and myocardial contractility was improved and pathological and ultrastructural injury was prevented in myocardial tissue induced by septic shock. The results indicate that OMT exhibits substantial therapeutic potential for the treatment of septic shock‑induced myocardial injury through inhibition of the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:23404057

  5. Evaluation of the preventative effects exerted by Lactobacillus fermentum in an experimental model of septic shock induced in mice.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Belén; Rodríguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena; Comalada, Mònica; Bailón, Elvira; Camuesco, Desireé; Olivares, Mónica; Xaus, Jordi; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Gálvez, Julio

    2009-01-01

    The preventative effects of the probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 were evaluated in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) model of septic shock in mice. The probiotic was administered suspended in drinking water at the final concentration of 108 colony-forming units/ml for 2 weeks before the induction of an endotoxic shock by an intraperitoneal injection of LPS (400 microg/200 microl per mouse). Blood and different organs were collected after 24 h to evaluate the severity of the endotoxic shock and the preventative effects of the probiotic. L. fermentum reduced TNF-alpha levels in blood, which promotes the major alterations observed during septic shock, as well as the infiltration of activated neutrophils into the lungs. Furthermore, free radical overproduction and oxidative stress were associated with a significant decrease in hepatic glutathione levels in septic mice, and with an excessive NO production attributed to the induction of the inducible isoform of NO synthase (iNOS). In fact, hepatic glutathione levels were significantly increased in the group of mice receiving the probiotic, and the increased iNOS expression both in the colon and lungs was down-regulated in those mice treated with L. fermentum. Finally, pre-treatment with L. fermentum may also exert its protective action modulating the expression of different cytokines in splenocyte-derived T cells such us IL-2, IL-5, IL-6 or IL-10. In conclusion, pre-treatment with L. fermentum may exert its protective action against LPS-induced organ damage in mice by a combination of several actions including its antioxidant properties and by reduction of the synthesis of the pro-inflammatory TNF-alpha and IL-6.

  6. Plasma and tissue levels of neuropeptide y in experimental septic shock: relation to hemodynamics, inflammation, oxidative stress, and hemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Kuncová, Jitka; Sýkora, Roman; Chvojka, Jiří; Svíglerová, Jitka; Stengl, Milan; Kroužecký, Aleš; Nalos, Lukáš; Matějovič, Martin

    2011-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a potent vasoconstrictor released from the sympathetic nerves, has been suggested to counterbalance sepsis-induced vasodilation. Thus, the changes in plasma and tissue NPY concentrations in relation to hemodynamic variables and inflammatory markers in a porcine model of moderate septic shock were investigated. Susceptibility of NPY to be removed by continuous hemofiltration in two settings has been also studied. Thirty-four domestic pigs were divided into five groups: (i) control group; (ii) control group with conventional hemofiltration; (iii) septic group; (iv) septic group with conventional hemofiltration; and (v) septic group with high-volume hemofiltration. Sepsis induced by fecal peritonitis continued for 22 h. Hemofiltration was applied for the last 10 h. Hemodynamic and inflammatory parameters (heart rate, mean arterial pressure, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and NPY) were measured before and at 12 and 22 h of peritonitis. NPY tissue levels were determined in the left ventricle and mesenteric and coronary arteries. Sepsis induced long-lasting increases in the systemic NPY levels without affecting its tissue concentrations. Continuous hemofiltration at any dose did not reduce sepsis-induced elevations in NPY plasma concentrations, nor did it affect the peptide tissue levels. The increases in NPY systemic levels were significantly correlated with changes in the systemic vascular resistance. The results support the hypothesis of NPY implication in the regulation of the vascular resistance under septic conditions and indicate that NPY clearance rate during hemofiltration does not exceed the capacity of perivascular nerves to release it.

  7. Differing effects of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and vasopressin on survival in a canine model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Minneci, Peter C; Deans, Katherine J; Banks, Steven M; Costello, Renee; Csako, Gyorgy; Eichacker, Peter Q; Danner, Robert L; Natanson, Charles; Solomon, Steven B

    2004-12-01

    During sepsis, limited data on the survival effects of vasopressors are available to guide therapy. Therefore, we compared the effects of three vasopressors on survival in a canine septic shock model. Seventy-eight awake dogs infected with differing doses of intraperitoneal Escherichia coli to produce increasing mortality were randomized to receive epinephrine (0.2, 0.8, or 2.0 microg.kg(-1).min(-1)), norepinephrine (0.2, 1.0, or 2.0 microg.kg(-1).min(-1)), vasopressin (0.01 or 0.04 U/min), or placebo in addition to antibiotics and fluids. Serial hemodynamic and biochemical variables were measured. Increasing doses of bacteria caused progressively greater decreases in survival (P <0.06), mean arterial pressure (MAP) (P <0.05), cardiac index (CI) (P <0.02), and ejection fraction (EF) (P=0.02). The effects of epinephrine on survival were significantly different from those of norepinephrine and vasopressin (P=0.03). Epinephrine had a harmful effect on survival that was significantly related to drug dose (P=0.02) but not bacterial dose. Norepinephrine and vasopressin had beneficial effects on survival that were similar at all drug and bacteria doses. Compared with concurrent infected controls, epinephrine caused greater decreases in CI, EF, and pH, and greater increases in systemic vascular resistance and serum creatinine than norepinephrine and vasopressin. These epinephrine-induced changes were significantly related to the dose of epinephrine administered. In this study, the effects of vasopressors were independent of severity of infection but dependent on the type and dose of vasopressor used. Epinephrine adversely affected organ function, systemic perfusion, and survival compared with norepinephrine and vasopressin. In the ranges studied, norepinephrine and vasopressin have more favorable risk-benefit profiles than epinephrine during sepsis.

  8. Donor Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization-Containing Protein 2 (NOD2) Single Nucleotide Polymorphism 13 Is Associated with Septic Shock after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Grube, Matthias; Brenmoehl, Julia; Rogler, Gerhard; Hahn, Joachim; Herr, Wolfgang; Holler, Ernst

    2015-08-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) and toll-like receptor (TLR) 5 genes have been recently associated with the incidence and outcome of infections. In this study, we analyzed 38 patients with septic shock after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for an association of SNPs within NOD2 and TLR5 genes, with susceptibility to septic shock. One hundred twenty-seven transplant recipients unaffected by any infectious complications were used as controls. We found a significant association between the presence of donor NOD2 SNP13 (3016_3017insC) and the incidence of septic shock (P = .002). In multivariate analysis, donor NOD2 SNP13 appeared as an independent risk factor for the incidence of septic shock after allo-SCT. No association was found for recipient SNPs (NOD2 and TLR5) and donor NOD2 SNP8, SNP12, and TLR5-Stop SNP. Our results suggest that NOD2 SNP13 has an impact on the pathophysiology of severe infectious complications and is an independent risk factor for the development of septic shock after allo-SCT.

  9. [Septic arthritis in children with normal initial C-reactive protein: clinical and biological features].

    PubMed

    Basmaci, R; Ilharreborde, B; Bonacorsi, S; Kahil, M; Mallet, C; Aupiais, C; Doit, C; Dugué, S; Lorrot, M

    2014-11-01

    Septic arthritis has to be suspected in children with joint effusion and fever so as to perform joint aspiration, which will confirm the diagnosis by bacteriological methods, and to perform surgical treatment by joint lavage. Since development of current molecular methods, such as real-time PCR, Kingella kingae has become the first microbial agent of osteoarticular infections in young children, whereas Staphylococcus aureus is second. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an aid used to diagnose septic arthritis, but its elevation could be moderate. In a previous study, conducted at our hospital, 10% of children hospitalized for S. aureus or K. kingae septic arthritis had a CRP level<10 mg/L. To determine if diagnosis of septic arthritis could be made by other parameters, we analyzed the clinical and biologic features of these patients and compared them to those of children hospitalized for septic arthritis with initial CRP ≥10 mg/L. Among the 89 children with septic arthritis, 10% (n=9) had initial CRP<10 mg/L (K. kingae, n=5/63 ; S. aureus, n=4/26). Initial temperature and fibrinogen were significantly lower in the CRP<10 mg/L group than in the other (37.3°C vs. 37.9°C, P=0.039 and 4.19 vs. 5.72 g/L, P=0.003, respectively). Age, symptom duration before diagnosis, as well as leukocyte and platelet counts were similar in both groups. Two children (2/89=2.2%) with S. aureus septic arthritis had no fever, CRP elevation, or fibrinogen elevation. In the CRP-negative group, three of four children with S. aureus arthritis and one of five with K. kingae arthritis had a high CRP level (34, 40, 61, and 13 mg/L, respectively) 3 days after surgery and antibiotic treatment. One child with K. kingae septic arthritis and initial CRP<10 mg/L needed a second surgical drainage because of relapse of arthritis. In the S. aureus arthritis group, none of the children with initial CRP<10 mg/L experienced complications, while six of those with initial CRP≥10 mg/L needed a second surgical act

  10. Effects of Shenfu Injection in the Treatment of Septic Shock Patients: A Multicenter, Controlled, Randomized, Open-Label Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinchao; Lin, Peihong; Wei, Jie; Cao, Yu; Pan, Shuming; Walline, Joseph; Qian, Chuanyun; Shan, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of Shenfu on biochemical parameters and survival during resuscitation in patients with septic shock was examined. This was a multicenter, controlled, randomized, open-label trial carried out in 210 patients with septic shock from seven medical centers in China. They were randomized to Shenfu or saline. The primary outcome was lactate clearance. The secondary outcomes were shock index normalization, dose of vasopressors, ICU stay, hospital stay, and mortality. A total of 199 patients completed the trial. Blood pressure, heart rate, and other routine lab tests showed no difference between the groups. Lactate levels and lactate clearance were similar between the two groups. Hospital and ICU stay were similar between the two groups. When considering all patients, the 7- and 28-day mortality were similar between the two groups, but when considering only patients with lactate levels ≥4.5 mmol/L, the Shenfu group showed a better 7-day survival than the control group (7 days: 83.3% versus 54.5%, P = 0.034; 28 days: 72.7% versus 47.6%, P = 0.092). Shenfu may improve the 7-day survival in patients with impaired lactate clearance (≥4.5 mmol/L), but the mechanism for this effect is unclear. Additional studies are necessary to characterize the hemodynamic changes after Shenfu infusion. This trial is registered with ChiCTR-TRC-11001369. PMID:27446222

  11. Polymyxin B-immobilized fiber hemoperfusion with low priming volume in an elderly septic shock patient with marked endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tsukasa; Kawagoe, Yasuhiro; Ueda, Yoshihiko; Koide, Hikaru

    2005-01-01

    An 84-year-old woman with septic shock caused by pyelonephritis is described herein. She was admitted for severe back pain and high fever. Her white blood cell (WBC) count and C-reactive protein (CRP) and endotoxin levels were elevated at 38,000/microl, 40.0 mg/dl, and 8,400 pg/ml, respectively. Her blood pressure was 80/34 mm Hg. Urinalysis revealed occult blood with innumerable WBCs. Plain abdominal radiography showed calcium stones in both kidneys. Septic shock with endotoxemia was diagnosed, and the patient was treated with antibiotics, gamma-globulin, and dopamine. However, her plasma endotoxin level remained high for 3 days. We performed direct hemoperfusion twice using a polymyxin B-immobilized fiber (PMX-F) column with a low priming volume. After PMX-F treatment, the patient's temperature decreased to 36.8 degrees C; her WBC count and CRP level decreased to 9,200/microl and 3.8 mg/dl, respectively. Her plasma endotoxin level decreased to 840 pg/ml after the first treatment and to 188 pg/ml after the second treatment. The next day, her blood endotoxin level further decreased to 32 pg/ml. Her blood pressure increased to 92/60 mm Hg after the first treatment and to 118/76 mm Hg after the second treatment. The patient was discharged on day 26 after admission. Our experience in this case suggests that PMX-F treatment with a low priming volume may be beneficial in elderly patients with septic shock and marked endotoxemia. PMID:16156319

  12. Impact of timely antibiotic administration on outcomes in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Young Min; Chae, Minjung Kathy; Hwang, Sung Yeon; Jin, Sang-Chan; Lee, Tae Rim; Cha, Won Chul; Jo, Ik Joon; Sim, Min Seob; Song, Keun Jeong; Jeong, Yeon Kwon; Shin, Tae Gun

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate the effect of timely antibiotic administration on outcomes in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Methods We analyzed data from a sepsis registry that included adult patients who initially presented to the emergency department (ED) and met criteria for severe sepsis or septic shock. Timely antibiotic use was defined as administration of a broad-spectrum antibiotic within three hours from the time of ED arrival. Multivariable logistic and linear regression analyses were performed to assess associations between timely administration of antibiotics and outcomes, including hospital mortality, 48-hour change in Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (delta SOFA), and hospital length of stay (LOS). Results A total of 591 patients were included in the study. In-hospital mortality was 16.9% for patients receiving timely antibiotics (n=377) and 22.9% for patients receiving delayed antibiotics (n=214; P=0.04). The adjusted odds ratio for in-hospital survival was 0.54 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34 to 0.87; P=0.01) in patients who received timely antibiotics. Timely antibiotic administration was also significantly associated with higher delta SOFA (2 vs. 1) and shorter hospital LOS among survivors (11 days vs. 15 days). Multivariable linear regression analyses showed that timely antibiotic administration was significantly associated with increased delta SOFA and decreased hospital LOS. Conclusion Antibiotic administration within three hours from the time of ED arrival was significantly associated with improved outcomes, including in-hospital survival, reversal of organ failure, and shorter hospital LOS, in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. PMID:27752550

  13. Applying dynamic parameters to predict hemodynamic response to volume expansion in spontaneously breathing patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Lanspa, Michael J; Grissom, Colin K; Hirshberg, Eliotte L; Jones, Jason P; Brown, Samuel M

    2013-02-01

    Volume expansion is a mainstay of therapy in septic shock, although its effect is difficult to predict using conventional measurements. Dynamic parameters, which vary with respiratory changes, appear to predict hemodynamic response to fluid challenge in mechanically ventilated, paralyzed patients. Whether they predict response in patients who are free from mechanical ventilation is unknown. We hypothesized that dynamic parameters would be predictive in patients not receiving mechanical ventilation. This is a prospective, observational, pilot study. Patients with early septic shock and who were not receiving mechanical ventilation received 10-mL/kg volume expansion (VE) at their treating physician's discretion after initial resuscitation in the emergency department. We used transthoracic echocardiography to measure vena cava collapsibility index and aortic velocity variation before VE. We used a pulse contour analysis device to measure stroke volume variation (SVV). Cardiac index was measured immediately before and after VE using transthoracic echocardiography. Hemodynamic response was defined as an increase in cardiac index 15% or greater. Fourteen patients received VE, five of whom demonstrated a hemodynamic response. Vena cava collapsibility index and SVV were predictive (area under the curve = 0.83, 0.92, respectively). Optimal thresholds were calculated: vena cava collapsibility index, 15% or greater (positive predictive value, 62%; negative predictive value, 100%; P = 0.03); SVV, 17% or greater (positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 82%, P = 0.03). Aortic velocity variation was not predictive. Vena cava collapsibility index and SVV predict hemodynamic response to fluid challenge patients with septic shock who are not mechanically ventilated. Optimal thresholds differ from those described in mechanically ventilated patients.

  14. A dose-finding study of methylene blue to inhibit nitric oxide actions in the hemodynamics of human septic shock.

    PubMed

    Juffermans, Nicole P; Vervloet, Marc G; Daemen-Gubbels, Catharina R G; Binnekade, Jan M; de Jong, Martin; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2010-05-15

    Methylene blue increases blood pressure and myocardial function in septic shock mainly by inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) actions. However, a dose-dependency of methylene blue has not been established. Therefore, the compound is currently used as rescue treatment only. To evaluate dose-dependency, a prospective, randomized, double blind, single centre study was performed in 15 consecutive, mechanically ventilated patients with septic shock admitted to the intensive care unit, in whom methylene blue was infused at 1 mg/kg (n=4), 3 mg/kg (n=6) or 7 mg/kg (n=5) over 20 min. Hemodynamic parameters were measured before and after the infusion. Gastric tonometry was performed. Methylene blue treatment increased heart rate, cardiac index, mean arterial, pulmonary artery, pulmonary artery occlusion and central venous pressures, systemic vascular resistance, ventricular stroke work indices and O(2) delivery and uptake, and decreased lactate levels. Methylene blue had a dose-dependent effect on cardiac index, mean arterial, mean pulmonary artery and pulmonary artery occlusion pressures, left ventricular function, O(2) delivery and consumption and lactate levels. The drug dose-dependently increased the gastric-arterial blood PCO(2) gap. The data suggest that in human septic shock, methylene blue increases mean arterial blood pressure by an increase in cardiac index and systemic vascular resistance. The rise in cardiac index is caused by an increase in left ventricular filling and function, increasing tissue oxygenation, even at a dose of 1mg/kg. High doses of methylene blue may compromise splanchnic perfusion, even though further enhancing global hemodynamics, and should therefore, be avoided in future studies.

  15. Effect of C1 inhibitor on inflammatory and physiologic response patterns in primates suffering from lethal septic shock.

    PubMed

    Jansen, P M; Eisele, B; de Jong, I W; Chang, A; Delvos, U; Taylor, F B; Hack, C E

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of C1 inhibitor (C1-inh), an inhibitor of the classical pathway of complement and the contact system, on the physiologic and inflammatory response in baboons suffering from lethal Escherichia coli sepsis. Five animals pretreated with 500 U/kg C1-inh (treatment group; n = 5), followed by a 9-h continuous infusion of 200 U/kg C1-inh subsequent to bacterial challenge, were compared with five controls receiving E. coli alone. Of the treatment group, one animal survived and another lived beyond 48 h, whereas all control animals died within 27 h. In four of five treated animals, less severe pathology was observed in various target organs. C1-inh administration did not prevent the hemodynamic or hematologic changes observed upon E. coli infusion. The activation of fibrinolysis and the development of disseminated intravascular coagulation were essentially unaffected by C1-inh. However, C1-inh supplementation significantly reduced decreases in plasma levels of factor XII and prekallikrein and abrogated the systemic appearance of C4b/c, indicating substantial inhibition of activation of the contact system and the classical complement pathway, respectively. Furthermore, treated animals displayed a reduced elaboration of various cytokines including TNF, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-8. Thus, the administration of C1-inh may have a beneficial but modest effect on the clinical course and outcome of severe sepsis in nonhuman primates. We suggest that activated complement and/or contact system proteases may, at least in part, contribute to the attendant manifestations of septic shock through an augmentation of the cytokine response.

  16. Acute cyst rupture, hemorrhage and septic shock after a shockwave lithotripsy in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeong Gon; Bae, Sang Rak; Lho, Yong Soo; Park, Hyoung Keun; Paick, Sung Hyun

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of urinary calculi in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) ranges from 10 to 36 %. Shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) for urinary calculi in ADPKD was reported to be a safe and effective treatment option. However, there is a potential risk of cyst rupture and traumatic hemorrhage because of shockwaves. A 39-year-old female with polycystic kidneys and upper ureter stone was treated with SWL and developed life-threatening complications of cyst rupture, traumatic hemorrhage and septic shock. She was initially treated with supportive care in the intensive care unit, but in the end nephrectomy was performed.

  17. Determinants of functional status among survivors of severe sepsis and septic shock: One-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalaf, Mustafa S.; Al Ehnidi, Fatimah H.; Al-Dorzi, Hasan M.; Tamim, Hani M.; Abd-Aziz, Noorizan; Tangiisuran, Balamurugan; Hassan, Yahaya; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Sepsis is a leading cause of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions worldwide and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Limited data exist regarding the outcomes and functional status among survivors of severe sepsis and septic shock. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the functional status among survivors of severe sepsis and septic shock a year after hospital discharge. METHODS: Adult patients admitted between April 2007 and March 2010 to the medical-surgical ICU of a tertiary hospital in Saudi Arabia, were included in this study. The ICU database was investigated for patients with a diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock. Survival status was determined based on hospital discharge. Patients who required re-admission, stayed in ICU for less than 24 hours, had incomplete data were all excluded. Survivors were interviewed through phone calls to determine their functional status one-year post-hospital discharge using Karnofsky performance status scale. RESULTS: A total of 209 patients met the eligibility criteria. We found that 38 (18.1%) patients had severe disability before admission, whereas 109 (52.2%) patients were with severe disability or died one-year post-hospital discharge. Only one-third of the survivors had good functional status one-year post-discharge (no/mild disability). After adjustment of baseline variables, age [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01-1.04] and pre-sepsis functional status of severe disability (aOR = 50.9, 95% CI = 6.82-379.3) were found to be independent predictors of functional status of severe disability one-year post-hospital discharge among survivors. CONCLUSIONS: We found that only one-third of the survivors of severe sepsis and septic shock had good functional status one-year post-discharge (no/mild disability). Age and pre-sepsis severe disability were the factors that highly predicted the level of functional status one-year post-hospital discharge. PMID:25829965

  18. Clinical and microbiological outcome in septic patients with extremely low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at initiation of critical care.

    PubMed

    De Pascale, G; Vallecoccia, M S; Schiattarella, A; Di Gravio, V; Cutuli, S L; Bello, G; Montini, L; Pennisi, M A; Spanu, T; Zuppi, C; Quraishi, S A; Antonelli, M

    2016-05-01

    A relationship between vitamin D status and mortality in patients in intensive care units (ICU) has been documented. The present study aims to describe the clinical profile and sepsis-related outcome of critically ill septic patients with extremely low (<7 ng/mL) vitamin D levels at ICU admission. We conducted an observational study in the ICU of a teaching hospital including all patients admitted with severe sepsis/septic shock and undergoing 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) testing within the first 24 hours from admission. We studied 107 patients over 12 months. At ICU admission vitamin D deficiency (≤20 ng/mL) was observed in 93.5% of the patients: 57 (53.3%) showed levels <7 ng/mL. As primary outcome, sepsis-related mortality rate was higher in patients with vitamin D levels <7 ng/mL (50.9% versus 26%). Multivariate regression analysis showed that vitamin D concentration <7 ng/mL on ICU admission (p 0.01) and higher mean SAPS II (p <0.01) score were independent predictors of sepsis-related mortality. Patients with very low vitamin D levels suffered higher rate of microbiologically confirmed infections but a lower percentage of microbiological eradication with respect to patients whose values were >7 ng/mL (80.7% versus 58%, p 0.02; 35.3% versus 68%; p 0.03, respectively). Post hoc analysis showed that, in the extremely low vitamin D group, the 52 patients with pneumonia showed a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (9 days (3.75-12.5 days) versus 4 days (2-9 days), p 0.04) and the 66 with septic shock needed vasopressor support for a longer period of time (7 days (4-10 days) versus 4 days (2-7.25 days), p 0.02). Our results suggest that in critical septic patients extremely low vitamin D levels on admission may be a major determinant of clinical outcome. Benefits of vitamin D replacement therapy in this population should be elucidated. PMID:26721785

  19. Early goal-directed therapy reduces mortality in adult patients with severe sepsis and septic shock: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chelkeba, Legese; Ahmadi, Arezoo; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Najafi, Atabak; Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Survival sepsis campaign guidelines have promoted early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) as a means for reduction of mortality. On the other hand, there were conflicting results coming out of recently published meta-analyses on mortality benefits of EGDT in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. On top of that, the findings of three recently done randomized clinical trials (RCTs) showed no survival benefit by employing EGDT compared to usual care. Therefore, we aimed to do a meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of EGDT on mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock patients. Methodology: We included RCTs that compared EGDT with usual care in our meta-analysis. We searched in Hinari, PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane central register of controlled trials electronic databases and other articles manually from lists of references of extracted articles. Our primary end point was overall mortality. Results: A total of nine trails comprising 4783 patients included in our analysis. We found that EGDT significantly reduced mortality in a random-effect model (RR, 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72–0.94; P = 0.008;   I2 =50%). We also did subgroup analysis stratifying the studies by the socioeconomic status of the country where studies were conducted, risk of bias, the number of sites where the trials were conducted, setting of trials, publication year, and sample size. Accordingly, trials carried out in low to middle economic income countries (RR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.67–0.91; P = 0.002; I2 = 34%) significantly reduced mortality compared to those in higher income countries (RR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.33–1.06; P = 0.28; I2 = 29%). On the other hand, patients receiving EGDT had longer length of hospital stay compared to the usual care (mean difference, 0.49; 95% CI, –0.04–1.02; P = 0.07; I2 = 0%). Conclusion: The result of our study showed that EGDT significantly reduced mortality in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Paradoxically, EGDT increased

  20. Creating a pro-survival and anti-inflammatory phenotype by modulation of acetylation in models of hemorrhagic and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqing; Alam, Hasan B

    2012-01-01

    Shock, regardless of etiology, is characterized by decreased tissue perfusion resulting in cell death, organ dysfunction, and poor survival. Current therapies largely focus on restoring tissue perfusion through resuscitation but have failed to address the specific cellular dysfunction caused by shock. Acetylation is rapidly emerging as a key mechanism that regulates the expression of numerous genes (epigenetic modulation through activation of nuclear histone proteins), as well as functions of multiple cytoplasmic proteins involved in key cellular functions such as cell survival, repair/healing, signaling, and proliferation. Cellular acetylation can be increased immediately through the administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI). A series of studies have been performed using: (1) cultured cells; (2) single-organ ischemia-reperfusion injury models; (3) rodent models of lethal septic and hemorrhagic shock; (4) swine models of lethal hemorrhagic shock and multi-organ trauma; and (5) tissues from severely injured trauma patients, to fully characterize the changes in acetylation that occur following lethal insults and in response to treatment with HDACI. These data demonstrate that: (1) shock causes a decrease in acetylation of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins; (2) hypoacetylation can be rapidly reversed through the administration of HDACI; (3) normalization of acetylation prevents cell death, decreases inflammation, attenuates activation of pro-apoptotic pathways, and augments pro-survival pathways; (4) the effect of HDACI significantly improves survival in lethal models of septic shock, hemorrhagic shock, and complex poly-trauma without need for conventional fluid resuscitation or blood transfusion; and (5) improvement in survival is not due to better resuscitation but due to an enhanced ability of cells to tolerate lethal insults.As different models of hemorrhagic or septic shock have specific strengths and limitations, this chapter will summarize our

  1. Prognosis Biomarkers of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock by 1H NMR Urine Metabolomics in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Modesto-Alapont, Vicente; Gonzalez-Marrachelli, Vannina; Vento-Rehues, Rosa; Jorda-Miñana, Angela; Blanquer-Olivas, Jose; Monleon, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and patient stratification may improve sepsis outcome by a timely start of the proper specific treatment. We aimed to identify metabolomic biomarkers of sepsis in urine by 1H-NMR spectroscopy to assess the severity and to predict outcomes. Urine samples were collected from 64 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock in the ICU for a 1H NMR spectra acquisition. A supervised analysis was performed on the processed spectra, and a predictive model for prognosis (30-days mortality/survival) of sepsis was constructed using partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). In addition, we compared the prediction power of metabolomics data respect the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. Supervised multivariate analysis afforded a good predictive model to distinguish the patient groups and detect specific metabolic patterns. Negative prognosis patients presented higher values of ethanol, glucose and hippurate, and on the contrary, lower levels of methionine, glutamine, arginine and phenylalanine. These metabolites could be part of a composite biopattern of the human metabolic response to sepsis shock and its mortality in ICU patients. The internal cross-validation showed robustness of the metabolic predictive model obtained and a better predictive ability in comparison with SOFA values. Our results indicate that NMR metabolic profiling might be helpful for determining the metabolomic phenotype of worst-prognosis septic patients in an early stage. A predictive model for the evolution of septic patients using these metabolites was able to classify cases with more sensitivity and specificity than the well-established organ dysfunction score SOFA. PMID:26565633

  2. Prognosis Biomarkers of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock by 1H NMR Urine Metabolomics in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Simon, Monica; Morales, Jose M; Modesto-Alapont, Vicente; Gonzalez-Marrachelli, Vannina; Vento-Rehues, Rosa; Jorda-Miñana, Angela; Blanquer-Olivas, Jose; Monleon, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and patient stratification may improve sepsis outcome by a timely start of the proper specific treatment. We aimed to identify metabolomic biomarkers of sepsis in urine by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy to assess the severity and to predict outcomes. Urine samples were collected from 64 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock in the ICU for a (1)H NMR spectra acquisition. A supervised analysis was performed on the processed spectra, and a predictive model for prognosis (30-days mortality/survival) of sepsis was constructed using partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). In addition, we compared the prediction power of metabolomics data respect the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. Supervised multivariate analysis afforded a good predictive model to distinguish the patient groups and detect specific metabolic patterns. Negative prognosis patients presented higher values of ethanol, glucose and hippurate, and on the contrary, lower levels of methionine, glutamine, arginine and phenylalanine. These metabolites could be part of a composite biopattern of the human metabolic response to sepsis shock and its mortality in ICU patients. The internal cross-validation showed robustness of the metabolic predictive model obtained and a better predictive ability in comparison with SOFA values. Our results indicate that NMR metabolic profiling might be helpful for determining the metabolomic phenotype of worst-prognosis septic patients in an early stage. A predictive model for the evolution of septic patients using these metabolites was able to classify cases with more sensitivity and specificity than the well-established organ dysfunction score SOFA.

  3. Interleukin 12 levels during the initial phase of septic shock with purpura in children: relation to severity of disease.

    PubMed

    Hazelzet, J A; Kornelisse, R F; van der Pouw Kraan, T C; Joosten, K F; van der Voort, E; van Mierlo, G; Suur, M H; Hop, W C; de Groot, R; Hack, C E

    1997-09-01

    Plasma levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12), a cytokine consisting of two different polypeptide subunits (p40 and p35), were measured together with interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and other cytokines in 46 children with septic shock and purpura. The median (range) plasma IL-12 p40 level on admission was 457 (244-2677) pg/ml in non-survivors vs 189 (< 40-521) pg/ml in survivors (P = < 0.001). IL-12 p70 levels were elevated in only nine patients. IL-12 p40 plasma levels were positively correlated with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and PRISM-score, whereas they were negatively correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP), whole blood cell (WBC) and serum glucose levels. Twelve (29%) of the patients had detectable levels of IFN-gamma. Thus, circulating levels of IL-12 p40 and to a lesser extent those of IL-12 p70, are elevated in children with septic shock and purpura, and correlate with severity of disease and outcome.

  4. The relationship between blood lactate and survival following the use of adrenaline in the treatment of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Omar, S; Burchard, A T; Lundgren, A C; Mathivha, L R; Dulhunty, J M

    2011-05-01

    This prospective observational study evaluates the relationship between adrenaline, lactate and intensive care unit survival in septic shock. Forty patients requiring adrenaline therapy for a first episode of septic shock acquired > 24 hours after admission to the intensive care unit had blood lactate levels measured two-hourly over a 24-hour period. Adrenaline therapy was escalated until target mean arterial pressure was reached. The lactate index was calculated as the ratio of maximum lactate increase to the adrenaline increase. Lactate increased from 2.3 to 2.9 mmol x l(-1) (P = 0.024) and the mean adrenaline increase was 0.14 microg x kg'.minute(-1). Peak lactate correlated with peak adrenaline (rho = 0.34, P = 0.032). Lactate index was the only independent predictor of survival after controlling for age and Acute Physiological and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (odds ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.26, P = 0.009). A high lactate following adrenaline administration may be a beneficial and appropriate response.

  5. Coefficient of Variation of Coarsely Sampled Heart Rate Is Associated with Early Vasopressor Independence in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Samuel M.; Tate, M. Quinn; Jones, Jason P.; Kuttler, Kathryn G.; Lanspa, Michael; Rondina, Matthew T.; Grissom, Colin K.; Mathews, V.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Determine whether variability of coarsely sample heart rate and blood pressure early in the course of severe sepsis and septic shock predicts successful resuscitation, defined as vasopressor independence at 24 hours after admission. Methods In an observational study of patients admitted with severe sepsis or septic shock from 2009 to 2011 to one of two ICUs at a tertiary-care hospital, in whom blood pressure was measured via an arterial catheter, we sampled heart rate and blood pressure every 30 seconds over the first six hours of ICU admission and calculated coefficient of variability of those measurements. Primary outcome was vasopressor independence at 24 hours; secondary outcome was 28-day mortality. Results We studied 165 patients, of which 97 (59%) achieved vasopressor independence at 24 hours. Overall 28-day mortality was 15%. Significant predictors of vasopressor independence at 24 hours included the coefficient of variation of heart rate, age, APACHE II, the number of increases in vasopressor dose, mean vasopressin dose, mean blood pressure, and time-pressure integral of mean blood pressure below 60mm Hg. Lower sampling frequencies (up to once every 5 minutes) did not affect the findings. Conclusions Increased variability of coarsely sampled heart rate was associated with vasopressor independence at 24 hours after controlling for possible confounders. Sampling frequencies of once in five minutes may be similar to once in 30 seconds. PMID:24578465

  6. Thallium 201 uptake in kidneys and heart as an indicator of prognosis in septic shock in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Senda, M.; Ahmad, M.; Rubin, R.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-03-01

    The change in distribution of cardiac output in septic shock was examined by radionuclide imaging with thallium 201 thallous chloride (/sup 201/Tl) which allows noninvasive evaluation of relative blood flow to various organs except for the brain. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1 X 10(9)-2 X 10(10) organisms) were inoculated into the thigh of rats 18-24 hr before the study. The mean arterial pressure was measured with an intracarotid catheter. Fractional blood flow to the heart, kidneys, and liver was evaluated as organ uptake of /sup 201/Tl. Those with zero or less than 5% kidney uptake (n = 8) had a high heart uptake and all died within 3 hr even if their pressure was maintained. In contrast, 20 out of 24 rats with kidney uptake greater than 5% survived for more than 6 hr. Those results suggest that the kidney uptake, representing fractional renal blood flow, is an excellent indicator of short-term prognosis in septic shock.

  7. Serum Procalcitonin and Procalcitonin Clearance as a Prognostic Biomarker in Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min-Yi; Chen, Chun-Yu; Chien, Ju-Huei; Wu, Kun-Hsi; Chang, Yu-Jun; Wu, Kang-Hsi; Wu, Han-Ping

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the tendency of the plasma concentration and procalcitonin (PCT) clearance (PCTc) to act as biomarkers of prognosis in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. From 2011 to 2013, we prospectively analyzed patients with sepsis admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). The serum PCT was evaluated at the time of sepsis diagnosis and again after 48 h (day 3) and 96 h (day 5). PCTc after 48 h (PCTc-day 3) and 96 h (PCTc-day 5) was also calculated to evaluate the prognostic value for survival in patients with sepsis. A total of 48 patients were included. Overall mortality was 16.7% (8 patients). PCTc was higher in survivors than in nonsurvivors, with significant differences on day 3 and day 5 (p = 0.033; p = 0.002, resp.); however, serum PCT levels on day 1, day 3, and day 5 were not significant prognostic factors for survival. The prognosis of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock may be associated with PCTc. Dynamic changes of PCT reflected as PCTc at 48 h (day 3) and 96 h (day 5) after admission to the ICU may serve as a predictor of survival in critically ill patients with severe sepsis. PMID:27088084

  8. The Early Expression of HLA-DR and CD64 Myeloid Markers Is Specifically Compartmentalized in the Blood and Lungs of Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Małgorzata; Hoser, Grażyna; Zielińska-Borkowska, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Identification of reliable biomarkers is key to guide targeted therapies in septic patients. Expression monitoring of monocyte HLA-DR and neutrophil CD64 could fulfill the above need. However, it is unknown whether their expression on circulating cells reflects the status of tissue resident cells. We compared expressions of HLA-DR and CD64 markers in the circulation and airways of septic shock patients and evaluated their outcome prognostic value. The expression of CD64 on neutrophils and HLA-DR on monocytes was analyzed in the peripheral blood and mini-bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells by flow cytometry. Twenty-seven patients with septic shock were enrolled into the study. The fluorescence intensity of HLA-DR on circulating monocytes was 3.5-fold lower than on the pulmonary monocytes (p = 0.01). The expression of CD64 on circulating and airway neutrophils was similar (p = 0.47). Only the expression of CD64 on circulating neutrophils was higher in nonsurvivors versus survivors (2.8-fold; p = 0.031). Pulmonary monocytes display a higher level of HLA-DR activation compared to peripheral blood monocytes but the expression of neutrophil CD64 is similar on lung and circulating cells. Death in septic patients was effectively predicted by neutrophil CD64 but not monocytic HLA-DR. Prognostic value of cellular activation markers in septic shock appears to strongly depend on their level of compartmentalization. PMID:27413252

  9. Endotoxin adsorption therapy using polymyxin B-immobilized fiber as a treatment for septic shock-associated severe acute cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshihiro; Fujino, Yasuhisa; Onodera, Makoto; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Gaku; Kojika, Masahiro; Endo, Shigeatsu

    2013-10-01

    The application of endotoxin adsorption therapy for severe acute cholangitis is controversial. We present a survival case of septic shock and multiple organ failure due to severe acute cholangitis. The patient was treated by endotoxin adsorption therapy using polymyxin B-immobilized fiber because he continued to remain in shock even after successful endoscopic nasobiliary drainage. The patient was an 84-year-old male diagnosed with acute cholangitis and acute pancreatitis who was transferred to our department because of shock and severe dyspnea. The patient had already developed acute respiratory failure, acute renal failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. We performed endoscopic nasobiliary drainage immediately, but the patient continued to remain in shock and plasma endotoxin level was markedly elevated at 133.6 pg/mL. Therefore, we performed direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized fiber. On starting the hemoperfusion, blood pressure and urine volume increased, and the plasma endotoxin level reduced considerably. On the basis of our experience in this case, we think that direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized fiber may be a useful modality in the management of severe acute cholangitis.

  10. Improving outcomes for severe sepsis and septic shock: tools for early identification of at-risk patients and treatment protocol implementation.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Emanuel P; Ahrens, Tom

    2008-07-01

    Sepsis is a significant problem, and septicemia is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. Sepsis incidence is increasing, and the mortality rate is 20% to 50% for patients with severe sepsis. This article identifies methods for improving outcomes of severe sepsis and septic shock. Included are recommendations for diagnosis and treatment. Case studies are included.

  11. GM-CSF as successful salvage therapy of metamizole (dipyrone)-induced agranulocytosis with Fournier's gangrene and severe septic shock in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Annegret; Kietz, Silke; Bahlmann, Hagen; Jafarzade, Gunel; Lode, Holger N; Heckmann, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    This case report describes the successful use of granulocyte and macrophage colony-stimulating factor as salvage therapy and an alternative to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a 14-year-old adolescent with metamizole (dipyrone)-induced agranulocytosis and severe septic shock.

