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Sample records for clinical skills assessment

  1. Assessing registered nurses' clinical skills in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Sonya; McDonald, Sinead; Rainey, Debbie

    The aim of this article is to explore the views of registered nurses undertaking the new Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), incorporating an integrated preparatory skills workshop. The workshop and the OSCE were audited with particular regard to the student experience. This article describes the audit process and the results of three questionnaires: one carried out before the OSCE assessment, a second immediately after the workshop and a third four days after the assessment. The results provide an insight into the student experience.

  2. Assessment of Clinical Skills Using Simulator Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Malathi; Hwang, Judith C.; West, Daniel; Yellowlees, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Simulation technologies are used to assess and teach competencies through the provision of reproducible stimuli. They have exceptional utility in assessing responses to clinical stimuli that occur sporadically or infrequently. In this article, the authors describe the utility of emerging simulation technologies, and discuss critical…

  3. Assessing clinical communication skills in physicians: are the skills context specific or generalizable

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Lubna A; Violato, Claudio; Crutcher, Rodney A

    2009-01-01

    Background Communication skills are essential for physicians to practice Medicine. Evidence for the validity and domain specificity of communication skills in physicians is equivocal and requires further research. This research was conducted to adduce evidence for content and context specificity of communication skills and to assess the usefulness of a generic instrument for assessing communication skills in International Medical Graduates (IMGs). Methods A psychometric design was used for identifying the reliability and validity of the communication skills instruments used for high-stakes exams for IMG's. Data were collected from 39 IMGs (19 men – 48.7%; 20 women – 51.3%; Mean age = 41 years) assessed at 14 station OSCE and subsequently in supervised clinical practice with several instruments (patient surveys; ITERs; Mini-CEX). Results All the instruments had adequate reliability (Cronbach's alpha: .54 – .96). There were significant correlations (r range: 0.37 – 0.70, p < .05) of communication skills assessed by examiner with standardized patients, and of mini-CEX with patient surveys, and ITERs. The intra-item reliability across all cases for the 13 items was low (Cronbach's alpha: .20 – .56). The correlations of communication skills within method (e.g., OSCE or clinical practice) were significant but were non-significant between methods (e.g., OSCE and clinical practice). Conclusion The results provide evidence of context specificity of communication skills, as well as convergent and criterion-related validity of communication skills. Both in OSCEs and clinical practice, communication checklists need to be case specific, designed for content validity. PMID:19445685

  4. Physical assessment skills: a developing dimension of clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Maureen A; Moorse, Sue E

    2002-08-01

    This paper proposes that the current use of physical assessment skills within critical care nursing practice is part of a on-going nursing role development process. A review of the critical care nursing role highlights how nurses in this setting have always been responsive to patient management needs. In exploring one recent nursing role development, the critical care outreach nurse, it is suggested that enhanced assessment skills enable these practitioners to safely and competently assess critically ill patients out of the intensive care environment. The use of patient case studies in this paper, demonstrate how the theory of a more intensive physical assessment knowledge base can be applied in the everyday practice of an critical care outreach nurse. Through such systematic patient review, patient management plans can be agreed and ward based practitioners can be supported in the on-going treatment of sick ward patients. The use of the cases presented also highlights the complexity of the outreach nurse's practice in addressing clinical management and team management issues.

  5. Assessing Nonverbal Communication Skills through Video Recording and Debriefing of Clinical Skill Simulation Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinerichs, Scott; Cattano, Nicole M.; Morrison, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Nonverbal communication (NVC) skills are a critical component to clinician interactions with patients, and no research exists on the investigation of athletic training students' nonverbal communication skills. Video recording and debriefing have been identified as methods to assess and educate students' NVC skills in other allied health…

  6. Promoting Assessment Efficacy through an Integrated System for Online Clinical Assessment of Practical Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Peter J.; Engstrom, Craig; Green, Anita; Friis, Peter; Dickens, Sue; Macdonald, Doune

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents evaluation outcomes from an externally funded research project involving the online clinical assessment of practical skills (eCAPS) using web-based video technologies within a university medical programme. eCAPS was implemented to trial this web-based approach for promoting the efficacy of "practical" skills…

  7. OSCE vs. TEM: Different Approaches to Assess Clinical Skills of Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Jelly, Prasuna; Sharma, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Nurses are trained with specific clinical skills, and objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) could be a better approach to assess clinical skills of nursing students. Materials and Methods: A comparative study was conducted by observational checklist regarding antenatal care and opinionnaire on the usefulness of OSCE and tradition evaluation method (TEM) was used to assess the clinical skills and to get opinion. Results: The mean score of OSCE was more than TEM and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The opinion of students regarding the usefulness of OSCE was higher than TEM. Conclusions: The study concluded that implementing OSCE will overweigh the advantages of the TEM.

  8. Standardized Patients Provide a Reliable Assessment of Athletic Training Students' Clinical Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Kirk J.; Jarriel, Amanda J.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Providing students reliable objective feedback regarding their clinical performance is of great value for ongoing clinical skill assessment. Since a standardized patient (SP) is trained to consistently portray the case, students can be assessed and receive immediate feedback within the same clinical encounter; however, no research, to our…

  9. Students’ performance in the different clinical skills assessed in OSCE: what does it reveal?

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Joong Hiong; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Mansor, Azura; Vijayananthan, Anushya; Foong, Chan Choong; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to compare students’ performance in the different clinical skills (CSs) assessed in the objective structured clinical examination. Methods Data for this study were obtained from final year medical students’ exit examination (n=185). Retrospective analysis of data was conducted using SPSS. Means for the six CSs assessed across the 16 stations were computed and compared. Results Means for history taking, physical examination, communication skills, clinical reasoning skills (CRSs), procedural skills (PSs), and professionalism were 6.25±1.29, 6.39±1.36, 6.34±0.98, 5.86±0.99, 6.59±1.08, and 6.28±1.02, respectively. Repeated measures ANOVA showed there was a significant difference in the means of the six CSs assessed [F(2.980, 548.332)=20.253, p<0.001]. Pairwise multiple comparisons revealed significant differences between the means of the eight pairs of CSs assessed, at p<0.05. Conclusions CRSs appeared to be the weakest while PSs were the strongest, among the six CSs assessed. Students’ unsatisfactory performance in CRS needs to be addressed as CRS is one of the core competencies in medical education and a critical skill to be acquired by medical students before entering the workplace. Despite its challenges, students must learn the skills of clinical reasoning, while clinical teachers should facilitate the clinical reasoning process and guide students’ clinical reasoning development. PMID:25697602

  10. Students' performance in the different clinical skills assessed in OSCE: what does it reveal?

    PubMed

    Sim, Joong Hiong; Aziz, Yang Faridah Abdul; Mansor, Azura; Vijayananthan, Anushya; Foong, Chan Choong; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to compare students' performance in the different clinical skills (CSs) assessed in the objective structured clinical examination. Methods Data for this study were obtained from final year medical students' exit examination (n=185). Retrospective analysis of data was conducted using SPSS. Means for the six CSs assessed across the 16 stations were computed and compared. Results Means for history taking, physical examination, communication skills, clinical reasoning skills (CRSs), procedural skills (PSs), and professionalism were 6.25±1.29, 6.39±1.36, 6.34±0.98, 5.86±0.99, 6.59±1.08, and 6.28±1.02, respectively. Repeated measures ANOVA showed there was a significant difference in the means of the six CSs assessed [F(2.980, 548.332)=20.253, p<0.001]. Pairwise multiple comparisons revealed significant differences between the means of the eight pairs of CSs assessed, at p<0.05. Conclusions CRSs appeared to be the weakest while PSs were the strongest, among the six CSs assessed. Students' unsatisfactory performance in CRS needs to be addressed as CRS is one of the core competencies in medical education and a critical skill to be acquired by medical students before entering the workplace. Despite its challenges, students must learn the skills of clinical reasoning, while clinical teachers should facilitate the clinical reasoning process and guide students' clinical reasoning development.

  11. Assessing the Clinical Skills of Dental Students: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Carly L.; Grey, Nick; Satterthwaite, Julian D.

    2013-01-01

    Education, from a student perspective, is largely driven by assessment. An effective assessment tool should be both valid and reliable, yet this is often not achieved. The aim of this literature review is to identify and appraise the evidence base for assessment tools used primarily in evaluating clinical skills of dental students. Methods:…

  12. Instructor and Dental Student Perceptions of Clinical Communication Skills via Structured Assessments.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Carly T

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to use structured assessments to assess dental students' clinical communication skills exhibited during patient appointments. Fourth-year dental students (n=55) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham evaluated their own interpersonal skills in a clinical setting utilizing the Four Habits Coding Scheme. An instructor also assessed student-patient clinical communication. These assessments were used to identify perceived strengths and weaknesses in students' clinical communication. Both instructor assessments and student self-assessments pinpointed the following clinical communication skills as effective the most often: patient greeting, avoidance of jargon, and non-verbal behavior. There was also relative agreement between instructor assessments and student self-assessments regarding clinical communication skills that were rated as not effective most frequently: ensuring patient comprehension, identification of patient feelings, and exploration of barriers to treatment. These resulted pointed to strengths and weaknesses in the portion of the curriculum designed to prepare students for effective provider-patient communication. These results may suggest a need for the school's current behavioral science curriculum to better address discussion of potential treatment barriers and patient feelings as well as techniques to ensure patient comprehension.

  13. How Good Are Our Raters? Rater Errors in Clinical Skills Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iramaneerat, Cherdsak; Yudkowsky, Rachel

    2006-01-01

    A multi-faceted Rasch measurement (MFRM) model was used to analyze a clinical skills assessment of 173 fourth-year medical students in a Midwestern medical school to investigate four types of rater errors: leniency, inconsistency, halo, and restriction of range. Each student performed six clinical tasks with six standardized patients (SPs), who…

  14. Assessment of simulated clinical skills and distance students: can we do it better?

    PubMed

    Bouchoucha, Stéphane; Wikander, Lolita; Wilkin, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Australian universities have traditionally been able to supplement clinical education, for undergraduate nursing courses, delivered on placement with weekly clinical teaching in the simulated environment. The Objective Structured Clinical Assessment (OSCA) tool has been used in this simulated environment to assess clinical skills. Recently, however, online delivery of undergraduate nursing courses has become more common. The move from an internal mode of teaching to an online external mode is seen worldwide and poses challenges to staff and students as well as changing the teaching and learning culture of institutions (Philip and Wozniak, 2009). This cultural shift and the resulting diminishing timeframe for students to acquire and practice simulated clinical skills imply that it may become necessary to rethink assessment forms such as the OSCA assessment. This study examines whether or not the OSCA tool developed by Bujack et al. (1991a) is the best tool to be used in this new context, where online teaching is supplemented by very short, annual, intensive periods of study. Skills acquisition theories dictate that time is required to produce an ideal skills acquisition environment (Quinn, 2000) but the time constraints placed on students in such intensive periods of study could influence skills acquisition. This cross-sectional qualitative study used semi-structured interviews and focus groups to collect data. 65% of the nursing faculty participated in the study. The teaching of the Bachelor of Nursing (BN) occurred on two campuses and staff from both areas participated. This group of nurse academics was employed across the range of academic levels (from lecturer to professor) at the University. Data analysis followed a generic thematic analysis framework. Findings in this study show that there are a variety of attitudes and underpinning beliefs amongst staff in relation to the OSCAs. Doubts were raised in regard to the suitability of the use of the OSCA tool in

  15. Assessment and training of clinical interviewing skills: analogue analysis and field replication.

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, B A; Wong, S E; Riordan, M M; Dorsey, M F; Lau, M M

    1982-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to assess the train clinical interviewing skills. In Experiment 1, eight university practicum students ("therapists") and either role played or volunteer "clients" were audiotaped during simulated interviews. Following the collection of baseline data on both therapist and client responses, training was provided by way of written materials, classroom instruction and practice, and quizzes. Results of a multiple baseline design across subjects showed improvements in therapists' interviewing skills and subsequent increases in client responding. Experiment 2 replicated and extended the research to a hospital outpatient clinic, in which therapists interviewed the parents of children with behavior problems. In addition, four months following the completion of Experiment 2, follow-up data collected during a maintenance condition showed continued high levels of therapist and client behavior. Finally, a panel of expert peers indicated that each response category was judged highly relevant to the behavioral assessment process. PMID:7118753

  16. Web-based documentation of clinical skills to assess the competency of veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Rush, Bonnie R; Biller, David S; Davis, Elizabeth G; Higginbotham, Mary Lynn; Klocke, Emily; Miesner, Matt D; Rankin, David C

    2011-01-01

    Kansas State University implemented a Web-based program to assess students' competency to perform technical skills during clinical rotations throughout the fourth year of the veterinary curriculum. The classes of 2009 and 2010 recorded a minimum number of procedures (104 and 103, respectively) from a menu of more than 220 recommended procedures. Procedures were categorized by species (small animal, equine, food animal) and disciplines (imaging, anesthesia, diagnostic medicine/necropsy). Ophthalmology was added as a fourth discipline for the class of 2010. Students recorded procedures into the Web-based system, including information about the patient, procedure performed, supervisor, and a self-assessment of performance. Faculty, staff, and house officers evaluated the procedures electronically by confirming that they witnessed the procedure and providing qualitative and written feedback. The class of 2009 recorded 18,492 procedures (M=171/student) and the class of 2010 recorded 16,935 procedures (M=158/student). Two students from each class (2009 and 2010) did not complete the minimum required skills during clinical rotations and returned to perform procedures immediately before (n=3) or immediately after (n=1) graduation to receive their diploma. The Web-based system captured a large number of assessments of technical competency performed in the clinical setting. The system provided students with formative feedback throughout the clinical year, ensured equitable distribution of procedural opportunities across the student body, and required minimal additional resources.

  17. Application of national testing standards to simulation-based assessments of clinical palpation skills.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Carla M

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of simulation technology, several types of data acquisition methods have been used to capture hands-on clinical performance. Motion sensors, pressure sensors, and tool-tip interaction software are a few of the broad categories of approaches that have been used in simulation-based assessments. The purpose of this article is to present a focused review of 3 sensor-enabled simulations that are currently being used for patient-centered assessments of clinical palpation skills. The first part of this article provides a review of technology components, capabilities, and metrics. The second part provides a detailed discussion regarding validity evidence and implications using the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing as an organizational and evaluative framework. Special considerations are given to content domain and creation of clinical scenarios from a developer's perspective. The broader relationship of this work to the science of touch is also considered.

  18. [Advanced curriculum for clinical assessment and skill in new age pharmacist education].

    PubMed

    Kiuchi, Yuji; Masuda, Yutaka; Kamei, Daisuke; Kogo, Mari; Nakamura, Akihiro

    2013-01-01

    In Showa University School of pharmacy, 7 competencies for outcome-based education were set up in 2011. We are now creating sequential curriculum in order to achieve these competencies. As a member of team medical treatment, pharmacist must share a patient's information with other members, assess each patient's condition, propose the best medication with evidence, and also check the effect of medication. Therefore, many active practices in a hospital and community and problem-based learning (PBL) tutorials are carried out in curriculum in School of Pharmacy. As a training for the future pharmacists who positively perform primary care with responsibility in community pharmacy, students study the method of clinical assessment (assessment of condition of disease from the patient's complain, and choice of appropriate proposal). Furthermore, the exercise and training of parenteral medication, physical assessment, and first aid, etc. are also taken in the curriculums as new clinical skill. The systematic and gradual interprofessional education curriculum for the team medical education has been carried out aiming at training of active members in medical team in a hospital and community. At this symposium, I will introduce these systematic advanced curriculums for the pharmacist of a new age, and to show the usefulness and learning effect.

  19. Implementing an assessment-based communication skills training in pre-clinical phase: an IMU experience.

    PubMed

    Lukman, H; Beevi, Z; Mohamadou, G; Yeap, R

    2006-06-01

    This article describes the communication skills programme of the International Medical University, which adopts an integrated medical curriculum. The programme, implemented in February 2005, is based on a systematic framework aimed at teaching students basic interpersonal communication skills progressively and continuously throughout the pre-clinical phase.

  20. Implementation of an Electronic Objective Structured Clinical Exam for Assessing Practical Skills in Pre-Professional Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Programs: Examiner and Course Coordinator Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snodgrass, Suzanne J.; Ashby, Samantha E.; Rivett, Darren A.; Russell, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of practical clinical skills is essential in the health fields. Objective Structured Clinical Exams (OSCEs), where examiners assess students performing clinical procedures on simulated patients (actors), are central to the evaluation of practical skills. However, traditional OSCEs require considerable time-investment to administer, and…

  1. Using Objective Structured Clinical Examinations to Assess Intern Orthopaedic Physical Examination Skills: A Multimodal Didactic Comparison.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Donna; Pean, Christian A; Allen, Kathleen; Zuckerman, Joseph; Egol, Kenneth

    2016-12-21

    Patient care is 1 of the 6 core competencies defined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). The physical examination (PE) is a fundamental skill to evaluate patients and make an accurate diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate 3 different methods to teach PE skills and to assess the ability to do a complete PE in a simulated patient encounter.

  2. Peer Assessment of Clinical Skills and Professional Behaviors among Undergraduate Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelmann, Jeanine E.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Peer assessment is widely used in medical education as a formative evaluation and preparatory tool for students. Athletic training students learn similar knowledge, skills, and affective traits as medical students. Peer assessment has been widely studied with beneficial results in medical education, yet athletic training education has…

  3. A protocol for evaluating progressive levels of simulation fidelity in the development of technical skills, integrated performance and woman centred clinical assessment skills in undergraduate midwifery students

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Simulation as a pedagogical approach has been used in health professional education to address the need to safely develop effective clinical skills prior to undertaking clinical practice. However, evidence for the use of simulation in midwifery is largely anecdotal, and research evaluating the effectiveness of different levels of simulation fidelity are lacking. Woman centred care is a core premise of the midwifery profession and describes the behaviours of an individual midwife who demonstrates safe and effective care of the individual woman. Woman centred care occurs when the midwife modifies the care to ensure the needs of each individual woman are respected and addressed. However, a review of the literature demonstrates an absence of a valid and reliable tool to measure the development of woman centred care behaviours. This study aims to determine which level of fidelity in simulated learning experiences provides the most effective learning outcomes in the development of woman centred clinical assessment behaviors and skills in student midwives. Methods/Design Three-arm, randomised, intervention trial. In this research we plan to: a) trial three levels of simulation fidelity - low, medium and progressive, on student midwives performing the procedure of vaginal examination; b) measure clinical assessment skills using the Global Rating Scale (GRS) and Integrated Procedural Performance Instrument (IPPI); and c) pilot the newly developed Woman Centred Care Scale (WCCS) to measure clinical behaviors related to Woman-Centredness. Discussion This project aims to enhance knowledge in relation to the appropriate levels of fidelity in simulation that yield the best educational outcomes for the development of woman centred clinical assessment in student midwives. The outcomes of this project may contribute to improved woman centred clinical assessment for student midwives, and more broadly influence decision making regarding education resource allocation for

  4. Fostering Dental Students' Academic Achievements and Reflection Skills Through Clinical Peer Assessment and Feedback.

    PubMed

    Tricio, Jorge A; Woolford, Mark J; Escudier, Michael P

    2016-08-01

    Peer assessment is increasingly being encouraged to enhance dental students' learning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the educational impact in terms of academic achievements and reflective thinking of a formative prospective peer assessment and feedback protocol. Volunteer final-year dental students at King's College London Dental Institute, UK, received training on peer assessment, peer feedback, and self-reflection. At the beginning (baseline) and end (resultant) of the 2012-13 academic year, 86 students (55% of the year group) completed a reflection questionnaire (RQ). Sixty-eight of those students used a modified Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) as a framework for peer assessment and peer feedback during a complete academic year. End-of-year, high-stakes examination grades and RQ scores from the participants and nonparticipants were statistically compared. The participants completed 576 peer DOPS. Those 22 students who peer assessed each other ≥10 times exhibited highly statistically significant differences and powerful positive effect sizes in their high-stakes exam grades (p=0.0001, d=0.74) and critical reflection skills (p=0.005, d=1.41) when compared to those who did not assess one another. Furthermore, only the same 22 students showed a statistically significant increase and positive effect size in their critical reflection skills from baseline to resultant (p=0.003, d=1.04). The results of this study suggest that the protocol used has the potential to impact dental students' academic and reflection skills, provided it is practiced in ten or more peer encounters and ensuring peer feedback is provided followed by self-reflection.

  5. Assessment of Clinical Skills in Midwifery: Some Ethical and Practical Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers-Smith, M. J.; Race, Angela J.

    1997-01-01

    Increased academic standards in midwifery education are causing conflict between research-based and traditional knowledge used in clinical assessments. Training of evaluators, frequent changes in clinical placements, and lack of contact between students and evaluators also impinge on the validity and reliability of assessments. (SK)

  6. Assessment of Genetics Knowledge and Skills in Medical Students: Insight for a Clinical Neurogenetics Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearl, Phillip L.; Pettiford, Jennifer M.; Combs, Susan E.; Heffron, Ari; Healton, Sean; Hovaguimian, Alexandra; Macri, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    The pace of discovery in biochemistry and genetics and its effect on clinical medicine places new curricular challenges in medical school education. We sought to evaluate students' understanding of neurogenetics and its clinical applications to design a pilot curriculum into the clinical neurology clerkship. We utilized a needs assessment and a…

  7. An Advanced Objective Structured Clinical Examination Using Patient Simulators to Evaluate Pharmacy Students’ Skills in Physical Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Takamura, Norito; Ogata, Kenji; Setoguchi, Nao; Utsumi, Miho; Kourogi, Yasuyuki; Osaki, Takashi; Ozaki, Mineo; Sato, Keizo; Arimori, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To implement an advanced objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in the curriculum and to evaluate Japanese pharmacy students’ skills in physical assessment such as measuring pulse and blood pressure, and assessing heart, lung, and intestinal sounds. Design. An advanced OSCE was implemented in a hospital pharmacy seminar as a compulsory subject. We programmed patient simulators with 21 different patient cases in which normal and abnormal physiological conditions were produced. The virtual patients were then used to evaluate the physical assessment skills of fifth-year pharmacy students. Assessment. Significant differences were observed between the average of all the detailed evaluations and the mean results for the following skills: pulse measurement, blood pressure measurement, deflating the cuff at a rate of 2-3 mmHg/sec, listening to heart sounds, and listening to lung sounds. Conclusion. Administering an advanced OSCE using virtual patients was an effective way of assessing pharmacy students’ skills in a realistic setting. Several areas in which pharmacy students require further training were identified. PMID:25657371

  8. Assessment of first-year veterinary students' communication skills using an objective structured clinical examination: the importance of context.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Kent G; Adams, Cindy L; Coe, Jason B

    2012-01-01

    Communication skills are considered to be a core clinical skill in veterinary medicine and essential for practice success, including outcomes of care for patients and clients. While veterinary schools include communication skills training in their programs, there is minimal knowledge on how best to assess communication competence throughout the undergraduate program. The purpose of this study was to further our understanding of the reliability, utility, and suitability of a communication skills Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Specifically we wanted to (1) identify the greatest source of variability (student, rater, station, and track) within a first-year, four station OSCE using exam scores and scores from videotape review by two trained raters, and (2) determine the effect of different stations on students' communication skills performance. Reliability of the scores from both the exam data and the two expert raters was 0.50 and 0.46 respectively, with the greatest amount of variance attributable to student by station. The percentage of variance due to raters in the exam data was 16.35%, whereas the percentage of variance for the two expert raters was 0%. These results have three important implications. First, the results reinforce the need for communication educators to emphasize that use of communication skills is moderated by the context of the clinical interaction. Second, by increasing rater training the amount of error in the scores due to raters can be reduced and inter-rater reliability increases. Third, the communication assessment method (in this case the OSCE checklist) should be built purposefully, taking into consideration the context of the case.

  9. Finding reality: the use of objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in the assessment of mental health nursing students interpersonal skills.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Martin; Stickley, Theodore

    2002-09-01

    This paper presents the implementation of an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in the assessment of mental health nursing students' interpersonal skills. It begins by providing a rationale for the use of this instrument to assess such ski lls and offers a brief discussion of the development of OSCEs. The preparation and implementation of the OSCE is explored and both students' and tutors' reflections of the process are highlighted. The strengths and problems, particularly the use of an ac tor and video tape recordings are examined, in the light of other studies. The paper concludes by advocating the use of such an assessment tool as a formative exercise.

  10. Assessing Listening Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridge, Alice

    Teachers confronted with the task of teaching or assessing listening skills should realize that competence in listening is acquired by knowing and doing and is evidenced by appropriate feedback or response. Various state curriculum and assessment projects have identified and grouped competencies in listening according to function, such as sensing,…

  11. Adult Survival Skills Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsko, Gregory M.

    The purpose of this instrument is to supplement data from the Adult Basic Learning Examination in assessing the functional level of adults in daily situations. It may also be used as a teaching tool for adults requesting tutoring in specific concepts and skills presented in the instrument. This instrument is an informal assessment instrument and…

  12. [The role of the physical examination in clinical assessment: a useful skill for professional nursing].

    PubMed

    Lyn, S Lindpaintner

    2007-08-01

    Clinical Assessment by professional nurses relies upon appropriate gathering and interpretation of relevant subjective and objective biopsychosocial data. The physical examination provides primary objective data through the use of four techniques: inspection, percussion, palpation, and auscultation. In many countries the physical examination of patients is regarded as a standard source of clinical information for nurses. In daily nursing practice problem-focused physical examination is the rule, though complete physical examinations are commonly used in advanced nursing practice at the Master level. In this article the role of physical examination in professional nursing assessment is described, physical examination techniques are introduced and illustrated via case examples. The importance of including assessment competencies in academic nursing education is emphasized.

  13. Math Skills Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartel, R. W.; Adem, M.

    2004-01-01

    A math review exam, written and administered in conjunction with the Quantitative Assessment Program at the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, is used at the beginning of the 1st food engineering course to evaluate math skills needed for successful completion of the course. Students who do not score well on the math exam are targeted for individual…

  14. Assessing Students' Metacognitive Skills

    PubMed Central

    Alman, Martha; Gardner, Stephanie; Born, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Objective To develop a diagnostic test for assessing cognitive skills related to metacognition in a physiology course. Methods Cognitive skills believed to be related to metacognition (visualizing lecture information and interpreting diagrams) were identified in a first-professional year (P1) physiology course and test items were constructed for each. Analyses included overall reliability, item discrimination, and variance comparisons of 4 groups to assess the effect of prior physiology coursework and diagnostic test score level on the first examination in physiology. Results Overall reliability was 0.83 (N = 78). Eighty percent of the test items discriminated positively. The average diagnostic test scores of students with or without a prior physiology course did not differ significantly. Students who scored above the class mean on the diagnostic test and who had taken a prior physiology course also had the highest average scores on the physiology examination. Conclusion The diagnostic test provided a measure of a limited number of skills related to metacognition, and preliminary data suggest that such skills are especially important in retaining information. PMID:17429514

  15. Creativity in clinical communication: from communication skills to skilled communication.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Peter; Young, Bridget

    2011-03-01

    Medical Education 2011: 45: 217-226 Objectives  The view that training in communication skills produces skilled communication is sometimes criticised by those who argue that communication is individual and intuitive. We therefore examine the validity of the concept of communication as a skill and identify alternative principles to underpin future development of this field. Methods  We critically examine research evidence about the nature of clinical communication, and draw from theory and evidence concerning education and evaluation, particularly in creative disciplines. Results  Skilled communication cannot be fully described using the concept of communication skills. Attempts to do so risk constraining and distorting pedagogical development in communication. Current education practice often masks the difficulties with the concept by introducing subjectivity into the definition and assessment of skills. As all clinical situations differ to some extent, clinical communication is inherently creative. Because it is rarely possible to attribute specific effects to specific elements of communication, communication needs to be taught and evaluated holistically. Conclusions  For communication teaching to be pedagogically and clinically valid in supporting the inherent creativity of clinical communication, it will need to draw from education theory and practice that have been developed in explicitly creative disciplines.

  16. Student Attainment of Proficiency in a Clinical Skill: The Assessment of Individual Learning Curves

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Robert D.; Hecker, Kent G.; Biau, David J.; Pang, Daniel S. J.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if the learning curve cumulative summation test (LC-CUSUM) can differentiate proficiency in placing intravenous catheters by novice learners, and identify the cause of failure when it occurred. In a prospective, observational study design 6 undergraduate students with no previous experience of placing intravenous catheters received standardized training by a board certified veterinary anesthesiologist in intravenous catheter placement technique. Immediately following training, each student attempted 60 intravenous catheterizations in a dog mannequin thoracic limb model. Results were scored as a success or failure based upon completion of four specific criteria, and where catheter placement failure occurred, the cause was recorded according to pre-defined criteria. Initial acceptable and unacceptable failure rates were set by the study team and the LC-CUSUM was used to generate a learning curve for each student. Using 10% and 25% acceptable and unacceptable failure rates, 3 out of 6 students attained proficiency, requiring between 26 to 48 attempts. Applying 25% and 50% acceptable and unacceptable failure rates, 5 of 6 students obtained proficiency, requiring between 18 and 55 attempts. Wide inter-individual variability was observed and the majority of failed catheterisation attempts were limited to two of the four pre-defined criteria. These data indicate that the LC-CUSUM can be used to generate individual learning curves, inter-individual variability in catheter placement ability is wide, and that specific steps in catheter placement are responsible for the majority of failures. These findings may have profound implications for how we teach and assess technical skills. PMID:24586337

  17. Employability Skills Assessment Tool Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Rauf, Rose Amnah Abd; Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Puvanasvaran, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Research nationally and internationally found that technical graduates are lacking in employability skills. As employability skills are crucial in outcome-based education, the main goal of this research is to develop an Employability Skill Assessment Tool to help students and lecturers produce competent graduates in employability skills needed by…

  18. Baccalaureate Students Learn Assessment Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagopian, Gloria; Kilpack, Virginia

    1974-01-01

    A model for incorporating selected nursing practitioner skills at the University of Rochester School of Nursing (New York) begins the teaching of physical assessment skills with the neurological examination in the first year of the undergraduate nursing major. (EA)

  19. Assessment and Training of Clinical Interviewing Skills: Analogue Analysis and Field Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwata, Brian A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A study examining the behavior of eight university psychology students in simulated interviews was replicated in an outpatient clinical setting with seven therapists interviewing children (0 to 21) with behavioral, medical, and/or educational problems. Results demonstrated that certain aspects of clinical interviewing can be studied empirically.…

  20. Web-Based Learning System for Developing and Assessing Clinical Diagnostic Skills for Dermatology Residency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Fan-Ray; Chin, Yi-Ying; Lee, Chao-Hsien; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Hong, Chien-Hu; Lee, Kuang-Lieh; Ho, Wen-Hsien; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have explored the learning difficulties and misconceptions that students encounter when using information and communication technology for e-learning. To address this issue, this research developed a system for evaluating the learning efficiency of medical students by applying two-tier diagnosis assessment. The effectiveness of the…

  1. Let your communication skills equal your clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Demarais, Ann; Baum, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Relating effectively with patients is among the most valued skills of clinical care. Honing your communication skills is an art that every physician needs to learn and understand. In this era of increased volume of patients there is a tendency to lose sight of the importance of having good communication skills. This article will review 11 suggestions for letting your communication skills equal your clinical skills.

  2. Do Workshops in Evidence-Based Practice Equip Participants to Identify and Answer Questions Requiring Consideration of Clinical Research? A Diagnostic Skill Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyer, Peter C,; Naqvi, Zoon; Dayan, Peter S.; Celentano, James J.; Eskin, Barnet; Graham, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) requires practitioners to identify and formulate questions in response to patient encounters, and to seek, select, and appraise applicable clinical research. A standardized workshop format serves as the model for training of medical educators in these skills. We developed an evaluation exercise to assess the ability…

  3. Assessing Applied Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMartino, Joe; Castaneda, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    A recent employer survey sponsored by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills found that the skills new job entrants most need for success in the workplace--oral and written communication, time management, critical thinking, problem solving, personal accountability, and the ability to work effectively with others--are the areas in which recent…

  4. Assessing Writing Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2013-12-01

    This is an encore presentation of what was presented at the 2012 AGU International Conference. It was entitled: 'ASSESSING CORE COMPETENCIES.' The poster presentation, however, has been redesigned and reorganized with new, revised perspectives. The importance of ASSESSMENT principles has been emphasized. Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marchese in 1987. Assessment is the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology itself. He further argues that students must demonstrate that they have the have the ability to think critically before they make an attempt to use technology in a chosen application-specific environment. The author further

  5. Two Thinking Skills Assessment Approaches: "Assessment of Pupils' Thinking Skills" and "Individual Thinking Skills Assessments"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Lynsey A.; Williams, Joanne M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is linked to a previous paper outlining an evaluation of a thinking skills intervention (Burke & Williams, 2008). Following extensive requests for the assessment tools used in the intervention, this short paper presents the development and potential uses of two thinking skills assessment tools. The aim of the paper is simply to make…

  6. Assessing Pupils' Skills in Experimentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammann, Marcus; Phan, Thi Thanh Hoi; Ehmer, Maike; Grimm, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    This study is concerned with different forms of assessment of pupils' skills in experimentation. The findings of three studies are reported. Study 1 investigates whether it is possible to develop reliable multiple-choice tests for the skills of forming hypotheses, designing experiments and analysing experimental data. Study 2 compares scores from…

  7. Developing the Kuder Skills Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zytowski, Donald G.; Luzzo, Darrell Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Outlines issues surrounding construction of self-reported ability-skill-efficacy measures, including validity, response format, and norms. Illustrates how they were addressed in the development of the Kuder Skills Assessment, which consists of six self-efficacy subscales congruent with the Kuder Career Search. (Contains 46 references.) (SK)

  8. Phacoemulsification skills training and assessment.

    PubMed

    Spiteri, Anthony; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Kersey, Tom; Benjamin, Larry; Darzi, Ara; Bloom, Philip

    2010-05-01

    BACKGROUND The quality of ophthalmic surgical training is increasingly challenged by an untimely convergence of several factors. This article reviews the tools currently available for training and assessment in phacoemulsification surgery. METHODS Medline searches were performed to identify articles with combinations of the following words: phacoemulsification, training, curriculum, virtual reality and assessment. Further articles were obtained by manually searching the reference lists of identified papers. RESULTS Thus far phacoemulsification training outside the operating room include wet labs and micro-surgical skills courses. These methods have been criticised for being unrealistic, inaccurate and inconsistent. Virtual reality simulators have the ability to teach phacoemulsification psychomotor skills, as well as to carry out objective assessment. Other ophthalmic surgical skill assessment tools such as Objective Assessment of Skills in Intraocular Surgery (OASIS) and Global Rating Assessment of Skills in Intraocular Surgery (GRASIS) are emerging. Assessor bias is minimised by using video-based assessments, which have been shown to reduce subjectivity. Dexterity analysis technology such as the Imperial College Surgical Assessment Device (ICSAD) and virtual reality simulators can be used as objective assessment devices. CONCLUSION Improvements in technology can be utilised in ophthalmology and will help to address the increasingly limited opportunities for training and assessment during training and throughout a subsequent career (re-training and re-validation). This will inevitably translate into enhanced patient care.

  9. Developing Technical Skill Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyslop, Alisha

    2009-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges facing the career and technical education (CTE) community as it works to implement the 2006 Perkins Act is responding to more rigorous requirements for reporting on CTE students' technical skill attainment. The U.S. Department of Education suggested in non-regulatory guidance that states and locals use the number of…

  10. Assessing Business Student Thinking Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    The development of student thinking skills is a major goal of business education. As with other such goals, student outcomes assessment must be undertaken to measure goal achievement. Thinking is difficult to teach; it is also difficult to assess. The purpose of this article is to improve management educators' understanding of student thinking…

  11. Evaluation of health assessment skills.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, J

    1989-01-01

    This article presents the reliability and validity data on a checklist used to evaluate health assessment skills. In 1982, the nurse practitioner faculty at a large midwestern university acknowledged that health assessment skills were basic to the preparation of all nurses and made the decision to require these skills for entry into the graduate program. Because of the varying ways in which health assessment skills are acquired, the faculty saw the need to standardize the expected level of performance. An objective, three-page instrument to measure student competence in performing and recording a health history and physical examination for a client of any age is administered prior to beginning the nurse practitioner sequence of courses. The 91 objective items for this instrument are based on the traditional outline for writing up a client history and physical examination. Criteria for the items are located in an accompanying manual. The student achieves a "Yes" rating on an item if all the components of the item are performed and written according to the criteria. Reliability of the tool was assessed by 12 faculty members who participated in a simulated evaluation. The tool has been used to evaluate the skills of 165 nurses. Of these, 149 nurses were enrolled in a continuing education course, and 16 nurses tested out of a health assessment course.

  12. Clinical Anatomy and Anatomical Skills: An Innovative Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Hijleh, Marwan F.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Explains the organization, structure, and assessment of the undergraduate course entitled Clinical Anatomy and Anatomical Skills. The course aims to refocus, vertically integrate, and revise the subject using problem-solving methods plus testing of various clinically relevant skills recorded in a logbook. This report re-emphasizes the importance…

  13. A Procedural Skills OSCE: Assessing Technical and Non-Technical Skills of Internal Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Debra; Hamstra, Stanley J.; Wood, Timothy J.; Humphrey-Murto, Susan; Touchie, Claire; Yudkowsky, Rachel; Bordage, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Internists are required to perform a number of procedures that require mastery of technical and non-technical skills, however, formal assessment of these skills is often lacking. The purpose of this study was to develop, implement, and gather validity evidence for a procedural skills objective structured clinical examination (PS-OSCE) for internal…

  14. Assessing Students' Technical Skill Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Haley

    2010-01-01

    The Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS) is working to comply with the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act of 2006 (Perkins) to ensure that its graduates have mastered the technical skills needed by business and industry. The legislation requires that each state identify and approve program assessment strategies…

  15. Counselling on breastfeeding: assessing knowledge and skills.

    PubMed Central

    Rea, M. F.; Venancio, S. I.; Martines, J. C.; Savage, F.

    1999-01-01

    Reported are the results of a randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of the WHO/UNICEF 40-hour course "Breastfeeding counselling: a training course". The course was conducted in a maternity hospital which provides care to a low-income population in a metropolitan area in São Paulo, Brazil. Health workers from 60 health units were randomly assigned to be either participants (20) or controls (40), and their breastfeeding knowledge and skills were assessed before and immediately after the course, as well as 3 months later. Immediately after the course the participants' knowledge of breastfeeding had increased significantly compared to controls. Both their clinical and counselling skills also improved significantly. When assessed 3 months later, the scores remained high with only a small decrease. The implementation of the course was also evaluated. The methods used were participatory observation, key interviews and focus group discussion. In the 33 sessions of the course, the average score was 8.43 out of 10. Scores were highest for content and methodology of the theory sessions, and lowest for "use of time", "clinical management of lactation", and "discussion of clinical practice". "Breastfeeding counselling: a training course" therefore effectively increases health workers' knowledge and their clinical and counselling skills for the support of breastfeeding. The course can be conducted adequately using the material and methodology proposed, but could be more satisfactory if the time allocated to exercises and clinical practice sessions were increased. PMID:10427934

  16. A model for communication skills assessment across the undergraduate curriculum.

    PubMed

    Rider, Elizabeth A; Hinrichs, Margaret M; Lown, Beth A

    2006-08-01

    Physicians' interpersonal and communication skills have a significant impact on patient care and correlate with improved healthcare outcomes. Some studies suggest, however, that communication skills decline during the four years of medical school. Regulatory and other medical organizations, recognizing the importance of interpersonal and communication skills in the practice of medicine, now require competence in communication skills. Two challenges exist: to select a framework of interpersonal and communication skills to teach across undergraduate medical education, and to develop and implement a uniform model for the assessment of these skills. The authors describe a process and model for developing and institutionalizing the assessment of communication skills across the undergraduate curriculum. Consensus was built regarding communication skill competencies by working with course leaders and examination directors, a uniform framework of competencies was selected to both teach and assess communication skills, and the framework was implemented across the Harvard Medical School undergraduate curriculum. The authors adapted an assessment framework based on the Bayer-Fetzer Kalamazoo Consensus Statement adapted a patient and added and satisfaction tool to bring patients' perspectives into the assessment of the learners. The core communication competencies and evaluation instruments were implemented in school-wide courses and assessment exercises including the first-year Patient-Doctor I Clinical Assessment, second-year Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE), third-year Patient-Doctor III Clinical Assessment, fourth-year Comprehensive Clinical Practice Examination and the Core Medicine Clerkships. Faculty were offered workshops and interactive web-based teaching to become familiar with the framework, and students used the framework with repeated opportunities for faculty feedback on these skills. A model is offered for educational leaders and others who are involved

  17. Clinical Skills Verification, Formative Feedback, and Psychiatry Residency Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalack, Gregory W.; Jibson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the implementation of Clinical Skills Verification (CSV) in their program as an in-training assessment intended primarily to provide formative feedback to trainees, strengthen the supervisory experience, identify the need for remediation of interviewing skills, and secondarily to demonstrating resident competence…

  18. Development of a Learning-Oriented Computer Assisted Instruction Designed to Improve Skills in the Clinical Assessment of the Nutritional Status: A Pilot Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    García de Diego, Laura; Cuervo, Marta; Martínez, J. Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Computer assisted instruction (CAI) is an effective tool for evaluating and training students and professionals. In this article we will present a learning-oriented CAI, which has been developed for students and health professionals to acquire and retain new knowledge through the practice. A two-phase pilot evaluation was conducted, involving 8 nutrition experts and 30 postgraduate students, respectively. In each training session, the software developed guides users in the integral evaluation of a patient’s nutritional status and helps them to implement actions. The program includes into the format clinical tools, which can be used to recognize possible patient’s needs, to improve the clinical reasoning and to develop professional skills. Among them are assessment questionnaires and evaluation criteria, cardiovascular risk charts, clinical guidelines and photographs of various diseases. This CAI is a complete software package easy to use and versatile, aimed at clinical specialists, medical staff, scientists, educators and clinical students, which can be used as a learning tool. This application constitutes an advanced method for students and health professionals to accomplish nutritional assessments combining theoretical and empirical issues, which can be implemented in their academic curriculum. PMID:25978456

  19. Assessing scrub practitioner non-technical skills: a literature review.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Guy

    2015-01-01

    A review by Catchpole et al (2009) into the causes and types of harm experienced by the surgical patient emphasised the high risk nature of the perioperative period. Investigations into recent failures at NHS organisations have emphasised the relevance of non-technical skills education in improving clinical performance and patient outcomes. However, scrub practitioner non-technical skills are often developed on a tacit basis, making assessment of performance difficult. This literature review identifies strategies that facilitate assessment of non-technical skills during surgery. Recommendations are made that will assist scrub practitioners in using a validated scrub practitioner non-technical skills assessment framework reliably.

  20. Dental student attitudes towards communication skills instruction and clinical application.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Carly T

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated dental students' attitudes towards communication skills instruction and clinical application and explored the impact of a one-semester course and year in school on students' attitudes, measured by the Communication Skills Attitude Scale. Demographic characteristics and self-assessment of communication skills were also analyzed. The study employed a pretest-posttest survey design combined with cross-sectional data. Participants were first- and fourth-year students at a U.S. dental school. Out of a possible 120 students, 106 (fifty-seven D1 and forty-nine D4) participated in the pretest, an 88 percent response rate; out of a possible 121 students, 115 (fifty-seven D1 and fifty-eight D4) participated in the posttest, a 95 percent response rate. In the results, D4 students consistently demonstrated less positive attitudes towards communication skills instruction and more negative attitudes regarding the importance of interpersonal skills in clinical encounters than did their D1 counterparts. A single communications course had no discernible effect on attitudes or self-assessments for either cohort. Females reported more positive attitudes towards clinical application of interpersonal skills than did males. Gender significantly interacted with two demographic variables: primary language and parent as health care professional. Female children of health care professionals reported poorer attitudes towards clinical communication skills training and application than did their male counterparts. Generally, parental occupation in health care moderated the decrease in positive attitudes over time towards clinical usefulness of communication skills. The D4 students rated their communication skills higher than did the D1 students. Students who demonstrated more positive attitudes towards communication skills training and application were more likely to say their own skills needed improvement.

  1. Evaluating IMU communication skills training programme: assessment tool development.

    PubMed

    Yeap, R; Beevi, Z; Lukman, H

    2008-08-01

    This article describes the development of four assessment tools designed to evaluate the communication skills training (CST) programme at the International Medical University (IMU). The tools measure pre-clinical students' 1) perceived competency in basic interpersonal skills, 2) attitude towards patient-centred communication, 3) conceptual knowledge on doctor-patient communication, and 4) acceptance of the CST programme.