  12. GM-CSF as successful salvage therapy of metamizole (dipyrone)-induced agranulocytosis with Fournier's gangrene and severe septic shock in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Annegret; Kietz, Silke; Bahlmann, Hagen; Jafarzade, Gunel; Lode, Holger N; Heckmann, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    This case report describes the successful use of granulocyte and macrophage colony-stimulating factor as salvage therapy and an alternative to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a 14-year-old adolescent with metamizole (dipyrone)-induced agranulocytosis and severe septic shock. PMID:27525093

  13. Inhaled nitric oxide in acute respiratory distress syndrome with and without septic shock requiring norepinephrine administration: a dose–response study

    PubMed Central

    Mourgeon, Eric; Puybasset, Louis; Law-Koune, Jean-Dominique; Lu, Qin; Abdennour, Lamine; Gallart, Lluis; Malassine, Patrick; Rao, GS Umamaheswara; Cluzel, Philippe; Bennani, Abdelhai; Coriat, Pierre; Rouby, Jean-Jacques

    1997-01-01

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to assess whether the presence of septic shock could influence the dose response to inhaled nitric oxide (NO) in NO-responding patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Results: Eight patients with ARDS and without septic shock (PaO2 = 95 ± 16 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0), and eight patients with ARDS and septic shock (PaO2 = 88 ± 11 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0) receiving exclusively norepinephrine were studied. All responded to 15 ppm inhaled NO with an increase in PaO2 of at least 40 mmHg, at FiO2 1.0 and PEEP 10 cmH2O. Inspiratory intratracheal NO concentrations were recorded continuously using a fast response time chemiluminescence apparatus. Seven inspiratory NO concentrations were randomly administered: 0.15, 0.45, 1.5, 4.5, 15, 45 and 150 ppm. In both groups, NO induced a dose-dependent decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP), pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI), and venous admixture (QVA/QT), and a dose-dependent increase in PaO2/FiO2 (P ≤ 0.012). Dose-response of MPAP and PVRI were similar in both groups with a plateau effect at 4.5 ppm. Dose-response of PaO2/FiO2 was influenced by the presence of septic shock. No plateau effect was observed in patients with septic shock and PaO2/FiO2 increased by 173 ± 37% at 150 ppm. In patients without septic shock, an 82 ± 26% increase in PaO2/FiO2 was observed with a plateau effect obtained at 15 ppm. In both groups, dose-response curves demonstrated a marked interindividual variability and in five patients pulmonary vascular effect and improvement in arterial oxygenation were dissociated. Conclusion: For similar NOinduced decreases in MPAP and PVRI in both groups, the increase in arterial oxygenation was more marked in patients with septic shock. PMID:11056694

  14. Variation in the use of renal replacement therapy in patients with septic shock: a substudy of the prospective multicenter observational FINNAKI study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Indications for renal replacement therapy (RRT) have not been generally standardized and vary among intensive care units (ICUs). We aimed to assess the proportion, indications, and modality of RRT, as well as the association between the proportion of RRT use and 90-day mortality in patients with septic shock in Finnish adult ICUs. Methods We identified patients with septic shock from the prospective observational multicenter FINNAKI study conducted between 1 September 2011 and 1 February 2012. We divided the ICUs into high-RRT and low-RRT ICUs according to the median of the proportion of RRT-treated patients with septic shock. Differences in indications, and modality of RRT between ICU groups were assessed. Finally, we performed an adjusted logistic regression analysis to evaluate the possible association of the ICU group (high vs. low-RRT) with 90-day mortality. Results Of the 726 patients with septic shock, 131 (18.0%, 95% CI 15.2 to 20.9%) were treated with RRT. The proportion of RRT-treated patients varied from 3% up to 36% (median 19%) among ICUs. High-RRT ICUs included nine ICUs (354 patients) and low-RRT ICUs eight ICUs (372 patients). In the high-RRT ICUs patients with septic shock were older (P = 0.04), had more cardiovascular (P <0.001) and renal failures (P = 0.003) on the first day in the ICU, were more often mechanically ventilated, and received higher maximum doses of norepinephrine (0.25 μg/kg/min vs. 0.18 μg/kg/min, P <0.001) than in the low-RRT ICUs. No significant differences in indications for or modality of RRT existed between the ICU groups. The crude 90-day mortality rate for patients with septic shock was 36.2% (95% CI 31.1 to 41.3%) in the high-RRT ICUs compared to 33.9% (95% CI 29.0 to 38.8%) in the low-RRT ICUs, P = 0.5. In an adjusted logistic regression analysis the ICU group (high-RRT or low-RRT ICUs) was not associated with 90-day mortality. Conclusions Patients with septic shock in ICUs with a high

  15. SeptiFast real-time PCR for detection of bloodborne pathogens in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock.

    PubMed

    Markota, Andrej; Seme, Katja; Golle, Andrej; Poljak, Mario; Sinkovič, Andreja

    2014-09-01

    Several studies have been performed investigating the role of a real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay LightCycler SeptiFast with inconsistent results. In prospective evaluation of adult patients with severe sepsis or septic shock SeptiFast assay and blood culture results were compared regarding concordance, the impact of SeptiFast assay on antimicrobial therapy adjustment, time to results and the role of SeptiFast assay as a marker of disease severity. 63 blood sample sets were collected from 57 patients. 51 (80.9%) results were concordant negative and 7 (11.1%) concordant posi- tive. In one (1.6%) sample set blood culture was positive and SeptiFast assay negative, in three (4.8%) sample sets with negative blood cultures pathogens were detected by SeptiFast assay and in one (1.6%)patient an additional pathogen was detected by SeptiFast assay. If blood culture is considered as "gold standard", 1 (1.6%) SeptiFast false negative and 4 (6.3%) false positive results were identified (sensitivity 87.5%, specificity 92.6%, negative predictive value 97.8%). Antibiotic treatment was adjusted according to SeptiFast assay in 4 (6.3%) cases. Time to final results was significantly shorter with SeptiFast assay (32 +/- 23 h vs. 97 +/- 28 h, p < 0.0001). Positive SeptiFast assay was not associated with higher mortality, C-reactive protein orprocalcitonin (p = 0.74, p = 0.44 and p = 0.12, respectively). According to our results SeptiFast assay can be used as a valuable add-on to blood culture in diagnostic workup ofpatients with severe sepsis and septic shock but it cannot replace the blood culture.

  16. Predictors of outcome in ICU patients with septic shock caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Falcone, M; Russo, A; Iacovelli, A; Restuccia, G; Ceccarelli, G; Giordano, A; Farcomeni, A; Morelli, A; Venditti, M

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with mortality in intensive care unit patients with Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) septic shock. A retrospective analysis of intensive care unit patients with KPC-Kp infection and septic shock observed in a large teaching hospital from November 2010 to December 2014 was performed. A total of 111 patients were included in the study. The most frequent source of infection was unknown-focus bacteraemia in 53 patients (47.7%). The rate of resistance to colistin was 51.3%; 30-day mortality was reported for 44 patients (39.6%). Surviving patients were more frequently treated with an initial therapy (within 24 hours) including two or more antibiotics displaying in vitro activity against the isolated KPC-Kp strain (41.8 vs. 18.1%, p 0.01) and were also more likely to receive a definitive therapy including two or more in vitro active antibiotics (85.1 vs. 15.9%, p <0.001). Cox regression analysis revealed that a colistin-containing antibiotic regimen (hazard ratio (HR) 0.21, confidence interval (CI) 95% 0.05-0.72, p <0.001), use of two or more in vitro active antibiotics as definite therapy (HR 0.08, CI 95% 0.02-0.21, p <0.001) and control of removable source of infection (HR 0.14, CI 95% 0.04-0.25, p <0.001) were associated with favourable outcome; colistin resistance (HR 8.09, CI 95% 3.14-11.23, p 0.001) and intra-abdominal source of infection (HR 2.92, CI 95% 2.11-4.12, p 0.002) were associated with death. In conclusion, use of a definitive therapy with at least two antibiotics displaying in vitro activity against the KPC-Kp isolates was the most important determinant of favourable outcome, whilst isolation of colistin-resistant strains was associated with death in septic patients with KPC-Kp infection.

  17. Clinical Features, Short-Term Mortality, and Prognostic Risk Factors of Septic Patients Admitted to Internal Medicine Units: Results of an Italian Multicenter Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Antonino; Dentali, Francesco; La Regina, Micaela; Foglia, Emanuela; Gambacorta, Maurizia; Garagiola, Elisabetta; Bonardi, Giorgio; Clerici, Pierangelo; Concia, Ercole; Colombo, Fabrizio; Campanini, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Only a few studies provided data on the clinical history of sepsis within internal Medicine units. The aim of the study was to assess the short-term mortality and to evaluate the prognostic risk factors in a large cohort of septic patients treated in internal medicine units. Thirty-one internal medicine units participated to the study. Within each participating unit, all admitted patients were screened for the presence of sepsis. A total of 533 patients were included; 78 patients (14.6%, 95%CI 11.9, 18.0%) died during hospitalization; mortality rate was 5.5% (95% CI 3.1, 9.6%) in patients with nonsevere sepsis and 20.1% (95%CI 16.2, 28.8%) in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Severe sepsis or septic shock (OR 4.41, 95%CI 1.93, 10.05), immune system weakening (OR 2.10, 95%CI 1.12, 3.94), active solid cancer (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.16, 3.94), and age (OR 1.03 per year, 95% CI 1.01, 1.06) were significantly associated with an increased mortality risk, whereas blood culture positive for Escherichia coli was significantly associated with a reduced mortality risk (OR 0.46, 95%CI 0.24, 0.88). In-hospital mortality of septic patients treated in internal medicine units appeared similar to the mortality rate obtained in recent studies conducted in the ICU setting. PMID:26825876

  18. Clinical Features, Short-Term Mortality, and Prognostic Risk Factors of Septic Patients Admitted to Internal Medicine Units: Results of an Italian Multicenter Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Antonino; Dentali, Francesco; La Regina, Micaela; Foglia, Emanuela; Gambacorta, Maurizia; Garagiola, Elisabetta; Bonardi, Giorgio; Clerici, Pierangelo; Concia, Ercole; Colombo, Fabrizio; Campanini, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Only a few studies provided data on the clinical history of sepsis within internal Medicine units. The aim of the study was to assess the short-term mortality and to evaluate the prognostic risk factors in a large cohort of septic patients treated in internal medicine units. Thirty-one internal medicine units participated to the study. Within each participating unit, all admitted patients were screened for the presence of sepsis. A total of 533 patients were included; 78 patients (14.6%, 95%CI 11.9, 18.0%) died during hospitalization; mortality rate was 5.5% (95% CI 3.1, 9.6%) in patients with nonsevere sepsis and 20.1% (95%CI 16.2, 28.8%) in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Severe sepsis or septic shock (OR 4.41, 95%CI 1.93, 10.05), immune system weakening (OR 2.10, 95%CI 1.12, 3.94), active solid cancer (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.16, 3.94), and age (OR 1.03 per year, 95% CI 1.01, 1.06) were significantly associated with an increased mortality risk, whereas blood culture positive for Escherichia coli was significantly associated with a reduced mortality risk (OR 0.46, 95%CI 0.24, 0.88). In-hospital mortality of septic patients treated in internal medicine units appeared similar to the mortality rate obtained in recent studies conducted in the ICU setting.

  19. DGAEE, a newly synthesized derivative of glycyrrhetinic acid, potently attenuates mouse septic shock via its main metabolite DGA in an IL-10-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinque; Liu, Mei; Wu, Xin; Dou, Yannong; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue; Wei, Zhifeng

    2015-12-01

    Endotoxin can stimulate inflammatory cytokine release from monocytes/macrophages and result in septic shock. Glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), the main bioactive component of licorice, possesses substantial anti-inflammatory activity. Here, we explored effect of 11-deoxy-18α-glycyrrhetinic acid-30-ethyl ester (DGAEE), a newly synthesized derivative of GA, on septic shock. DGAEE and its main metabolite 11-deoxy-18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (DGA) significantly alleviated septic shock as evidenced by improvements of survival rates, lung histopathological changes and wet/dry ratio in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/D-galactosamine-stimulated mice, and decreased blood pressure in LPS/D-galactosamine-stimulated rats. The two compounds decreased serum levels of NO, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and increased the level of IL-10 more potently in mice. In LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, DGA but not DGAEE showed marked regulation of NO, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 levels, suggesting that DGAEE display anti-shock effect by DGA rather than itself. Moreover, the neutralizing antibody against IL-10 markedly prohibited the inhibitory effect of DGA on the production of cytokines from RAW 264.7 cells, and AS101 (an inhibitor of IL-10 biosynthesis) almost completely reversed the anti-shock effect of DGA in mice. In addition, DGA did not affect activation of NF-κB-p65 and p38 MAPK as well as IκBα degradation, but moderately reduced activation of ERK and JNK, and markedly increased phosphorylation of GSK3β in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. LY294002 (an inhibitor of GSK3β phosphorylation) and LiCl (an inhibitor of GSK3β activity) diminished and potentiated increase of IL-10 levels by DGA, respectively. In conclusion, DGAEE alleviates septic shock through DGA in an IL-10-dependent manner, and the mechanism is related to inactivation of GSK3β. PMID:26456500

  20. Antimicrobial cathelicidin polypeptide CAP11 suppresses the production and release of septic mediators in D-galactosamine-sensitized endotoxin shock mice.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Taisuke; Obata, Toru; Kuwahara-Arai, Kyoko; Tamura, Hiroshi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Nagaoka, Isao

    2009-08-01

    Endotoxin shock is a severe systemic inflammatory response that is caused by the augmented production and release of septic mediators. Among them, inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6 play a pivotal role. In addition, anandamide, an endogenous cannabinoid and high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a non-histone chromosomal protein has recently been recognized as members of septic mediators. We previously reported that cationic antibacterial polypeptide of 11-kDa (CAP11), an antimicrobial cathelicidin peptide (originally isolated from guinea pig neutrophils), potently neutralizes the biological activity of LPS and protects mice from lethal endotoxin shock. In this study, to clarify the protective mechanism of CAP11 against endotoxin shock, we evaluated the effects of CAP11 on the production and release of septic mediators in vitro and in vivo using a murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 and a D-galactosamine-sensitized murine endotoxin shock model. LPS stimulation induced the production of inflammatory cytokines and anandamide and release of HMGB1 from RAW264.7 cells. Importantly, CAP11 suppressed the LPS-induced production and release of these mediators by RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, LPS administration enhanced the serum levels of HMGB1, anandamide and inflammatory cytokines in the endotoxin shock model. Of note, CAP11 suppressed the LPS-induced increase of these mediators in sera, and LPS binding to CD14-positive cells (peritoneal macrophages), accompanied with the increase of survival rates. Together these observations suggest that the protective action of CAP11 on endotoxin shock may be explained by its suppressive effect on the production and release of septic mediators by CD14-positive cells possibly via the inhibition of LPS binding to the targets.

  1. Initial studies on the administration of C1-esterase inhibitor to patients with septic shock or with a vascular leak syndrome induced by interleukin-2 therapy.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Ogilvie, A C; Eisele, B; Jansen, P M; Wagstaff, J; Thijs, L G

    1994-01-01

    Activation of the complement and contact systems occur in patients with septic shock and is associated with a poor outcome. Activation of both systems is regulated by a common inhibitor, C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh). Functional levels of C1-Inh are normal or slightly decreased in septic patients although this inhibitor is an acute phase protein. Moreover, an increased turn-over of C1-Inh in sepsis likely occurs since levels of proteolytically inactivated ("modified") C1-Inh are increased in this syndrome. One may therefore postulate that in sepsis there is a relative deficiency of C1-Inh. Here we will summarize our preliminary studies in 11 patients with septic shock, who received high doses of C1-Inh for up to 5 days. Activation of complement and contact systems also occurs in "a human model for septic shock" i.e., the vascular leak syndrome (VLS) induced by immunotherapy with the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2). The similarity between VLS and sepsis is not only reflected by similar patterns of complement and contact activation, but also by comparable hemodynamic and biochemical changes, and by the involvement of a number of other inflammatory mediators, such as the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis and of neutrophils. Here we will also summarize our initial studies of the effect of C1-Inh administration to 6 patients with the VLS induced by IL-2. Our results indicate that high doses of C1-Inh can be safely administered to patients with septic shock or with the VLS, and may attenuate complement and contact activation in these conditions. Whether this therapy may reduce mortality and or morbidity of either syndrome has to be established by double-blind controlled studies.

  2. C1-inhibitor substitution therapy in septic shock and in the vascular leak syndrome induced by high doses of interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Ogilvie, A C; Eisele, B; Eerenberg, A J; Wagstaff, J; Thijs, L G

    1993-01-01

    C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) is the major plasma inhibitor of the complement and contact systems. Activation of either system has been shown to occur in patients with septic shock and is associated with a poor outcome. Functional levels of C1-INH tend to be normal in septic patients although paradoxically this inhibitor is an acute phase protein. Moreover, levels of proteolytically inactivated C1-INH are increased in sepsis pointing to an increased turn-over. These observations suggest a relative deficiency of biologically active C1-INH in sepsis. Complement and contact activation have also been shown to occur in the vascular leak syndrome (VLS) induced by immunotherapy with the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2), which syndrome may be regarded as a human model for septic shock. The similarity between VLS and sepsis encompasses more than complement and contact activation since a number of other inflammatory mediators considered to play a role in the pathogenesis of septic shock, are also involved in the development of VLS. The role and the mechanisms of complement and contact activation in sepsis and in the VLS are reviewed in this paper. Initial results of intervention therapy with high doses of C1-INH in these syndromes are also reported. It is concluded that high doses of C1-INH can be safely administered to patients with septic shock or with the VLS and may attenuate complement and contact activation in these conditions. Double-blind controlled studies are needed to definitely proved these effects and to establish whether this treatment is able to reduce mortality and morbidity of these syndromes.

  3. The Impact of Timing of Antibiotics on Outcomes in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Sarah A.; Miller, W. Ryan; Pryor, Jason; Puskarich, Michael A.; Jones, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to systematically review and meta-analyze the available data on the association between timing of antibiotic administration and mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock. Data Sources and Study Selection A comprehensive search was performed using a pre-defined protocol. Inclusion criteria: adult patients with severe sepsis or septic shock, reported time to antibiotic administration in relation to ED triage and/or shock recognition, and mortality. Exclusion criteria: immunosuppressed populations, review article, editorial, or non-human studies. Data Extraction Two reviewers screened abstracts with a third reviewer arbitrating. The effect of time to antibiotic administration on mortality was based on current guideline recommendations: 1) administration within 3 hours of ED triage; 2) administration within 1 hour of severe sepsis/septic shock recognition. Odds Ratios (OR) were calculated using a random effect model. The primary outcome was mortality. Data Synthesis 1123 publications were identified and 11 were included in the analysis. Among the 11 included studies, 16,178 patients were evaluable for antibiotic administration from ED triage. Patients who received antibiotics more than 3 hours after ED triage (< 3 hours reference), had a pooled OR for mortality of 1.16 (0.92 to 1.46, p = 0.21). A total of 11,017 patients were evaluable for antibiotic administration from severe sepsis/septic shock recognition. Patients who received antibiotics more than 1 hour after severe sepsis/shock recognition (< 1 hour reference) had a pooled OR for mortality of 1.46 (0.89 to 2.40, p = 0.13). There was no increased mortality in the pooled ORs for each hourly delay from <1 to >5 hours in antibiotic administration from severe sepsis/shock recognition. Conclusion Using the available pooled data we found no significant mortality benefit of administering antibiotics within 3 hours of ED triage or within 1 hour of shock recognition in severe sepsis and septic shock

  4. Exogenous heat shock cognate protein 70 pretreatment attenuates cardiac and hepatic dysfunction with associated anti-inflammatory responses in experimental septic shock.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jong-Hau; Yang, Rei-Cheng; Lin, Shih-Jen; Liou, Shu-Fen; Dai, Zen-Kong; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Wu, Jiunn-Ren

    2014-12-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that intracellular heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70) can be released into extracellular space with physiologic effects. However, its extracellular function in sepsis is not clear. In this study, we hypothesize that extracellular HSC70 can protect against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced myocardial and hepatic dysfunction because of its anti-inflammatory actions. In Wistar rats, septic shock developed with hypotension, tachycardia, and myocardial and hepatic dysfunction at 4 h following LPS administration (10 mg/kg, i.v.). Pretreatment with recombinant bovine HSC70 (20 μg/kg, i.v.) attenuated LPS-induced hypotension and tachycardia by 21% and 23%, respectively (P < 0.05), improved myocardial dysfunction (left ventricular systolic pressure: 33%; max dP/dt: 20%; min dP/dt: 33%, P < 0.05), and prevented hepatic dysfunction (glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase: 81 vs. 593 IU/L; glutamic-pyruvic transaminase: 15 vs. 136 IU/L, P < 0.05) compared with LPS-treated rats at 4 h. Heat shock cognate protein 70 also prevented LPS-induced hypoglycemia (217 vs. 59 mg/dL, P < 0.05) and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (1,312 vs. 6,301 IU/L, P < 0.05). Furthermore, HSC70 decreased LPS-induced elevation of circulating tumor necrosis factor α and nitrite/nitrate, and tissue expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 in the heart and liver. To investigate underlying mechanisms, we found that HSC70 attenuated LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB subunit p65 by blocking the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor κB. Finally, we showed that HSC70 repressed the activation of MAPKs caused by LPS. These results demonstrate that in LPS-induced septic shock, extracellular HSC70 conveys pleiotropic protection on myocardial, hepatic, and systemic derangements, with associated inhibition of proinflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor α, nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase 2

  5. Association of susceptibility to septic shock with platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 gene Leu125Val polymorphism and serum sPECAM-1 levels in sepsis patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Li, Fang-Shun; Zhang, Yuan-Huai; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Chao-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection and includes severe sepsis, septic shock and death. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is one cell adhesion molecule expressed on platelets and leukocytes. It regulates platelet activation and mediates transendothelial migration of leukocytes, thus maintaining the integrity of the vasculature. There are some animal experiments associated with the protective role of PECAM-1 against septic shock. However few host genetic risk factors have been identified for sepsis severity and susceptibility to septic shock. A case-control study was conducted, which included 217 patients with sepsis and 90 control subjects recruited from our hospital. One single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of PECAM-1 gene Leu125Val (C373G) was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Serum soluble PECAM-1 (sPECAM-1) levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results showed that the CG and GG genotypes of SNP in Leu125Val of PECAM-1 (rs668: C>G) was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to septic shock compared with CC genotype in sepsis patients (CG genotype, OR: 2.493, 95% CI: 1.175~5.287, P = 0.016; GG genotype: OR: 3.328, 95% CI: 1.445~7.666, P = 0.004). The serum levels of sPECAM-1 in the sepsis patients (47.1 ± 17.5 ng/ml) were significantly higher than those in the healthy controls (61.3 ± 20.9 ng/ml, P<0.01). Among sepsis patients, the serum levels of sPECAM-1 were significantly higher in CG and GG genotype than in CC genotype. In septic shock patients, nonsurvivors (83.7 ± 12.6 ng/ml, n = 69) had a significantly higher serum sPECAM-1 level than the survivors (76.9 ± 12.7 ng/ml, n = 53) (P<0.01). In conclusion, PECAM-1 Leu125Val polymorphism and its sPECAM-1 levels are associated with sepsis severity and susceptibility to septic shock. PMID:26884965

  6. Association of susceptibility to septic shock with platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 gene Leu125Val polymorphism and serum sPECAM-1 levels in sepsis patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Li, Fang-Shun; Zhang, Yuan-Huai; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Chao-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection and includes severe sepsis, septic shock and death. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is one cell adhesion molecule expressed on platelets and leukocytes. It regulates platelet activation and mediates transendothelial migration of leukocytes, thus maintaining the integrity of the vasculature. There are some animal experiments associated with the protective role of PECAM-1 against septic shock. However few host genetic risk factors have been identified for sepsis severity and susceptibility to septic shock. A case-control study was conducted, which included 217 patients with sepsis and 90 control subjects recruited from our hospital. One single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of PECAM-1 gene Leu125Val (C373G) was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Serum soluble PECAM-1 (sPECAM-1) levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results showed that the CG and GG genotypes of SNP in Leu125Val of PECAM-1 (rs668: C>G) was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to septic shock compared with CC genotype in sepsis patients (CG genotype, OR: 2.493, 95% CI: 1.175~5.287, P = 0.016; GG genotype: OR: 3.328, 95% CI: 1.445~7.666, P = 0.004). The serum levels of sPECAM-1 in the sepsis patients (47.1 ± 17.5 ng/ml) were significantly higher than those in the healthy controls (61.3 ± 20.9 ng/ml, P<0.01). Among sepsis patients, the serum levels of sPECAM-1 were significantly higher in CG and GG genotype than in CC genotype. In septic shock patients, nonsurvivors (83.7 ± 12.6 ng/ml, n = 69) had a significantly higher serum sPECAM-1 level than the survivors (76.9 ± 12.7 ng/ml, n = 53) (P<0.01). In conclusion, PECAM-1 Leu125Val polymorphism and its sPECAM-1 levels are associated with sepsis severity and susceptibility to septic shock. PMID:26884965

  7. [The value of systematic monitoring of oxygen consumption in the diagnosis and therapy of septic shock].

    PubMed

    Pilas, V; Cubrilo, M; Bakula, V; Vranjkovic, S; Bakula, B; Bilic, A

    1990-01-01

    In 31 patients with sepsis and multiple organic dysfunction, changes in the systemic oxygen consumption (VO2) during reanimation were observed in order to discover more objective indicators of the course and prognosis of the disease. In a prospective randomized study, 21 live (Group 1) and 11 dead patients (Group 2) were included. The investigation was based upon the application of the invasive tracing of oxygen hemodynamics and transport. The findings of the initially hypovolemic status were compared with those of the stabile normovolemic status obtained by the application of infusions and the blood volume substitute. In the early phase of the disease there were no significant differences in the clinical finding of the circulatory shock and the volume deficit of the circulated blood between these two groups of patients. Group 1 patients had lower values of the cardiac index (CI) and the systemic oxygen transport (DO2). In them there was a greater frequency of acute organic insufficiency, especially pulmonal, renal and hepatal. In the initial status VO2 decreased. In the normovolemic status of Group 1, a significant VO2 was found, while in Group 2 in spite of a DO2 increase and hemodynamics improvement, a more significant VO2 increase was not obtained. As VO2 is an objective indicator of oxidative metabolic reactions of the organism and the circulatory system, the authors maintain that by the VO2 tracing, a better insight into the seriousness and course of the disease is obtained, and that an inadequate VO2 finding during the therapeutic treatment requires a revision of the treatment. PMID:2077821

  8. [New recommendations on the use of human albumin solutions in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. A critical evaluation of the literature].

    PubMed

    Latour-Pérez, J

    2013-01-01

    The third edition of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines opens the door to the use of albumin for fluid resuscitation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. This recommendation is based on a recent meta-analysis that included studies with evidence of insufficient plasma expansion in the control group and studies performed in children with malaria with clear statistical heterogeneity (P for interaction=.02). After excluding pediatric studies, the confidence interval of the effect estimate was consistent with a mortality excess in the group treated with albumin (OR=.87 [95%CI: .71 to 1.07]). Two new randomized studies reported after publication of the meta-analysis found no benefit in patients treated with albumin. Given the uncertainty about the true effect of albumin (due to the existence of indirectness and imprecision) and its cost considerations, it is suggested not to use albumin in the initial resuscitation of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock (GRADE2C). PMID:23664006

  9. High-volume hemofiltration and prone ventilation in subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and refractory septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Rodrigo; Romero, Carlos; Ugalde, Diego; Bustos, Patricio; Diaz, Gonzalo; Galvez, Ricardo; Llanos, Osvaldo; Tobar, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We report the successful treatment of two patients with aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe respiratory failure and refractory septic shock using simultaneous prone position ventilation and high-volume hemofiltration. These rescue therapies allowed the patients to overcome the critical situation without associated complications and with no detrimental effects on the intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Prone position ventilation is now an accepted therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, and high-volume hemofiltration is a non-conventional hemodynamic support that has several potential mechanisms for improving septic shock. In this manuscript, we briefly review these therapies and the related evidence. When other conventional treatments are insufficient for providing safe limits of oxygenation and perfusion as part of basic neuroprotective care in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, these rescue therapies should be considered on a case-by-case basis by an experienced critical care team. PMID:25028955

  10. Meropenem population pharmacokinetics in critically ill patients with septic shock and continuous renal replacement therapy: influence of residual diuresis on dose requirements.

    PubMed

    Ulldemolins, Marta; Soy, Dolors; Llaurado-Serra, Mireia; Vaquer, Sergi; Castro, Pedro; Rodríguez, Alejandro H; Pontes, Caridad; Calvo, Gonzalo; Torres, Antoni; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    Meropenem dosing in critically ill patients with septic shock and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is complex, with the recommended maintenance doses being 500 mg to 1,000 mg every 8 h (q8h) to every 12 h. This multicenter study aimed to describe the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of meropenem in this population to identify the sources of PK variability and to evaluate different dosing regimens to develop recommendations based on clinical parameters. Thirty patients with septic shock and CRRT receiving meropenem were enrolled (153 plasma samples were tested). A population PK model was developed with data from 24 patients and subsequently validated with data from 6 patients using NONMEM software (v.7.3). The final model was characterized by CL = 3.68 + 0.22 · (residual diuresis/100) and V = 33.00 · (weight/73)(2.07), where CL is total body clearance (in liters per hour), residual diuresis is the volume of residual diuresis (in milliliters per 24 h), and V is the apparent volume of distribution (in liters). CRRT intensity was not identified to be a CL modifier. Monte Carlo simulations showed that to maintain concentrations of the unbound fraction (fu ) of drug above the MIC of the bacteria for 40% of dosing interval T (referred to as 40% of the ƒ uT >MIC), a meropenem dose of 500 mg q8h as a bolus over 30 min would be sufficient regardless of the residual diuresis. If 100% of the ƒ uT >MIC was chosen as the target, oligoanuric patients would require 500 mg q8h as a bolus over 30 min for the treatment of susceptible bacteria (MIC < 2 mg/liter), while patients with preserved diuresis would require the same dose given as an infusion over 3 h. If bacteria with MICs close to the resistance breakpoint (2 to 4 mg/liter) were to be treated with meropenem, a dose of 500 mg every 6 h would be necessary: a bolus over 30 min for oligoanuric patients and an infusion over 3 h for patients with preserved diuresis. Our results suggest that residual diuresis may be an easy and

  11. Meropenem Population Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Patients with Septic Shock and Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: Influence of Residual Diuresis on Dose Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Llaurado-Serra, Mireia; Vaquer, Sergi; Castro, Pedro; Rodríguez, Alejandro H.; Pontes, Caridad; Calvo, Gonzalo; Torres, Antoni; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Meropenem dosing in critically ill patients with septic shock and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is complex, with the recommended maintenance doses being 500 mg to 1,000 mg every 8 h (q8h) to every 12 h. This multicenter study aimed to describe the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of meropenem in this population to identify the sources of PK variability and to evaluate different dosing regimens to develop recommendations based on clinical parameters. Thirty patients with septic shock and CRRT receiving meropenem were enrolled (153 plasma samples were tested). A population PK model was developed with data from 24 patients and subsequently validated with data from 6 patients using NONMEM software (v.7.3). The final model was characterized by CL = 3.68 + 0.22 · (residual diuresis/100) and V = 33.00 · (weight/73)2.07, where CL is total body clearance (in liters per hour), residual diuresis is the volume of residual diuresis (in milliliters per 24 h), and V is the apparent volume of distribution (in liters). CRRT intensity was not identified to be a CL modifier. Monte Carlo simulations showed that to maintain concentrations of the unbound fraction (fu) of drug above the MIC of the bacteria for 40% of dosing interval T (referred to as 40% of the ƒuT>MIC), a meropenem dose of 500 mg q8h as a bolus over 30 min would be sufficient regardless of the residual diuresis. If 100% of the ƒuT>MIC was chosen as the target, oligoanuric patients would require 500 mg q8h as a bolus over 30 min for the treatment of susceptible bacteria (MIC < 2 mg/liter), while patients with preserved diuresis would require the same dose given as an infusion over 3 h. If bacteria with MICs close to the resistance breakpoint (2 to 4 mg/liter) were to be treated with meropenem, a dose of 500 mg every 6 h would be necessary: a bolus over 30 min for oligoanuric patients and an infusion over 3 h for patients with preserved diuresis. Our results suggest that residual diuresis may be an easy and

  12. ENDOCRINE AND METABOLIC ALTERATIONS MAY UNDERLIE MORTALITY OF SEVERE SEPSIS AND SEPTIC SHOCK PATIENTS ADMITTED TO ICU.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Abdelbadee; Abdel Rehim, Marwa; Shaaban, Yasser Hassan

    2016-04-01

    The study evaluated endocrinal and metabolic response to sepsis and its applicability for the prediction of outcome of septic patients. Patients were 39 adult with severe infections and within 24 h after onset or suspected clinical tissue hypoperfusion. At enrollment patients were evaluated for acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (APACHE II) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Global hemodynamic parameters including systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR) and central venous pressure (CVP) were recorded and monitored. All patients were managed at ICU due to Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines. ELISA estimated serum copeptin, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and total cortisol (TC) and blood lactate levels. Study outcome was survival rate via 28 days (28-D SR) and best predictor for it. The results showed that 22 patients passed total hospital stay uneventfully for a total survival rate of 56.4%. Seventeen patients died; 10 during ICU stay and 7 during word stay. At admission serum markers levels were significantly higher in survivors and non-survivors compared to controls and in non-survivors compared to survivors. Survival showed negative significant correlation with age, high blood lactate and serum copeptin, TC and MIF levels. Survival showed positive significant correlation with SBP, CVP and urine output. ROC curve and Regression analyses defined high at admission serum copeptin and blood lactate levels as significant predictors for mortality of septic patients. PMID:27363046

  13. Vitamin D deficiency at admission is not associated with 90-day mortality in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock: Observational FINNAKI cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ala-Kokko, Tero I; Mutt, Shivaprakash J; Nisula, Sara; Koskenkari, Juha; Liisanantti, Janne; Ohtonen, Pasi; Poukkanen, Meri; Laurila, Jouko J; Pettilä, Ville; Herzig, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with increased mortality in patients that are critically ill. This study explored whether vitamin D levels were associated with 90-day mortality in severe sepsis or septic shock. Methods Plasma vitamin D levels were measured on admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) in a prospective multicentre observational study. Results 610 patients with severe sepsis were included; of these, 178 (29%) had septic shock. Vitamin D deficiency (<50 nmol/L) was present in 333 (55%) patients. The 90-day mortality did not differ among patients with or without vitamin D deficiency (28.3% vs. 28.5%, p = 0.789). Diabetes was more common among patients deficient compared to those not deficient in vitamin D (30% vs. 18%, p < 0.001). Hospital-acquired infections at admission were more prevalent in patients with a vitamin D deficiency (31% vs. 16%, p < 0.001). A multivariable adjusted Cox regression model showed that low vitamin D levels could not predict 90-day mortality (<50 nmol/L: hazard ratio (HR) 0.99 (95% CI: 0.72-1.36), p > 0.9; and <25 nmol/L: HR 0.44 (95% CI: 0.22-0.87), p = 0.018). Conclusions Vitamin D deficiency detected upon ICU admission was not associated with 90-day mortality in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Key messages In severe sepsis and septic shock, a vitamin D deficiency upon ICU admission was not associated with increased mortality. Compared to patients with sufficient vitamin D, patients with deficient vitamin D more frequently exhibited diabetes, elevated C-reactive protein levels, and hospital-acquired infections upon ICU admission, and they more frequently developed acute kidney injury.

  14. Bronchoscopic administration of bovine natural surfactant in ARDS and septic shock: impact on gas exchange and haemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Walmrath, D; Grimminger, F; Pappert, D; Knothe, C; Obertacke, U; Benzing, A; Günther, A; Schmehl, T; Leuchte, H; Seeger, W

    2002-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of bronchoscopic surfactant administration in a noncontrolled multicentre study in five university centres. A total number of 27 patients, suffering from severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (mean+/-SEM lung injury score: 3.15+/-0.06) and septic shock (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score at study entry 33.2+/-1.3, lactate 4.3+/-0.6 mmol x L(-1)) were studied. The patients were ventilated with a mean tidal volume of 11.0+/-0.5 mL x kg(-1) body weight (bw), either volume or pressure controlled, with 16.3+/-2.8 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure, for an average of 3.5+/-0.3 days at study entry. A natural bovine surfactant extract (300 mg x kg(-1) bw Alveofact; mean total volume 378 mL) was delivered in divided doses to each segment of the lungs via flexible bronchoscope within approximately 45 min. No untoward effects on gas exchange, lung mechanics and haemodynamics were noted during the procedure of surfactant administration. Within 12 h the oxygen tension in arterial blood/inspiratory oxygen fraction increased from a mean of 109+/-8 mmHg to 210+/-20 mmHg (p<0.001). In seven patients, in whom gas exchange again deteriorated with further progression of the disease, a second surfactant dose of 200 mg x kg(-1) was administered 18-24 h after the first application, again improving arterial oxygenation. A total of 15 patients survived the 28-day study period (mortality rate 44.4%, compared to a calculated risk of death for the given APACHE II scores of 74.0+/-3.5%), with all causes of death being nonrespiratory. The bronchoscopic application of a high dose of natural surfactant in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and septic shock is both feasible and safe, resulting in a pronounced improvement in gas exchange.

  15. A Multicentre Study of Acute Kidney Injury in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: Association with Inflammatory Phenotype and HLA Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, Matthieu; Gayat, Etienne; Faivre, Valérie; Megarbane, Bruno; Azoulay, Elie; Fieux, Fabienne; Charron, Dominique; Loiseau, Pascale; Busson, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate the association between severity of acute kidney injury (AKI) and outcome, systemic inflammatory phenotype and HLA genotype in severe sepsis. Methodology/Principal Findings Prospective multicenter observational study done in 4 intensive care units in two university hospitals. Severe sepsis and septic shock patients with at least 2 organ failures based on the SOFA score were classified: 1) "no AKI", 2) "mild AKI" (grouping stage 1 and 2 of AKIN score) and 3) "severe AKI" (stage 3 of AKIN score). Sequential measurements: The vasopressor dependency index (VDI; dose and types of drugs) to evaluate the association between hemodynamic status and the development of early AKI; plasma levels of IL-10, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), IL-6 and HLA-DR monocyte expression. Genotyping of the 13 HLA-DRB1 alleles with deduction of presence of HLA-DRB3, -DRB4 and -DRB5 genes. We used multivariate analysis with competitive risk model to study associations. Overall, 176 study patients (146 with septic shock) were classified from AKIN score as "no AKI" (n = 43), "mild AKI" (n = 74) or "severe AKI" (n = 59). The VDI did not differ between groups of AKI. After adjustment, "mild and severe AKI" were an independent risk factor for mortality (HR 2.42 95%CI[1.01-5.83], p = 0.048 and HR 1.99 95%CI[1.30-3.03], p = 0.001 respectively). "Severe AKI" had higher levels of plasma IL-10, MIF and IL-6 compared to “no AKI” and mild AKI (p<0.05 for each), with no difference in mHLA-DR at day 0. HLA-DRB genotyping showed a significantly lower proportion of 4 HLA-DRB alleles among patients requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) (58%) than in patients with severe AKI who did not receive RRT (84%) (p = 0.004). Conclusions AKI severity is independently associated with mortality and plasma IL-10, MIF or IL-6 levels. Presence of 4 alleles of HLA-DRB in severe AKI patients seems associated with a lower need of RRT. PMID:22701553

  16. Severe sepsis and septic shock in pre-hospital emergency medicine: survey results of medical directors of emergency medical services concerning antibiotics, blood cultures and algorithms.

    PubMed

    Casu, Sebastian; Häske, David

    2016-06-01

    Delayed antibiotic treatment for patients in severe sepsis and septic shock decreases the probability of survival. In this survey, medical directors of different emergency medical services (EMS) in Germany were asked if they are prepared for pre-hospital sepsis therapy with antibiotics or special algorithms to evaluate the individual preparations of the different rescue areas for the treatment of patients with this infectious disease. The objective of the survey was to obtain a general picture of the current status of the EMS with respect to rapid antibiotic treatment for sepsis. A total of 166 medical directors were invited to complete a short survey on behalf of the different rescue service districts in Germany via an electronic cover letter. Of the rescue districts, 25.6 % (n = 20) stated that they keep antibiotics on EMS vehicles. In addition, 2.6 % carry blood cultures on the vehicles. The most common antibiotic is ceftriaxone (third generation cephalosporin). In total, 8 (10.3 %) rescue districts use an algorithm for patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock. Although the German EMS is an emergency physician-based rescue system, special opportunities in the form of antibiotics on emergency physician vehicles are missing. Simultaneously, only 10.3 % of the rescue districts use a special algorithm for sepsis therapy. Sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock do not appear to be prioritized as highly as these deadly diseases should be in the pre-hospital setting. PMID:26719078

  17. Incidence and Predictors of New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation in Septic Shock Patients in a Medical ICU: Data from 7-Day Holter ECG Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Guenancia, Charles; Binquet, Christine; Laurent, Gabriel; Vinault, Sandrine; Bruyère, Rémi; Prin, Sébastien; Pavon, Arnaud; Charles, Pierre-Emmanuel; Quenot, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We investigated incidence, risk factors for new-onset atrial fibrillation (NAF), and prognostic impact during septic shock in medical Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Methods Prospective, observational study in a university hospital. Consecutive patients from 03/2011 to 05/2013 with septic shock were eligible. Exclusion criteria were age <18 years, history of AF, transfer with prior septic shock. Included patients were equipped with long-duration (7 days) Holter ECG monitoring. NAF was defined as an AF episode lasting >30 seconds. Patient characteristics, infection criteria, cardiovascular parameters, severity of illness, support therapies were recorded. Results Among 66 patients, 29(44%) developed NAF; 10 (34%) would not have been diagnosed without Holter ECG monitoring. NAF patients were older, with more markers of heart failure (troponin and NT-pro-BNP), lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), longer QRS duration and more nonsustained supra ventricular arrhythmias (<30s) on day 1 than patients who maintained sinus rhythm. By multivariate analysis, age (OR: 1.06; p = 0.01) and LVEF<45% (OR: 13.01, p = 0.03) were associated with NAF. NAF did not predict 28 or 90 day mortality. Conclusions NAF is common, especially in older patients, and is associated with low ejection fraction. We did not find NAF to be independently associated with higher mortality. PMID:25965915

  18. Activated cytotoxic T cells and NK cells in severe sepsis and septic shock and their role in multiple organ dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Hack, C Erik; Caliezi, Christoph; van Mierlo, Gerard; Eerenberg-Belmer, Anke; Wolbink, Angela; Wuillenmin, Walter A

    2005-08-01

    To evaluate the role of activated cytotoxic cells in patients with severe sepsis (n = 32) or septic shock (n = 8), direct (granzymes A and B) as well as indirect markers (cytokines) for cytotoxic cell activation were measured. Elevated IL-12p40 levels had been detected in 58% of the sepsis patients, whereas only a few had detectable TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, or IL-12p70 levels. Granzymes A and B levels were elevated in 42.5% and 22.5%, respectively. IL-12p40 inversely correlated with disease severity. Inflammatory parameters (IL-6) and coagulation markers were significantly lower and higher, respectively, in patients with elevated IL-12p40 and granzyme B levels, as compared to those with normal levels. Elevation of granzyme A directly correlated with the increase of apoptotic markers. Activated cytotoxic cells reflected by elevated granzymes A and/or B were found in 50% of our sepsis patients. This group showed a higher mortality and a worse organ function.

  19. Epidemiology and Outcome of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock in Surgical Intensive Care Units in Northern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Tsai, Pi-Ru; Yu, Chong-Jen; Ko, Wen-Je

    2015-11-01

    Severe sepsis remains the leading cause of mortality in the critically ill. Local epidemiological studies on sepsis are of paramount importance to increase our knowledge about sepsis features and to improve patient care and prognosis.Adult patients (≥20 years) admitted to the surgical intensive care units with severe sepsis or septic shock from 2009 to 2010 were retrospectively retrieved and analyzed. The primary outcome of interest was 28-day mortality.Of 7795 admissions, 536 (6.9%) patients had severe sepsis. The most common sites of infection were the respiratory tract (38%) and abdomen (33%). Gram-negative bacteria, particularly Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.6%) and Escherichia coli (6.0%), were the major infecting micro-organisms, responsible for approximately two-thirds of the severe sepsis episodes. The overall 28-day mortality rate was 61%, and a higher sequential organ failure assessment score and the use of mechanical ventilation were independently associated with a worse outcome.Admissions with severe sepsis are not uncommon and are associated with substantial 28-day mortality in surgical intensive care units in northern Taiwan. Establishment and optimization of each institutional sepsis care standard to improve the outcome of sepsis are warranted.

  20. Epidemiology and Outcome of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock in Surgical Intensive Care Units in Northern Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Tsai, Pi-Ru; Yu, Chong-Jen; Ko, Wen-Je

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Severe sepsis remains the leading cause of mortality in the critically ill. Local epidemiological studies on sepsis are of paramount importance to increase our knowledge about sepsis features and to improve patient care and prognosis. Adult patients (≥20 years) admitted to the surgical intensive care units with severe sepsis or septic shock from 2009 to 2010 were retrospectively retrieved and analyzed. The primary outcome of interest was 28-day mortality. Of 7795 admissions, 536 (6.9%) patients had severe sepsis. The most common sites of infection were the respiratory tract (38%) and abdomen (33%). Gram-negative bacteria, particularly Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.6%) and Escherichia coli (6.0%), were the major infecting micro-organisms, responsible for approximately two-thirds of the severe sepsis episodes. The overall 28-day mortality rate was 61%, and a higher sequential organ failure assessment score and the use of mechanical ventilation were independently associated with a worse outcome. Admissions with severe sepsis are not uncommon and are associated with substantial 28-day mortality in surgical intensive care units in northern Taiwan. Establishment and optimization of each institutional sepsis care standard to improve the outcome of sepsis are warranted. PMID:26632737

  1. Sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock: current evidence for emergency department management.

    PubMed

    Booker, Ethan

    2011-05-01

    In the middle of a busy shift, a patient arrives by ambulance from a local long-term care facility with a report of altered mental status. You enter the room to find a chronically ill-appearing 85-year-old man with fever, tachycardia, and hypotension, and it is instantly apparent that this patient is septic. What is not clear is what the source is, what modifications in treatment might be necessary based on preexisting microbial resistance, and which of the array of invasive resuscitation techniques are appropriate when meaningful recovery is questionable and efforts may not be desired by the patient and family. You order IV fluids and broad-spectrum antibiotics; send lab tests, including lactate and cultures of blood, urine, and sputum; and begin to review his extensive history to discuss goals of care with his family and primary doctor. While reviewing these issues, a 54-year-old woman with a history of asthma is brought straight back from triage with respiratory distress. You listen to her lungs, expecting wheezes, but hear decreased lung sounds at the right base, preserved air movement elsewhere, and her skin radiates heat. Now, on the monitor, she has a heart rate of 135 beats per minute, blood pressure of 90/60 mm Hg, O2 saturation of 86%, and a temperature of 39.4 degrees C (103 degrees F). You again identify sepsis and instruct your team that you will be using your department's severe sepsis protocol. Equipment for monitoring and procedures is assembled, your staff provides preprinted order and monitoring flow sheets, and the ICU is alerted. Within an hour, the patient is intubated, has a central line placed, and has received IV fluids, broad-spectrum antibiotics and norepinephrine, and you are pleased to see a MAP of 67 mm Hg, a lactate decreasing from an initial value of 7.0, CVP of 10, and ScvO2 of 78%.

  2. [Septic Shock: Innate Molecular Genetic Mechanisms of the Development of Generalized Inflammation].

    PubMed

    Kurmyshkina, O V; Bogdanova, A A; Volkova, T O; Poltoraka, A N

    2015-01-01

    The capacity for immune surveilance and protection against genetically alien agents is a basic property of multicellular organisms, and increasing significance in realizing this, capacity is assigned to mechanisms of innate immunity. The data accumulated to date show that many components of these mechanisms have a very wide spectrum of biological functions and play essential roles at different stages of ontogeny. An illustrative example is the signal system activated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), which is responsible for the inflammation process. Analysis of its structural organization has shown that signaling mechanisms initiating inflammation largely overlap with mechanisms of programmed cell death. This is why hypersecretion of TNFα may lead to systemic inflammatory reation, or septic shok, and, hence, have a fatal outcome. Although studies on the TNFα-dependent mechanism have long history, many aspects of its regulation remain obscure. In particular, this concerns the nature of interspecific differences in the sensitivity of mammals to TNFα action and the ability of TNFα to activate oppositely directed cell programs depending on cell type or ambient conditions. The numerous data obtained in studies on different experimental systems need generalization and critical analysis. This review is an attempt at such an analysis. Its scope is concentrated on modern views on the divergence of TNFα-induced signal at the level of intracellular receptor-associated proteins. A description is given to potential "molecular triggers" responsible for switching between the main TNFα-dependent signaling pathways: inflammation, apoptosis, and necroptosis. The contribution of necroptosis (genetically programmed necrotic cell death) to the development of systemic inflammation and the lethal effect of TNFα are described. Consideration is also given to various lines of mice possessing natural resistance or sensitivity to TNFα, which hold much promise as models for

  3. Early biomarker activity in severe sepsis and septic shock and a contemporary review of immunotherapy trials: not a time to give up, but to give it earlier.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Emanuel P; Jaehne, Anja Kathrin; Nguyen, H Bryant; Papamatheakis, Demosthenes G; Singer, Daniel; Yang, James J; Brown, Samantha; Klausner, Howard

    2013-02-01

    Improving time to diagnosis and intervention has positively impacted outcomes in acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and trauma through elucidating the early pathogenesis of those diseases. This insight may partly explain the futility of time-insensitive immunotherapy trials for severe sepsis and septic shock. The aim of this study was to examine the early natural history of circulatory biomarker activity in sepsis, relative to previous animal and human outcome trials. We conducted a literature search using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar to identify outcome trials targeting biomarkers with emphasis on the timing of therapy. These findings were compared with the biomarker activity observed over the first 72 h of hospital presentation in a cohort of severe sepsis and septic shock patients. Biomarker levels in animal and human research models are elevated within 30 min after exposure to an inflammatory septic stimulus. Consistent with these findings, the biomarker cascade is activated at the most proximal point of hospital presentation in our patient cohort. These circulatory biomarkers overlap; some have bimodal patterns and generally peak between 3 and 36 h while diminishing over the subsequent 72 h of observation. When this is taken into account, prior outcome immunotherapy trials have generally enrolled patients after peak circulatory biomarker concentrations. In previous immunotherapy sepsis trials, intervention was delayed after the optimal window of peak biomarker activity. As a result, future studies need to recalibrate the timing of enrollment and administration of immunotherapy agents that still may hold great promise for this deadly disease.

  4. Effects of ATP-sensitive potassium channel blockers on vascular hyporeactivity, mesenteric blood flow, and survival in lipopolysaccharide-induced septic shock model.

    PubMed

    Boz, Mustafa; Atilla, Pergin; Iskit, Alper B; Ilhan, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the possible therapeutic effects of various ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) blockers (glibenclamide, repaglinide, 5-HD, HMR-1098) have been tested in experimental septic shock model. Rats were given lipopolysaccharide (1 mg·kg(-1)) to create experimental shock model and 4 h later, under 400 mg·kg(-1) chloral hydrate anesthesia, parameters such as blood pressure, mesenteric blood flow, the response of mesenteric circulation to phenylephrine (vasoconstrictor stimulation), and organ and oxidative damage were analyzed. Also 75 mg·kg(-1) lethal dose of lipopolysaccharide was given to mice and effects of KATP blockers on survival have been tested. Non-selective blocker glibenclamide with sulphonylurea structure and sarcolemmal KATP channel blocker HMR-1098, which have the similar chemical structure, have improved the pathological parameters such as decrease in mesenteric blood flow, vascular hyporeactivity, but could not prevent the decrease in blood pressure, and oxidative and organ damage that were observed in the shock model. Also, both blockers have decreased the mortality rate from 80% to 40%-50%. Similar (preventive) therapeutic effects were not observed with non-selective blocker repaglinide and mitochondrial KATP channel blocker 5-HD, which were non-sulphonylurea structure. As a result, only KATP channel blockers that have sulphonylurea structure can be a new therapeutic approach in septic shock. PMID:27239899

  5. Studies on the contact system of coagulation during therapy with high doses of recombinant IL-2: implications for septic shock.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Wagstaff, J; Strack van Schijndel, R J; Eerenberg, A J; Pinedo, H M; Thijs, L G; Nuijens, J H

    1991-05-01

    Patients treated with high doses of interleukin-2 (IL-2) because of cancer, develop hemodynamic and vasopermeability changes, that resemble those observed in sepsis. These patients thus provide a unique opportunity to study the early events in the development of septic shock. We analysed the changes that occurred in the contact system of coagulation in plasma from 4 patients, who together received seven 12-day cycles of high doses of IL-2. Levels of factor XII and prekallikrein during the cycles progressively fell to 50 and 30% of their initial levels, respectively, whereas significant increases in plasma factor XIIa- and kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complexes were not observed (in 3 out of 211 samples slightly increased levels of both complexes were found). The reductions in factor XII and prekallikrein were only in part due to protein leakage, since levels were still significantly lower, i.e., 80 and 50%, respectively, when corrected for albumin decreases. Levels of high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK) also decreased during IL-2 therapy, however, this decrease paralleled that of albumin. SDS-PAGE analysis of plasma HMWK did not reveal increased cleavage of this protein. The reduction of factor XII and prekallikrein, corrected for protein leakage, significantly correlated with albumin levels and inversely with daily cumulative weight gain in the patients. Thus, we demonstrate that factor XII and prekallikrein decrease during IL-2 therapy. As these decreases, already observed after 1 day treatment, were disproportional to that of albumin, a negative acute phase reactant, and correlated with signs of the vascular leak syndrome, we favor the explanation that they reflected activation rather than a decreased synthesis of the contact system proteins.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Effects of N-acetylcysteine and terbutaline treatment on hemodynamics and regional albumin extravasation in porcine septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Groeneveld, A.B.; den Hollander, W.; Straub, J.; Nauta, J.J.; Thijs, L.G. )

    1990-03-01

    We studied the therapeutic effects of continuously infused N-acetylcysteine, an O2 radical scavenger (N, n = 6), and terbutaline, a beta 2-agonist (T, n = 6), versus dextrose (controls C, N = 6) on hemodynamics and regional albumin extravasation in porcine septic shock. After instrumentation, injection of 99mTc-labeled red blood cells, and baseline measurements, pigs received a 90 min infusion of 11 +/- 9 X 10(8).kg-1 live Escherichia coli bacteria. Thereafter, therapy was started, and 131I human serum albumin was injected. Images were obtained hourly using a gamma camera and a computer until 5 hours after baseline. Regions of interest were drawn in the 99mTc images, yielding regional 131I/99mTc radioactivity ratios, with blood samples as reference. From these ratios, an albumin leak index, a rate constant of transvascular albumin transport, was calculated. Control pigs developed pulmonary hypertension, arterial hypotension, hemoconcentration, and lactic acidemia. In spite of tachycardia and unchanged filling pressures, cardiac output fell. In arterial blood, white cell count, PO2, albumin level, and colloid osmotic pressure fell. The albumin leak index (X10(-3).min-1) measured 1.56 +/- 0.59 over the lungs and 2.87 +/- 1.19 over the abdomen in C, confirming previously found increased albumin flux in both lung and abdomen, the latter exceeding the former. Neither N nor T significantly affected hemodynamic and biochemical changes. The drugs neither decreased the regional albumin leak index nor attenuated the formation of albumin-rich ascites found at autopsy. However, the lung albumin index obtained at autopsy was significantly reduced with N (P less than .01 vs. C), at similar gravimetrically determined extravascular lung water (EVLW). EVLW positively correlated with pulmonary albumin extravasation in C and T but not in N.

  7. Septic shock non-thyroidal illness syndrome causes hypothyroidism and conditions for reduced sensitivity to thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Castro, Isabel; Quisenberry, Leah; Calvo, Rosa-Maria; Obregon, Maria-Jesus; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin

    2013-04-01

    Non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is part of the neuroendocrine response to stress, but the significance of this syndrome remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NTIS on thyroid hormone (TH) levels and TH molecular targets, as well as the relationship between septic shock nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kB) activation and TH receptor β (THRB) gene expression at a multi-tissue level in a pig model. Prepubertal domestic pigs were given i.v. saline or LPS for 48 h. Serum and tissue TH was measured by chemiluminescence and RIA. Expression of THRs and cofactors was measured by real-time PCR, and deiodinase (DIO) activity was measured by enzyme assays. Tissue NF-kB nuclear binding activity was evaluated by EMSA. LPS-treated pigs had decreased TH levels in serum and most tissues. DIO1 expression in liver and kidney and DIO1 activity in kidney decreased after LPS. No changes in DIO2 activity were observed between groups. LPS induced an increase in hypothalamus, thyroid, and liver DIO3 activity. Among the other studied genes, monocarboxylate transporter 8 and THRB were the most commonly repressed in endotoxemic pigs. LPS-induced NF-kB activation was associated with a decrease in THRB gene expression only in frontal lobe, adrenal gland, and kidney cortex. We conclude that LPS-induced NTIS in pigs is characterized by hypothyroidism and tissue-specific reduced TH sensitivity. The role of NF-kB in regulating THRB expression during endotoxemia, if any, is restricted to a limited number of tissues.

  8. Methylguanidine reduces the development of non septic shock induced by zymosan in mice.

    PubMed

    Marzocco, Stefania; Di Paola, Rosanna; Genovese, Tiziana; Sorrentino, Raffaella; Britti, Domenico; Scollo, Giuseppe; Pinto, Aldo; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Autore, Giuseppina

    2004-08-01

    In the present study we evaluate the effect of methylguanidine (MG), a product of protein catabolism, in a model of acute inflammation (zymosan induced inflammation) in mice where oxyradical and nitric oxide (NO) play a crucial role. Our data show that MG, given intraperitoneally at the dose of 30 mg/Kg, inhibits the inflammatory response reducing significantly (P < 0.05) peritoneal exudates formation, mononuclear cell infiltration and histological injury in mice. Furthermore, our data suggests that there is a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in kidney, liver and pancreas injury as demonstrated by the reduction in amylase, lipase, creatinine, AST, ALT, bilirubine and alkaline phosfatase levels. MG is also able to reduce the appearance of nitrotyrosine and of the nuclear enzyme poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) synthase (PARS) immunoreactivity in the inflamed intestinal and lung tissues. The histological examination revealed a significant reduction in zymosan-induced intestinal and lung damage in MG-treated mice. Taken together, the present results demonstrate that MG exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects on zymosan-induced shock.

  9. Hypoalbuminemia, Low Base Excess Values, and Tachypnea Predict 28-Day Mortality in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Patients in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Min Ho; Choa, Minhong; You, Je Sung; Lee, Hye Sun; Hong, Jung Hwa; Chung, Sung Phil; Park, Incheol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to develop a new nomogram that can predict 28-day mortality in severe sepsis and/or septic shock patients using a combination of several biomarkers that are inexpensive and readily available in most emergency departments, with and without scoring systems. Materials and Methods We enrolled 561 patients who were admitted to an emergency department (ED) and received early goal-directed therapy for severe sepsis or septic shock. We collected demographic data, initial vital signs, and laboratory data sampled at the time of ED admission. Patients were randomly assigned to a training set or validation set. For the training set, we generated models using independent variables associated with 28-day mortality by multivariate analysis, and developed a new nomogram for the prediction of 28-day mortality. Thereafter, the diagnostic accuracy of the nomogram was tested using the validation set. Results The prediction model that included albumin, base excess, and respiratory rate demonstrated the largest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) value of 0.8173 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.7605–0.8741]. The logistic analysis revealed that a conventional scoring system was not associated with 28-day mortality. In the validation set, the discrimination of a newly developed nomogram was also good, with an AUC value of 0.7537 (95% CI, 0.6563–0.8512). Conclusion Our new nomogram is valuable in predicting the 28-day mortality of patients with severe sepsis and/or septic shock in the emergency department. Moreover, our readily available nomogram is superior to conventional scoring systems in predicting mortality. PMID:27593863

  10. SvO(2)-guided resuscitation for experimental septic shock: effects of fluid infusion and dobutamine on hemodynamics, inflammatory response, and cardiovascular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rosário, André Loureiro; Park, Marcelo; Brunialti, Milena Karina; Mendes, Marialice; Rapozo, Marjorie; Fernandes, Denise; Salomão, Reinaldo; Laurindo, Francisco Rafael; Schettino, Guilherme Paula; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar P

    2011-12-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms associated to the beneficial effects of mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO(2))-guided resuscitation during sepsis are unclear. Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of an algorithm of SvO(2)-driven resuscitation including fluids, norepinephrine and dobutamine on hemodynamics, inflammatory response, and cardiovascular oxidative stress during a clinically resembling experimental model of septic shock. Eighteen anesthetized and catheterized pigs (35-45 kg) were submitted to peritonitis by fecal inoculation (0.75 g/kg). After hypotension, antibiotics were administered, and the animals were randomized to two groups: control (n = 9), with hemodynamic support aiming central venous pressure 8 to 12 mmHg, urinary output 0.5 mL/kg per hour, and mean arterial pressure greater than 65 mmHg; and SvO(2) (n = 9), with the goals above, plus SvO(2) greater than 65%. The interventions lasted 12 h, and lactated Ringer's and norepinephrine (both groups) and dobutamine (SvO(2) group) were administered. Inflammatory response was evaluated by plasma concentration of cytokines, neutrophil CD14 expression, oxidant generation, and apoptosis. Oxidative stress was evaluated by plasma and myocardial nitrate concentrations, myocardial and vascular NADP(H) oxidase activity, myocardial glutathione content, and nitrotyrosine expression. Mixed venous oxygen saturation-driven resuscitation was associated with improved systolic index, oxygen delivery, and diuresis. Sepsis induced in both groups a significant increase on IL-6 concentrations and plasma nitrate concentrations and a persistent decrease in neutrophil CD14 expression. Apoptosis rate and neutrophil oxidant generation were not different between groups. Treatment strategies did not significantly modify oxidative stress parameters. Thus, an approach aiming SvO(2) during sepsis improves hemodynamics, without any significant effect on inflammatory response and oxidative stress. The beneficial effects associated

  11. The effect of ex vivo CDDO-Me activation on nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway in white blood cells from patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Noel, Sanjeev; Zheng, Laura; Navas-Acien, Ana; Fuchs, Ralph J

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) has been shown to protect against experimental sepsis in mice and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in ex vivo white blood cells from healthy subjects by upregulating cellular antioxidant genes. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that ex vivo methyl 2-cyano-3,12-dioxoolean-1,9-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me) activates NRF2-regulated antioxidant genes in white blood cells from patients with septic shock and protects against LPS-induced inflammation and reactive oxidative species production. Peripheral blood was collected from 18 patients with septic shock who were being treated in medical and surgical intensive care units. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the expression of NRF2 target genes (NQO1, HO-1, GCLM, and FTL) and IL-6 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), monocytes, and neutrophils after CDDO-Me treatment alone or after subsequent LPS exposure. Superoxide anion (O2) was measured to assess the effect of CDDO-Me pretreatment on subsequent LPS exposure. Treatment with CDDO-Me increased the gene expression of NQO1 (P = 0.04) and decreased the expression of HO-1 (P = 0.03) in PBMCs from patients with septic shock. Purified monocytes exhibited significant increases in the expression of NQO1 (P = 0.01) and GCLM (P = 0.003) after CDDO-Me treatment. Levels of other NRF2 target genes (HO-1 and FTL) remained similar to those of vehicle-treated cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed a trend toward increased IL-6 gene expression after CDDO-Me treatment, whereas purified monocytes showed a trend toward decreased IL-6. There was no discernible trend in the IL-6 expression subsequent to LPS treatment in either vehicle-treated or CDDO-Me-treated PBMCs and monocytes. Treatment with CDDO-Me significantly increased O2 production in PBMCs (P = 0.04). Although CDDO-Me pretreatment significantly attenuated O2 production to subsequent LPS exposure (P = 0.03), the

  12. The ability of endotoxin adsorption during a longer duration of direct hemoperfusion with a polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tomoharu; Obata, Toru; Sonoda, Hiromichi; Akabori, Hiroya; Tabata, Takahisa; Eguchi, Yutaka; Endo, Yoshihiro; Tani, Tohru

    2013-12-01

    The patients' hemodynamic conditions of septic shock due to intra-abdominal infection were improved by the longer duration of direct hemoperfusion with a polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column (PMX), reducing plasma endotoxins measured by the novel endotoxin detection method, named endotoxin scattering photometry (ESP) method; however, turbidimetric method could not detect endotoxins. We also observed the reduction in the endotoxin after passing through column by ESP method even after the longer duration of PMX. ESP method may more sensitively detect endotoxins than the ordinary turbidimetric method. Moreover, we demonstrated the ability of endotoxin adsorption in spite of the longer duration of PMX.

  13. Analysis of septic biomarker patterns: prognostic value in predicting septic state.

    PubMed

    Carlyn, Cynthia J; Andersen, Nancy J; Baltch, Aldona L; Smith, Raymond; Reilly, Andrew A; Lawrence, David A

    2015-11-01

    Patients with infection, sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock were compared to each other and to healthy controls with regard to serum levels of biomarkers and clinical symptoms. Of the 15 biomarkers assayed, 9 were detectable in patients, and 4, in controls. Both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines were detected in the patients. No single biomarker could differentiate the 3 septic levels of severity from each other; however, interleukin (IL) 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) had the best sensitivity and specificity for differentiating sepsis and severe sepsis from septic shock. IL-6 was the only cytokine able to differentiate infected patients without signs of sepsis from those with sepsis. Although IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 could differentiate infection, sepsis, and severe sepsis from septic shock, the biomarkers could not differentiate sepsis from severe sepsis. The top scoring pair algorithm with clinical and biomarker analyses was able to correctly diagnose those with sepsis who will progress to a more severe state.

  14. [Septic shock by Vibrio vulnificus at the coast Gulf of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Baizabal-Ramírez, Oscar; Negrete-Pérez, Mónica; Guerrero-Daza, Damayanty; Martínez-Herrera, Nahum; Aburto-Desachy, Yolanda; Mata-Miranda, Pilar

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a Gram-negative bacterium which is found in marine environments and where there is a partly enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. The infection by these bacteria can cause primary septicemia by two mechanisms: upon consuming crustaceans, mollusks and some fish (filtering shellfish) raw or barely cooked or by an open injury in contact with seawater. The patients with infections of the primary injury by Vibrio vulnificus developed contaminated painful cellulitis that progresses quickly as well as a marked local inflammation with signs of hemorrhaging. We described a case of Vibrio vulnificus sepsis, with emphasis on the clinical picture, the epidemiological background and lab findings; finally we did a brief review of the literature related to the case.

  15. Impact on mortality of the timing of renal replacement therapy in patients with severe acute kidney injury in septic shock: the IDEAL-ICU study (initiation of dialysis early versus delayed in the intensive care unit): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the most dreaded complications of septic shock is acute kidney injury. It occurs in around 50% of patients, with a mortality rate of about 60% at 3 months. There is no consensus on the optimal time to initiate renal replacement therapy. Retrospective and observational studies suggest that early implementation of renal replacement therapy could improve the prognosis for these patients. Methods/design This protocol summarizes the rationale and design of a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial investigating the effect of early versus delayed renal replacement therapy in patients with severe acute kidney injury in early septic shock. In total, 864 critically ill adults with septic shock and evidence of acute kidney injury, defined as the failure stage of the RIFLE classification, will be enrolled. The primary outcome is mortality at 90 days. Secondary outcomes include safety, number of days free of mechanical ventilation, number of days free of renal replacement therapy, intensive care length of stay, in-hospital length of stay, quality of life as evaluated by the EQ-5D and renal replacement therapy dependence at hospital discharge. The primary analysis will be intention to treat. Recruitment started in March 2012 and will be completed by March 2015. Discussion This protocol for a randomized controlled study investigating the impact of the timing of renal replacement therapy initiation should provide an answer to a key question for the management of patients with acute kidney injury in the context of septic shock, for whom the mortality rate remains close to 60% despite improved understanding of physiopathology and recent therapeutic advances. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01682590, registered on 10 September 2012. PMID:24998258

  16. The Role of Hepatic Invariant (I)NKT Cells in Systemic/Local Inflammation and Mortality During Polymicrobial Septic Shock1

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Caroline K.; Venet, Fabienne; Heffernan, David S.; Wang, Yvonne L.; Horner, Brian; Huang, Xin; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Gregory, Stephen H.; Ayala, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT)4 cells have been described as “innate regulatory cells” because of their rapid response to conserved glycolipids presented on CD1d via their invariant TCR. However, little is known about the contribution of the hepatic NKT cell to the development of a local and/or systemic immune response to acute septic challenge (cecal ligation & puncture; CLP). We found not only that mice deficient in invariant [i] NKT cells (Jα18 -/-) had a marked attenuation in CLP induced mortality, but also exhibited an oblation of the systemic inflammatory response (with little effect on splenic/ peritoneal immune responsiveness). Flow cytometric data indicated that following CLP, there was a marked decline in the % of CD3+αGalCer-CD1d-tetramer+ cells in the mouse C57BL/6J and Balb/c liver non-parenchymal cell population. This was associated with the marked activation of these cells (increased expression of CD69 and CD25) as well as a rise in the frequency of NKT cells positive for both Th1 and Th2 intracellular cytokines. In this respect, when mice were pre-treated in vivo with anti-CD1d blocking antibody we observed not only that this inhibited the systemic rise of IL-6 and IL-10 levels in septic mice and improved overall septic survival, but that the CLP induced changes in liver macrophage IL-6 and IL-10 expressions were inversely effected by this treatment. Together, these findings suggest that the activation of hepatic iNKT cells plays a critical role in regulating the innate immune/ systemic inflammatory response and survival in a model of acute septic shock. PMID:19201902

  17. Effect of stress doses of hydrocortisone on S-100B vs. interleukin-8 and polymorphonuclear elastase levels in human septic shock.

    PubMed

    Mussack, Thomas; Briegel, Josef; Schelling, Gustav; Biberthaler, Peter; Jochum, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Stress doses of hydrocortisone are known to have immunomodulatory effects in patients with hyperdynamic septic shock. The prognosis correlates with the presence and severity of septic encephalopathy. However, neurological evaluation is influenced by the use of analgesia sedation during artificial ventilation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the effect of stress doses of hydrocortisone during the initial phase of human septic shock on the serum values of the neurospecific protein S-100B in comparison to the inflammation markers interleukin (IL)-8 in serum and polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase in plasma. A total of 24 consecutive patients, who met the American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine criteria for septic shock, were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, double-blind, single-center trial. The severity of illness at recruitment was graded using the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and the Simplified Acute Physiology Score II scoring systems. Multi-organ dysfunction syndrome was described by the Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. All patients were prospectively randomized to receive either stress doses of hydrocortisone or placebo. Hydrocortisone was started in 12 patients with a loading dose of 100 mg and followed by a continuous infusion of 0.18 mg/kg/h for 6 days. Median S-100B serum levels of the hydrocortisone group decreased from 0.32 ng/mL at study entry to 0.07 ng/mL 6 days later without significant differences compared to the placebo group. Initial IL-8 serum levels were significantly higher in the hydrocortisone group up to 12 h after study entry, and significantly decreased from 715 to 17 pg/mL at the end of the observation period. Median PMN elastase plasma levels were not affected by hydrocortisone infusion. Patients with initial S-100B serum levels > 0.50 ng/mL revealed significantly higher SOFA scores up to 30 h, IL-8 serum levels up to 12 h, and PMN elastase plasma

  18. Temperature variability analysis using wavelets and multiscale entropy in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis, and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Even though temperature is a continuous quantitative variable, its measurement has been considered a snapshot of a process, indicating whether a patient is febrile or afebrile. Recently, other diagnostic techniques have been proposed for the association between different properties of the temperature curve with severity of illness in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), based on complexity analysis of continuously monitored body temperature. In this study, we tried to assess temperature complexity in patients with systemic inflammation during a suspected ICU-acquired infection, by using wavelets transformation and multiscale entropy of temperature signals, in a cohort of mixed critically ill patients. Methods Twenty-two patients were enrolled in the study. In five, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, group 1) developed, 10 had sepsis (group 2), and seven had septic shock (group 3). All temperature curves were studied during the first 24 hours of an inflammatory state. A wavelet transformation was applied, decomposing the signal in different frequency components (scales) that have been found to reflect neurogenic and metabolic inputs on temperature oscillations. Wavelet energy and entropy per different scales associated with complexity in specific frequency bands and multiscale entropy of the whole signal were calculated. Moreover, a clustering technique and a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were applied for permitting pattern recognition in data sets and assessing diagnostic accuracy of different wavelet features among the three classes of patients. Results Statistically significant differences were found in wavelet entropy between patients with SIRS and groups 2 and 3, and in specific ultradian bands between SIRS and group 3, with decreased entropy in sepsis. Cluster analysis using wavelet features in specific bands revealed concrete clusters closely related with the groups in focus. LDA after wrapper-based feature selection was able to classify

  19. Pathology Image Of the Month: Rapidly Progressive Hemorrhagic Cellulitis of Bilateral Lower Extremities with Subsequent Septic Shock and Death.

    PubMed

    Connor, Ellen E; Jackson, Nicole R; McGoey, Robin R

    2016-01-01

    A 51-year-old man presented to a community based emergency department with bilateral lower extremity swelling that began four days prior and that had evolved into recent blister formation on the left lower extremity. Medical history was significant only for hypertension and a recent self-described episode of "food poisoning" five days earlier characterized by diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting that quickly resolved. Physical exam revealed marked bilateral lower extremity edema and an ecchymotic rash below the knee. In addition to the rash, there were large flaccid bullae on the left leg, mostly intact but some notable for draining of scanty serosanguinous fluid. The patient was tachycardic with a rate of 114 bpm and initial labs showed thrombocytopenia (platelets 56 x 103/uL [140-440 x 103/uL]), hypoglycemia (15mg/dl [70-105mg/dl]), an elevated creatinine (2.7mg/dL [0.7- 1.25mg/dL]), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST 156U/L [5- 34U/L]). Two sets of blood cultures were drawn, broad spectrum antibiotics including doxycycline were empirically initiated and then he was subsequently transported to a tertiary care hospital for escalation of care. Within hours of presentation to the tertiary care facility, the rash appeared progressively hemorrhagic and bullous, lactic acidosis and coagulopathy developed and hemodynamic instability and septic shock necessitated endotracheal intubation and vasopressors. He was taken to the operating room for skin debridement but was emergently converted to bilateral above the knee lower extremity amputations due to the extent of the soft tissue necrosis. The patient remained intubated and in critical condition following surgery and the ecchymotic rash reappeared at the amputation sites. A newly developed ecchymotic rash with bullae formation was noted on the right upper extremity forearm. At that time, the clinicians were notified that four out of four blood culture bottles from admission were rapidly growing a microorganism. The family

  20. Harmonizing international trials of early goal-directed resuscitation for severe sepsis and septic shock: methodology of ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMISe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe and compare the design of three independent but collaborating multicenter trials of early goal-directed resuscitation for severe sepsis and septic shock. Methods We reviewed the three current trials, one each in the USA (ProCESS: protocolized care for early septic shock), Australasia (ARISE: Australasian resuscitation in sepsis evaluation), and the UK (ProMISe: protocolised management in sepsis). We used the 2010 CONSORT (consolidated standards of reporting trials) statement and the 2008 CONSORT extension for trials assessing non-pharmacologic treatments to describe and compare the underlying rationale, commonalities, and differences. Results All three trials conform to CONSORT guidelines, address the same fundamental questions, and share key design elements. Each trial is a patient-level, equal-randomized, parallel-group superiority trial that seeks to enroll emergency department patients with inclusion criteria that are consistent with the original early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) trial (suspected or confirmed infection, two or more systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria, and refractory hypotension or elevated lactate), is powered to detect a 6–8 % absolute mortality reduction (hospital or 90-day), and uses trained teams to deliver EGDT. Design differences appear to primarily be driven by between-country variation in health care context. The main difference between the trials is the inclusion of a third, alternative resuscitation strategy arm in ProCESS. Conclusions Harmonization of study design and methods between severe sepsis trials is feasible and may facilitate pooling of data on completion of the trials. PMID:23958738

  1. Effectiveness of endotoxin scattering photometry for determining the efficacy of polymyxin B-immobilized fiber treatment in septic shock: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Mashiko, Kunihiro; Obata, Toru; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2010-04-01

    The limulus test, which has been established as a test for endotoxin measurement, is associated with problems, including that posed by the presence of a response inhibitor factor and the longer time needed for the measurement of low concentrations. On the other hand, the technique of direct hemoperfusion with a polymyxin B immobilized fiber column (DHP-PMX) was developed in Japan in 1994 and has been used for the control of endotoxemia in septic shock. The limulus test, which is a common endotoxin measurement test, has several problems with regard to sensitivity. Therefore, this test is no longer used to determine the effectiveness of DHP-PMX. Here, we describe a patient presenting with colonic perforation who recovered from septic shock with DHP-PMX. This treatment effect was reflected by a decrease in plasma endotoxin levels as demonstrated more readily with endotoxin scattering photometry assay than with the standard limulus test. We conclude that endotoxin measurement with endotoxin scattering photometry is superior to nephelometry in patients with endotoxemia.

  2. Inhibition of viral pathogenesis and promotion of the septic shock response to bacterial infection by IRF-3 are regulated by the acetylation and phosphorylation of its coactivators.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Fensterl, Volker; Zhang, Ying; Veleeparambil, Manoj; Wetzel, Jaime L; Sen, Ganes C

    2013-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) is required for protecting mice from viral pathogenesis; reciprocally, it mediates the deleterious septic shock response to bacterial infection. The critical transcription factor for IFN induction, in both cases, is IRF-3, which is activated by TLR3 or RIG-I signaling in response to virus infection and TLR4 signaling in response to bacterial infection. Here, we report that IRF-3's transcriptional activity required its coactivators, β-catenin and CBP, to be modified by HDAC6-mediated deacetylation and protein kinase C isozyme β (PKC-β)-mediated phosphorylation, respectively, so that activated nuclear IRF-3 could form a stable transcription initiation complex at the target gene promoters. β-Catenin bridges IRF-3 and CBP, and the modifications were required specifically for the interaction between β-catenin and CBP but not β-catenin and IRF-3. Consequently, like IRF-3(-/-) mice, HDAC6(-/-) mice were resistant to bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced septic shock. Conversely, they were highly susceptible to pathogenesis caused by Sendai virus infection. Thus, HDAC6 is an essential component of the innate immune response to microbial infection. PMID:23532979

  3. Role of endotoxemia in cardiovascular dysfunction and mortality. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus challenges in a canine model of human septic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Natanson, C; Danner, R L; Elin, R J; Hosseini, J M; Peart, K W; Banks, S M; MacVittie, T J; Walker, R I; Parrillo, J E

    1989-01-01

    Using different types of bacteria and a canine model simulating human septic shock, we investigated the role of endotoxin in cardiovascular dysfunction and mortality. Either Escherichia coli (a microorganism with endotoxin) or Staphylococcus aureus (a microorganism without endotoxin) were placed in an intraperitoneal clot in doses of viable or formalin-killed bacteria. Cardiovascular function of conscious animals was studied using simultaneous radionuclide heart scans and thermodilution cardiac outputs. Serial plasma endotoxin levels were measured. S. aureus produced a pattern of reversible cardiovascular dysfunction over 7-10 d that was concordant (P less than 0.01) with that of E. coli. Although this cardiovascular pattern was not altered by formalin killing (S. aureus and E. coli), formalin-killed organisms produced a lower mortality and less myocardial depression (P less than 0.01). S. aureus, compared to E. coli, produced higher postmortem concentrations of microorganisms and higher mortality (P less than 0.025). E. coli produced significant endotoxemia (P less than 0.01), though viable organisms (versus nonviable) resulted in higher endotoxin blood concentrations (P less than 0.05). Significant endotoxemia did not occur with S. aureus. Thus, in the absence of endotoxemia, S. aureus induced the same cardiovascular abnormalities of septic shock as E. coli. These findings indicate that structurally and functionally distinct microorganisms, with or without endotoxin, can activate a common pathway resulting in similar cardiovascular injury and mortality. PMID:2642920

  4. Salmonella Typhi-Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Ugas, Melissa Brosset; Carroll, Timothy; Kovar, Lacey; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics. PMID:27294165

  5. Interleukin-6 Kinetics can be Useful for Early Treatment Monitoring of Severe Bacterial Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Cantara, Giulio; Sechtem, Udo; Athanasiadis, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Early appropriate anti-microbial therapy is necessary to improve outcomes of septic patients. We describe 20 case histories of patients with severe bacterial sepsis regarding kinetics of several biomarkers. We found that interleukin-6 is able to predict survival and might be able to evaluate appropriateness of anti-microbial therapy. PMID:27103972

  6. Interleukin-6 Kinetics can be Useful for Early Treatment Monitoring of Severe Bacterial Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Klag, Thomas; Cantara, Giulio; Sechtem, Udo; Athanasiadis, Anastasios

    2016-03-21

    Early appropriate anti-microbial therapy is necessary to improve outcomes of septic patients. We describe 20 case histories of patients with severe bacterial sepsis regarding kinetics of several biomarkers. We found that interleukin-6 is able to predict survival and might be able to evaluate appropriateness of anti-microbial therapy. PMID:27103972

  7. Septic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute septic arthritis are caused by Staphylococcus or Streptococcus bacteria . Chronic septic arthritis (which is less common) ... cases are caused by the bacteria group B streptococcus. Another common cause is Haemophilus influenza , especially if ...