  2. Advances in Teaching and Assessing Nontechnical Skills.

    PubMed

    Hull, Louise; Sevdalis, Nick

    2015-08-01

    The importance of surgeons' nontechnical skills is gaining widespread recognition as a critical element of high-quality and safe surgical care. This article reviews the knowledge base on training and assessing surgeons, and operating room (OR) teams, in nontechnical aspects of their performance. Nontechnical skills are defined in the context of the OR and key assessment instruments that have been developed to capture these skills are reviewed. Key developments that have taken place in the past decade on formal skills training are discussed, and recommendations to further advance nontechnical skills and team-based training and assessment in surgery are presented.

  3. Progress testing 2.0: clinical skills meets necessary science

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Jonathan; DeMuth, Robin; Mavis, Brian; Wagner, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Progress testing has been widely used in medical schools to test scientific knowledge but has not been reported for assessing clinical skills. Development We designed a novel progress examination that included assessments of both clinical performance and underlying basic and social science knowledge. This Progress Clinical Skills Examination (PCSE) was given to 21 early medical students at the beginning and end of a 6-week pilot test of a new medical school curriculum. Implementation This examination was feasible for early students, easy to map to curricular objectives, and easy to grade using a combination of assessment strategies. Future directions Use of a PCSE is feasible for early medical students. As medical schools integrate clinical experience with underlying knowledge, this type of examination holds promise. Further data are needed to validate this examination as an accurate measure of clinical performance and knowledge. PMID:25948045

  4. Progress testing 2.0: clinical skills meets necessary science.

    PubMed

    Gold, Jonathan; DeMuth, Robin; Mavis, Brian; Wagner, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Progress testing has been widely used in medical schools to test scientific knowledge but has not been reported for assessing clinical skills. Development We designed a novel progress examination that included assessments of both clinical performance and underlying basic and social science knowledge. This Progress Clinical Skills Examination (PCSE) was given to 21 early medical students at the beginning and end of a 6-week pilot test of a new medical school curriculum. Implementation This examination was feasible for early students, easy to map to curricular objectives, and easy to grade using a combination of assessment strategies. Future directions Use of a PCSE is feasible for early medical students. As medical schools integrate clinical experience with underlying knowledge, this type of examination holds promise. Further data are needed to validate this examination as an accurate measure of clinical performance and knowledge.

  5. Teaching and assessing procedural skills: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Graduating Internal Medicine residents must possess sufficient skills to perform a variety of medical procedures. Little is known about resident experiences of acquiring procedural skills proficiency, of practicing these techniques, or of being assessed on their proficiency. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively investigate resident 1) experiences of the acquisition of procedural skills and 2) perceptions of procedural skills assessment methods available to them. Methods Focus groups were conducted in the weeks following an assessment of procedural skills incorporated into an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Using fundamental qualitative description, emergent themes were identified and analyzed. Results Residents perceived procedural skills assessment on the OSCE as a useful formative tool for direct observation and immediate feedback. This positive reaction was regularly expressed in conjunction with a frustration with available assessment systems. Participants reported that proficiency was acquired through resident directed learning with no formal mechanism to ensure acquisition or maintenance of skills. Conclusions The acquisition and assessment of procedural skills in Internal Medicine programs should move toward a more structured system of teaching, deliberate practice and objective assessment. We propose that directed, self-guided learning might meet these needs. PMID:23672617

  6. The odontology victim identification skill assessment system.

    PubMed

    Zohn, Harry K; Dashkow, Sheila; Aschheim, Kenneth W; Dobrin, Lawrence A; Glazer, Howard S; Kirschbaum, Mitchell; Levitt, Daniel; Feldman, Cecile A

    2010-05-01

    Mass fatality identification efforts involving forensic odontology can involve hundreds of dental volunteers. A literature review was conducted and forensic odontologists and dental educators consulted to identify lessons learned from past mass fatality identification efforts. As a result, the authors propose a skill assessment system, the Odontology Victim Identification Skill Assessment System (OVID-SAS), which details qualifications required to participate on the Antemortem, Postmortem, Ante/Postmortem Comparison, Field, and Shift Leader/Initial Response Teams. For each qualification, specific skills have been identified along with suggested educational pedagogy and skill assessment methods. Courses and assessments can be developed by dental schools, professional associations, or forensic organizations to teach and test for the skills required for dental volunteers to participate on each team. By implementing a system, such as OVID-SAS, forensic odontologists responsible for organizing and managing a forensic odontology mass fatality identification effort will be able to optimally utilize individuals presenting with proven skills.

  7. Teaching and Assessing Communication Skills in Medical Undergraduate Training.

    PubMed

    Modi, Jyoti Nath; Anshu, -; Chhatwal, Jugesh; Gupta, Piyush; Singh, Tejinder

    2016-06-08

    Good communication skills are essential for an optimal doctor-patient relationship, and also contribute to improved health outcomes. Although the need for training in communication skills is stated as a requirement in the 1997 Graduate Medical Education Regulations of the Medical Council of India, formal training in these skills has been fragmentary and non-uniform in most Indian curricula. The Vision 2015 document of the Medical Council of India reaffirms the need to include training in communication skills in the MBBS curriculum. Training in communication skills needs approaches which are different from that of teaching other clinical subjects. It is also a challenge to ensure that students not only imbibe the nuances of communication and interpersonal skills, but adhere to them throughout their careers. This article addresses the possible ways of standardizing teaching and assessment of communication skills and integrating them into the existing curriculum.

  8. Improvement of Clinical Skills through Pharmaceutical Education and Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Junko

    2017-01-01

     Professors and teaching staff in the field of pharmaceutical sciences should devote themselves to staying abreast of relevant education and research. Similarly those in clinical pharmacies should contribute to the advancement of pharmaceutical research and the development of next generation pharmacists and pharmaceuticals. It is thought that those who work in clinical pharmacies should improve their own skills and expertise in problem-finding and -solving, i.e., "clinical skills". They should be keen to learn new standard treatments based on the latest drug information, and should try to be in a position where collecting clinical information is readily possible. In the case of pharmacists in hospitals and pharmacies, they are able to aim at improving their clinical skills simply through performing their pharmaceutical duties. On the other hand, when a pharmaceutical educator aims to improve clinical skills at a level comparable to those of clinical pharmacists, it is necessary to devote or set aside considerable time for pharmacist duties, in addition to teaching, which may result in a shortage of time for hands-on clinical practice and/or in a decline in the quality of education and research. This could be a nightmare for teaching staff in clinical pharmacy who aim to take part in such activities. Nonetheless, I believe that teaching staff in the clinical pharmacy area could improve his/her clinical skills through actively engaging in education and research. In this review, I would like to introduce topics on such possibilities from my own experiences.

  9. Comparing new BSN RN self skills assessment to actual skills demonstration.

    PubMed

    Adair, Jean; Hughes, Lin; Davis, Sue; Wolcott-Breci, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the self-skills assessment with the skill competence during an actual skills demonstration of newly hired bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) registered nurse graduates. This retrospective study included 32 randomly selected BSN registered nurse graduates from January 2010 to December 31, 2010. The participants were already hired into a midwest health system. Because this was a retrospective study, no demographic data were collected, and no consent from participants was needed. This study included a clinical skills check list where the participants rated themselves on specific skills utilizing a Likert scale ranging from 1 (no knowledge) to 4 (able to perform independently). The same clinical check list was utilized by an expert registered nurse when the skill was demonstrated. This study compared the difference between the subject's self-rating of skills and the clinical demonstration of the skills. We used t tests in the analysis to demonstrate the differences between the participant's self-rating of skills and the expert evaluation of the clinical demonstration of the skills. The data were inserted into the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 19 software program to assist in the analysis process. The study demonstrated 17 significant differences in the skills ratings between the participant and competency demonstration of new BSN graduates. These significant results (2 tailed) ranged from .000 to .048.The 17 out of 46 specific skills where differences were noted included the following: staple removal, nasal pharyngeal suctioning, urinary catheter specimen collection, site care dressing change, urinary catheter irrigation, Juzo application and measurement, 5-lead telemetry, oral airway insertion, hemovac/Jackson Pratt, oral pharyngeal suctioning, urinary catheter insertion, dry suction chest drainage, bed to cart/slider board, urinary catheter removal, antiembolism stockings, measurement and application, removal of

  10. Enhancing Professional Writing Skills of Veterinary Technology Students: Linking Assessment and Clinical Practice in a Communications Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Patricia; Schull, Daniel; Coleman, Glen; Pitt, Rachael; Manathunga, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary technology is an emerging profession within the veterinary and allied animal health fields in Australia and affords graduates the opportunity to contribute to the small but growing body of literature within this discipline. This study describes the introduction of a contextualised assessment task to develop students' research…

  11. Teamwork Skills Assessment for Cooperative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strom, Paris S.; Strom, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Teamwork skills are required at work, but teacher efforts in many countries to track achievement within this context have been hindered by lack of assessment tools and input from students. The Teamwork Skills Inventory relies on peer and self-evaluation to establish accountability, identify competencies, and detect learning needs. Twenty-five…

  12. Ecosystem Model Skill Assessment. Yes We Can!

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Erik; Fay, Gavin; Gaichas, Sarah; Gamble, Robert; Lucey, Sean; Link, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Need to Assess the Skill of Ecosystem Models Accelerated changes to global ecosystems call for holistic and integrated analyses of past, present and future states under various pressures to adequately understand current and projected future system states. Ecosystem models can inform management of human activities in a complex and changing environment, but are these models reliable? Ensuring that models are reliable for addressing management questions requires evaluating their skill in representing real-world processes and dynamics. Skill has been evaluated for just a limited set of some biophysical models. A range of skill assessment methods have been reviewed but skill assessment of full marine ecosystem models has not yet been attempted. Northeast US Atlantis Marine Ecosystem Model We assessed the skill of the Northeast U.S. (NEUS) Atlantis marine ecosystem model by comparing 10-year model forecasts with observed data. Model forecast performance was compared to that obtained from a 40-year hindcast. Multiple metrics (average absolute error, root mean squared error, modeling efficiency, and Spearman rank correlation), and a suite of time-series (species biomass, fisheries landings, and ecosystem indicators) were used to adequately measure model skill. Overall, the NEUS model performed above average and thus better than expected for the key species that had been the focus of the model tuning. Model forecast skill was comparable to the hindcast skill, showing that model performance does not degenerate in a 10-year forecast mode, an important characteristic for an end-to-end ecosystem model to be useful for strategic management purposes. Skill Assessment Is Both Possible and Advisable We identify best-practice approaches for end-to-end ecosystem model skill assessment that would improve both operational use of other ecosystem models and future model development. We show that it is possible to not only assess the skill of a complicated marine ecosystem model, but that

  13. Does a Rater's Professional Background Influence Communication Skills Assessment?

    PubMed

    Artemiou, Elpida; Hecker, Kent G; Adams, Cindy L; Coe, Jason B

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing pressure in veterinary education to teach and assess communication skills, with the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) being the most common assessment method. Previous research reveals that raters are a large source of variance in OSCEs. This study focused on examining the effect of raters' professional background as a source of variance when assessing students' communication skills. Twenty-three raters were categorized according to their professional background: clinical sciences (n=11), basic sciences (n=4), clinical communication (n=5), or hospital administrator/clinical skills technicians (n=3). Raters from each professional background were assigned to the same station and assessed the same students during two four-station OSCEs. Students were in year 2 of their pre-clinical program. Repeated-measures ANOVA results showed that OSCE scores awarded by the rater groups differed significantly: (F(matched_station_1) [2,91]=6.97, p=.002), (F(matched_station_2) [3,90]=13.95, p=.001), (F(matched_station_3) [3,90]=8.76, p=.001), and ((Fmatched_station_4) [2,91]=30.60, p=.001). A significant time effect between the two OSCEs was calculated for matched stations 1, 2, and 4, indicating improved student performances. Raters with a clinical communication skills background assigned scores that were significantly lower compared to the other rater groups. Analysis of written feedback provided by the clinical sciences raters showed that they were influenced by the students' clinical knowledge of the case and that they did not rely solely on the communication checklist items. This study shows that it is important to consider rater background both in recruitment and training programs for communication skills' assessment.

  14. Assessing Participation Skills: Online Discussions with Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Karyn

    2012-01-01

    Many tertiary-level courses assess students' participation in tutorial or online discussions. However, in educational and pedagogical research literature, criteria for assessing students' skills in engaging with peers remain unclear. This article describes an online assignment with a set of participation criteria and a method for assessing the…

  15. Undesired Variance Due to Examiner Stringency/Leniency Effect in Communication Skill Scores Assessed in OSCEs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harasym, Peter H.; Woloschuk, Wayne; Cunning, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Physician-patient communication is a clinical skill that can be learned and has a positive impact on patient satisfaction and health outcomes. A concerted effort at all medical schools is now directed at teaching and evaluating this core skill. Student communication skills are often assessed by an Objective Structure Clinical Examination (OSCE).…

  16. Enabling performance skills: Assessment in engineering education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrone, Jenny Kristina

    Current reform in engineering education is part of a national trend emphasizing student learning as well as accountability in instruction. Assessing student performance to demonstrate accountability has become a necessity in academia. In newly adopted criterion proposed by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), undergraduates are expected to demonstrate proficiency in outcomes considered essential for graduating engineers. The case study was designed as a formative evaluation of freshman engineering students to assess the perceived effectiveness of performance skills in a design laboratory environment. The mixed methodology used both quantitative and qualitative approaches to assess students' performance skills and congruency among the respondents, based on individual, team, and faculty perceptions of team effectiveness in three ABET areas: Communications Skills. Design Skills, and Teamwork. The findings of the research were used to address future use of the assessment tool and process. The results of the study found statistically significant differences in perceptions of Teamwork Skills (p < .05). When groups composed of students and professors were compared, professors were less likely to perceive student's teaming skills as effective. The study indicated the need to: (1) improve non-technical performance skills, such as teamwork, among freshman engineering students; (2) incorporate feedback into the learning process; (3) strengthen the assessment process with a follow-up plan that specifically targets performance skill deficiencies, and (4) integrate the assessment instrument and practice with ongoing curriculum development. The findings generated by this study provides engineering departments engaged in assessment activity, opportunity to reflect, refine, and develop their programs as it continues. It also extends research on ABET competencies of engineering students in an under-investigated topic of factors correlated with team

  17. Clinical Reading and Writing Skills of Junior Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, Joseph A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A three-year study compared entry-level and junior-level clinically oriented reading and writing skills of 231 medical students. Entry-level skills were found to be the best predictors of clinical skills. Inclusion of communication skills training in admission criteria and/or medical curriculum are recommended. (Author/MSE)

  18. The Relationship between Athletic Training Student Critical Thinking Skills and Clinical Instructor Supervision: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabay, Michele R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to 1) assess the critical thinking skill level of the athletic training student at onset and end of the clinical education experience 2) to examine the influence of the students' critical thinking skills and the CIs' supervision responses to the changes in the students' critical thinking skills and 3) to compare the…

  19. Can Clinical Skills Be Taught Online? Comparing Skill Development between Online and F2F Students Using a Blinded Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilke, Dina J.; King, Erin; Ashmore, Margaret; Stanley, Craig

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the development of clinical assessment and intervention skills between students enrolled in a face-to-face (F2F) or an asynchronous online clinical social work class. All students from three semesters of F2F (n = 74) and online (n = 78) sections of an MSW clinical class taught by the same instructor were included. Two…

  20. [Role of the portfolio in skills assessment].

    PubMed

    Berrahou, Zoulika; Roumanet, Marie-Cécile

    2013-05-01

    The portfolio is used in monitoring the student's pathway and in his or her assessment, a fundamental tool for the acquisition of skills. Chambéry hospital has created a tutoring training course and teams from the hospital and nurse training institute work closely together on the portfolio, the essential requirements and the assessment of students' practice during work placements.

  1. Skills Assessment in Career Counseling: A Developmental Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzi, Peter A.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses rationale, techniques, and application of skills assessment. Recommends ways of using skills assessment at different stages of career development. Suggests need to recognize value of skills assessment in career counseling. Notes importance of skills assessment in career counseling when it is used to promote career growth and development…

  2. Skill Assessment in Ocean Biological Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Robinson, Allan R.; Rose, Kenneth A.; Schlitzer, Reiner; Thompson, Keith R.; Doney, Scott C.

    2008-01-01

    There is growing recognition that rigorous skill assessment is required to understand the ability of ocean biological models to represent ocean processes and distributions. Statistical analysis of model results with observations represents the most quantitative form of skill assessment, and this principle serves as well for data assimilation models. However, skill assessment for data assimilation requires special consideration. This is because there are three sets of information in the free-run model, data, and the assimilation model, which uses Data assimilation information from both the flee-run model and the data. Intercom parison of results among the three sets of information is important and useful for assessment, but is not conclusive since the three information sets are intertwined. An independent data set is necessary for an objective determination. Other useful measures of ocean biological data assimilation assessment include responses of unassimilated variables to the data assimilation, performance outside the prescribed region/time of interest, forecasting, and trend analysis. Examples of each approach from the literature are provided. A comprehensive list of ocean biological data assimilation and their applications of skill assessment, in both ecosystem/biogeochemical and fisheries efforts, is summarized.

  3. Clinical skills evaluation of trainees in a neurology department.

    PubMed

    Wiles, C M; Dawson, K; Hughes, T A T; Llewelyn, J G; Morris, H R; Pickersgill, T P; Robertson, N P; Smith, P E M

    2007-08-01

    Three to 12 evaluations of clinical performance using the mini-clinical evaluation exercise (Mini-CEX) (n = 124) or direct observation of procedural skills (DOPS) (n = 21) were performed on 27 trainees working in an NHS neurology department. The communications/ counselling skills subdomain was scored in 64 evaluations. For Mini-CEX the focus was on gathering data (22%), diagnosis (31%), management (34%) and counselling (7%) (focus not recorded in 6%). For DOPS, lumbar puncture was the most common evaluated procedure (57%). Mini-CEX evaluations lasted 23.8 minutes (10.6) (mean, sd) and DOPS 25.9 minutes (12.6). Mini-CEX scores for overall competence and communication skills were mean 5.99 (sd 0.95, range 4-8) and 5.98 (sd 1.21, range 3-9) and for DOPS 5.71 (sd 0.90, range 4-8) both on scales of 1 to 9. Overall trainee competence and communication scores increased with year of training (p < 0.001, p < 0.004 univariate analysis). Assessors undertook up to three or four assessments in a session. Assessors and trainees considered that the observation and feedback had been 'very' or 'quite' useful in providing a relevant element of assessment. These assessments were feasible and useful in a neurology department and provided some evidence for increasing performance with trainee seniority. More assessor time (approximately one hour) than trainee time (24-26 min) was needed for each assessment undertaken.

  4. Instructional Scaffolding to Improve Students’ Skills in Evaluating Clinical Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Karen D.; Troutman, William G.; Bond, Rucha; Cone, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Objective To implement and assess the effectiveness of an activity to teach pharmacy students to critically evaluate clinical literature using instructional scaffolding and a Clinical Trial Evaluation Rubric. Design The literature evaluation activity centered on a single clinical research article and involved individual, small group, and large group instruction, with carefully structured, evidence-based scaffolds and support materials centered around 3 educational themes: (1) the reader's awareness of text organization, (2) contextual/background information and vocabulary, and (3) questioning, prompting, and self-monitoring (metacognition). Assessment Students initially read the article, scored it using the rubric, and wrote an evaluation. Students then worked individually using a worksheet to identify and define 4 to 5 vocabulary/concept knowledge gaps. They then worked in small groups and as a class to further improve their skills. Finally, they assessed the same article using the rubric and writing a second evaluation. Students’ rubric scores for the article decreased significantly from a mean pre-activity score of 76.7% to a post-activity score of 61.7%, indicating that their skills in identifying weaknesses in the article's study design had improved. Conclusion Use of instructional scaffolding in the form of vocabulary supports and the Clinical Trial Evaluation Rubric improved students’ ability to critically evaluate a clinical study compared to lecture-based coursework alone. PMID:21769138

  5. An Alumni Assessment of MIS Related Job Skill Importance and Skill Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Jerod W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a job skill survey of Management Information Systems (MIS) alumni from a Northeastern U.S. university. The study assesses job skill importance and skill gaps associated with 104 technical and non-technical skill items. Survey items were grouped into 6 categories based on prior research. Skill importance and skill…

  6. Assessment of dental students’ communication skills with patients

    PubMed Central

    MEMARPOUR, MAHTAB; BAZRAFKAN, LEILA; ZAREI, ZAHRA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Establishment of effective communication between the clinician and patient is essential in order to increase the effectiveness of treatment. These skills have been less investigated among dental students. This study aimed to evaluate communication skills of dental students in Shiraz with patients through direct observation, patients' perspectives and students' self-assessments. Methods This cross-sectional study enrolled the fifth and sixth year dental students and one of each student’s patients who was chosen using simple random sampling method. We used a checklist for data collection. Students’ communication skills were assessed at three steps of the student-patient interview – at the beginning of the interview, during the interview, and at the end of the interview. The checklist was completed by three groups: 1) an observer, 2) the patient and 3) the student, as self-assessment. The validity of the checklist was confirmed by clinical professors and the reliability was determined by Cronbach's alpha test. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Student’s t test. A repeated measure MANOVA was used to compare the mean communication skills in the researcher, patients, and students at each step of the patient interviews. Results There were 110 students (mean age: 22.3±8.4 years) and 110 patients (mean age: 32±8.8 years) who completed the checklists. Overall, the communication skills of dental students were rated as good according to the patients. However, the observer and student participants rated the skills at the moderate level. We observed significant differences between communication skills in all three groups and in the three steps of the patient interviews (p<0.001). According to patients' beliefs and students' self assessments, there were no differences between male and female students in communication skills in the three steps of the patient interviews (all p>0.05). However from the observer’s viewpoint, female students

  7. Effect of Clinical Teaching Associate Model on Nursing Students' Clinical Skills and Nurses' Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Rahnavard, Zahra; Eybpoosh, Sana; Alianmoghaddam, Narges

    2013-10-02

    Abstract Background and Objectives: The credit of the practice nurses in developing countries, due to gap between theory and practice in nursing education and health care delivery has been questioned by nursing professionals. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of the application of the CTA model in nursing students' clinical skills and to assess the participants' (faculty members, staff nurses, and nursing students) level of satisfaction with the CTA model and with achieving the educational goals in Iran, as a developing country. Methods and Materials: In this experimental study, random sampling was used to assess 104 nursing students' clinical skills, and assess 6 faculty members and 6 staff nurses. After obtaining informed consent, the level of satisfaction was evaluated by a questionnaire and clinical skills were evaluated by standard checklists. Data were assessed and analyzed with SPSS version 15. Results: The results showed that the mean scores of all clinical skills of the students were significantly higher after intervention (p<0.01). Moreover, the mean scores of instructors' satisfaction with applying the CTA model was significantly higher (p = 0.004), but their satisfaction with achieving clinical education outcomes did not show a significant difference (p = 0.109). Similarly, students' satisfaction with achieving educational outcomes did not show any significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.058). Conclusion: According to this study, the CTA model is an effective method for developing clinical skills in nursing students in Iran as a developing country. Therefore, application of the method is recommended in clinical nursing education systems of such counties.

  8. Teaching communication skills to clinical students.

    PubMed Central

    McManus, I C; Vincent, C A; Thom, S; Kidd, J

    1993-01-01

    Seven years' experience in teaching communication skills to first year clinical students at St Mary's Hospital School of Medicine is described. The first component consists of a day during the introductory clinical course; this is divided into a lecture and small seminar groups and involves behavioural scientists and clinicians from many departments. The second component uses simulated patients and video feedback and takes place in small groups later in the year. Participation of the students through active critical discussion, role play, and interactive video feedback are important aspects in the success of the course. The methods have been refined through evaluation by students and tutors. This article aims to allow others, already running or considering such a course, to develop effective courses within the practical constraints of their own institutions. Images p1325-a PMID:8518575

  9. Non-technical skills assessment in surgery.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bharat; Mishra, Amit; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2011-09-01

    Adverse events in surgery have highlighted the importance of non-technical skills, such as communication, decision-making, teamwork, situational awareness and leadership, to effective organizational performance. These skills carry particular importance to surgical oncology, as members of a multidisciplinary team must work cohesively to formulate effective patient care plans. Several non-technical skills evaluation tools have been developed for use in surgery, without adequate comparison and consensus on which should be standard for training. Eleven articles describing the use of three non-technical evaluation tools related to surgery: NOTSS (Non Technical Skills for Surgeons), NOTECHS (Non Technical Skills) and OTAS (Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery) were analyzed with respect to scale formulation, validity, reliability and feasibility. Furthermore, their use in training thus far and the future of non-technical rating scales in surgical curricula was discussed. Future work should focus on incorporating these assessment tools into training and into a real operating room setting to provide formative evaluations for surgical residents.

  10. Revitalization of clinical skills training at the University of the Western Cape.

    PubMed

    Jeggels, J D; Traut, A; Kwast, M

    2010-06-01

    Most educational institutions that offer health related qualifications make use of clinical skills laboratories. These spaces are generally used for the demonstration and assessment of clinical skills. The purpose of this paper is to share our experiences related to the revitalization of skills training by introducing the skills lab method at the School of Nursing (SoN), University of the Western Cape (UWC). To accommodate the contextual changes as a result of the restructuring of the higher education landscape in 2003, the clinical skills training programme at UWC had to be reviewed. With a dramatic increase in the student numbers and a reduction in hospital beds, the skills lab method provided students with an opportunity to develop clinical skills prior to their placement in real service settings. The design phase centred on adopting a skills training methodology that articulates with the case-based approach used by the SoN. Kolb's, experiential learning cycle provided the theoretical underpinning for the methodology. The planning phase was spent on the development of resources. Eight staff members were trained by our international higher education collaborators who also facilitated the training of clinical supervisors and simulated patients. The physical space had to be redesigned to accommodate audio visual and information technology to support the phases of the skills lab method. The implementation of the skills lab method was phased in from the first-year level. An interactive seminar held after the first year of implementation provided feedback from all the role players and was mostly positive. The results of introducing the skills lab method include: a move by students towards self-directed clinical skills development, clinical supervisors adopting the role of facilitators of learning and experiential clinical learning being based on, amongst others, the students' engagement with simulated patients. Finally, the recommendations relate to tailor

  11. Clinical skills: cardiac rhythm recognition and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Joanna

    With technological advances, changes in provision of healthcare services and increasing pressure on critical care services, ward patients' severity of illness is ever increasing. As such, nurses need to develop their skills and knowledge to care for their client group. Competency in cardiac rhythm monitoring is beneficial to identify changes in cardiac status, assess response to treatment, diagnosis and post-surgical monitoring. This paper describes the basic anatomy and physiology of the heart and its conduction system, and explains a simple and easy to remember process of analysing cardiac rhythms (Resuscitation Council UK, 2000) that can be used in first-line assessment to assist healthcare practitioners in providing care to their patients.

  12. A Model for Evaluating Student Clinical Psychomotor Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Fiel, Nicholas J.

    1979-01-01

    A long-range plan to evaluate medical students' physical examination skills was undertaken at the Ingham Family Medical Clinic at Michigan State University. The development of the psychomotor skills evaluation model to evaluate the skill of blood pressure measurement, tests of the model's reliability, and the use of the model are described. (JMD)

  13. The Postoperative Pain Assessment Skills pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    McGillion, Michael; Dubrowski, Adam; Stremler, Robyn; Watt-Watson, Judy; Campbell, Fiona; McCartney, Colin; Victor, J Charles; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Snell, Linda; Costello, Judy; Robb, Anja; Nelson, Sioban; Stinson, Jennifer; Hunter, Judith; Dao, Thuan; Promislow, Sara; McNaughton, Nancy; White, Scott; Shobbrook, Cindy; Jeffs, Lianne; Mauch, Kianda; Leegaard, Marit; Beattie, W Scott; Schreiber, Martin; Silver, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Pain-related misbeliefs among health care professionals (HCPs) are common and contribute to ineffective postoperative pain assessment. While standardized patients (SPs) have been effectively used to improve HCPs’ assessment skills, not all centres have SP programs. The present equivalence randomized controlled pilot trial examined the efficacy of an alternative simulation method – deteriorating patient-based simulation (DPS) – versus SPs for improving HCPs’ pain knowledge and assessment skills. METHODS: Seventy-two HCPs were randomly assigned to a 3 h SP or DPS simulation intervention. Measures were recorded at baseline, immediate postintervention and two months postintervention. The primary outcome was HCPs’ pain assessment performance as measured by the postoperative Pain Assessment Skills Tool (PAST). Secondary outcomes included HCPs knowledge of pain-related misbeliefs, and perceived satisfaction and quality of the simulation. These outcomes were measured by the Pain Beliefs Scale (PBS), the Satisfaction with Simulated Learning Scale (SSLS) and the Simulation Design Scale (SDS), respectively. Student’s t tests were used to test for overall group differences in postintervention PAST, SSLS and SDS scores. One-way analysis of covariance tested for overall group differences in PBS scores. RESULTS: DPS and SP groups did not differ on post-test PAST, SSLS or SDS scores. Knowledge of pain-related misbeliefs was also similar between groups. CONCLUSIONS: These pilot data suggest that DPS is an effective simulation alternative for HCPs’ education on postoperative pain assessment, with improvements in performance and knowledge comparable with SP-based simulation. An equivalence trial to examine the effectiveness of deteriorating patient-based simulation versus standardized patients is warranted. PMID:22184553

  14. A Formal Investigation of Human Spatial Control Skills: Mathematical Formalization, Skill Development, and Skill Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin

    Spatial control behaviors account for a large proportion of human everyday activities from normal daily tasks, such as reaching for objects, to specialized tasks, such as driving, surgery, or operating equipment. These behaviors involve intensive interactions within internal processes (i.e. cognitive, perceptual, and motor control) and with the physical world. This dissertation builds on a concept of interaction pattern and a hierarchical functional model. Interaction pattern represents a type of behavior synergy that humans coordinates cognitive, perceptual, and motor control processes. It contributes to the construction of the hierarchical functional model that delineates humans spatial control behaviors as the coordination of three functional subsystems: planning, guidance, and tracking/pursuit. This dissertation formalizes and validates these two theories and extends them for the investigation of human spatial control skills encompassing development and assessment. Specifically, this dissertation first presents an overview of studies in human spatial control skills encompassing definition, characteristic, development, and assessment, to provide theoretical evidence for the concept of interaction pattern and the hierarchical functional model. The following, the human experiments for collecting motion and gaze data and techniques to register and classify gaze data, are described. This dissertation then elaborates and mathematically formalizes the hierarchical functional model and the concept of interaction pattern. These theories then enables the construction of a succinct simulation model that can reproduce a variety of human performance with a minimal set of hypotheses. This validates the hierarchical functional model as a normative framework for interpreting human spatial control behaviors. The dissertation then investigates human skill development and captures the emergence of interaction pattern. The final part of the dissertation applies the hierarchical

  15. Enabling students to develop confidence in basic clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Mayne, Wendy; Jootun, Dev; Young, Beverley; Marland, Glenn; Harris, Margaret; Lyttle, C Paul

    An increase in the number of nursing students is making it difficult to guarantee those on the common foundation programme the opportunity to practise basic nursing skills. In order to address this problem a nursing college developed a skills week that enabled students to practise their skills and develop confidence. Simulated clinical situations gave students the opportunity to relate these skills to practice while learning about teamwork and holistic patient care.

  16. Movement Skill Assessment of Typically Developing Preschool Children: A Review of Seven Movement Skill Assessment Tools

    PubMed Central

    Cools, Wouter; Martelaer, Kristine De; Samaey, Christiane; Andries, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    The importance of movement is often overlooked because it is such a natural part of human life. It is, however, crucial for a child’s physical, cognitive and social development. In addition, experiences support learning and development of fundamental movement skills. The foundations of those skills are laid in early childhood and essential to encourage a physically active lifestyle. Fundamental movement skill performance can be examined with several assessment tools. The choice of a test will depend on the context in which the assessment is planned. This article compares seven assessment tools which are often referred to in European or international context. It discusses the tools’ usefulness for the assessment of movement skill development in general population samples. After a brief description of each assessment tool the article focuses on contents, reliability, validity and normative data. A conclusion outline of strengths and weaknesses of all reviewed assessment tools focusing on their use in educational research settings is provided and stresses the importance of regular data collection of fundamental movement skill development among preschool children. Key pointsThis review discusses seven movement skill assessment tool’s test content, reliability, validity and normative samples.The seven assessment tools all showed to be of great value. Strengths and weaknesses indicate that test choice will depend on specific purpose of test use.Further data collection should also include larger data samples of able bodied preschool children.Admitting PE specialists in assessment of fundamental movement skill performance among preschool children is recommended.The assessment tool’s normative data samples would benefit from frequent movement skill performance follow-up of today’s children. Abbreviations MOT 4-6: Motoriktest fur vier- bis sechsjährige Kinder, M-ABC: Movement Assessment Battery for Children, PDMS: Peabody Development Scales, KTK: K

  17. Computerized assessment of dental student writing skills.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Joseph M; Elliot, Norbert; Biber, Cheryl L; Sanders, R Michael

    2005-02-01

    This study tested the feasibility of using computer-based tools for the assessment of written materials produced by dental students. Written assignments produced by three consecutive incoming dental school classes (240 students) were assessed, and the performance among and between classes was analyzed. Computerized assessment of documents produced by students in the context of their regular coursework proved to be an efficient and effective mechanism for assessing performance. Student performance, assessed as a byproduct of this research, was disappointing. The performance of all classes fell below the eleventh grade level, with some students producing written material at a level of sophistication generally expected from middle school children. Existing technology shows promise as a vehicle for enhancing the assessment of dental students' written communication skills. The ease of use and minimal training necessary to apply this technology can help mitigate the time-intensive nature of writing assessment. If this assessment information is then used to enhance instruction--a process inherently available through software such as WebCT--the distance between assessment and instruction may be more readily bridged through an increase in the use of technology.

  18. Getting Skills Right: Assessing and Anticipating Changing Skill Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Digitalisation, globalisation, demographic shifts and other changes in work organisation are constantly reshaping skill needs. This can lead to persistent skill shortages and mismatch which are costly for individuals, firms and society in terms of lost wages and lower productivity and growth. These costs can be reduced through better assessment…

  19. Peer Assessment of Soft Skills and Hard Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Aimao

    2012-01-01

    Both the information technology (IT) industry and the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) demand soft-skill training in higher education and require IT graduates to demonstrate competence in interpersonal communication, teamwork, and conflict management. Group projects provide teamwork environment for soft-skill training, but…

  20. Defining and Assessing Team Skills of Business and Accountancy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alghalith, Nabil; Blum, Michael; Medlock, Amanda; Weber, Sandy

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the project are (1) to define the skills necessary for students to work effectively with others to achieve common goals, and (2) to develop an assessment instrument to measure student progress toward achieving these skills. The defined skill set will form a basis for common expectations related to team skills that will be shared…

  1. Using the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy in the clinical laboratory: thinking skills involved in diagnostic reasoning.

    PubMed

    Su, Whei Ming; Osisek, Paul J; Starnes, Beth

    2005-01-01

    Achieving effective transfer of theoretical knowledge to clinical practice requires knowledge of thinking paradigms in relation to specific nursing content. It is a challenge to develop instructional designs for teaching and assessing implicit thought processes involved in clinical reasoning. The authors demonstrate the use of the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy to teach thinking skills involved in diagnostic reasoning in a clinical laboratory.

  2. Pairing as an instructional strategy to promote soft skills amongst clinical dental students.

    PubMed

    Abu Kasim, N H; Abu Kassim, N L; Razak, A A A; Abdullah, H; Bindal, P; Che' Abdul Aziz, Z A; Sulaiman, E; Farook, M S; Gonzalez, M A G; Thong, Y L; Ahmad, N A; Naimie, Z; Abdullah, M; Lui, J L; Abdul Aziz, A

    2014-02-01

    Training dentists today is challenging as they are expected to provide a wide range of dental care. In the provision of good dental care, soft skills are equally important as clinical skills. Therefore in dental education the development of soft skills are of prime concern. This study sought to identify the development of soft skills when dental students are paired in their clinical training. In this perception study, four open-ended items were used to elicit students' feedback on the appropriateness of using clinical pairing as an instructional strategy to promote soft skills. The most frequently cited soft skills were teamwork (70%) and communication (25%) skills. However, both negative and positive behaviours were reported. As for critical thinking and problem solving skills, more positive behaviours were reported for abilities such as to explain, analyze, find ideas and alternative solutions, and make decisions. Leadership among peers was not evident as leading without legitimate authority could be a hindrance to its development. If clinical pairing is to be used as an effective instructional strategy to promote soft skills amongst students, clear guidelines need to be developed to prepare students to work in a dental team and the use of appropriate assessment tools can facilitate the development of these soft skills.

  3. Construction and Validation of the Clinical Judgment Skill Inventory: Clinical Judgment Skill Competencies That Measure Counselor Debiasing Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Bryan S.; Leahy, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To construct and validate a new self-report instrument, the Clinical Judgment Skill Inventory (CJSI), inclusive of clinical judgment skill competencies that address counselor biases and evidence-based strategies. Method: An Internet-based survey design was used and an exploratory factor analysis was performed on a sample of rehabilitation…

  4. A pilot project in distance education: nurse practitioner students' experience of personal video capture technology as an assessment method of clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Strand, Haakan; Fox-Young, Stephanie; Long, Phil; Bogossian, Fiona

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on a pilot project aimed at exploring postgraduate distance students' experiences using personal video capture technology to complete competency assessments in physical examination. A pre-intervention survey gathered demographic data from nurse practitioner students (n=31) and measured their information communication technology fluency. Subsequently, thirteen (13) students were allocated a hand held video camera to use in their clinical setting. Those participating in the trial completed a post-intervention survey and further data were gathered using semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics and deductive content analysis, and the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (Venkatesh et al., 2003) were used to guide the project. Uptake of the intervention was high (93%) as students recognised the potential benefit. Students were video recorded while performing physical examinations. They described high level of stress and some anxiety, which decreased rapidly while assessment was underway. Barriers experienced were in the areas of facilitating conditions (technical character e.g. upload of files) and social influence (e.g. local ethical approval). Students valued the opportunity to reflect on their recorded performance with their clinical mentors and by themselves. This project highlights the demands and difficulties of introducing technology to support work-based learning.

  5. Assessment of Health Decision Making Skills of Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Gary D.

    Although the development of rational decision making skills among school age populations has been identified as a goal of school health education programs, few measurement tools or methods exist to assess such skills. In order to develop an instrument for assessing adolescent health decision-making skills, a preliminary health decision making…

  6. Tracking Patient Encounters and Clinical Skills to Determine Competency in Ambulatory Care Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Chrystian R.; Harris, Ila M.; Moon, Jean Y.; Westberg, Sarah M.; Kolar, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine if the amount of exposure to patient encounters and clinical skills correlates to student clinical competency on ambulatory care advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Design. Students in ambulatory care APPEs tracked the number of patients encountered by medical condition and the number of patient care skills performed. At the end of the APPE, preceptors evaluated students’ competency for each medical condition and skill, referencing the Dreyfus model for skill acquisition. Assessment. Data was collected from September 2012 through August 2014. Forty-six responses from a student tracking tool were matched to preceptor ratings. Students rated as competent saw more patients and performed more skills overall. Preceptors noted minimal impact on workload. Conclusions. Increased exposure to patient encounters and skills performed had a positive association with higher Dreyfus stage, which may represent a starting point in the conversation for more thoughtful design of ambulatory care APPEs. PMID:26941440

  7. Evaluation of Clinical and Communication Skills of Pharmacy Students and Pharmacists with an Objective Structured Clinical Examination

    PubMed Central

    Attridge, Rebecca L.; Tovar, John M.; Witte, Amy P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate how effectively pharmacy students and practicing pharmacists communicate and apply knowledge to simulations of commonly encountered patient scenarios using an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Design. Second-, third-, and fourth-year pharmacy students completed an OSCE as part of their required courses in 2012 and 2013. All students in both years completed identical OSCE cases. Licensed pharmacists were recruited to complete the OSCE and serve as controls in 2012. A survey assessed student perception and acceptance of the OSCE as well as student confidence in performance. Assessment. Licensed pharmacists had significantly higher clinical and communication skills scores than did pharmacy students. Student progression in communication and clinical skills improved significantly over time. Survey results indicated that students felt the OSCE was well-structured and assessed clinical skills taught in pharmacy school; 86% of students felt confident they could provide these skills. Conclusion. Objective structured clinical examinations can evaluate clinical competence and communication skills among professional students. Implementation of OSCEs may be an effective tool for assessment of the Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education domains. PMID:26690286

  8. Evaluation of Clinical and Communication Skills of Pharmacy Students and Pharmacists with an Objective Structured Clinical Examination.

    PubMed

    Urteaga, Elizabeth M; Attridge, Rebecca L; Tovar, John M; Witte, Amy P

    2015-10-25

    Objective. To evaluate how effectively pharmacy students and practicing pharmacists communicate and apply knowledge to simulations of commonly encountered patient scenarios using an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Design. Second-, third-, and fourth-year pharmacy students completed an OSCE as part of their required courses in 2012 and 2013. All students in both years completed identical OSCE cases. Licensed pharmacists were recruited to complete the OSCE and serve as controls in 2012. A survey assessed student perception and acceptance of the OSCE as well as student confidence in performance. Assessment. Licensed pharmacists had significantly higher clinical and communication skills scores than did pharmacy students. Student progression in communication and clinical skills improved significantly over time. Survey results indicated that students felt the OSCE was well-structured and assessed clinical skills taught in pharmacy school; 86% of students felt confident they could provide these skills. Conclusion. Objective structured clinical examinations can evaluate clinical competence and communication skills among professional students. Implementation of OSCEs may be an effective tool for assessment of the Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education domains.

  9. Respiratory clinical guidelines inform ward-based nurses’ clinical skills and knowledge required for evidence-based care

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alisha M.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory clinical guidelines provide clinicians with evidence-based guidance for practice. Clinical guidelines also provide an opportunity to identify the knowledge and technical and non-technical skills required by respiratory ward-based registered nurses. The aim of this review was to use a systematic process to establish the core technical and non-technical skills and knowledge identified in evidence-based clinical guidelines that enable the care of hospitalised adult respiratory patients. 17 guidelines were identified in our systematic review. The quality assessment demonstrated variability in these guidelines. Common core knowledge and technical and non-technical skills were identified. These include pathophysiology, understanding of physiological measurements and monitoring, education, counselling, and ward and patient management. The knowledge and skills extracted from respiratory clinical guidelines may inform a curriculum for ward-based respiratory nursing to ensure optimal care of adult patients. PMID:28210299

  10. Respiratory clinical guidelines inform ward-based nurses' clinical skills and knowledge required for evidence-based care.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alisha M; Smith, Sheree M S

    2016-09-01

    Respiratory clinical guidelines provide clinicians with evidence-based guidance for practice. Clinical guidelines also provide an opportunity to identify the knowledge and technical and non-technical skills required by respiratory ward-based registered nurses. The aim of this review was to use a systematic process to establish the core technical and non-technical skills and knowledge identified in evidence-based clinical guidelines that enable the care of hospitalised adult respiratory patients. 17 guidelines were identified in our systematic review. The quality assessment demonstrated variability in these guidelines. Common core knowledge and technical and non-technical skills were identified. These include pathophysiology, understanding of physiological measurements and monitoring, education, counselling, and ward and patient management. The knowledge and skills extracted from respiratory clinical guidelines may inform a curriculum for ward-based respiratory nursing to ensure optimal care of adult patients.

  11. Construct Validity of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in Psychiatry: Associations with the Clinical Skills Examination and Other Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Robin S.; Chibnall, John T.; Blaskiewicz, Robert J.; Furman, Gail E.; Powell, Jill K.; Mohr, Clinton J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The construct validity of checklist and global process scores for an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in psychiatry was assessed. Multiple regression analysis was used to predict psychiatry OSCE scores from the clinical skills examination, an obstetrics/gynecology (OB/GYN) OSCE, and the National Board of Medical…

  12. Assessment of the Long-Term Benefits of Life Skills Programming on Psychosocial Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Ruby; Reddon, John R.; Hoglin, Brenda; Woodman, Mary-Ann

    2008-01-01

    The durability of the psychosocial benefits of Life Skills programming on outpatient adults with mental health/forensic issues was examined. Participants were 52 adults (28 males, 24 females) who completed 16 weeks of Life Skills at a psychiatric outpatient clinic and were re-assessed between six months and six years following treatment.…

  13. A procedural skills OSCE: assessing technical and non-technical skills of internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Debra; Hamstra, Stanley J; Wood, Timothy J; Humphrey-Murto, Susan; Touchie, Claire; Yudkowsky, Rachel; Bordage, Georges

    2015-03-01

    Internists are required to perform a number of procedures that require mastery of technical and non-technical skills, however, formal assessment of these skills is often lacking. The purpose of this study was to develop, implement, and gather validity evidence for a procedural skills objective structured clinical examination (PS-OSCE) for internal medicine (IM) residents to assess their technical and non-technical skills when performing procedures. Thirty-five first to third-year IM residents participated in a 5-station PS-OSCE, which combined partial task models, standardized patients, and allied health professionals. Formal blueprinting was performed and content experts were used to develop the cases and rating instruments. Examiners underwent a frame-of-reference training session to prepare them for their rater role. Scores were compared by levels of training, experience, and to evaluation data from a non-procedural OSCE (IM-OSCE). Reliability was calculated using Generalizability analyses. Reliabilities for the technical and non-technical scores were 0.68 and 0.76, respectively. Third-year residents scored significantly higher than first-year residents on the technical (73.5 vs. 62.2%) and non-technical (83.2 vs. 75.1%) components of the PS-OSCE (p < 0.05). Residents who had performed the procedures more frequently scored higher on three of the five stations (p < 0.05). There was a moderate disattenuated correlation (r = 0.77) between the IM-OSCE and the technical component of the PS-OSCE scores. The PS-OSCE is a feasible method for assessing multiple competencies related to performing procedures and this study provides validity evidence to support its use as an in-training examination.

  14. Teaching students in the classroom and clinical skills environment.

    PubMed

    Dix, Greg; Hughes, Suzanne

    This article demonstrates that careful planning and management can help to ensure effective learning for pre-registration students during theory and practical skills teaching. It highlights two lesson plans with intended learning outcomes, one for a didactic teaching session and the other for a psychomotor clinical skills session. The article identifies a variety of teaching and learning strategies that could be adopted.

  15. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Clinical Laboratory Science/Biotechnology Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for workforce preparation program providers, details the Illinois Occupational Skill Standards for clinical laboratory occupations programs. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and credentialing, the process used to develop the…

  16. Digital video documentation as evidence of clinical skill acquisition.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Simon; Rajaratnam, V

    2009-01-01

    Video recordings have become requirements for the assessment and recording of the consulting skills module of the MRCGP examination and surgical skill modules for the post FRCS hand diploma examination. Previous research has shown that the knowledge and judgement skills needed by trainees to achieve operative competence can be reliably assessed using structured checklists. However evaluation of surgical competency should also include technical skills, which have been difficult to document adequately and transparently. There is now evidence demonstrating that surgeons can discriminate between the video recordings of a competent and non-competent trainee. Like those of previous researchers our findings indicate that intra-operative video monitoring enables an objective and permanent recordable assessment of the a trainees skill level whilst completing the checklist after a particular procedure. Video evidence can also be distributed widely to assessors outside the trainee's locale.

  17. Assessing practical skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    González, Baltasar Sánchez; Martínez, Laura; Cerdà, Manel; Piacentini, Enrique; Trenado, Josep; Quintana, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This paper aims to analyze agreement in the assessment of external chest compressions (ECC) by 3 human raters and dedicated feedback software. While 54 volunteer health workers (medical transport technicians), trained and experienced in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), performed a complete sequence of basic CPR maneuvers on a manikin incorporating feedback software (Laerdal PC v 4.2.1 Skill Reporting Software) (L), 3 expert CPR instructors (A, B, and C) visually assessed ECC, evaluating hand placement, compression depth, chest decompression, and rate. We analyzed the concordance among the raters (A, B, and C) and between the raters and L with Cohen's kappa coefficient (K), intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Bland–Altman plots, and survival–agreement plots. The agreement (expressed as Cohen's K and ICC) was ≥0.54 in only 3 instances and was ≤0.45 in more than half. Bland–Altman plots showed significant dispersion of the data. The survival–agreement plot showed a high degree of discordance between pairs of raters (A–L, B–L, and C–L) when the level of tolerance was set low. In visual assessment of ECC, there is a significant lack of agreement among accredited raters and significant dispersion and inconsistency in data, bringing into question the reliability and validity of this method of measurement. PMID:28353609

  18. Challenge Course Facilitator Technical Skills Assessment Tool Mark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagstaff, William Quinn

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to develop a technical skills assessment tool for the training and development of challenge course facilitators. Researchers accessed two professional on-line listserves to collect a sample size of twenty-seven currently used technical skills assessment tools. The assessment tools were critically analysed by three independent…

  19. Take a Skills Snapshot: Employing Online Self-Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Peter; Pearson, Jon

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development of an online self-assessment of students' technology skills based on a summer program for middle school students. Explains how the course design was based on feedback from a student survey that indicated a need to learn PowerPoint and Web-page-design skills rather than word-processing skills. (LRW)

  20. Using the Academic Skills Inventory to Assess the Biology Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seifert, Kyle; Hurney, Carol A.; Wigtil, Clifton J.; Sundre, Donna L.

    2009-01-01

    The Academic Skills Inventory (Kruger and Zechmeister, 2001) was developed at Loyola University of Chicago and originally designed for use with psychology majors. It was later extended for use in a variety of academic programs. The Academic Skills Inventory (ASI) assesses student self-reports of behaviors in 10 skill areas: (1) written and oral…

  1. Soft Skills Assessment: Theory Development and the Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Soft skills have become a subject of increasing interest in lifelong learning. Soft skills development is intended to enable and enhance personal development, participation in learning and success in employment. The assessment of soft skill is therefore widely practised, but there is little in the way of research or evidence on how well this…

  2. How well do final year undergraduate medical students master practical clinical skills?

    PubMed Central

    Störmann, Sylvère; Stankiewicz, Melanie; Raes, Patricia; Berchtold, Christina; Kosanke, Yvonne; Illes, Gabrielle; Loose, Peter; Angstwurm, Matthias W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical examination and other practical clinical skills are fundamental to guide diagnosis and therapy. The teaching of such practical skills has gained significance through legislative changes and adjustments of the curricula of medical schools in Germany. We sought to find out how well final year undergraduate medical students master practical clinical skills. Methods: We conducted a formative 4-station objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) focused on practical clinical skills during the final year of undergraduate medical education. Participation was voluntary. Besides the examination of heart, lungs, abdomen, vascular system, lymphatic system as well as the neurological, endocrinological or orthopaedic examination we assessed other basic clinical skills (e.g. interpretation of an ECG, reading a chest X-ray). Participants filled-out a questionnaire prior to the exam, inter alia to give an estimate of their performance. Results: 214 final year students participated in our study and achieved a mean score of 72.8% of the total score obtainable. 9.3% of participants (n=20) scored insufficiently (<60%). We found no influence of sex, prior training in healthcare or place of study on performance. Only one third of the students correctly estimated their performance (35.3%), whereas 30.0% and 18.8% over-estimated their performance by 10% and 20% respectively. Discussion: Final year undergraduate medical students demonstrate considerable deficits performing practical clinical skills in the context of a formative assessment. Half of the students over-estimate their own performance. We recommend an institutionalised and frequent assessment of practical clinical skills during undergraduate medical education, especially in the final year. PMID:27579358

  3. Video as a strategy to evaluate and assist clinical teachers with student assessment.

    PubMed

    Kevin, Jim; Downie, Judith; Kendall, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of the clinical competence of nursing students requires expertise in nursing as well as skills in student assessment. The development of these student assessment skills is dependent on the preparation of the clinical teacher. The results of this pilot study indicate that video can be one successful tool in evaluating the assessment skills of clinical teachers. Video also may be useful as a staff development tool by providing a nonthreatening way for clinical teachers to familiarize themselves with clinical assessment. In turn, this will have benefits for universities and students by ensuring consistency of clinical assessment by clinical teachers.

  4. School nurse survival: reviewing clinical skills in the simulation laboratory.

    PubMed

    McKee, Sue; Bultas, Margaret; Ahearn, Tina

    2011-07-01

    School nursing is a specialty that requires nurses to provide holistic health care to a diverse population. Federal disability laws make it necessary for the school nurse to maintain and competently perform higher level technical skills--outside the home or hospital setting. Skills include tracheotomy care, gastric tube care, urinary catheterizations, central line care, oxygen delivery, ostomy care, and advanced assessment skills. How do school nurses maintain these skills if they are not used frequently enough to assure competency? The authors' college of nursing and a school outreach department have partnered to offer an annual school nurse conference. One option for participants is to use the simulation laboratory to refresh these skills and to review newer equipment and technology. The simulation laboratory staff and pediatric faculty are available to demonstrate and assist participants with skills technique. Participants have responded positively to this collaborative effort.

  5. Skills for nursing practice: development of clinical skills in pre-registration nurse education.

    PubMed

    Felton, Anne; Royal, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Rapid changes during the past two decades have seen a growing challenge to prepare newly qualified nurses who are clinically competent and confident to meet the demands of contemporary healthcare. Recent publications emphasise the need to prioritise clinical skills in nurse education (DH 2012a, Francis, 2012). This discussion reports on a project scoping the clinical skills required within pre-registration nursing curricula and considers how this has influenced curriculum development at one Higher Education Institution in the UK. This paper reports on the project analysis of nursing and healthcare policy, identifying six core themes of skills relevant for nursing practice. Furthermore it explores the findings of a series of focus groups with nursing practitioners and managers identifying priorities for clinical skills in the pre-registration curriculum. These highlighted a broad range of skills required of newly qualified practitioners, which pose a challenge for integration within nurse education. How this challenge has been addressed through the incorporation of these skills themes throughout a new pre-registration curriculum is also examined.

  6. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice.

    PubMed

    Bugaj, T J; Nikendei, C

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or "skills labs", i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills. In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I) the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II) an outline of the underlying idea and (III) an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV) the training method's effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V) the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI) the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training.

  7. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bugaj, T. J.; Nikendei, C.

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or “skills labs”, i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills. In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I) the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II) an outline of the underlying idea and (III) an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV) the training method’s effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V) the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI) the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training. PMID:27579363

  8. A Perkins Challenge: Assessing Technical Skills in CTE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, James R., III

    2009-01-01

    Federal law requires state to develop performance measures and data-collection systems for secondary and postsecondary technical-skill attainment. This poses many challenges, such as defining a technical skills, measurement and when to assess students. In this article, the author outlines various assessment models and looks at the challenges…

  9. Assessing Practical Laboratory Skills in Undergraduate Molecular Biology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Lynne; Koenders, Annette; Gynnild, Vidar

    2012-01-01

    This study explored a new strategy of assessing laboratory skills in a molecular biology course to improve: student effort in preparation for and participation in laboratory work; valid evaluation of learning outcomes; and students' employment prospects through provision of evidence of their skills. Previously, assessment was based on written…

  10. Teaching and assessing procedural skills using simulation: metrics and methodology.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Richard L; Davenport, Moira; Korley, Frederick; Griswold-Theodorson, Sharon; Fitch, Michael T; Narang, Aneesh T; Evans, Leigh V; Gross, Amy; Rodriguez, Elliot; Dodge, Kelly L; Hamann, Cara J; Robey, Walter C

    2008-11-01

    Simulation allows educators to develop learner-focused training and outcomes-based assessments. However, the effectiveness and validity of simulation-based training in emergency medicine (EM) requires further investigation. Teaching and testing technical skills require methods and assessment instruments that are somewhat different than those used for cognitive or team skills. Drawing from work published by other medical disciplines as well as educational, behavioral, and human factors research, the authors developed six research themes: measurement of procedural skills; development of performance standards; assessment and validation of training methods, simulator models, and assessment tools; optimization of training methods; transfer of skills learned on simulator models to patients; and prevention of skill decay over time. The article reviews relevant and established educational research methodologies and identifies gaps in our knowledge of how physicians learn procedures. The authors present questions requiring further research that, once answered, will advance understanding of simulation-based procedural training and assessment in EM.

  11. A rapid assessment of skills in young children with autism.

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, Dorothea C; Vorndran, Christina; Addison, Laura; Kuhn, Stephanie A

    2004-01-01

    Educational interventions based on the principles of behavior analysis are highly effective for establishing skills in young children with autism. As a first step in program development, the child's current skill level is determined by evaluating performance on tasks drawn from a preestablished curriculum. However, few specific guidelines have been delineated for conducting these skills assessments or interpreting the results. In this study, we evaluated an efficient methodology for conducting skills assessments. Six children who had been diagnosed with autism participated. The relative efficacy of two assessment packages--one containing several reinforcement procedures and one containing several potentially effective prompts--was evaluated across two to three skills for each child using multiple baseline and reversal designs. Results suggested that the methodology was useful for matching targeted skills to appropriate interventions. PMID:15154212

  12. Cognitive Skills: Enhancement and Assessment Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Richard A.; Taylor, Shannon V.

    A thinking-skills course at Montana State University is described, along with recent issues concerning the potential effectiveness of such courses. Advantages and disadvantages of different designs for studying the effects of thinking-skills training are also considered. The focus of the course is: hypothesis formation and evaluation, problem…

  13. Skill Assessment for College Racquetball Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    A review of the literature on racquetball skills tests suggests a general skill test, the wall rally, can be a highly reliable measurement tool under certain conditions. In addition, a student's ability in relation to his or her classmates can best be judged by running a round robin tournament. (IAH)

  14. Empirically Assessing the Importance of Computer Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William M.

    2013-01-01

    This research determines which computer skills are important for entry-level accountants, and whether some skills are more important than others. Students participated before and after internships in public accounting. Longitudinal analysis is also provided; responses from 2001 are compared to those from 2008-2009. Responses are also compared to…

  15. Clinical performance and skill retention after simulation-based education for nephrology fellows.

    PubMed

    Ahya, Shubhada N; Barsuk, Jeffrey H; Cohen, Elaine R; Tuazon, Jennifer; McGaghie, William C; Wayne, Diane B

    2012-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that simulation-based education (SBE) improved temporary hemodialysis catheter (THDC) insertion skills by nephrology fellows. SBE, featuring deliberate practice and rigorous achievement standards, was a powerful method to enhance THDC insertion skills in nephrology fellows. However, experts have called for further research to evaluate skill transfer from the simulated environment to actual clinical care and skill retention. This is a prospective observational cohort study of THDC insertion skills. Twelve nephrology fellows from three academic centers in Chicago were evaluated using a skills checklist from July 2008 to June 2009. Simulator-trained fellows were tested after the SBE intervention and expected to meet or exceed a minimum passing score (MPS) set by an expert panel. To assess transfer of skill to clinical care, three simulator-trained fellows were assessed at 6 months on actual patient THDC insertions using the checklist. To assess retention of skill, 11 of 12 simulator-trained fellows were reassessed at 1 year using the checklist and central venous catheter simulator. Outcomes were determined by THDC insertion skill performance. Simulator-trained fellows scored similarly during 6-month THDC insertions on actual patients and immediate posttest (M = 86.2%, SD = 22.3% vs. M = 93.5%, SD = 5.3%, p = 0.32). However, 1 year after SBE, simulated THDC insertion scores were significantly lower than at immediate posttest (M = 73.4%, SD = 22.2% vs. M = 93.5%, SD = 5.3%, p = 0.01). Our results show that nephrology fellows who completed SBE displayed high levels of performance during THDC insertions on actual patients 6 months later. At 1 year, there was statistically significant skills decay. We recommend booster training at 6 months.

  16. Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories.

    PubMed

    Ewertsson, Mona; Allvin, Renée; Holmström, Inger K; Blomberg, Karin

    2015-07-01

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified - walking the bridge - in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking.

  17. Clinical skills training in undergraduate medical education using a student-centered approach.

    PubMed

    Tolsgaard, Martin Grønnebæk

    2013-08-01

    This thesis focuses on how to engage students in self-directed learning and in peer-learning activities to improve clinical skills training in undergraduate medical education. The first study examined the clinical skills teaching provided by student teachers compared to that provided by associate professors. This study showed that student teachers performed as good as or even better than associate professors when teaching simple clinical skills. The second study of this thesis examined how complex clinical skills--such as patient management skills--develop with increasing levels of competence. The Reporter-Interpreter-Manager-Educator framework was used to reflect this change and construct validity was explored for RIME-based evaluations of single-patient encounters. In the third study the effects of training in pairs--also known as dyad practice--examined. This study showed that the students practicing in pairs significantly out-performed those training alone using RIME-based assessments and that dyad training significantly improved students' confidence in managing future patient encounters. The final study examined students' use of self-directed clinical encounter cards (CECs) based on the RIME framework. Results from this study showed that self-directed CECs can have positive effects on participatory practice and clinical reasoning when implemented in a supporting environment but the chance of success depends on the context of use. Self-directed CECs can be successful but major faculty development initiatives are required before implementation in large and dispersed settings. In conclusion, this thesis demonstrated different aspects of student-centered approaches to clinical skills learning. Whereas self-directed learning is difficult in clinical clerkship, the experimental studies demonstrated remarkable advantages to peer-learning in skills-lab. Thus, peer-learning activities could be essential to providing high-quality medical training in the face of limited

  18. [Development of guide to clinical performance and basic clinical skills for medical students].

    PubMed

    Roh, HyeRin; Lee, KeunMi; Eo, Eunkyung; Hong, Young Sun; Lee, Hakseung; Jang, Byung Woo; Rhee, Byoung Doo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this report was to discuss the development and content of a guide on clinical performance and basic clinical skills for medical students. We published the first edition of this guide in 2010 and will publish the second edition in 2016. Initially, we took a survey on important clinical presentations and fundamental clinical and technical skills in 41 medical schools in Korea. Ultimately, we chose 80 core clinical presentations and 56 clinical skills. In the guide to basic clinical skills, we described the physical examination and technical skills according to the preprocedural preparation, procedure, and postprocedural process. In the guide on clinical performance, we reviewed patient encounters-from history taking and the physical examination to patient education. We included communication skills, principles of patient safety, and clinical reasoning schemes into the guides. In total, 43 academic faculty members helped develop the basic clinical skills guide, 75 participated in establishing the clinical performance guide, and 16 advisors from 14 medical specialty societies contributed to the guide. These guides can help medical students approach patients holistically and safely.

  19. Spanish-speaking patients' satisfaction with clinical pharmacists' communication skills and demonstration of cultural sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kim-Romo, Dawn N; Barner, Jamie C; Brown, Carolyn M; Rivera, José O; Garza, Aida A; Klein-Bradham, Kristina; Jokerst, Jason R; Janiga, Xan; Brown, Bob

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess Spanish-speaking patients' satisfaction with their clinical pharmacists' communication skills and demonstration of cultural sensitivity, while controlling for patients' sociodemographic, clinical, and communication factors, as well as pharmacist factors, and to identify clinical pharmacists' cultural factors that are important to Spanish-speaking patients. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING Central Texas during August 2011 to May 2012. PARTICIPANTS Spanish-speaking patients of federally qualified health centers (FQHCs). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S) A Spanish-translated survey assessed Spanish-speaking patients' satisfaction with their clinical pharmacists' communication skills and demonstration of cultural sensitivity. RESULTS Spanish-speaking patients (N = 101) reported overall satisfaction with their clinical pharmacists' communication skills and cultural sensitivity. Patients also indicated that pharmacists' cultural rapport (e.g., ability to speak Spanish, respectfulness) was generally important to Spanish speakers. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that cultural rapport was significantly related to satisfaction with pharmacists' communication skills and demonstration of cultural sensitivity. CONCLUSION Overall, patients were satisfied with pharmacists' communication skills and cultural sensitivity. Patient satisfaction initiatives that include cultural rapport should be developed for pharmacists who provide care to Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency.

  20. Assessing Writing Skills through a Process Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiStefano, Philip; Killion, Joellen

    1984-01-01

    Concludes that students whose teachers participated in process-model inservice training performed significantly better on a number of writing evaluation criteria than did those of teachers who had relied on a skills-approach technique.

  1. Assessing Motivational Skill Deficiencies in Military Trainees,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Experience and research with the Air Force Advanced Instructional System (AIS) indicated that many students entering this computer-managed instructional (CMI) environment lack the basic conative, affective, and cognitive skills required to effectively motivate themselves and perform well in their technical training courses. Prior work in this area has shown that substantial payoffs in reduced training time can be achieved through self-instructional student training in time management and study skills. The present study was part of an effort

  2. Towards an Integrated Model for Developing Sustainable Assessment Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fastre, Greet M. J.; van der Klink, Marcel R.; Sluijsmans, Dominique; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2013-01-01

    One of the goals of current education is to ensure that graduates can act as independent lifelong learners. Graduates need to be able to assess their own learning and interpret assessment results. The central question in this article is how to acquire sustainable assessment skills, enabling students to assess their performance and learning…

  3. Feedback on students' clinical reasoning skills during fieldwork education

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, Marianne; Mårtensson, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim Feedback on clinical reasoning skills during fieldwork education is regarded as vital in occupational therapy students' professional development. The nature of supervisors' feedback however, could be confirmative and/or corrective and corrective feedback could be with or without suggestions on how to improve. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of supervisors' feedback on final-year occupational therapy students' clinical reasoning skills through comparing the nature of feedback with the students' subsequent clinical reasoning ability. Method A mixed-method approach with a convergent parallel design was used combining the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data. From focus groups and interviews with students, data were collected and analysed qualitatively to determine how the students experienced the feedback they received from their supervisors. By quantitatively comparing the final practical exam grades with the nature of the feedback, their fieldwork End-of-Term grades and average academic performance it became possible to merge the results for comparison and interpretation. Results Students' clinical reasoning skills seem to be improved through corrective feedback if accompanied by suggestions on how to improve, irrespective of their average academic performance. Supervisors were inclined to underrate high performing students and overrate lower performing students. Conclusions Students who obtained higher grades in the final practical examinations received more corrective feedback with suggestions on how to improve from their supervisors. Confirmative feedback alone may not be sufficient for improving the clinical reasoning skills of students. PMID:26256854

  4. Social Skills Assessment of Indian Children with Visual Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Sushama; Sigafoos, Jeff; Carroll, Annemaree

    2000-01-01

    A study used the Matson Evaluation of Social Skills with Youngsters (MESSY) to assess social skills in 200 Indian children with visual impairments. The factor structure for the resulting 50-item Hindi MESSY was highly comparable to four of the five original factors of the English version of the MESSY. (Contains references.) (CR)

  5. Assessing Transition Skills in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Dawn A.; Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Hirano, Kara; Alverson, Charlotte Y.

    2015-01-01

    As a result of the demanding 21st-century workforce, local education agencies are beginning to refocus and retool to ensure students with disabilities have the knowledge and skills to be productive adults and attain positive postschool outcomes. The skills 21st-century transition assessments address are relevant to teachers and students given the…

  6. Assessment of Anger Coping Skills in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willner, P.; Brace, N.; Phillips, J.

    2005-01-01

    Recent controlled studies have supported the effectiveness of anger management training for people with intellectual disabilities (IDs). This report describes an evaluation instrument designed to assess their usage of specific anger coping skills. The Profile of Anger Coping Skills (PACS) is designed for completion by a staff member or carer.…

  7. Assessing Attentional Skills and Interpersonal Style for Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Curtiss S.

    The relevance of assessing attention or concentration skills for personnel selection is discussed, and how a person's interpersonal characteristics are influenced by and influence attentional skills is explored. Scales in the Theory Attentional and Interpersonal Style (TAIS) inventory developed by Robert Nideffer are described. The interaction of…

  8. Augmented Reality M-Learning to Enhance Nursing Skills Acquisition in the Clinical Skills Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Bernard M.; Jackson, Cathryn; Wilson, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report on a pilot research project designed to explore if new mobile augmented reality (AR) technologies have the potential to enhance the learning of clinical skills in the lab. Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory action-research-based pilot study was undertaken to explore an initial proof-of-concept design in…

  9. The consequences of using advanced physical assessment skills in medical and surgical nursing: A hermeneutic pragmatic study

    PubMed Central

    Zambas, Shelaine I.; Smythe, Elizabeth A.; Koziol-Mclain, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Aims and objectives The aim of this study was to explore the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills on medical and surgical wards. Background Appropriate, accurate, and timely assessment by nurses is the cornerstone of maintaining patient safety in hospitals. The inclusion of “advanced” physical assessment skills such as auscultation, palpation, and percussion is thought to better prepare nurses for complex patient presentations within a wide range of clinical situations. Design This qualitative study used a hermeneutic pragmatic approach. Method Unstructured interviews were conducted with five experienced medical and surgical nurses to obtain 13 detailed narratives of assessment practice. Narratives were analyzed using Van Manen's six-step approach to identify the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills. Results The consequences of using advanced assessment skills include looking for more, challenging interpretations, and perseverance. The use of advanced assessment skills directs what the nurse looks for, what she sees, interpretation of the findings, and her response. It is the interpretation of what is seen, heard, or felt within the full context of the patient situation, which is the advanced skill. Conclusion Advanced assessment skill is the means to an accurate interpretation of the clinical situation and contributes to appropriate diagnosis and medical management in complex patient situations. Relevance to clinical practice The nurse's use of advanced assessment skills enables her to contribute to diagnostic reasoning within the acute medical and surgical setting. PMID:27607193

  10. Psychometric Advances in Measuring Clinical Problem-Solving Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Leon J.

    1981-01-01

    Advances have been made in testing optometrists' clinical skills, particularly with the use of simulation techniques. Further research into these techniques will probably receive the most attention, although a shift in research emphasis from correlational studies of test validity and reliability to test development studies is needed. (MSE)

  11. Interactive Development of Reading Skills in an Educational Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grocke, Margaret

    Computer-based reading programs have been used at the City Educational Clinic in Canberra, Australia, to improve the reading skills of children who are "reading disabled." Children interacted with the computer via a graphic display, touch sensitive screen, and synthesized speech. The first program taught a basic sight vocabulary and…

  12. Evaluating the Accuracy of Pharmacy Students' Self-Assessment Skills

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Paul A. M.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the accuracy of self-assessment skills of senior-level bachelor of science pharmacy students. Methods A method proposed by Kruger and Dunning involving comparisons of pharmacy students' self-assessment with weighted average assessments of peers, standardized patients, and pharmacist-instructors was used. Results Eighty students participated in the study. Differences between self-assessment and external assessments were found across all performance quartiles. These differences were particularly large and significant in the third and fourth (lowest) quartiles and particularly marked in the areas of empathy, and logic/focus/coherence of interviewing. Conclusions The quality and accuracy of pharmacy students' self-assessment skills were not as strong as expected, particularly given recent efforts to include self-assessment in the curriculum. Further work is necessary to ensure this important practice competency and life skill is at the level expected for professional practice and continuous professional development. PMID:17998986

  13. Discussion of skill improvement in marine ecosystem dynamic models based on parameter optimization and skill assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chengcheng; Shi, Honghua; Liu, Yongzhi; Li, Fen; Ding, Dewen

    2016-07-01

    Marine ecosystem dynamic models (MEDMs) are important tools for the simulation and prediction of marine ecosystems. This article summarizes the methods and strategies used for the improvement and assessment of MEDM skill, and it attempts to establish a technical framework to inspire further ideas concerning MEDM skill improvement. The skill of MEDMs can be improved by parameter optimization (PO), which is an important step in model calibration. An efficient approach to solve the problem of PO constrained by MEDMs is the global treatment of both sensitivity analysis and PO. Model validation is an essential step following PO, which validates the efficiency of model calibration by analyzing and estimating the goodness-of-fit of the optimized model. Additionally, by focusing on the degree of impact of various factors on model skill, model uncertainty analysis can supply model users with a quantitative assessment of model confidence. Research on MEDMs is ongoing; however, improvement in model skill still lacks global treatments and its assessment is not integrated. Thus, the predictive performance of MEDMs is not strong and model uncertainties lack quantitative descriptions, limiting their application. Therefore, a large number of case studies concerning model skill should be performed to promote the development of a scientific and normative technical framework for the improvement of MEDM skill.

  14. Core Skills Assessment to Improve Mathematical Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Michael; Bowe, Brian; Ní Fhloinn, Eabhnat

    2013-01-01

    Many engineering undergraduates begin third-level education with significant deficiencies in their core mathematical skills. Every year, in the Dublin Institute of Technology, a diagnostic test is given to incoming first-year students, consistently revealing problems in basic mathematics. It is difficult to motivate students to address these…

  15. Developing and Assessing College Student Teamwork Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Richard L.; Jones, Steven K.

    2011-01-01

    Some form of team-oriented work is employed in most, if not all, organizations today. It would seem, then, that an important role for higher education should involve developing critical teamwork skills among students so as to prepare them for success in life. This very point was highlighted in a 2009 poll conducted on behalf of the Association of…

  16. Coherence in the Assessment of Writing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robin; Riu, Carmen Perez

    2008-01-01

    Unhappy with the contradiction of teaching writing skills through a process-genre approach and testing them by means of a timed essay, the authors devised the Extended Writing Project (EWP) as an alternative evaluation mechanism. This requires students to write an extended text in consecutive sections that are drafted and revised with external…

  17. Residency Programs and Clinical Leadership Skills Among New Saudi Graduate Nurses.

    PubMed

    Al-Dossary, Reem Nassar; Kitsantas, Panagiota; Maddox, P J

    2016-01-01

    Nurse residency programs have been adopted by health care organizations to assist new graduate nurses with daily challenges such as intense working environments, increasing patient acuity, and complex technologies. Overall, nurse residency programs are proven beneficial in helping nurses transition from the student role to independent practitioners and bedside leaders. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of residency programs on leadership skills of new Saudi graduate nurses who completed a residency program compared to new Saudi graduate nurses who did not participate in residency programs. The study design was cross-sectional involving a convenience sample (n = 98) of new graduate nurses from three hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The Clinical Leadership Survey was used to measure the new graduate nurses' clinical leadership skills based on whether they completed a residency program or not. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to examine leadership skills in this sample of new Saudi graduate nurses. A significant difference was found between residents and nonresidents in their leadership skills (t = 10.48, P = .000). Specifically, residents were significantly more likely to show higher levels of leadership skills compared to their counterparts. Attending a residency program was associated with a significant increase in clinical leadership skills. The findings of this study indicate that there is a need to implement more residency programs in hospitals of Saudi Arabia. It is imperative that nurse managers and policy makers in Saudi Arabia consider these findings to improve nurses' leadership skills, which will in turn improve patient care. Further research should examine how residency programs influence new graduate nurses' transition from student to practitioner with regard to clinical leadership skills in Saudi Arabia.

  18. Assessing students' communication skills: validation of a global rating.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Simone; Muehlinghaus, Isabel; Froehmel, Annette; Ortwein, Heiderose

    2008-12-01

    Communication skills training is an accepted part of undergraduate medical programs nowadays. In addition to learning experiences its importance should be emphasised by performance-based assessment. As detailed checklists have been shown to be not well suited for the assessment of communication skills for different reasons, this study aimed to validate a global rating scale. A Canadian instrument was translated to German and adapted to assess students' communication skills during an end-of-semester-OSCE. Subjects were second and third year medical students at the reformed track of the Charité-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin. Different groups of raters were trained to assess students' communication skills using the global rating scale. Validity testing included concurrent validity and construct validity: Judgements of different groups of raters were compared to expert ratings as a defined gold standard. Furthermore, the amount of agreement between scores obtained with this global rating scale and a different instrument for assessing communication skills was determined. Results show that communication skills can be validly assessed by trained non-expert raters as well as standardised patients using this instrument.

  19. How Effective Are Self- and Peer Assessment of Oral Presentation Skills Compared with Teachers' Assessments?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Grez, Luc; Valcke, Martin; Roozen, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of oral presentation skills is an underexplored area. The study described here focuses on the agreement between professional assessment and self- and peer assessment of oral presentation skills and explores student perceptions about peer assessment. The study has the merit of paying attention to the inter-rater reliability of the…

  20. Chart Review Skills: A Dimension of Clinical Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Axel A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A study of undergraduate medical students' abilities to identify salient information in reviewing patient charts was conducted at Southern Illinois University. Specific goals were to develop and test a method for assessing chart skills and to test several hypotheses that examine the effect of certain factors on chart review performance.…

  1. Developing an equipment library for clinical skills and simulation training.

    PubMed

    Barrott, Joanne; Hope, Angela

    2011-08-01

    This article describes the the development of a regional equipment library for clinical skills and simulation training. This was a project undertaken to address a reduction in the available funding for the purchasing of clinical skills equipment throughout the Yorkshire and Humber region. It was envisaged that utilizing regionally accessible equipment through the development of an equipment library could support clinical areas with no other means of acquiring the necessary equipment for training. A consultation exercise met with initial concerns around the cost of some of this equipment and who would be responsible for the repair, transportation costs and maintenance. A SWOT analysis identified how these concerns may be addressed and processes of developing a database, tracking usage and auditing of the service emerged.

  2. Assessing pragmatic skills in elicited production.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, Peter

    2004-02-01

    In developing a test of pragmatic skills for children ages 4 to 9 years, we focused on a number of functional language skills that are important for children's success in early schooling and for the development of fluent reading and writing. They included (1) wh-question asking, (2) communicative role taking, (3) linking events in a cohesive narrative, and (4) articulating the mental states of the characters in a story. All of the proposed items provide specific referential support and pragmatic motivation for the forms and content to be produced by the child. The pictured materials and elicitation prompts constrain the range of appropriate utterances, so the children's productions are more easily scored than an open-ended spontaneous speech sample. All tasks described show a clear developmental trend, a clear separation between the performance of typically developing and language-impaired children, and no performance differences between African American English- and Mainstream American English-speaking children.

  3. Impact of tailored feedback in assessment of communication skills for medical students.

    PubMed

    Uhm, Seilin; Lee, Gui H; Jin, Jeong K; Bak, Yong I; Jeoung, Yeon O; Kim, Chan W

    2015-01-01

    Background Finding out the effective ways of teaching and assessing communication skills remain a challenging part of medication education. This study aims at exploring the usefulness and effectiveness of having additional feedback using qualitative analysis in assessment of communication skills in undergraduate medical training. We also determined the possibilities of using qualitative analysis in developing tailored strategies for improvement in communication skills training. Methods This study was carried out on medical students (n=87) undergoing their final year clinical performance examination on communication skills using standardized patient by video-recording and transcribing their performances. Video-recordings of 26 students were randomly selected for qualitative analysis, and additional feedback was provided. We assessed the level of acceptance of communication skills scores between the study and nonstudy group and within the study group, before and after receiving feedback based on qualitative analysis. Results There was a statistically significant increase in the level of acceptance of feedback after delivering additional feedback using qualitative analysis, where the percentage of agreement with feedback increased from 15.4 to 80.8% (p<0.001). Conclusions Incorporating feedback based on qualitative analysis for communication skills assessment gives essential information for medical students to learn and self-reflect, which could potentially lead to improved communication skills. As evident from our study, feedback becomes more meaningful and effective with additional feedback using qualitative analysis.

  4. Cross-platform digital assessment forms for evaluating surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts

    2015-01-01

    A variety of structured assessment tools for use in surgical training have been reported, but extant assessment tools often employ paper-based rating forms. Digital assessment forms for evaluating surgical skills could potentially offer advantages over paper-based forms, especially in complex assessment situations. In this paper, we report on the development of cross-platform digital assessment forms for use with multiple raters in order to facilitate the automatic processing of surgical skills assessments that include structured ratings. The FileMaker 13 platform was used to create a database containing the digital assessment forms, because this software has cross-platform functionality on both desktop computers and handheld devices. The database is hosted online, and the rating forms can therefore also be accessed through most modern web browsers. Cross-platform digital assessment forms were developed for the rating of surgical skills. The database platform used in this study was reasonably priced, intuitive for the user, and flexible. The forms have been provided online as free downloads that may serve as the basis for further development or as inspiration for future efforts. In conclusion, digital assessment forms can be used for the structured rating of surgical skills and have the potential to be especially useful in complex assessment situations with multiple raters, repeated assessments in various times and locations, and situations requiring substantial subsequent data processing or complex score calculations.

  5. Core skills assessment to improve mathematical competency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Michael; Bowe, Brian; Fhloinn, Eabhnat Ní

    2013-12-01

    Many engineering undergraduates begin third-level education with significant deficiencies in their core mathematical skills. Every year, in the Dublin Institute of Technology, a diagnostic test is given to incoming first-year students, consistently revealing problems in basic mathematics. It is difficult to motivate students to address these problems; instead, they struggle through their degree, carrying a serious handicap of poor core mathematical skills, as confirmed by exploratory testing of final year students. In order to improve these skills, a pilot project was set up in which a 'module' in core mathematics was developed. The course material was basic, but 90% or higher was required to pass. Students were allowed to repeat this module throughout the year by completing an automated examination on WebCT populated by a question bank. Subsequent to the success of this pilot with third-year mechanical engineering students, the project was extended to five different engineering programmes, across three different year-groups. Full results and analysis of this project are presented, including responses to interviews carried out with a selection of the students involved.

  6. Right person, right skills, right job: the contribution of objective structured clinical examinations in advancing staff nurse experts.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Marion; Strube, Petra; Vaux, Amanda; West, Nicky; Auditore, Anthony

    2013-10-01

    Recruitment processes need to discriminate among candidates to ensure that the right person with the right skills is selected for advancement opportunities. An innovative recruitment process using an objective structured clinical examination grounded in best practice guidelines resulted in improved recruitment practices for senior nursing clinical expert roles. Candidates' skills, knowledge, and attitudes in the areas of patient focus, clinical expertise, teamwork, and leadership were assessed using a clinical simulation. Candidates achieving advancement were assessed at 6 months to validate the efficacy of the process.

  7. Assessing Patients' Cognitive Therapy Skills: Initial Evaluation of the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale.

    PubMed

    Strunk, Daniel R; Hollars, Shannon N; Adler, Abby D; Goldstein, Lizabeth A; Braun, Justin D

    2014-10-01

    In Cognitive Therapy (CT), therapists work to help patients develop skills to cope with negative affect. Most current methods of assessing patients' skills are cumbersome and impractical for clinical use. To address this issue, we developed and conducted an initial psychometric evaluation of self and therapist reported versions of a new measure of CT skills: the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale (CCTS). We evaluated the CCTS at intake and post-treatment in a sample of 67 patients participating in CT. The CCTS correlated with a preexisting measure of CT skills (the Ways of Responding Questionnaire) and was also related to concurrent depressive symptoms. Across CT, self-reported improvements in CT competencies were associated with greater changes in depressive symptoms. These findings offer initial evidence for the validity of the CCTS. We discuss the CCTS in comparison with other measures of CT skills and suggest future research directions.

  8. Social Skills: Adolf Meyer's Revision of Clinical Skill for the New Psychiatry of the Twentieth Century.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Susan

    2015-07-01

    Adolf Meyer (1866-1950) exercised considerable influence over the development of Anglo-American psychiatry during the first half of the twentieth century. The concepts and techniques he implemented at his prominent Phipps Psychiatric Clinic at Johns Hopkins remain important to psychiatric practice and neuro-scientific research today. In the 1890s, Meyer revised scientific medicine's traditional notion of clinical skill to serve what he called the 'New Psychiatry', a clinical discipline that embodied social and scientific ideals shared with other 'new' progressive reform movements in the United States. This revision conformed to his concept of psychobiology - his biological theory of mind and mental disorders - and accorded with his definition of scientific medicine as a unity of clinical-pathological methods and therapeutics. Combining insights from evolutionary biology, neuron theory and American pragmatist philosophy, Meyer concluded that subjective experience and social behaviour were functions of human biology. In addition to the time-honoured techniques devised to exploit the material data of the diseased body - observing and recording in the clinic, dissecting in the morgue and conducting histological experiments in the laboratory - he insisted that psychiatrists must also be skilled at wielding social interaction and interpersonal relationships as investigative and therapeutic tools in order to conceptualise, collect, analyse and apply the ephemeral data of 'social adaptation'. An examination of his clinical practices and teaching at Johns Hopkins between 1913 and 1917 shows how particular historical and intellectual contexts shaped Meyer's conceptualisation of social behaviour as a biological function and, subsequently, his new vision of clinical skill for twentieth-century psychiatry.

  9. Assessment of Writing Skills through Essay Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocker, Linda

    1987-01-01

    Examines reasons for using essay tests in the direct assessment of writing ability. Reviews the steps in developing a large-scale testing program; e.g., creating a pool of topics or prompts; developing scoring procedures; training raters; field-testing the system; scoring writing samples; assessing reliability; and assessing validity. (DMM)

  10. The importance of knowledge, skills, and attitude attributes for veterinarians in clinical and non-clinical fields of practice: a survey of licensed veterinarians in Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Michèle Y; Vrins, André

    2009-01-01

    To improve content validity and the pertinence of outcome assessment tools used for the undergraduate Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program at the University of Montreal's Faculté de médecine vétérinaire, a survey of members of the Quebec veterinary association was conducted. This survey aimed to determine the importance of a list of 71 attributes-categorized as knowledge, general skills, specific skills, and attitudes-for clinical and non-clinical types of professional activities. The results indicated that all basic knowledge components, general skills, and attitudes were equally important for all types of veterinary professional activities, while the importance of specific skills was significantly different for clinical practice and non-clinical fields. It was therefore proposed that outcomes assessment surveys of stakeholders, such as alumni and employers, be analyzed separately for each type of career option.

  11. The Use of Structured Imagery and Dispositional Measurement to Assess Situational Use of Mindfulness Skills

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jonathan C.; Bach, Patricia A.; Cassisi, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    The recent proliferation of studies on mindfulness produced varying theoretical models, each based in part on how mindfulness is assessed. These models agree, however, that mindfulness encompasses moment-to-moment or situational experiences. Incongruence between dispositional and situational assessment would be problematic for theory and empirical research. In particular, it remains to be established whether situational measurement is an accurate method for mindfulness assessment and whether dispositional measures are able to accurately detect mindfulness skills in various situations. The association between dispositional and situational mindfulness processes (i.e., situational attention awareness and emotion acceptance) was examined in two studies. In Study 1 (N = 148), independent groups who reported high and low levels of dispositional mindfulness skills were compared on a continuous measure of situational mindfulness skills. In Study 2 (N = 317), dispositional mindfulness questionnaires were used to predict situational use of mindfulness skills. Results suggest not only that situational measures accurately detect use of mindfulness skills, but also that dispositional measures can predict one’s use of situational mindfulness skills. Findings from both studies were consistent across both positive and negative situations. Moreover, neither neuroticism nor extraversion was shown to have a moderating effect on the relationship between dispositional and situational use of mindfulness skills. The implications of these findings for clinical practice and future investigations pertaining to measurement validity in this area are discussed. PMID:23936175

  12. The use of structured imagery and dispositional measurement to assess situational use of mindfulness skills.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan C; Bach, Patricia A; Cassisi, Jeffrey E

    2013-01-01

    The recent proliferation of studies on mindfulness produced varying theoretical models, each based in part on how mindfulness is assessed. These models agree, however, that mindfulness encompasses moment-to-moment or situational experiences. Incongruence between dispositional and situational assessment would be problematic for theory and empirical research. In particular, it remains to be established whether situational measurement is an accurate method for mindfulness assessment and whether dispositional measures are able to accurately detect mindfulness skills in various situations. The association between dispositional and situational mindfulness processes (i.e., situational attention awareness and emotion acceptance) was examined in two studies. In Study 1 (N = 148), independent groups who reported high and low levels of dispositional mindfulness skills were compared on a continuous measure of situational mindfulness skills. In Study 2 (N = 317), dispositional mindfulness questionnaires were used to predict situational use of mindfulness skills. Results suggest not only that situational measures accurately detect use of mindfulness skills, but also that dispositional measures can predict one's use of situational mindfulness skills. Findings from both studies were consistent across both positive and negative situations. Moreover, neither neuroticism nor extraversion was shown to have a moderating effect on the relationship between dispositional and situational use of mindfulness skills. The implications of these findings for clinical practice and future investigations pertaining to measurement validity in this area are discussed.

  13. Does Computer-Based Motor Skill Assessment Training Transfer to Live Assessing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Luke E.; Taliaferro, Andrea; Krause, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Developing competency in motor skill assessment has been identified as a critical need in physical educator preparation. We conducted this study to evaluate (a) the effectiveness of a web-based instructional program--Motor Skill Assessment Program (MSAP)--for developing assessment competency, and specifically (b) whether competency developed by…

  14. Who should teach clinical skills to nursing students?

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Katherine M

    Nurse education has traditionally relied on clinical placements to provide nursing students with the 'hands-on' experience that is not possible to teach in a classroom setting. However, with changes to the NHS this is becoming increasingly difficult, with fewer resources available and issues of patient safety to consider. Hennman and Cunningham (2005) recognize there is a significant gulf between the theoretical component taught in the classroom and the complex realities of clinical practice. Cave (2005) has suggested the move into higher education has hindered rather than helped the linking of theory and practice in nurse education, because many nurse teachers are far removed from clinical practice and therefore no longer competent or clinically credible to be able to teach up-to-date clinical skills. In Scotland the Practice Education Facilitators role in integrating theory with practice is essential for both the NHS Trusts and higher education institutes. It would appear that these clinicians are the lynchpin between linking university work with the harsh realities of daily practice. If nurse education is to provide effective clinical skill simulation then it must also provide effective teachers who are up to date with current practice. In many cases this will not be the nurse teacher.