  8. Effect of early goal-directed therapy on mortality in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Chi, Dongmei; Wang, Siyang; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether patients with severe sepsis or septic shock could benefit from a strict and early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) protocol recommended by Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) Guidelines. Methods MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE/OVID and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched between March 1983 and March 2015. Eligible studies evaluated the outcomes of EGDT versus usual care or standard therapy in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. The primary outcomes were mortality within 28 days, 60 days and 90 days. Included studies must report at least one metric of mortality. Results 5 studies that enrolled 4303 patients with 2144 in the EGDT group and 2159 in the control group were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, there were slight decreases of mortality within 28 days, 60 days and 90 days in the random-effect model in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock receiving EGDT resuscitation. However, none of the differences reached statistical significance (RR=0.86; 95% CI 0.69 to 1.06; p=0.16; p for heterogeneity=0.008, I2=71%; RR=0.94; 95% CI 0.81 to 1.10; p=0.46; p for heterogeneity=0.16, I2=43%; RR=0.98; 95% CI 0.88 to 1.10; p=0.75; p for heterogeneity=0.87, I2=0%, respectively). Conclusions The current meta-analysis pooled data from five RCTs and found no survival benefit of EGDT in patients with sepsis. However, the included trials are not sufficiently homogeneous and potential confounding factors in the negative trials (ProCESS, ARISE and ProMISe) might bias the results and diminish the treatment effect of EGDT. Further well-designed studies should eliminate all potential source of bias to determine if EGDT has a mortality benefit. PMID:26932135

  9. Surgical treatment for septic arthritis of the knee joint in elderly patients: a 10-year retrospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Ming; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Tung-Fu; Chen, Wei-Ming; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2013-04-01

    Septic arthritis is the most rapidly destructive joint disease, but its early diagnosis remains challenging; delayed or inadequate treatment, even by expert physicians, can lead to irreversible joint destruction. Between 25% and 50% of patients develop irreversible loss of joint function, which is especially concerning in elderly patients. To understand the factors influencing the outcome of septic arthritis, the authors reviewed patients aged older than 50 years who had undergone debridement surgery for primary septic arthritis at their institution between 1998 and 2008. Ninety-two patients (92 knees) were enrolled in the study; 14 did not meet inclusion criteria and were excluded from the final analysis. Of the 78 included patients, 7 underwent arthrodesis, 22 underwent total knee arthroplasty, 19 were indicated for total knee arthroplasty for severe knee joint osteoarthritis but did not undergo surgery by the end of this study, and the remaining 30 had no or mild symptoms of osteoarthrosis and did not receive any surgical procedure. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogenic agent (38%), followed by mixed bacterial infection (10%). Several factors negatively influenced the final clinical outcome, including delayed treatment, advanced macroscopic staging made during debridement surgery, performing multiple debridement surgeries, and a larger Lysholm score difference pre- and posttreatment. More antibiotics administered, longer duration of antibiotic treatment, and more pathogenic agents present were also significantly correlated with poor outcome. These findings shed new light on the management of septic arthritis. Accurate diagnoses and effective treatments are important for the clinical outcome of knee joint bacterial infection in elderly patients.

  10. Presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors are involved in the inhibition of the neurogenic vasopressor response during septic shock in pithed rats

    PubMed Central

    Godlewski, Grzegorz; Malinowska, Barbara; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2004-01-01

    Our study was undertaken to investigate whether bacterial endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide (LPS) affects the neurogenic vasopressor response in rats in vivo by presynaptic mechanisms and, if so, to characterize the type of presynaptic receptor(s) operating in the initial phase of septic shock. In pithed and vagotomized rats treated with pancuronium, electrical stimulation (ES) (1 Hz, 1 ms, 50 V for 10 s) of the preganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers or intravenous bolus injection of noradrenaline (NA) (1–3 nmol kg−1) increased the diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by about 30 mmHg. Administration of LPS (0.4 and 4 mg kg−1) under continuous infusion of vasopressin inhibited the neurogenic vasopressor response by 25 and 50%, respectively. LPS did not affect the increase in DBP induced by exogenous NA. The LPS-induced inhibition of the neurogenic vasopressor response was counteracted by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A (0.1 μmol kg−1), but not by the CB2 receptor antagonist SR 144528 (3 μmol kg−1), the vanilloid VR1 receptor antagonist capsazepine (1 μmol kg−1) or the histamine H3 receptor antagonist clobenpropit (0.1 μmol kg−1). The four antagonists by themselves did not affect the increase in DBP induced by ES or by injection of NA in rats not exposed to LPS. We conclude that in the initial phase of septic shock, the activation of presynaptic CB1 receptors by endogenously formed cannabinoids contributes to the inhibition of the neurogenic vasopressor response. PMID:15159284

  11. Presynaptic cannabinoid CB(1) receptors are involved in the inhibition of the neurogenic vasopressor response during septic shock in pithed rats.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Grzegorz; Malinowska, Barbara; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2004-06-01

    1. Our study was undertaken to investigate whether bacterial endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide (LPS) affects the neurogenic vasopressor response in rats in vivo by presynaptic mechanisms and, if so, to characterize the type of presynaptic receptor(s) operating in the initial phase of septic shock. 2. In pithed and vagotomized rats treated with pancuronium, electrical stimulation (ES) (1 Hz, 1 ms, 50 V for 10 s) of the preganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers or intravenous bolus injection of noradrenaline (NA) (1-3 nmol x kg(-1)) increased the diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by about 30 mmHg. Administration of LPS (0.4 and 4 mg x kg(-1)) under continuous infusion of vasopressin inhibited the neurogenic vasopressor response by 25 and 50%, respectively. LPS did not affect the increase in DBP induced by exogenous NA. 3. The LPS-induced inhibition of the neurogenic vasopressor response was counteracted by the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist SR 141716A (0.1 micromol x kg(-1)), but not by the CB(2) receptor antagonist SR 144528 (3 micromol x kg(-1)), the vanilloid VR1 receptor antagonist capsazepine (1 micromol x kg(-1)) or the histamine H(3) receptor antagonist clobenpropit (0.1 micromol x kg(-1)). The four antagonists by themselves did not affect the increase in DBP induced by ES or by injection of NA in rats not exposed to LPS. 4. We conclude that in the initial phase of septic shock, the activation of presynaptic CB(1) receptors by endogenously formed cannabinoids contributes to the inhibition of the neurogenic vasopressor response.

  12. CLINICAL FACTORS FOR DEVELOPING SHOCK IN RADIOCONTRAST MEDIA INDUCED ANAPHYLAXIS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Min; Ko, Byuk Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon; Ha, Sang Ook; Ahn, Shin; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong Woo; Kim, Tae-Bum; Kim, Won Young

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the time interval between radiocontrast media (RCM) administration and the development of anaphylactic shock, and risk factors associated with RCM-induced anaphylactic shock. We reviewed the medical records of 154 patients with RCM-induced anaphylaxis presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital between January 2005 and December 2014. Clinical features of RCM-induced anaphylaxis were analyzed, and patients were categorized into shock and non-shock groups to identify associated factors in affected patients. Of the 154 cases of RCM-induced anaphylaxis, 101 (65.9%) patients experienced shock. The median time between RCM exposure and the onset of shock was 11 min (interquartile range, 7.0-18.8). In patients with RCM-induced anaphylaxis accompanying shock, the median time from RCM to the first symptom onset was 6 min (interquartile range, 5.0-10.0). In the multivariate analysis, age, neurological manifestations, and allergy history except RCM were associated with the development of shock. RCM-induced anaphylaxis was commonly accompanied with shock, and the time interval between RCM exposure and the onset of shock was short. Physicians should pay attention to the development of potential cardiovascular collapse in anaphylaxis patients of old age and with neurologic manifestations. PMID:26506069

  13. Simultaneous bilateral septic arthritis of the knee after intraarticular steroid injection: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; O'Sullivan, Theresa A; Lenehan, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Osteoarthritis of knee is one of the common problems in elderly population. Intraarticular corticosteroid injection is a conservative management modality in osteoarthritis of knee. Septic arthritis is an infective complication of intraarticular corticosteroid injection. Septic arthritis in rheumatoid arthritis patients have worse prognosis because of delay in diagnosis. A higher rate of infectious complications following intraarticular injection is expected in immunocompromised and rheumatoid patients. We would like to report an extremely rare case of simultaneous bilateral knee septic arthritis after bilateral knee intraarticular steroid injection in a rheumatoid arthritis patient. Patient was treated successfully with multiple bilateral knee arthroscopic washouts and long-term intravenous antibiotics. This case report emphasizes the increased risk of infection in rheumatoid arthritis patients and a risk benefit assessment on individual basis before carrying out intraarticular steroid injection. Patient should be aware of this increased risk of infection.

  14. High Mortality in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Patients with Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders in East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Chuang, Yu-Chung; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Ko, Wen-Je; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe sepsis is a potentially deadly illness and always requires intensive care. Do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders remain a debated issue in critical care and limited data exist about its impact on care of septic patients, particularly in East Asia. We sought to assess outcome of severe sepsis patients with regard to DNR status in Taiwan. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted in intensive care units (ICUs) between 2008 and 2010. All severe sepsis patients were included for analysis. Primary outcome was association between DNR orders and ICU mortality. Volume of interventions was used as proxy indicator to indicate aggressiveness of care. Results Sixty-seven (9.4%) of 712 patients had DNR orders on ICU admission, and these patients were older and had higher disease severity compared with patients without DNR orders. Notably, DNR patients experienced high ICU mortality (90%). Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of DNR orders was independently associated with ICU mortality (odds ratio: 6.13; 95% confidence interval: 2.66–14.10). In propensity score-matched cohort, ICU mortality rate (91%) in the DNR group was statistically higher than that (62%) in the non-DNR group (p <0.001). Regarding ICU interventions, arterial and central venous catheterization were more commonly used in DNR patients than in non-DNR patients. Conclusions From the Asian perspective, septic patients placed on DNR orders on ICU admission had exceptionally high mortality. In contrast to Western reports, DNR patients received more ICU interventions, reflecting more aggressive approach to dealing with this patient population. The findings in some ways reflect differences between East and West cultures and suggest that DNR status is an important confounder in ICU studies involving severely septic patients. PMID:27416064

  15. A Case of Septic Arthritis of Shoulder Presenting as Stiffness of the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Atturu, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Septic arthritis of the shoulder is uncommon in adults. It is a surgical emergency as joint destruction occurs rapidly and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Accurate diagnosis can be particularly challenging in patients with underlying liver disease. MRI is a useful adjunct in early detection of atypical causes of shoulder pain. Case report: A 43 years old male came to our outpatient department with complaints of pain and stiffness of his left shoulder. On examination, his shoulder movements were severely restricted. Further evaluation with MRI revealed septic arthritis of left gleno-humeral joint for which emergency arthroscopic debridement was done. Conclusion: Septic arthritis of shoulder may not present with classical clinical features. Hence, a through clinical and radiological evaluation will help us prognosticate and treat accordingly thereby preventing complications like septic shock, osteomyelitis.

  16. Clinical features of septic discitis in the UK: a retrospective case ascertainment study and review of management recommendations.

    PubMed

    Hopkinson, Neil; Patel, Kamal

    2016-09-01

    Septic discitis is a rare but important cause of spinal pain caused by intervertebral disc infection. This retrospective observational case series analysis will examine the clinical features and management of septic discitis in 23 patients and compare with a similar 2001 study. We will also review the evidence behind management recommendations to identify areas for future research. The incidence of septic discitis was 2 per 100,000 per year. Patients presented with spinal pain (96 %), fever (70 %) and raised inflammatory markers. All patients had blood cultures and 52 % had targeted microbiological analysis. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common causative organism (39 %). Treatment was most often with intravenous flucloxacillin or ceftriaxone. CT-guided sampling for culture before commencing antibiotics increased organism detection from 33 to 67 %, and organism identification reduced the antibiotic course from an average of 142 days to 77 days. An increased number of significant co-morbid conditions were associated with worse outcomes. Results broadly resembled the 2001 study. Key differences were increased use and yield of magnetic resonance imaging and computerised tomography (CT) scanning and more frequent use of intravenous antibiotics. Comparisons between the studies suggest that improvements in the consistency of management have been slow. We suggest this due to the large spectrum of disease and the lack of guidelines in the UK. It is widely recommended to perform blood cultures and CT-guided biopsies before starting antibiotics, but it is unclear how long to withhold antibiotics if cultures remain negative. Six weeks of intravenous followed by 6 weeks of oral therapy is often suggested as treatment, whereas some recommend using inflammatory markers to guide antibiotic duration. Larger studies addressing these specific questions are required to provide more definitive guidance for these clinical decisions. PMID:27417552

  17. The adverse effect of emergency department crowding on compliance with the resuscitation bundle in the management of severe sepsis and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of emergency department (ED) crowding on the implementation of tasks in the early resuscitation bundle during acute care of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, as recommended by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines. Methods We analyzed the sepsis registry from August 2008 to March 2012 for patients presenting to an ED of a tertiary urban hospital and meeting the criteria for severe sepsis or septic shock. The ED occupancy rate, which was defined as the total number of patients in the ED divided by the total number of ED beds, was used for measuring the degree of ED crowding. It was categorized into three groups (low; intermediate; high crowding). The primary endpoint was the overall compliance with the entire resuscitation bundle. Results A total of 770 patients were enrolled. Of the eligible patients, 276 patients were assigned to the low crowding group, 250 patients to the intermediate crowding group, and 244 patients to the high crowding group (ED occupancy rate: ≤ 115; 116–149; ≥ 150%). There was significant difference in compliance rates among the three groups (31.9% in the low crowding group, 24.4% in the intermediate crowding group, and 16.4% in the high crowding group, P < 0.001). In a multivariate model, the high crowding group had a significant association with lower compliance (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 0.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.26 to 0.76; P = 0.003). When the ED occupancy rate was included as a continuous variable in the model, it had also a negative correlation with the overall compliance (OR of 10% increase of the ED occupancy rate, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.84 to 0.96, P = 0.002). Conclusions ED crowding was significantly associated with lower compliance with the entire resuscitation bundle and decreased likelihood of the timely implementation of the bundle elements. PMID:24093643

  18. [Disputes on traumatic shock in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    D'iachenko, P K

    1985-02-01

    On the basis of an analysis of 80 experiments in animals and 200 observations of patients the author denies the leading significance of initial inhibition of the cortex in the development of shock. Along with reflex reactions the leading part is played by a direct injury of different organs and systems and autointoxication. Urgent resuscitation and purposeful anesthesia (ketamin, potassium hydroxybutyrate, viadryl with/without ganglion block) result in favourable operations in 60% of patients. In 15% of patients the injuries are incompatible with life, in 25% no operative procedures are needed.

  19. Deletion of scavenger receptor A gene in mice resulted in protection from septic shock and modulation of TLR4 signaling in isolated peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Robert; Cauvi, David M; Hawisher, Dennis; Song, Donghuan; Niño, Diego F; Coimbra, Raul; Bickler, Stephen; De Maio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptor A (Sra), also known as macrophage scavenger receptor 1 (Msr1), is a surface glycoprotein preferentially present in macrophages that plays a primary role in innate immunity. Previous studies have shown that Sra is a modifier gene for the response to bacterial LPS in mice at the level of IL-10 production, in particular. In the present study, we found that Sra(−/−) mice are more resistant to septic shock induced by cecal ligation and puncture than wild-type C57BL/6 J (B6) mice. In addition, Sra(−/−) mice displayed initial elevated high density lipoprotein (HDL) circulating levels. Naïve peritoneal macrophages (PMϕs) were isolated from Sra(−/−) mice to understand the possible protective mechanism. Incubation of these cells with LPS was found to modulate TLR4 signaling, leading to a reduction in IL-10 and IL-6 mRNA levels, but not TNF-α expression, at low concentrations of LPS in comparison with PMϕs isolated from B6 mice. No differences were found in LPS binding between PMϕs derived from Sra(−/−) or B6 mice. The lack of Sra binding to LPS was confirmed after transfection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with the Sra gene. The contribution of Sra to the outcome of sepsis may be a combination of changes in TLR4 signaling pathway and elevated levels of HDL in circulation, but also LPS toxicity. PMID:22751446

  20. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced CD300b Receptor Binding to Toll-like Receptor 4 Alters Signaling to Drive Cytokine Responses that Enhance Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Voss, Oliver H; Murakami, Yousuke; Pena, Mirna Y; Lee, Ha-Na; Tian, Linjie; Margulies, David H; Street, Jonathan M; Yuen, Peter S T; Qi, Chen-Feng; Krzewski, Konrad; Coligan, John E

    2016-06-21

    Receptor CD300b is implicated in regulating the immune response to bacterial infection by an unknown mechanism. Here, we identified CD300b as a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding receptor and determined the mechanism underlying CD300b augmentation of septic shock. In vivo depletion and adoptive transfer studies identified CD300b-expressing macrophages as the key cell type augmenting sepsis. We showed that CD300b, and its adaptor DAP12, associated with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) upon LPS binding, thereby enhancing TLR4-adaptor MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling that resulted in an elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine storm. LPS engagement of the CD300b-TLR4 complex led to the recruitment and activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K). This resulted in an inhibition of the ERK1/2 protein kinase- and NF-κB transcription factor-mediated signaling pathways, which subsequently led to a reduced interleukin-10 (IL-10) production. Collectively, our data describe a mechanism of TLR4 signaling regulated by CD300b in myeloid cells in response to LPS. PMID:27261276

  1. Procalcitonin kinetics – prognostic and diagnostic significance in septic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mierzchała-Pasierb, Magdalena; Durek, Grażyna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severe sepsis and septic shock are advanced clinical conditions representing the patient's response to infection and having a variable but high mortality rate. Early evaluation of sepsis stage and choice of adequate treatment are key factors for survival. Some study results suggest the necessity of daily procalcitonin (PCT) monitoring because of its prognostic and discriminative value. Material and methods An observational and prospective study was conducted to evaluate the prognostic and discriminative value of PCT kinetics in comparison to PCT absolute value measurements. In a group of 50 intensive care unit patients with diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock, serum PCT measurements were performed on admission, and on the 2nd, 3rd and 5th day of therapy. The level of PCT was determined with a commercially available test according to the manufacturer's protocol. Results The kinetics of PCT assessed by ΔPCT was statistically significant in the survivors vs. the non-survivors subgroup (ΔPCT3/1, p = 0.022; ΔPCT5/1, p = 0.021). ΔPCT has no statistical significance in the severe sepsis and septic shock subgroups for all analyzed days. Only the 5th day PCT level was significantly higher in the non-survivors vs. survivors group (p = 0.008). The 1st day PCT level in the severe sepsis vs. septic shock group has a discriminative impact (p = 0.009). Conclusions According to the results, single serum PCT measurement, regardless of absolute value, has a discriminative impact but no prognostic significance, during the first 2 days of therapy. The PCT kinetics is of prognostic value from the 3rd day and is of earlier prognostic significance in comparison to changes in the patient's clinical condition evaluated by SOFA score kinetics. PMID:26925126

  2. Septic acute kidney injury in critically ill patients - a single-center study on its incidence, clinical characteristics, and outcome predictors.

    PubMed

    Shum, Hoi-Ping; Kong, Harriet Hoi-Yan; Chan, King-Chung; Yan, Wing-Wa; Chan, Tak Mao

    2016-06-01

    Purpose The objective of this study is to examine the incidence, clinical characteristics, and outcome (90-day mortality) of critically ill Chinese patients with septic AKI. Methods Patients admitted to the ICU of a regional hospital from 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2013 were included, excluding those on chronic renal replacement therapy. AKI was defined using KDIGO criteria. Patients were followed till 90 days from ICU admission or death, whichever occurred earlier. Demographics, diagnosis, clinical characteristics, and outcome were analyzed. Results In total, 3687 patients were included and 54.7% patients developed AKI. Sepsis was the most common cause of AKI (49.2%). Compared to those without AKI, AKI patients had higher disease severity, more physiological and biochemical disturbance, and carried significant co-morbidities. Ninety-day mortality increased with severity of AKI (16.7, 27.5, and 48.3% for KDIGO stage 1, 2, and 3 AKI, p < 0.001). Full renal recovery was achieved in 71.6% of AKI patients. Compared with non-septic AKI, septic AKI was associated with higher disease severity and required more aggressive support. Non-recovery of renal function occurred in 2.5% of patients with septic AKI, compared with 6.4% in non-septic AKI (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis showed that age, emergency ICU admission, post-operative cases, admission diagnosis, etiology of AKI, disease severity score, mechanical ventilation, vasopressor support, and blood parameters (like albumin, potassium and pH) independently predicted 90-day mortality. Conclusions AKI, especially septic AKI is common in critically ill Chinese patients and is associated with poor patient outcome. Etiology of AKI has a significant impact on 90-day mortality and may affect renal outcome. PMID:26981621

  3. Simvastatin and a Plant Galactolipid Protect Animals from Septic Shock by Regulating Oxylipin Mediator Dynamics through the MAPK-cPLA2 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Apaya, Maria Karmella; Lin, Chih-Yu; Chiou, Ching-Yi; Yang, Chung-Chih; Ting, Chen-Yun; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains a major medical issue despite decades of research. Identification of important inflammatory cascades and key molecular mediators are crucial for developing intervention and prevention strategies. In this study, we conducted a comparative oxylipin metabolomics study to gain a comprehensive picture of lipid mediator dynamics during the initial hyperinflammatory phase of sepsis, and demonstrated, in parallel, the efficacy of simvastatin and plant galactolipid, 1,2-di-O-α-linolenoyl-3-O-β-­galactopyranosyl-sn-glycerol (dLGG) in the homeostatic regulation of the oxylipin metabolome using a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis C57BL/6J mouse model. LPS increased the systemic and organ levels of proinflammatory metabolites of linoleic acid including leukotoxin diols (9-,10-DHOME, 12-,13-DHOME) and octadecadienoic acids (9-HODE and 13-HODE) and arachidonic acid-derived prostanoid, PGE2, and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (8-, 12- and 15-HETE). Treatment with either compound decreased the levels of proinflammatory metabolites and elevated proresolution lipoxin A4, 5(6)-EET, 11(12)-EET and 15-deoxy-PGJ2. dLGG and simvastatin ameliorated the effects of LPS-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent activation of cPLA2, cyclooxygenase-2, lipoxygenase, cytochrome P450 and/or epoxide hydrolase lowered systemic TNF-α and IL-6 levels and aminotransferase activities and decreased organ-specific infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes and macrophages, and septic shock-induced multiple organ damage. Furthermore, both dLGG and simvastatin increased the survival rates in the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) sepsis model. This study provides new insights into the role of oxylipins in sepsis pathogenesis and highlights the potential of simvastatin and dLGG in sepsis therapy and prevention. PMID:26701313

  4. A scarlet pimpernel for the resolution of inflammation? The role of supra-therapeutic doses of cobalamin, in the treatment of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic or traumatic shock.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Cobalamin carrier proteins,the Transcobalamins (TCS), are elevated during trauma, infections and chronic inflammatory conditions. This remains un-explained. It is proposed that such TC elevations signal a need for cobalamin central to the resolution of inflammation. Thus Cobalamin may regulate the transcription factor, NFkappaB, activation or suppression of which determines the inflammatory response and its resolution. Such regulation may involve at least 5 separate mechanisms: (i) hormone-like regulation of TNFalpha, through reduction of excess NO by cobalamin, as well as through the selective inhibition, in tandem with glutathione, of inducible nitric oxide synthase; (ii) quenching of nitric oxide radicals and reactive oxygen species, enhanced by cobalamin's glutathione sparing effect; (iii) the promotion of acetylcholine synthesis, central to the neuro-immune cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway; (iv) the promotion of oxidative phosphorylation; (v) and a bacteriostatic role of the TCS released by neutrophil secondary granules during phagocytosis, which also appears to modulate the inflammatory response. TC elevations are dependent on NFkappaB activation, through crosstalk between NFkappaB and Sp1, another member of the helix-loop-helix protein family, which directly mediates transcription of the TCII gene. Sp1 also has binding sites on the TNFalpha and EGF gene promoters. NFkappaB may thus ensure sufficient cobalamin to determine its own eventual suppression. Cobalamin's established regulation of EGF may additionally preserve normal function of macrophages and the coagulation cascade in wound healing. By regulating NFkappaB, Cobalamin may also be the as yet unidentified mediator needed to potentiate the anti-inflammatory action of eicosanoids derived from omega-3 essential fatty acids. Moreover, animal and human clinical data suggests that high dose cobalamin may prove a promising approach to SIRS/sepsis/septic and traumatic shock. PMID:16545917

  5. Lethal septic shock after dental scaling in a healthy dog due to Ochrobactrum anthropi-contaminated propofol.

    PubMed

    Franci, P; Dotto, G; Cattai, A; Pasotto, D

    2015-05-01

    A 10-year-old, 6-kg male Yorkshire terrier dog was scheduled for routine dental cleaning. No significant problem was observed either during anaesthesia, which was induced with propofol, or during recovery. However, 2 hours after discharge, the dog's owner returned to the clinic, complaining that the animal was lethargic and had had bloody diarrhoea. On physical examination the dog was depressed, dyspnoeic, tachycardic and hypoglycaemic. Despite supportive treatment, the dog deteriorated and died within a few hours.A presumed diagnosis of sepsis was confirmed by laboratory testing. Bacteriological and molecular examinations of both premortem blood samples and the anaesthetic, highlighted the presence of Ochrobactrum anthropi, an opportunistic pathogen usually associated with immunocompromised hosts with indwelling medical devices. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of sepsis in a healthy dog due to contamination of an anaesthetic solution by O. anthropi, suggesting a potential role of this microorganism as an emerging pathogen.

  6. Maternal Death Following Cardiopulmonary Collapse after Delivery: Amniotic Fluid Embolism or Septic Shock Due to Intrauterine Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Roberto; Kadar, Nicholas; Vaisbuch, Edi; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2010-01-01

    Problem The amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) syndrome is a catastrophic complication of pregnancy frequently associated with maternal death. The causes and mechanisms of disease responsible for this syndrome remain elusive. Methods of study We report two cases of maternal deaths attributed to AFE: 1) one woman presented with spontaneous labor at term, developed intrapartum fever, and after delivery had sudden cardiovascular collapse and disseminated intravascular coagulation(DIC), leading to death; 2) another woman presented with preterm labor and foul-smelling amniotic fluid, underwent a Cesarean section for fetal distress, and also had postpartum cardiovascular collapse and DIC, leading to death. Results Of major importance is that in both cases, the maternal plasma concentration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α at the time of admission to the hospital and when patients had no clinical evidence of infection was in the lethal range (a lethal range is considered to be above 0.1 ng/mL). Conclusions We propose that subclinical intra-amniotic infection may be a cause of postpartum cardiovascular collapse and DIC and resemble AFE. Thus, some patients with the clinical diagnosis of AFE may have infection/systemic inflammation as a mechanism of disease. These observations have implications for the understanding of the mechanisms of disease of patients who develop cardiovascular collapse and DIC, frequently attributed to AFE. It may be possible to identify a subset of patients who have biochemical and immunological evidence of systemic inflammation at the time of admission, and before a catastrophic event occurs. PMID:20236259

  7. Lactate kinetics in sepsis and septic shock: a review of the literature and rationale for further research.

    PubMed

    Chertoff, Jason; Chisum, Michael; Garcia, Bryan; Lascano, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, there have been vast improvements in sepsis-related outcomes, largely resulting from the widespread adoption of aggressive fluid resuscitation and infection control. With increased understanding of the pathophysiology of sepsis, novel diagnostics and resuscitative interventions are being discovered. In recent years, few diagnostic tests like lactate have engendered more attention and research in the sepsis arena. Studies highlighting lactate's prognostic potential for mortality and other outcomes are ubiquitous and largely focus on the early stage of sepsis management, defined as the initial 6 h and widely referred to as the "golden hours." Additional investigations, although more representative of surgical and trauma patients, suggest that lactate measurements beyond 24 h from the initiation of resuscitation continue to have predictive and prognostic utility. This review summarizes the current research and evidence regarding lactate's utility as a prognosticator of clinical outcomes in both early and late sepsis management, defines the mechanism of lactate production and clearance, and identifies areas warranting further research.

  8. Chorioamnionitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus with intact membranes in a term pregnancy: A case of maternal and fetal septic shock.

    PubMed

    Sorano, Sumire; Goto, Maki; Matsuoka, Sakiko; Tohyama, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Nakamura, Sumie; Fukami, Tatsuya; Matsuoka, Ryoei; Tsujioka, Hiroshi; Eguchi, Fuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Chorioamnionitis is usually caused by migration of cervicovaginal flora through the cervical canal in women with ruptured membranes. Common causative pathogens are genital mycoplasmas, anaerobes, enteric gram-negative bacilli, and group B streptococcus. There have been only seven previous reports of chorioamnionitis due to Staphylococcus aureus and their clinical courses are characterized by rapid disease progression and poor prognosis. This case report describes a case of acute chorioamnionitis due to S. aureus, which was successfully managed with immediate cesarean section and postoperative intensive care. A 22-year-old woman presented at 39 weeks' gestation with a fever and acute lower abdominal pain. Fetal heart monitoring showed fetal distress. Immediate cesarean delivery was performed under general anesthesia. A male infant weighing 2450 g was born. He had Apgar scores of 3 and 7 at 1 and 5 min, respectively. He was immediately intubated and admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Maternal blood culture, vaginal culture, neonatal nares, and blood and gastric fluid culture all showed methicillin-sensitive S. aureus. Histopathology of the placenta demonstrated focal acute funisitis and acute chorioamnionitis. Interestingly, most of the patients in the previous reports developed chorioamnionitis due to S. aureus despite the presence of intact membranes, as in our case. Bacterial spread in the absence of membrane rupture and the presence of bacteremia suggests hematogenous, rather than ascending, etiology of S. aureus chorioamnionitis. PMID:26705749

  9. Release of interleukin-12 in experimental Escherichia coli septic shock in baboons: relation to plasma levels of interleukin-10 and interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Jansen, P M; van der Pouw Kraan, T C; de Jong, I W; van Mierlo, G; Wijdenes, J; Chang, A A; Aarden, L A; Taylor, F B; Hack, C E

    1996-06-15

    Interleukin (IL)-12 is thought to be a key factor for the induction of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), a cytokine essential for the lethal effects of endotoxin. We report here on the release of the nonfunctional subunit of IL-12, p40, as well as biologically active heterodimeric IL-12, p70, after administration of a lethal (n = 5) or sublethal (n = 8) dose of live Escherichia coli to baboons. Remarkably, on lethal challenge, peak levels of p40 were observed at 3 hours that were about twofold lower than those elicited after sublethal challenge (2,813 +/- 515 pg/mL v 4,972 +/- 732 pg/mL, P < .05). This disparity was also observed, although to a lesser extent, for IL-12 p70 antigen, of which maximum levels of 91 +/- 47 pg/mL and 151 +/- 41 pg/mL were measured 6 hours after a lethal or sublethal dose of E coli, respectively. Circulating p70 antigen correlated with IL-12 biologic activity (r = 0.869; P < .001). When comparing lethal to sublethal conditions, lower peak levels of IL-12 on lethal E coli sharply contrasted with higher levels of other proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 observed in these animals. Lower IL-12 concentrations in the lethal group may have resulted in part from the enhanced production of IL-10, a known inhibitor of IL-12 synthesis in vitro, as peak levels of this cytokine 3 hours postchallenge inversely correlated with peak levels of IL-12, in particular p40 (r = -0.802; P < .01). Contrary to what might be expected if IFN-gamma were solely induced by IL-12, lethally challenged baboons generated threefold more IFN-gamma at 6 hours than those receiving a sublethal dose (P < .05). Moreover, higher levels of IFN-gamma were associated with lower p40/p70 ratios, suggesting that, in agreement with observations in vitro, IFN-gamma may have preferentially upregulated the release of p70 over p40. These data show that IL-12 is released in experimental septic shock in nonhuman primates and suggest that

  10. The effect of liver disease on lactate normalization in severe sepsis and septic shock: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Sarah A.; Puskarich, Michael A.; Jones, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the effect of liver disease (LD) on lactate clearance during early sepsis resuscitation. Methods This is a multicenter randomized clinical trial. An initial lactate >2 mmol/L and subsequent serum lactate measurement within 6 hours were required for inclusion. LD was categorized by two methods: 1) past medical history (PMH) categorized as no LD, mild LD (no Child’s score criteria, but PMH of hepatitis B/C), cirrhosis; and 2) measurable liver dysfunction determined by the liver component of the sequential organ failure assessment (L-SOFA) score as no dysfunction (L-SOFA score 0), mild dysfunction (score 1), moderate-severe dysfunction (score 2 to 4). Primary outcome was the rate of lactate normalization. Results One hundred eighty-seven patients were included. When categorized by PMH, 169 patients had no LD, 6 mild LD, and 12 cirrhosis. 63/169 (37%) of patients with no LD achieved lactate normalization, compared to 4/6 (67%) with mild LD, and 1/12 (8%) with cirrhosis (P<0.03). Categorized by L-SOFA score, 59/124 (47%) patients with L-SOFA 0 achieved lactate normalization, compared to 6/31 (19%) with L-SOFA 1, and 3/32 (9%) with L-SOFA 2–4 (P<0.01). Relative lactate clearance [(initial lactate–subsequent lactate)/initial lactate] was lower in patients with more advanced LD by PMH (37.7 vs. 40.4 vs. 21.8, P=0.07), and lower with increasing L-SOFA score (42.0 vs. 30.1 vs. 23.4, P=0.01). Conclusion Liver dysfunction was significantly associated with impaired lactate clearance and normalization during the early resuscitation of sepsis. PMID:27752598

  11. Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome (DRESS) syndrome associated with azithromycin presenting like septic shock: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome is a potentially life-threatening cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction characterized by extensive mucocutaneous eruption, fever, hematologic abnormalities including eosinophilia and/or atypical lymphocytosis, and extensive organ involvement. The drugs most often responsible for causing drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome are anticonvulsants, antimicrobial agents and antipyretic or anti-inflammatory analgesics. Although azithromycin is widely prescribed in clinical practice, serious cutaneous reactions from this agent have been rarely described. We report the first adult case of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome associated with azithromycin. Case presentation A 44-year-old previously healthy Caucasian man with history of tobacco use presented to his primary care physician with fever and productive cough. He was prescribed azithromycin, promethazine hydrochloride and dextromethorphan hydrobromide syrup. One week later, he developed a blistering erythematous rash over both hands, which over the next two weeks spread to involve nearly his entire body surface, sparing only his face. He was admitted to an outside hospital with signs of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and severe sepsis, presumably from a skin infection. Despite aggressive therapy he deteriorated, with worsening diffuse erythema, and was transferred to our institution. He developed multiple organ failure requiring ventilatory and hemodynamic support. Pertinent laboratory studies included a leukocytosis with a white blood cell count of 17.6×109/L and 47% eosinophils. A skin biopsy showed evidence of spongiotic lichenoid dermatitis with eosinophils and neutrophils, compatible with a systemic drug-induced hypersensitivity reaction. Our patient was started on high-dose steroids and showed dramatic improvement within 48 hours. Conclusions We report the first adult case of

  12. Markers of Oxidative Stress and Clinical Outcome in Critically ill Septic Patients: A Preliminary Study from North India

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naushad Ahmad; Singh, Harpreet; Chhoda, Ankit; Mattoo, Sahil; Gupta, Basant Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is the leading cause of mortality in non-coronary Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Oxidative stress is one of the important features in pathogenesis of sepsis. Aim This study was undertaken to evaluate levels of oxidants and antioxidants in patients with sepsis admitted to ICU. Study Design: This was a non-interventional clinical case-control study undertaken at a tertiary level teaching hospital in New Delhi, India. Materials and Methods Forty-six consecutive non-pediatric patients admitted to ICU with sepsis were included and subjected to detailed history, physical examination and investigations. Blood samples were drawn to evaluate oxidant Malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant (alpha-tocopherol) levels. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Organ Dysfunction and/or Infection (ODIN) scores were calculated and patients followed up for outcomes. Twenty age and sex matched healthy subjects served as controls. Results Mean levels of malondialdehyde were higher in patients than controls (17.2±3.8nm/ml versus 4.6±1.6nm/ml, p<0.001) while levels of alpha-tocopherol were lower (3.2±1.3μg/ml versus 9.9±2.0μg/ml, p<0.001). The mean APACHE II and ODIN scores were 18.1±9.3 and 1.7±1.3 respectively in patients. These scores were two to three fold higher in non survivor patients (n=22) in comparison with survivors (n=18) (p<0.001). There was no significant difference between the two groups in oxidants and antioxidants levels (p>0.05). However, a significant and positive correlation was observed between oxidant -antioxidant levels and APACHE II, ODIN and International Normalized Ratio (INR) scores in septic patients overall. Conclusion The oxidants in septic patients were significantly higher while antioxidants were significantly lower than healthy controls. There was also a significant correlation with APACHE II and ODIN scores. A large patient population based study may draw more specific conclusions. PMID:27656484

  13. A Non-inferiority Pilot Study Comparing the Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Generic Wide-spectrum Antibiotic Use in Septic Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Araya, I; Fasce, G; Núñez, E; Opazo, J L; Saez, E; Hurtado, V; Contreras, S; Quiñones, L A

    2015-12-01

    The present study is a non-inferiority study based on a descriptive and comparative case series for comparison of generic vs. original intravenous antimicrobials in septic oncology patients at an oncology private ICU. 1906 cancer patients admitted to Arturo Lopez Perez Foundation, Chile, were included in this study. After recruitment, a first retrospective group of 206 septic cancer patients recorded from 1st January, 2008 until July 14th, 2010, treated with original antibiotics (cefoperazone-sulbactam, imipenem-cilastatin, piperacillin-tazobactam) were included for analyses and a second prospective group of 143 septic cancer patients recorded from July 15th, 2010 until January 02, 2013, treated with the same but generic antibiotics were also included for comparisons. The trial protocol was developed in accordance with Helsinki and Good Clinical Practices recommendations. The results of this study showed no significant differences between the 2 groups in days of treatment, rate of success and lab test determinations (white cell count, PCR and procalcitonin), with lower, but not significant, total bed days and CPU bed days for generic antibiotics. Therefore, we conclude that the safety and efficacy of the generic antibiotics cefactam®, imipen® and Piperazam® are not inferior to original antibiotics for the treatment of severe sepsis in hospitalised patients at the Arturo Lopez Perez Foundation. PMID:25811220

  14. A Non-inferiority Pilot Study Comparing the Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Generic Wide-spectrum Antibiotic Use in Septic Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Araya, I; Fasce, G; Núñez, E; Opazo, J L; Saez, E; Hurtado, V; Contreras, S; Quiñones, L A

    2015-12-01

    The present study is a non-inferiority study based on a descriptive and comparative case series for comparison of generic vs. original intravenous antimicrobials in septic oncology patients at an oncology private ICU. 1906 cancer patients admitted to Arturo Lopez Perez Foundation, Chile, were included in this study. After recruitment, a first retrospective group of 206 septic cancer patients recorded from 1st January, 2008 until July 14th, 2010, treated with original antibiotics (cefoperazone-sulbactam, imipenem-cilastatin, piperacillin-tazobactam) were included for analyses and a second prospective group of 143 septic cancer patients recorded from July 15th, 2010 until January 02, 2013, treated with the same but generic antibiotics were also included for comparisons. The trial protocol was developed in accordance with Helsinki and Good Clinical Practices recommendations. The results of this study showed no significant differences between the 2 groups in days of treatment, rate of success and lab test determinations (white cell count, PCR and procalcitonin), with lower, but not significant, total bed days and CPU bed days for generic antibiotics. Therefore, we conclude that the safety and efficacy of the generic antibiotics cefactam®, imipen® and Piperazam® are not inferior to original antibiotics for the treatment of severe sepsis in hospitalised patients at the Arturo Lopez Perez Foundation.

  15. Toxic shock syndrome: clinical and laboratory findings in 30 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, A. W.; Wong, C. K.; MacFarlane, A. M.; Bartlett, K. H.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty patients with toxic shock syndrome (TSS) that developed between May 1980 and March 1983 in Vancouver were studied prospectively. In the 15 cases related to menstruation the illness followed a uniform and predictable clinical course. In the 15 other cases (3 in males) the disease was not related to menstruation, and the sources of the Staphylococcus aureus infections were diverse; 67% were hospital-acquired. Profound but transient lymphocytopenia associated with marked leukocytosis was the most striking laboratory finding and one not previously emphasized in the literature. S. aureus was isolated from sites of soft-tissue infection, the vagina or the endocervix in all except one case. Two patients had bacteremia. Phage types 29 and 29 + predominated among the isolates tested. All the genital S. aureus isolates tested produced the TSS marker protein, while the bacteria from wounds, throat, nose and blood were sometimes positive. Two patients (7%) died from refractory shock and multiple organ failure. All patients with a febrile, exanthematous, multisystem illness, particularly if it is associated with menstruation or a staphylococcal infection, should be evaluated promptly and treated empirically for TSS. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:6692240

  16. Study of a tissue protecting system for clinical applications of underwater shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S. H. R.; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2005-04-01

    Applications of underwater shock waves have been extended to various clinical therapies during the past two decades. Besides the successful contribution of extracorporeal shock waves, tissue damage especially to the vasculature has been reported. These side effects are believed to be due to the shock wave-tissue interaction and cavitation. In the present research in order to minimize shock wave induced damage a shock wave attenuating system was designed and studied. The attenuating system consisted of thin gas packed layers immersed in water, which could attenuate more than 90% of shock waves overpressure. Silver azide micro-pellets (10 mg) were ignited by irradiation of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to generate shock waves. Pressure histories were measured with fiber optic probe and PVDF needle hydrophones. The strength of incident shock waves was changed by adjusting the distance between the pellets and the layers. The whole sequences of the shock wave attenuation due to the interaction of shock waves with the dissipating layers were quantitatively visualized by double exposure holographic interferometry and time resolved high speed photography. The attenuated shock had overpressure less than threshold damage of brain tissue evaluated from histological examination of the rat brain treated by shock waves.

  17. Polyarticular septic arthritis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Clements, J; Dinneen, A; Heilpern, G

    2013-03-01

    Septic arthritis is an uncommon condition with an incidence of 2-3/100,000. It is clinically notable, however, as it is a rapidly destructive joint disease with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Polyarticular septic arthritis has an estimated incidence of 15% of all cases of infectious arthritis. We report a case of polyarticular septic arthritis with involvement of bilateral shoulders and wrist to highlight the importance of early diagnosis and treatment as well as the high mortality rates associated with this condition. Bilateral septic shoulder arthritis poses a challenge to treat, and its significance should not be underestimated as even with early surgical intervention and aggressive antibiotic and fluid resuscitation death is a sad but perhaps not uncommon outcome. It is therefore imperative that the diagnosis of polyarticular septic arthritis is kept prominent in the physician's mind when confronted with a patient with symptomatic polyarthralgia.

  18. Clinical application of shock wave therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Ioppolo, F; Rompe, J D; Furia, J P; Cacchio, A

    2014-04-01

    Currently the application of shock wave therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been primarily used in the treatment of tendinopathies (proximal plantar fasciopathy, lateral elbow tendinopathy, calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder, and patellar tendinopathy, etc.) and bone defects (delayed- and non-union of bone fractures, avascular necrosis of femoral head, etc.). Although the mechanism of their therapeutic effects are still unknown, the majority of published papers have shown positive and beneficial effects of using SWT as a treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, with a success rate ranging from 65% to 91%, while the complications are low or negligible. The purpose of this paper is to inform the reader about the published data on the clinical application of SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper, with the help of a literature review, indications and success rates for SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders are outlined, while adequate SWT parameters (e.g., rate of impulses, energy flux density, etc.) are defined according to the present state of knowledge.

  19. Predictors and Clinical Impact of Inappropriate Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Shocks in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeong Hoon; Byeon, Kyeongmin; Yim, Hye Ran; Park, Jung Wae; Park, Seung-Jung; Huh, June; Kim, June Soo

    2012-01-01

    Limited data are available on inappropriate shocks in Korean patients implanted with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). We investigated the impact of inappropriate shocks on clinical outcomes. This retrospective, single-center study included 148 patients treated between October 1999 and June 2011. The primary outcome was a composite event of all-cause mortality or hospitalization for any cardiac reason. The median follow-up duration was 29 months (interquartile range: 8 to 53). One or more inappropriate shocks occurred in 34 (23.0%) patients. A history of atrial fibrillation was the only independent predictor of inappropriate shock (hazard ratio [HR]: 4.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.89-9.15, P < 0.001). Atrial fibrillation was the most common cause of inappropriate shock (67.7%), followed by supraventricular tachycardia (23.5%), and abnormal sensing (8.8%). A composite event of all-cause mortality or hospitalizations for any cardiac reason during follow-up was not significantly different between patients with or without inappropriate shock (inappropriate shock vs no inappropriate shock: 35.3% vs 35.4%, adjusted HR: 1.06, 95% CI: 0.49-2.29, P = 0.877). Inappropriate shocks do not affect clinical outcomes in patients implanted with an ICD, although the incidence of inappropriate shocks is high. PMID:22690092

  20. SHOCK-WAVE THERAPY APPLICATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE (REVIEW).

    PubMed

    Sheveleva, N; Minbayeva, L; Belyayeva, Y

    2016-03-01

    The article presents literature review on the use of extracorporeal shock-wave therapy in physiotherapeutic practice. The basic mechanisms of shock waves influence on the organism are spotlighted. Studies proving high efficacy of the method in treatment of wide variety of inflammatory diseases and traumatic genesis are presented. The data on comparative assessment of shock-wave therapy efficacy, and results of researches on possibility of extracorporeal shock-wave therapy effect potentiating in combination with other therapeutic methods are reflected. Recent years, the range of indications for shock-wave therapy application had been significantly widened. However, further study of the method is still relevant because mechanisms of action of the factor are studied insufficiently; methods of therapy parameters selection (energy flux density, number of pulses per treatment, duration of a course) are either advisory or empirical.

  1. Management of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Avinash K; Gedalia, Abraham

    2004-09-01

    Septic arthritis in children remains a serious disease with the potential for significant systemic and musculoskeletal morbidity. Staphlococcus aureus is the most common cause of bone and joint infections in all age groups. Microbial invasion of the synovial space occurs typically results from hematogenous seeding. Diagnosis in neonates and young infants can be difficult since the clinical signs are much less specific in these age groups. Early diagnosis by needle aspiration of the affected joint and prompt initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy in conjunction with drainage of the affected joint is critical to avoid destruction of the articular cartilage and prevent disability. Septic arthritis in infants and children should always be managed by a pediatrician in close consultation with an orthopedic surgeon. Empiric antibiotic regimens should always include adequate anti-staphylococcal coverage. Antibiotic treatment should be started with appropriate doses of intravenous antibiotics. Switch to oral antibiotic therapy can be made when patient demonstrates clinical improvement. A minimum of 3-4 weeks of therapy is recommended. Close follow-up is warranted to monitor the growth of the affected limb until skeletal maturity.

  2. Technetium phosphate bone scan in the diagnosis of septic arthritis in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, S.B.; Savage, J.P.; Foster, B.K. )

    1989-09-01

    The technetium phosphate bone scans of 106 children with suspected septic arthritis were reviewed to determine whether the bone scan can accurately differentiate septic from nonseptic arthropathy. Only 13% of children with proved septic arthritis had correct blind scan interpretation. The clinically adjusted interpretation did not identify septic arthritis in 30%. Septic arthritis was incorrectly identified in 32% of children with no evidence of septic arthritis. No statistically significant differences were noted between the scan findings in the septic and nonseptic groups and no scan findings correlated specifically with the presence or absence of joint sepsis.

  3. Cardiogenic Shock: Failure of Oxygen Delivery and Oxygen Utilization.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hoong Sern

    2016-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock remains a highly lethal condition. Conventional therapy including revascularization and mechanical circulatory support aims to improve cardiac output and oxygen delivery, but increasing basic and clinical observations indicate wider circulatory and cellular abnormalities, particularly at the advanced stages of shock. Progressive cardiogenic shock is associated with microcirculatory and cellular abnormalities. Cardiogenic shock is initially characterized by a failure to maintain global oxygen delivery; however, progressive cardiogenic shock is associated with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, derangement of the regulation of regional blood flow, microcirculatory abnormalities, and cellular dysoxia. These abnormalities are analogous to septic shock and may not be reversed by increase in oxygen delivery, even to supranormal levels. Earlier mechanical circulatory support in cardiogenic shock may limit the development of microcirculatory and cellular abnormalities. PMID:27509355

  4. Cardiogenic Shock: Failure of Oxygen Delivery and Oxygen Utilization.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hoong Sern

    2016-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock remains a highly lethal condition. Conventional therapy including revascularization and mechanical circulatory support aims to improve cardiac output and oxygen delivery, but increasing basic and clinical observations indicate wider circulatory and cellular abnormalities, particularly at the advanced stages of shock. Progressive cardiogenic shock is associated with microcirculatory and cellular abnormalities. Cardiogenic shock is initially characterized by a failure to maintain global oxygen delivery; however, progressive cardiogenic shock is associated with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, derangement of the regulation of regional blood flow, microcirculatory abnormalities, and cellular dysoxia. These abnormalities are analogous to septic shock and may not be reversed by increase in oxygen delivery, even to supranormal levels. Earlier mechanical circulatory support in cardiogenic shock may limit the development of microcirculatory and cellular abnormalities.

  5. [Definition of shock types].

    PubMed

    Adams, H A; Baumann, G; Gänsslen, A; Janssens, U; Knoefel, W; Koch, T; Marx, G; Müller-Werdan, U; Pape, H C; Prange, W; Roesner, D; Standl, T; Teske, W; Werner, G; Zander, R

    2001-11-01

    Definitions of shock types. Hypovolaemic shock is a state of insufficient perfusion of vital organs with consecutive imbalance of oxygen supply and demand due to an intravascular volume deficiency with critically impaired cardiac preload. Subtypes are haemorrhagic shock, hypovolaemic shock in the narrow sense, traumatic-haemorrhagic shock and traumatic-hypovolaemic shock. Cardiac shock is caused by a primary critical cardiac pump failure with consecutive inadequate oxygen supply of the organism. Anaphylactic shock is an acute failure of blood volume distribution (distributive shock) and caused by IgE-dependent, type-I-allergic, classical hypersensibility, or a physically, chemically, or osmotically induced IgE-independent anaphylactoid hypersensibility. The septic shock is a sepsis-induced distribution failure of the circulating blood volume in the sense of a distributive shock. The neurogenic shock is a distributive shock induced by generalized and extensive vasodilatation with consecutive hypovolaemia due to an imbalance of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of vascular smooth muscles. PMID:11753724

  6. [The current situation and trends in the clinical treatment of shock].

    PubMed

    Huang, Go-Shine; Hu, Mei-Hua; Hung, Nan-Kai; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Liu, Tien-Chien; Liaw, Wen-Jinn

    2010-02-01

    Shock is defined as hypoperfusion of tissues and/or organs. The initial focus of resuscitation following shock is on establishing an open airway and ensuring adequate ventilation and circulation. Causes of shock can be recognized quickly via clinical manifestations. A professional physical examination and observation of response to therapy can result in early diagnosis of the causes of unstable vital signs. Identification of shock symptoms in order to administer appropriate treatment quickly is key to saving patient lives, because "time is tissue". In all shock cases, treatments begin with an evaluation, resuscitation and immediate treatment of life-threatening symptoms. Patients may experience more than one kind of shock simultaneously, which further complicates their assessment and treatment. The critical care of shock should be done thoroughly and systematically in order to assess and manage patients so as to avoid dysfunctions in one organ damaging others. During emergency and critical management of shock patients, once a certain stage of assessment is completed, further evaluation is necessary to assess condition improvement. If improvement is confirmed, maintenance therapy may be considered. If improvement is not confirmed, it should be considered whether treatment is inadequate or misfocused, or whether the patient's response is atypically poor. In addition to timely resuscitation and ICU care, there are specific effective treatments for each type of shock. Such must be administered in accordance with guidelines, standard protocols and goal-oriented approaches. Trends in shock management currently focus on integrating guidelines, standard protocols and goal-oriented approaches into a "treatment bundle", which facilitates the implementation of clinical medical care and completes specific goals within a specified time limit to reduce the risk of multiple organ failure and death due to shock.

  7. [Septic arthritis of thoracic facet joint].

    PubMed

    Ben Abdelghani, K; Gérard-Dran, D; Combe, B

    2009-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the facet joint is a rare condition. We report a case of septic arthritis of both a thoracic facet joint and a wrist. Clinical manifestations were consistent with a spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine demonstrated infection of facet joints of T1 and T2. A surgical biopsy of the wrist isolated a type B streptococcus. The same organism was found in urine culture. The patient had an uneventful recovery on antibiotics.

  8. A clinical trial of a combination of amoxycillin and flucloxacillin in amputations for septic ischaemic lower limb lesions.

    PubMed

    Robbs, J V; Kritzinger, N A; Mogotlane, K A; Odell, J A; Huizinga, W H

    1981-12-12

    The incidence of sepsis after amputation with or without a proximal arterial reconstructive procedure in 24 patients presenting with septic ischaemic lower limb lesions and who received a parenteral combination of amoxycillin and flucloxacillin (Suprapen; Bencard) is compared with that in a similar control group of 22 patients who received antibiotics only if postoperative sepsis developed. There was no significant difference in the incidence of sepsis in the arterial reconstruction wounds. Amputation stump sepsis occurred in 33.3% of patients receiving prophylactic antibiotics compared with 72.7% of the control group. The difference is statistically significant. A similar significant difference was found among 32 patients submitted to primary amputation without an arterial reconstructive procedure. Bacteriological data are discussed.

  9. Clinical experiences of treating septic arthritis in the equine by repeated joint lavage: a series of 39 cases.

    PubMed

    Meijer, M C; van Weeren, P R; Rijkenhuizen, A B

    2000-08-01

    The condition of septic arthritis was treated in 12 foals with 21 affected joints (Group I) and in 27 adult horses. The adult horses were divided into three groups, based on aetiology of the condition: haematogenous (Group II, n = 6), iatrogenic (Group III, n = 6), and perforating trauma (Group IV, n = 15). The treatment consisted of an initial systemic antibiotic that anticipated the microbial agents that were considered most likely per group, repeated through-and-through joint lavages every other day and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The antibiotics were adjusted to the results of bacteriological culture and susceptibility tests. Joint lavages were continued until the white blood cell count dropped below 15 G/l and bacteriological culture was negative, after which a single dose of a short-acting corticosteroid was administered intra-articularly. Joint recovery rate in group I was 71%. Patient recovery rate of the foals, however, was lower (42%). Three foals were killed for reasons other than arthritis; one foal because of an arthritis-related problem and three foals because of persistent arthritis. Overall joint recovery rate, equalling patient recovery rate, in the adult horses was 81%. The expected predominance of Streptococcus spp. in haematogenous arthritis in adult horses was not confirmed, indicating that in these cases also, an initial antibiotic treatment with a broad-spectrum combination is preferable. It is concluded that with intensive treatment, the prognosis of septic arthritis in the adult horse can be classified as fair to even good. Results in the foals are not as good, but this seems to be more due to the specific problems surrounding the equine neonate than to unresponsiveness to the treatment.

  10. The Septic Shock-associated IL-10 -1082 A>G Polymorphism Mediates Allele-specific Transcription via Poly ADP-ribose Polymerase 1 in Macrophages Engulfing Apoptotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xiaoyan; Kim, Ha-Jeong; Ramirez, Michelle; Salameh, Sarah; Ma, Xiaojing

    2013-01-01

    The biallelic Interleukin-10 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at -1082 of the promoter region linked to individual variation in cytokine inducibility has been strongly implicated in several pathological conditions including the development of, and outcomes in, septic shock during pneumococcal infection, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and cardiac dysfunction. However, the molecular basis of the SNP-mediated variable IL-10 production levels has not been explored. Here we report that the -1082G>A alleles in the promoter region of the human IL-10 gene physically interact with a nuclear protein in an allele-specific manner that results in different levels of IL-10 transcription. This protein has been identified as poly ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1). We show that PARP-1 acts as a transcription repressor, and its DNA-binding activity is strongly regulated in macrophages that engulf apoptotic cells but not stimulated with lippopolysaccharides. These findings unveil a novel role of PARP-1 in the regulation of IL-10 production in an allele-dependent way, which determines individual susceptibility to sepsis-induced inflammatory pathology and the immunological sequelae in a physiological process where clearance of infection-induced apoptotic cells by professional phagocytes triggers the cytokine synthesis. PMID:20181890

  11. Emergency percutaneous nephrostomy in the septic kidney.

    PubMed

    Nicolescu, D; Boja, R; Osanu, V; Bakos, I; Negrut, I; Cantar, C; Schwartz, L

    1992-01-01

    From 250 upper tract obstructive uropathy cases we have studied 64 patients hospitalized with toxico-septic shock. The constant symptom was arterial hypotension. Other 3 patients with long-standing urinary infection due to lithiasis developed this dreaded complication after PNL (staghorn stones-2, pyelic stone-1). In complicated obstructive uropathy cases associated with toxico-septic shock, percutaneous nephrostomy for high urinary derivation in emergency is usually made under local anaesthesia. Its aim is rapid and efficient clearance of kidney obstruction, with minimal damage for the patient; then it is followed by strong antibiotherapy associated with other reanimation and intensive care measures. There were 11 deaths. The stone generating obstructive uropathy was removed subsequently, after the improvement of biological constants and general state of the patient, under the protection of percutaneous nephrostomy.

  12. Septic neonate rescued by polymyxin B hemoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Eiji; Ibara, Satoshi; Tokuhisa, Takuya; Hiwatashi, Sayuri; Hayashida, Yoshihiro; Maede, Yoshinobu; Matsui, Takako; Nakazawa, Yusuke; Inoue, Takeshi; Kodaira, Yuichi

    2013-06-01

    Sepsis caused by group B streptococcus has been well controlled with aminobenzylpenicillin, but the incidence of Escherichia coli sepsis has increased in proportion. E. coli is a Gram-negative bacillus associated with poor prognosis due to the release of endotoxins. Conventional treatment with antibiotics alone may not be sufficient because the inflammatory response exacerbates the unstable hemodynamic status. Polymyxin B hemoperfusion has been established as a treatment option for septic shock in adults. Polymyxin B hemoperfusion adsorbs endotoxins and cannabinoids such as anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Reported herein is a case of severe septic shock induced by E. coli. The concomitant use of polymyxin B hemoperfusion rapidly reduced the requirement for catecholamines and the patient was discharged without short-term neurological or respiratory sequelae. It is suggested that polymyxin B hemoperfusion might be an innovative therapy for severe sepsis, and could improve outcome.

  13. [Acute heart failure and cardiogenic shock: pathophysiology, clinical aspects and management strategies].

    PubMed

    Störk, S; Angermann, C E; Ertl, G

    2005-03-01

    Irrespective of improved medical and interventional therapeutic options, mortality among patients with acute heart failure and cardiogenic shock has remained disappointingly high. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of basic treatment measures to improve hemodynamics and metabolism are of vital importance until causal therapy, e. g. revascularization, is initiated. Due to the principal difficulty to set up larger clinical trials, in patients with cardiogenic shock empirical rather than firm evidence supports the various treatment and management strategies currently in use. Continuous hemodynamic monitoring to tailor fluid therapy, new drugs, and prognostic markers have been developed for the treatment and monitoring of cardiogenic shock, all of which await testing in larger-scale studies. Ongoing challenges remain the right ventricular pump failure or hemodynamically compromising arrhythmia which may be either cause or consequence of cardiogenic shock. PMID:15702302

  14. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for wound healing: technology, mechanisms, and clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Mittermayr, Rainer; Antonic, Vlado; Hartinger, Joachim; Kaufmann, Hanna; Redl, Heinz; Téot, Luc; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Schaden, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    For almost 30 years, extracorporeal shock wave therapy has been clinically implemented as an effective treatment to disintegrate urinary stones. This technology has also emerged as an effective noninvasive treatment modality for several orthopedic and traumatic indications including problematic soft tissue wounds. Delayed/nonhealing or chronic wounds constitute a burden for each patient affected, significantly impairing quality of life. Intensive wound care is required, and this places an enormous burden on society in terms of lost productivity and healthcare costs. Therefore, cost-effective, noninvasive, and efficacious treatments are imperative to achieve both (accelerated and complete) healing of problematic wounds and reduce treatment-related costs. Several experimental and clinical studies show efficacy for extracorporeal shock wave therapy as means to accelerate tissue repair and regeneration in various wounds. However, the biomolecular mechanism by which this treatment modality exerts its therapeutic effects remains unclear. Potential mechanisms, which are discussed herein, include initial neovascularization with ensuing durable and functional angiogenesis. Furthermore, recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells, stimulated cell proliferation and differentiation, and anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects as well as suppression of nociception are considered important facets of the biological responses to therapeutic shock waves. This review aims to provide an overview of shock wave therapy, its history and development as well as its current place in clinical practice. Recent research advances are discussed emphasizing the role of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in soft tissue wound healing. PMID:22642362

  15. Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Ismail A; Wasay, Mohammad

    2016-03-15

    Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, once a common and deadly disease, has fortunately become rare now. Not only that the incidence has fallen significantly after the antibiotic era, the morbidity and mortality has also decreased substantially. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is by far the commonest form of septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Due to its rare occurrence, a lot of current generation clinicians have not encountered the entity in person. Despite all the advances in diagnostic modalities, a high index of clinical suspicion remains the mainstay in prompt diagnosis and management of this potentially lethal condition. Keeping this in view, the authors have reviewed the subject including the old literature and have summarized the current approach to diagnosis and management. Septic cavernous thrombosis is a fulminant disease with dramatic presentation in most cases comprised of fever, periorbital pain and swelling, associated with systemic symptoms and signs. The preceding infection is usually in the central face or paranasal sinuses. The disease rapidly spreads to contralateral side and if remains undiagnosed and untreated can result in severe complications or even death. Prompt diagnosis using radiological imaging in suspected patient, early use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and judicial use of anticoagulation may save the life and prevent disability. Surgery is used only to treat the nidus of infection. PMID:26944152

  16. [Septic arthritis and spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Yosuke

    2014-10-01

    Septic arthritis and spondylitis in elderly adult are uncommon disease. But symptoms and signs of septic arthritis and spondylitis are an important medical emergency, with high mortality and morbidity. Delayed or inadequate treatment can result in irreversible joint destruction and neurological condition. Early diagnoses as well as prompt and effective treatment are essential for avoiding severe outcomes. In spite of advances in diagnostic imaging techniques, the incidence of septic arthritis and spondylitis appears to have been increased. The aging of the population, the widespread use of immunosuppressant therapies, including systemic corticosteroids, cytokines and anticytokines, and growing resistance to conventional antibiotics seem to be the major cause.

  17. Cardiovascular devices; reclassification of intra-aortic balloon and control systems for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure; effective date of requirement for premarket approval for intra-aortic balloon and control systems for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. Final order.

    PubMed

    2013-12-30

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify intra-aortic balloon and control system (IABP) devices when indicated for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) or a notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) for IABPs when indicated for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. PMID:24383147

  18. Septic Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arian, Mahdieh; Kamali, Azadeh; Tabatabaeichehr, Mahbubeh; Arashnia, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is a rare condition that can result in high mortality and morbidity rates if not treated immediately. CST may be aseptic or septic. Less common primary sites of infection include the tonsils, soft palate, middle ear, and orbit. Reported cases of middle ear infection are very rare, and response to treatment is poor. Case Presentation The present study is a case report of acute otitis media which led to septic cavernous sinus thrombosis in a 56-year-old woman in Bojnord city, North Khorasan, Iran. Conclusions Findings of laboratory tests and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Clinical-based medical care led to successful management of the patient with broad spectrum intravenous antibiotics that prevented serious complications. PMID:27781123

  19. [Anaphylactic shock associated with ceftriaxone, case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Del Carpio-Orantes, Luis; Azuara-Trujillo, Hugo Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a case of anaphylactic shock in a senile patient, who had a biphasic event associated with the administration of a beta-lactam cephalosporin (ceftriaxone), needing stay in the intensive care unit and support with vasoactive amines, which it is rare to see in this issue, already being in itself a difficult diagnosis and often undervalued by rejecting causes of shock in a senile patient other than cardiogenic or septic. Also, a case review is made based on epidemiological issues, clinical and paraclinical diagnosis, and current treatment implications based on current international guidelines and a review of the topic.

  20. Meningoencephalitis caused by a zygomycete fungus (Basidiobolus) associated with septic shock in an immunocompetent patient: 1-year follow-up after treatment.

    PubMed

    Auxiliadora-Martins, M; Alkmim-Teixeira, G C; Machado-Viana, J; Nicolini, E A; Martins-Filho, O A; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, F; Carlotti, C G; Basile-Filho, A

    2010-08-01

    Zygomycosis is an infection caused by opportunistic fungi of the Zygomycetes class, specifically those from the Mucorales and Entomophthorales orders. It is an uncommon disease, mainly restricted to immunocompromised patients. We report a case of a 73-year-old male patient with a history of fever (39 degrees C) lasting for 1 day, accompanied by shivering, trembling, and intense asthenia. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit with complex partial seizures, and submitted to orotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation under sedation with midazolam. The electroencephalogram showed evidence of non-convulsive status epilepticus. There is no fast specific laboratory test that permits confirmation of invasive fungal disease. Unless the physician suspects this condition, the disease may progress rapidly while the patient is treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Differential diagnosis between fungal and bacterial infection is often difficult. The clinical presentation is sometimes atypical, and etiological investigation is not always successful. In the present case, the histopathological examination of the biopsy obtained from the right temporal lobe indicated the presence of irregular, round, thick-walled fungi forming papillae and elongated structures of irregular diameter, with no septa, indicative of zygomycete (Basidiobolus). Treatment with liposomal amphotericin B and fluconazole was initiated after diagnosis of meningoencephalitis by zygomycete, with a successful outcome.

  1. [Septic monarthritis caused by Sphingomonas paucimobilis].

    PubMed

    Dischereit, G; Burk, M; Storck-Müller, K; Lange, U

    2013-10-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis, formerly known as Pseudomonas paucimobilis, is a rare cause of septic arthritis and is therefore regarded as being of minor clinical interest in rheumatological diagnostics. In this connection the yellow pigmented, aerobic, glucose non-fermenting, Gram negative bacillus is usually associated with immunocompromised patients. A case of septic arthritis in a 70-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) initially presenting with right knee pain, swelling and redness is reported. After diagnosis of septic gonarthritis due to Sphingomonas paucimobilis, the infection was successfully treated by oral antibiotic therapy with ofloxacine based on the patient's antibiotic susceptibility profile, combined with analgesic and anti-inflammatory local physical therapy several times a day leading to a considerable improvement in the symptoms so that operative interventions could therefore be avoided.

  2. Prospective Clinical Trial for Septic Arthritis: Cartilage Degradation and Inflammation Are Associated with Upregulation of Cartilage Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Anke; Pham, That Minh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intra-articular infections can rapidly lead to osteoarthritic degradation. The aim of this clinical biomarker analysis was to investigate the influence of inflammation on cartilage destruction and metabolism. Methods. Patients with acute joint infections were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial and the cytokine composition of effusions (n = 76) was analyzed. Characteristics of epidemiology and disease severity were correlated with levels of cytokines with known roles in cartilage turnover and degradation. Results. Higher synovial IL-1β concentrations were associated with clinical parameters indicating a higher disease severity (p < 0.03) excluding the incidence of sepsis. Additionally, intra-articular IL-1β levels correlated with inflammatory serum parameters as leucocyte counts (LC) and C-reactive protein concentrations (p < 0.05) but not with age or comorbidity. Both higher LC and synovial IL-1β levels were associated with increased intra-articular collagen type II cleavage products (C2C) indicating cartilage degradation. Joints with preinfectious lesions had higher C2C levels. Intra-articular inflammation led to increased concentrations of typical cartilage metabolites as bFGF, BMP-2, and BMP-7. Infections with Staphylococcus species induced higher IL-1β expression but less cartilage destruction than other bacteria. Conclusion. Articular infections have bacteria-specific implications on cartilage metabolism. Collagen type II cleavage products reliably mark destruction, which is associated with upregulation of typical cartilage turnover cytokines. This trial is registered with DRKS00003536, MISSinG.

  3. Prospective Clinical Trial for Septic Arthritis: Cartilage Degradation and Inflammation Are Associated with Upregulation of Cartilage Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Anke; Pham, That Minh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intra-articular infections can rapidly lead to osteoarthritic degradation. The aim of this clinical biomarker analysis was to investigate the influence of inflammation on cartilage destruction and metabolism. Methods. Patients with acute joint infections were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial and the cytokine composition of effusions (n = 76) was analyzed. Characteristics of epidemiology and disease severity were correlated with levels of cytokines with known roles in cartilage turnover and degradation. Results. Higher synovial IL-1β concentrations were associated with clinical parameters indicating a higher disease severity (p < 0.03) excluding the incidence of sepsis. Additionally, intra-articular IL-1β levels correlated with inflammatory serum parameters as leucocyte counts (LC) and C-reactive protein concentrations (p < 0.05) but not with age or comorbidity. Both higher LC and synovial IL-1β levels were associated with increased intra-articular collagen type II cleavage products (C2C) indicating cartilage degradation. Joints with preinfectious lesions had higher C2C levels. Intra-articular inflammation led to increased concentrations of typical cartilage metabolites as bFGF, BMP-2, and BMP-7. Infections with Staphylococcus species induced higher IL-1β expression but less cartilage destruction than other bacteria. Conclusion. Articular infections have bacteria-specific implications on cartilage metabolism. Collagen type II cleavage products reliably mark destruction, which is associated with upregulation of typical cartilage turnover cytokines. This trial is registered with DRKS00003536, MISSinG. PMID:27688601

  4. Aeromonas hydrophila septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Danaher, Patrick J; Mueller, William P

    2011-12-01

    Septic arthritis is a serious, life and limb threatening infection. If suspected, empiric treatment must begin immediately and account for the most likely pathogens. Eight days following left knee arthroscopic surgery, a 51-year-old active duty male spent approximately 1 hour driving a personal watercraft on Okaloosa Bay near the Gulf of Mexico. Eight days later, he presented to the emergency room with septic arthritis of that knee. Fluid aspirated from the joint yielded Aeromonas hydrophila. The infection resolved with surgical drainage and 21 days of levofloxacin. A. hydrophila is a rare cause of septic arthritis, and reported cases have involved exposure to water after trauma to the affected joint. Many U.S. military bases are located in coastal areas and military members frequently participate in activities which compromise skin integrity and place them at increased risk for contracting waterborne infections. We present the ninth case of A. hydrophila septic arthritis described in the English language literature, highlight the importance of considering this pathogen in at-risk populations, and review the diagnosis and management of septic arthritis.

  5. Protection against endotoxic shock and lipopolysaccharide-induced local inflammation by tetracycline: correlation with inhibition of cytokine secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, L; Soskolne, W A; Houri, Y; Barak, V; Halabi, A; Stabholz, A

    1996-01-01

    Septic shock results from excessive stimulation of host immune cells, particularly monocytes and macrophages, by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) released from gram-negative bacteria. Macrophage-derived cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1 beta), have been identified as central mediators in the pathogenesis of septic shock and the resultant mortality. Therefore, these cytokines were targets for experimental therapy for septic shock. Because of tetracycline's ability to intervene in cellular mechanisms involved in cytokine secretion, we tested the effect of tetracycline on LPS-induced septic shock and inflammatory lesions in mice. Tetracycline was found to protect mice against LPS-induced lethality and to abolish clinical signs of LPS-induced inflammatory lesions. This protection correlates with tetracycline's ability to reduce LPS-induced TNF-alpha levels in serum. Furthermore, tetracycline was found to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta secretion, but not cytokine mRNA accumulation, in human monocytes in vitro. The results presented here suggest that tetracycline is a potent drug for LPS-induced pathology and that its mechanism of action involves blockage of posttranscriptional events of cytokine production. PMID:8641787

  6. The Clinical and Medicolegal Analysis of Electrical Shocked Rats: Based on the Serological and Histological Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiaofeng; Zhao, Ze; Xie, Yanan; Ding, Suzhen

    2016-01-01

    This research was aimed at discovering the serological and histological changes in cardiac and hepatic tissue after electric shock. The CK-MB, ALT, and AMS indexes were tested with serological methods. Moreover, the Bcl-2, Bax, and Hsp-60 expression levels were carefully measured. An electrical injury model was established by giving rats electric shocks at 110 V with alternating electric current. Blood samples from the rats were analyzed for the biochemical indexes. The degrees of pathological changes in the heart and liver were evaluated using IHC staining for Bcl-2, Bax, and Hsp-60. The levels of CK-MB in the electrical injury group rapidly peaked at 0.5 hours after the electric shock. Additionally, the levels of Bcl-2, Bax, and Hsp-60 in the cardiac and hepatic tissues changed regularly after the electrical injury and exhibited apparent differences from the levels in the control group. CK-MB, ALT, and AMS were altered regularly after electric shock, and these results provide significant information for clinical and medicolegal practice. This research has shed light on the assessment of electrical injury without obvious electrical burns. Furthermore, the findings obtained for Bcl-2/Bax and Hsp-60 can also facilitate pathological diagnosis and the identification of antemortem and postmortem electrical injury. PMID:27648446

  7. The Clinical and Medicolegal Analysis of Electrical Shocked Rats: Based on the Serological and Histological Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiaofeng; Zhao, Ze; Xie, Yanan; Ding, Suzhen

    2016-01-01

    This research was aimed at discovering the serological and histological changes in cardiac and hepatic tissue after electric shock. The CK-MB, ALT, and AMS indexes were tested with serological methods. Moreover, the Bcl-2, Bax, and Hsp-60 expression levels were carefully measured. An electrical injury model was established by giving rats electric shocks at 110 V with alternating electric current. Blood samples from the rats were analyzed for the biochemical indexes. The degrees of pathological changes in the heart and liver were evaluated using IHC staining for Bcl-2, Bax, and Hsp-60. The levels of CK-MB in the electrical injury group rapidly peaked at 0.5 hours after the electric shock. Additionally, the levels of Bcl-2, Bax, and Hsp-60 in the cardiac and hepatic tissues changed regularly after the electrical injury and exhibited apparent differences from the levels in the control group. CK-MB, ALT, and AMS were altered regularly after electric shock, and these results provide significant information for clinical and medicolegal practice. This research has shed light on the assessment of electrical injury without obvious electrical burns. Furthermore, the findings obtained for Bcl-2/Bax and Hsp-60 can also facilitate pathological diagnosis and the identification of antemortem and postmortem electrical injury.

  8. The Clinical and Medicolegal Analysis of Electrical Shocked Rats: Based on the Serological and Histological Methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huitong; Wang, Qiaofeng; Zhao, Ze; Xie, Yanan; Ding, Suzhen; Wang, Zhenyuan

    2016-01-01

    This research was aimed at discovering the serological and histological changes in cardiac and hepatic tissue after electric shock. The CK-MB, ALT, and AMS indexes were tested with serological methods. Moreover, the Bcl-2, Bax, and Hsp-60 expression levels were carefully measured. An electrical injury model was established by giving rats electric shocks at 110 V with alternating electric current. Blood samples from the rats were analyzed for the biochemical indexes. The degrees of pathological changes in the heart and liver were evaluated using IHC staining for Bcl-2, Bax, and Hsp-60. The levels of CK-MB in the electrical injury group rapidly peaked at 0.5 hours after the electric shock. Additionally, the levels of Bcl-2, Bax, and Hsp-60 in the cardiac and hepatic tissues changed regularly after the electrical injury and exhibited apparent differences from the levels in the control group. CK-MB, ALT, and AMS were altered regularly after electric shock, and these results provide significant information for clinical and medicolegal practice. This research has shed light on the assessment of electrical injury without obvious electrical burns. Furthermore, the findings obtained for Bcl-2/Bax and Hsp-60 can also facilitate pathological diagnosis and the identification of antemortem and postmortem electrical injury. PMID:27648446

  9. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF SHOCK WAVE THERAPY IN MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS: PART I.

    PubMed

    Saggini, R; Di Stefano, A; Saggini, A; Bellomo, R G

    2015-01-01

    The shock wave has been widely recognized in literature as a biological regulator; therefore we carried out a review on the activity performed by shock waves on the bone-myofascial tissue system. To date, the application of Shock Wave Therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been primarily used in the treatment of tendinopathies (proximal plantar fasciopathy, lateral elbow tendinopathy, calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder, and patellar tendinopathy, etc.) and bone defects (delayed- and non-union of bone fractures, avascular necrosis of femoral head, etc.). Although the mechanism of their therapeutic effects is still unknown, the majority of published papers have shown positive and beneficial effects of using SWT as a treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, with a success rate ranging from 65 to 91%, while the complications are low or negligible. The purpose of this paper is to inform the reader about the published data on the clinical application of SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper, with the help of a literature review, indications and success rates for SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders are outlined, while adequate SWT parameters (e.g., rate of impulses, energy flux density, etc.) are defined according to the present state of knowledge. Given the abundance of the argument, it seems appropriate to subdivide the review into two parts, the first concerning the evidence of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) on bone disorders, the second concerning findings on tendon and muscle treatment.

  10. Pyomyositis of the obturator internus muscle extending to septic arthritis of the hip in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Amari, Rui; Yokoi, Hiromichi

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of primary pyomyositis in the obturator internus muscle. Pyomyositis involving muscles around the hip needs to be differentiated from septic arthritis because these infections show similar symptoms. Management with antibiotics can avoid the need for surgical intervention. Uncontrolled pyomyosistis can cause sequelae such as septic shock, osteomyelitis of adjacent bone, and septic arthritis. Awareness of this condition will facilitate correct diagnosis and early treatment.

  11. Septic Pelvic Thrombophlebitis Following Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Farhady, Parastoo; Lemyre, Madeleine

    2009-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of septic pelvic thrombophlebitis is frequently one of exclusion; a suspicion should arise when fever fails to respond to standard broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and defervesces within 48 hours of the addition of systemic anticoagulation. The risk of a thromboembolic event following minimally invasive surgery is not well defined. Case Report: We report the first case of septic pelvic thrombophlebitis following laparoscopic hysterectomy in a 51-year-old woman who developed fever on postoperative day 4. The fever workup was negative. The patient's temperature spikes were unresponsive to medical management. A clinical diagnosis of septic pelvic thrombophlebitis was made, and the patient responded excellently to anticoagulation in conjunction with antibiotic therapy. Conclusion: Although rare, septic pelvic thrombophlebitis should be suspected after laparoscopy in patients with appropriate risk factors and persistent fever despite antibiotic therapy. Considerable benefit will be derived from clinical trials that study and provide data on the risk and incidence of thromboembolism after laparoscopic procedures. PMID:19366549

  12. Bone and Joint Infections in Children: Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Aggarwal, Aditya N

    2016-08-01

    The pathological invasion of a joint and subsequent inflammation is known as septic arthritis. The knee and hip are the most frequently involved joints. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of septic arthritis in children. An acute onset of illness with an inflamed painful joint and restricted movements and inability to use joint (pseudoparalysis) clinically indicates septic arthritis. The diagnosis is difficult in a neonate or young child where refusal to feed, crying, discomfort during change of diaper (if hip is involved) or attempted joint movement may be the only findings. Fever and other systemic signs may also be absent in neonates. Septic arthritis is diagnosed clinically, supported by appropriate radiological and laboratory investigations. The peripheral blood white cell count is frequently raised with a predominance of polymorphonuclear cells. The acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are often markedly raised. Ultrasonography and MRI are preferred investigations in pediatric septic arthritis. Determination of infecting organism in septic arthritis is the key to the correct antibiotic choice, treatment duration and overall management. Joint aspirate and/or blood culture should be obtained before starting antibiotic treatment. Several effective antibiotic regimes are available for managing septic arthritis in children. Presence of large collections, thick pus, joint loculations and pus evacuating into surrounding soft tissues are main indications for surgical drainage. Joint aspiration can be a practical alternative in case the lesion is diagnosed early, with uncomplicated presentations and superficial joints. PMID:26189923

  13. Bone and Joint Infections in Children: Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Aggarwal, Aditya N

    2016-08-01

    The pathological invasion of a joint and subsequent inflammation is known as septic arthritis. The knee and hip are the most frequently involved joints. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of septic arthritis in children. An acute onset of illness with an inflamed painful joint and restricted movements and inability to use joint (pseudoparalysis) clinically indicates septic arthritis. The diagnosis is difficult in a neonate or young child where refusal to feed, crying, discomfort during change of diaper (if hip is involved) or attempted joint movement may be the only findings. Fever and other systemic signs may also be absent in neonates. Septic arthritis is diagnosed clinically, supported by appropriate radiological and laboratory investigations. The peripheral blood white cell count is frequently raised with a predominance of polymorphonuclear cells. The acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are often markedly raised. Ultrasonography and MRI are preferred investigations in pediatric septic arthritis. Determination of infecting organism in septic arthritis is the key to the correct antibiotic choice, treatment duration and overall management. Joint aspirate and/or blood culture should be obtained before starting antibiotic treatment. Several effective antibiotic regimes are available for managing septic arthritis in children. Presence of large collections, thick pus, joint loculations and pus evacuating into surrounding soft tissues are main indications for surgical drainage. Joint aspiration can be a practical alternative in case the lesion is diagnosed early, with uncomplicated presentations and superficial joints.

  14. A rare cause of septic arthritis: melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Caldera, Aruna Sanjeewa; Kumanan, Thirunavukarasu; Corea, Enoka

    2013-10-01

    Melioidosis is a pyogenic infection with high mortality caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. As the clinical presentation is not distinctive, a high index of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis. We present a case of a 50-year-old farmer who was diabetic and a chronic alcoholic, who presented to us with pneumonia, followed by septic arthritis. He was ultimately diagnosed as having melioidosis.