  15. Clinical scenarios: enhancing the skill set of the nurse as a vigilant guardian.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Therese; Belcher, Erin; Sarr, Barbara; Riutta, Emily; Ferrier, Jennifer Douglas; Botten, Mary A

    2010-08-01

    Patient safety is enhanced when nursing staff recognize and respond to subtle changes in a patient's condition. In this quality improvement project, simulated clinical scenarios were conducted with staff nurses on a multi-specialty surgical unit. Scenarios were developed from actual patient situations as well as from calls to the rapid response team. Nurses were given the opportunity to practice assessment, critical thinking, and communication skills. Pre- and post-project surveys were used to assess nurses' perceived level of confidence and skill in handling emergency situations. Post-project survey data showed that nurses perceived that the scenario exercises improved their confidence and skill in managing critical patient situations. In addition, the findings supported the continued use of the scenarios as a teaching strategy. The scenarios have increased nurses' awareness of early signs of patients' conditions deteriorating and have the potential to decrease the number of patient situations that escalate to emergencies.

  16. Effectiveness of current teaching methods in Cardiology: the SKILLS (medical Students Knowledge Integration of Lower Level clinical Skills) study

    PubMed Central

    Lavranos, G; Koliaki, C; Briasoulis, A; Nikolaou, A; Stefanadis, C

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the study is to assess reported changes in medical students’ capacity to attain five basic cardiological clinical skills, following a one-month intensive cardiology course provisioned in the core curriculum. Materials and Methods: An anonymous questionnaire comprising self reported performance in the five skills, namely 1) arterial blood pressure measurement, 2) cardiac auscultation, 3) electrocardiogram (ECG) carry out, 4) ECG interpretation and 5) defibrillation, was distributed to 177 fifth year students of the Athens Medical School upon initiating the cardiology course (pre-training group) and to 59 students matched for sex, age, year of study and training centre, following completion of the course (post training group). Comparison of pre- and post- training performance was evaluated using the χ2 test. Results: No change was noted with regards to blood pressure measurement, cardiac auscultation or defibrillation. By contrast, a statistically significant improvement was reported for ECG execution (54.3 versus 81.4%; p<0.001) and interpretation (from 33.1 to 89.8%; p<0.001). Conclusions: Improvement in the execution and interpretation of ECGs seems to be among the strengths of the cardiology training program. Further studies including larger samples from multiple medical schools and objective assessment of skill execution might facilitate accurate training evaluation and define opportunities for improvement. PMID:23935341

  17. Clinical training in medical students during preclinical years in the skill lab

    PubMed Central

    Upadhayay, Namrata

    2017-01-01

    Background In Nepal, medical education is a high-stakes and stressful course. To enhance learning and minimize students’ stress, the conventional method has been replaced by integrated, student-centered learning. As an approach to train effectively, colleges have started establishing skill labs. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of clinical skill training on exam performance as compared with the conventional teaching practice. Further, to assess the perceptions of students of the importance of skill lab training in college. Method Twenty students were randomly selected to participate in this cross-sectional study. On the internal examination, students showed skills on manikins, and examiners evaluated them. A sample question in the exam was “To perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on half body human manikin.” On completion of the exam, opinions were collected from the students via a predesigned self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire included questions regarding skill lab use and its benefits to them in developing their skills, with a few questions related to the exam pattern. The responses were expressed in frequencies. Results We found that all (20/20) students performed CPR with confidence and without hesitation on the manikin. The practical examination performance (marks) was categorized as excellent (7/20), good (8/20), average (3/20), and poor (2/20). The pass percentage after skill training was increased by 25% as compared with conventional teaching practice. The majority of the students (17/20) mentioned that skill is better learned by doing than by observing others’ performance or watching videos. A few students (6/20) said skills are better learned by observing the real disease state. They mentioned that skill lab is the better choice for learning major skills such as catheterization, opening vein, auscultation of heart sounds, and endotracheal intubation. Conclusion Students are confident and showed better exam

  18. Skills-Building Assessment of Service-Focused Wellness Assistantships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segrist, Kathy; Schoonaert, Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of graduate student competencies is important, and benefits are realized at the student, department, institution, and community levels. The institution has a method of assessing the achievement of identified skills; the gerontology department or division has prepared workers to promote to potential employers and to potential recruits to…

  19. Assessing Job Knowledge and Generally Useful Skills of Young Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmann, J. Stanley

    1977-01-01

    Discusses data collection and presents data analysis of NAEP's (National Assessment of Educational Progress) career and occupational development (COD) assessment, designed to determine how knowledgeable young Americans are about the work of the world and how well developed their basic skills (needed to obtain almost any job) are. (SH) Aspect of…

  20. To Assess Students' Attitudes, Skills and Competencies in Mathematical Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingefjard, Thomas; Holmquist, Mikael

    2005-01-01

    Peer-to-peer assessment, take-home exams and a mathematical modeling survey were used to monitor and assess students' attitudes, skills and competencies in mathematical modeling. The students were all in a secondary mathematics, teacher education program with a comprehensive amount of mathematics studies behind them. Findings indicate that…

  1. Investigating Secondary School Students' Unmediated Peer Assessment Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsivitanidou, Olia E.; Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Hovardas, Tasos

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate secondary school students' unmediated peer assessment skills. Specifically, 36 seventh graders, without receiving any kind of support, were anonymously assigned to reciprocally assess their peers' science web-portfolios. Additionally, students' attitudes towards and intentions about the use of…

  2. Assessment of Inquiry Skills in the SAILS Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Inquiry provides both the impetus and experience that helps students acquire problem solving and lifelong learning skills. Teachers on the Strategies for Assessment of Inquiry Learning in Science Project (SAILS) strengthened their inquiry pedagogy, through focusing on seeking assessment evidence for formative action. This paper reports on both the…

  3. Developing Enterprise Skills through Peer-Assessed Pitch Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faherty, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of using summative peer assessment to develop enterprise skills within higher education. Design/methodology/approach: An empirical investigation analysing students own perceptions of the peer assessment process to evaluate its impact. Findings: Participating students indicate that…

  4. Assessing Gross Motor Skills of Kosovar Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shala, Merita

    2009-01-01

    In the light of the new developments in preschool education in Kosovo, this study attempts to carry out an assessment of the development of gross motor skills of preschool children attending institutional education. The emphasis is on creating a set of tests to measure the motor attainments of these children by conducting assessments of the…

  5. Assessment of DoD Job Skill Enhancement Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, J. D.; And Others

    In response to Congressional direction, an assessment was undertaken of programs developed by the Department of Defense (DoD) that can be made available to civilian organizations to provide immediate support and assistance to upgrade skills for better civilian employment opportunities. The assessment focuses on interactive courseware programs and…

  6. Teaching & Assessing 21st Century Skills. The Classroom Strategies Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano, Robert J.; Heflebower, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    As the 21st century unfolds, the pace of change in the world is accelerating. Teachers and administrators must lead the cultural shift required to ensure their students can survive and thrive in the changing world. In Teaching & Assessing 21st Century Skills the authors present a model of instruction and assessment based on a combination of…

  7. Programmatic Assessment of Information Literacy Skills Using Rubrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Dorothy Anne

    2009-01-01

    The author describes the programmatic assessment of her medium-sized institution's library instruction program that focuses on the information literacy skills taught in the research component of the required English composition course. A research journal kept by each student serves as the assessment tool, and multiple rubrics are used for data…

  8. Development of a Virtual Reality Assessment of Everyday Living Skills

    PubMed Central

    Ruse, Stacy A.; Davis, Vicki G.; Atkins, Alexandra S.; Krishnan, K. Ranga R.; Fox, Kolleen H.; Harvey, Philip D.; Keefe, Richard S.E.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairments affect the majority of patients with schizophrenia and these impairments predict poor long term psychosocial outcomes.  Treatment studies aimed at cognitive impairment in patients with schizophrenia not only require demonstration of improvements on cognitive tests, but also evidence that any cognitive changes lead to clinically meaningful improvements.  Measures of “functional capacity” index the extent to which individuals have the potential to perform skills required for real world functioning.  Current data do not support the recommendation of any single instrument for measurement of functional capacity.  The Virtual Reality Functional Capacity Assessment Tool (VRFCAT) is a novel, interactive gaming based measure of functional capacity that uses a realistic simulated environment to recreate routine activities of daily living. Studies are currently underway to evaluate and establish the VRFCAT’s sensitivity, reliability, validity, and practicality. This new measure of functional capacity is practical, relevant, easy to use, and has several features that improve validity and sensitivity of measurement of function in clinical trials of patients with CNS disorders. PMID:24798174

  9. Development of a virtual reality assessment of everyday living skills.

    PubMed

    Ruse, Stacy A; Davis, Vicki G; Atkins, Alexandra S; Krishnan, K Ranga R; Fox, Kolleen H; Harvey, Philip D; Keefe, Richard S E

    2014-04-23

    Cognitive impairments affect the majority of patients with schizophrenia and these impairments predict poor long term psychosocial outcomes.  Treatment studies aimed at cognitive impairment in patients with schizophrenia not only require demonstration of improvements on cognitive tests, but also evidence that any cognitive changes lead to clinically meaningful improvements.  Measures of "functional capacity" index the extent to which individuals have the potential to perform skills required for real world functioning.  Current data do not support the recommendation of any single instrument for measurement of functional capacity.  The Virtual Reality Functional Capacity Assessment Tool (VRFCAT) is a novel, interactive gaming based measure of functional capacity that uses a realistic simulated environment to recreate routine activities of daily living. Studies are currently underway to evaluate and establish the VRFCAT's sensitivity, reliability, validity, and practicality. This new measure of functional capacity is practical, relevant, easy to use, and has several features that improve validity and sensitivity of measurement of function in clinical trials of patients with CNS disorders.

  10. EQClinic: a platform for learning communication skills in clinical consultations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunfeng; Scott, Karen M; Lim, Renee L; Taylor, Silas; Calvo, Rafael A

    2016-01-01

    Background Doctors' verbal and non-verbal communication skills have an impact on patients' health outcomes, so it is important for medical students to develop these skills. Traditional, non-verbal communication skills training can involve a tutor manually annotating a student's non-verbal behaviour during patient-doctor consultations, but this is very time-consuming. Tele-conference systems have been used in verbal communication skills training. Methods We describe EQClinic, a system that enables verbal and non-verbal communication skills training during tele-consultations with simulated patients (SPs), with evaluation exercises promoting reflection. Students and SPs can have tele-consultations through the tele-consultation component. In this component, SPs can provide feedback to students through a thumbs-up/ thumbs-down tool and a comments box. EQClinic automatically analyses communication features in the recorded consultations, such as facial expressions, and provides graphical representations. Our 2015 pilot study investigated whether EQClinic helped students be aware of their non-verbal behaviour and improve their communication skills, and evaluated the usability of the platform. Students received automated feedback, and SP and tutor evaluations, and then completed self-assessment and reflection questionnaires. Results Eight medical students and three SPs conducted 13 tele-consultations using EQClinic. More students paid attention to their non-verbal communication and students who were engaged in two consultations felt more confident in their second consultation. Students rated the system positively, felt comfortable using it (5.9/7), and reported that the structure (5.4/7) and information (5.8/7) were clear. This pilot provides evidence that EQClinic helps, and positively influences, medical students practise their communication skills with SPs using a tele-conference platform. Discussion It is not easy to improve non-verbal communication skills in a short

  11. EQClinic: a platform for learning communication skills in clinical consultations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunfeng; Scott, Karen M.; Lim, Renee L.; Taylor, Silas; Calvo, Rafael A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Doctors’ verbal and non-verbal communication skills have an impact on patients’ health outcomes, so it is important for medical students to develop these skills. Traditional, non-verbal communication skills training can involve a tutor manually annotating a student's non-verbal behaviour during patient–doctor consultations, but this is very time-consuming. Tele-conference systems have been used in verbal communication skills training. Methods We describe EQClinic, a system that enables verbal and non-verbal communication skills training during tele-consultations with simulated patients (SPs), with evaluation exercises promoting reflection. Students and SPs can have tele-consultations through the tele-consultation component. In this component, SPs can provide feedback to students through a thumbs-up/ thumbs-down tool and a comments box. EQClinic automatically analyses communication features in the recorded consultations, such as facial expressions, and provides graphical representations. Our 2015 pilot study investigated whether EQClinic helped students be aware of their non-verbal behaviour and improve their communication skills, and evaluated the usability of the platform. Students received automated feedback, and SP and tutor evaluations, and then completed self-assessment and reflection questionnaires. Results Eight medical students and three SPs conducted 13 tele-consultations using EQClinic. More students paid attention to their non-verbal communication and students who were engaged in two consultations felt more confident in their second consultation. Students rated the system positively, felt comfortable using it (5.9/7), and reported that the structure (5.4/7) and information (5.8/7) were clear. This pilot provides evidence that EQClinic helps, and positively influences, medical students practise their communication skills with SPs using a tele-conference platform. Discussion It is not easy to improve non-verbal communication skills in a

  12. Skill Assessment in the Interpretation of 3D Fracture Patterns from Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Murillo, Salvador; Hanley, Jessica M; Kreiter, Clarence D; Karam, Matthew D; Anderson, Donald D

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Interpreting two-dimensional radiographs to ascertain the three-dimensional (3D) position and orientation of fracture planes and bone fragments is an important component of orthopedic diagnosis and clinical management. This skill, however, has not been thoroughly explored and measured. Our primary research question is to determine if 3D radiographic image interpretation can be reliably assessed, and whether this assessment varies by level of training. A test designed to measure this skill among orthopedic surgeons would provide a quantitative benchmark for skill assessment and training research. Methods Two tests consisting of a series of online exercises were developed to measure this skill. Each exercise displayed a pair of musculoskeletal radiographs. Participants selected one of three CT slices of the same or similar fracture patterns that best matched the radiographs. In experiment 1, 10 orthopedic residents and staff responded to nine questions. In experiment 2, 52 residents from both orthopedics and radiology responded to 12 questions. Results Experiment 1 yielded a Cronbach alpha of 0.47. Performance correlated with experience; r(8) = 0.87, p<0.01, suggesting that the test could be both valid and reliable with a slight increase in test length. In experiment 2, after removing three non-discriminating items, the Cronbach coefficient alpha was 0.28 and performance correlated with experience; r(50) = 0.25, p<0.10. Conclusions Although evidence for reliability and validity was more compelling with the first experiment, the analyses suggest motivation and test duration are important determinants of test efficacy. The interpretation of radiographs to discern 3D information is a promising and a relatively unexplored area for surgical skill education and assessment. The online test was useful and reliable. Further test development is likely to increase test effectiveness. Clinical Relevance Accurately interpreting radiographic images is an

  13. Assessing computer skills in Tanzanian medical students: an elective experience

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Miriam; Coombes, John C; Miranda, J Jaime; Melvin, Rob; Young, Eoin JW; Azarmina, Pejman

    2004-01-01

    Background One estimate suggests that by 2010 more than 30% of a physician's time will be spent using information technology tools. The aim of this study is to assess the information and communication technologies (ICT) skills of medical students in Tanzania. We also report a pilot intervention of peer mentoring training in ICT by medical students from the UK tutoring students in Tanzania. Methods Design: Cross sectional study and pilot intervention study. Participants: Fourth year medical students (n = 92) attending Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Main outcome measures: Self-reported assessment of competence on ICT-related topics and ability to perform specific ICT tasks. Further information related to frequency of computer use (hours per week), years of computer use, reasons for use and access to computers. Skills at specific tasks were reassessed for 12 students following 4 to 6 hours of peer mentoring training. Results The highest levels of competence in generic ICT areas were for email, Internet and file management. For other skills such as word processing most respondents reported low levels of competence. The abilities to perform specific ICT skills were low – less than 60% of the participants were able to perform the core specific skills assessed. A period of approximately 5 hours of peer mentoring training produced an approximate doubling of competence scores for these skills. Conclusion Our study has found a low level of ability to use ICT facilities among medical students in a leading university in sub-Saharan Africa. A pilot scheme utilising UK elective students to tutor basic skills showed potential. Attention is required to develop interventions that can improve ICT skills, as well as computer access, in order to bridge the digital divide. PMID:15306029

  14. Educational assessment of mathematics skills and abilities.

    PubMed

    Bryant, B R; Rivera, D P

    1997-01-01

    Mathematics assessments play a valuable role in identifying students' strengths and weaknesses and in developing and monitoring instructional practice. Over the last century, mathematics assessment has been refined as math content has changed as a result of curriculum reform. Today, researchers and practitioners use various assessment techniques to (a) identify students who have mathematics learning disabilities (LD), (b) target individual strengths and weaknesses across mathematics areas, (c) document the effects of mathematics instruction in a remedial or special program, (d) identify strategies that students employ during math activities, (e) conduct research about the characteristics of students with math LD, and (f) examine the technical characteristics of mathematics tests. This article provides an historical overview of the development of mathematics assessment and a description of specific strategies for conducting math evaluations.

  15. Summative clinical competency assessment: A survey of ultrasound practitioners' views.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Gill

    2015-02-01

    Clinical competency and the assessment of core skills is a crucial element of any programme leading to an award with a clinical skills component. This has become a more prominent feature of current reports on quality health care provision. This project aimed to determine ultrasound practitioners' opinions about how best to assess clinical competency. An on-line questionnaire was sent to contacts from the Consortium for the Accreditation of Sonographic Education and details distributed at the British Medical Ultrasound Society conference in 2011. One hundred and sixteen responses were received from a range of clinical staff with an interest in ultrasound assessment. The majority of respondents suggested that competency assessments should take place in the clinical departments with or without an element of assessment at the education centre. Moderation was an important area highlighted by respondents, with 84% of respondents suggesting that two assessors were required and 66% of those stating some element of external moderation should be included. The findings suggest that respondents' preference is for some clinical competency assessments to take place on routine lists within the clinical department, assessed by two people one of which would be an external assessor. In view of recent reports relating to training and assessment of health care professionals, the ultrasound profession needs to begin the debate about how best to assess clinical competence and ensure appropriate first post-competency of anyone undertaking ultrasound examinations.

  16. Cinemeducation: teaching family assessment skills using full-length movies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Astrid H; Blake, Barbara J; Taylor, Gloria A; Hannings, Glenda

    2013-05-01

    A thorough family assessment provides a foundation for the nursing process when working with families. Therefore, nurses, along with other health care providers must develop expertise in conducting family assessments to provide the best possible care within the community. This article describes an innovative educational strategy using movies to teach family assessment skills and puts forth recommendations for future research to provide evidence to support this teaching modality.

  17. From the educational bench to the clinical bedside: translating the Dreyfus developmental model to the learning of clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Carraccio, Carol L; Benson, Bradley J; Nixon, L James; Derstine, Pamela L

    2008-08-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Outcome Project has shifted the focus of residents' education to competency-based outcomes of learning. The challenge of meaningful assessment of learner competence has stimulated interest in the Dreyfus and Dreyfus Model, a framework for assessing skill acquisition that describes developmental stages beginning with novice and progressing through advanced beginner, competent, proficient, expert, and master. Many educators have adopted this model, but no consensus about its adaptation to clinical medicine has been documented. In this article, the authors seek to integrate generally accepted knowledge and beliefs about how one learns to practice clinical medicine into a coherent developmental framework using the Dreyfus and Dreyfus model of skill acquisition. Using the general domain of patient care, the characteristics and skills of learners at each stage of development are translated into typical behaviors. A tangible picture of this model in real-world practice is provided through snapshots of typical learner performance at discrete moments in time along the developmental continuum. The Dreyfus and Dreyfus model is discussed in the context of other developmental models of assessment of learner competence. The limitations of the model, in particular the controversy around the behaviors of "experts," are discussed in light of other interpretations of expertise in the literature. Support for descriptive developmental models of assessment is presented in the context of a discussion of the deconstructing versus reconstructing of competencies.

  18. Assessing family caregiver skill in managing behavioral symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Farran, Carol J.; Fogg, Louis G.; McCann, Judith J.; Etkin, Caryn; Dong, Xinqi; Barnes, Lisa L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This measurement study operationalized family caregiver skill in managing behavioral symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by testing a Caregiver Assessment of Behavioral Skill-Self Report measure (CAB-SR). Method A cross-sectional design was used. Caregivers had a family member with possible/probable AD, resided at home with the care recipient and provided the majority of care (N=82). The mail-administered assessment included the CAB-SR and other care recipient and caregiver measures. Results Preliminary CAB-SR reliability and validity were determined, using reliability, factor analytic and correlational procedures. Conclusion This measure provides a preliminary assessment of caregiver skill in managing behavioral symptoms of AD and shows promise for use in research and clinical intervention settings. PMID:21500018

  19. Skill Learning Through Early Clinical Exposure: An Experience of Indian Medical School

    PubMed Central

    Jagzape, Arunita; Srivastava, Tripti; Gotarkar, Shashank

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Indian Medical curriculum being discipline based, there is a line of demarcation between preclinical and clinical subjects. The challenges in medical education include the methods that would enhance the clinical education quality; one such method been Early Clinical Exposure (ECE). ECE can help to instill the skill component of medical education in the first year students helping to minimize the line of demarcation. Hence this study was undertaken to assess the skill learning of students through early clinical exposure and to collate the perception of them. Materials and Methods: In the present study, students of 1st MBBS were exposed to ECE as an adjunct teaching method with preset modules. They were evaluated by Objectively Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Feedback was obtained from 1st MBBS and also from the same students after passing the 1st MBBS in 4th semester. Results Significant differences in pre and post OSCE scores were noted (p<0.0001). Seventy six percent students rated ECE as an excellent tool. Second year students also perceived ECE held in 1st year was helpful to correlate topics and increasing confidence. Conclusion ECE had an effective influence on learning as manifested in skills gained by the students and their perceptions of ECE being helpful prospectively in their routine clinical posting. PMID:26894088

  20. Assessing Teaching Skills with a Mobile Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, David

    2013-01-01

    Because mobile technologies are overtaking personal computers as the primary tools of Internet access, and cloud-based resources are fundamentally transforming the world's knowledge, new forms of teaching and assessment are required to foster 21st century literacies, including those needed by K-12 teachers. A key feature of mobile technology…

  1. The teaching of clinical skills in the context of children's nursing: a UK survey.

    PubMed

    McNee, Peter; Clarke, Dave; Davies, Jane

    2005-09-01

    The teaching of clinical skills within nursing is currently enjoying a resurgence following the implementation of the 'Fitness for Practice Curriculum'. However, the teaching of clinical skills specifically within children's nursing has received little attention within the research arena. This article presents the data of a national postal survey sent to United Kingdom institutions providing pre-registration child branch studies, to ascertain the current provision of clinical skills teaching. The findings conclude that very few institutions have invested in specific skills laboratories to teach children's nursing students. It was also identified that a wide range of clinical skills are taught to child branch students; however, the resources and realism to clinical practice is limited by the lack of specialist children's skills laboratories or equipment. In conclusion the authors recommend the development of child specific skills laboratories, to augment child branch skills teaching, in order to enhance the realistic simulation of clinical practice.

  2. Development of a Social Skills Assessment Screening Scale for Psychiatric Rehabilitation Settings: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhola, Poornima; Basavarajappa, Chethan; Guruprasad, Deepti; Hegde, Gayatri; Khanam, Fatema; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Chaturvedi, Santosh K.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Deficits in social skills may present in a range of psychiatric disorders, particularly in the more serious and persistent conditions, and have an influence on functioning across various domains. Aims: This pilot study aimed at developing a brief measure, for structured evaluation and screening for social skills deficits, which can be easily integrated into routine clinical practice. Settings and Design: The sample consisted of 380 inpatients and their accompanying caregivers, referred to Psychiatric Rehabilitation Services at a tertiary care government psychiatric hospital. Materials and Methods: The evaluation included an Inpatient intake Proforma and the 20-item Social Skills Assessment Screening Scale (SSASS). Disability was assessed using the Indian Disability Evaluation and Assessment Scale (IDEAS) for a subset of 94 inpatients. Statistical Analysis Used: The analysis included means and standard deviations, frequency and percentages, Cronbach's alpha to assess internal consistency, t-tests to assess differences in social skills deficits between select subgroups, and correlation between SSASS and IDEAS scores. Results: The results indicated the profile of social skills deficits assessed among the inpatients with varied psychiatric diagnoses. The “psychosis” group exhibited significantly higher deficits than the “mood disorder” group. Results indicated high internal consistency of the SSASS and adequate criterion validity demonstrated by correlations with select IDEAS domains. Modifications were made to the SSASS following the pilot study. Conclusions: The SSASS has potential value as a measure for screening and individualised intervention plans for social skills training in mental health and rehabilitation settings. The implications for future work on the psychometric properties and clinical applications are discussed. PMID:27833220

  3. Clinical program leadership: skill requirements for contemporary leaders.

    PubMed

    Spallina, Joseph M

    2002-01-01

    With knowledge of these leadership requirements and a shrinking base of experienced managers, healthcare organizations and professional societies have little choice in their approach to prepare for the leadership development challenges of the future. Organizations will focus leadership development, training, and continuing management education on integrating business tools and skills into clinical program management. The management requirements for clinical programs will continue to grow in complexity and the number of qualified managers will continue to diminish, New approaches to solving this shortage will evolve. Professional, forprofit companies, healthcare provider organizations, and academic programs will develop clinical program management training tracks. Organizations that create solutions to this management imperative will maintain their competitive edge in the challenging times that will greet the industry in the future.

  4. Preparing clinical laboratory science students with teaching skills.

    PubMed

    Isabel, Jeanne M

    2010-01-01

    Training clinical laboratory science (CLS) students in techniques of preparation and delivery of an instructional unit is an important component of all CLS education programs and required by the national accrediting agency. Participants of this study included students admitted to the CLS program at Northern Illinois University and enrolled in the teaching course offered once a year between the years of 1997 and 2009. Courses on the topic of "teaching" may be regarded by CLS students as unnecessary. However, entry level practitioners are being recruited to serve as clinical instructors soon after entering the workforce. Evaluation of the data collected indicates that students are better prepared to complete tasks related to instruction of a topic after having an opportunity to study and practice skills of teaching. Mentoring CLS students toward the career role of clinical instructor or professor is important to maintaining the workforce.

  5. A digital peer-to-peer learning platform for clinical skills development

    PubMed Central

    Basnak, Jesse; Ortynski, Jennifer; Chow, Meghan; Nzekwu, Emeka

    2017-01-01

    Background Due to constraints in time and resources, medical curricula may not provide adequate opportunities for pre-clerkship students to practice clinical skills. To address this, medical students at the University of Alberta developed a digital peer-to-peer learning initiative. The initiative assessed if students can learn clinical skills from their peers in co-curricular practice objective structured clinical exams (OSCEs). Methods A total of 144 first-year medical students participated. Students wrote case scenarios that were reviewed by physicians. Students enacted the cases in practice OSCEs, acting as the patient, physician, and evaluator. Verbal and electronic evaluations were completed. A digital platform was used to automate the process. Surveys were disseminated to assess student perceptions of their experience. Results Seventy-five percent of participants said they needed opportunities to practice patient histories and physical exams in addition to those provided in the medical school curriculum. All participants agreed that the co-curricular practice OSCEs met this need. The majority of participants also agreed that the digital platform was efficient and easy to use. Conclusion Students found the practice OSCEs and digital platform effective for learning clinical skills. Thus, peer-to-peer learning and computer automation can be useful adjuncts to traditional medical curricula. PMID:28344717

  6. Developing new dental communication skills assessment tools by including patients and other stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Wener, Mickey Emmons; Schönwetter, Dieter J; Mazurat, Nita

    2011-12-01

    Effectively using patients as teachers to provide authentic feedback is an underused strategy in dental education, but it has potential for integrating the teaching of therapeutic communication skills within the dental clinic setting. This study focuses on the absence of patient input into the design of instruments used to assess students' clinical communication skills and demonstrates how a holistic approach, with input from key stakeholders including patients, was used to produce two such instruments. The development of complementary communication assessment instruments, one for patient use and one for student use, took place in three phases. In Phase I the authors reviewed a sample of existing patient satisfaction surveys; in Phase II they captured input from stakeholders; and Phase III resulted in the generation of the patient communication assessment instrument and the student communication self-assessment instrument. This article highlights communication skill issues relevant to the education of oral health professionals and describes the rationale and process for the development of the first iteration of the patient assessment and student self-assessment clinical communication instruments.

  7. The clinic is my woodshed: a new paradigm for learning and refining communication skills.

    PubMed

    Haidet, Paul; Picchioni, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Jazz cats use the term 'woodshedding' to denote a period of intense practice during which they aim to take their playing up a few notches. Developing expertise, whether we are speaking musically or talking about communicating with patients, requires a lifelong commitment to such practice. For physicians, the woodshed is not a practice room or an isolated space. No: clinical environments are the woodsheds; they are the only places in which one can hone communication skills. The idea of 'shedding' in the setting of routine practice challenges prevailing notions about communication skills training and has implications for how such skills should be learned, nurtured and assessed. In this essay, we use stories of woodshedding from jazz music history to discuss concepts related to deliberative practice, formal education and learning communities.

  8. Assessing Social Interaction Skills of Children with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, Sunita

    1994-01-01

    An observational technique for assessing the social interaction skills of elementary age students with disabilities is described. The procedure focuses on three interaction elements: (1) initiating the interaction, (2) turn taking, and (3) responding to the interaction. The method of data recording and analysis is delineated. (DB)

  9. Using Oral Exams to Assess Communication Skills in Business Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke-Smalley, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Business, like many other fields in higher education, continues to rely largely on conventional testing methods for assessing student learning. In the current article, another evaluation approach--the oral exam--is examined as a means for building and evaluating the professional communication and oral dialogue skills needed and utilized by…

  10. Hampden District Regional Skills Center. Orientation & Assessment. Description & Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampden District Regional Skills Center, Springfield, MA.

    This booklet describes a 5-day orientation and assessment program (for economically disadvantaged people who are unemployed and have no marketable skill) designed (1) To determine the trainees' level of learning, his aptitudes, attitudes, abilities, behaviors and interests in the employment field; and (2) to introduce the trainee to the world of…

  11. Essential Skills in Diagnosis and Assessment for Beginning Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Stephen C.; Bruno, Rachelle M.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 106 educators rated the importance of knowledge statements and skill statements in the area of assessment of children in special education. Highly ranked items concerned referral, screening, prereferral, classification, state and federal guidelines, multidisciplinary team roles, monitoring student progress, and evaluating the results…

  12. Assessment of Critical Business Skill Development by MBA Alumni

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glynn, Joseph G.; Wood, Gregory R.

    2008-01-01

    Six years of survey data were analyzed to assess, among other things, the degree to which an AACSB accredited graduate business program successfully developed student skills in a variety of areas deemed important for career success. The study illustrates a methodology institutions can use to respond to increasing demands for program evaluation and…

  13. The Status of Alternative Assessments through the 1990s: Performance and Authentic Assessments in Relation to Vocational-Technical Education Technical Skills, Workplace Skills, and Related Academic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Border, Barbara

    This study examines performance and authentic assessments related to job and academic skills. It begins with a general historical perspective that discusses the evolution of assessment systems used by education and industry in the United States, Germany, the United Kingdom, Australia, and Japan. The influence of federal policy also is discussed,…

  14. Communication skills for mobile remote presence technology in clinical interactions.

    PubMed

    Nestel, Debra; Sains, Parvinder; Wetzel, Cordula M; Nolan, Carmel; Tay, Ann; Kneebone, Roger L; Darzi, Ara W

    2007-01-01

    The use of mobile robotic units for teleconsultation means that the clinician's cognitive and attention skills are divided between tele-operation of the robotic unit and the consultation with the patient. We developed a communication guide based on evidence-based patient-centred interviewing and telephone conferencing skills. The communication guide was tested by five trainee surgeons in a pre- and post-test design. Each surgeon completed three simulated patient consultations. After reading the communication guide, trainees completed three further consultations. The trainees rated authenticity, degree of difficulty, familiarity of clinical presentation and confidence in using telepresence to manage the consultations. Their mean scores were 3.0-4.6, 2.2-4.0, 4.4-4.8 and 3.2-4.2 respectively (maximum possible score 5). The simulated patients rated their satisfaction with communication. Their ratings suggested that there were areas for communication skills development with mean scores ranging from 8.2 to 11.4 (maximum possible score = 15). Although we do not yet know enough about communicating with real patients using mobile robotic units, the communication guide appeared to be useful in our simulated interactions.

  15. Who Is the Preferred Tutor in Clinical Skills Training: Physicians, Nurses, or Peers?

    PubMed

    Abay, Ece Şükriye; Turan, Sevgi; Odabaşı, Orhan; Elçin, Melih

    2017-03-15

    Phenomenon: Clinical skills centers allow structured training of undergraduate medical students for the acquisition of clinical skills in a simulated environment. Physician, nurse, or peer tutors are employed for training in those centers. All tutors should have appropriate training about the methodology used in the clinical skills training. Many of the studies revealed the effectiveness of various types of tutors. The aim of our study was to evaluate medical students' satisfaction with clinical skills training, and their opinions about the differences in coaching skills among the physician, nurse, and peer tutors.

  16. Innovative integrative bedside teaching model improves tutors' self-assessments of teaching skills and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Gat, Itai; Pessach-Gelblum, Liat; Givati, Gili; Haim, Nadav; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Unterman, Avraham; Bar-Shavit, Yochay; Grabler, Galit; Sagi, Doron; Achiron, Anat; Ziv, Amitai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patient bedside is the ideal setting for teaching physical examination, medical interviewing, and interpersonal skills. Herein we describe a novel model for bedside teaching (BST) practiced during tutor training workshop and its resulting effect on practitioners' self assessment of teaching skills and perceptions. Methods One-day tutor training workshop included theoretical knowledge supplementation regarding tutors' roles as well as implementing practical tools for clinical education, mainly BST model. The model, which emphasizes simultaneous clinical and communication teaching in a stepwise approach, was practiced by consecutive simulations with a gradual escalation of difficulty and adjusted instruction approaches. Pre- and post-workshop-adjusted questionnaires using a Likert scale of 1 to 4 were completed by participants and compared. Results Analysis was based on 25 out of 48 participants who completed both questionnaires. Significantly improved teaching skills were demonstrated upon workshop completion (mean 3.3, SD 0.5) compared with pre-training (mean 2.6, SD 0.6; p<0.001) with significant increase in most examined parameters. Significantly improved tutor's roles internalization was demonstrated after training completion (mean 3.7, SD 0.3) compared with pre-workshop (mean 3.5 SD 0.5; p=0.002). Discussion Successful BST involves combination of clinical and communication skills. BST model practiced during the workshop may contribute to improved teaching skills in this challenging environment.

  17. Innovative integrative bedside teaching model improves tutors’ self-assessments of teaching skills and attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Gat, Itai; Pessach-Gelblum, Liat; Givati, Gili; Haim, Nadav; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Unterman, Avraham; Bar-Shavit, Yochay; Grabler, Galit; Sagi, Doron; Achiron, Anat; Ziv, Amitai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patient bedside is the ideal setting for teaching physical examination, medical interviewing, and interpersonal skills. Herein we describe a novel model for bedside teaching (BST) practiced during tutor training workshop and its resulting effect on practitioners’ self assessment of teaching skills and perceptions. Methods One-day tutor training workshop included theoretical knowledge supplementation regarding tutors’ roles as well as implementing practical tools for clinical education, mainly BST model. The model, which emphasizes simultaneous clinical and communication teaching in a stepwise approach, was practiced by consecutive simulations with a gradual escalation of difficulty and adjusted instruction approaches. Pre- and post-workshop-adjusted questionnaires using a Likert scale of 1 to 4 were completed by participants and compared. Results Analysis was based on 25 out of 48 participants who completed both questionnaires. Significantly improved teaching skills were demonstrated upon workshop completion (mean 3.3, SD 0.5) compared with pre-training (mean 2.6, SD 0.6; p<0.001) with significant increase in most examined parameters. Significantly improved tutor's roles internalization was demonstrated after training completion (mean 3.7, SD 0.3) compared with pre-workshop (mean 3.5 SD 0.5; p=0.002). Discussion Successful BST involves combination of clinical and communication skills. BST model practiced during the workshop may contribute to improved teaching skills in this challenging environment. PMID:26894587

  18. Should we use philosophy to teach clinical communication skills?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Effective communication between the doctor and patient is crucial for good quality health care. Yet, this form of communication is often problematic, which may lead to several negative consequences for both patients and doctors. Clinical communication skills have become important components of medical training programmes. The traditional approach is to teach students particular communication skills, such as listening to patients and asking open-ended questions. Despite their importance, such training approaches do not seem to be enough to deliver medical practitioners who are able and committed to communicate effectively with patients. This might be due to the pervasive negative influence of the medical profession’s (mistaken) understanding of itself as a natural science on doctor–patient communication. Doctors who have been trained according to a positivist framework may consider their only responsibility to be the physical treatment of physical disorders. They may thus have little regard for the patient’s psychological and social world and by extension for communication with the patient and/or their caregivers. To address this problem, I propose a curriculum, based on the academic field of philosophy, for teaching clinical communication. PMID:28155325

  19. Should we use philosophy to teach clinical communication skills?

    PubMed

    Gerber, Berna

    2016-11-16

    Effective communication between the doctor and patient is crucial for good quality health care. Yet, this form of communication is often problematic, which may lead to several negative consequences for both patients and doctors. Clinical communication skills have become important components of medical training programmes. The traditional approach is to teach students particular communication skills, such as listening to patients and asking open-ended questions. Despite their importance, such training approaches do not seem to be enough to deliver medical practitioners who are able and committed to communicate effectively with patients. This might be due to the pervasive negative influence of the medical profession's (mistaken) understanding of itself as a natural science on doctor-patient communication. Doctors who have been trained according to a positivist framework may consider their only responsibility to be the physical treatment of physical disorders. They may thus have little regard for the patient's psychological and social world and by extension for communication with the patient and/or their caregivers. To address this problem, I propose a curriculum, based on the academic field of philosophy, for teaching clinical communication.

  20. Using standardized patients to assess the interpersonal skills of physicians: six years' experience with a high-stakes certification examination.

    PubMed

    van Zanten, Marta; Boulet, John R; McKinley, Danette

    2007-01-01

    Communication and interpersonal skills are essential elements of a physician's clinical expertise. Since 1998, the interpersonal competencies of over 37,000 internationally-trained physicians have been assessed as part of the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) Clinical Skills Assessment (CSA). Standardized patients (SPs) provided ratings of interpersonal skills along 4 dimensions: skills in interviewing and collecting information; skills in counseling and delivering information; rapport; and personal manner. The content of the rating scale, the development and implementation of training materials and procedures, and the psychometric characteristics of the measures are described. Data from over 400,000 simulated patient encounters were analyzed. Correlations with other measures supported the construct validity of the assessment. A generalizability study showed that the ratings were reproducible over encounters. Analysis of individual SP ratings indicated that they were consistent in their application of the scoring rubric. Overall, the findings indicate that SPs, with proper training and a benchmarked scoring rubric, can provide accurate and defensible ratings of physicians' interpersonal skills. These results may also generalize to other clinical skills assessments, or other evaluations that employ raters to judge communication abilities.

  1. Use of Portfolios for Assessment of Resident Teaching Skills

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Anthony A.; Harris, Ilene

    2013-01-01

    Background Portfolios are effective instruments for assessment of teaching skills among professional teachers and have recently been adapted in medical education. However, scoring rubrics are needed to effectively guide assessors. Intervention Portfolio assessors reviewed and made assessment comments about the resident-as-teacher sections of 11 internal medicine residents' electronic portfolios and discussed their assessments in an assessor group discussion. We performed qualitative analyses of written and oral comments. Major themes were identified, and member checking and triangulation with the literature was performed to evaluate the trustworthiness of the qualitative analysis. Results Three faculty educators reviewed and commented on 241 uploaded e-portfolio documents accompanying reflections. Three major themes were identified: Application of Teaching Skills, Presentation Skills, and Insights as a Teacher. Themes and subthemes matched closely to several components of the conceptual framework of effective presentations formulated in Glassick standards for scholarly work, as well as themes found in assessments of professional teachers' portfolios. Conclusions Assessments of portfolios by experienced faculty educators appear to be useful for identifying many important facets of formal teaching presentations and may be useful for creation of a scoring rubric. PMID:24404313

  2. Conceptual Models and Guidelines for Clinical Assessment of Financial Capacity.

    PubMed

    Marson, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    The ability to manage financial affairs is a life skill of critical importance, and neuropsychologists are increasingly asked to assess financial capacity across a variety of settings. Sound clinical assessment of financial capacity requires knowledge and appreciation of applicable clinical conceptual models and principles. However, the literature has presented relatively little conceptual guidance for clinicians concerning financial capacity and its assessment. This article seeks to address this gap. The article presents six clinical models of financial capacity : (1) the early gerontological IADL model of Lawton, (2) the clinical skills model and (3) related cognitive psychological model developed by Marson and colleagues, (4) a financial decision-making model adapting earlier decisional capacity work of Appelbaum and Grisso, (5) a person-centered model of financial decision-making developed by Lichtenberg and colleagues, and (6) a recent model of financial capacity in the real world developed through the Institute of Medicine. Accompanying presentation of the models is discussion of conceptual and practical perspectives they represent for clinician assessment. Based on the models, the article concludes by presenting a series of conceptually oriented guidelines for clinical assessment of financial capacity. In summary, sound assessment of financial capacity requires knowledge and appreciation of clinical conceptual models and principles. Awareness of such models, principles and guidelines will strengthen and advance clinical assessment of financial capacity.

  3. Clinical Research Careers: Reports from a NHLBI Pediatric Heart Network Clinical Research Skills Development Conference

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wyman W.; Richmond, Marc; Li, Jennifer S.; Saul, J. Philip; Mital, Seema; Colan, Steven D.; Newburger, Jane W.; Sleeper, Lynn A.; McCrindle, Brain W.; Minich, L. LuAnn; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Marino, Bradley S.; Williams, Ismee A.; Pearson, Gail D.; Evans, Frank; Scott, Jane D.; Cohen, Meryl S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Wyman W. Lai, MD, MPH, and Victoria L. Vetter, MD, MPH. The Pediatric Heart Network (PHN), funded under the U.S. National Institutes of Health-National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH–NHLBI), includes two Clinical Research Skills Development (CRSD) Cores, which were awarded to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and to the Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York–Presbyterian. To provide information on how to develop a clinical research career to a larger number of potential young investigators in pediatric cardiology, the directors of these two CRSD Cores jointly organized a one-day seminar for fellows and junior faculty from all of the PHN Core sites. The participants included faculty members from the PHN and the NHLBI. The day-long seminar was held on April 29, 2009, at the NHLBI site, immediately preceding the PHN Steering Committee meeting in Bethesda, MD. Methods The goals of the seminar were 1) to provide fellows and early investigators with basic skills in clinical research 2) to provide a forum for discussion of important research career choices 3) to introduce attendees to each other and to established clinical researchers in pediatric cardiology, and 4) to publish a commentary on the future of clinical research in pediatric cardiology. Results The following chapters are compilations of the talks given at the 2009 PHN Clinical Research Skills Development Seminar, published to share the information provided with a broader audience of those interested in learning how to develop a clinical research career in pediatric cardiology. The discussions of types of clinical research, research skills, career development strategies, funding, and career management are applicable to research careers in other areas of clinical medicine as well. Conclusions The aim of this compilation is to stimulate those who might be interested in the research career options available to investigators. PMID:21167335

  4. Assessing family planning service-delivery skills in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Valadez, J J; Transgrud, R; Mbugua, M; Smith, T

    1997-06-01

    This report demonstrates the use of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) to evaluate the technical competence of two cohorts of family planning service providers in Kenya trained with a new curriculum. One cohort had just finished training within two months of the study. The other cohort was the first group trained with the new curriculum about one year before the study. LQAS was adapted from industrial and other public health applications to assess both the individual competence of 30 service providers and the competence of each cohort. Results show that Cohorts One and Two did not differ markedly in the number of tasks needing improvement. However, both cohorts exhibited more tasks needing improvement in counseling skills as compared with physical examination skills or with all other skills. Care-givers who were not currently providing services accounted for most service-delivery problems. This result suggests that providers' use of their skills explains their ability to retain service-delivery skills learned in training to a greater degree than does the amount of time elapsed since they were trained. LQAS proved to be a rapid, easy-to-use empirical method for management decisionmaking for improvement of a family planning training curriculum and services.