  15. Clinical evaluation of a type III secretion system real-time PCR assay for diagnosing melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Meumann, Ella M; Novak, Ryan T; Gal, Daniel; Kaestli, Mirjam E; Mayo, Mark; Hanson, Joshua P; Spencer, Emma; Glass, Mindy B; Gee, Jay E; Wilkins, Patricia P; Currie, Bart J

    2006-08-01

    A Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secretion system real-time PCR assay was evaluated on clinical specimens in a region where melioidosis is endemic. The PCR was positive in 30/33 (91%) patients with culture-confirmed melioidosis. All six patients with melioidosis septic shock were blood PCR positive, suggesting potential for rapid diagnosis and commencement of appropriate therapy.

  16. Septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint: an uncommon location.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Morillo, Melania; Mateo Soria, Lourdes; Riveros Frutos, Anne; Tejera Segura, Beatriz; Holgado Pérez, Susana; Olivé Marqués, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Septic pyogenic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint is a rare entity that occurs in immunosuppressed patients or those with discontinuity of defense barriers. There are only 15 cases described in the literature. The diagnosis is based on clinical features and the isolation of a microorganism in synovial fluid or blood cultures. The evidence of arthritis by imaging (MRI, ultrasound or scintigraphy) may be useful. Antibiotic treatment is the same as in septic arthritis in other locations. Staphylococcus aureus is the microorganism most frequently isolated. Our objective was to describe the clinical features, treatment and outcome of patients diagnosed with septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint at a Rheumatology Department. We developed a study with a retrospective design (1989-2012). The medical records of patients with septic arthritis were reviewed (101 patients). Those involving the acromioclavicular joint were selected (6 patients; 6%).

  17. Acromioclavicular septic arthritis and sternoclavicular septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis.

    PubMed

    Corey, Sally A; Agger, William A; Saterbak, Andrew T

    2015-03-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) and sternoclavicular (SC) septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis are rare, especially in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of septic AC joint with pyomyositis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles and a separate case with septic SC joint with pyomysitis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Both patients had similar presentations of infections with Staphylococcus aureus and were successfully treated with surgical incision and drainage followed by prolonged antibiotic therapy.

  18. L-arginine and asymmetric dimethylarginine are early predictors for survival in septic patients with acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Thorsten; Fleming, Thomas H; Rosenhagen, Claudia; Krauser, Ute; Mieth, Markus; Bruckner, Thomas; Martin, Eike; Nawroth, Peter P; Weigand, Markus A; Bierhaus, Angelika; Hofer, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunctions of the L-arginine (L-arg)/nitric-oxide (NO) pathway are suspected to be important for the pathogenesis of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in septic shock. Therefore plasma concentrations of L-arg and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) were measured in 60 patients with septic shock, 30 surgical patients and 30 healthy volunteers using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Plasma samples from patients with septic shock were collected at sepsis onset, and 24 h, 4 d, 7 d, 14 d and 28 d later. Samples from surgical patients were collected prior to surgery, immediately after the end of the surgical procedure as well as 24 h later and from healthy volunteers once. In comparison to healthy volunteers and surgical patients, individuals with septic shock showed significantly increased levels of ADMA, as well as a decrease in the ratio of L-arg and ADMA at all timepoints. In septic patients with an acute liver failure (ALF), plasma levels of ADMA and L-arg were significantly increased in comparison to septic patients with an intact hepatic function. In summary it can be stated, that bioavailability of NO is reduced in septic shock. Moreover, measurements of ADMA and L-arg appear to be early predictors for survival in patients with sepsis-associated ALF.

  19. Acoustic field characterization of the Duolith: measurements and modeling of a clinical shock wave therapy device.

    PubMed

    Perez, Camilo; Chen, Hong; Matula, Thomas J; Karzova, Maria; Khokhlova, Vera A

    2013-08-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) uses acoustic pulses to treat certain musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper the acoustic field of a clinical portable ESWT device (Duolith SD1) was characterized. Field mapping was performed in water for two different standoffs of the electromagnetic head (15 or 30 mm) using a fiber optic probe hydrophone. Peak positive pressures at the focus ranged from 2 to 45 MPa, while peak negative pressures ranged from -2 to -11 MPa. Pulse rise times ranged from 8 to 500 ns; shock formation did not occur for any machine settings. The maximum standard deviation in peak pressure at the focus was 1.2%, indicating that the Duolith SD1 generates stable pulses. The results compare qualitatively, but not quantitatively with manufacturer specifications. Simulations were carried out for the short standoff by matching a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov equation to the measured field at a plane near the source, and then propagating the wave outward. The results of modeling agree well with experimental data. The model was used to analyze the spatial structure of the peak pressures. Predictions from the model suggest that a true shock wave could be obtained in water if the initial pressure output of the device were doubled.

  20. Acoustic field characterization of the Duolith: Measurements and modeling of a clinical shock wave therapy device

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Camilo; Chen, Hong; Matula, Thomas J.; Karzova, Maria; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) uses acoustic pulses to treat certain musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper the acoustic field of a clinical portable ESWT device (Duolith SD1) was characterized. Field mapping was performed in water for two different standoffs of the electromagnetic head (15 or 30 mm) using a fiber optic probe hydrophone. Peak positive pressures at the focus ranged from 2 to 45 MPa, while peak negative pressures ranged from −2 to −11 MPa. Pulse rise times ranged from 8 to 500 ns; shock formation did not occur for any machine settings. The maximum standard deviation in peak pressure at the focus was 1.2%, indicating that the Duolith SD1 generates stable pulses. The results compare qualitatively, but not quantitatively with manufacturer specifications. Simulations were carried out for the short standoff by matching a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov equation to the measured field at a plane near the source, and then propagating the wave outward. The results of modeling agree well with experimental data. The model was used to analyze the spatial structure of the peak pressures. Predictions from the model suggest that a true shock wave could be obtained in water if the initial pressure output of the device were doubled. PMID:23927207

  1. Differences in clinical features between children and adults with dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Namvongsa, Vannyda; Sirivichayakul, Chukiat; Songsithichok, Sirilak; Chanthavanich, Pornthep; Chokejindachai, Watcharee; Sitcharungsi, Raweerat

    2013-09-01

    This retrospective study was conducted to assess the differences in clinical features between children and adults with dengue hemorrhagic fever/ dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) admitted to Ratchaburi Hospital, Ratchaburi Province, Thailand. A total of 273 patients with DHF/DSS admitted to Ratchaburi Hospital during January 2007 to May 2008 were included in the study. The median age (range) of studied subjects was 16 years (6 months to 62 years) and the ratio of adults to children was 1.6:1. Forty-eight percent of subjects were 16-30 years old. The common signs, symptoms and clinical features were: nausea/vomiting (74.0%), a positive tourniquet test (73.0%), anorexia (67.0%), hemoconcentration (58.0%), headache (54.0%), abdominal tenderness (43.0%), myalgia (39.0%) and pleural effusion (20.0%). Children had anorexia, a positive tourniquet test, abdominal tenderness and a convalescent rash more frequently than adults. Children also had significantly more prominent plasma leakage as shown by lower serum albumin and sodium and a higher prevalence of pleural effusion, ascites and shock. Although not statistically significant, the prevalence of bleeding in children was higher than in adults but more adults needed blood transfusion. This study provides additional insight into the clinical picture of DHF/DSS in adults and children and may be beneficial for clinicians caring for these adults and children.

  2. Albumin in Burn Shock Resuscitation: A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, David G.; Wilkes, Mahlon M.

    2016-01-01

    Critical appraisal of outcomes after burn shock resuscitation with albumin has previously been restricted to small relatively old randomized trials, some with high risk of bias. Extensive recent data from nonrandomized studies assessing the use of albumin can potentially reduce bias and add precision. The objective of this meta-analysis was to determine the effect of burn shock resuscitation with albumin on mortality and morbidity in adult patients. Randomized and nonrandomized controlled clinical studies evaluating mortality and morbidity in adult patients receiving albumin for burn shock resuscitation were identified by multiple methods, including computer database searches and examination of journal contents and reference lists. Extracted data were quantitatively combined by random-effects meta-analysis. Four randomized and four nonrandomized studies with 688 total adult patients were included. Treatment effects did not differ significantly between the included randomized and nonrandomized studies. Albumin infusion during the first 24 hours showed no significant overall effect on mortality. However, significant statistical heterogeneity was present, which could be abolished by excluding two studies at high risk of bias. After those exclusions, albumin infusion was associated with reduced mortality. The pooled odds ratio was 0.34 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.19 to 0.58 (P < .001). Albumin administration was also accompanied by decreased occurrence of compartment syndrome (pooled odds ratio, 0.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.07–0.50; P < .001). This meta-analysis suggests that albumin can improve outcomes of burn shock resuscitation. However, the scope and quality of current evidence are limited, and additional trials are needed. PMID:25426807

  3. Roundtable debate: Controversies in the management of the septic patient – desperately seeking consensus

    PubMed Central

    Waxman, Aaron B; Ward, Nicholas; Thompson, Taylor; Lilly, Craig M; Lisbon, Alan; Hill, Nicholas; Nasraway, Stanley A; Heard, Stephen; Corwin, Howard; Levy, Mitchell

    2005-01-01

    Despite continuous advances in technologic and pharmacologic management, the mortality rate from septic shock remains high. Care of patients with sepsis includes measures to support the circulatory system and treat the underlying infection. There is a substantial body of knowledge indicating that fluid resuscitation, vasopressors, and antibiotics accomplish these goals. Recent clinical trials have provided new information on the addition of individual adjuvant therapies. Consensus on how current therapies should be prescribed is lacking. We present the reasoning and preferences of a group of intensivists who met to discuss the management of an actual case. The focus is on management, with emphasis on the criteria by which treatment decisions are made. It is clear from the discussion that there are areas where there is agreement and areas where opinions diverge. This presentation is intended to show how experienced intensivists apply clinical science to their practice of critical care medicine. PMID:15693960

  4. Predictability of the individual clinical outcome of extracorporeal shock wave therapy for cellulite

    PubMed Central

    Schlaudraff, Kai-Uwe; Kiessling, Maren C; Császár, Nikolaus BM; Schmitz, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal shock wave therapy has been successfully introduced for the treatment of cellulite in recent years. However, it is still unknown whether the individual clinical outcome of cellulite treatment with extracorporeal shock wave therapy can be predicted by the patient’s individual cellulite grade at baseline, individual patient age, body mass index (BMI), weight, and/or height. Methods Fourteen Caucasian females with cellulite were enrolled in a prospective, single-center, randomized, open-label Phase II study. The mean (± standard error of the mean) cellulite grade at baseline was 2.5±0.09 and mean BMI was 22.8±1.17. All patients were treated with radial extracorporeal shock waves using the Swiss DolorClast® device (Electro Medical Systems, S.A., Nyon, Switzerland). Patients were treated unilaterally with 2 weekly treatments for 4 weeks on a randomly selected side (left or right), totaling eight treatments on the selected side. Treatment was performed at 3.5–4.0 bar, with 15,000 impulses per session applied at 15 Hz. Impulses were homogeneously distributed over the posterior thigh and buttock area (resulting in 7,500 impulses per area). Treatment success was evaluated after the last treatment and 4 weeks later by clinical examination, photographic documentation, contact thermography, and patient satisfaction questionnaires. Results The mean cellulite grade improved from 2.5±0.09 at baseline to 1.57±0.18 after the last treatment (ie, mean δ-1 was 0.93 cellulite grades) and 1.68±0.16 at follow-up (ie, mean δ-2 was 0.82 cellulite grades). Compared with baseline, no patient’s condition worsened, the treatment was well tolerated, and no unwanted side effects were observed. No statistically significant (ie, P<0.05) correlation was found between individual values for δ-1 and δ-2 and cellulite grade at baseline, BMI, weight, height, or age. Conclusion Radial shock wave therapy is a safe and effective treatment option for cellulite. The

  5. Septic arthritis of the shoulder in a dental patient.

    PubMed

    Dolin, Elana; Perlmutter, Leigh D; Segelnick, Stuart L; Weinberg, Mea A; Schoor, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Septic arthritis of the glenohumoral joint is rare following dental procedures, comprising approximately 3% of all joint infections. Septic arthritis following bacteremia from dental procedures is uncommon and generally occurs in prosthetic joints. Predisposing causes may include immunocompromising diseases such as diabetes, HIV infection, renal failure and intravenous drug abuse. We report a rare case of unilateral glenohumoral joint septic arthritis in a 60-year-old male patient (without a prosthetic joint) secondary to a dental procedure. The insidious nature of the presentation is highlighted. Septic arthritis infections, though rare, require a high level of clinical suspicion. Vague symptoms of shoulder pain may mask the initial diagnosis, as was the case in our patient. Incision and drainage via surgical intervention are often required, followed by parenteral antibiotics.

  6. Septic arthritis of the shoulder in a dental patient.

    PubMed

    Dolin, Elana; Perlmutter, Leigh D; Segelnick, Stuart L; Weinberg, Mea A; Schoor, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Septic arthritis of the glenohumoral joint is rare following dental procedures, comprising approximately 3% of all joint infections. Septic arthritis following bacteremia from dental procedures is uncommon and generally occurs in prosthetic joints. Predisposing causes may include immunocompromising diseases such as diabetes, HIV infection, renal failure and intravenous drug abuse. We report a rare case of unilateral glenohumoral joint septic arthritis in a 60-year-old male patient (without a prosthetic joint) secondary to a dental procedure. The insidious nature of the presentation is highlighted. Septic arthritis infections, though rare, require a high level of clinical suspicion. Vague symptoms of shoulder pain may mask the initial diagnosis, as was the case in our patient. Incision and drainage via surgical intervention are often required, followed by parenteral antibiotics. PMID:25647886

  7. Enteral nutritional therapy in septic patients in the intensive care unit: compliance with nutritional guidelines for critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Pasinato, Valeska Fernandes; Berbigier, Marina Carvalho; Rubin, Bibiana de Almeida; Castro, Kamila; Moraes, Rafael Barberena; Perry, Ingrid Dalira Schweigert

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the compliance of septic patients' nutritional management with enteral nutrition guidelines for critically ill patients. Methods Prospective cohort study with 92 septic patients, age ≥18 years, hospitalized in an intensive care unit, under enteral nutrition, evaluated according to enteral nutrition guidelines for critically ill patients, compliance with caloric and protein goals, and reasons for not starting enteral nutrition early or for discontinuing it. Prognostic scores, length of intensive care unit stay, clinical progression, and nutritional status were also analyzed. Results The patients had a mean age of 63.4±15.1 years, were predominantly male, were diagnosed predominantly with septic shock (56.5%), had a mean intensive care unit stay of 11 (7.2 to 18.0) days, had 8.2±4.2 SOFA and 24.1±9.6 APACHE II scores, and had 39.1% mortality. Enteral nutrition was initiated early in 63% of patients. Approximately 50% met the caloric and protein goals on the third day of intensive care unit stay, a percentage that decreased to 30% at day 7. Reasons for the late start of enteral nutrition included gastrointestinal tract complications (35.3%) and hemodynamic instability (32.3%). Clinical procedures were the most frequent reason to discontinue enteral nutrition (44.1%). There was no association between compliance with the guidelines and nutritional status, length of intensive care unit stay, severity, or progression. Conclusion Although the number of septic patients under early enteral nutrition was significant, caloric and protein goals at day 3 of intensive care unit stay were met by only half of them, a percentage that decreased at day 7. PMID:23887755

  8. Septic arthritis with Staphylococcus lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with BPTB allograft.

    PubMed

    Mei-Dan, Omer; Mann, Gideon; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Ballester, Soleda J; Cugat, Ramon Bertomeu; Alvarez, Pedro Diaz

    2008-01-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an uncommon but a serious complication resulting in six times greater hospital costs than that of uncomplicated ACL surgery and an inferior postoperative activity level. Promptly initiating a specific antibiotic therapy is the most critical treatment, followed by open or arthroscopic joint decompression, debridement and lavage. Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus predominantly infecting the skin and soft tissue. The few reported cases of bone and joint infections by S. lugdunensis indicate that the clinical manifestations were severe, the diagnosis elusive, and the treatment difficult. If the microbiology laboratory does not use the tube coagulase (long) test to confirm the slide coagulase test result, the organism might be misidentified as Staphylococcus aureus. S. lugdunensis is more virulent than other coagulase-negative staphylococcus; in many clinical situations it behaves like S. aureus, further increasing the confusion and worsening the expected outcome. S. lugdunensis is known to cause infective endocarditis with a worse outcome, septicemia, deep tissue infection, vascular and joint prosthesis infection, osteomyelitis, discitis, breast abscess, urine tract infections, toxic shock and osteitis pubis. We present the first case report in the literature of septic arthritis with S. lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with bone-patellar-tendon-bone allograft.

  9. Septic arthritis with Staphylococcus lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with BPTB allograft.

    PubMed

    Mei-Dan, Omer; Mann, Gideon; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Ballester, Soleda J; Cugat, Ramon Bertomeu; Alvarez, Pedro Diaz

    2008-01-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an uncommon but a serious complication resulting in six times greater hospital costs than that of uncomplicated ACL surgery and an inferior postoperative activity level. Promptly initiating a specific antibiotic therapy is the most critical treatment, followed by open or arthroscopic joint decompression, debridement and lavage. Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus predominantly infecting the skin and soft tissue. The few reported cases of bone and joint infections by S. lugdunensis indicate that the clinical manifestations were severe, the diagnosis elusive, and the treatment difficult. If the microbiology laboratory does not use the tube coagulase (long) test to confirm the slide coagulase test result, the organism might be misidentified as Staphylococcus aureus. S. lugdunensis is more virulent than other coagulase-negative staphylococcus; in many clinical situations it behaves like S. aureus, further increasing the confusion and worsening the expected outcome. S. lugdunensis is known to cause infective endocarditis with a worse outcome, septicemia, deep tissue infection, vascular and joint prosthesis infection, osteomyelitis, discitis, breast abscess, urine tract infections, toxic shock and osteitis pubis. We present the first case report in the literature of septic arthritis with S. lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with bone-patellar-tendon-bone allograft. PMID:17684731

  10. The potential use of microcalorimetry in rapid differentiation between septic arthritis and other causes of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, E; Hügle, T; Daikeler, T; Voide, C; Borens, O; Trampuz, A

    2015-03-01

    Current diagnostic methods in differentiating septic from non-septic arthritis are time-consuming (culture) or have limited sensitivity (Gram stain). Microcalorimetry is a novel method that can rapidly detect microorganisms by their heat production. We investigated the accuracy and time to detection of septic arthritis by using microcalorimetry. Patients older than 18 years of age with acute arthritis of native joints were prospectively included. Synovial fluid was aspirated and investigated by Gram stain, culture and microcalorimetry. The diagnosis of septic arthritis and non-septic arthritis were made by experienced rheumatologists or orthopaedic surgeons. Septic arthritis was diagnosed by considering the finding of acute arthritis together with findings such as positive Gram stain or positive culture of synovial fluid or positive blood culture. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing septic arthritis and the time to positivity of microcalorimetry were determined. Of 90 patients (mean age 64 years), nine had septic arthritis, of whom four (44 %) had positive Gram stain, six (67 %) positive synovial fluid culture and four (44 %) had positive blood culture. The sensitivity of microcalorimetry was 89 %, the specificity was 99 % and the mean detection time was 5.0 h (range, 2.2-8.0 h). Microcalorimetry is an accurate and rapid method for the diagnosis of septic arthritis. It has potential to be used in clinical practice in diagnosing septic arthritis.

  11. Septic arthritis in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Carstanjen, B; Boehart, S; Cislakova, M

    2010-01-01

    Septic arthritis in horses is a serious disease which can become life-threatening. In case the infection can be eliminated before irreversible joint damage occurs, complete recovery is possible. This article gives an overview of the literature concerning etiology, diagnosis and strategies of therapy in cases of septic arthritis in adult horses, with special reference to novel options of treatment.

  12. Elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takuya; Yagi, Hirohisa; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Yokoi, Takuya; Shintani, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Acute leukemia in children presents with various clinical manifestations that mimic orthopaedic conditions. The association of septic arthritis of the elbow with acute leukemia is very rare, and the correct diagnosis of acute leukemia is often established only after treatment of the septic arthritis. In this article, we present a three-year-old child patient with elbow septic arthritis related to acute leukemia, diagnosed promptly by bone marrow aspiration on the same day as emergency surgical debridement of the septic elbow joint due to the maintenance of a high index of suspicion, and treated with chemotherapy as soon as possible. The emergency physician and orthopaedist must recognize unusual patterns of presentation like this. Since delay in initiating treatment of septic arthritis may result in growth disturbance, elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia must be treated promptly and appropriately. Early diagnosis is a good prognostic feature of childhood acute leukemia.

  13. The Clinical Significance of Phosphorylated Heat Shock Protein 27 (HSPB1) in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Okuno, Mitsuru; Adachi, Seiji; Kozawa, Osamu; Shimizu, Masahito; Yasuda, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of most aggressive forms of cancer. After clinical detection it exhibits fast metastatic growth. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27; HSPB1) has been characterized as a molecular chaperone which modifies the structures and functions of other proteins in cells when they are exposed to various stresses, such as chemotherapy. While the administration of gemcitabine, an anti-tumor drug, has been the standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, accumulating evidence shows that HSP27 plays a key role in the chemosensitivity to gemcitabine. In addition, phosphorylated HSP27 induced by gemcitabine has been associated with the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth. In this review, we summarize the role of phosphorylated HSP27, as well as HSP27, in the regulation of chemosensitivity in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26805817

  14. [Open comparative study between the combination clyndamicin/gentamycin and penicillin/gentamycin in septic abortion].

    PubMed

    French, A R; Kennion, G

    1985-01-01

    Septic abortion is not uncommon in countries where abortion is illegal, and antibiotics are second only to uterine evacuation in the treatment of such cases. Although the combination of penicillin and gentamycin has given excellent results, the high incidence of Bacteroides fragilis and other anerobics in septic abortion prompted a comparison of penicillin and gentamycin with clindamycin and gentamycin at the Hospital Santo Tomas in Panama City, Panama, beginning in May 1984. Among 30 febrile patients with diagnoses of septic abortion, 14 were treated with penicillin/gentamycin and 16 with clindamycin/gentamycin. The penicillin group ranged in age from 17-29 with an average age of 21.9, while the clindamycin group ranged from 18-32 years with an average of 24.3. The average gestational ages were 10.2 weeks for the penicillin group and 10.7 for the clindamycin group. The average body temperature of both groups was 38.9 degrees Celsius. 1 patient had a blood pressure of 80/60 without clinical evidence of shock. The average duration of fever was 43 hours in the penicillin group and 40.6 hours in the clindamycin group. The hospital stay ranged from 3-7 days with an average of 5.4 in the penicillin group and from 3-6 days with an average of 4.2 in the clindamycin group. Patients recovered rapidly after uterine curettage and initiation of antibiotic therapy. Bacteremia was not detected in any patient. Tolerance to the drugs was similar in both groups.

  15. Septic Arthritis in the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalisy, Hassan Mahdi; Nikiforov, Ivan; Mansoora, Qurat; Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia's and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash and had to discontinue the antibiotic. On physical exam the patient had a large swelling and tenderness in his left periauricular area, with erythema and deviation of the right mandible which limited his ability to open the mouth. A computed tomography showed mild asymmetric soft tissue swelling in the left pharyngeal region but did not show joint effusion. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging did show effusion of the joint space. The effusion was drained, and the synovial fluid was submitted for gram stain, culture, and sensitivity. The cultures grew menthicillin sensitive Staphyloccocus Aureus. The patient was discharged to complete a two week course of intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Vancomycin via home infusion. Conclusion: Septic Arthritis of the TMJ is a rare event with very specific clinical symptoms. Due to the low sensitivity of the computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging should be considered when computed tomography scan is negative for TMJ effusion. PMID:26713295

  16. Septic Arthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint in an Infant.

    PubMed

    Chuk, Raymond; Arvier, John; Laing, Barbara; Coman, David

    2015-04-24

    Infantile temporomandibular joint septic arthritis is an uncommon paediatric infection, but one which carries the potential for severe morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and aggressive medical and possibly surgical management is indicated for the best outcomes. The presenting clinical features are non-specific in a neonate and an infant; as such a high degree of clinical suspicion is required. We present the case of an eleven-month-old boy who has made a full recovery from an acute temporomandibular joint septic arthritis and review the relevant literature.

  17. [Septic arthritis in adults].

    PubMed

    Loock, J; Haustedt, N; Wollenhaupt, J

    2014-09-01

    Septic arthritis is a true rheumatological emergency requiring immediate and thoughtful effort for rapid diagnosis establishment and treatment initiation. Children and elderly persons as well as immunocompromised individuals, patients with pre-existing joint damage and with inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases are preferentially affected. Bacteremia, joint surgery and intra-articular injections pose risk situations for the development of joint infections. The most frequent causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus but other relevant pathogens include coagulase-negative staphylococci, streptococci and mycobacteria. Synovial fluid analysis (e.g. appearance, cell count and microbiological examination) is the most important step to establish the diagnosis. The two main components of therapy consist of joint drainage and antibiotic treatment. The approach to periprosthetic joint infections depends on the duration of symptoms, causative organism and individual factors.

  18. Effects of 5,14-HEDGE, a 20-HETE mimetic, on lipopolysaccharide-induced changes in MyD88/TAK1/IKKβ/IκB-α/NF-κB pathway and circulating miR-150, miR-223, and miR-297 levels in a rat model of septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Sari, A. Nihal; Korkmaz, Belma; Serin, Mehmet Sami; Kacan, Meltem; Unsal, Demet; Buharalioglu, C. Kemal; Firat, Seyhan Sahan; Manhati, Vijay L.; Falck, John R.; Malik, Kafait U.; Tunctan, Bahar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We have previously demonstrated that a stable synthetic analog of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), N-(20-hydroxyeicosa-5[Z],14[Z]-dienoyl)glycine (5,14-HEDGE), which mimics the effects of endogenously produced 20-HETE, prevents vascular hyporeactivity, hypotension, tachycardia, inflammation, and mortality in a rodent model of septic shock. The present study was performed to determine whether decreased renal and cardiovascular expression and activity of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/transforming growth factor-activated kinase 1 (TAK1)/inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase β (IKKβ)/IκB-α/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway and reduced circulating microRNA (miR)-150, miR-223, and miR-297 expression levels participate in the protective effect of 5,14-HEDGE against hypotension, tachycardia, and inflammation in response to systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methods Conscious male Wistar rats received saline (4 ml/kg) or LPS (10 mg/kg) at time 0. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured using a tail-cuff device. Separate groups of LPS-treated rats were given 5,14-HEDGE (30 mg/kg) 1 h after injection of saline or LPS. The rats were sacrificed 4 h after LPS challenge and blood, kidney, heart, thoracic aorta, and superior mesenteric artery were collected for measurement of the protein expression. Results LPS-induced fall in blood pressure and rise in heart rate were associated with increased MyD88 expression and phosphorylation of TAK1 and IκB-α in cytosolic fractions of the tissues. LPS also caused an increase in both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated NF-κB p65 proteins in the cytosolic and nuclear fractions as well as nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. In addition, serum miR-150, miR-223, and miR-297 expression levels were increased in LPS-treated rats. These effects of LPS were prevented by 5,14-HEDGE. Conclusions These results suggest that downregulation of MyD88/TAK1/IKKβ/IκB-α/NF-κB pathway as well as

  19. Novel method for early signs of clinical shock detection by monitoring blood capillary/vessel spatial pattern.

    PubMed

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Klämpfl, Florian; Riemann, Max; Knipfer, Christian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Schmidt, Michael; Stelzle, Florian

    2014-10-01

    The ability to monitor capillary/vessel spatial patterns and local blood volume fractions is critical in clinical shock detection and its prevention in Intensive Care Units (ICU). Although the causes of shock might be different, the basic abnormalities in pathophysiological changes are the same. To detect these changes, we have developed a novel method based on both spectrally and spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectra. The preliminary study has shown that this method can monitor the spatial distribution of capillary/vessel spatial patterns through local blood volume fractions of reduced hemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin. This method can be used as a real-time and non-invasive tool for the monitoring of shock development and feedback on the therapeutic intervention.

  20. Association of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes isolates with clinical components of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Talkington, D F; Schwartz, B; Black, C M; Todd, J K; Elliott, J; Breiman, R F; Facklam, R R

    1993-01-01

    Sixty-two invasive Streptococcus pyogenes strains, including 32 strains isolated from patients with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), were analyzed for the following phenotypic and genotypic characteristics: M-protein type, serum opacity factor production, protease production, the presence of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin (Spe) genes A, B, and C, and in vitro production of SpeA and SpeB. These characteristics were analyzed for possible associations with each other as well as with clinical components of STSS. M-type 1, the most commonly isolated M-type, was significantly associated with protease production. Protease activity was significantly associated with the clinical sign of soft tissue necrosis. M-type 1 and 3 strains from STSS patients were significantly associated with the clinical signs of shock and organ involvement as well as with SpeA production in vitro. Finally, the production of SpeA was significantly associated with the clinical component of shock and organ involvement as well as with rash. These data suggest that STSS does not make up a single syndrome but, rather, that the multiple STSS clinical criteria probably reflect different phenotypic characteristics of individual S. pyogenes isolates. PMID:8335368

  1. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jaume; Conesa, Xavier; Pisa, Jose; Moreno, Josefa; Siles, Eduard; Novell, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection by Mycobacterium marinum is rising, mainly due to the increasing popularity of home aquariums. The infection typically manifests as skin lesions, with septic arthritis being a rare presentation form. The disease is difficult to diagnose even when there is a high clinical suspicion, as culture in specific media may not yield positive findings. Thus, establishment of appropriate treatment is often delayed. Synovectomy, capsular thinning, and joint drainage together with prolonged, combined antibiotic therapy may be needed to cure the infection.

  2. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jaume; Conesa, Xavier; Pisa, Jose; Moreno, Josefa; Siles, Eduard; Novell, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection by Mycobacterium marinum is rising, mainly due to the increasing popularity of home aquariums. The infection typically manifests as skin lesions, with septic arthritis being a rare presentation form. The disease is difficult to diagnose even when there is a high clinical suspicion, as culture in specific media may not yield positive findings. Thus, establishment of appropriate treatment is often delayed. Synovectomy, capsular thinning, and joint drainage together with prolonged, combined antibiotic therapy may be needed to cure the infection. PMID:26511731

  3. The Application of Clinical Lithotripter Shock Waves to RNA Nucleotide Delivery to Cells.

    PubMed

    Nwokeoha, Sandra; Carlisle, Robert; Cleveland, Robin O

    2016-10-01

    The delivery of genes into cells through the transfer of ribonucleic acids (RNAs) has been found to cause a change in the level of target protein expression. RNA-based transfection is conceptually more efficient than commonly delivered plasmid DNA because it does not require division or damage of the nuclear envelope, thereby increasing the chances of the cell remaining viable. Shock waves (SWs) have been found to induce cellular uptake by transiently altering the permeability of the plasma membrane, thereby overcoming a critical step in gene therapy. However, accompanying SW bio-effects include dose-dependent irreversible cell injury and cytotoxicity. Here, the effect of SWs generated by a clinical lithotripter on the viability and permeabilisation of three different cell lines in vitro was investigated. Comparison of RNA stability before and after SW exposure revealed no statistically significant difference. Optimal SW exposure parameters were identified to minimise cell death and maximise permeabilisation, and applied to enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) messenger RNA (mRNA) or anti-eGFP small interfering RNA delivery. As a result, eGFP mRNA expression levels increased up to 52-fold in CT26 cells, whereas a 2-fold decrease in GFP expression was achieved after anti-eGFP small interfering RNA delivery to MCF-7/GFP cells. These results indicate that SW parameters can be employed to achieve effective nucleotide delivery, laying the foundation for non-invasive and high-tolerability RNA-based gene therapy.

  4. Subtalar joint septic arthritis in a patient with hypogammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Wynes, Jacob; Harris, William; Hadfield, Robert A; Malay, D Scot

    2013-01-01

    The clinical presentation of a monoarticular, red, hot, and swollen joint has many possible diagnoses, including septic arthritis, which is 1 of the most devastating. The morbidity associated with this pathologic process involves permanent joint damage and the potential for progression to systemic illness and, even, mortality. The common risk factors for joint sepsis include a history of rheumatoid arthritis, previous joint surgery, joint prosthesis, intravenous drug abuse, alcoholism, diabetes, previous intra-articular steroid use, and cutaneous ulceration. The diagnosis is primarily determined from the culture results after arthrocentesis and correlation with direct visualization, imaging, and various serologies, including synovial analysis. In the present report, a case of an insidious presentation of subtalar joint septic arthritis and its association with a unique patient presentation concomitant with primary immunodeficiency and culture-proven Myocplasma hominis infection is discussed. Septic arthritis has a predilection for the lower extremities and typically is isolated to the hip or knee, with less common involvement of the ankle or metatarsophalangeal joints. Owing to the uncommon nature of primary immunodeficiency disorders and the paucity of studies discussing their association with septic arthridites, we aimed to raise awareness of subtalar joint septic arthritis and to provide a brief overview of the pathogenesis as it presented in a 33-year-old male with X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia/agammaglobulinema.

  5. Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis caused by Kingella kingae.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J M; Peel, M M

    1982-01-01

    The clinical and bacteriological findings in two cases of osteomyelitis and one case of septic arthritis caused by Kingella kingae are presented. This appears to be the first report providing clear evidence for a pathogenic role for this species in bone and joint infections. PMID:7068914

  6. Gram staining in the diagnosis of acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Faraj, A A; Omonbude, O D; Godwin, P

    2002-10-01

    This study aimed at determining the sensitivity and specificity of Gram staining of synovial fluid as a diagnostic tool in acute septic arthritis. A retrospective study was made of 22 patients who had arthroscopic lavage following a provisional diagnosis of acute septic arthritis of the knee joint. Gram stains and cultures of the knee aspirates were compared with the clinical and laboratory parameters, to evaluate their usefulness in diagnosing acute arthritis. All patients who had septic arthritis had pain, swelling and limitation of movement. CRP was elevated in 90% of patients. The incidence of elevated white blood cell count was higher in the group of patients with a positive Gram stain study (60%) as compared to patients with a negative Gram stain study (33%). Gram staining sensitivity was 45%. Its specificity was however 100%. Gram staining is an unreliable tool in early decision making in patients requiring urgent surgical drainage and washout.

  7. Septic arthritis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Rivera, J; Monteagudo, I; Lopez-Longo, J; Sanchez-Atrio, A

    1992-12-01

    We have evaluated the presence and characteristics of septic arthritis in intravenous (iv) drug users with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Sixteen patients with both HIV infection and septic arthritis were studied and compared with 5 patients with septic arthritis but no HIV infection. Clinical profile, laboratory findings at the time of onset, localization, causative organisms, mean hospitalization time and presence of complications were the same in HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated organism in both groups. We conclude that septic arthritis in HIV infected iv drug users is not uncommon, it is produced by the same organisms and presents similar characteristics to the ones found in iv drug users without HIV infection. Therefore, the presence of HIV infection does not appear to modify the characteristics of septic arthritis.

  8. Septic tank additive impacts on microbial populations.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Hoover, M T; Clark, G H; Gumpertz, M; Wollum, A G; Cobb, C; Strock, J

    2008-01-01

    Environmental health specialists, other onsite wastewater professionals, scientists, and homeowners have questioned the effectiveness of septic tank additives. This paper describes an independent, third-party, field scale, research study of the effects of three liquid bacterial septic tank additives and a control (no additive) on septic tank microbial populations. Microbial populations were measured quarterly in a field study for 12 months in 48 full-size, functioning septic tanks. Bacterial populations in the 48 septic tanks were statistically analyzed with a mixed linear model. Additive effects were assessed for three septic tank maintenance levels (low, intermediate, and high). Dunnett's t-test for tank bacteria (alpha = .05) indicated that none of the treatments were significantly different, overall, from the control at the statistical level tested. In addition, the additives had no significant effects on septic tank bacterial populations at any of the septic tank maintenance levels. Additional controlled, field-based research iswarranted, however, to address additional additives and experimental conditions.

  9. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics, basic research, and clinical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausdorf, Joerg; Jansson, Volkmar; Maier, Markus; Delius, Michael

    2005-04-01

    The molecular events following shock wave treatment of bone are widely unknown. Nevertheless patients with osteonecrosis and non unions are already treated partly successful with shock waves. Concerning the first indication, the question of the permeation of the shock wave into the bone was addressed. Therefore shockwaves were applied to porcine femoral heads and the intraosseous pressure was measured. A linear correlation of the pressure to the intraosseous distance was found. Approximately 50% of the pressure are still measurable 10 mm inside the femoral head. These findings should encourage continued shock wave research on this indication. Concerning the second indication (non union), osteoblasts were subjected to 250 or 500 shock waves at 25 kV. After 24, 48, and 72 h the levels of the bone and vascular growth factors bFGF, TGFbeta1, and VEGF were examined. After 24 h there was a significant increase in bFGF levels (p<0.05) with significant correlation (p<0.05) to the number of impulses. TGFbeta1, and VEGF showed no significant changes. This may be one piece in the cascade of new bone formation following shock wave treatment and may lead to a more specific application of shock waves in orthopedic surgery.

  10. Direct cardiac effects of dobutamine, dopamine, epinephrine, and levosimendan in isolated septic rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Zausig, York A; Geilfus, Diana; Missler, Goetz; Sinner, Barbara; Graf, Bernhard M; Zink, Wolfgang

    2010-09-01

    In septic patients, myocardial depression-the so-called septic cardiomyopathy-needing inotropic support is common. The aim of this study was to compare the dose-responsive electrophysiological and mechanical properties concerning metabolic effects of clinically available inotropic agents in an isolated septic rat heart model. After 20 h of incubation, both sham-operated and septic (cecal ligation and single puncture) hearts from male Wistar rats (n = 64) were isolated and received dobutamine, dopamine, epinephrine, or levosimendan at concentrations of 10 to 10 M. Electrophysiological, mechanical, and metabolic properties were measured, and the myocardial oxygen supply-demand ratio and cardiac efficiency were calculated. With the exception of levosimendan, all of the drugs tested showed dose-dependent, significantly positive changes in chronotropy, inotropy, and lusitropy in all hearts. Maximum increases in septic hearts were dose-dependent and were ordered as follows: epinephrine > dopamine > dobutamine > levosimendan. These increases in cardiac performance were accompanied by a decrease in the myocardial oxygen supply-demand ratio. However, cardiac efficiency was significantly improved in the epinephrine-treated septic hearts. With the drug-induced increase in cardiac performance, the myocardial oxygen supply-demand ratio decreased proportionally in the epinephrine-, dobutamine-, and dopamine-treated septic hearts. However, epinephrine showed the most favorable results with regard to cardiac efficiency, and levosimendan showed no beneficial effect in septic hearts with regard to efficiency in this study.