  5. Clinical Vignettes Improve Performance in Anatomy Practical Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikah, December S. K.; Finn, Gabrielle M.; Swamy, Meenakshi; White, Pamela M.; McLachlan, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Although medical curricula now adopt an integrated teaching approach, this is not adequately reflected in assessment of anatomy knowledge and skills. In this study, we aimed to explore the impact of the addition of clinical vignette to item stems on students' performance in anatomy practical examinations. In this study, 129 undergraduate medical…

  6. Workplace-based assessment: assessing technical skill throughout the continuum of surgical training.

    PubMed

    Beard, Jonathan; Rowley, David; Bussey, Maria; Pitts, David

    2009-03-01

    The Royal Colleges of Surgeons and Surgical Specialty Associations in the UK have introduced competence-based syllabi and curricula for surgical training. The syllabi of the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme (ISCP) and Orthopaedic Curriculum and Assessment Programme (OCAP) define the core competencies, that is, the observable and measureable behaviours required of a surgical trainee. The curricula define when, where and how these will be assessed. Procedure-based assessment (PBA) has been adopted as the principal method of assessing surgical skills. It combines competencies specific to the procedure with generic competencies such as safe handling of instruments. It covers the entire procedure, including preoperative and postoperative planning. A global summary of the level at which the trainee performed the assessed elements of the procedure is also included. The form has been designed to be completed quickly by the assessor (clinical supervisor) and fed-back to the trainee between operations. PBA forms have been developed for all index procedures in all surgical specialties. The forms are intended to be used as frequently as possible when performing index procedures, as their primary aim is to aid learning. At the end of a training placement the aggregated PBA forms, together with the logbook, enable the Educational Supervisor and/or Programme Director to make a summary judgement about the competence of a trainee to perform index procedures to a given standard.

  7. Advanced physical assessment skills: implementation of a module.

    PubMed

    Aldridge-Bent, Sharon

    2011-02-01

    This article aims to explore and examine advanced physical assessment skills and the role of the district nurse. It will particularly highlight district nurses' perceptions of how they may implement skills learnt on a new module introduced into the Community Health Care Nursing degree at a university in London. Physical assessment skills have traditionally been viewed as part of a doctor's role; however, with the advancement of nursing roles, it is argued that it has become a key nursing skill. As Government policy continues to expect health professionals to keep patients in the community who have complex health and social care needs, the role of the district nurse presents as 'best placed' to take on this challenge (Department of Health (DH), 2005a; 2005b). Evaluation of the district nurses' perceptions of their practice is shared here, highlighting some of the challenges that they face. The article will address the complexity of developing a curriculum in response to the DH initiatives and the importance of listening to students on courses.

  8. The standardized patient encounter: a dynamic educational approach to enhance students' clinical healthcare skills.

    PubMed

    Herge, E Adel; Lorch, Arlene; Deangelis, Tina; Vause-Earland, Tracey; Mollo, Kimberly; Zapletal, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Occupational therapy educators are challenged to prepare students entering the profession to be skilled in assessment, critical thinking, self-analysis, and decision-making. Simulation is an effective strategy used in medical and nursing curriculums to develop or enhance critical thinking, self-analysis, and decision-making skills. Through simulated learning activities, such as encounters with standardized patients (SP), students develop skills in decision-making, clinical reasoning, and interpersonal communication, skills necessary to function effectively in the current health care environment. This paper describes the process for integrating SP encounters in a professional healthcare curriculum for occupational therapy graduate students. Evidence that supports the use of simulation in healthcare curriculums for health profession students is explored. An example of an SP encounter in one occupational therapy course is described to illustrate how students engage in higher-level thinking as they administer an assessment tool and interact with an SP. The process of developing and evaluating the SP encounter is described and the outcomes are presented. The authors believe the SP experience is a viable teaching method in preparing competent, reflective practitioners for tomorrow's healthcare environment.

  9. Clinical applications of neuropsychological assessment.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip D

    2012-03-01

    Neuropsychological assessment is a performance-based method to assess cognitive functioning. This method is used to examine the cognitive consequences of brain damage, brain disease, and severe mental illness. There are several specific uses of neuropsychological assessment, including collection of diagnostic information, differential diagnostic information, assessment of treatment response, and prediction of functional potential and functional recovery. We anticipate that clinical neuropsychological assessment will continue to be used, even in the face of advances in imaging technology, because it is already well known that the presence of significant brain changes can be associated with nearly normal cognitive functioning, while individuals with no lesions detectable on imaging can have substantial cognitive and functional limitations.

  10. Assessing clinical competency in the health sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzarella, Karen Joanne

    To test the success of integrated curricula in schools of health sciences, meaningful measurements of student performance are required to assess clinical competency. This research project analyzed a new performance assessment tool, the Integrated Standardized Patient Examination (ISPE), for assessing clinical competency: specifically, to assess Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students' clinical competence as the ability to integrate basic science knowledge with clinical communication skills. Thirty-four DPT students performed two ISPE cases, one of a patient who sustained a stroke and the other a patient with a herniated lumbar disc. Cases were portrayed by standardized patients (SPs) in a simulated clinical setting. Each case was scored by an expert evaluator in the exam room and then by one investigator and the students themselves via videotape. The SPs scored each student on an overall encounter rubric. Written feedback was obtained from all participants in the study. Acceptable reliability was demonstrated via inter-rater agreement as well as inter-rater correlations on items that used a dichotomous scale, whereas the items requiring the use of the 4-point rubric were somewhat less reliable. For the entire scale both cases had a significant correlation between the Expert-Investigator pair of raters, for the CVA case r = .547, p < .05 and for the HD case r = .700, p < .01. The SPs scored students higher than the other raters. Students' self-assessments were most closely aligned with the investigator. Effects were apparent due to case. Content validity was gathered in the process of developing cases and patient scenarios that were used in this study. Construct validity was obtained from the survey results analyzed from the experts and students. Future studies should examine the effect of rater training upon the reliability. Criterion or predictive validity could be further studied by comparing students' performances on the ISPE with other independent estimates

  11. Does Composition Medium Affect the Psychometric Properties of Scores on an Exercise Designed to Assess Written Medical Communication Skills?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulet, John R.; McKinley, Danette W.; Rebbecchi, Thomas; Whelan, Gerald P.

    2007-01-01

    The ECFMG[R] Clinical Skills Assessment (CSA[R]) was developed to evaluate whether graduates of international medical schools are ready to enter graduate training programs in the United States. The performance-based patient note exercise is specifically used to assess an examinee's ability to summarize, synthesize and interpret the data collected…

  12. Use of online clinical videos for clinical skills training for medical students: benefits and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multimedia learning has been shown effective in clinical skills training. Yet, use of technology presents both opportunities and challenges to learners. The present study investigated student use and perceptions of online clinical videos for learning clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examination). This study aims to inform us how to make more effective us of these resources. Methods A mixed-methods study was conducted for this study. A 30-items questionnaire was administered to investigate student use and perceptions of OSCE videos. Year 3 and 4 students from 34 Korean medical schools who had access to OSCE videos participated in the online survey. Additionally, a semi-structured interview of a group of Year 3 medical students was conducted for an in-depth understanding of student experience with OSCE videos. Results 411 students from 31 medical schools returned the questionnaires; a majority of them found OSCE videos effective for their learning of clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE. The number of OSCE videos that the students viewed was moderately associated with their self-efficacy and preparedness for OSCE (p < 0.05). One-thirds of those surveyed accessed the video clips using mobile devices; they agreed more with the statement that it was convenient to access the video clips than their peers who accessed the videos using computers (p < 0.05). Still, students reported lack of integration into the curriculum and lack of interaction as barriers to more effective use of OSCE videos. Conclusions The present study confirms the overall positive impact of OSCE videos on student learning of clinical skills. Having faculty integrate these learning resources into their teaching, integrating interactive tools into this e-learning environment to foster interactions, and using mobile devices for convenient access are recommended to help students make more effective use of these resources. PMID:24650290

  13. The Effects of Performance-Based Assessment Criteria on Student Performance and Self-Assessment Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fastre, Greet Mia Jos; van der Klink, Marcel R.; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of performance-based versus competence-based assessment criteria on task performance and self-assessment skills among 39 novice secondary vocational education students in the domain of nursing and care. In a performance-based assessment group students are provided with a preset list of performance-based…

  14. Assessing competence in communication and interpersonal skills: the Kalamazoo II report.

    PubMed

    Duffy, F Daniel; Gordon, Geoffrey H; Whelan, Gerald; Cole-Kelly, Kathy; Frankel, Richard; Buffone, Natalie; Lofton, Stephanie; Wallace, MaryAnne; Goode, Leslie; Langdon, Lynn

    2004-06-01

    Accreditation of residency programs and certification of physicians requires assessment of competence in communication and interpersonal skills. Residency and continuing medical education program directors seek ways to teach and evaluate these competencies. This report summarizes the methods and tools used by educators, evaluators, and researchers in the field of physician-patient communication as determined by the participants in the "Kalamazoo II" conference held in April 2002. Communication and interpersonal skills form an integrated competence with two distinct parts. Communication skills are the performance of specific tasks and behaviors such as obtaining a medical history, explaining a diagnosis and prognosis, giving therapeutic instructions, and counseling. Interpersonal skills are inherently relational and process oriented; they are the effect communication has on another person such as relieving anxiety or establishing a trusting relationship. This report reviews three methods for assessment of communication and interpersonal skills: (1) checklists of observed behaviors during interactions with real or simulated patients; (2) surveys of patients' experience in clinical interactions; and (3) examinations using oral, essay, or multiple-choice response questions. These methods are incorporated into educational programs to assess learning needs, create learning opportunities, or guide feedback for learning. The same assessment tools, when administered in a standardized way, rated by an evaluator other than the teacher, and using a predetermined passing score, become a summative evaluation. The report summarizes the experience of using these methods in a variety of educational and evaluation programs and presents an extensive bibliography of literature on the topic. Professional conversation between patients and doctors shapes diagnosis, initiates therapy, and establishes a caring relationship. The degree to which these activities are successful depends, in

  15. Goodness of Fit of Skills Assessment Approaches: Insights from Patterns of Real vs. Synthetic Data Sets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beheshti, Behzad; Desmarais, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the issue of the goodness of fit of different skills assessment models using both synthetic and real data. Synthetic data is generated from the different skills assessment models. The results show wide differences of performances between the skills assessment models over synthetic data sets. The set of relative performances…

  16. A vertically integrated geriatric curriculum improves medical student knowledge and clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Supiano, Mark A; Fitzgerald, James T; Hall, Karen E; Halter, Jeffrey B

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a vertically integrated curriculum intervention on the geriatric knowledge and performance in clinical skills of third-year medical students. This observational cohort study conducted at the University of Michigan Medical School evaluates the performance of 622 third-year medical students from the graduating class years of 2004 through 2007. An integrated curriculum intervention was developed and implemented for the class of 2006. Its elements included identification and tracking of geriatric learning outcomes in an individualized Web-based student portfolio, integration of geriatric content into preclinical courses, development of a geriatric functional assessment standardized patient instructor, and an experience in a geriatrics clinic during the ambulatory component of the third-year internal medicine clerkship. Medical student performance was assessed on a geriatric knowledge test and during a geriatric functional assessment station administered during an Observed Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) at the beginning of the fourth year. Student performance on the geriatric functional assessment OSCE station progressively improved from pre-intervention performance (mean performance+/-standard deviation 43+/-15% class of 2005, 62 + 15% class of 2006, 78+/-10% class of 2007; analysis of variance, P<.001). Similarly, student performance on the geriatric knowledge test was significantly better for the classes of 2006 and 2007 than for the class of 2005 (model F ratio=4.72; P<.001). In conclusion, an integrated approach to incorporating new educational geriatric objectives into the medical school curriculum leads to significant improvements in medical student knowledge and in important clinical skills in the functional assessment of older patients.

  17. Development and implementation of an objective structured clinical examination to provide formative feedback on communication and interpersonal skills in geriatric training.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Patricia; Chao, Serena; Russell, Matthew; Levine, Sharon; Fabiny, Anne

    2008-09-01

    Teaching and assessment of communication and interpersonal skills, one of the American Council for Graduate Medical Education-designated core competencies, is an important but difficult task in the training of physicians. Assessment of trainees offers an opportunity to provide explicit feedback on their skills and encourages learning. This article describes a pilot study in which clinician-educators affiliated with the geriatrics training programs at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Boston University Medical Center designed and piloted a novel Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) to assess the communication and interpersonal skills of medical, dental, and geriatric psychiatry fellows. The OSCE consisted of three stations where geriatricians and standardized patients evaluated candidates using specifically designed checklists and an abbreviated version of the Master Interview Rating Scale. Communication skills were assessed through performance of specific "real life" clinical tasks, such as obtaining a medical history, explaining a diagnosis and prognosis, giving therapeutic instructions, and counseling. Interpersonal skills were assessed through the effect of the communication between doctor and standardized patient on fostering trust, relieving anxiety, and establishing a therapeutic relationship. This pilot study demonstrated that the OSCE format of assessment provides a valid means of evaluating the communication and interpersonal skills of interdisciplinary geriatric trainees and provides a valuable forum for formative assessment and feedback. Given that geriatricians and non geriatricians involved in elder care both need communication and interpersonal skills, this novel OSCE can be used for assessment of these skills in trainees in diverse healthcare subspecialties.

  18. Ability-versus skill-based assessment of emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Bradberry, Travis R; Su, Lac D

    2006-01-01

    Emotional intelligence has received an intense amount of attention in leadership circles during the last decade and continuing debate exists concerning the best method for measuring this construct. This study analyzed leader emotional intelligence scores, measured via skill and ability methodologies, against leader job performance. Two hundred twelve employees from three organizations participated in this study. Scores on the Emotional Intelligence Appraisal, a skill-based assessment, were positively, though not significantly, correlated with scores on the MSCEIT, an ability-based assessment of emotional intelligence. Scores on the MSCEIT did not have a significant relationship with job performance in this study, whereas, scores on the Emotional Intelligence Appraisal had a strong link to leader job performance. The four subcomponents of the Emotional Intelligence Appraisal were examined against job performance. Relationship management was a stronger predictor of leader job performance than the other three subcomponents. Social awareness was the single emotional intelligence skill that did not have a significant link to leader job performance. Factor analyses yielded a two-component model of emotional intelligence encompassing personal and social competence, rather than confirmation of a four-part taxonomy.

  19. Clinical Skills for Nursing Practice Moore Tina and Cunningham Sheila (Eds) Clinical Skills for Nursing Practice 596pp £39.99 Routledge 9780273767947 0273767941 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2017-02-28

    Drawing on the evidence base on the core clinical skills and competencies required by newly qualified nurses, this comprehensive text provides useful learning outcomes, activities to encourage reflection, and top tips to expand readers' knowledge and practice.

  20. Assessment of email communication skills of rheumatology fellows: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dhuper, Sonal; Siva, Chokkalingam; Fresen, John L; Petruc, Marius; Velázquez, Celso R

    2010-01-01

    Physician–patient email communication is gaining popularity. However, a formal assessment of physicians' email communication skills has not been described. We hypothesized that the email communication skills of rheumatology fellows can be measured in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) setting using a novel email content analysis instrument which has 18 items. During an OSCE, we asked 50 rheumatology fellows to respond to a simulated patient email. The content of the responses was assessed using our instrument. The majority of rheumatology fellows wrote appropriate responses scoring a mean (±SD) of 10.6 (±2.6) points (maximum score 18), with high inter-rater reliability (0.86). Most fellows were concise (74%) and courteous (68%) but not formal (22%). Ninety-two percent of fellows acknowledged that the patient's condition required urgent medical attention, but only 30% took active measures to contact the patient. No one encrypted their messages. The objective assessment of email communication skills is possible using simulated emails in an OSCE setting. The variable email communication scores and incidental patient safety gaps identified, suggest a need for further training and defined proficiency standards for physicians' email communication skills. PMID:20962134

  1. Mining Sector. Basic Skills Needs Assessment. INCO (Manitoba Division) & Local 6166 United Steelworkers of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Lee Thomas

    A project examined the skills gap within the mining industry, identified and prioritized skills common to all jobs and occupations, and provided insight into skills that workers are likely to need in the future. The research for the basic skills needs assessment was conducted from June-October 1993 at INCO's Manitoba Division Operations in…

  2. Effects of an experiential learning program on the clinical reasoning and critical thinking skills of occupational therapy students.

    PubMed

    Coker, Patty

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of participation in a 1-week, experiential, hands-on learning program on the critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills of occupational therapy students. A quasi-experimental, nonrandomized pre- and post-test design was used with a sample of 25 students. The students had completed three semesters of didactic lecture coursework in a master's level OT educational program prior to participation in a hands-on therapy program for children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Changes in critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills were evaluated using the following dependent measures: Self-Assessment of Clinical Reflection and Reasoning (SACRR) and the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST). Changes in pretest and posttest scores on the SACRR and the CCTST were statistically significant (p>0.05) following completion of the experiential learning program. This study supports the use of hands-on learning to develop clinical reasoning and critical thinking skills in healthcare students, who face ever more diverse patient populations upon entry-level practice. Further qualitative and quantitative investigations are needed to support the results of this study and determine which components of experiential learning programs are essential for developing clinical reasoning and critical thinking skills in future allied health professionals.

  3. Development of clinical assessment criteria for postgraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Tolhurst, B G; Bonner, A

    2000-04-01

    This paper explores the development and implementation of specific criteria to determine the level of clinical performance of postgraduate nursing students during the first year of a Master of Nursing course. The authors describe two commonly used clinical skill assessment tools and identify limitations of these tools for postgraduate nursing students. As a result of these limitations, Clinical Assessment Criteria (CAC) utilising the framework of Benner (1984) was developed. Inherent within the CAC is four levels of clinical nursing performance, which enable the nurse teacher and student to monitor the progression from novice to proficient levels of practice within a specialty area. Following a successful pilot study, the CAC was incorporated into clinical assessments in nine specialty postgraduate courses. Furthermore, the framework developed for the CAC can also be integrated into a variety of professional development domains.

  4. Assessing interpersonal and communication skills in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Chan, Teresa M; Wallner, Clare; Swoboda, Thomas K; Leone, Katrina A; Kessler, Chad

    2012-12-01

    Interpersonal and communication skills (ICS) are a key component of several competency-based schemata and key competency in the set of six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies. With the shift toward a competency-based educational framework, the importance of robust learner assessment becomes paramount. The journal Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) hosted a consensus conference to discuss education research in emergency medicine (EM). This article summarizes the initial preparatory research that was conducted to brief consensus conference attendees and reports the results of the consensus conference breakout session as it pertains to ICS assessment of learners. The goals of this consensus conference session were to twofold: 1) to determine the state of assessment of observable learner performance and 2) to determine a research agenda within the ICS field for medical educators. The working group identified six key recommendations for medical educators and researchers.

  5. Undesired variance due to examiner stringency/leniency effect in communication skill scores assessed in OSCEs.

    PubMed

    Harasym, Peter H; Woloschuk, Wayne; Cunning, Leslie

    2008-12-01

    Physician-patient communication is a clinical skill that can be learned and has a positive impact on patient satisfaction and health outcomes. A concerted effort at all medical schools is now directed at teaching and evaluating this core skill. Student communication skills are often assessed by an Objective Structure Clinical Examination (OSCE). However, it is unknown what sources of error variance are introduced into examinee communication scores by various OSCE components. This study primarily examined the effect different examiners had on the evaluation of students' communication skills assessed at the end of a family medicine clerkship rotation. The communication performance of clinical clerks from Classes 2005 and 2006 were assessed using six OSCE stations. Performance was rated at each station using the 28-item Calgary-Cambridge guide. Item Response Theory analysis using a Multifaceted Rasch model was used to partition the various sources of error variance and generate a "true" communication score where the effects of examiner, case, and items are removed. Variance and reliability of scores were as follows: communication scores (.20 and .87), examiner stringency/leniency (.86 and .91), case (.03 and .96), and item (.86 and .99), respectively. All facet scores were reliable (.87-.99). Examiner variance (.86) was more than four times the examinee variance (.20). About 11% of the clerks' outcome status shifted using "true" rather than observed/raw scores. There was large variability in examinee scores due to variation in examiner stringency/leniency behaviors that may impact pass-fail decisions. Exploring the benefits of examiner training and employing "true" scores generated using Item Response Theory analyses prior to making pass/fail decisions are recommended.

  6. Comparison of student self-assessment with faculty assessment of clinical competence.

    PubMed

    Root Kustritz, Margaret V; Molgaard, Laura K; Rendahl, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    At the University of Minnesota, fourth-year veterinary students assessed their clinical competence after completion of a small-animal, internal-medicine clinical rotation using the same rotation assessment form used by supervising faculty. Grades were compared between the two groups. Students identified by faculty as low-performing were more likely to overestimate their competence in the areas of knowledge, clinical skill, and professionalism than were students identified by faculty as higher performing. This finding mirrors research results in human health professional training. Self-assessment should not be used as the primary or sole measure of clinical competence in veterinary medical training without the introduction of measures to ensure the accuracy of student self-assessment, measures that include active faculty mentoring of student self-assessment, student goal-setting and reflection, and availability of subsequent opportunities to practice additional self-assessment.

  7. Assessing Motor Skill Competency in Elementary School Students: A Three-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiyun; Mason, Steve; Hypnar, Andrew; Bennett, Austin

    2016-01-01

    This study was to examine how well fourth- and fifth-grade students demonstrated motor skill competency assessed with selected PE Metrics assessment rubrics (2009). Fourth- and fifth-grade students (n = 1,346-1,926) were assessed on their performance of three manipulative skills using the PE Metrics Assessment Rubrics during the pre-intervention year, the post-intervention year 1, and the post-intervention year 3. Descriptive statistics, independent t-test, ANOVA, and follow-up comparisons were conducted for data analysis. The results indicated that the post-intervention year 2 cohort performed significantly more competent than the pre-intervention cohort and the post-intervention year 1 cohort on the three manipulative skill assessments. The post-intervention year 1 cohort significantly outperformed the pre-intervention cohort on the soccer dribbling, passing, and receiving and the striking skill assessments, but not on the throwing skill assessment. Although the boys in the three cohorts performed significantly better than the girls on all three skills, the girls showed substantial improvement on the overhand throwing and the soccer skills from baseline to the post-intervention year 1 and the post-intervention year 2. However, the girls, in particular, need to improve striking skill. The CTACH PE was conducive to improving fourth- and fifth-grade students’ motor skill competency in the three manipulative skills. This study suggest that PE Metrics assessment rubrics are feasible tools for PE teachers to assess levels of students’ demonstration of motor skill competency during a regular PE lesson. Key points CATCH PE is an empirically-evidenced quality PE curricular that is conducive to improving students’ manipulative skill competency. Boys significantly outperformed than girls in all three manipulative skills. Girls need to improve motor skill competency in striking skill. PE Metrics are feasible assessment rubrics that can be easily used by trained

  8. Assessing the skills of home care workers in helping older people take their prescribed medications.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Elizabeth E J

    2015-08-01

    The Southern Health and Social Care Trust in Northern Ireland applied a modified version of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) to assess the skills of home care workers in assisting older people taking prescribed medications. In Northern Ireland, home care workers are care workers employed by health and social care trusts or private agencies. The application of the model has developed the skills of this staff group, improved the relationship between the commissioner and provider, significantly reduced the time spent by community nurses in individual training and assessment, and enhanced the patient experience for those taking medication. Overall, the application of this model has provided assurances to the Trust board, the executive director of nursing, and operational directors that home care workers are competent in assisting older people in this high-risk activity.

  9. Rapid application design of an electronic clinical skills portfolio for undergraduate medical students.

    PubMed

    Dornan, Tim; Lee, Catherine; Stopford, Adam; Hosie, Liam; Maredia, Neil; Rector, Alan

    2005-04-01

    The aim was to find how to use information and communication technology to present the clinical skills content of an undergraduate medical curriculum. Rapid application design was used to develop the product, and technical action research was used to evaluate the development process. A clinician-educator, two medical students, two computing science masters students, two other project workers, and a hospital education informatics lead, formed a design team. A sample of stakeholders took part in requirements planning workshops and continued to advise the team throughout the project. A university hospital had many features that favoured fast, inexpensive, and successful system development: a clearly defined and readily accessible user group; location of the development process close to end-users; fast, informal communication; leadership by highly motivated and senior end-users; devolved authority and lack of any rigidly imposed management structure; cooperation of clinicians because the project drew on their clinical expertise to achieve scholastic goals; a culture of learning and involvement of highly motivated students. A detailed specification was developed through storyboarding, use case diagramming, and evolutionary prototyping. A very usable working product was developed within weeks. "SkillsBase" is a database web application using Microsoft Active Server Pages, served from a Microsoft Windows 2000 Server operating system running Internet Information Server 5.0. Graphing functionality is provided by the KavaChart applet. It presents the skills curriculum, provides a password-protected portfolio function, and offers training materials. The curriculum can be presented in several different ways to help students reflect on their objectives and progress towards achieving them. The reflective portfolio function is entirely private to each student user and allows them to document their progress in attaining skills, as judged by self, peer and tutor assessment, and

  10. Teaching Skills to Promote Clinical Reasoning in Early Basic Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizondo-Omana, Rodrigo Enrique; Morales-Gomez, Jesus Alberto; Morquecho-Espinoza, Orlando; Hinojosa-Amaya, Jose Miguel; Villarreal-Silva, Eliud Enrique; Garcia-Rodriguez, Maria de los Angeles; Guzman-Lopez, Santos

    2010-01-01

    Basic and superior reasoning skills are woven into the clinical reasoning process just as they are used to solve any problem. As clinical reasoning is the central competence of medical education, development of these reasoning skills should occur throughout the undergraduate medical curriculum. The authors describe here a method of teaching…

  11. Wiki Activities in Blended Learning for Health Professional Students: Enhancing Critical Thinking and Clinical Reasoning Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snodgrass, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Health professionals use critical thinking, a key problem solving skill, for clinical reasoning which is defined as the use of knowledge and reflective inquiry to diagnose a clinical problem. Teaching these skills in traditional settings with growing class sizes is challenging, and students increasingly expect learning that is flexible and…

  12. Impact of Facilitated Asynchronous Distance Education on Clinical Skills Development of International Pharmacy Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Zubin; Dean, Marie Rocchi

    2006-01-01

    The use of distance education for clinical skills development in the health professions has not been extensively described, due in part to the intensive nature of the relationship between the patient and practitioner. In the context of pharmacy practice, there are specific needs to develop new vehicles for clinical skills education due to growing…

  13. Teaching clinical reasoning and problem-solving skills using human patient simulation.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Deepti; Ottis, Erica J; Caligiuri, Frank J

    2011-11-10

    This paper discusses using human patient simulation (HPS) to expose students to complex dynamic patient cases that require clinical judgment, problem-solving skills, and teamwork skills for success. An example of an HPS exercise used to teach multifaceted clinical concepts in a therapeutics course also is provided.

  14. Peer Mentoring as a Strategy to Improve Paramedic Students' Clinical Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Gill; Hajzler, Darko; Ivanov, Tina; Limon, Jodie

    2008-01-01

    The development of clinical skills and judgment is a key area of learning for undergraduate paramedic students but they typically find translating theory to practice a daunting prospect not least because they practice their developing clinical skills in front of others. This paper documents the rationale and outcomes of a peer mentoring program in…

  15. Dynamic assessment of word learning skills of pre-school children with primary language impairment.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Bernard; Law, James

    2014-10-01

    Dynamic assessment has been shown to have considerable theoretical and clinical significance in the assessment of socially disadvantaged and culturally and linguistically diverse children. In this study it is used to enhance assessment of pre-school children with primary language impairment. The purpose of the study was to determine whether a dynamic assessment (DA) has the potential to enhance the predictive capacity of a static measure of receptive vocabulary in pre-school children. Forty pre-school children were assessed using the static British Picture Vocabulary Scale (BPVS), a DA of word learning potential and an assessment of non-verbal cognitive ability. Thirty-seven children were followed up 6 months later and re-assessed using the BPVS. Although the predictive capacity of the static measure was found to be substantial, the DA increased this significantly especially for children with static scores below the 25th centile. The DA of children's word learning has the potential to add value to the static assessment of the child with low language skills, to predict subsequent receptive vocabulary skills and to increase the chance of correctly identifying children in need of ongoing support.

  16. Assessing Change in High School Student Information Literacy Using the Tool for Real-Time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalik, Cindy L.; Yutzey, Susan D.; Piazza, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    Change in high school student information literacy (IL) knowledge and skills, from freshman year to senior year in high school was the focus of this quasi-experimental research project. Researchers used a free information literacy skills assessment tool entitled TRAILS (Tool for Real-time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills) to measure…

  17. A new methodology for teaching clinical reasoning skills: problem solving clinical seminars.

    PubMed

    Struyf, E; Beullens, J; Van Damme, B; Janssen, P; Jaspaert, H

    2005-06-01

    In the final year of the medical curriculum of the Faculty of Medicine of the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium), a new methodology for teaching clinical skills was introduced: Problem Solving Clinical Seminars (PSCS). Two eight-week series of 70 seminars were offered. Students prepared for the seminars in groups of five students who worked on one or more clinical cases followed by half-open questions. Additional information was collected individually. At the clinical seminar the solutions were presented and discussed, guided by a clinical teacher. A questionnaire was administered to investigate whether students perceive the new type of clinical seminars as a powerful learning environment. Students were satisfied with the new methodology. The importance of the postulated educational aspects--preparation, clinical case and the seminar--was confirmed. The preparation phase (self-study and group work) and the clinical seminar were experienced as two separate and important learning events. The implementation of the problem solving clinical seminars is considered by students to be a powerful learning environment and therefore a broader applicability of the PSCS methodology is recommended.

  18. The Measurement Properties of the Assessing Math Concepts' Assessments of Primary Students' Number Sense Skills.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christie; Lambert, Richard; Polly, Drew; Wang, Chuang; Pugalee, David

    The purpose of this study was to examine the measurement properties of the Assessing Math Concepts AMC Anywhere Hiding and Ten Frame Assessments, formative assessments of primary students' number sense skills. Each assessment has two parts, where Part 1 is intended to be foundational skills for part two. Part 1 includes manipulatives whereas Part 2 does not. Student data from 228 kindergarten through second grade teachers with a total of 3,666 students was analyzed using Rasch scaling. Data analyses indicated that when the two assessments were examined separately the intended order of item difficulty was clear. When the parts of both assessments were analyzed together, the items in Part 2 were not consistently more difficult that the items in Part 1. This suggests an alternative sequence of tasks in that students may progress from working with a specific number with manipulatives then without manipulatives rather than working with a variety of numbers with manipulatives before moving onto assessments without manipulatives.

  19. Management of Radioactive Spills in Nuclear Medicine; Teaching and Assessing with Objectively Structured Assessment of Technical Skills.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Riffat Parveen

    2015-01-01

    Routine work in nuclear medicine requires the careful elution of radioactivity and its subsequent, storage and handling. Though all effort is maintained to prevent any "spill" of this radioactivity, accidents are bound to happen. The response to this spill is a methodically worked out a plan that is written and adopted as a "standard operating procedure." This protocol is taught to all involved in the area of working as a mock drill/apprenticeship model. No formal evaluation of learning is in place except for the mock drills. The objectively structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS) is a variation on the Objective Structured Clinical Examination, which is a form of workplace based assessment. The OSATS is cited in the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education evaluation toolbox on the website as the most desirable evaluation tool for the patient care topics. It is the objective of this paper is to introduce the "OSATS" for teaching, and assessment of the learning, of the protocol for the management of radioactive spill. As a review of the literature on the subject failed to reveal any such teaching protocol/material/document for this important technical skill, we hope that it may act as a landmark for the development of teaching and assessment of other technical skills also.

  20. Teaching communication skills in clinical settings: comparing two applications of a comprehensive program with standardized and real patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Communication is important for the quality of clinical practice, and programs have been implemented to improve healthcare providers’ communication skills. However, the consistency of programs teaching communication skills has received little attention, and debate exists about the application of acquired skills to real patients. This study inspects whether (1) results from a communication program are replicated with different samples, and (2) results with standardized patients apply to interviews with real patients. Methods A structured, nine-month communication program was applied in two consecutive years to two different samples of healthcare professionals (25 in the first year, 20 in the second year). Results were assessed at four different points in time, each year, regarding participants’ confidence levels (self-rated), basic communication skills in interviews with standardized patients, and basic communication skills in interviews with real patients. Data were analyzed using GLM Repeated-Measures procedures. Results Improvements were statistically significant in both years in all measures except in simulated patients’ assessment of the 2008 group. Differences between the two samples were non-significant. Differences between interviews with standardized and with real patients were also non-significant. Conclusions The program’s positive outcomes were replicated in different samples, and acquired skills were successfully applied to real-patient interviews. This reinforces this type of program structure as a valuable training tool, with results translating into real situations. It also adds to the reliability of the assessment instruments employed, though these may need adaptation in the case of real patients. PMID:24886341

  1. New graduate nurses, new graduate nurse transition programs, and clinical leadership skill: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Kathy B; Richards, Kathy C

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review evaluated the relationship between new graduate nurses and clinical leadership skill, and between new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs have been cited as one strategy to improve clinical leadership skill, but to our knowledge, no one has synthesized the evidence on new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. Results of this review showed that new graduate nurse transition programs that were at least 24 weeks in length had a positive impact on clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs using the University HealthSystem Consortium/American Association of Colleges of Nursing Nurse Residency curriculum had the greatest impact, followed by curriculum developed by the Versant New Graduate RN Residency, an important finding for nursing professional development specialists.

  2. Teaching Early Childhood Teacher Candidates How to Assess Children's Inquiry Skills in Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joohi; Yoon, Ji Yoon

    2008-01-01

    This article presents pragmatic information on teaching early childhood teacher candidates how to assess children's inquiry process skills. The authors list three important steps in choosing inquiry skills. They generated behavioral indicators for each inquiry skill, and designed an assessment rubric using number grading or a…

  3. Medical students retain pain assessment and management skills long after an experiential curriculum: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Stevens, David L; King, Danielle; Laponis, Ryan; Hanley, Kathleen; Zabar, Sondra; Kalet, Adina L; Gillespie, Colleen

    2009-10-01

    We implemented a pain assessment and management (PAM) curriculum for second year medical students and evaluated long-term skills retention compared to the prior year's class which did not receive the curriculum. The curriculum included pain pathophysiology, assessment and treatment instruction plus feedback on PAM practice with standardized patients. Both cohorts underwent a required end-of-third-year clinical skills examination. Intervention and control group performance on three pain cases (acute, chronic and terminal) was compared. The PAM curriculum was implemented 1.5years before the intervention cohort participated in the clinical skills exam. More intervention students (134/159, 84.3% response rate) obtained basic (87.2% vs. 76.0%, p=.028) and comprehensive (75.2% vs. 60.9%, p=.051) descriptions of acute pain than control students (n=129/174, 74.1% response rate). Intervention students demonstrated superior skills for terminal pain, including: more often asking about impact on functioning (40.7% vs. 25.8%, p=.027), advising change of medication (97.3% vs. 38.7%, p<.001), and providing additional medication counseling (55.0% vs. 27.0%, p<.001). Virtually all students obtained basic descriptions of chronic (intervention vs. control, 98.1% vs. 96.1%, p=.367) and terminal (92.9% vs. 91.7%, p=.736) pain. Surprisingly, more control than intervention students obtained a comprehensive description of chronic pain (94.6% vs. 77.8%, p<.001) and asked about current pain medication in the terminal case (75.6% vs. 55.0%, p=.004). Exposure to the curriculum resulted in durable increases in students' ability to perform PAM skills in patients with acute and terminal pain.

  4. Comparison between videotape and personal teaching as methods of communicating clinical skills to medical students.

    PubMed Central

    Mir, M A; Marshall, R J; Evans, R W; Hall, R; Duthie, H L

    1984-01-01

    The efficacy of video recording in transmitting clinical knowledge and skills to medical students was tested by recording on videotape demonstrations of physical examinations given by five clinicians to a randomly selected group of 12 students (personal group) from the first clinical year and then showing these recordings, under identical conditions, to 13 students from the same year (video group). The efficacy of both the personal and video mediums in terms of whether content was retained was tested by a questionnaire completed by all students at the end of the sessions and by a structured clinical assessment in which students were asked to demonstrate some of the same clinical tasks three weeks after the demonstration. In answering the questionnaire the video group obtained a mean (SD) score of 20.8 (7.0) (maximum possible score 40), which was not significantly different from the score achieved by the personal group (17.4 (7.7)). The video group was able to reproduce 44 (10)% of the total clinical steps demonstrated and the personal group 45 (14)%. Videotaped demonstrations can be as effective as personal teaching of clinical methods, and video should be developed as a medium for first line clinical teaching. PMID:6428655

  5. Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Bahia; Irani, Jihad; Sailian, Silva Dakessian; Gebran, Vicky George; Rizk, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students’ performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties’ expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students’ skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school. PMID:25419165

  6. The Standardized Professional Encounter: A New Model to Assess Professionalism and Communication Skills

    PubMed Central

    Lifchez, Scott D.; Cooney, Carisa M.; Redett, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Physician-patient communication is vital to patient care, and physician-nurse interactions are equally critical. Conflict between nurses and physicians can greatly impair communication, increasing the risk of treatment errors, yet physicians receive little education during training on recognizing and resolving professional conflicts. Innovation We created and implemented the Standardized Professional (S-Pro) Encounter to improve training and provide opportunities to evaluate resident professionalism and communication with health care team colleagues. Methods The standardized patient model is well established for teaching and assessing clinical and communication skills. Using the standardized patient concept, we created a nurse-resident encounter with 2 professionally trained medical portrayers (1 “nurse,” 1 “patient”), in which the nurse disagrees with the resident's treatment plan. Residents were surveyed for prior experience with nurse-physician conflict management, and we assessed postencounter for collaborative skills and conflict resolution. Results All residents (n = 18) observed at least 1 physician-nurse conflict in front of patients. Eleven (61%) reported being involved in at least 1 conflict. Twelve residents (67%) had 2 or fewer prior education experiences in interprofessional conflict management. Faculty assessment and S-Pro scores demonstrated high agreement, while resident self-assessment scores demonstrated low agreement with faculty and S-Pro scores. Conclusions Participants and evaluators found the encounter to be reasonably authentic. There was strong agreement between the faculty and S-Pro assessment of resident performance when using the Boggs scale. The S-Pro Encounter is easily adapted for other clinical situations or training programs, and facilitates the assessment of professionalism and communication skills between residents and other health care professionals. PMID:26221440

  7. Electrodiagnostic medicine skills competency in physical medicine and rehabilitation residents: a method for development and assessment.

    PubMed

    Brown, David; Cuccurullo, Sara; Lee, Joseph; Petagna, Ann; Strax, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    This project sought to create an educational module including evaluation methodology to instruct physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) residents in electrodiagnostic evaluation of patients with neuromuscular problems, and to verify acquired competencies in those electrodiagnostic skills through objective evaluation methodology. Sixteen residents were trained by board-certified neuromuscular and electrodiagnostic medicine physicians through technical training, lectures, and review of self-assessment examination (SAE) concepts from the American Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation syllabus provided in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. After delivery of the educational module, knowledge acquisition and skill attainment were measured in (1) clinical skill in diagnostic procedures via a procedure checklist, (2) diagnosis and ability to design a patient-care management plan via chart simulated recall (CSR) exams, (3) physician/patient interaction via patient surveys, (4) physician/staff interaction via 360-degree global ratings, and (5) ability to write a comprehensive patient-care report and to document a patient-care management plan in accordance with Medicare guidelines via written patient reports. Assessment tools developed for this program address the basic competencies outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). To test the success of the standardized educational module, data were collected on an ongoing basis. Objective measures compared resident SAE scores in electrodiagnostics (EDX) before and after institution of the comprehensive EDX competency module in a PM&R residency program. Fifteen of 16 residents (94%) successfully demonstrated proficiency in every segment of the evaluation element of the educational module by the end of their PGY-4 electrodiagnostic rotation. The resident who did not initially pass underwent remedial coursework and passed on the second attempt. Furthermore, the

  8. Teaching and Assessing Complex Skills in Simulation With Application to Rifle Marksmanship Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Interservice /Industry Training, Simulation, and Education Conference (I/ITSEC) 2009 2009 Paper No. 9086 Page 1 of 10 Teaching and Assessing Complex...integrate key areas of knowledge related to skill acquisition and expertise, address strategies for teaching and assessing complex skills, and examine the...complex skill development, based upon learning principles and enhanced performance feedback. Our emphasis is on teaching the “warrior” skills needed for

  9. A randomized controlled pilot trial comparing the impact of access to clinical endocrinology video demonstrations with access to usual revision resources on medical student performance of clinical endocrinology skills

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Demonstrating competence in clinical skills is key to course completion for medical students. Methods of providing clinical instruction that foster immediate learning and potentially serve as longer-term repositories for on-demand revision, such as online videos demonstrating competent performance of clinical skills, are increasingly being used. However, their impact on learning has been little studied. The aim of this study was to determine the value of adjunctive on-demand video-based training for clinical skills acquisition by medical students in endocrinology. Methods Following an endocrinology clinical tutorial program, 2nd year medical students in the pre-assessment revision period were recruited and randomized to either a set of bespoke on-line clinical skills training videos (TV), or to revision as usual (RAU). The skills demonstrated on video were history taking in diabetes mellitus (DMH), examination for diabetes lower limb complications (LLE), and examination for signs of thyroid disease (TE). Students were assessed on these clinical skills in an observed structured clinical examination two weeks after randomization. Assessors were blinded to student randomization status. Results For both diabetes related clinical skills assessment tasks, students in the TV group performed significantly better than those in the RAU group. There were no between group differences in thyroid examination performance. For the LLE, 91.7% (n = 11/12) of students randomized to the video were rated globally as competent at the skill compared with 40% (n = 4/10) of students not randomized to the video (p = 0.024). For the DMH, 83.3% (n = 10/12) of students randomized to the video were rated globally as competent at the skill compared with 20% (n = 2/10) of students not randomized to the video (p = 0.007). Conclusion Exposure to high quality videos demonstrating clinical skills can significantly improve medical student skill performance in an

  10. Exploring the Role and Skill Set of Physiotherapy Clinical Educators in Work-Integrated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Susan; Connaughton, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Clinical educators are under increasing pressures in the workplace to provide quality education of healthcare students within varying supervision frameworks. Along with facilitating the teaching of clinical skills, clinical educators play a support role for students and so require more than expert clinical abilities in their vital position linking…

  11. Design and Effectiveness of a Required Pre-Clinical Simulation-based Curriculum for Fundamental Clinical Skills and Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Lofaso, Daryl P.; DeBlieux, Peter M.; DiCarlo, Richard P.; Hilton, Charles; Yang, Tong; Chauvin, Sheila W.

    2011-01-01

    Background For more than 20 years, medical literature has increasingly documented the need for students to learn, practice and demonstrate competence in basic clinical knowledge and skills. In 2001, the Louisiana State University Health Science Centers (LSUHSC) School of Medicine – New Orleans replaced its traditional Introduction in to Clinical Medicine (ICM) course with the Science and Practice of Medicine (SPM) course. The main component within the SPM course is the Clinical Skills Lab (CSL). The CSL teaches 30 plus skills to all pre-clinical medical students (Years 1 and 2). Methods Since 2002, an annual longitudinal evaluation questionnaire was distributed to all medical students targeting the skills taught in the CSL. Students were asked to rate their self- confidence (Dreyfus and Likert-type) and estimate the number of times each clinical skill was performed (clinically/non-clinically). Of the 30 plus skills taught, 8 were selected for further evaluation. Results An analysis was performed on the eight skills selected to determine the effectiveness of the CSL. All students that participated in the CSL reported a significant improvement in self-confidence and in number performed in the clinically/non-clinically setting when compared to students that did not experience the CSL. For example, without CSL training, the percentage of students reported at the end of their second year self-perceived expertise as “novice” ranged from 21.4% (CPR) to 84.7% (GU catheterization). Students who completed the two-years CSL, only 7.8% rated their self-perceived expertise at the end of the second year as “novice” and 18.8% for GU catheterization. Conclusion The CSL design is not to replace real clinical patient experiences. It's to provide early exposure, medial knowledge, professionalism and opportunity to practice skills in a patient free environment. PMID:22190848

  12. Assessment of laparoscopic skills based on force and motion parameters.

    PubMed

    Horeman, Tim; Dankelman, Jenny; Jansen, Frank Willem; van den Dobbelsteen, John J

    2014-03-01

    Box trainers equipped with sensors may help in acquiring objective information about a trainee's performance while performing training tasks with real instruments. The main aim of this study is to investigate the added value of force parameters with respect to commonly used motion and time parameters such as path length, motion volume, and task time. Two new dynamic bimanual positioning tasks were developed that not only requiring adequate motion control but also appropriate force control successful completion. Force and motion data for these tasks were studied for three groups of participants with different experience levels in laparoscopy (i.e., 11 novices, 19 intermediates, and 12 experts). In total, 10 of the 13 parameters showed a significant difference between groups. When the data from the significant motion, time, and force parameters are used for classification, it is possible to identify the skills level of the participants with 100% accuracy. Furthermore, the force parameters of many individuals in the intermediate group exceeded the maximum values in the novice and expert group. The relatively high forces used by the intermediates argue for the inclusion of training and assessment of force application during tissue handling in future laparoscopic skills training programs.

  13. An Investigation of Factors Influencing Nurses' Clinical Decision-Making Skills.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Yang, Jinqiu; Liu, Lingying; Ye, Benlan

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the influencing factors on nurses' clinical decision-making (CDM) skills. A cross-sectional nonexperimental research design was conducted in the medical, surgical, and emergency departments of two university hospitals, between May and June 2014. We used a quantile regression method to identify the influencing factors across different quantiles of the CDM skills distribution and compared the results with the corresponding ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates. Our findings revealed that nurses were best at the skills of managing oneself. Educational level, experience, and the total structural empowerment had significant positive impacts on nurses' CDM skills, while the nurse-patient relationship, patient care and interaction, formal empowerment, and information empowerment were negatively correlated with nurses' CDM skills. These variables explained no more than 30% of the variance in nurses' CDM skills and mainly explained the lower quantiles of nurses' CDM skills distribution.

  14. A Methodology for Assessing Skill-Based Educational Outcomes in a Pharmacy Course

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Carrie L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To develop a methodology for assessing skill development in a course while providing objective evidence of success and actionable data to improve instructional effectiveness. Design. Course objectives were recast as skills to be demonstrated. Confidence in these skills was surveyed before and after the course. Student skills were demonstrated using 4 work products and a multiple-choice examination. Assessment. The change from precourse survey to postcourse survey was analyzed with a paired t test. Quality of the student work product was assessed using scoring guides. All students demonstrated skill mastery by scoring 70% or above on the work product, and 87/88 demonstrated individual progress on the surveyed skills during the 15-week course. Conclusion. This assessment strategy is based on sound design principles and provides robust multi-modal evidence of student achievement in skill development, which is not currently available using traditional student course evaluation surveys. PMID:27168618

  15. Listening Skills Assessment: Manual and Script. 1980 New Hampshire Educational Assessment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Thomas G.; And Others

    Designed to assess listening ability and to indicate implications for listening instruction, this instrument comes in a full and an abbreviated form. The 45 multiple choice items on the full form measure 53 specific listening skills in five categories: (1) simple recall, (2) recognizing and following spoken directions, (3) recognizing a speaker's…

  16. The Intra-Rater Reliability of Nine Content-Validated Technical Skill Assessment Instruments (TSAI) for Athletic Taping Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagumen, Niko G.; Butterwick, Dale J.; Paskevich, David M.; Fung, Tak S.; Donnon, Tyrone L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To establish the intra-rater reliability of nine content-validated Technical Skill Assessment Instruments (TSAI) for the skills of athletic taping. Setting: University of Calgary. Subjects: Canadian Certified Athletic Therapists, CAT(C), with a mean ± SD of 9.6 ± 10.8 years as a CAT(C), 7.8 ± 10.9 years as a Supervisory Athletic…

  17. Assessment of Diagnostic Skills in Specialist Examinations Should Include Lessons Learnt From Misdiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zamir, Ehud; Atkinson, Kaye

    2013-01-01

    Background Poor authenticity in high stake clinical exams adversely effects validity. We propose including known misleading diagnostic factors and contextual biases in the assessment of diagnostic skills amongst advanced specialty trainees. We hypothesise that this strategy offers a more realistic and critical assessment of diagnostic skill than strategies in which candidates are presented with directive, bias free information, allowing for assumptions which cannot be made in real life. Methods Eleven patient based practice clinical exam stations were presented to nine advanced ophthalmology trainees. Four patients had a history of misdiagnosis or near misdiagnosis of key ophthalmic findings, presumed to result from identifiable biases and misleading information. In those four stations, candidates were presented with authentic, file based information and were asked authentic questions, similar to those with which the patients presented. If the candidates were unsuccessful in identifying key findings, the questions were converted into directive questions about the same key findings (i.e. “examine the patient’s eyelids, what is your diagnosis?”), and the candidates re-assessed the patient and re-answered. Results Ninety-eight doctor-patient encounters took place. Of those, 35 encounters were analysed for the purpose of this study. In 63% of those encounters, key findings were missed when the question included authentic biases or misleading background information, but rephrasing the question to a directive exam format led to their correct identification (Fail converted to pass). Key findings were detected despite contextual biases or misleading background information in only 23% of encounters. In 14% the findings were missed with either question phrasing. Conclusions Presentation authentic questions provide a more realistic and less forgiving measure of diagnostic skills than directive exam questions. Given the prevalence of diagnostic errors and their

  18. Importance of Building Confidence in Patient Communication and Clinical Skills Among Chiropractic Students

    PubMed Central

    Hecimovich, Mark D.; Volet, Simone E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: One important objective of chiropractic education is to foster student professional confidence and competence in patient communication and clinical skills. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the extant literature on this topic, stressing the significance of building students' confidence for effective practice and the need for more research in this area. Methods: The authors reviewed MEDLINE and ERIC from 1980 through 2008 using several key words pertinent to confidence and health care. Three distinct, but interrelated, bodies of literature were assessed, including professional confidence in health care research, the nature and development of confidence in educational psychology research, and fostering professional confidence in chiropractic education. Results: It was apparent through the review that chiropractic education has developed educational methods and opportunities that may help develop and build student confidence in patient communication and clinical skills. However, there has not been sufficient research to provide empirical evidence of the impact. Conclusion: Fostering chiropractic students' development of confidence in what they say and do is of paramount importance not only to them as new practitioners but more importantly to the patient. There is no doubt that a better understanding of how confidence can be developed and consolidated during tertiary study should be a major goal of chiropractic education PMID:19826543

  19. Communication and Research Skills in the Information Systems Curriculum: A Method of Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarony, Paul J.; Driscoll, Donna A.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of learning goals has become the norm in business programs in higher education across the country. This paper offers a methodology for the assessment of both communication skills and research skills within a curriculum of the Bachelor of Science in Information Systems Program. Program level learning goals assessed in this paper are: (1)…

  20. Assessing 21st Century Skills: A Guide to Evaluating Mastery and Authentic Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards clearly define the skills students need for success in college and the 21st century workplace. The question is, how can you measure student mastery of skills like creativity, problem solving, and use of technology? Laura Greenstein demonstrates how teachers can teach and assess 21st century skills using authentic…

  1. Concrete Steps for Assessing the "Soft Skills" in an MBA Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingols, Cynthia; Shapiro, Mary

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, our School of Management began the serious path of assessing both the "hard skills" (such as accounting, finance, and strategy) and the "soft skills" (such as leadership, team work, and ethics) of our MBA Program. The data generated from examining the "soft skills" that we want students to learn within our…

  2. Assessing Core Manipulative Skills in a Large, First-Year Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moni, Roger W.; Hryciw, Deanne H.; Poronnik, Philip; Lluka, Lesley J.; Moni, Karen B.

    2007-01-01

    Responding to the concern from our faculty that undergraduate students do not have robust laboratory skills, we designed and implemented a strategy to individually teach and assess the manipulative skills of students in first-year laboratories. Five core laboratory skills were selected for the course entitled Human Biology, a large, first-year…

  3. A Process Analysis of Engineering Problem Solving and Assessment of Problem Solving Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigg, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    In the engineering profession, one of the most critical skills to possess is accurate and efficient problem solving. Thus, engineering educators should strive to help students develop skills needed to become competent problem solvers. In order to measure the development of skills, it is necessary to assess student performance, identify any…

  4. New paradigm in training of undergraduate clinical skills: the NEPTUNE-CS project at the Split University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Vladimir J; Hozo, Izet; Rakic, Mladen; Jukic, Marko; Tomic, Snjezana; Kokic, Slaven; Ljutic, Dragan; Druzijanic, Nikica; Grkovic, Ivica; Simunovic, Filip; Marasovic, Dujomir

    2010-10-01

    Clinical skills' training is arguably the weakest point in medical schools' curriculum. This study briefly describes how we at the Split University School of Medicine cope with this problem. We consider that, over the last decades, a considerable advancement in teaching methodologies, tools, and assessment of students has been made. However, there are many unresolved issues, most notably: (i) the institutional value system, impeding the motivation of the teaching staff; (ii) lack of a strong mentoring system; (iii) organization, timing, and placement of training in the curriculum; (iv) lack of publications pertinent to training; and (v) unwillingness of patients to participate in student training. To improve the existing training models we suggest increased institutional awareness of obstacles, as well as willingness to develop mechanisms for increasing the motivation of faculty. It is necessary to introduce changes in the structure and timing of training and to complement it with a catalog, practicum, and portfolio of clinical skills. At Split University School of Medicine, we developed a new paradigm aimed to improve the teaching of clinical skills called "Neptune-CSS," which stands for New Paradigm in Training of Undergraduate Clinical Skills in Split.

  5. Clinical Instructor Characteristics, Behaviors and Skills in Allied Health Care Settings: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Linda S.; Sexton, Patrick; Willeford, K. Sean; Barnum, Mary G.; Guyer, M. Susan; Gardner, Greg; Fincher, A. Louise

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to compare both clinical instructor and student perceptions of helpful and hindering clinical instructor characteristics, behaviors and skills in athletic training and allied health care settings. Clinical education in athletic training is similar to that of other allied health care professions. Clinical…

  6. Integrating Academic and Clinical Learning Using a Clinical Swallowing Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an experiential learning activity designed to integrate classroom knowledge and a clinical swallowing assessment. Twenty master's-level graduate students in a dysphagia course conducted a clinical swallowing assessment with a resident of an independent retirement community. The exercise was designed to allow students an…

  7. Skin assessment and pressure ulcer care in hospital-based skilled nursing facilities.

    PubMed

    Siem, Carol A; Wipke-Tevis, Deidre D; Rantz, Marilyn J; Popejoy, Lori L

    2003-06-01

    The Minimum Data Set, a comprehensive assessment tool for nursing home residents, is used for clinical decision-making, research, quality improvement, and Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement. Within the Minimum Data Set, pressure ulcers and skin condition are evaluated. Because information about pressure ulcer prevalence and care in hospital-based skilled nursing facilities is sparse, a study was conducted to: a) determine pressure ulcer prevalence upon admission to hospital-based skilled nursing facilities in the state of Missouri, and b) ascertain methods of assessment, treatment, and documentation of skin and pressure ulcer care in these facilities. Prevalence data were obtained from analysis of the Minimum Data Set data, and a survey was conducted to obtain skin care practices. The vast majority of residents (96%) were admitted from acute care facilities, and pressure ulcer prevalence on admission was 18.4% +/- 8.0%. Seventy-seven percent (77%) of the 88 surveys mailed were returned. The Braden or Norton Scale for risk assessment is reportedly used by 55% of facilities; whereas, 35% use a facility-developed tool. Commonly reported pressure ulcer prevention/treatment interventions used include: dietitian referral, use of barrier ointments, and a written repositioning schedule. Incontinence management and minimizing the head of bed elevation were infrequently used. Nearly one-half (47%) of facilities reported daily reassessment and documentation of wound status, suggesting less-than-optimal, time-consuming wound care practices. Despite the limitations inherent in survey designs and the use of databases such as the Minimum Data Set, the results of this study suggest that pressure ulcers are a common problem in acute care and hospital-based skilled nursing facilities and research-based risk assessment, prevention, and wound assessment strategies have not been widely implemented. The results of this study provide a basis for developing educational programs and a

  8. A facilitative versus directive approach in training clinical skills? Investigating students' clinical performance and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Berghmans, Inneke; Druine, Nathalie; Dochy, Filip; Struyven, Katrien

    2012-08-01

    Over the years, many medical school curricula have started implementing diverse student-centred teaching and learning methodologies. Previous studies, however, have indicated that students prefer more traditional and directive methodologies instead, raising questions on which training approach should be advocated. This study contrasts the effects of a student-centred (i.e. facilitative) training approach on students' clinical skills learning with students' perceptions. More specifically, a quasi-experimental study was set up in which students experienced either a directive or facilitative training approach. Data were collected by means of an OSCE on the one hand, and a questionnaire on students' perceptions of the training sessions, and two open-ended questions about students' likes and dislikes on the other hand. While no general differences were found in terms of clinical knowledge and understanding, and actual clinical performance, an interaction between students' course-specific prior knowledge and the training approach was found. Especially students with low levels of knowledge benefited more from the facilitative training approach in terms of clinical knowledge, while highly knowledgeable students experienced a negative effect of this training approach. Moreover, students' perceptions revealed that facilitative-trained students reported more deep-level learning, while the directive training approach turned out to score higher in terms of quality and perceived effects.

  9. Norming a VALUE rubric to assess graduate information literacy skills

    PubMed Central

    Turbow, David J.; Evener, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study evaluated whether a modified version of the information literacy Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education (VALUE) rubric would be useful for assessing the information literacy skills of graduate health sciences students. Methods Through facilitated calibration workshops, an interdepartmental six-person team of librarians and faculty engaged in guided discussion about the meaning of the rubric criteria. They applied the rubric to score student work for a peer-review essay assignment in the “Information Literacy for Evidence-Based Practice” course. To determine inter-rater reliability, the raters participated in a follow-up exercise in which they independently applied the rubric to ten samples of work from a research project in the doctor of physical therapy program: the patient case report assignment. Results For the peer-review essay, a high level of consistency in scoring was achieved for the second workshop, with statistically significant intra-class correlation coefficients above 0.8 for 3 criteria: “Determine the extent of evidence needed,” “Use evidence effectively to accomplish a specific purpose,” and “Access the needed evidence.” Participants concurred that the essay prompt and rubric criteria adequately discriminated the quality of student work for the peer-review essay assignment. When raters independently scored the patient case report assignment, inter-rater agreement was low and statistically insignificant for all rubric criteria (kappa=−0.16, p>0.05–kappa=0.12, p>0.05). Conclusions While the peer-review essay assignment lent itself well to rubric calibration, scorers had a difficult time with the patient case report. Lack of familiarity among some raters with the specifics of the patient case report assignment and subject matter might have accounted for low inter-rater reliability. When norming, it is important to hold conversations about search strategies and expectations of performance. Overall

  10. Assessing cognitive therapy skills comprehension, acquisition, and use by means of an independent observer version of the Skills of Cognitive Therapy (SoCT-IO).

    PubMed

    Brown, Gregory K; Thase, Michael E; Vittengl, Jeffrey R; Borman, Patricia D; Clark, Lee Anna; Jarrett, Robin B

    2016-02-01

    The purposes of this study were (a) to describe the adaptation and psychometric properties of the Skills for Cognitive Therapy (SoCT) measure for use by an independent observer (SoCT-IO) who rates the cognitive therapy (CT) skill acquisition, comprehension, and use by depressed adults and (b) to compare ratings of CT skill comprehension, acquisition, and use by independent observers to those by patients and therapists. Like the other SoCT versions, the SoCT-IO consists of 8 items that assess patients' comprehension, acquisition, and use of cognitive and behavioral skills for managing depressive symptoms, using a 5-point Likert-type scale. Four experienced raters (2 doctoral-level CT therapists and 2 bachelor-level nontherapists) used the SoCT-IO to rate 80 CT videotapes from both mid and later sessions in acute-phase CT from a randomized controlled trial for outpatients with recurrent major depression. The SoCT-IO ratings showed excellent internal consistency reliability and moderately high interrater reliability. Concurrent validity was demonstrated by convergence of the SoCT-IO with 2 other versions of the SoCT, 1 completed by therapists (SoCT-O) and the other by patients (SoCT-P). SoCT-IO ratings evidenced good predictive validity: Independent observers' ratings of patient CT skills midphase in therapy predicted treatment response even when the predictive effects of SoCT ratings by therapists and patients were controlled. The SoCT-IO is a psychometrically sound measure of CT skill comprehension, acquisition and use for rating outpatients with recurrent depression. The clinical utility and implications for using the SoCT-IO as a measure of CT skills acquisition are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. A Clinical Skills Instruction Program: The Acute Abdomen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laube, Douglas W.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    An effective evaluation of the acutely ill female implies a thorough examination that integrates skills representing three learning domains. This process should include: a thorough medical history, a physical examination, good patient-physician rapport, and development of an efficacious management plan. A University of Iowa simulation approach is…

  12. Students' Experiences of Learning Manual Clinical Skills through Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannesson, Eva; Silen, Charlotte; Kvist, Joanna; Hult, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Learning manual skills is a fundamental part of health care education, and motor, sensory and cognitive learning processes are essential aspects of professional development. Simulator training has been shown to enhance factors that facilitate motor and cognitive learning. The present study aimed to investigate the students' experiences and…

  13. Workplace-based assessment: measuring and shaping clinical learning.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tejinder; Sood, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of clinical competence is a challenge. It should not only help us in measuring performance but also in improving performance. Traditional assessment has many flaws, mainly related to snapshot observations, artificial settings and lack of opportunity to improve performance. Workplace-based assessment (WPBA) refers to direct observation of performance at the workplace. It builds on the ways people learn at the workplace. The key feature of all tools used for WPBA is direct observation of trainee performance at the workplace followed by provision of feedback based on that observation. This makes such an assessment valid. Though most of the tools use subjective observations, the assessment is reliable due to use of multiple encounters being assessed by multiple assessors in multiple settings. In addition, WPBA has high utility in terms of its educational impact. WPBA involves sampling of the clinical work using logbooks or encounter cards and direct observation of performance of clinical competence and procedural skills. These are supplemented by assessment by various people who can provide authentic information about a trainee's work habits. The encounters and ratings are documented in a portfolio, which allows a longitudinal record of trainees' progress. Experience suggests that WPBA has the potential to shape clinical learning and steer it towards desirable learning outcomes. Most of the tools used for WPBA can be applied in the Indian context.

  14. Developing students' time management skills in clinical settings: practical considerations for busy nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan

    2011-06-01

    In clinical settings, nursing staff often find themselves responsible for students who have varying time management skills. Nurses need to respond sensitively and appropriately, and to teach nursing students how to prioritize and better allocate time. This is important not only for developing students' clinical skills but also for shaping their perceptions about the quality of the placement and their willingness to consider it as a potential work specialty. In this column, some simple, practical strategies that nurses can use to assist students with improving their time management skills are identified.

  15. Social Skills: Adolf Meyer’s Revision of Clinical Skill for the New Psychiatry of the Twentieth Century

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Adolf Meyer (1866–1950) exercised considerable influence over the development of Anglo-American psychiatry during the first half of the twentieth century. The concepts and techniques he implemented at his prominent Phipps Psychiatric Clinic at Johns Hopkins remain important to psychiatric practice and neuro-scientific research today. In the 1890s, Meyer revised scientific medicine’s traditional notion of clinical skill to serve what he called the ‘New Psychiatry’, a clinical discipline that embodied social and scientific ideals shared with other ‘new’ progressive reform movements in the United States. This revision conformed to his concept of psychobiology – his biological theory of mind and mental disorders – and accorded with his definition of scientific medicine as a unity of clinical–pathological methods and therapeutics. Combining insights from evolutionary biology, neuron theory and American pragmatist philosophy, Meyer concluded that subjective experience and social behaviour were functions of human biology. In addition to the time-honoured techniques devised to exploit the material data of the diseased body – observing and recording in the clinic, dissecting in the morgue and conducting histological experiments in the laboratory – he insisted that psychiatrists must also be skilled at wielding social interaction and interpersonal relationships as investigative and therapeutic tools in order to conceptualise, collect, analyse and apply the ephemeral data of ‘social adaptation’. An examination of his clinical practices and teaching at Johns Hopkins between 1913 and 1917 shows how particular historical and intellectual contexts shaped Meyer’s conceptualisation of social behaviour as a biological function and, subsequently, his new vision of clinical skill for twentieth-century psychiatry. PMID:26090738

  16. The Dreyfus model of clinical problem-solving skills acquisition: a critical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Context The Dreyfus model describes how individuals progress through various levels in their acquisition of skills and subsumes ideas with regard to how individuals learn. Such a model is being accepted almost without debate from physicians to explain the ‘acquisition’ of clinical skills. Objectives This paper reviews such a model, discusses several controversial points, clarifies what kind of knowledge the model is about, and examines its coherence in terms of problem-solving skills. Dreyfus' main idea that intuition is a major aspect of expertise is also discussed in some detail. Relevant scientific evidence from cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience is reviewed to accomplish these aims. Conclusions Although the Dreyfus model may partially explain the ‘acquisition’ of some skills, it is debatable if it can explain the acquisition of clinical skills. The complex nature of clinical problem-solving skills and the rich interplay between the implicit and explicit forms of knowledge must be taken into consideration when we want to explain ‘acquisition’ of clinical skills. The idea that experts work from intuition, not from reason, should be evaluated carefully. PMID:20563279

  17. The effects of performance-based assessment criteria on student performance and self-assessment skills.

    PubMed

    Fastré, Greet Mia Jos; van der Klink, Marcel R; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J G

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of performance-based versus competence-based assessment criteria on task performance and self-assessment skills among 39 novice secondary vocational education students in the domain of nursing and care. In a performance-based assessment group students are provided with a preset list of performance-based assessment criteria, describing what students should do, for the task at hand. The performance-based group is compared to a competence-based assessment group in which students receive a preset list of competence-based assessment criteria, describing what students should be able to do. The test phase revealed that the performance-based group outperformed the competence-based group on test task performance. In addition, higher performance of the performance-based group was reached with lower reported mental effort during training, indicating a higher instructional efficiency for novice students.

  18. Utility and assessment of non-technical skills for rapid response systems and medical emergency teams.

    PubMed

    Chalwin, R P; Flabouris, A

    2013-09-01

    Efforts are ongoing to improve outcomes from cardiac arrest and medical emergencies. A promising quality improvement modality is use of non-technical skills (NTS) that aim to address human factors through improvements in performance of leadership, communication, situational awareness and decision-making. Originating in the airline industry, NTS training has been successfully introduced into anaesthesia, surgery, emergency medicine and other acute medical specialities. Some aspects of NTS have already achieved acceptance for cardiac arrest teams. Leadership skills are emphasised in advanced life support training and have shown favourable results when employed in simulated and clinical resuscitation scenarios. The application of NTS in medical emergency teams as part of a rapid response system attending medical emergencies is less certain; however, observations of simulations have also shown promise. This review highlights the potential benefits of NTS competency for cardiac arrest teams and, more importantly, medical emergency teams because of the diversity of clinical scenarios encountered. Discussion covers methods to assess and refine NTS and NTS training to optimise performance in the clinical environment. Increasing attention should be applied to yielding meaningful patient and organisational outcomes from use of NTS. Similarly, implementation of any training course should receive appropriate scrutiny to refine team and institutional performance.

  19. Interpreting Assessment Reports - TABS 1982: A Guide for Interpreting and Using Results from TABS--Texas Assessment of Basic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    The Texas Assessment of Basic Skills (TABS) helps to improve basic skills mastery by assessing student achievement and district performance levels in reading, writing and mathematics. TABS was designed to provide information for instructional planning in the state-funded compensatory education service. Minimum competency objectives are to be…

  20. Assessment Work: Examining the Prevalence and Nature of Assessment Competencies and Skills in Student Affairs Job Postings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, John L.; Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2010-01-01

    This mixed method study explored the assessment-related skills and job duties that student affairs administrators expect from new employees as reflected in 1,759 job openings posted in 2008, of which seven job postings were specialist positions in outcomes-based assessment. The skills and duties required of these seven positions were primarily…

  1. Assessing clinical reasoning abilities of medical students using clinical performance examination

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sunju; Kim, Do-Kyong; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Roh, Hye-Rin; Oh, Young-Rim; Seo, Ji-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the reliability and validity of new clinical performance examination (CPX) for assessing clinical reasoning skills and evaluating clinical reasoning ability of the students. Methods: Third-year medical school students (n=313) in Busan-Gyeongnam consortium in 2014 were included in the study. One of 12 stations was developed to assess clinical reasoning abilities. The scenario and checklists of the station were revised by six experts. Chief complaint of the case was rhinorrhea, accompanied by fever, headache, and vomiting. Checklists focused on identifying of the main problem and systematic approach to the problem. Students interviewed the patient and recorded subjective and objective findings, assessments, plans (SOAP) note for 15 minutes. Two professors assessed students simultaneously. We performed statistical analysis on their scores and survey. Results: The Cronbach α of subject station was 0.878 and Cohen κ coefficient between graders was 0.785. Students agreed on CPX as an adequate tool to evaluate students’ performance, but some graders argued that the CPX failed to secure its validity due to their lack of understanding the case. One hundred eight students (34.5%) identified essential problem early and only 58 (18.5%) performed systematic history taking and physical examination. One hundred seventy-three of them (55.3%) communicated correct diagnosis with the patient. Most of them had trouble in writing SOAP notes. Conclusion: To gain reliability and validity, interrater agreement should be secured. Students' clinical reasoning skills were not enough. Students need to be trained on problem identification, reasoning skills and accurate record-keeping. PMID:26838567

  2. Questioning Skills Demonstrated by Approved Clinical Instructors During Clinical Field Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Mary G

    2008-01-01

    Context: The current trend in athletic training clinical education places greater emphasis on the quality of interactions occurring between Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs) and athletic training students (ATSs). Among other attributes, the ability of ACIs to facilitate and direct quality clinical learning experiences may be influenced by the skill with which the ACI is able to use selected teaching strategies. Objective: To gain insight into ACIs' use of questioning as a specific teaching strategy during the clinical education experiences of undergraduate ATSs. Design: Qualitative case study design involving initial and stimulated-recall interviews, prolonged field observations, and audio recording of ACI-ATS interactions. Setting: The primary athletic training facility at one athletic training education program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants: The 8 ACI participants included 3 full-time athletic training education program faculty members and 5 graduate-level assistants. The 24 ATS participants included 1 senior, 17 juniors, and 6 sophomores. Data Collection and Analysis: Transcribed data collected from 8 initial interviews, 23 field observations, 23 audio-recorded ACI-ATS interactions and 54 stimulated-recall interviews were analyzed through microscopic, open, and axial coding, as well as coding for process. The cognition level of questions posed by ACIs was analyzed according to Sellappah and colleagues' Question Classification Framework. Results: The ACI participants posed 712 questions during the 23 observation periods. Of the total questions, 70.37% were classified as low-level cognitive questions and 17.00% as high-level cognitive questions. The remaining 12.64% were classified as other. Conclusions: Although all ACIs used questioning during clinical instruction, 2 distinct questioning patterns were identified: strategic questioning and nonstrategic questioning. The way ACIs

  3. Using clinical video excerpts to prompt music therapy majors' recall of related experiences and self-attributions of comfort and skill.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Dianne

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to develop a method for collecting music therapy majors' hypothesized self-attributions of comfort and skill in diverse clinical scenarios and relating their attributions to recall and perceptions of similar personal and clinical experience. Fifty eight music therapy majors, from freshmen to graduate (board-certified) students, watched 10 brief video excerpts. After each excerpt participants moved 2 Continuous Response Digital Interface (CRDI) dials, one labeled "comfort" and the other labeled "skill," to indicate their feelings about themselves as therapist with the client(s) in the excerpt. At the end of viewing all excerpts, participants completed an open-ended total recall paper/pencil form requesting estimation of personal and clinical experience with any population represented in the excerpts. Participants recalled more personal experience compared to clinical experience. A strong positive correlation was found between personal and clinical experience estimates. A strong positive correlation was also found between comfort and skill scores. Personal experience estimates were not related to self-attributions of comfort or skill. Clinical excerpts prompted neutral self-attributions of comfort and skill with comfort being slightly higher than skill self-attributions. Clinical experience estimates, although not related to self-attributions of comfort; were positively related to self-attributions of skill. Exploratory comparisons with small groups within the total sample suggest a highly positive impact of specific music therapy clinical experience, particularly the post-coursework internship, on skill self-attributions. Results are discussed within the context of using the assessment to investigate the predictive value of self-attributes as clinical indicators of persistence for recruitment and retention of potentially successful music therapy students and young professionals.

  4. Using Model-Tracing to Conduct Performance Assessment of Students' Inquiry Skills within a Microworld

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gobert, Janice D.; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2011-01-01

    The National frameworks for science emphasize inquiry skills (NRC, 1996), however, in typical classroom practice, science learning often focuses on rote learning in part because science process skills are difficult to assess (Fadel, Honey, & Pasnick, 2007) and rote knowledge is prioritized on high-stakes tests. Short answer assessments of…

  5. Effective Student Assessment and Evaluation in the Classroom: Knowledge + Skills + Attributes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Todd; Swanson, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of "Effective Student Assessment and Evaluation in the Classroom: Knowledge + Skills + Attributes" is to more clearly articulate the student assessment knowledge, skills and attributes expected under the Teaching Quality Standard Ministerial Order of applicants for Alberta interim professional teacher certification. The…

  6. Critical Emergency Medicine Procedural Skills: A Comparative Study of Methods for Teaching and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Dane M.; And Others

    Three critical procedural skills in emergency medicine were evaluated using three assessment modalities--written, computer, and animal model. The effects of computer practice and previous procedure experience on skill competence were also examined in an experimental sequential assessment design. Subjects were six medical students, six residents,…

  7. Aligning CASAS Competencies and Assessments to Basic Skills Content Standards. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CASAS - Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Since its inception, the Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS) has focused on teaching and assessing basic skills in contexts that are relevant and important to adult learners. CASAS has developed and continues to refine a highly formalized hierarchy of competencies, the application of basic skills that adults need to be fully…

  8. Assessing Language Related Skills of Pre-Linguistic Children. Final Report. Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairns, George F.; Butterfield, Earl C.

    The third of four documents reviews research on assessment in three domains (receptive language skills, expressive language skills, and perceptual and cognitive processes) as the most likely to predict subsequent language development of young children who have yet to speak their first word. Section II focuses on assessment of hearing sensitivity…

  9. Validation of Modified Soft Skills Assessment Instrument (MOSSAI) for Use in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aworanti, O. A.; Taiwo, M. B.; Iluobe, O. I.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, it has become an accepted norm nearly all over the globe to teach and assess soft skills. However, in Nigeria, it is an emerging area of interest that needs to be addressed squarely. In the light of the fore-going, this study validated a modified version of Measuring and Assessment Soft Skills (MASS) (an instrument developed and used by…

  10. Teachers' Perceptions of a Fundamental Movement Skill (FMS) Assessment Battery in a School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lander, Natalie; Morgan, Philip J.; Salmon, Jo; Barnett, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental movement skills (FMS) competence is low in adolescent girls. An assessment tool for teachers is needed to monitor FMS in this demographic. The present study explored whether the Canadian Agility and Movement Skill Assessment (CAMSA) is feasible for use by physical education (PE) teachers of Australian Year 7 girls in a school setting.…

  11. A Calculus of Occupational Skill Attainment: Building More Validity into a Valid Assessment System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munyofu, Paul; Kohr, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated several aspects of occupational skill assessment as implemented in one state: (1) What is the extent to which student achievement on the cognitive component was related to their achievement on the psychomotor component of the technical skill assessments? (2) How efficiently was their overall composite attainment calculated?…

  12. Unpacking Pandora's Box: Issues in the Assessment of English Learners' Literacy Skill Development in Multimodal Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandya, Jessica Zacher

    2012-01-01

    In this commentary I unpack the Pandora's Box of issues related to the assessment of English language learners' literacy skill development in multimodal classrooms. I ask how we might quantify the benefits of multimodal composing, for k-12 as well as college students, given the existing complexity of assessing ELLs' traditional literacy skills. I…

  13. Using Assessment to Improve Early Elementary Students' Knowledge and Skills for Comprehending Informational Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witmer, Sara E.; Duke, Nell K.; Billman, Alison K.; Betts, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Although assessment of student progress in word reading skills is common, students' knowledge and skills for comprehending informational text are rarely assessed. Despite research indicating the need for instruction in this area and a growing national understanding of its importance that is reflected in the Common Core State Standards, few…

  14. ASK Standards: Assessment, Skills, and Knowledge Content Standards for Student Affairs Practitioners and Scholars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACPA College Student Educators International, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Assessment Skills and Knowledge (ASK) standards seek to articulate the areas of content knowledge, skill and dispositions that student affairs professionals need in order to perform as practitioner-scholars to assess the degree to which students are mastering the learning and development outcomes the professionals intend. Consistent with…

  15. Moving beyond Assessment to Improving Students' Critical Thinking Skills: A Model for Implementing Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Ada; Lisic, Elizabeth; Goltz, Michele; Stein, Barry; Harris, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This research examines how the use of the CAT (Critical thinking Assessment Test) and involvement in CAT-Apps (CAT Applications within the discipline) training can serve as an important part of a faculty development model that assists faculty in the assessment of students' critical thinking skills and in the development of these skills within…

  16. Assessing Information Literacy Skills Development in First Year Students: A Multi-Year Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Assessment data from 5 years of a pretest/posttest with first-year students was analyzed using McNemar's test. The results show that revisiting previous assessment data can identify significant changes in information literacy skill development.

  17. Perceived importance and self-assessment of the skills of Canada's health-system pharmacy managers.

    PubMed

    Axworthy, Sheri; MacKinnon, Neil J

    2002-06-01

    The relationship between the perceived importance of managerial skills and self-assessed proficiency in each skill among health-system pharmacy managers in Canada was examined, and the demographic characteristics associated with pharmacy managers who lack these skills were analyzed. Surveys were mailed to 514 health-system pharmacy managers in Canada in July 2000. The survey listed 61 specific managerial skills, under seven general categories. The respondents were asked to rate the level of importance that each of the skills had in their job and rate their proficiency in each skill. Ratings were based on a five-point Likert scale ranging from very high importance or skill level to very low importance or skill level. The response rate was 52.7%. Of the 61 specific managerial skills considered, the majority of respondents identified "Demonstrating ethical conduct" as both the most important skill and their greatest strength. "Understand the operating principles of managed care" was viewed as the least important skill, while "Participating in the implementation of a marketing program" was respondents' greatest weakness. There were significant differences in the mean self-assessed skill levels of the respondents according to their educational background, size of the institution in which they work, and years of managerial experience. Health-system pharmacy managers with a master of business administration degree had a significantly higher overall mean perceived skill level than managers in all other "Education" categories. Managers with a bachelor of science degree in pharmacy had a significantly lower overall mean perceived skill level than those with a bachelor of science degree in pharmacy plus "other" degrees, while managers employed in institutions of 500 or more inpatient beds had a significantly higher overall self-rated mean skill level than managers employed in institutions of 51-100 inpatient beds. A national survey of health-system pharmacy managers in Canada

  18. The use of physical assessment skills by registered nurses in Australia: issues for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Birks, Melanie; Cant, Robyn; James, Ainsley; Chung, Catherine; Davis, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of pre-service nursing education programs is to prepare competent graduates who are able to function as safe, professional registered nurses. An extensive element of these programs is the teaching of physical assessment skills, with most programs educating students to perform over 120 such skills. Previous research from North America suggests that the majority of skills taught to nurses in their pre-service programs are not used in practice. As part of a larger study, an online survey was used to explore use of 121 physical assessment skills by Australian nurses. Recruitment occurred via mailed invitation to members of the Australian Nursing Federation. Data were extracted from 1220 completed questionnaires returned by nurses who were mostly employed in New South Wales, were female and experienced nurses. Respondents indicated that they used only 34% of skills routinely. Results reinforce evidence found in the literature that many of the skills taught to nurses are either not used at all (35.5%) or are used rarely (31%). These findings have implications for the teaching of physical assessment skills in pre-service nursing programs, and raise questions about the value of extensive skills teaching in the context of contemporary health care. Further research into barriers to the use of physical assessment skills in nursing and the need for comprehensive skills preparation for the generalist nurse is likely to offer some solutions to these questions.

  19. Agreement Among Dental Students, Peer Assessors, and Tutor in Assessing Students' Competence in Preclinical Skills.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jennifer I; Richardson, Gillian L; Drummie, Joyce

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of agreement regarding assessments of competence among dental students, their student peers, and their clinical skills tutors in a preclinical skills program. In 2012-13 at the University of Edinburgh, second-year dental students learned to perform the following seven cavity preparations/restorations on primary and permanent Frasaco teeth: single-surface adhesive occlusal cavity; single-surface adhesive interproximal cavity; single-surface adhesive labial cavity; multi-surface adhesive cavity; multi-surface amalgam cavity; pre-formed metal crown preparation; and composite resin buildup of a fractured maxillary central incisor tooth. Each student, a randomly allocated student peer, and the clinical skills tutor used standardized descriptors to assign a competency grade to all the students' preparations/restorations. The grades were analyzed by chi-square analysis. Data were available for all 59 second-year students in the program. The results showed that both the students and their peers overestimated the students' competence compared to the tutor at the following levels: single-surface adhesive occlusal cavity (χ(2)=10.63, p=0.005); single-surface adhesive interproximal cavity (χ(2)=11.40, p=0.003); single-surface labial cavity (χ(2)=23.70, p=0.001); multi-surface adhesive cavity (χ(2)=12.56, p=0.002); multi-surface amalgam cavity (χ(2)=38.85, p=0.001); pre-formed metal crown preparation (χ(2)=40.41, p=0.001); and composite resin buildup (χ(2)=57.31, p=0.001). As expected, the lowest levels of agreement occurred on the most complicated procedures. These findings support the need for additional ways to help students better self-assess their work.

  20. Assessing skill of operational forest fire emissions model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-10-01

    Across the continental United States, the BlueSky Smoke Modeling Framework provides hourly forest fire emissions forecasts and calculates the concentrations of hazardous compounds 72 hours in advance. Though a traditional computational model itself, the BlueSky Framework pulls together the results from a number of different independent models for fire and fuel information, combustion of fuel, and speciated emissions calculations to produce its operational forecasts of fire-related emissions and smoke dispersals. One aspect of forest fire emissions that is of particular concern is small particulate matter, particularly microscopic particles with diameters less than 2.5 micrometers. These particles, known as PM2.5, are small enough to penetrate lung tissue and cause serious health problems in high concentrations. To assess the skill of the BlueSky Gateway, a system that uses the BlueSky Framework and the Community MultiScale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to forecast PM2.5 surface concentrations, Strand et al. compared the modeled estimates for two Californian forest wildfire events against observations.

  1. [Health assessment of local residents who made full use of symptomatology skills and test device].

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Shinichiro; Morikawa, Norifumi; Ikeda, Kayo; Okazaki, Teruo; Takahashi, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    A strategy named "Japan is back" adopted in June 2013 specifies that pharmacies shall be regarded as community-based places where health-related information is provided, and the public shall be encouraged to use the services of pharmacies and pharmacists who can advise on health and appropriate use of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, and promote self medication. In Japan there are approximately 55000 pharmacies and 260000 pharmacists, and community residents are recommended to use these resources. As advisors on healthcare in the community, pharmacists are required to make judgments regarding drug use in individuals performing self medication and using OTC drugs in consideration of their symptoms and level of understanding of their health conditions, and recommend that they consult a medical center if necessary. To meet these requirements pharmacists need to have the skills to monitor each individual's lifestyle, behavior, and environment as well as trends in society, and assess their health status. However, education that allows pharmacists to practice such skills remains insufficiently developed. We consider that to be able to detect diseases early among community residents and appropriately support them using pharmacotherapy, it is very important to train pharmacists to do the following at pharmacies: 1) determine individuals who should be treated early using symptomatologic skills; 2) promote public awareness of disease; and 3) perform biochemical examination (blood is collected by fingerprick promptly to obtain biochemical data) in cooperation with the Department of Clinical Pharmacotherapy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hiroshima University.

  2. The music therapy clinical intern: performance skills, academic knowledge, personal qualities, and interpersonal skills necessary for a student seeking clinical training.

    PubMed

    Brookins, L M

    1984-01-01

    The music therapy curriculum consists of two distinct parts: the academic phase and the internship. The music therapy student must apply for a clinical internship during the last year of the academic phase, and the student is expected to evolve from student to professional music therapist during the internship phase. The present study sought to determine the skills, knowledge, and qualities clinical training directors considered most important for a prospective intern to possess. The sample population of the survey consisted of 25 clinical training directors from the Great Lakes Region. Results of the survey indicated that piano skills, knowledge of psychology, emotional maturity, and the ability to express needs and feelings were considered most important for the prospective intern to possess.

  3. Preparing Pre-Service Primary School Teachers to Assess Fundamental Motor Skills: Two Skills and Two Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, John; Miller, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pre-service teacher education (PSTE) programmes for generalist primary school teachers have limited time allocated to Physical Education, Health and Personal Development. In practice, teachers in schools are required to assess motor skills despite the fact that their training provides minimal preparation. This necessitates creative…

  4. The Validity and Clinical Uses of the Pepper Visual Skills for Reading Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, G.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The Pepper Visual Skills for Reading Test was assessed as a measure of reading ability with meaningful text in 38 adults with macular degeneration; scores were compared with assessment made using the Gray Oral Reading Test, a previously standardized assessment. The test's validity was confirmed. (Author/JDD)

  5. Assessment of Numerical Skills of Navy Enlisted Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cheryl J.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to examine the extent of basic numerical skills deficiencies in the population of recruits bound for Apprentice Training, and (2) to examine whether selected Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test scores could be used to predict numerical skills performance. This project was undertaken by…

  6. Teaching, Learning and Assessment for Adults: Improving Foundation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2008

    2008-01-01

    Many adults in OECD countries have low language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) skills. The consequences of these low foundation skills span the economic, health and social well-being of individuals, families and communities. Investment in this sector of adult education is therefore crucial. This study looks specifically inside the programmes for…

  7. Developing Critical Thinking Skills: Assessing the Effectiveness of Workbook Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Elise D.; Jefferson, Renee N.