  11. The Application of Clinical Lithotripter Shock Waves to RNA Nucleotide Delivery to Cells.

    PubMed

    Nwokeoha, Sandra; Carlisle, Robert; Cleveland, Robin O

    2016-10-01

    The delivery of genes into cells through the transfer of ribonucleic acids (RNAs) has been found to cause a change in the level of target protein expression. RNA-based transfection is conceptually more efficient than commonly delivered plasmid DNA because it does not require division or damage of the nuclear envelope, thereby increasing the chances of the cell remaining viable. Shock waves (SWs) have been found to induce cellular uptake by transiently altering the permeability of the plasma membrane, thereby overcoming a critical step in gene therapy. However, accompanying SW bio-effects include dose-dependent irreversible cell injury and cytotoxicity. Here, the effect of SWs generated by a clinical lithotripter on the viability and permeabilisation of three different cell lines in vitro was investigated. Comparison of RNA stability before and after SW exposure revealed no statistically significant difference. Optimal SW exposure parameters were identified to minimise cell death and maximise permeabilisation, and applied to enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) messenger RNA (mRNA) or anti-eGFP small interfering RNA delivery. As a result, eGFP mRNA expression levels increased up to 52-fold in CT26 cells, whereas a 2-fold decrease in GFP expression was achieved after anti-eGFP small interfering RNA delivery to MCF-7/GFP cells. These results indicate that SW parameters can be employed to achieve effective nucleotide delivery, laying the foundation for non-invasive and high-tolerability RNA-based gene therapy. PMID:27444864

  12. Septic arthritis involving Capnocytophaga ochracea.

    PubMed Central

    Winn, R E; Chase, W F; Lauderdale, P W; McCleskey, F K

    1984-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the knee developed in a 21-month-old child. The causative organism, isolated from two separate arthrocenteses, was identified as Capnocytophaga ochracea morphologically and by biochemical reactions. Previous human infections (bacteremias) have occurred in granulocytopenic hosts with concomitant oral pathology including periodontitis and gingivitis. No abnormalities of oral hygiene were present in this patient, and granulocyte numbers were normal or elevated. Eradication of the infection was accomplished with 8 weeks of antibiotic therapy combined with surgical drainage. Septic arthritis expands the spectrum of infections reported to be caused by Capnocytophaga spp. PMID:6715520

  13. Ultrasonographic findings in 38 horses with septic arthritis/tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Beccati, Francesca; Gialletti, Rodolfo; Passamonti, Fabrizio; Nannarone, Sara; Di Meo, Antonio; Pepe, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis/tenosynovitis in the horse can have life-threatening consequences. The purpose of this cross-sectional retrospective study was to describe ultrasound characteristics of septic arthritis/tenosynovitis in a group of horses. Diagnosis of septic arthritis/tenosynovitis was based on historical and clinical findings as well as the results of the synovial fluid analysis and/or positive synovial culture. Ultrasonographic findings recorded were degree of joint/sheath effusion, degree of synovial membrane thickening, echogenicity of the synovial fluid, and presence of hyperechogenic spots and fibrinous loculations. Ultrasonographic findings were tested for dependence on the cause of sepsis, time between admission and beginning of clinical signs, and the white blood cell counts in the synovial fluid. Thirty-eight horses with confirmed septic arthritis/tenosynovitis of 43 joints/sheaths were included. Degree of effusion was marked in 81.4% of cases, mild in 16.3%, and absent in 2.3%. Synovial thickening was mild in 30.9% of cases and moderate/severe in 69.1%. Synovial fluid was anechogenic in 45.2% of cases and echogenic in 54.8%. Hyperechogenic spots were identified in 32.5% of structures and fibrinous loculations in 64.3%. Relationships between the degree of synovial effusion, degree of the synovial thickening, presence of fibrinous loculations, and the time between admission and beginning of clinical signs were identified, as well as between the presence of fibrinous loculations and the cause of sepsis (P ≤ 0.05). Findings indicated that ultrasonographic findings of septic arthritis/tenosynovitis may vary in horses, and may be influenced by time between admission and beginning of clinical signs.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in horses with septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Easley, Jeremiah T; Brokken, Matthew T; Zubrod, Chad J; Morton, Alison J; Garrett, Katherine S; Holmes, Shannon P

    2011-01-01

    Fourteen horses with septic arthritis underwent high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Septic arthritis was diagnosed based on results from historical and clinical findings, synovial fluid analyses and culture, and radiographic, ultrasonographic, arthroscopic, and histopathologic findings. MR findings included diffuse hyperintensity within bone and extracapsular tissue on fat-suppressed images in 14/14 horses (100%), joint effusion, synovial proliferation, and capsular thickening in 13/14 horses (93%), bone sclerosis in 11/14 horses (79%), and evidence of cartilage and subchondral bone damage in 8/14 horses (57%). Intravenous gadolinium was administered to five of the 14 horses and fibrin deposition was noted in all horses. Other findings after gadolinium administration included synovial enhancement in 4/5 (80%) horses, and bone enhancement in 1/5 (20%) horses. The MR findings of septic arthritis in horses were consistent with those reported in people. MRI may allow earlier and more accurate diagnosis of septic arthritis in horses as compared with other imaging modalities, especially when the clinical diagnosis is challenging. It also provides additional information not afforded by other methods that may influence and enhance treatment.

  15. Is It Time to Beta Block the Septic Patient?

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Philip; Veenith, Tonny; Snelson, Catherine; Whitehouse, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Beta blockers are some of the most studied drugs in the pharmacopoeia. They are already widely used in medicine for treating hypertension, chronic heart failure, tachyarrhythmias, and tremor. Whilst their use in the immediate perioperative patient has been questioned, the use of esmolol in the patients with established septic shock has been recently reported to have favourable outcomes. In this paper, we review the role of the adrenergic system in sepsis and the evidence for the use of beta stimulation and beta blockers from animal models to critically ill patients. PMID:26557668

  16. Transpulmonary thermodilution-derived cardiac function index identifies cardiac dysfunction in acute heart failure and septic patients: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction There is limited clinical experience with the single-indicator transpulmonary thermodilution (pulse contour cardiac output, or PiCCO) technique in critically ill medical patients, particularly in those with acute heart failure (AHF). Therefore, we compared the cardiac function of patients with AHF or sepsis using the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) and the PiCCO technology. Methods This retrospective observational study was conducted in the medical intensive care unit of a university hospital. Twelve patients with AHF and nine patients with severe sepsis or septic shock had four simultaneous hemodynamic measurements by PAC and PiCCO during a 24-hour observation period. Comparisons between groups were made with the use of the Mann-Whitney U test. Including all measurements, correlations between data pairs were established using linear regression analysis and are expressed as the square of Pearson's correlation coefficients (r2). Results Compared to septic patients, AHF patients had a significantly lower cardiac index, cardiac function index (CFI), global ejection fraction, mixed venous oxygen saturation (SmvO2) and pulmonary vascular permeability index, but higher pulmonary artery occlusion pressure. All patients with a CFI less than 4.5 per minute had an SmvO2 not greater than 70%. In both groups, the CFI correlated with the left ventricular stroke work index (sepsis: r2 = 0.30, P < 0.05; AHF: r2 = 0.23, P < 0.05) and cardiac power (sepsis: r2 = 0.39, P < 0.05; AHF: r2 = 0.45, P < 0.05). Conclusions In critically ill medical patients, assessment of cardiac function using transpulmonary thermodilution technique is an alternative to the PAC. A low CFI identifies cardiac dysfunction in both AHF and septic patients. PMID:19671146

  17. Ivabradine during cardiogenic shock: a clinical case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bonadei, Ivano; Sciatti, Edoardo; Vizzardi, Enrico; D'Aloia, Antonio; Metra, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Although the introduction of novel medical and invasive therapies in recent years has led to a significant reduction in mortality from heart failure, the same cannot be said for mortality due to cardiogenic shock. Drug therapy with inotropic agents and catecholamines has the disadvantage of causing increased myocardial oxygen consumption resulting in increased heart rate which may lead to the widening of the ischemic area. A reduction in heart rate with the administration of β-blockers is contraindicated due to negative inotropic and blood pressure lowering effects, typical of this group of drugs. Thus the theoretical possibility of ivabradine administration for an isolated reduction in heart rate, associated with the absence of a negative inotropic effect, could favorably influence hemodynamics in patients with cardiogenic shock. We report a case of cardiogenic shock treated by adding ivabradine to the currently used therapy.

  18. Best vasopressor for advanced vasodilatory shock: should vasopressin be part of the mix?

    PubMed

    Maybauer, Marc O; Walley, Keith R

    2010-09-01

    Since the publication of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines, a number of additional and highly relevant studies have been published addressing the issue of vasopressor use during septic shock. While these new results are provocative, none of the studies are definitive. In sum, they suggest that maybe we should not be thinking of one vasopressor versus another in a winner-takes-all sense. Rather, we should be looking for the best balance of vasopressor agents and, further, the choice likely depends on clinical context. Clinical context may drive the choice of adrenergic agonist; for example, norepinephrine may be superior to dopamine when the potential for arrhythmias is of concern. Norepinephrine may be superior to epinephrine if elevated lactate associated with epinephrine use confounds the clinical picture. The Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial (VASST) identified an effective dose of arginine vasopressin (AVP) when adrenergic agonist doses are low, but higher doses of AVP may be appropriate in the context of very high adrenergic agonist doses. The effect may be a direct beneficial AVP effect or indirect sparing of adrenergic agonist use. The choice to add AVP may also be influenced by the clinical context, including renal function or the concomitant use of corticosteroids. These interim conclusions, in truth, are hypotheses warranting randomized controlled trials adequately powered to test for survival differences in these severely ill patients.

  19. Clinical application of shock wave therapy in musculoskeletal disorders: part II related to myofascial and nerve apparatus.

    PubMed

    Saggini, R; Di Stefano, A; Saggini, A; Bellomo, R G

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves have been widely recognized in literature as a biological regulator; accordingly we carried out a review on the effect of shock waves on the mesenchymal cells in their various expressions: bone, muscle, ligament and tendon tissue. To date, the application of Shock Wave Therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been primarily used in the treatment of tendinopathies (proximal plantar fasciopathy, lateral elbow tendinopathy, calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder, and patellar tendinopathy, etc.) and bone defects (delayed and non-union of bone fractures, avascular necrosis of femoral head, etc.). Although the mechanism of their therapeutic effects is still unknown, the majority of published papers have shown the positive and beneficial effects of using SWT as a treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, with a success rate ranging from 65% to 91%, while the complications are low or negligible. The purpose of this paper is to present the published data on the clinical application of SWT in the treatment of myofascial and nerve disorders. With the help of the relevant literature, in this paper we outline the indications and success rates of SWT, as well as the adequate SWT parameters (e.g., rate of impulses, energy flux density) defined according to the present state of knowledge. PMID:26753637

  20. Clinical application of shock wave therapy in musculoskeletal disorders: part II related to myofascial and nerve apparatus.

    PubMed

    Saggini, R; Di Stefano, A; Saggini, A; Bellomo, R G

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves have been widely recognized in literature as a biological regulator; accordingly we carried out a review on the effect of shock waves on the mesenchymal cells in their various expressions: bone, muscle, ligament and tendon tissue. To date, the application of Shock Wave Therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been primarily used in the treatment of tendinopathies (proximal plantar fasciopathy, lateral elbow tendinopathy, calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder, and patellar tendinopathy, etc.) and bone defects (delayed and non-union of bone fractures, avascular necrosis of femoral head, etc.). Although the mechanism of their therapeutic effects is still unknown, the majority of published papers have shown the positive and beneficial effects of using SWT as a treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, with a success rate ranging from 65% to 91%, while the complications are low or negligible. The purpose of this paper is to present the published data on the clinical application of SWT in the treatment of myofascial and nerve disorders. With the help of the relevant literature, in this paper we outline the indications and success rates of SWT, as well as the adequate SWT parameters (e.g., rate of impulses, energy flux density) defined according to the present state of knowledge.

  1. In Vivo Monitoring of Hemodynamic Changes during Clogging and Unclogging of Blood Supply for the Application of Clinical Shock Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Stelzle, Florian; Schmidt, Michael

    This paper presents a novel methodology in early detection of clinical shock by monitoring hemodynamic changes using diffuse reflectance measurement technique. Detailed prototype of the reflectance measurement system and data analysis technique of hemodynamic monitoring was carried out in our laboratory. The real time in-vivo measurements were done from the index finger. This study demonstrates preliminary results of real time monitoring of reduced/- oxyhemoglobin changes during clogging and unclogging of blood flow in the finger tip. The obtained results were verified with pulse-oximeter values, connected to the tip of the same index finger.

  2. Septic Arthritis and Hemarthroses Caused by Haemophilus Influenzae Serotype A in Children

    PubMed Central

    Samraj, Ravi S.; Fergie, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Invasive disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae serotype A (Hia) is rare in children. Clinical syndromes caused by Hia include meningitis, sepsis and respiratory tract infections. Septic arthritis is rare in children with invasive Hia infection and hemarthrosis has not been described in the published literature. We report a case of septic arthritis and hemarthrosis caused by Hia infection in a 2.5 year-old-boy and review invasive Hia infection in children.

  3. Good's Syndrome Accompanied by Agranulocytosis Following a Rapid Clinical Course.

    PubMed

    Okusu, Takahiro; Sato, Taiki; Ogata, Yoshitaka; Nagata, Shinpei; Kozumi, Kazuhiro; Kim, Sung-Ho; Yamamoto, Suguru; Yamayoshi, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Good's syndrome is an immunodeficiency disease involving thymoma accompanied by hypogammaglobulinemia. We encountered a case of Good's syndrome accompanied by agranulocytosis that followed a rapid clinical course. A 72-year-old man visited our hospital with a two-week history of a sore throat. Candida albicans was detected in the pharynx, and hypogammaglobulinemia was detected in addition to granulocytopenia. The patient subsequently developed septic shock and followed a rapid clinical course which ended in death. Good's syndrome with agranulocytosis was diagnosed at autopsy. Good's syndrome accompanied by agranulocytosis can follow a rapid clinical course and some cases remain asymptomatic until old age. Its prompt treatment is crucial. PMID:26935379

  4. Fungal osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bariteau, Jason T; Waryasz, Gregory R; McDonnell, Matthew; Fischer, Staci A; Hayda, Roman A; Born, Christopher T

    2014-06-01

    Management of fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis is challenging, especially in the setting of immunodeficiency and conditions that require immunosuppression. Because fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis are rare conditions, study of their pathophysiology and treatment has been limited. In the literature, evidence-based treatment is lacking and, historically, outcomes have been poor. The most common offending organisms are Candida and Aspergillus, which are widely distributed in humans and soil. However, some fungal pathogens, such as Histoplasma, Blastomyces, Coccidioides, Cryptococcus, and Sporothrix, have more focal areas of endemicity. Fungal bone and joint infections result from direct inoculation, contiguous infection spread, or hematogenous seeding of organisms. These infections may be difficult to diagnose and eradicate, especially in the setting of total joint arthroplasty. Although there is no clear consensus on treatment, guidelines are available for management of many of these pathogens.

  5. Influence of the bacterial phenotypes on the clinical manifestations in Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia patients: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Togawa, Atsushi; Toh, Hiromi; Onozawa, Kyoko; Yoshimura, Michinobu; Tokushige, Chiemi; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Takata, Tohru; Tamura, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    Ninety-four episodes of Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infection were identified at a university hospital in Japan. After excluding extended-spectrum beta lactamase-producing strains, 83 blood isolates from these patients were assayed in terms of their bacterial phenotypes such as the mucoid and hypermucoviscosity phenotypes. Bacterial phenotypes were correlated with the patients' clinical manifestations. The hypermucoviscosity phenotype was significantly associated with septic shock at the onset of infections (odds ratio, 15.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-468.12), but was not associated with liver abscess formation. Mortality was determined by the presence of septic shock. RmpA gene was associated with the induction of the hypermucoviscosity phenotype. These results reveal unique roles of bacterial phenotypes on the patient's clinical condition in K. pneumoniae bacteremia.

  6. Blood coagulation disorders in septic patients.

    PubMed

    Knoebl, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Host defense and blood coagulation are tightly connected and interacting systems, necessary for the integrity of an organism. Complex mechanisms regulate the intensity of a host response to invading pathogens or other potentially dangerous situations. Under regular conditions, this response is limited in time and located to the site of injury. Sometimes, however, systemic host response is overwhelming and disproportional and causes damage, not cure. Dependent on the genetical predisposition of the host, its current immunocompetence, or the type of injury, the reaction leads to the clinical picture of the different degrees of sepsis. Septic organ dysfunction is caused by intravascular fibrin deposition as a result of coagulation activation, anticoagulant breakdown, and shut down of fibrinolysis. This article describes the major pathophysiologic reactions in these situations and presents www.SepDIC.eu, an online tool on sepsis and associated coagulopathy.

  7. Flavanones and Chromones from Salicornia herbacea Mitigate Septic Lethality via Restoration of Vascular Barrier Integrity.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Nguyen Quoc; Lee, Wonhwa; Oh, Joonseok; Kulkarni, Roshan Rajan; Gény, Charlotte; Jung, Byeongjin; Kang, Hyejin; Bae, Jong-Sup; Na, MinKyun

    2015-11-25

    Salicornia herbacea is an annual halophytic glasswort that has been employed as a culinary vegetable, salad, and traditional medicinal resource. Chemical investigation of the aerial parts of S. herbacea led to the isolation of two new (1, 2) and known (3) flavanones as well as a new nature-derived (4) and two known chromone derivatives (5, 6). These purified compounds were evaluated for their suppressive potentials against the release of high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), which has captured attention as a viable target for alleviating serious septic manifestations or septicemia. The phenolic compounds improved the survival rates of cecal ligation and puncture operation (CLP) in murine models, simulating severe septic shock and its related complications, to 40-60%. These results collectively validate that flavanone- and chromone-based secondary metabolites may serve as prospective prodrugs or food additives that may be commercialized for the control of septic complications and lethality.

  8. Flavanones and Chromones from Salicornia herbacea Mitigate Septic Lethality via Restoration of Vascular Barrier Integrity.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Nguyen Quoc; Lee, Wonhwa; Oh, Joonseok; Kulkarni, Roshan Rajan; Gény, Charlotte; Jung, Byeongjin; Kang, Hyejin; Bae, Jong-Sup; Na, MinKyun

    2015-11-25

    Salicornia herbacea is an annual halophytic glasswort that has been employed as a culinary vegetable, salad, and traditional medicinal resource. Chemical investigation of the aerial parts of S. herbacea led to the isolation of two new (1, 2) and known (3) flavanones as well as a new nature-derived (4) and two known chromone derivatives (5, 6). These purified compounds were evaluated for their suppressive potentials against the release of high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), which has captured attention as a viable target for alleviating serious septic manifestations or septicemia. The phenolic compounds improved the survival rates of cecal ligation and puncture operation (CLP) in murine models, simulating severe septic shock and its related complications, to 40-60%. These results collectively validate that flavanone- and chromone-based secondary metabolites may serve as prospective prodrugs or food additives that may be commercialized for the control of septic complications and lethality. PMID:26522440

  9. An epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome in Delhi: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, V K; Suri, S; Bhasin, A; Srivastava, L; Bharadwaj, M

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four cases of dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome were studied in Delhi in the months of September and October, 1988. The majority of these cases were boys aged 6-10 years. Classical symptoms of dengue (fever, headache, aesthesia, myalgia) occurred in all the patients. Digestive symptoms (nausea, vomiting, anorexia, abdominal pain and hepatomegaly) were also common. Haemorrhagic manifestations were present in 41.7% of the cases. Of these, 90% had gastrointestinal haemorrhages. Shock occurred in 17 cases (70.8%). Thrombocytopenia and prolongation of coagulation profile were found in 62.5% of cases. Three patients (12.5%) who presented with encephalopathy died. The other 21 patients recovered after an average period of 2-8 days.

  10. Septic arthritis in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed hosts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dingyuan Alvin; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah

    2015-04-01

    Septic arthritis has long been considered an orthopedic emergency. Historically, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus have been the most common causes of septic arthritis worldwide but in the modern era of biological therapy and extensive use of prosthetic joint replacements, the spectrum of microbiological causes of septic arthritis has widened considerably. There are also new approaches to diagnosis but therapy remains a challenge, with a need for careful consideration of a combined medical and surgical approach in most cases.

  11. Echocardiography in shock management.

    PubMed

    McLean, Anthony S

    2016-01-01

    Echocardiography is pivotal in the diagnosis and management of the shocked patient. Important characteristics in the setting of shock are that it is non-invasive and can be rapidly applied.In the acute situation a basic study often yields immediate results allowing for the initiation of therapy, while a follow-up advanced study brings the advantage of further refining the diagnosis and providing an in-depth hemodynamic assessment. Competency in basic critical care echocardiography is now regarded as a mandatory part of critical care training with clear guidelines available. The majority of pathologies found in shocked patients are readily identified using basic level 2D and M-mode echocardiography. A more comprehensive diagnosis can be achieved with advanced levels of competency, for which practice guidelines are also now available. Hemodynamic evaluation and ongoing monitoring are possible with advanced levels of competency, which includes the use of colour Doppler, spectral Doppler, and tissue Doppler imaging and occasionally the use of more recent technological advances such as 3D or speckled tracking.The four core types of shock-cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, and vasoplegic-can readily be identified by echocardiography. Even within each of the main headings contained in the shock classification, a variety of pathologies may be the cause and echocardiography will differentiate which of these is responsible. Increasingly, as a result of more complex and elderly patients, the shock may be multifactorial, such as a combination of cardiogenic and septic shock or hypovolemia and ventricular outflow obstruction.The diagnostic benefit of echocardiography in the shocked patient is obvious. The increasing prevalence of critical care physicians experienced in advanced techniques means echocardiography often supplants the need for more invasive hemodynamic assessment and monitoring in shock. PMID:27543137

  12. Optoacoustic measurement of central venous oxygenation for assessment of circulatory shock: clinical study in cardiac surgery patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Prough, Donald S.; Kinsky, Michael; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Andrey; Henkel, S. Nan; Seeton, Roger; Salter, Michael G.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Circulatory shock is a dangerous medical condition, in which blood flow cannot provide the necessary amount of oxygen to organs and tissues. Currently, its diagnosis and therapy decisions are based on hemodynamic parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, blood gases) and mental status of a patient, which all have low specificity. Measurement of mixed or central venous blood oxygenation via catheters is more reliable, but highly invasive and associated with complications. Our previous studies in healthy volunteers demonstrated that optoacoustic systems provide non-invasive measurement of blood oxygenation in specific vessels, including central veins. Here we report our first results of a clinical study in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery patients. We used a medical-grade OPO-based optoacoustic system developed in our laboratory to measure in real time blood oxygenation in the internal jugular vein (IJV) of these patients. A clinical ultrasound imaging system (GE Vivid e) was used for IJV localization. Catheters were placed in the IJV as part of routine care and blood samples taken via the catheters were processed with a CO-oximeter. The optoacoustic oxygenation data were compared to the CO-oximeter readings. Good correlation between the noninvasive and invasive measurements was obtained. The results of these studies suggest that the optoacoustic system can provide accurate, noninvasive measurements of central venous oxygenation that can be used for patients with circulatory shock.

  13. FALLS-protocol: lung ultrasound in hemodynamic assessment of shock.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, D

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of acute circulatory failure is a challenge in absence of solid gold standard. It is suggested that artifacts generated by lung ultrasound can be of help. The FALLS-protocol (Fluid Administration Limited by Lung Sonography) follows Weil's classification of shocks. Firstly, it searches for pericardial fluid, then right heart enlargment, lastly abolished lung sliding. In this setting, the diagnoses of pericardial tamponade, pulmonary embolism and tension pneumothorax, i.e. obstructive shock, can be schematically ruled out. Moreover, the search of diffuse lung rockets (i.e. multiple B-lines, a comet-tail artifact) is performed. Its absence excludes pulmonary edema, that in clinical practice is left cardiogenic shock (most cases). At this step, the patient (defined FALLS-responder) receives fluid therapy. He/she has usually a normal sonographic lung surface, an A-profile. Any clinical improvement suggests hypovolemic shock. The absence of improvement generates continuation of fluid therapy, eventually yielding fluid overload. This condition results in the change from A-profile to B-profile. Lung ultrasound has the advantage to demonstrate this interstitial syndrome at an early and infraclinical stage (FALLS-endpoint). The change from horizontal A-lines to vertical B-lines can be considered as a direct marker of volemia in this use. By elimination, this change indicates schematically distributive shock, while in current practice septic shock. The major limitation is the B-profile on admission generated by an initial lung disorder. FALLS-protocol, which can be associated with no drawback with traditional hemodynamic tools, uses a simple machine (without Doppler) and a suitable microconvex probe allowing for heart, lung and vein assessment. PMID:24364005

  14. Septic arthritis of the shoulder in a dental patient: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Dolin, Elana; Perlmutter, Leigh D; Segelnick, Stuart L; Weinberg, Mea A; Schoor, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the glenohumoral joint is rare following dental procedures, comprising approximately 3% of all joint infections. Septic arthritis following bacteremia from dental procedures is uncommon and generally occurs in prosthetic joints. Predisposing causes may include immunocompromising diseases such as diabetes, HIV infection, renal failure and intravenous drug abuse. We report a rare case of unilateral glenohumoral joint septic arthritis in a 60-year-old male patient (without a prosthetic joint) secondary to a dental procedure. The insidious nature of the presentation is highlighted. Septic arthritis infections, though rare, require a high level of clinical suspicion. Vague symptoms of shoulder pain may mask the initial diagnosis, as was the case in our patient. Incision and drainage via surgical intervention are often required, followed by parenteral antibiotics.

  15. Septic arthritis of the shoulder in a dental patient: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Dolin, Elana; Perlmutter, Leigh D; Segelnick, Stuart L; Weinberg, Mea A; Schoor, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the glenohumoral joint is rare following dental procedures, comprising approximately 3% of all joint infections. Septic arthritis following bacteremia from dental procedures is uncommon and generally occurs in prosthetic joints. Predisposing causes may include immunocompromising diseases such as diabetes, HIV infection, renal failure and intravenous drug abuse. We report a rare case of unilateral glenohumoral joint septic arthritis in a 60-year-old male patient (without a prosthetic joint) secondary to a dental procedure. The insidious nature of the presentation is highlighted. Septic arthritis infections, though rare, require a high level of clinical suspicion. Vague symptoms of shoulder pain may mask the initial diagnosis, as was the case in our patient. Incision and drainage via surgical intervention are often required, followed by parenteral antibiotics. PMID:24933767

  16. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection.

  17. [Obstructive shock].

    PubMed

    Pich, H; Heller, A R

    2015-05-01

    An acute obstruction of blood flow in central vessels of the systemic or pulmonary circulation causes the clinical symptoms of shock accompanied by disturbances of consciousness, centralization, oliguria, hypotension and tachycardia. In the case of an acute pulmonary embolism an intravascular occlusion results in an acute increase of the right ventricular afterload. In the case of a tension pneumothorax, an obstruction of the blood vessels supplying the heart is caused by an increase in extravascular pressure. From a hemodynamic viewpoint circulatory shock caused by obstruction is closely followed by cardiac deterioration; however, etiological and therapeutic options necessitate demarcation of cardiac from non-cardiac obstructive causes. The high dynamics of this potentially life-threatening condition is a hallmark of all types of obstructive shock. This requires an expeditious and purposeful diagnosis and a rapid and well-aimed therapy. PMID:25994928

  18. 5,14-HEDGE, a 20-HETE mimetic, reverses hypotension and improves survival in a rodent model of septic shock: Contribution of soluble epoxide hydrolase, CYP2C23, MEK1/ERK1/2/IKKβ/IκB-α/NF-κB pathway, and proinflammatory cytokine formation

    PubMed Central

    Tunctan, Bahar; Korkmaz, Belma; Sari, Ayse Nihal; Kacan, Meltem; Unsal, Demet; Serin, Mehmet Sami; Buharalioglu, C. Kemal; Sahan-Firat, Seyhan; Cuez, Tuba; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen; Falck, John R.; Malik, Kafait U.

    2013-01-01

    mortality in the rodent model of septic shock. PMID:23454652

  19. Recent developments in septic bursitis.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Jennifer A

    2013-10-01

    Septic bursitis is a disease that can be difficult to distinguish from aseptic bursitis. There are no definitive treatment guidelines. The optimal duration of antibiotic therapy is not defined. Most of the cases are due to infection with Staphylococcus aureus, although many other pathogens can also cause this infection. The optimal management includes early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Surgical management may be necessary, and complications can arise from open procedures. Endoscopic bursectomy may be considered for patients requiring surgical debridement. This approach may lead to decreased morbidity in those requiring surgical intervention. PMID:23933823

  20. A Case of Acinetobacter Septic Pulmonary Embolism in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Ananthan, Anitha; David, Jane; Ghildiyal, Radha

    2016-01-01

    Case Characteristics. An 11-month-old girl presented with fever and breathlessness for 5 days. Patient had respiratory distress with bilateral coarse crepitations. Chest radiograph revealed diffuse infiltrations in the right lung with thick walled cavities in mid and lower zone. Computed tomography showed multiple cystic spaces and emboli. Blood culture grew Acinetobacter species. Intervention. Patient was treated with Meropenem and Vancomycin. Outcome. Complete clinical and radiological recovery was seen in child. Message. Blood cultures and CT of the chest are invaluable in the evaluation of a patient with suspected septic pulmonary embolism. With early diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial therapy, complete recovery can be expected in patients with septic pulmonary embolism. PMID:27529040

  1. Spontaneous Septic Arthritis of Pubic Symphysis in an Elite Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Sommer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis is a potentially severe disease. Athletes are at risk of this form of spontaneous arthritis, as inflammation of the pubic bone due to muscular stress is relatively common. Oedema due to inflammation might predispose to infection through bacteraemia or local bacterial translocation. Suspicion should be raised when an athlete complains of groin pain and has signs of infection (i.e., fever, elevated white blood cell count, and elevated C-reactive protein). Diagnosis is made by imaging showing signs of inflammation combined with positive (blood) cultures. Broad spectrum antibiotics should be started upon suspicion and adjusted according to cultures. An abscess causing clinical deterioration under antibiotic treatment is an indication for invasive intervention (i.e., surgical or image-guided drainage). This is the first case of spontaneous septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis in an athlete requiring surgical and additional image-guided drainage. PMID:27703831

  2. STARD-compliant article: The utility of red cell distribution width to predict mortality for septic patients visiting the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Kuei; Lin, Shen-Che; Wu, Chin-Chieh; Chen, Li-Min; Tzeng, I-Shiang; Chen, Kuan-Fu

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is a common condition in the emergency department that is associated with high mortality. Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) has been used as a simple prognosis predictor for patients with community-acquired pneumonia, gram-negative bacteremia, and severe sepsis or septic shock. To evaluate the performance of RDW to predict in-hospital mortality among septic patients, we conducted a hospital-based retrospective cohort study in an emergency department of a tertiary teaching hospital. RDW was compared with other commonly used clinical prediction scores (Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS), Mortality in Emergency Department Sepsis (MEDS) and the Confusion, Urea nitrogen, Respiratory rate, Blood pressure, 65 years of age and older (CURB65)). Of 6973 consecutive adult patients with a clinical diagnosis of sepsis and 2 sets of blood culture ordered by physicians, 477 (6.8%) died. The mortality group had higher RDW levels than the survival group (15.7% vs 13.8%). After dividing RDW into quartiles, the patients in the highest RDW quartile (RDW >15.6%; mortality, 16.7%) had more than twice the risk of in-hospital mortality compared with patients in the second highest quartile (RDW >14% and <15.6%; mortality, 7.3%), whereas the mortality rate in the lowest RDW quartile (<13.1%) was only 1.6%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of RDW to predict mortality was 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.72-0.77), which is significantly higher than the areas under the curve of clinical prediction rules (SIRS, MEDS, and CURB65). After integrating RDW into these scores, all scores performed better in predicting mortality (0.73, 0.72, and 0.77, for SIRS, MEDS, and CURB65, respectively). RDW could be an independent predictor of mortality among septic patients. Clinicians could classify the septic patients into different risk groups according to RDW quartiles. For more accurate mortality prediction, RDW could be a potential parameter to be

  3. Septic pulmonary embolism induced by dental infection.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Yutaro; Taniguchi, Akihiko; Yuzurio, Syota; Horita, Naokatsu; Hosokawa, Shinobu; Watanabe, Yoichi; Tohmori, Hidetoshi; Ono, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    Dental infection can be an important source for septic pulmonary embolism (SPE), but only a few cases of SPE accompanying dental infection have been reported. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical features of SPE induced by dental infection. Patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria described in the text were recruited in a retrospective fashion. All 9 patients were men, with a median age of 59 years (range:47 to 74 years). Eight patients had chest pain (88.9%), 5 had a preceding toothache (55.6%) and 3 had preceding gingival swelling (33.3%). Blood cultures obtained from 7 patients were negative. Periodontitis was found in all of the cases, periapical periodontitis in 5 cases, and gingival abscess in 3 cases. The median duration of hospitalization was 15 days, and symptoms were mild in some cases. In addition to antimicrobial therapy, tooth extraction was performed in 3 cases, tooth scaling in 6. SPE induced by dental infection has prominent clinical characteristics such as male preponderance, chest pain, preceding toothache, and mild clinical course.

  4. Clinical, laboratory and radiological parameters in children with dengue fever and predictive factors for dengue shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Betty; Subramanian, Gayathri

    2008-04-01

    This article is a prospective study of the clinical, laboratory and radiological picture of children satisfying the case definition criteria of dengue by WHO admitted at Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, a suburban tertiary referral centre, to determine the predictive factors for dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Data were analyzed by Chi-squared test and Student's t-test for significance after dividing the patients into two groups, those with and those without DSS for the same. Bleeding manifestations, presence of effusion on USG/X-ray, haematocrit >35%, WBC <4000/cumm, Na < or =130 meq/l, bicarbonate level of <18 mmol/l, deranged coagulation profile and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) > or =40 IU were predictive of DSS.

  5. Septic acute kidney injury: molecular mechanisms and the importance of stratification and targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrell, Eric D; Kellum, John A; Pastor-Soler, Núria M; Hallows, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    The most common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients is sepsis. However, the molecular pathways and mechanisms that mediate septic AKI are not well defined. Experiments performed over the past 20 years suggest that there are profound differences in the pathogenesis between septic and ischemic AKI. Septic AKI often occurs independently of hypoperfusion, and is mediated by a concomitant pro- and anti-inflammatory state that is activated in response to various pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as endotoxin, as well as damage-associated molecular patterns. These molecular patterns are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) found in the kidney, and effectuate downstream inflammatory pathways. Additionally, apoptosis has been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of septic AKI. However, targeted therapies designed to mitigate the above aspects of the inflammatory state, TLR-related pathways, and apoptosis have failed to show significant clinical benefit. This failure is likely due to the protean nature of septic AKI, whereby different patients present at different points along the immunologic spectrum. While one patient may benefit from targeted therapy at one end of the spectrum, another patient at the other end may be harmed by the same therapy. We propose that a next important step in septic AKI research will be to identify where patients lie on the immunologic spectrum in order to appropriately target therapies at the inflammatory cascade, TLRs, and possibly apoptosis. PMID:25575158

  6. Enterotoxin production by strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical and non-clinical specimens with special reference to enterotoxin F and toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    de Nooij, M. P.; van Leeuwen, W. J.; Notermans, S.

    1982-01-01

    Enterotoxin production by strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical specimens of human and animal origin and from healthy human carriers was investigated. All nine patients admitted to hospital with symptoms of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) yielded enterotoxin-producing strains of S. aureus. Eight of these produced staphylococcal enterotoxin F (SEF). A significantly smaller proportion of strains (42% of 50 strains tested) isolated from other clinical specimens of hospitalized patients produced SEF. Production of SEF by strains isolated from clinical specimens of animal origin (48 strains) was not observed. Twenty-nine per cent of 24 S. aureus strains isolated from noses of hospital staff produced SEF. This result was not significantly different from that obtained from strains isolated from clinical specimens other than TSS. A similar percentage of strains isolated from healthy human carriers outside hospital produced SEF (25% of 24 strains tested). The results indicated that enterotoxin production, especially that of SEF, is associated with S. aureus isolated from patients suspected of TSS. There was no indication of an association between S. aureus isolated from other staphylococcal infections and SEF production. All strains were phage typed and 79% of the strains belonging to the international phage-group I produced SEF. All strains lysed by phage 187 were found to produce SEF. PMID:6218196

  7. Minocycline hypersensitivity syndrome with hypotension mimicking septic shock.

    PubMed

    Colvin, J H; Sheth, A P

    2001-01-01

    Minocycline is a semisynthetic tetracycline derivative that is often used in the treatment of acne vulgaris. A serious but rare adverse effect caused by minocycline therapy is a hypersensitivity syndrome (HS), consisting of fever, skin eruption, and internal organ involvement that begins within 8 weeks of therapy initiation. We report a case of minocycline HS with unique features, namely, associated hypotension, and a rebound of the cutaneous eruption upon discontinuation of systemic steroids.

  8. Septic Mice Are Susceptible to Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Benjamim, Claudia F.; Hogaboam, Cory M.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical data underscores the fact that subsequent high mortality rates occur in patients who survive acute septic episodes. Herein, we described a clinically relevant model of experimental sepsis that we believe will allow further investigation of the manner in which the pulmonary innate immune response is modulated after sepsis. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model, whereby the cecum was partially ligated and punctured nine times with a 21-gauge needle. This procedure was associated with 100% mortality at 3 days after surgery. In contrast, when mice subjected to CLP were treated with antibiotic beginning at 8 hours after surgery, and every 12 hours thereafter until 3 days, ∼60% of the mice survived. Interestingly, CLP survivors quickly succumbed (100% mortality) to pulmonary infection when intratracheally challenged, at day 3 after CLP, with viable Aspergillus fumigatus conidia. No mortality was observed in conidia-challenged sham-operated mice. The defective innate immune response against A. fumigatus in CLP mice could not be explained by a failure of neutrophils to infiltrate the lungs. Instead, gene array analysis revealed that several components of the innate immune response, including the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway, were down-regulated. Thus, we describe a system of sepsis-induced innate immune failure in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. PMID:14633632

  9. Advances in the clinical development of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Komal; Taldone, Tony; Modi, Shanu; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Hsp90 is an ATP dependent molecular chaperone protein which integrates multiple oncogenic pathways. As such, Hsp90 inhibition is a promising anti-cancer strategy. Several inhibitors that act on Hsp90 by binding to its N-terminal ATP pocket have entered clinical evaluation. Robust pre-clinical data suggested anti-tumor activity in multiple cancer types. Clinically, encouraging results have been demonstrated in melanoma, acute myeloid leukemia, castrate refractory prostate cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma and multiple myeloma. In breast cancer, proof-of-concept was demonstrated by first generation Hsp90 inhibitors in combination with trastuzumab mainly in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) + metastatic breast cancer. There are a multitude of second generation Hsp90 inhibitors currently under investigation. To date, however, there is no FDA approved Hsp90 inhibitor nor standardized assay to ascertain Hsp90 inhibition. This review summarizes the current status of both first and second generation Hsp90 inhibitors based on their chemical classification and stage of clinical development. It also discusses the pharmacodynamic assays currently implemented in clinic as well as other novel strategies aimed at enhancing the effectiveness of Hsp90 inhibitors. Ultimately, these efforts will aid in maximizing the full potential of this class of agents. PMID:22062686

  10. The protective effects of the traditional Chinese herbs against renal damage induced by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Binwu; He, Dalin; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Xingfa; Nan, Xunyi

    2011-04-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL)-induced renal damage can occur as a result of multiple mechanisms. We have reported previously that Astragalus membranaceus, Salvia miltiorrhiza, a decoction of six drugs containing rhizoma Rehmanniae preparata and supplements of a few traditional Chinese medicinal herbs for invigorating the kidney and excreting calculus, have a protective effect on renal injury induced by high-energy shock waves (HESW) in rabbits. In this clinical study we further investigate the protective effects of these traditional Chinese herbs against renal damage induced by ESWL. Sixty consenting patients with renal calculus who underwent ESWL treatment were included and randomly assigned to the medication group or control group. Post-ESWL plasma nitric oxide (NO), endothelin-1 (ET-1), malondialdehyde (MDA), and serum tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) increased significantly in the controls (P < 0.05), while in the medication group, slightly but not significantly elevated levels of plasma ET-1, NO, and serum TNF-α were found. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased gradually in the controls, reaching a trough 72 h after ESWL (P < 0.05), while in the treated group it was unchanged, and remained at a level higher versus the controls (P < 0.05). Plasma NO peaked twice by 72 h and at 1 week in the controls (P < 0.05). Urinary enzymes and β(2)-microglobulin increased significantly and peaked by 24 h and immediately after ESWL (P < 0.05). These values were greater in the controls, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates that the preparations of traditional Chinese medicines for invigorating the kidney and excreting calculus can reduce renal tubular damage induced by ESWL, and can shorten the recovery time of renal tubules in human subjects. PMID:20607528

  11. Point-of-care optical tool to detect early stage of hemorrhage and shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurjar, Rajan S.; Riccardi, Suzannah L.; Johnson, Blair D.; Johnson, Christopher P.; Paradis, Norman A.; Joyner, Michael J.; Wolf, David E.

    2014-02-01

    There is a critical unmet clinical need for a device that can monitor and predict the onset of shock: hemorrhagic shock or bleeding to death, septic shock or systemic infection, and cardiogenic shock or blood flow and tissue oxygenation impairment due to heart attack. Together these represent 141 M patients per year. We have developed a monitor for shock based on measuring blood flow in peripheral (skin) capillary beds using diffuse correlation spectroscopy, a form of dynamic light scattering, and have demonstrated proof-of-principle both in pigs and humans. Our results show that skin blood flow measurement, either alone or in conjunction with other hemodynamic properties such as heart rate variability, pulse pressure variability, and tissue oxygenation, can meet this unmet need in a small self-contained patch-like device in conjunction with a hand-held processing unit. In this paper we describe and discuss the experimental work and the multivariate statistical analysis performed to demonstrate proof-of-principle of the concept.

  12. Management of melioidosis osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shetty, R P; Mathew, M; Smith, J; Morse, L P; Mehta, J A; Currie, B J

    2015-02-01

    Little information is available about several important aspects of the treatment of melioidosis osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. We undertook a retrospective review of 50 patients with these conditions in an attempt to determine the effect of location of the disease, type of surgical intervention and duration of antibiotic treatment on outcome, particularly complications and relapse. We found that there was a 27.5% risk of osteomyelitis of the adjacent bone in patients with septic arthritis in the lower limb. Patients with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of an adjacent bone were in hospital significantly longer (p = 0.001), needed more operations (p = 0.031) and had a significantly higher rate of complications and re-presentation (p = 0.048). More than half the patients (61%), most particularly those with multifocal bone and joint involvement, and those with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of an adjacent bone who were treated operatively, needed more visits to theatre.