    2015-01-01

    To address the challenge of developing critical thinking skills in college students, this empirical study examines the effectiveness of cognitive exercises in developing those skills. The study uses Critical Thinking: Building the Basics by Walter, Knudsvig, and Smith (2003). This workbook is specifically designed to exercise and develop critical…

  8. Simulation-guided cardiac auscultation improves medical students' clinical skills: the Pavia pilot experience.

    PubMed

    Perlini, Stefano; Salinaro, Francesco; Santalucia, Paola; Musca, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Clinical evaluation is the cornerstone of any cardiac diagnosis, although excessive over-specialisation often leads students to disregard the value of clinical skills, and to overemphasize the approach to instrumental cardiac diagnosis. Time restraints, low availability of "typical" cardiac patients on whom to perform effective bedside teaching, patients' respect and the underscoring of the value of clinical skills all lead to a progressive decay in teaching. Simulation-guided cardiac auscultation may improve clinical training in medical students and residents. Harvey(©) is a mannequin encompassing more than 50 cardiac diagnoses that was designed and developed at the University of Miami (Florida, USA). One of the advantages of Harvey(©) simulation resides in the possibility of listening, comparing and discussing "real" murmurs. To objectively assess its teaching performance, the capability to identify five different cardiac diagnoses (atrial septal defect, normal young subject, mitral stenosis with tricuspid regurgitation, chronic mitral regurgitation, and pericarditis) out of more than 50 diagnostic possibilities was assessed in 523 III-year medical students (i.e. at the very beginning of their clinical experience), in 92 VI-year students, and in 42 residents before and after a formal 10-h teaching session with Harvey(©). None of them had previously experienced simulation-based cardiac auscultation in addition to formal lecturing (all three groups) and bedside teaching (VI-year students and residents). In order to assess the "persistence" of the acquired knowledge over time, the test was repeated after 3 years in 85 students, who did not repeat the formal 10-h teaching session with Harvey(©) after the III year. As expected, the overall response was poor in the "beginners" who correctly identified 11.0 % of the administered cardiac murmurs. After simulation-guided training, the ability to recognise the correct cardiac diagnoses was much better (72.0 %; p < 0

  9. Self-assessment and goal-setting is associated with an improvement in interviewing skills

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Kathleen; Zabar, Sondra; Charap, Joseph; Nicholson, Joseph; Disney, Lindsey; Kalet, Adina; Gillespie, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Describe the relationship between medical students’ self-assessment and goal-setting (SAGS) skills and development of interviewing skills during the first-year doctoring course. Method 157 first-year medical students completed three two-case standardized patient (SP) interviews. After each of the first two, students viewed videotapes of their interview, completed a SAGS worksheet, and reviewed a selected tape segment in a seminar. SAGS was categorized into good and poor quality and interviewing skills were rated by trained raters. Results SAGS improved over time (37% good week 1 vs. 61% good week 10). Baseline SAGS and interviewing skills were not associated. Initial SAGS quality was associated with change in interviewing skills – those with poor-quality SAGS demonstrated a decrease and those with good-quality SAGS demonstrated an increase in scores by 17 weeks (ANOVA F=4.16, p=0.024). For students whose SAGS skills were good at both week 1 and 10, interviewing skills declined in weeks 1–10 and then increased significantly at week 17. For those whose SAGS remained ‘poor’ in weeks 1–10, interviewing skills declined in weeks 10–17. Conclusions In general, the quality of students’ SAGS improved over time. Poor baseline SAGS skills and failure to improve were associated with a decrease in interviewing skills at 17 weeks. For students with better SAGS, interviewing skills increased at week 17. Improvement in SAGS skills was not associated with improved interviewing skills. Understanding structured self-assessment skills helps identify student characteristics that influence progressive mastery of communication skills and therefore may inform curriculum and remediation tailoring. PMID:25059835

  10. Virtual Patient Simulations for Medical Education: Increasing Clinical Reasoning Skills through Deliberate Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Virtual Patient Simulations (VPS) are web-based exercises involving simulated patients in virtual environments. This study investigates the utility of VPS for increasing medical student clinical reasoning skills, collaboration, and engagement. Many studies indicate that VPS provide medical students with essential practice in clinical decision…

  11. The Weak Relationship between Anatomy Competence and Clinical Skills in Junior Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoeman, Scarpa; Chandratilake, Madawa

    2012-01-01

    In modern curricula, the early integration of anatomy and clinical skills education at undergraduate level is seen as important. However, the direct relationship between medical students' competence in anatomy, and their clinical proficiency during early undergraduate years, has scarcely been studied. In this study, the marks for anatomy and…

  12. Clinical Skills Verification in General Psychiatry: Recommendations of the ABPN Task Force on Rater Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jibson, Michael D.; Broquet, Karen E.; Anzia, Joan Meyer; Beresin, Eugene V.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Kaye, David; Rao, Nyapati Raghu; Rostain, Anthony Leon; Sexson, Sandra B.; Summers, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) announced in 2007 that general psychiatry training programs must conduct Clinical Skills Verification (CSV), consisting of observed clinical interviews and case presentations during residency, as one requirement to establish graduates' eligibility to sit for the written certification…

  13. Hand-Held Video for Clinical Skills Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Mark; Jones, Steve; Murphy, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    In health care education a balance needs to be struck between theoretical and practical teaching. Undergraduates typically split their time between clinical placement and university-based teaching blocks. A proportion of the time spent in preparation for clinical practice placements will be spent in the classroom or in simulation suites. The…

  14. Objective Structured Clinical Examination as an educational initiative for summative simulation competency evaluation of first-year student registered nurse anesthetists' clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Wunder, Linda L; Glymph, Derrick C; Newman, Johanna; Gonzalez, Vicente; Gonzalez, Juan E; Groom, Jeffrey A

    2014-12-01

    The use of simulation to imitate real-life scenarios reaches back many centuries. In the last decade, the use of simulation in healthcare has gained acceptance as a valuable tool for teaching and learning technical and nontechnical skills in healthcare. The use of simulation technology has moved medical education from the standard of pen and paper examinations to the assessment of clinical competency before caring for patients. The old thinking of "see one, do one, teach one" is behind us as healthcare works to create a culture of safety that holds healthcare personnel accountable. A current use of testing clinical competence is the use of Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) by physician training programs. As a testing tool, the OSCE has great potential to assess the clinical competence of students before they enter the clinical setting. The nurse anesthesia program at the authors' university has moved toward creating a formal assessment to ensure clinical competence of their student registered nurse anesthetists. In this article, we describe the development and implementation of an OSCE to ensure clinical competence of first-year student registered nurse anesthetists before they begin their clinical training.

  15. Using simulation to enhance the acquisition and retention of clinical skills in neonatology.

    PubMed

    Anderson, JoDee M; Warren, Jamie B

    2011-04-01

    Neonatal care occurs in extremely complex and dynamic environments and requires providers to operate under intense time pressure in coordination with multiple disciplines. Teaching the clinical skills requisite to effective practice requires the meticulous application of curricular design principles. Simulation can be used as an effective instructional strategy in achieving learner acquisition and retention of the cognitive, technical, and behavioral skills essential to optimal delivery of care in neonatology.

  16. The Clinical Assessment and Remote Administration Tablet

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jessica A.; Lane, Susan R.; Bockholt, H. Jeremy; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic data capture of case report forms, demographic, neuropsychiatric, or clinical assessments, can vary from scanning hand-written forms into databases to fully electronic systems. Web-based forms can be extremely useful for self-assessment; however, in the case of neuropsychiatric assessments, self-assessment is often not an option. The clinician often must be the person either summarizing or making their best judgment about the subject’s response in order to complete an assessment, and having the clinician turn away to type into a web browser may be disruptive to the flow of the interview. The Mind Research Network has developed a prototype for a software tool for the real-time acquisition and validation of clinical assessments in remote environments. We have developed the clinical assessment and remote administration tablet on a Microsoft Windows PC tablet system, which has been adapted to interact with various data models already in use in several large-scale databases of neuroimaging studies in clinical populations. The tablet has been used successfully to collect and administer clinical assessments in several large-scale studies, so that the correct clinical measures are integrated with the correct imaging and other data. It has proven to be incredibly valuable in confirming that data collection across multiple research groups is performed similarly, quickly, and with accountability for incomplete datasets. We present the overall architecture and an evaluation of its use. PMID:22207845

  17. Cross-Linguistic Expression of Contrastive Accent: Clinical Assessment in Spanish and English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Castilla, Pastora; Peppe, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Well-documented Romance-Germanic differences in the use of accent in speech to convey information-structure and focus cause problems for the assessment of prosodic skills in populations with clinical disorders. The strategies for assessing the ability to use lexical and contrastive accent in English and Spanish are reviewed, and studies in the…

  18. Communication Skills in Standardized-Patient Assessment of Final-Year Medical Students: A Psychometric Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiton, Gretchen; Hodgson, Carol S.; Delandshere, Ginett; Wilkerson, Luann

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the content-specificity of communication skills. It investigates the reliability and dimensionality of standardized patient (SP) ratings of communication skills in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination(OSCE) for final year medical students. An OSCE consisting of seven standardized patient(SP)…

  19. Cognitive Assessment: Clinical Applications of Self-Statement Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.

    1993-01-01

    Presents overview of cognitive assessment, with emphasis on self-statement assessment. Reviews clinically useful methods of cognitive assessment and presents States of Mind model to illustrate interpretive framework for thought data and their relationship to psychopathology. Presents two case studies to illustrate specific techniques of…

  20. The Development and Validation of a Golf Swing and Putt Skill Assessment for Children

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Lisa M.; Hardy, Louise L.; Brian, Ali S.; Robertson, Sam

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to describe development of a process-oriented instrument designed to assess the golf swing and putt stroke, and to assess the instrument’s discriminative validity in terms of age and reliability (intra-rater and re-test). A Delphi consultation (with golf industry professionals and researchers in movement skill assessment) was used to develop an assessment for each skill based on existing skill assessment protocols. Each skill had six components to be marked as present/absent. Individual scores were based on the number of performance components successfully demonstrated over two trials for each skill (potential score range 0 to 24). Children (n = 43) aged 6-10 years (M = 7.8 years, SD = 1.3) were assessed in both skills live in the field by one rater at Time 1(T1). A subset of children (n = 28) had consent for assessments to be videoed. Six weeks later 19 children were reassessed, five days apart (T2, T3). An ANOVA assessed discriminative validity i.e. whether skill competence at T1 differed by age (6 years, 7/8 years and 9/10 years). Intraclass correlations (ICC) assessed intra-rater reliability between the live and video assessment at T1 and test-retest reliability (between T2 and T3). Paired t-tests assessed any systematic differences between live and video assessments (T1) and between T2 and T3. Older children were more skilled (F (2, 40) = 11.18, p < 0.001). The live assessment reflected the video assessment (ICC = 0.79, 95% CI 0.59, 0.90) and scores did not differ between live and video assessments. Test retest reliability was acceptable (ICC = 0.60, 95% CI 0.23, 0.82), although the mean score was slightly higher at retest. This instrument could be used reliably by golf coaches and physical education teachers as part of systematic early player assessment and feedback. Key points Golf is becoming an increasingly popular sport among young children, however there is no standard protocol available to assess and identify skill deficits, mastery level

  1. Skill assessment for coupled biological/physical models of marine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stow, Craig A.; Jolliff, Jason; McGillicuddy, Dennis J., Jr.; Doney, Scott C.; Allen, J. Icarus; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Rose, Kenneth A.; Wallhead, Philip

    2009-02-01

    Coupled biological/physical models of marine systems serve many purposes including the synthesis of information, hypothesis generation, and as a tool for numerical experimentation. However, marine system models are increasingly used for prediction to support high-stakes decision-making. In such applications it is imperative that a rigorous model skill assessment is conducted so that the model's capabilities are tested and understood. Herein, we review several metrics and approaches useful to evaluate model skill. The definition of skill and the determination of the skill level necessary for a given application is context specific and no single metric is likely to reveal all aspects of model skill. Thus, we recommend the use of several metrics, in concert, to provide a more thorough appraisal. The routine application and presentation of rigorous skill assessment metrics will also serve the broader interests of the modeling community, ultimately resulting in improved forecasting abilities as well as helping us recognize our limitations.

  2. Assessing depression outcomes in group practice clinics.

    PubMed Central

    Braswell, H R; Williamson, J W

    1979-01-01

    The application of a protocol for the initial assessment of medical care outcomes of geriatric depression management in four multispecialty group practice clinics is described. The clinical findings of this study are limited, but the protocol for the assessment of depression outcomes was found to be feasible, practical and acceptable in all four clinics. The success of the study has positive implications both for improving management of depressed clinic patients and for adapting this quality assurance approach to other health conditions and care settings. PMID:507262

  3. Workplace-based assessment of communication skills: A pilot project addressing feasibility, acceptance and reliability.

    PubMed

    Weyers, Simone; Jemi, Iman; Karger, André; Raski, Bianca; Rotthoff, Thomas; Pentzek, Michael; Mortsiefer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Imparting communication skills has been given great importance in medical curricula. In addition to standardized assessments, students should communicate with real patients in actual clinical situations during workplace-based assessments and receive structured feedback on their performance. The aim of this project was to pilot a formative testing method for workplace-based assessment. Our investigation centered in particular on whether or not physicians view the method as feasible and how high acceptance is among students. In addition, we assessed the reliability of the method. Method: As part of the project, 16 students held two consultations each with chronically ill patients at the medical practice where they were completing GP training. These consultations were video-recorded. The trained mentoring physician rated the student's performance and provided feedback immediately following the consultations using the Berlin Global Rating scale (BGR). Two impartial, trained raters also evaluated the videos using BGR. For qualitative and quantitative analysis, information on how physicians and students viewed feasibility and their levels of acceptance was collected in written form in a partially standardized manner. To test for reliability, the test-retest reliability was calculated for both of the overall evaluations given by each rater. The inter-rater reliability was determined for the three evaluations of each individual consultation. Results: The formative assessment method was rated positively by both physicians and students. It is relatively easy to integrate into daily routines. Its significant value lies in the personal, structured and recurring feedback. The two overall scores for each patient consultation given by the two impartial raters correlate moderately. The degree of uniformity among the three raters in respect to the individual consultations is low. Discussion: Within the scope of this pilot project, only a small sample of physicians and

  4. Workplace-based assessment of communication skills: A pilot project addressing feasibility, acceptance and reliability

    PubMed Central

    Weyers, Simone; Jemi, Iman; Karger, André; Raski, Bianca; Rotthoff, Thomas; Pentzek, Michael; Mortsiefer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Imparting communication skills has been given great importance in medical curricula. In addition to standardized assessments, students should communicate with real patients in actual clinical situations during workplace-based assessments and receive structured feedback on their performance. The aim of this project was to pilot a formative testing method for workplace-based assessment. Our investigation centered in particular on whether or not physicians view the method as feasible and how high acceptance is among students. In addition, we assessed the reliability of the method. Method: As part of the project, 16 students held two consultations each with chronically ill patients at the medical practice where they were completing GP training. These consultations were video-recorded. The trained mentoring physician rated the student’s performance and provided feedback immediately following the consultations using the Berlin Global Rating scale (BGR). Two impartial, trained raters also evaluated the videos using BGR. For qualitative and quantitative analysis, information on how physicians and students viewed feasibility and their levels of acceptance was collected in written form in a partially standardized manner. To test for reliability, the test-retest reliability was calculated for both of the overall evaluations given by each rater. The inter-rater reliability was determined for the three evaluations of each individual consultation. Results: The formative assessment method was rated positively by both physicians and students. It is relatively easy to integrate into daily routines. Its significant value lies in the personal, structured and recurring feedback. The two overall scores for each patient consultation given by the two impartial raters correlate moderately. The degree of uniformity among the three raters in respect to the individual consultations is low. Discussion: Within the scope of this pilot project, only a small sample of physicians and

  5. Technology-based strategies for promoting clinical reasoning skills in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Shellenbarger, Teresa; Robb, Meigan

    2015-01-01

    Faculty face the demand of preparing nursing students for the constantly changing health care environment. Effective use of online, classroom, and clinical conferencing opportunities helps to enhance nursing students' clinical reasoning capabilities needed for practice. The growth of technology creates an avenue for faculty to develop engaging learning opportunities. This article presents technology-based strategies such as electronic concept mapping, electronic case histories, and digital storytelling that can be used to facilitate clinical reasoning skills.

  6. Trade and Technical Volumes I: Access Skills. Vocational Readiness Skills. Missouri LINC. Assessing Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Dept. of Practical Arts and Vocational-Technical Education.

    This document contains trade and industrial occupations-related materials to help teachers and parents teach access skills to Missouri junior high and high school special needs students who want to pursue a vocational program in carpentry; commercial art; drafting; electronics; heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration; or offset lithography…

  7. Comparison of performance on process- and product-oriented assessments of fundamental motor skills across childhood.

    PubMed

    Logan, Samuel W; Barnett, Lisa M; Goodway, Jacqueline D; Stodden, David F

    2017-04-01

    Process-oriented motor competence (MC) assessments evaluate how a movement is performed. Product-oriented assessments evaluate the outcome of a movement. Determining the concurrent validity of process and product assessments is important to address the predictive utility of motor competence for health. The current study aimed to: (1) compare process and product assessments of the standing long jump, hop and throw across age groups and (2) determine the capacity of process assessments to classify levels of MC. Participants included 170 children classified into three age groups: 4-5, 7-8 and 10-11 years old. Participants' skills were examined concurrently using three process assessments ((Test of Gross Motor Development-2nd edition [TGMD-2]), Get Skilled; Get Active, and developmental sequences) and one product measure (throw speed, jump and hop distance). Results indicate moderate to strong correlations between (1) process assessments across skills and age groups (r range = .37-70) and (2) process and product assessments across skills and age groups (r range = .26-.88). In general, sensitivity to detect advanced skill level is lowest for TGMD-2 and highest for developmental sequences for all three skills. The use of process and product assessments is suggested to comprehensively capture levels of MC in human movement.

  8. The effect of high-fidelity patient simulation on the critical thinking and clinical decision-making skills of new graduate nurses.

    PubMed

    Maneval, Rhonda; Fowler, Kimberly A; Kays, John A; Boyd, Tiffany M; Shuey, Jennifer; Harne-Britner, Sarah; Mastrine, Cynthia

    2012-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether the addition of high-fidelity patient simulation to new nurse orientation enhanced critical thinking and clinical decision-making skills. A pretest-posttest design was used to assess critical thinking and clinical decision-making skills in two groups of graduate nurses. Compared with the control group, the high-fidelity patient simulation group did not show significant improvement in mean critical thinking or clinical decision-making scores. When mean scores were analyzed, both groups showed an increase in critical thinking scores from pretest to posttest, with the high-fidelity patient simulation group showing greater gains in overall scores. However, neither group showed a statistically significant increase in mean test scores. The effect of high-fidelity patient simulation on critical thinking and clinical decision-making skills remains unclear.

  9. Use of videos to support teaching and learning of clinical skills in nursing education: A review.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Helen; Oprescu, Florin I; Downer, Terri; Phillips, Nicole M; McTier, Lauren; Lord, Bill; Barr, Nigel; Alla, Kristel; Bright, Peter; Dayton, Jeanne; Simbag, Vilma; Visser, Irene

    2016-07-01

    Information and communications technology is influencing the delivery of education in tertiary institutions. In particular, the increased use of videos for teaching and learning clinical skills in nursing may be a promising direction to pursue, yet we need to better document the current research in this area of inquiry. The aim of this paper was to explore and document the current areas of research into the use of videos to support teaching and learning of clinical skills in nursing education. The four main areas of current and future research are effectiveness, efficiency, usage, and quality of videos as teaching and learning materials. While there is a clear need for additional research in the area, the use of videos seems to be a promising, relevant, and increasingly used instructional strategy that could enhance the quality of clinical skills education.

  10. Uncertainty Analysis for Peer Assessment: Oral Presentation Skills for Final Year Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Ho Sung

    2014-01-01

    Peer assessment plays an important role in engineering education for an active involvement in the assessment process, developing autonomy, enhancing reflection, and understanding of how to achieve the learning outcomes. Peer assessment uncertainty for oral presentation skills as part of the FYP assessment is studied. Validity and reliability for…

  11. Self-Assessment of Employability Skill Outcomes among Undergraduates and Alignment with Academic Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Despite acknowledgement of the benefits of self-assessment in higher education, disparity between student and academic assessments, with associated trends in overrating and underrating, plagues its meaningful use, particularly as a tool for formal assessment. This study examines self-assessment of capabilities in certain employability skills in…

  12. How to Assess Higher-Order Thinking Skills in Your Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Don't settle for assessing recall and comprehension only when you can use this guide to create assessments for higher-order thinking skills. Assessment expert Susan M. Brookhart brings you up to speed on how to develop and use test questions and other assessments that reveal how well your students can analyze, reason, solve problems, and think…

  13. Factors influencing the confidence in core clinical skills among hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Young Ok; Kim, Minju; Park, Kyung-Yeon; Yang, Jin-Hyang

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the confidence to perform 20 clinical skills and identify factors influencing the confidence of hospital nurses. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted with 550 hospital nurses at four hospitals in B city, Korea. The confidence to perform, frequency of performance and educational needs on 20 clinical skills identified by Korean Accreditation Board of Nursing were measured with a self-reported questionnaire. Data were analysed by SPSS 19.0 (IBM Corporation, Armonk, New York, USA). Participants were 27 years old on average, and 49.5% had less than 3 years of total working experience. The most confident skill was measuring vital signs, whereas the least confident skill was using defibrillator. In results of stepwise regression, confidence to perform was associated with educational needs, total working experience, frequency of performance and position. It is necessary to give opportunities to practice clinical skills at both schools and clinics for producing well-prepared nurses.

  14. Professional Nurses' Perceptions of Skills Required for Performing Preterm Infants' Follow-up Assessments.

    PubMed

    Cordewener, Debbie; Lubbe, Welma

    2017-02-14

    Improved perinatal and neonatal care enhances preterm infant survival rates, but the adverse outcomes remain high. Nurses play vitally important roles regarding the follow-up assessments, treatment, and care of preterm infants. This explorative, descriptive study aimed to describe nurses' perceptions of skills required to perform effective preterm infant assessments. Thirteen semistructured interviews were conducted. Identified themes included the role of the professional nurse, the importance of preterm infant assessments, lack of skills and knowledge to conduct quality assessments, formal and continuous development training needs, the absence of assessment tools and physical resources to perform standardized assessments of preterm infants, and the required support and referral systems.

  15. National Clinical Skills Competition: an effective simulation-based method to improve undergraduate medical education in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guanchao; Chen, Hong; Wang, Qiming; Chi, Baorong; He, Qingnan; Xiao, Haipeng; Zhou, Qinghuan; Liu, Jing; Wang, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Background The National Clinical Skills Competition has been held in China for 5 consecutive years since 2010 to promote undergraduate education reform and improve the teaching quality. The effects of the simulation-based competition will be analyzed in this study. Methods Participation in the competitions and the compilation of the questions used in the competition finals are summarized, and the influence and guidance quality are further analyzed. Through the nationwide distribution of questionnaires in medical colleges, the effects of the simulation-based competition on promoting undergraduate medical education reform were evaluated. Results The results show that approximately 450 students from more than 110 colleges (accounting for 81% of colleges providing undergraduate clinical medical education in China) participated in the competition each year. The knowledge, skills, and attitudes were comprehensively evaluated by simulation-based assessment. Eight hundred and eighty copies of the questionnaires were distributed to 110 participating medical schools in 2015. In total, 752 valid responses were received across 95 schools. The majority of the interviewees agreed or strongly agreed that competition promoted the adoption of advanced educational principles (76.8%), updated the curriculum model and instructional methods (79.8%), strengthened faculty development (84.0%), improved educational resources (82.1%), and benefited all students (53.4%). Conclusions The National Clinical Skills Competition is widely accepted in China. It has effectively promoted the reform and development of undergraduate medical education in China.

  16. Clinical Reasoning Skills of Speech and Language Therapy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoben, Kirsty; Varley, Rosemary; Cox, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Background: Difficulties experienced by novices in clinical reasoning have been well documented in many professions, especially medicine (Boshuizen and Schmidt 1992, 2000; Elstein, Shulman and Sprafka 1978; Patel and Groen 1986; Rikers, Loyens and Schmidt 2004). These studies have shown that novice clinicians have difficulties with both knowledge…

  17. Chairside Assisting Skill Evaluation (CASE). Clinical Setting. Health Manpower References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Innovative Programming Systems, Minneapolis, Minn.

    These checklists are designed for use during the dental assistant student's extramural clinical experience assignment. Checklists test students on their knowledge of terminology, equipment, procedures, and patient relations. Objectives are listed outline style with columns to check progress during a first and a second evaluation. Areas included…

  18. A Curriculum Skills Matrix for Development and Assessment of Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Benjamin; Rohlman, Christopher; Benore-Parsons, Marilee

    2004-01-01

    We have designed a skills matrix to be used for developing and assessing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory curricula. We prepared the skills matrix for the Project Kaleidoscope Summer Institute workshop in Snowbird, Utah (July 2001) to help current and developing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology program…

  19. Systematic Assessment of Caregiving Skill Performance by Individuals with Tetraplegia and Their Caregivers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Caregiving Skill Performance by Individuals with Tetraplegia and Their Caregivers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeanne M. Zanca, PhD, MPT...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Systematic Assessment of Caregiving Skill Performance by Individuals with Tetraplegia and Their Caregivers 5b. GRANT NUMBER...systematically evaluate and describe competence in self-direction of care by persons with tetraplegia (PWTs) and provision of care by their caregivers

  20. Basic French Assessment: Speaking and Writing Skills, Senior 1 and 4, 1993. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg. Bureau of French Education.

    The report summarizes an assessment of the extent to which Manitoba schools are meeting the learning objectives for speaking and writing skills specified for senior (secondary) levels 1 and 4 in the basic French curriculum for the province. For each level and skill area, a random sample of students representing urban and rural school populations…

  1. Teachers' Perceptions of Their RTI Skills as They Relate to Assessment, Instruction, and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Karyn Spann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine teachers' perceptions of their Response to Intervention (RTI) skills as they relate to assessment, instruction, and intervention. "The Perceptions of RTI Skills Survey" was distributed to 138 elementary general education teachers in ten elementary schools in six rural school districts, and ninety…

  2. The Gain-Loss Model: A Probabilistic Skill Multimap Model for Assessing Learning Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robusto, Egidio; Stefanutti, Luca; Anselmi, Pasquale

    2010-01-01

    Within the theoretical framework of knowledge space theory, a probabilistic skill multimap model for assessing learning processes is proposed. The learning process of a student is modeled as a function of the student's knowledge and of an educational intervention on the attainment of specific skills required to solve problems in a knowledge…

  3. Measuring beyond Content: A Rubric Bank for Assessing Skills in Authentic Research Assignments in the Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishbaugh, Tara L. S.; Cessna, Stephen; Horst, S. Jeanne; Leaman, Lori; Flanagan, Toni; Neufeld, Doug Graber; Siderhurst, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report the development of an analytic rubric bank to assess non-content learning, namely higher order cognitive skills, the understanding of the nature of science, and effective scientific communication skills in student research projects. Preliminary findings indicate that use of this tool enhances our students' learning in these areas,…

  4. An Occupational Therapy Work Skills Assessment for Individuals with Head Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Irene; Higham, Julie; McLean, Alison M.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an occupational therapy skills assessment protocol developed and used to evaluate physical, cognitive, and behavioral abilities for persons seeking to return to work following head injuries. It measures them within the framework of productivity, interpersonal skills, and safety. (Contains 48 references.) (Author/JOW)

  5. Assessing the Transition Skills of Adolescents and Young Adults Who Are Deaf through Video Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching Research, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter issue describes a programmatic line of research to develop and standardize a test battery of transition skills (employment and independent living skills) for adolescents and young adults (ages 14 to 25) who are deaf. The newsletter first discusses the importance of assessment data to the transition process for persons who are deaf.…

  6. Information Literacy and Adult Learners: Using Authentic Assessment to Determine Skill Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapchak, Marcia E.; Lewis, Leslie A.; Motyka, Julie K.; Balmert, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Information literacy (IL) skills are essential for adult learners in higher education, especially those unfamiliar with information systems. Citing a lack of literature assessing such skills in adult learners, this article examines the IL abilities of adult learners in an IL course. Using a rubric and annotated bibliographies from study…

  7. Social Skills Assessment in Young Children with Autism: A Comparison Evaluation of the SSRS and PKBS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hui-Ting; Sandall, Susan R.; Davis, Carol A.; Thomas, Carnot James

    2011-01-01

    Impairment in the development of reciprocal social interaction and other social skills is one of the defining characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). There is a need for assessment tools that will help guide social skills interventions and document outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential usefulness of two…

  8. Assessing Teamwork in Undergraduate Education: A Measurement Tool to Evaluate Individual Teamwork Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Emily; Simper, Natalie; Leger, Andrew; Stephenson, Jenn

    2017-01-01

    Effective teamwork skills are essential for success in an increasingly team-based workplace. However, research suggests that there is often confusion concerning how teamwork is measured and assessed, making it difficult to develop these skills in undergraduate curricula. The goal of the present study was to develop a sustainable tool for assessing…

  9. Using Student Skill Self-Assessments To Get Balanced Groups for Group Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blowers, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Discusses common methods of forming student groups for group work, suggesting that many are ineffective, then describes a student self-assessment method used to group students according to their skills. Asserts that the method, used for 2 years in both sophomore- and senior-level courses, has been proven to prevent intragroup skill imbalances. (EV)

  10. Investigating the Baseline Skills of Research Students Using a Competency-Based Self-Assessment Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, Anthony P.; Boran, James R.; Myddelton, William A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent government-led initiatives are changing the nature of the UK PhD to support the greater development of transferable skills. There are similar initiatives internationally. A key requirement and challenge is to effectively assess the "baseline" skills of a cohort on entry to a research programme and then monitor their progress in…

  11. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Rating Instruments for a Communication Skills Assessment of Medical Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iramaneerat, Cherdsak; Myford, Carol M.; Yudkowsky, Rachel; Lowenstein, Tali

    2009-01-01

    The investigators used evidence based on response processes to evaluate and improve the validity of scores on the Patient-Centered Communication and Interpersonal Skills (CIS) Scale for the assessment of residents' communication competence. The investigators retrospectively analyzed the communication skills ratings of 68 residents at the…

  12. Assessment of Higher Order Thinking Skills. Current Perspectives on Cognition, Learning and Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraw, Gregory, Ed.; Robinson, Daniel H., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This volume examines the assessment of higher order thinking skills from the perspectives of applied cognitive psychology and measurement theory. The volume considers a variety of higher order thinking skills, including problem solving, critical thinking, argumentation, decision making, creativity, metacognition, and self-regulation. Fourteen…

  13. Assessing Reading Skill with a Think-Aloud Procedure and Latent Semantic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magliano, Joseph P.; Millis, Keith K.

    2003-01-01

    Two studies examined the viability of assessing reading strategies using a think-aloud protocol combined with latent semantic analysis (LSA). Findings demonstrated that the responses of less-skilled readers semantically overlapped more with focal sentences than with causal antecedent sentences, whereas skilled readers' responses overlapped with…

  14. Psychometric Characteristics of Role-Play Assessments of Social Skill in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellack, Alan S.; Brown, Clayton H.; Thomas-Lohrman, Shannon

    2006-01-01

    There is an extensive literature documenting that people with schizophrenia have marked impairments in social role functioning and social skill. One of the most widely employed strategies for assessing social skill has been role-play tests: simulated social interactions that are videotaped for subsequent behavioral coding. There has been…

  15. Assessment and Teaching of Science Skills: Whole of Programme Perceptions of Graduating Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Yvonne; Varsavsky, Cristina; Matthews, Kelly E.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on science student perceptions of their skills (scientific knowledge, oral communication, scientific writing, quantitative skills, teamwork and ethical thinking) as they approach graduation. The focus is on which teaching activities and assessment tasks over the whole programme of study students thought utilised each of the six…

  16. Prekindergarten Children's Executive Functioning Skills and Achievement Gains: The Utility of Direct Assessments and Teacher Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuhs, Mary Wagner; Farran, Dale Clark; Nesbitt, Kimberly Turner

    2015-01-01

    An accumulating body of evidence suggests that young children who exhibit greater executive functioning (EF) skills in early childhood also achieve more academically. The goal of the present study was to examine the unique contributions of direct assessments and teacher ratings of children's EF skills at the beginning of prekindergarten (pre-k) to…

  17. Essential Communication and Documentation Skills. Module: Final Assessment and Action Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Muriel; And Others

    This module is the 10th of 10 in the Essential Communication and Documentation Skills curriculum. It develops final assessment and action planning, workplace literacy skills identified as being directly related to the job of the direct care worker. The curriculum is designed to improve the competence of New York State Division for Youth direct…

  18. Information Literacy Follow-Through: Enhancing Preservice Teachers' Information Evaluation Skills through Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seely, Sara Robertson; Fry, Sara Winstead; Ruppel, Margie

    2011-01-01

    An investigation into preservice teachers' information evaluation skills at a large university suggests that formative assessment can improve student achievement. Preservice teachers were asked to apply information evaluation skills in the areas of currency, relevancy, authority, accuracy, and purpose. The study used quantitative methods to assess…

  19. Clinical Assessment in Mathematics: Learning the Craft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunting, Robert P.; Doig, Brian A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses a professional development program called Clinical Approaches to Mathematics Assessment. Argues for the advanced training of mathematics teachers who understand knowledge construction processes of students; can use clinical tools for evaluating a student's unique mathematical "fingerprint"; and can create or adapt problems, tasks, or…

  20. Assessing musical skills in autistic children who are not savants

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Descriptions of autistic musical savants suggest that they possess extraordinary skills within the domain. However, until recently little was known about the musical skills and potential of individuals with autism who are not savants. The results from these more recent studies investigating music perception, cognition and learning in musically untrained children with autism have revealed a pattern of abilities that are either enhanced or spared. For example, increased sensitivity to musical pitch and timbre is frequently observed, and studies investigating perception of musical structure and emotions have consistently failed to reveal deficits in autism. While the phenomenon of the savant syndrome is of considerable theoretical interest, it may have led to an under-consideration of the potential talents and skills of that vast majority of autistic individuals, who do not meet savant criteria. Data from empirical studies show that many autistic children possess musical potential that can and should be developed. PMID:19528029

  1. Assessing musical skills in autistic children who are not savants.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Pamela

    2009-05-27

    Descriptions of autistic musical savants suggest that they possess extraordinary skills within the domain. However, until recently little was known about the musical skills and potential of individuals with autism who are not savants. The results from these more recent studies investigating music perception, cognition and learning in musically untrained children with autism have revealed a pattern of abilities that are either enhanced or spared. For example, increased sensitivity to musical pitch and timbre is frequently observed, and studies investigating perception of musical structure and emotions have consistently failed to reveal deficits in autism. While the phenomenon of the savant syndrome is of considerable theoretical interest, it may have led to an under-consideration of the potential talents and skills of that vast majority of autistic individuals, who do not meet savant criteria. Data from empirical studies show that many autistic children possess musical potential that can and should be developed.

  2. Assessing students' English language proficiency during clinical placement: A qualitative evaluation of a language framework.

    PubMed

    San Miguel, Caroline; Rogan, Fran

    2015-06-01

    The increase in nursing students for whom English is an additional language requires clinical facilitators to assess students' performance regarding clinical skills, nursing communication and English language. However, assessing language proficiency is a complex process that is often conflated with cultural norms and clinical skills, and facilitators may lack confidence in assessing English language. This paper discusses an evaluation of a set of guidelines developed in a large metropolitan Australian university to help clinical facilitators make decisions about students' English language proficiency. The study found that the guidelines were useful in helping facilitators assess English language. However, strategies to address identified language problems needed to be incorporated to enable the guidelines to also be used as a teaching tool. The study concludes that to be effective, such guidelines need embedding within a systematic approach that identifies and responds to students who may be underperforming due to a low level of English language proficiency.

  3. [Qualitative study of the acceptance and the requirements of a clinical skills lab at a university of veterinary medicine].

    PubMed

    Rösch, Tanja; Schaper, Elisabeth; Tipold, Andrea; Fischer, Martin R; Ehlers, Jan P

    2014-01-01

    In the education of veterinary medicine undergraduate students are taught theoretical knowledge and practical clinical skills in order to become practically trained professionals. A possibility to teach practical skills is a center for clinical skills ("Clinical Skills Lab"). Students can train skills and gain experience through frequent repetitions of exercises. To respect animal welfare and introduce alternative methods to animal testing simulators and models are used in such a skills lab. In the current study the demands for a center for clinical skills and its equipment should be identified. The hypothesis should be proven, that students and teachers of veterinary medicine are highly motivated to enhance the education in practical skills. Focus group interviews were conducted with students, veterinarians (private practitioners), lecturers of veterinary medicine and experts for simulation of clinical skills. Needs and requirements of students participating in skills lab classes were identified.The interviews were conducted in individual or in group interviews. Many opinions, topics and needs were expressed, from which great benefit for the development of the skills lab can be drawn. The hypothesis that a skills lab is supported by all participants had to be rejected. Especially students were afraid of this new lab, because no former experience existed. In the interviews many needs and requirements were raised. However, they could easily be summarized to formulate an accurate list of requirements for the Clinical Skills Lab. A Skills Lab planned taking into consideration the results of this qualitative study will have a positive impact on veterinary medical education and teaching. According to empirical values of experts from other Skills Labs a widespread acceptance by the users can be expected on a long-term basis.

  4. Assessment Methodology, Context, and Empowerment: The ACE Model of Skill Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Sharon L.; Moffett, Richard G. III

    2000-01-01

    The Assessment, Context, and Empowerment Model provides students with opportunities to practice communication, interpersonal, and problem-solving skills in relevant contexts related to the workplace. They receive developmental feedback from themselves, their peers, and their instructor. (SK)

  5. Teaching and Assessing Manipulative Motor Skills in High School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bert, Greg

    2015-01-01

    This article provides new ways to teach and assess motor skills in various lifetime sports such as tennis, golf, badminton, and other sports that students are likely to play as adults by focusing on five basic biomechanical principles.

  6. Assessing 21st Century Skills: Summary of a Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Judith Anderson

    2011-01-01

    The routine jobs of yesterday are being replaced by technology and/or shipped off-shore. In their place, job categories that require knowledge management, abstract reasoning, and personal services seem to be growing. The modern workplace requires workers to have broad cognitive and affective skills. Often referred to as "21st century…

  7. Is the Stock of VET Skills Adequate? Assessment Methodologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandy, Richard; Freeland, Brett

    In Australia and elsewhere, four approaches have been used to determine whether stocks of vocational education and training (VET) skills are adequate to meet industry needs. The four methods are as follows: (1) the manpower requirements approach; (2) the international, national, and industry comparisons approach; (3) the labor market analysis…

  8. The Use of Rubrics in Benchmarking and Assessing Employability Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riebe, Linda; Jackson, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Calls for employability skill development in undergraduates now extend across many culturally similar developed economies. Government initiatives, industry professional accreditation criteria, and the development of academic teaching and learning standards increasingly drive the employability agenda, further cementing the need for skill…

  9. Assessing Reading Skills in an F.E. College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Judy

    This guide outlines a model that adult educators can use to construct a test for their adult students, regardless of subject area, that is written at the students' reading level. The problems that written tests pose for trade and technical students in further education (FE) who have poor reading skills and the drawbacks of using commercially…

  10. Assessing Aptitude and Attitude Development in a Translation Skills Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mekheimer, Mohamed Amin A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effects on EFL students of using Blackboard technology and online dictionaries in developing translating skills and building positive attitudes towards translation in male Saudi college students. The study compares two groups of students in a translation course; one in a traditional, face-to-face setting (control) and…

  11. What Do They Know? An Assessment of Undergraduate Library Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunkel, Lilith R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Discusses a study conducted at Kent State University's (Ohio) regional campuses that measured the basic library competencies of incoming college freshmen. Results show that the frequency of student assignments was the best predictor of scores on the test measuring library skills. Implications for bibliographic instruction are discussed. (LRW)

  12. Job Literacy: A Framework for Categorizing Skills and Assessing Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norback, Judith Shaul; Forehand, Garlie A.

    Job Literacy Analysis (JLA) is a systematic, comprehensive process for identifying the literacy requirements of jobs. It examines materials used for real tasks in real jobs and provides data about the materials used in jobs, tasks performed using them, and skills required to perform the tasks. Researchers reviewing the materials and tasks infer…

  13. A comprehensive clinical competency-based assessment in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Shiloah, J; Scarbecz, M; Bland, P S; Hottel, T L

    2017-05-01

    Traditional periodontics clinical examinations in dental education frequently assess a narrow set of clinical skills and do not adequately assess the ability of students to independently manage a periodontal patient. As an alternative, the authors developed a comprehensive periodontics competency case experience (CCCE) for senior dental students and surveyed students regarding their experience with the CCCE. Students challenging the CCCE must treat a patient with moderate periodontitis and must independently decide when a state of periodontal and oral health has been achieved. Students are also required to conduct an oral presentation to periodontology faculty. Dental students who completed the CCCE had a favourable impression of the experience, compared with the traditional clinical examinations taken in the junior year. The majority of students rated all the components of the CCCE as 'somewhat' or 'very helpful'. About 72.4% of students felt that being able to work independently on the examination was very helpful for learning about the clinical management of patients with periodontal disease, followed by 'simulation of care in private practice' (65.5%), and oral photography experience (55.2%). The greatest difficulty reported by students was finding an acceptable patient. About 62.1% of students rated 'finding the right patient' as very difficult. Students reported having to screen a mean of 5.9 patients (SD: 4.5) to find a qualified patient. The results of the survey will be useful in improving the examination as an assessment tool in periodontal therapy.

  14. The Effect of Communication Skills Training by Video Feedback Method on Clinical Skills of Interns of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Compared to Didactic Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Managheb, S. E.; Zamani, A.; Shams, B.; Farajzadegan, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Effective communication is essential to the practice of high-quality medicine. There are methodological challenges in communication skills training. This study was performed in order to assess the educational benefits of communication skills training by video feedback method versus traditional formats such as lectures on clinical…

  15. Movement skill mastery in a clinical sample of overweight and obese children.

    PubMed

    Cliff, Dylan P; Okely, Anthony D; Magarey, Anthea M

    2011-10-01

    This study describes the prevalence of fundamental movement skill (FMS) mastery and advanced skill proficiency among treatment-seeking 6-10-year old children with overweight/obesity. A total of 132 participants (8.4 ± 1.0 years, BMI 24.2 ± 3.1 kg/m(2), 55% female, 76.5% obese) were assessed on 12 FMS and compared with a normative sample. The prevalence of FMS mastery was significantly lower among children categorized as overweight/obese for all skills across all age groups (all p < 0.05). Excluding the leap for 6-7-year olds, differences between the two samples remained when the prevalence of advance skill proficiency was examined for children categorized as overweight/obese. Physical activity programs designed for children with overweight/obesity need to address deficiencies in FMS proficiency as part of an overall strategy to promote physical activity participation.

  16. An Assessment of Competency-Based Simulations on E-Learners' Management Skills Enhancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Yair; Ramim, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the assessment of tangible skills and competence. Specifically, there is an increase in the offerings of competency-based assessments, and some academic institutions are offering college credits for individuals who can demonstrate adequate level of competency on such assessments. An increased interest has been placed…

  17. The Impact of Self-Assessment on Iranian EFL Learners' Writing Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javaherbakhsh, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    Self-assessment has gained much attention in recent years owing to graving emphasis on learner independence and learner autonomy and self-assessment has significant pedagogic value (Mrudula, 2002). The present study was an attempt to investigate whether self-assessment impact Iranian EFL learners' writing skill. To fulfil the purpose of the study,…

  18. Approaches to the Assessment of Science Process Skills: A Reconceptualist View and Option

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oloruntegbe, K. O.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment means many things to many people. There is a plethora of terms and definitions. To measure science-learning outcomes at skills level, assessment was modified and restructured not only in form and context, but in vocabularies and nomenclatures. Thus, there emerged different forms, like alternative, authentic and performance assessments,…

  19. Project RAILS: Lessons Learned about Rubric Assessment of Information Literacy Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belanger, Jackie; Zou, Ning; Mills, Jenny Rushing; Holmes, Claire; Oakleaf, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Rubric assessment of information literacy is an important tool for librarians seeking to show evidence of student learning. The authors, who collaborated on the Rubric Assessment of Informational Literacy Skills (RAILS) research project, draw from their shared experience to present practical recommendations for implementing rubric assessment in a…

  20. The Psychometric Properties of Scales that Assess Market Orientation and Team Leadership Skills: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Theresa J. B.

    2003-01-01

    This study assessed the psychometric properties of two scales that can be used in predicting team performance: specifically how team members assess the market orientation of their work unit as well the leadership skills present in the team. The first scale is a three-dimensional assessment of the unit's market orientation (innovative, process, or…

  1. Early Childhood Reading Skills and Proficiency in NAEP Eighth-Grade Reading Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan, Enis; Ogut, Burhan; Kim, Young Yee

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between reading skills in earlier grades and achieving "Proficiency" on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) grade 8 reading assessment was examined by establishing a statistical link between NAEP and the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS) grade 8 reading assessments using data from a common…

  2. Physical Education Teacher Training in Fundamental Movement Skills Makes a Difference to Instruction and Assessment Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lander, Natalie Jayne; Barnett, Lisa M.; Brown, Helen; Telford, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate instruction and assessment of fundamental movement skills (FMSs) by Physical Education (PE) teachers of Year 7 girls. Of 168 secondary school PE teachers, many had received little FMSs professional development, and although most assessed student FMSs proficiency, the quality of assessment was variable.…

  3. Using Portfolio to Assess Rural Young Learners' Writing Skills in English Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aziz, Muhammad Noor Abdul; Yusoff, Nurahimah Mohd.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at discussing the benefits of portfolio assessment in assessing students' writing skills. The study explores the use of authentic assessment in the classroom. Eleven primary school children from Year 4 in a rural school in Sabah participated in this study. Data were collected by observing them during the English Language lessons…

  4. The effects of laryngeal mask airway passage simulation training on the acquisition of undergraduate clinical skills: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective use of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) requires learning proper insertion technique in normal patients undergoing routine surgical procedures. However, there is a move towards simulation training for learning practical clinical skills, such as LMA placement. The evidence linking different amounts of mannequin simulation training to the undergraduate clinical skill of LMA placement in real patients is limited. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness in vivo of two LMA placement simulation courses of different durations. Methods Medical students (n = 126) enrolled in a randomised controlled trial. Seventy-eight of these students completed the trial. The control group (n = 38) received brief mannequin training while the intervention group (n = 40) received additional more intensive mannequin training as part of which they repeated LMA insertion until they were proficient. The anaesthetists supervising LMA placements in real patients rated the participants' performance on assessment forms. Participants completed a self-assessment questionnaire. Results Additional mannequin training was not associated with improved performance (37% of intervention participants received an overall placement rating of > 3/5 on their first patient compared to 48% of the control group, X2 = 0.81, p = 0.37). The agreement between the participants and their instructors in terms of LMA placement success rates was poor to fair. Participants reported that mannequins were poor at mimicking reality. Conclusions The results suggest that the value of extended mannequin simulation training in the case of LMA placement is limited. Educators considering simulation for the training of practical skills should reflect on the extent to which the in vitro simulation mimics the skill required and the degree of difficulty of the procedure. PMID:21834978

  5. Developing skills in clinical leadership for ward sisters.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Katherine; Phillips, Natasha

    The Francis report has called for a strengthening of the ward sister's role. It recommends that sisters should operate in a supervisory capacity and should not be office bound. Effective ward leadership has been recognised as being vital to high-quality patient care and experience, resource management and interprofessional working. However, there is evidence that ward sisters are ill equipped to lead effectively and lack confidence in their ability to do so. University College London Hospitals Foundation Trust has recognised that the job has become almost impossible in increasingly large and complex organisations. Ward sisters spend less than 40% of their time on clinical leadership and the trust is undertaking a number of initiatives to support them in this role.