  13. Suppressive effects of three diketopiperazines from marine-derived bacteria on polyphosphate-mediated septic responses.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seongdo; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Min, Gahee; Choi, Hyukjae; Park, Dong Ho; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-09-25

    Diketopiperazine is a natural products found from bacteria, fungi, marine sponges, gorgonian and red algae. They are cyclic dipeptides possessing relatively simple and rigid structures with chiral nature and various side chains. The compounds in this structure class have been known to possess diverse bioactivities including antibiotic activity, anti-cancer activity, neuroprotective activity, and anti-inflammatory activity. Previous studies have reported proinflammatory responses of endothelial cells to the release of polyphosphate (PolyP). In this study, we examined the anti-inflammatory responses and mechanisms of diketopiperazine and its effects on PolyP-induced septic activities in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. The survival rates, septic biomarker levels, behavior of human neutrophils, and vascular permeability were determined in PolyP-activated HUVECs and mice. Diketopiperazine suppressed the PolyP-mediated vascular barrier permeability, upregulation of inflammatory biomarkers, adhesion/migration of leukocytes, and activation and/or production of nuclear factor-κB, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. Furthermore, diketopiperazine demonstrated protective effects on PolyP-mediated lethal death and the levels of the related septic biomarkers. Therefore, these results indicated the therapeutic potential of diketopiperazine on various systemic inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis or septic shock. PMID:27481191

  14. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Following Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Shoichi; Sekiya, Noritaka; Takizawa, Yasunobu; Morioka, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirofumi; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Mitarai, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Satomi; Kamei, Satoshi; Setoguchi, Keigo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium found mainly in patients with respiratory or cutaneous infections, but it rarely causes disseminated infections. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of disseminated M abscessus infection. A 75-year-old Japanese woman who had been treated for 17 years with a corticosteroid for antisynthetase syndrome with antithreonyl-tRNA synthetase antibody developed swelling of her right elbow. X-ray of her right elbow joint showed osteolysis, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed fluid in her right elbow joint. M abscessus grew in joint fluid and blood cultures. She was diagnosed with a disseminated M abscessus infection following septic arthritis. Antimicrobial treatment by clarithromycin, amikacin, and imipenem/cilastatin combined with surgical debridement was administered. Although blood and joint fluid cultures became negative 1 week later, the patient died at 6 weeks from starting antimicrobial treatment. We reviewed 34 cases of disseminated M abscessus infections from the literature. Most of the patients had immunosuppressive backgrounds such as transplantation, use of immunosuppressive agents, hematological malignancy, and end stage renal disease. The duration from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was over 3 months in half of the cases. All fatal cases had positive blood cultures or use of immunosuppressive agents. Clinicians should bear in mind that mycobacterial infections including M abscessus are one of the differential diagnoses in patients with subacute arthritis and soft tissue infections. PMID:26020393

  15. Complicated septic arthritis after knee arthroscopy in a 75-year-old man with osteoarthritis and a popliteal cyst.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Antonios; Karachalios, Theofilos S; Malizos, Constantinos N; Varitimidis, Sokratis

    2015-04-09

    A 75-year-old man presented in shock secondary to septic arthritis of the knee. The patient, with a known history of knee osteoarthritis, was treated elsewhere for mechanical locking symptoms and effusion with arthroscopic debridement, and developed septic arthritis, which disseminated to the leg and foot after a tear in the capsule, and a ruptured pyogenic popliteal cyst. Open debridement of the knee joint, and drainage of the abscesses of the leg and foot, were performed. Antibiotic-loaded cement beads were left in the residual space. Debridement was repeated and cement beads removed after 4 days, and finally the infection was eradicated without any serious consequences for the patient. There is debate over arthroscopic intervention for osteoarthritic knees. The presence of a popliteal cyst, which is a rather common finding in the latter, could be related to a significant number of complications, such as septic arthritis.

  16. Comparison of clinical features of left-sided infective endocarditis involving previously normal versus previously abnormal valves.

    PubMed

    Olmos, Carmen; Vilacosta, Isidre; Fernández, Cristina; Sarriá, Cristina; López, Javier; Del Trigo, María; Ferrera, Carlos; Vivas, David; Maroto, Luis; Hernández, Miguel; Rodríguez, Enrique; San Román, José Alberto

    2014-07-15

    Native valve infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with normal valves has increased in the last decades. Whether patients with normal valves present a similar prognosis to those with pathologic valves is unresolved. Our aim is to describe epidemiologic and clinical differences between patients with left-sided IE and normal valves and those with native pathologic valves. We analyzed 945 consecutive episodes of IE, 435 of which involved left-sided nonprosthetic IE. They were classified into 2 groups: episodes in normal valves (normal group, n=173) and episodes in pathologic valves (abnormal group, n=262). Patients in the normal group were younger, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus bovis were more frequently isolated, and vegetations were more frequently found. Heart failure, septic shock, and the need for surgery or death were more common. Multivariate analysis identified the following as factors independently associated with normal valve IE: age<65 years, S bovis, S aureus, heart failure, and vegetation detection. Factors independently associated with in-hospital events included S aureus, periannular complications, heart failure, and septic shock development. In conclusion, compared with patients with abnormal valve IE, patients with IE on normal valves were younger, had a more virulent microbiological profile, developed heart failure and septic shock more frequently, needed more surgical procedures, and had worse prognosis.

  17. Cardiogenic shock

    MedlinePlus

    Shock - cardiogenic ... electrical system of the heart (heart block) Cardiogenic shock occurs when the heart is unable to pump ... orthostatic hypotension) Weak (thready) pulse To diagnose cardiogenic shock, a catheter (tube) may be placed in the ...

  18. The use of ultrasound in the management of septic arthritis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Laine, Jennifer C; Denning, Jaime R; Riccio, Anthony I; Jo, ChanHee; Joglar, Jeanne M; Wimberly, Robert L

    2015-03-01

    In the assessment of septic arthritis of the hip in a pediatric population, ultrasound is a safe and easily conducted method to confirm an effusion. The need for MRI to further evaluate the patient for adjacent infection before treatment is debatable. Once an effusion is confirmed on ultrasonography, we have found that septic arthritis of the hip does not need advanced imaging before arthrotomy and debridement. Patients who fail to clinically respond to an initial hip arthrotomy and appropriate antibiotics may benefit from an MRI for the identification of concomitant infections that may require surgical intervention.

  19. Management of septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a review of current practices and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Edwin R; Makhni, Eric C; Mehran, Nima; Schulz, Brian M

    2013-11-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a rare and potentially devastating complication that often leads to articular destruction and adverse clinical outcomes. Because of its rare occurrence, best practices for diagnosis and management have yet to be established. However, graft retention and favorable outcomes are possible with early diagnosis, surgical intervention, and appropriate antibiotic management. Clinicians must be familiar with the diagnostic criteria and management options for septic arthritis. Most patients require multiple procedures to effectively eradicate infection. When the original reconstructed graft cannot be salvaged, a staged anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction revision is required.

  20. Unusual cause of neck pain: septic arthritis of a cervical facet.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jaime L; Ernst, Amy A

    2012-11-01

    Neck pain is a common cause for presentation to an emergency department. Most causes are benign and often secondary to arthritis or injuries. We present a case of septic cervical facet arthritis, a very rare cause of neck pain. The clinical presentation of septic cervical facet arthritis includes fever, neck pain that is often unilateral that is worse with movement, nerve root symptoms, and radiation of pain to the shoulder. Consequences may be severe and include joint destruction and infection progression. Symptoms may be indolent, and a high index of suspicion is necessary to make this diagnosis.

  1. Septic arthritis due to a Sneathia species most closely related to Sneathia sanguinegens.

    PubMed

    Bachy, B; Bémer, P; Tortellier, L; Giraudeau, C; Reynaud, A; Corvec, S

    2011-11-01

    Sneathia sanguinegens is an infrequent bacterium in clinical specimens. We describe a case of right elbow septic arthritis due to a Sneathia species most closely related to S. sanguinegens in a young immunocompetent woman. S. sanguinegens has never been implicated in osteoarticular infections.

  2. Septic arthritis due to a Sneathia species most closely related to Sneathia sanguinegens.

    PubMed

    Bachy, B; Bémer, P; Tortellier, L; Giraudeau, C; Reynaud, A; Corvec, S

    2011-11-01

    Sneathia sanguinegens is an infrequent bacterium in clinical specimens. We describe a case of right elbow septic arthritis due to a Sneathia species most closely related to S. sanguinegens in a young immunocompetent woman. S. sanguinegens has never been implicated in osteoarticular infections. PMID:21737545

  3. Septic arthritis of the neonatal hip: acute management and late reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Samora, Julie Balch; Klingele, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    Septic arthritis of the hip in neonates is rare but can have devastating consequences. Presenting signs and symptoms may differ from those encountered in older children, which may result in diagnostic challenge or delay. Many risk factors predispose neonates to septic arthritis, including the presence of transphyseal vessels and invasive procedures. Bacterial infection of the joint occurs via hematogenous invasion, extension from an adjacent site, or direct inoculation. A strong correlation exists between younger age at presentation and severity of residual hip deformity. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination, laboratory markers, and ultrasound evaluation. Early management includes parenteral antibiotics and surgical drainage. Late-stage management options include femoral and pelvic osteotomies, trochanteric arthroplasty, arthrodesis, pelvic support procedures, and nonsurgical measures. Early diagnosis and management continues to be the most important prognostic factor for a favorable outcome in the neonate with septic arthritis.

  4. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Castellazzi, Luca; Mantero, Marco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients. PMID:27258258

  5. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Castellazzi, Luca; Mantero, Marco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients.

  6. Cardiogenic shock: A look at acute functional mitral incompetence.

    PubMed

    Steyn, F A; Vosloo, J; Naude, H; Steyn, A J

    2016-08-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with cardiogenic shock secondary to acute functional mitral incompetence as well as septic shock related to pneumonia. The patient deteriorated haemodynamically despite adequate medical therapy. An echocardiogram revealed a massive mitral incompetence and an ejection fraction of 32%. An intra-aortic balloon pump was placed and the patient improved dramatically. On day 6 after admission the echocardiogram was repeated, revealing a mild mitral incompetence and an ejection fraction of 58%. PMID:27499404

  7. Sphingomonas paucimobilis bacteraemia and septic arthritis in a diabetic patient presenting with septic pulmonary emboli.

    PubMed

    Kuo, I-Ching; Lu, Po-Liang; Lin, Wei-Ru; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2009-09-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis, a yellow-pigmented, aerobic, glucose non-fermenting, Gram-negative bacillus, is a rare cause of human infection normally associated with immunocompromised hosts. We report a case of bacteraemia and septic arthritis in a 47-year-old diabetic man who presented with septic pulmonary emboli due to S. paucimobilis. The patient had an initial presentation of fever, right knee pain, coughing, dyspnoea and chest pain. The infection was treated successfully by surgical debridement combined with meropenem plus ciprofloxacin, based on the patient's antibiotic susceptibility profile. To our knowledge, this is the first case report for septic pulmonary emboli having arisen from an S. paucimobilis infection.

  8. Transient synovitis, septic hip, and Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease: an approach to the correct diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cook, P Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Transient synovitis, septic hip, and Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease are common conditions in children. Distinguishing between these disorders can be a diagnostic challenge. Similar presentations, in an age group difficult to examine, coupled with literature that is confusing creates difficulty. It is important to make the correct diagnosis of septic hip in a timely fashion to avoid serious and potentially crippling consequences. As there is no single test for discriminating between these conditions, knowledge of the nuances of clinical presentation, physical examination, laboratory investigations, and imaging is essential. Judicious use of clinical algorithms can complement clinical acumen. PMID:25439014

  9. Current status of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kok, Jen; Chen, Sharon C A; Dwyer, Dominic E; Iredell, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    The integration of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) into many clinical microbiology laboratories has revolutionised routine pathogen identification. MALDI-TOF MS complements and has good potential to replace existing phenotypic identification methods. Results are available in a more clinically relevant timeframe, particularly in bacteraemic septic shock. Novel applications include strain typing and the detection of antimicrobial resistance, but these are not widely used. This review discusses the technical aspects, current applications, and limitations of MALDI-TOF MS.

  10. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: Case reports and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gayle, Eryka A.; Young, Sean M.; McKenna, Samuel J.; McNaughton, Candace D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular (TM) joint is rare, but it is associated with high risk for significant morbidity. Objective We reviewed the available literature regarding the presentation, evaluation, treatment, and clinical course of TM joint septic arthritis, focusing on elements relevant to emergency medicine physicians. Case Reports In the first case, a healthy 6-year-old boy presented with fever and trismus; computed tomography with contrast revealed a TM joint effusion. After empiric intravenous antibiotics, intraoperative arthrocentesis of the TM joint returned one milliliter of flocculent fluid, which was cultured and grew pan-sensitive Streptococcus pyogenes. He was discharge home with amoxicillin/clavulanate and experienced complete resolution of his symptoms. In the second case, more than three weeks after extraction of her third molars, an 18-year-old woman presented with facial pain, swelling, and trismus and was found to have a loculated abscess involving the left masseteric and pterygomandibular spaces with extension to the left deep temporal region and the skull base. She experienced a complicated postoperative course and required multiple procedures and intravenous antibiotics for growth of multiple bacteria. More than a month later underwent TM joint arthrotomy for TM joint septic arthritis, and she was found to have acute osteomyelitis. She continued to require multiple treatment modalities; twenty months after her initial presentation, she underwent left total TM joint arthroplasty for fibrous ankylosis of the TM joint. Conclusion Septic arthritis of the TM joint may be caused by hematogenous spread of distant infection or local spread of deep masticator space infections. Patients may present with TM joint septic arthritis acutely or sub-acutely. Septic arthritis of the TM joint should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with trismus and pain or fever. PMID:23896057

  11. Domestic wells have high probability of pumping septic tank leachate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, J. E.; Harter, T.

    2011-06-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems such as septic systems are common in rural and semi-rural areas around the world; in the US, about 25-30 % of households are served by a septic system and a private drinking water well. Site-specific conditions and local groundwater flow are often ignored when installing septic systems and wells. Particularly in areas with small lots, thus a high septic system density, these typically shallow wells are prone to contamination by septic system leachate. Typically, mass balance approaches are used to determine a maximum septic system density that would prevent contamination of the aquifer. In this study, we estimate the probability of a well pumping partially septic system leachate. A detailed groundwater and transport model is used to calculate the capture zone of a typical drinking water well. A spatial probability analysis is performed to assess the probability that a capture zone overlaps with a septic system drainfield depending on aquifer properties, lot and drainfield size. We show that a high septic system density poses a high probability of pumping septic system leachate. The hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer has a strong influence on the intersection probability. We conclude that mass balances calculations applied on a regional scale underestimate the contamination risk of individual drinking water wells by septic systems. This is particularly relevant for contaminants released at high concentrations, for substances which experience limited attenuation, and those being harmful even in low concentrations.

  12. Domestic wells have high probability of pumping septic tank leachate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, J. E.; Harter, T.

    2012-08-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems are common in rural and semi-rural areas around the world; in the US, about 25-30% of households are served by a septic (onsite) wastewater treatment system, and many property owners also operate their own domestic well nearby. Site-specific conditions and local groundwater flow are often ignored when installing septic systems and wells. In areas with small lots (thus high spatial septic system densities), shallow domestic wells are prone to contamination by septic system leachate. Mass balance approaches have been used to determine a maximum septic system density that would prevent contamination of groundwater resources. In this study, a source area model based on detailed groundwater flow and transport modeling is applied for a stochastic analysis of domestic well contamination by septic leachate. Specifically, we determine the probability that a source area overlaps with a septic system drainfield as a function of aquifer properties, septic system density and drainfield size. We show that high spatial septic system density poses a high probability of pumping septic system leachate. The hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer has a strong influence on the intersection probability. We find that mass balance calculations applied on a regional scale underestimate the contamination risk of individual drinking water wells by septic systems. This is particularly relevant for contaminants released at high concentrations, for substances that experience limited attenuation, and those that are harmful even at low concentrations (e.g., pathogens).

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Alison J

    2005-12-01

    Septic arthritis (SA) is a common orthopedic condition encountered in horses that are presented to equine veterinarians. Successful out-come is dependent on prompt and thorough evaluation and treatment. This article briefly reviews the pathophysiology, outlines diagnostics, describes treatment options and prognostics, and discusses current research in diagnosis and treatment of SA.

  14. Costochondral junction osteomyelitis in 3 septic foals

    PubMed Central

    Cesarini, Carla; Macieira, Susana; Girard, Christiane; Drolet, Richard; d’Anjou, Marc-André; Jean, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The costochondral junction constitutes a potential site of infection in septic foals and it could be favored by thoracic trauma. Standard radiographs and ultrasonography are useful tools for diagnosis of this condition and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration could permit the definitive confirmation of infection. PMID:22210943

  15. Evaluation of a balloon constant rate infusion system for treatment of septic arthritis, septic tenosynovitis, and contaminated synovial wounds: 23 cases (2002-2005).

    PubMed

    Meagher, Daniel T; Latimer, Federico G; Sutter, W Wes; Saville, William J A

    2006-06-15

    OBJECTIVE-To determine clinical findings and outcome in horses treated by means of a balloon constant rate infusion system. DESIGN-Retrospective case series. ANIMALS-23 horses. PROCEDURES-Medical records of horses examined at The Ohio State University veterinary teaching hospital from 2002 to 2005 that had septic arthritis, septic tenosynovitis, or penetration of a synovial structure and in which treatment involved a balloon constant rate infusion system were searched. Information pertaining to signalment, history, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, treatment, and duration of hospitalization was recorded. RESULTS-Mean+/- SD duration of hospitalization was 11.5+/-5.26 days. No correlation between duration of clinical signs and duration of hospitalization or duration of infusion pump use was detected, but correlations between WBC count and duration of hospitalization and WBC and duration of infusion-pump use were observed. All horses survived to discharge. Follow-up information was obtained on 17 horses, 16 of which were alive at the time of follow-up. Twelve of 13 horses for which followup information was available for at least 5 months were alive 5 months or longer after discharge. Thirteen of the 16 horses alive at follow-up were reported by owners as not lame, whereas the remaining 3 were mildly lame or intermittently moderately lame or had developed angular limb deformity in the contralateral limb. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Balloon constant rate infusion systems may be used effectively in treatment of septic arthritis, septic tenosynovitis, and contaminated synovial wounds. Clinical response and long-term outcome appeared to be comparable to results obtained with other techniques.

  16. Application of a Novel Diagnostic Rule in the Differential Diagnosis between Acute Gouty Arthritis and Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Choi, Sang-Tae; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Joo-Hyun; Yoon, Bo-Young

    2015-06-01

    Septic arthritis and gout are major diseases that should be suspected in patients with acute monoarthritis. These two diseases are clinically similar and often indistinguishable without the help of synovial fluid analysis. Recently, a novel diagnostic rule for gout without synovial fluid analysis was developed and showed relevant performances. This study aimed to determine whether this diagnostic rule could perform well in distinguishing gout from septic arthritis. The diagnostic rule comprises 7 clinical and laboratory variables, each of which is given a specified score. The probability of gout is classified into 3 groups according to the sum of the scores: high (≥ 8), intermediate (> 4 to < 8) and low probability (≤ 4). In this retrospective study, we applied this diagnostic rule to 136 patients who presented as acute monoarthritis and were subsequently diagnosed as acute gout (n = 82) and septic arthritis (n = 54) based on synovial fluid analysis. The mean sum of scores of acute gout patients was significantly higher than that of those with septic arthritis (8.6 ± 0.2 vs. 3.6 ± 0.32, P < 0.001). Patients with acute gout had significantly more 'high', and less 'low' probabilities compared to those with septic arthritis (Eta[η]: 0.776). The prevalence of acute gouty arthritis, as confirmed by the presence of monosodium crystal, was 95.5% (61/64), 57.5% (19/33), and 5.1% (2/39) in high, intermediate and low probability group, respectively. The recently introduced diagnostic rule properly discriminates acute gout from septic arthritis. It may help physicians diagnose gout in cases difficult to be differentiated from septic arthritis.

  17. Streptococcus constellatus Causing Septic Thrombophlebitis of the Right Ovarian Vein with Extension into the Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Haidar, Abdallah; Haddad, Amy; Naqvi, Amir; Onyesoh, Ngozi U.; Malik, Rushdah; Williams, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcus constellatus collectively with Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus intermedius constitute the Streptococcus anginosus (formerly Streptococcus milleri) group. Though they are commonly associated with abscesses, bacteremia with subsequent septic thrombophlebitis is extremely rare, and resulting mortality is infrequent. Case Presentation. We report a case of a previously healthy 60-year-old African American female who presented with Streptococcus constellatus bacteremia associated with septic thrombophlebitis to the right ovarian vein extending into the inferior vena cava. She was urgently treated with antibiotics and anticoagulation. Conclusion. Septic thrombophlebitis has a clinical presentation that is often misleading. Therefore, a high clinical index of suspicion and the use of appropriate imaging modalities (computed tomography) are essential in recognizing and confirming this diagnosis. Prompt treatment is warranted. Surgical thrombectomies have been successfully replaced by a combination of antibiotics and anticoagulation therapy. PMID:26171262

  18. Enhanced sludge reduction in septic tanks by increasing temperature.

    PubMed

    Pussayanavin, Tatchai; Koottatep, Thammarat; Eamrat, Rawintra; Polprasert, Chongrak

    2015-01-01

    Septic tanks in most developing countries are constructed without drainage trenches or leaching fields to treat toilet wastewater and /or grey water. Due to the short hydraulic retention time, effluents of these septic tanks are still highly polluted, and there is usually high accumulation of septic tank sludge or septage containing high levels of organics and pathogens that requires frequent desludging and subsequent treatment. This study aimed to reduce sludge accumulation in septic tanks by increasing temperatures of the septic tank content. An experimental study employing two laboratory-scale septic tanks fed with diluted septage and operating at temperatures of 40 and 30°C was conducted. At steady-state conditions, there were more methanogenic activities occurring in the sludge layer of the septic tank operating at the temperature of 40°C, resulting in less total volatile solids (TVS) or sludge accumulation and more methane (CH4) production than in the unit operating at 30°C. Molecular analysis found more abundance and diversity of methanogenic microorganisms in the septic tank sludge operating at 40°C than at 30°C. The reduced TVS accumulation in the 40°C septic tank would lengthen the period of septage removal, resulting in a cost-saving in desluging and septage treatment. Cost-benefit analysis of increasing temperatures in septic tanks was discussed.

  19. The lack of consistent diaspirin cross-linked hemoglobin infusion blood pressure effects in the US and EU traumatic hemorrhagic shock clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Edward P; Philbin, Nora B; Koenigsberg, Max D; Gao, Weihua

    2010-02-01

    Hemoglobin solutions have demonstrated a pressor effect that could adversely affect hemorrhagic shock patient resuscitation through accelerated hemorrhage, diminished perfusion, or inadequate resuscitation. Data from two parallel, multicenter traumatic hemorrhagic shock clinical trials in 17 US emergency departments and in 27 EU prehospital systems using diaspirin cross-linked hemoglobin (DCLHb), a hemoglobin-based resuscitation fluid. In the 219 patients, patients were 37 years old, 64% sustained blunt injury, 48% received DCLHb, and 36% expired. Although mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure values differed at 2 of the 10 measured time points, blood pressure (BP) curve analysis showed no SBP, diastolic blood pressure, or MAP differences based on treatment. Although SBP values 160 and 120 mmHg or greater were 2.2x and 2.6x more frequently noted in survivors, they were not more common with DCLHb use or in DCLHb patients who expired in US study nonsurvivors or in any EU study patients. Systolic blood pressure values 160 and 120 mmHg or greater were 2.8x and 1.3x more frequently noted in DCLHb survivors as compared with normal saline survivors. Only 3% of the BP variation noted could be attributed to DCLHb use, and as expected, injury severity and baseline physiologic status were stronger predictors. In the United States alone, treatment group was not correlated by regression with BP at any time point. Neither mean BP readings nor elevated BP readings were correlated with DCLHb treatment of traumatic hemorrhagic shock patients. As such, no clinically demonstrable DCLHb pressor effect could be directly related to the adverse mortality outcome observed in the US study. PMID:20092028

  20. Septic arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint in 12 horses.

    PubMed

    Honnas, C M; Welch, R D; Ford, T S; Vacek, J R; Watkins, J P

    1992-01-01

    The medical records of 12 horses with septic arthritis of a distal interphalangeal joint were reviewed to determine clinical features and response to treatment. Sepsis was caused by trauma or an injection that resulted in an open or contaminated distal interphalangeal joint. All horses were severely lame. Treatment included broad-spectrum parenterally administered antimicrobial drugs (ten horses), percutaneous through-and-through joint lavage (eight horses), indwelling drains (three horses), immobilization of the limb in a cast (three horses), intraarticular injection of sodium hyaluronate (one horse), intraarticular injection of antimicrobial drugs (five horses), curettage of the distal phalanx (one horse), and cancellous bone grafting to promote fusion (one horse). Five horses were euthanatized. Ankylosis of the affected joint developed in five horses, four of which are pasture sound. Two horses treated medically are sound although one underwent subsequent palmar digital neurectomy for treatment of navicular syndrome.

  1. Pathophysiology of septic encephalopathy--an unsolved puzzle.

    PubMed

    Flierl, Michael A; Rittirsch, Daniel; Huber-Lang, Markus S; Stahel, Philip F

    2010-01-01

    The exact cellular and molecular mechanisms of sepsis-induced encephalopathy remain elusive. The breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered a focal point in the development of sepsis-induced brain damage. Contributing factors for the compromise of the BBB include cytokines and chemokines, activation of the complement cascade, phagocyte-derived toxic mediators, and bacterial products. To date, we are far from fully understanding the neuropathology that develops as a secondary remote organ injury as a consequence of sepsis. However, recent studies suggest that bacterial proteins may readily cross the functional BBB and trigger an inflammatory response in the subarachnoid space, in absence of a bacterial invasion. A better understanding of the pathophysiological events leading to septic encephalopathy appears crucial to advance the clinical care for this vulnerable patient population.

  2. Septic discitis: an important cause of back pain.

    PubMed

    Patel, Prakashchandra; Olive, Kenneth E; Krishnan, Koyamangalath

    2003-07-01

    A 65-year-old man with a 3-month history of intractable back pain had previously received cytotoxic curative chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. His postchemotherapy course had been complicated by febrile neutropenia, recurrent coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacteremia, and gastrostomy site infections. He was admitted with severe intractable lower back pain requiring high doses of intravenous narcotic analgesia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine was highly suggestive of disk infection. Fluoroscopically guided needle aspiration of the disk space was confirmatory, and both tissue and blood cultures were positive for coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species. Treatment included i.v. vancomycin and oral levofloxacin. The most common organism causing disk space infection is Staphylococcus aureus. but Staphylococcus epidermis should be considered in immunocompromised patients. Septic discitis is an important differential diagnosis of back pain and should be considered in any clinical situation associated with bacteremia. PMID:12940323

  3. Serum and Urinary NGAL in Septic Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Suchojad, Anna; Majcherczyk, Malgorzata; Jadamus-Niebroj, Danuta; Owsianka-Podlesny, Teresa; Brzozowska, Aniceta

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is postulated to be a potentially new and highly specific/sensitive marker of acute kidney injury (AKI). The aim of this study was to assess the impact of inflammation on serum and urine NGAL in newborns that were treated due to infection. We determined serum and urine NGAL concentrations in 73 infants (51 with sepsis; 22 with severe sepsis) admitted to the Intensive Care Unit in the first month of life, for three consecutive days during the course of treatment for infection. 29 neonates without infection served as the control group. Septic patients, in particular, severe sepsis patients, had increased serum and urinary NGAL levels in the three subsequent days of observation. Five septic patients who developed AKI had elevated serum and urinary NGAL values to a similar extent as septic neonates without AKI. A strong correlation was found between the concentration of serum and urinary NGAL and inflammatory markers, such as CRP and procalcitonin. Serum and urinary NGAL levels were also significantly associated with NTISS (neonatal therapeutic intervention scoring system) values. We conclude that increased serum and urinary NGAL values are not solely a marker of AKI, and more accurately reflect the severity of inflammatory status. PMID:24579085

  4. Arthroscopic management of septic arthritis of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Sammer, Douglas M; Shin, Alexander Y

    2011-08-01

    Bacterial septic arthritis of the wrist is a joint-threatening emergency that is often treated by open irrigation and debridement (I and D). There is evidence that patients with isolated septic arthritis of the wrist require fewer operations and have a shorter hospital stay when treated arthroscopically. This article describes the surgical technique for arthroscopic I and D of the wrist and discusses the indications and benefits of arthroscopic versus open I and D for septic arthritis of the wrist.

  5. De-escalation, adequacy of antibiotic therapy and culture positivity in septic patients: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Rafael Barberena; Guillén, Julián Alberto Viteri; Zabaleta, William Javier Castillo; Borges, Flavia Kessler

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of antibiotic de-escalation in patients diagnosed with severe sepsis or septic shock at a public academic tertiary hospital and to evaluate antibiotic adequacy and culture positivity. Methods The prevalence of antibiotic de-escalation, the adequacy of antibiotic treatment and the rates of culture positivity were analyzed in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock between April and December 2013 at an intensive care unit in a tertiary university hospital. Results Among the 224 patients included in the study, de-escalation was appropriate in 66 patients (29.4%) but was implemented in 44 patients (19.6%). Among the patients who underwent de-escalation, half experienced narrowing of the antimicrobial spectrum. The mortality rate was 56.3%, with no differences between the patients with or without de-escalation (56.8% versus 56.1%; p = 0.999) nor in the length of hospital stay. Empirical antibiotic therapy was appropriate in 89% of cases. Microorganisms were isolated from total cultures in 30% of cases and from blood cultures in 26.3% of cases. Conclusion The adequacy rate of empirical antibiotic therapy was high, reflecting an active institutional policy of monitoring epidemiological profiles and institutional protocols on antimicrobial use. However, antibiotic de-escalation could have been implemented in a greater number of patients. De-escalation did not affect mortality rates. PMID:27626951

  6. n-Butanol extract from Folium isatidis inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and protects mice against lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lili; Lu, Yili; Jin, Jiahui; Dong, Lili; Xu, Fengli; Chen, Shuangshuang; Wang, Zhanyue; Liang, Guang; Shan, Xiaoou

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, which is caused by severe infection, is an important cause of mortality, but effective clinical treatment against sepsis is extremely limited. As the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a major role in inflammatory responses. Studies have shown beneficial pharmacological effects for Folium isatidis. The present study further illuminated the effects of n-butanol extract from Folium isatidis in LPS-induced septic shock and identified the main active chemical components. Our study showed that pretreatment with n-butanol extract from Folium isatidis not only significantly inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 production but also markedly and dose dependently enhanced the recruitment of MyD88, the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and the degradation of IκB-α. Additionally, the extract exhibited dramatic protective effects against lung injury and death in mice with septic shock. Eight main active compounds were identified, including organic acids, glycoside, indolinones, and flavonoids. These findings provide a perspective on the respiratory protection offered by n-butanol extract from Folium isatidis in LPS-induced sepsis and outline a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:26491261

  7. Successful staged hip replacement in septic hip osteoarthritis in osteopetrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteopetrosis is a rare, inherited, bone disorder, characterized by osteosclerosis, obliteration of the medullary cavity and calcified cartilage. The autosomal dominant form is compatible with a normal life span, although fractures often result from minimal trauma, due to the pathologic nature of bone. Osteomyelitis is common in patients with osteopetrosis because of a reduced resistance to infection, attributed to the lack of marrow vascularity and impairment of white cell function. Only one case of osteomyelitis of the proximal third of the femur has been previously reported, treated with several repeated debridements and finally with femoral head resection. Here we present for the first time a case of a staged implant of a cementless total hip prosthesis for the treatment of a septic hip in femoral neck nonunion in osteopetrosis. Case presentation A 36-years-old woman, affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis was referred to our department because of a septic hip arthritis associated with femoral neck septic non-union, with draining fistulas. The infection occurred early after a plate osteosynthesis for a closed perthrocanteric fracture of the femur and persisted in spite of osteosynthesis removal, surgical debridement and external fixation. In our hospital the patient underwent accurate debridement, femoral head and greater trochanter resection, preparation of the diaphyseal intramedullary canal and implant of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer. The spacer was exchanged after one month, due to infection recurrence and four months later, a cementless total hip arthroplasty was implanted, with no clinical and laboratory signs of infection recurrence at two years follow-up. Conclusions In case of hip septic arthritis and proximal femur septic non-union, femoral head resection may not be the only option available and staged total hip arthroplasty can be considered. PMID:22472060

  8. Dynamics of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus in septic tanks.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Andrew J; Amador, Manuel; Diaz, Annette; Smith, Josh; Barrera, Roberto

    2009-12-01

    Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus were found in large numbers emerging from septic tanks in southern Puerto Rico during the dry season. Previous studies suggested that Ae. aegypti uses subterranean aquatic habitats only during dry periods when surface containers do not have water. This research investigated whether septic tanks are alternative aquatic habitats that this mosquito uses during unfavorable times of the year, or whether Ae. aegypti uses this aquatic habitat throughout the year. To assess temporal change, exit traps were used to collect mosquitoes emerging from septic tanks in Playa/Playita, southern Puerto Rico, from November 2006 to October 2007. We also investigated the hypotheses that (1) the production of Ae. aegypti in septic tanks was larger than in surface containers and (2) adult mosquitoes emerging from septic tanks were larger than those emerging from surface containers. This study demonstrated that unsealed septic tanks produced large numbers of Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus throughout the year, without any significant relationship with rainfall. The number of adult Ae. aegypti emerging per day from septic tanks in each community was 3 to 9 times larger than those produced in surface containers. It was also demonstrated that Ae. aegypti emerging from septic tanks were significantly larger than those emerging from surface container habitats. It is recommended that dengue prevention programs include regular inspection and maintenance of septic tanks in communities lacking sewerage.

  9. [Cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Houegnifioh, Komlanvi Kafui; Gfeller, Etienne; Garcia, Wenceslao; Ribordy, Vincent

    2014-08-13

    Cardiogenic shock, especially when it complicates a myocardial infarction, is still associated with high mortality rate. Emergency department or first care physicians are often the first providers to assess the cardiogenic shock patient, and plays thereby a key role in achieving a timely diagnosis and treatment. This review will detail the actual physiopathology understanding of the cardiogenic shock, its diagnosis and management focusing on the care within the emergency department.

  10. Primary septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint in a heroin user

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Longo, F.J.; Monteagudo, I.; Vaquero, F.J.; Martinez Moreno, J.L.; Carreno, L.

    1986-01-01

    A 20-year-old heroin user developed staphylococcus septic arthritis of the manubrium joint. The diagnosis was established by a culture of the infected tissue and blood culture. The clinical impression was aided by 99mTc radionuclide scintimetry. Early diagnosis localized the infection. Immediate antibiotic therapy solved a problem in the sternum that seems not to have been reported in the English literature.

  11. [Necrotizing soft tissue infection of upper extremity complicated with toxic shock syndrome--clinical presentation and treatment options].

    PubMed

    Oberhofer, Dagmar; Kucisec-Tepes, Nastja; Huljev, Dubravko

    2008-12-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI) are uncommon infections associated with considerable morbidity and mortality (20%-40%). They are characterized by rapidly progressive necrosis of soft tissue that primarily involves subcutaneous fat and fascia with variable involvement of the overlying skin and muscle. Extensive soft tissue necrosis is often accompanied by systemic toxicity. Establishing the diagnosis in the early stage of the infection can be difficult, which leads to a delay in surgical treatment and a poor outcome. The principles of treatment are early and aggressive surgical debridement, broad spectrum antimicrobial therapy administered empirically and reassessed pending culture and sensitivity results, and intensive care management. We report a case of NSTI of the arm in a 64-year-old female patient caused by group A Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus complicated with toxic shock-like syndrome with emphasis on the pathophysiology of toxic shock-like syndrome and treatment modalities. NSTI developed 10 days after a knife cut wound of the thumb. The patient had no significant comorbidity. Treatment included aggressive surgical debridement with removal of necrotic tissue and extensive fasciotomies 24 h of admission, cardiovascular stabilization and monitoring at intensive care unit, and repeat surgical debridement at 72 h of admission. Early triple drug antimicrobial therapy included high-dose clindamycin, which inhibits protein synthesis and bacterial exotoxin production that is responsible for inflammatory response and toxic shock-like syndrome. In addition, the patient received hyperbaric oxygen therapy (8 treatments in total). The above management led to control of the infective process. Prolonged surgical wound care followed by thin split-skin grafting and placement of secondary sutures on day 36 of admission preserved the extremity with good functional and cosmetic result.

  12. Deficiency of the Complement Component 3 but Not Factor B Aggravates Staphylococcus aureus Septic Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Ali, Abukar; Welin, Amanda; Magnusson, Malin; Stokowska, Anna; Pekna, Marcela; Jin, Tao

    2016-04-01

    The complement system plays an essential role in the innate immune response and protection against bacterial infections. However, detailed knowledge regarding the role of complement in Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is still largely missing. In this study, we elucidated the roles of selected complement proteins in S. aureus septic arthritis. Mice lacking the complement component 3 (C3(-/-)), complement factor B (fB(-/-)), and receptor for C3-derived anaphylatoxin C3a (C3aR(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) control mice were intravenously or intra-articularly inoculated with S. aureus strain Newman. The clinical course of septic arthritis, as well as histopathological and radiological changes in joints, was assessed. After intravenous inoculation, arthritis severity and frequency were significantly higher in C3(-/-)mice than in WT controls, whereas fB(-/-)mice displayed intermediate arthritis severity and frequency. This was in accordance with both histopathological and radiological findings. C3, but not fB, deficiency was associated with greater weight loss, more frequent kidney abscesses, and higher bacterial burden in kidneys. S. aureus opsonized with C3(-/-)sera displayed decreased uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages compared with bacteria opsonized with WT or fB(-/-)sera. C3aR deficiency had no effect on the course of hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis. We conclude that C3 deficiency increases susceptibility to hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis and impairs host bacterial clearance, conceivably due to diminished opsonization and phagocytosis of S. aureus.

  13. Clinical impact of intra-aortic balloon pump during extracorporeal life support in patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is no available data on clinical outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) complicated by cardiogenic shock who are supported by an intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) in combination with extracorporeal life support (ECLS). Methods We analysed 96 consecutive patients with AMI and complicating cardiogenic shock who were assisted by an ECLS system between January 2004 and December 2011. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. The secondary outcomes were the success rate of weaning from ECLS and the lactate clearance for 48 hours (%). Results A combination of IABP and ECLS was used in 41 (42.7%) patients. In-hospital mortality occurred for 51 patients (ECLS with IABP versus ECLS alone; 51.2% vs. 54.5%, p = 0.747). The success rate of weaning from ECLS was similar between the two groups (63.4% vs. 58.2%, p = 0.604). Complications such as ischemia of a lower extremity or bleeding at the ECLS insertion site (p = 0.521 and p = 0.667, respectively) did not increase when ECLS was combined with IABP. Among patients who survived for 24 hours after intervention, lactate clearance was not significantly different between patients who received ECLS alone and those who received ECLS with IABP (p = 0.918). Conclusions The combined use of ECLS and IABP did not improve in-hospital survival in patients with AMI complicated by cardiogenic shock. PMID:24725532

  14. Expression of Heat Shock Protein 27 in Melanoma Metastases Is Associated with Overall Response to Bevacizumab Monotherapy: Analyses of Predictive Markers in a Clinical Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Cornelia; Akslen, Lars A.; Straume, Oddbjørn

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential predictive biomarkers in 35 patients with metastatic melanoma treated with anti-angiogenic bevacizumab monotherapy in a clinical phase II study. The immunohistochemical expression of various angiogenic factors in tissues from primary melanomas and metastases as well as their concentration in blood samples were examined. Strong expression of Heat Shock Protein 27 (HSP27) in metastases correlated significantly with complete or partial response to bevacizumab (p = 0.044). Furthermore, clinical benefit, i.e., complete or partial response or stable disease for at least 6 months, was more frequent in patients with strong expression of HSP27 in primary tumors (p = 0.046). Tissue expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), its splicing variant VEGF165b or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) did not correlate with response, and the concentration of HSP27, VEGF-A or bFGF measured in blood samples before treatment did not show predictive value. Further, m