  6. Generic Reflective Feedback: An Effective Approach to Developing Clinical Reasoning Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojcikowski, K.; Brownie, S.

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning can be an effective tool to develop clinical reasoning skills. However, it traditionally takes place in tutorial groups, giving students little flexibility in how and when they learn. This pilot study compared the effectiveness of generic reflective feedback (GRF) with tutorial-based reflective feedback on the development of…

  7. Identifying Culturally Competent Clinical Skills in Speech-Language Pathologists in the Central Valley of California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maul, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify specific clinical skills in speech-language pathologists (SLPs) that may constitute cultural competency, a term which currently lacks operational definition. Through qualitative interview methods, the following research questions were addressed: (1) What dominant themes, if any, can be found in SLPs'…

  8. The Integration of Psychomotor Skills in a Hybrid-PBL Dental Curriculum: The Clinical Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Joanne N.; MacNeil, M. A. J.; Harrison, Rosamund L.; Clark, D. Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Describes the restructuring of clinical clerkships at the University of British Columbia (Canada) dental school as part of a new, hybrid, problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum, focusing on strategies for integrating development of psychomotor skills. Methods of achieving both horizontal and vertical integration of competencies through grouping…

  9. The Psychometric Properties of the Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills in Clinical Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Corinna; Kuyken, Willem; Bohus, Martin; Heidenreich, Thomas; Michalak, Johannes; Steil, Regina

    2010-01-01

    The Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills (KIMS) is a well-validated multidimensional questionnaire measuring dimensions of mindfulness on four scales: Observing, Describing, Act With Awareness, and Accept Without Judgment. Even though the KIMS has been used in several clinical studies no information is available about the psychometric…

  10. An Assessment of the Skill of GEOS-5 Seasonal Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Yoo-Geun; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Rienecker, Michele M.

    2013-01-01

    The seasonal forecast skill of the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office coupled global climate model (CGCM) is evaluated based on an ensemble of 9-month lead forecasts for the period 1993 to 2010. The results from the current version (V2) of the CGCM consisting of the GEOS-5 AGM coupled to the MOM4 ocean model are compared with those from an earlier version (V1) in which the AGCM (the NSIPP model) was coupled to the Poseidon Ocean Model. It was found that the correlation skill of the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) forecasts is generally better in V2, especially over the sub-tropical and tropical central and eastern Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Ocean. Furthermore, the improvement in skill in V2 mainly comes from better forecasts of the developing phase of ENSO from boreal spring to summer. The skill of ENSO forecasts initiated during the boreal winter season, however, shows no improvement in terms of correlation skill, and is in fact slightly worse in terms of root mean square error (RMSE). The degradation of skill is found to be due to an excessive ENSO amplitude. For V1, the ENSO amplitude is too strong in forecasts starting in boreal spring and summer, which causes large RMSE in the forecast. For V2, the ENSO amplitude is slightly stronger than that in observations and V1 for forecasts starting in boreal winter season. An analysis of the terms in the SST tendency equation, shows that this is mainly due to an excessive zonal advective feedback. In addition, V2 forecasts that are initiated during boreal winter season, exhibit a slower phase transition of El Nino, which is consistent with larger amplitude of ENSO after the ENSO peak season. It is found that this is due to weak discharge of equatorial Warm Water Volume (WWV). In both observations and V1, the discharge of equatorial WWV leads the equatorial geostrophic easterly current so as to damp the El Nino starting in January. This process is delayed by about 2 months in V2 due to the slower phase

  11. Assessing the skill of seasonal rainfall outlooks for the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedward, Shanice; Van Meerbeeck, Cedric

    2013-04-01

    The Caribbean's island and low lying coastal nations make the region highly vulnerable to water-related natural hazards, many originating from seasonal rainfall variability. To help mitigate this risk, Global Producing Centres (GPCs) such as the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) publish global seasonal rainfall probability forecasts each month. However, the Caribbean's geography warrants the production of downscaled forecasts, such as done by the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH). Yet, even CIMH's prediction system, which balances GPC forecasts with regional climatological expertise, is perceived to show limited reliability. To find out to what extent this results from inherently low predictability and what model improvements should be made, we compared the forecasting skills of the IRI and CIMH prediction systems from 2000 to 2012. Specifically, we calculated the commonly used Ranked Probability Skill Score (RPSS) and Heidke Skill Score (HSS) to distinguish which system, season and sub-region are more accurately forecasted. If scores above 0.2 and 0.5 represent good and very good forecasts, respectively, the CIMH prediction system produced ~1/3 good and ~1/10 very good forecasts or ~1.5 times as many as IRI's. The most accurately forecasted season was Jan-Feb-Mar by IRI (~1/3% good or very good forecasts), compared to Sep-Oct-Nov by CIMH (~2/3 good or very good forecasts). By contrast, Apr-May-Jun was less well predicted by both systems. Broken down by sub-region, the Lesser Antilles were best predicted with an average RPSS score of nearly 0.1 by CIMH and 0.05 by IRI whereas less skill was found for the Greater Antilles and Guianas and virtually no skill for Belize in either system. Though consistent with a greater predictability of seasonal rainfall in the Lesser Antilles, such scores point to forecasting accuracy well below a previously estimated 30% inherent predictability. Thus, there is much space for system

  12. The outcomes and acceptability of near-peer teaching among medical students in clinical skills

    PubMed Central

    Raw, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the outcomes and acceptability of final-year students tutoring in Clinical Skills to Years 1-2 students in a 4-week Medical Education elective. Methods A paper-based survey with 14 questions requiring responses on a Likert-like scale and 2 questions with free-text responses was used to investigate Year 6 student-tutor (n=45) and Years 1-2 tutee (n=348) perceptions of near-peer teaching in Clinical Skills. The independent t-test compared mean responses from student-tutors and tutees, and thematic analysis of free-text responses was conducted.  Results Tutee perceptions were significantly higher than student-tutor self-perceptions in small-group teaching and facilitation skills (p=0.000), teaching history-taking skills (p=0.046) and teaching physical examination skills (p=0.000). Perceptions in aspects of ‘Confidence in tutoring’ were not significantly different for student-tutors and tutees, with both having lowest perceptions for identifying and providing remediation for underperforming tutees. Student-tutors rated all areas of personal and professional development highly. Main themes emerging from analysis of student comments were the benefits to student-tutors, benefits to tutees and areas needing improvement, with outcomes of this near-peer teaching relating well to cognitive and social theories in the literature. Conclusions Both student tutors and their tutees perceived near-peer teaching in Clinical Skills to be acceptable and beneficial with particular implications for Medical Education. PMID:27295403

  13. Learning Clinical Skills during Bedside Teaching Encounters in General Practice: A Video-Observational Study with Insights from Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajjawi, Rola; Rees, Charlotte; Monrouxe, Lynn V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore how opportunities for learning clinical skills are negotiated within bedside teaching encounters (BTEs). Bedside teaching, within the medical workplace, is considered essential for helping students develop their clinical skills. Design/methodology/approach: An audio and/or video observational study examining…

  14. The clinical viva: an assessment of clinical thinking.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Debbie

    2013-04-01

    In order to enable Masters level pre-registration students to demonstrate sophisticated cognitive abilities, integration of knowledge, complex problem solving, critical opinion, lateral thinking and innovative action; an innovative assessment tool is required (Sadler, 2009). A clinical viva was devised to enable third year students in their final transitional placement prior to qualifying demonstrate both the art and science of nursing practice. The assessment combines some of the viva element of an Australian assessment model described by Levett-Jones et al. (2011), together with the think aloud approach suggested by Banning (2008); whereby the think aloud model acts as a catalyst for eliciting students' understandings and knowledge and the SOAP model is a mechanism for the assessment of students' understandings and knowledge. Rust (2002) calls for students to be afforded opportunities for regular formative feedback; therefore, the assessment includes a replica formative assessment, one week prior to the summative assessment. This formative test prevents assessment being seen as a snapshot of the student's development and encourages assessment for learning and is an approach which is suggested to discourage surface learning (Rust, 2002). A holistic rubric was developed in an attempt to capture the students' abilities against the six cognitive operators or heuristics suggested by Banning (2008). Open-ended questions were devised to be asked of the students as advocated by Levett-Jones et al. (2011), to uncover the student's cognitive abilities, integration of knowledge, complex problem solving, critical opinion, lateral thinking and innovative action. Roberts (2011) calls for new and innovative ways of assessing student learning which bridges the artificial divide between theory and practice and enables students to demonstrate both the art and science of nursing practice (p610). The clinical viva has the potential to be one such mechanism.

  15. Predictors of early literacy skills in children with intellectual disabilities: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, Arjan; Segers, Eliane; van Balkom, Hans; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2014-07-01

    The present study investigated the linguistic and cognitive predictors of early literacy in 17 children with intellectual disabilities (ID) (mean age: 7; 6 years) compared to 24 children with normal language acquisition (NLA) (mean age: 6; 0 years), who were all in the so-called partial alphabetic phase of reading (Ehri, 2005). In each group, children's performances in early literacy skills (phonological awareness, letter knowledge, and word decoding) were assessed, as well as their achievement in linguistic and cognitive measures associated to these skills. The results showed that, notwithstanding the fact that there were no differences in word decoding, children with ID lagged behind on all predictor measures relevant to early literacy skills compared to children with NLA. Moreover, whereas children with NLA showed a regular predictive pathway of early literacy skills, children with ID showed a deviant pattern, in which nonverbal intelligence and rhythmic skills proved to be of major importance. Also letter knowledge appeared to be involved in their early literacy processing. It can be tentatively concluded that in the ID group, children's level of nonverbal intellectual abilities in combination with rhythmic ability proves pivotal in the development of their early literacy skills.

  16. Clinical assessment of social cognitive function in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Henry, Julie D; von Hippel, William; Molenberghs, Pascal; Lee, Teresa; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2016-01-01

    Social cognition broadly refers to the processing of social information in the brain that underlies abilities such as the detection of others' emotions and responding appropriately to these emotions. Social cognitive skills are critical for successful communication and, consequently, mental health and wellbeing. Disturbances of social cognition are early and salient features of many neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders, and often occur after acute brain injury. Its assessment in the clinic is, therefore, of paramount importance. Indeed, the most recent edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) introduced social cognition as one of six core components of neurocognitive function, alongside memory and executive control. Failures of social cognition most often present as poor theory of mind, reduced affective empathy, impaired social perception or abnormal social behaviour. Standard neuropsychological assessments lack the precision and sensitivity needed to adequately inform treatment of these failures. In this Review, we present appropriate methods of assessment for each of the four domains, using an example disorder to illustrate the value of these approaches. We discuss the clinical applications of testing for social cognitive function, and finally suggest a five-step algorithm for the evaluation and treatment of impairments, providing quantitative evidence to guide the selection of social cognitive measures in clinical practice.

  17. Enhancement of Medical Interns' Levels of Clinical Skills Competence and Self-Confidence Levels via Video iPods: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Designing and delivering evidence-based medical practice for students requires careful consideration from medical science educators. Social Web (Web 2.0) applications are a part of today’s educational technology milieu; however, empirical research is lacking to support the impact of interactive Web 2.0 mobile applications on medical educational outcomes. Objectives The aim of our study was to determine whether instructional videos provided by iPod regarding female and male urinary catheter insertion would increase students’ confidence levels and enhance skill competencies. Methods We conducted a prospective study with medical trainee intern (TI) participants: 10 control participants (no technological intervention) and 11 intervention participants (video iPods). Before taking part in a skills course, they completed a questionnaire regarding previous exposure to male and female urinary catheterization and their level of confidence in performing the skills. Directly following the questionnaire, medical faculty provided a 40-minute skills demonstration in the Advanced Clinical Skills Centre (ACSC) laboratory at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. All participants practiced the skills following the demonstrations and were immediately evaluated by the same faculty using an assessment rubric. Following the clinical skill evaluation, participants completed a postcourse questionnaire regarding skill confidence levels. At the end of the skills course, the intervention group were provided video iPods and viewed a male and a female urinary catheterization video during the next 3 consecutive months. The control group did not receive educational technology interventions during the 3-month period. At the end of 3 months, participants completed a follow-up questionnaire and a clinical assessment of urinary catheterization skills at the ACSC lab. Results The results indicate a decline in skill competency over time among the control group for both male and female

  18. A new approach to assessing skill needs of senior managers.

    PubMed

    Griffith, John R; Warden, Gail L; Neighbors, Kamilah; Shim, Beth

    2002-01-01

    Management of health care organizations must improve to meet the well-documented challenges of quality improvement and cost control. Other industries have developed the tools--entry education, mentoring, planned mid-career formal education and experience, and special programs for senior management. The purpose of this paper is to pilot test an alternative method to identify competencies and performance of health care executives. We propose using formal lists of technical, interpersonal, and strategic competencies and specific real events chosen by the respondent to identify and prioritize competencies. Results of a trial with 30 large health care system CEOs and 15 early careerists demonstrate that the method reveals useful depth and detail about managers' educational needs. The results suggest that current thinking about managerial education and learning patterns may be seriously inadequate in several respects. The continued improvement of U.S. health care is a pressing national concern. Quality of care is highly variable and substantially deficient in many institutions (Chassin and Galvin 1998; Committee on Quality of Health Care in America 2001). "Quality improvement should be the essential business strategy for healthcare in the 21st century (Kizer 2001)." Productivity improvements will be essential to balance cost pressures from an aging population and growing technology (Heffler, et al. 2002). Skillful management is necessary to improve quality and productivity. Teams of dozens of caregivers are often required to improve a patient's health. The organizations that provide care have grown larger in response to the greater cost, complexity of operation and finance, and evidence of the success of scale in other industries. While many small professional practices, hospitals, and nursing homes remain, consolidation has created a few dozen provider and intermediary organizations exceeding a billion dollars a year in expenditures. These large health care

  19. Virtual patients for assessment of clinical reasoning in nursing -- a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Elenita; Georg, Carina; Ziegert, Kristina; Fors, Uno

    2011-11-01

    In different nursing programmes, one important learning outcome is clinical reasoning (CR) skills. However, to date, there is limited number of methods available for assessment of CR skills; especially for distance-based courses. This study investigates students' opinions about the feasibility of using Virtual Patients (VPs) for assessing CR in nursing education. VPs were introduced as an assessment tool in three different nursing courses at two universities, comprising 77 students in total. Students' overall acceptance of this assessment tool, including its applicability to the practise of nursing and the potential of VP-based assessment as a learning experience, were investigated using questionnaires. Course directors used the Web-SP system to assess students' interactions with VPs and their answers regarding diagnoses, caring procedures and their justifications. Students' found the VP cases to be realistic and engaging, and indicate a high level of acceptance for this assessment method. In addition, the students' indicated that VPs were good for practising their clinical skills, although some would prefer that the VP system be less "medical" and asked for more focus on nursing. Although most students supplied correct diagnoses and made adequate clinical decisions, there was a wide range in their ability to explain their clinical reasoning processes.

  20. A Field-Based Testing Protocol for Assessing Gross Motor Skills in Preschool Children: The CHAMPS Motor Skills Protocol (CMSP)

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Harriet G.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Dowda, Marsha; Jeter, Chevy; Jones, Shaverra; Pate, Russell R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop a valid and reliable tool for use in assessing motor skills in preschool children in field based settings. The development of the CHAMPS (Children’s Activity and Movement in Preschool Study) Motor Skills Protocol (CMSP) included evidence of its reliability and validity for use in field-based environments as part of large epidemiological studies. Following pilot work, 297 children (3-5 years old) from 22 preschools were tested using the final version of the CMSP and the TGMD-2. Reliability of the CMSP and interobserver reliability were determined using intraclass correlation procedures (ICC; ANOVA). Concurrent validity was assessed using Pearson correlation coefficients to compare the CMSP to the original Test of Gross Motor Development (2nd Edition) (TGMD-2). Results indicated that test reliability, interobserver reliability and validity coefficients were all high, generally above R/r = 0.90. Significant age differences were found. Outcomes indicate that the CMSP is an appropriate tool for assessing motor development of 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children in field-based settings that are consistent with large-scale trials. PMID:21532999

  1. Social skills assessment in young children with autism: a comparison evaluation of the SSRS and PKBS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Ting; Sandall, Susan R; Davis, Carol A; Thomas, Carnot James

    2011-11-01

    Impairment in the development of reciprocal social interaction and other social skills is one of the defining characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). There is a need for assessment tools that will help guide social skills interventions and document outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential usefulness of two behavior rating scales with young children with ASD in an early childhood program. The results showed that the two social skills measures, the SSRS and PKBS, had adequate psychometric properties in terms of internal consistency, construct validity, convergent validity, and criterion validity with the AEPS, and were found to be predictive of how the tests would function when assessing young children with ASD in a natural setting. However, their usefulness in detecting social skills progress over time or intervention outcomes for young children with ASD may not be satisfactory.

  2. [Objective surgery -- advanced robotic devices and simulators used for surgical skill assessment].

    PubMed

    Suhánszki, Norbert; Haidegger, Tamás

    2014-12-01

    Robotic assistance became a leading trend in minimally invasive surgery, which is based on the global success of laparoscopic surgery. Manual laparoscopy requires advanced skills and capabilities, which is acquired through tedious learning procedure, while da Vinci type surgical systems offer intuitive control and advanced ergonomics. Nevertheless, in either case, the key issue is to be able to assess objectively the surgeons' skills and capabilities. Robotic devices offer radically new way to collect data during surgical procedures, opening the space for new ways of skill parameterization. This may be revolutionary in MIS training, given the new and objective surgical curriculum and examination methods. The article reviews currently developed skill assessment techniques for robotic surgery and simulators, thoroughly inspecting their validation procedure and utility. In the coming years, these methods will become the mainstream of Western surgical education.

  3. Adapting the Helpful Responses Questionnaire to assess communication skills involved in delivering contingency management: Preliminary psychometrics

    PubMed Central

    Hartzler, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    A paper/pencil instrument, adapted from Miller and colleagues’ (1991) Helpful Responses Questionnaire (HRQ), was developed to assess clinician skill with core communicative aspects involved in delivering contingency management (CM). The instrument presents a single vignette consisting of six points of client dialogue to which respondents write ‘what they would say next.’ In the context of an implementation/effectiveness hybrid trial, 19 staff clinicians at an opiate treatment program completed serial training outcome assessments before, following, and three months after CM training. Assessments included this adaptation of the HRQ, a multiple-choice CM knowledge test, and a recorded standardized patient encounter scored for CM skillfulness. Study results reveal promising psychometric properties for the instrument, including strong scoring reliability, internal consistency, concurrent and predictive validity, test-retest reliability and sensitivity to training effects. These preliminary findings suggest the instrument is a viable, practical method to assess clinician skill in communicative aspects of CM delivery. PMID:25770870

  4. Evaluating first-year nursing students' ability to self-assess psychomotor skills using videotape.

    PubMed

    Watts, Wilda Ellen; Rush, Kathy; Wright, Marjorie

    2009-01-01

    Developing confidence in self-assessment is an important skill in becoming a self-regulated learner. This article describes the process undertaken by a group of educators of incorporating self-assessment in combination with psychomotor skill development with freshman students. Students were videotaped performing a wound-dressing change; the videotaping was immediately followed by a self-assessment of their performance using a faculty-generated checklist. Comparison of faculty and student ratings revealed the tendency for students to overrate their performance and identified discordance between students and faculty on several steps of the procedure. These evaluation findings are discussed and future directions explored.

  5. Personality Assessment Use by Clinical Neuropsychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Steven R.; Gorske, Tad T.; Wiggins, Chauntel; Little, Jessica A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study is an exploration of the personality assessment practices of clinical neuropsychologists. Professional members of the National Academy of Neuropsychology and the International Neuropsychological Society (N = 404) were surveyed to examine use of several forms of personality, behavior, and emotional function measures. Results…

  6. The use of clinical and management case studies to increase problem solving skills.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, L W; Jarreau, P C; Zitzmann, M B

    2001-01-01

    Clinical laboratory science (CLS) students are presented courses in each of the laboratory disciplines and often are not given the opportunity to correlate data from all areas of the laboratory as it relates to a patient. Management courses are often taught in a classroom setting without an opportunity for real-life problem solving. To address these two deficiencies in our curriculum, a self-directed learning course was developed to give students an opportunity to apply skills and knowledge acquired in the classroom to clinical laboratory science practice and to demonstrate problem solving, communication and presentation skills. After entry into the clinical practicum courses, students are required to gather data and present a clinical case study involving several laboratory disciplines or to identify a laboratory management problem and present solutions. Students are assigned a clinical faculty advisor to assist with identification of the case and data collection and an academic faculty advisor to assist with presentation preparation. Clinical faculty advisors are invited to attend the student presentations and earn continuing education credit. Evaluations of the course by students, clinical and academic faculty are favorable. The course has been offered for three years and will be continued with ongoing changes to improve it each year.

  7. The Influence of Peer Feedback on Self- and Peer-Assessment of Oral Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patri, Mrudula

    2002-01-01

    Investigates agreement among teacher-, self-, and peer-assessments of students in the presence of peer feedback. This is done in the context of oral presentation skills of first year undergraduate students of ethnic Chinese background. Findings how that when assessment criteria are firmly set, peer feedback enables students to judge the…

  8. The Direct Assessment of Writing Skill: A Measurement Review. College Board Report No. 83-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breland, Hunter M.

    Direct assessment of writing skill, usually considered to be synonymous with assessment by means of writing samples, is reviewed in terms of its history and with respect to evidence of its reliability and validity. Reliability is examined as it is influenced by reader inconsistency, domain sampling, and other sources of error. Validity evidence is…

  9. Curricular Impact of College Level Skills Assessments. AIR 1988 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Daniel R.; Bolte, John R.

    The quest for excellence in American higher education has been accompanied by the implementation of basic skills requirements and the corresponding assessment programs. Assessment results could provide feedback for curricular improvement, although they are frequently used as indicators of institutional quality. A study is presented that compared…

  10. Informal Assessment of Developmental Skills for Visually Handicapped Students. AFB Practice Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swallow, Rose-Marie, Ed.; And Others

    The booklet presents a compilation of informal checklists and inventories to help in assessing the developmental skills of visually handicapped students from birth through senior high school. Part 1, "Informal Assessment of School Age Visually Handicapped Students," covers the following areas: visual functioning; unique academic needs (such as…

  11. Promoting Learning Skills through Teamwork Assessment and Self/Peer Evaluation in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Issa, Tomayess

    2012-01-01

    In the education sector, teamwork assessment and self/peer evaluation are widely applied in higher education nationally and internationally. This assessment is designed to encourage students to promote and improve their skills in teamwork, communication (writing, interpersonal interaction and cultural awareness, and presenting), critical and…

  12. Assessing Life Skills in Young Working Adults--Part 1: The Development of an Alternative Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Wal, Rachel Jacoba; van der Wal, Ruurd

    2003-01-01

    A collage with pictorial and verbal stimuli to assess life skills of young workers was developed using a framework for alternative assessment and stimuli instruments. The instrument was evaluated using Bloom's taxonomy for the cognitive domain and Krathwohl et al.'s taxonomy for the affective domain. (Contains 16 references.) (SK)

  13. Assessing Scientific and Technological Enquiry Skills at Age 11 Using the E-Scape System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Dan; Collier, Chris; Howe, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the outcomes from the "e-scape Primary Scientific and Technological Understanding Assessment Project" (2009-2010), which aimed to support primary teachers in developing valid portfolio-based tasks to assess pupils' scientific and technological enquiry skills at age 11. This was part of the wider…

  14. Leveraging Educational Data Mining for Real-Time Performance Assessment of Scientific Inquiry Skills within Microworlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gobert, Janice D.; Sao Pedro, Michael A.; Baker, Ryan S. J. D.; Toto, Ermal; Montalvo, Orlando

    2012-01-01

    We present "Science Assistments," an interactive environment, which assesses students' inquiry skills as they engage in inquiry using science microworlds. We frame our variables, tasks, assessments, and methods of analyzing data in terms of "evidence-centered design." Specifically, we focus on the "student model," the…

  15. Reactions to Skill Assessment: The Forgotten Factor in Explaining Motivation to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Bradford S.; Ford, J. Kevin

    2007-01-01

    The study presented here examined the effects of trainees' reactions to skill assessment on their motivation to learn. A model was developed that suggests that two dimensions of trainees' assessment reactions, distributive justice and utility, influence training motivation and overall training effectiveness. The model was tested using a sample of…

  16. Documenting Student Competence through Effective Performance Assessment: Employability Skills. Workshop Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Agricultural Curriculum Materials Service.

    This report contains 26 performance assessments for documenting student employability skills. Each performance assessment consists of the following: a competency; a terminal performance objective (outcome); competency builders and pupil performance objectives (criteria for documenting mastery of the objective); applied academic competencies;…

  17. Analysis and Validation of a Rubric to Assess Oral Presentation Skills in University Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Ros, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The main objective of this study was to analyze users' perceptions and convergent validity of peer- and teacher summative assessment using a rubric for students' oral presentation skills in a university context. Method: Peer- and teacher-assessment convergence was analyzed from an analytical and holistic perspective. Students'…

  18. Assessing the Progress of Moderately Retarded Students in Applied Academic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiduson, Sandra; Mitacek, Barbara

    The Assessment Tool for Moderately Retarded Students in Academic Skills (1978) is designed for moderately retarded students (5-21 years) and mildly retarded students (3-14 years) who will be living in sheltered home and work settings. The assessment tool is based on a life centered curricular model concerned with developing--in a sequential…

  19. Got Game? A Choice-Based Learning Assessment of Data Literacy and Visualization Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Doris B.; Blair, Kristen P.; Schwartz, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    In partnership with both formal and informal learning institutions, researchers have been building a suite of online games, called choicelets, to serve as interactive assessments of learning skills, e.g. critical thinking or seeking feedback. Unlike more traditional assessments, which take a retrospective, knowledge-based view of learning,…

  20. The Effectiveness of a Web-Based Motor Skill Assessment Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Luke E.; Moran, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a web-based, intereactive video assessment program on teaching preservice physical education majors to assess the motor skill of kicking. The program provided component specific feedback through tutorial, guided practice, and competency training options. The 72 participants were…

  1. A Classroom-Based Assessment Method to Test Speaking Skills in English for Specific Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberola Colomar, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    This article presents and analyses a classroom-based assessment method to test students' speaking skills in a variety of professional settings in tourism. The assessment system has been implemented in the Communication in English for Tourism course, as part of the Tourism Management degree programme, at Florida Universitaria (affiliated to the…

  2. Designing an Automated Assessment of Public Speaking Skills Using Multimodal Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Lei; Feng, Gary; Leong, Chee Wee; Joe, Jilliam; Kitchen, Christopher; Lee, Chong Min

    2016-01-01

    Traditional assessments of public speaking skills rely on human scoring. We report an initial study on the development of an automated scoring model for public speaking performances using multimodal technologies. Task design, rubric development, and human rating were conducted according to standards in educational assessment. An initial corpus of…

  3. Teenage Consumers: A Profile. Results of the 1978 National Assessment of Consumer Skills and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This document reports some of the findings of a national assessment of seventeen-year-olds on consumer knowledge, skills, and attitudes. An introduction describes the development of the survey, the probability sample, the administration of the assessment, and the format for reporting the results. Chapter 1 of five chapters summarizes the responses…

  4. Moving towards the Assessment of Collaborative Problem Solving Skills with a Tangible User Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ras, Eric; Krkovic, Katarina; Greiff, Samuel; Tobias, Eric; Maquil, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    The research on the assessment of collaborative problem solving (ColPS), as one crucial 21st Century Skill, is still in its beginnings. Using Tangible User Interfaces (TUI) for this purpose has only been marginally investigated in technology-based assessment. Our first empirical studies focused on light-weight performance measurements, usability,…

  5. Exploring the use of mobile technologies for the acquisition of clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Clay, Collette A

    2011-08-01

    Mobile learning has the potential to supplement information communication technology (ICT), online learning and the traditional teaching and learning methods to educate practitioners in the clinical practice area. Following the development of several Post Graduate modules of learning for the theory and clinical skills required to undertake the Newborn Infant Physical Examination (NIPE), a small research study was undertaken to combine mobile learning and NIPE. The research study explored the hypothesis that mobile devices could be used in pedagogically effective ways to support and enhance the learning and acquisition of clinical skills in the clinical arena. Participants in the study each received a handheld mobile device (iPod) that had been loaded with several Reusable Learning Objects (RLO) outlining each aspect of the physical examination to be performed. At the end of the module (12 weeks in duration), each participant completed an evaluation questionnaire. Participants confirmed that mobile learning afforded flexibility in time and place of learning and captured their interest in the learning material. This study reports that the use of mobile technology for skill acquisition is creative and innovative, placing learning firmly in the hands of the learner.

  6. A cluster analysis to investigating nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and skills regarding the clinical management system.

    PubMed

    Chan, M F

    2007-01-01

    Nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and skills regarding the Clinical Management System are explored by identifying profiles of nurses working in Hong Kong. A total of 282 nurses from four hospitals completed a self-reported questionnaire during the period from December 2004 to May 2005. Two-step cluster analysis yielded two clusters. The first cluster (n = 159, 56.4%) was labeled "negative attitudes, less skillful, and average knowledge" group. The second cluster (n = 123, 43.6%) was labeled "positive attitudes, good knowledge, but less skillful." There was a positive correlation in cluster 1 for nurses' knowledge and attitudes (rs = 0.28) and in cluster 2 for nurses' skills and attitudes (rs = 0.25) toward computerization. The study showed that senior and more highly educated nurses generally held more positive attitudes to computerization, whereas the attitudes among younger and less well educated nurses generally were more negative. Such findings should be used to formulate strategies to encourage nurses to resolve actual problems following computer training and to increase the depth and breadth of nurses' computer knowledge and skills and improve their attitudes toward computerization.

  7. Developing assessment: involving the sessional clinical teacher.

    PubMed

    Bateman, H; Thomason, J M; McCracken, G; Ellis, J

    2016-02-12

    Assessment development is a fundamental element of curriculum management and a requirement for providers of education to consistently demonstrate attainment of educational standards. Development of authentic, valid and reliable assessment is, however, both challenging and resource intensive. In the UK, dental education standards are regulated by the General Dental Council (GDC). The 'safe beginner' is the threshold determined by the GDC for the passing student - but how do we apply this? This article describes an approach the School of Dental Sciences at Newcastle University has adopted to address the challenges associated with developing assessments. Sessional clinical teachers contribute a significant proportion of the clinical supervision within the BDS programme and also have a good appreciation of both the standard and concept of the 'safe beginner'. By implementing a process of active timetable management, we have identified time where this group could contribute to assessment development. We believe that aspects, which could be enhanced by their involvement, include writing, validation, standard-setting and utilisation of assessment. To achieve this, we recognise a requirement for investment in careful manpower planning and training, but consider that it is realistic and beneficial to include sessional clinical teachers in this essential part of learning and teaching.

  8. Teaching Domain-Specific Skills before Peer Assessment Skills Is Superior to Teaching Them Simultaneously

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zundert, M. J.; Konings, K. D.; Sluijsmans, D. M. A.; van Merrienboer, J.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Instruction in peer assessment of complex task performance may cause high cognitive load, impairing learning. A stepwise instructional strategy aimed at reducing cognitive load was investigated by comparing it with a combined instructional strategy in an experiment with 128 secondary school students (mean age 14.0 years; 45.2% male) with the…

  9. Assessing Spelling Skills and Strategies: A Critique of Available Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohnen, Saskia; Nickels, Lyndsey; Castles, Anne

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a variety of spelling tests that are used to assess developmental spelling difficulties. We differentiate between tests that are valuable tools to monitor spelling development and spelling tests that should be used to further assess children who are not making sufficient progress in the mainstream classroom. We recommend…

  10. Assessing Oral Communication Skills--Reflections of an Examiner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Roy E.; Davidson, Fred

    1996-01-01

    This article cautions against complacency in "subjective" assessment, arguing that even tests designed to reflect the development of learner-centered, interactive and communicative approaches to teaching English may have cultural bias built into their assessment criteria. The reply article singles out as an unresolved issue whether or…

  11. Learning Strategies Used while Developing Motor Skill Assessment Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Luke E.; Bishop, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a web-based assessment training program and whether explicitly guiding the participants toward the recommended learning sequence would improve their performance on assessing the underhand roll compared to participants that were given free choice of their learning sequence. Participants were 48 volunteer…

  12. Measuring non-technical skills in medical emergency care: a review of assessment measures

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Simon; Endacott, Ruth; Cant, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Aim To review the literature on non-technical skills and assessment methods relevant to emergency care. Background Non-technical skills (NTS) include leadership, teamwork, decision making and situation awareness, all of which have an impact on healthcare outcomes. Significant concerns have been raised about the rates of adverse medical events, many of which are attributed to NTS failures. Methods Ovid, Medline, ProQUEST, PsycINFO and specialty websites were searched for NTS measures using applicable access strategies, inclusion and exclusion criteria. Publications identified were assessed for relevance. Results A range of non-technical skill measures relevant to emergency care was identified: leadership (n = 5), teamwork (n = 7), personality/behavior (n = 3) and situation awareness tools (n = 1). Of these, 9 have been used with emergency care populations/clinicians. All had varying degrees of reliability and validity. In the last decade there has been some development of teamwork measures specific to emergency care with a predominantly global and collective rating of broad skills. Conclusion A variety of non-technical skill measures are available; only a few have been used in the emergency care arena. There is a need for an increase in the focused assessment of teamwork skills for a greater understanding of team performance to enhance patient safety in medical emergency care. PMID:27147832

  13. A Field-Based Testing Protocol for Assessing Gross Motor Skills in Preschool Children: The Children's Activity and Movement in Preschool Study Motor Skills Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Harriet G.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Dowda, Marsha; Jeter, Chevy; Jones, Shaverra; Pate, Russell R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable tool for use in assessing motor skills in preschool children in field-based settings. The development of the Children's Activity and Movement in Preschool Study Motor Skills Protocol included evidence of its reliability and validity for use in field-based environments as part of large…

  14. The Clinical Assessment of Intraventricular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermejo, Javier; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in imaging techniques have allowed physicians to obtain robust measurements of intracardiac flows in the clinical setting. Consequently, the physiological implications of intraventricular fluid dynamics are beginning to be understood. Initial data show that these flows involve complex fluid-structure interactions and mixing phenomena that are modified by disease. Here we critically review the most important aspects of intraventricular fluid mechanics relevant for clinical applications. We discuss current image and numerical methods for assessing intraventricular flows, as well as implemented approaches to analyze their impact on cardiac function. The physiological and clinical insights provided by such techniques are discussed both in health and in disease. The final goal is to encourage research in the application of fluid dynamic foundations to patient-based clinical data. A huge potential is anticipated not only in terms of the basic science of large-scale biological systems, but also in practical terms of improving patient care.

  15. Social Work Practice with LGBT Elders at End of Life: Developing Practice Evaluation and Clinical Skills Through a Cultural Perspective.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Darren P

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on culturally sensitive clinical issues related to best practices with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) elder patients at end-of-life (EOL) at key points in the therapeutic relationship. Vital concepts, including practice evaluation and clinical skills, are presented through a cultural and oncology lens. There is a paucity of LGBT research and literature as well as a shortfall of MSW graduate school education specific to social work palliative and end-of-life care (PELC) practice with LGBT elders. The content of this article is designed to be adapted and used as an educational tool for institutions, agencies, graduate programs, medical professions, social work, and students. Learning the unique elements of LGBT cultural history and their implications on EOL care can improve social work practice. This article provides an examination from assessment and engagement basics to advance care planning incorporating specific LGBT EOL issues.

  16. Development of a Brazilian Portuguese adapted version of the Gap-Kalamazoo communication skills assessment form

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Elizabeth A.; Lajolo, Paula P.; Tone, Luiz G.; Pinto, Rogerio M. C.; Lajolo, Marisa P.; Calhoun, Aaron W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to translate, adapt and validate the items of the Gap-Kalamazoo Communication Skills Assessment Form for use in the Brazilian cultural setting. Methods The Gap-Kalamazoo Communication Skills Assessment Form was translated into Portuguese by two independent bilingual Brazilian translators and was reconciled by a third bilingual healthcare professional. The translated text was then assessed for content using a modified Delphi technique and adjusted as needed to assure content validity. A total of nine phrases in the completed tool were adjusted. The final tool was then used to assess videotaped simulations as a means of validation.  Response process was assessed using exploratory factor analysis and internal structure was assessed via Cronbach’s Alpha (internal consistency) and Intraclass Correlation (test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability). Results One hundred and four (104) videotaped communication skills simulations were assessed by 38 subjects (6 staff physicians, 4 faculty physicians, 8 resident physicians, 4 professional actors with experience in simulation, and 16 other allied healthcare professionals). Measures of Internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.818) and test-retest reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.942) were high.  Exploratory factor analysis confirmed the uni-dimensionality of the instrument. Conclusions Our results support the validity and reliability of the Brazilian Gap-Kalamazoo Communication Skills Assessment Form when used among Brazilian medical residents.  The Brazilian version of Gap-Kalamazoo Communication Skills Assessment Form was found to be adequate both in the linguistic and technical aspects.  The use of this instrument in Brazilian medical education can enhance the assessment of physician-patient-team relationships on an ongoing basis. PMID:27941183

  17. The effect of short-term workshop on improving clinical reasoning skill of medical students

    PubMed Central

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Jafari, Farshad; Kahbazi, Manijeh; Rafiei, Mohammad; Pakniyat, AbdolGhader

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical reasoning process leads clinician to get purposeful steps from signs and symptoms toward diagnosis and treatment. This research intends to investigate the effect of teaching clinical reasoning on problem-solving skills of medical students. Methods: This research is a semi-experimental study. Nineteen Medical student of the pediatric ward as case group participated in a two-day workshop for training clinical reasoning. Before the workshop, they filled out Diagnostic Thinking Inventory (DTI) questionnaires. Fifteen days after the workshop the DTI questionnaire completed and "key feature" (KF) test and "clinical reasoning problem" (CRP) test was held. 23 Medical student as the control group, without passing the clinical reasoning workshop DTI questionnaire completed, and KF test and CRP test was held. Results: The average score of the DTI questionnaire in the control group was 162.04 and in the case group before the workshop was 153.26 and after the workshop was 181.68. Compare the average score of the DTI questionnaire before and after the workshop there is a significant difference. The difference between average KF test scores in the control and the case group was not significant but between average CRP test scores was significant. Conclusion: Clinical reasoning workshop is effectiveness in promoting problem-solving skills of students. PMID:27579286

  18. Clinical Assessment of Risk Management: an INtegrated Approach (CARMINA).

    PubMed

    Tricarico, Pierfrancesco; Tardivo, Stefano; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Moretti, Francesca; Poletti, Piera; Fiore, Alberto; Monturano, Massimo; Mura, Ida; Privitera, Gaetano; Brusaferro, Silvio

    2016-08-08

    Purpose - The European Union recommendations for patient safety calls for shared clinical risk management (CRM) safety standards able to guide organizations in CRM implementation. The purpose of this paper is to develop a self-evaluation tool to measure healthcare organization performance on CRM and guide improvements over time. Design/methodology/approach - A multi-step approach was implemented including: a systematic literature review; consensus meetings with an expert panel from eight Italian leader organizations to get to an agreement on the first version; field testing to test instrument feasibility and flexibility; Delphi strategy with a second expert panel for content validation and balanced scoring system development. Findings - The self-assessment tool - Clinical Assessment of Risk Management: an INtegrated Approach includes seven areas (governance, communication, knowledge and skills, safe environment, care processes, adverse event management, learning from experience) and 52 standards. Each standard is evaluated according to four performance levels: minimum; monitoring; outcomes; and improvement actions, which resulted in a feasible, flexible and valid instrument to be used throughout different organizations. Practical implications - This tool allows practitioners to assess their CRM activities compared to minimum levels, monitor performance, benchmarking with other institutions and spreading results to different stakeholders. Originality/value - The multi-step approach allowed us to identify core minimum CRM levels in a field where no consensus has been reached. Most standards may be easily adopted in other countries.

  19. A Serious Game for Teaching Nursing Students Clinical Reasoning and Decision-Making Skills.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Hege Mari; Fossum, Mariann; Vivekananda-Schmidt, Pirashanthie; Fruhling, Ann; Slettebø, Åshild

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design and pilot-test a serious game for teaching nursing students clinical reasoning and decision-making skills in caring for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A video-based serious game prototype was developed. A purposeful sample of six participants tested and evaluated the prototype. Usability issues were identified regarding functionality and user-computer interface. However, overall the serious game was perceived to be useful, usable and likable to use.

  20. Investigating nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and skills patterns towards clinical management system: results of a cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Chan, M F

    2006-09-01

    To determine whether definable subtypes exist within a cohort of Hong Kong nurses as related to the clinical management system use in their clinical practices based on their knowledge, attitudes, skills, and background factors. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire. The sample of 242 registered nurses was recruited from three hospitals in Hong Kong. The study employs personal and demographic variables, knowledge, attitudes, and skills scale. A cluster analysis yielded two clusters. Each cluster represents a different profile of Hong Kong nurses on the clinical management system use in their clinical practices. The first group (Cluster 1) was labeled 'lower attitudes, less skilful and average knowledge' group, and represented 55.4% of the total respondents. The second group (Cluster 2) was labeled as 'positive attitudes, good knowledge but less skilful'. They comprised almost 44.6% of this nursing sample. Cluster 2 had more older nurses, the majority were educated to the baccalaureate or above level, with more than 10 years working experience, and they held a more senior ranking then Cluster 1. A clear profile of Hong Kong nurses may benefit healthcare professionals in making appropriate education or assistance to prompt the use of the clinical management system by nurses an officially recognized profession. The findings were useful in determining nurse-users' specific needs and their preferences for modification of the clinical management system. Such findings should be used to formulate strategies to encourage nurses to resolve actual problems following computer training and to increase the depth and breadth of nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and skills toward such system.

  1. Use of the human patient simulator to teach clinical judgment skills in a baccalaureate nursing program.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Mattie L; Curran, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    Nurse educators are finding it increasingly more challenging to prepare undergraduate students for the ever-changing and more acute clinical environment. As an answer to this dilemma, the human patient simulator can provide students with the opportunity to enhance knowledge, to facilitate skill acquisition, to decrease anxiety, and to promote clinical judgment in a safe environment. These experiences assist the novice nursing student to progress to the advanced beginner stage of practice. This article describes how faculty used the human patient simulator in creating a case scenario that enhanced critical thinking in senior nursing students.

  2. An exploration of student midwives' experiences of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination assessment process.

    PubMed

    Barry, Maebh; Noonan, Maria; Bradshaw, Carmel; Murphy-Tighe, Sylvia

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative descriptive study that explored student midwives' experiences of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination assessment process for obstetric emergencies within a university setting. The development of fundamental clinical skills is an important component in preparing students to meet the responsibilities of a midwife. There is an international concern that the transfer of midwifery education into universities may impact on the development of midwifery clinical skills. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) have the potential to promote integration and consolidation of skills prior to clinical placement. Twenty six students (n=36) from two midwifery programmes (BSc and Higher Diploma) participated in four focus groups and Burnard's (2006) framework was used for data analysis. Three main themes emerged following analysis: preparation for the OSCE assessment, the OSCE process and learning through simulating practice. Preparation for the OSCE's which included lectures, demonstrations, and practice of OSCE's facilitated by lecturers and by the students themselves, was considered central to the process. Learning via OSCEs was perceived to be more effective in comparison to other forms of assessment and prepared students for clinical practice. Positive aspects of the process and areas for improvement were identified. Using OSCE's increased the depth of learning for the students with the steps taken in preparation for the OSCE's proving to be a valuable learning tool. This study adds to the evidence on the use of OSCE's in midwifery education.

  3. Enhancing Higher Order Thinking Skills Among Inservice Science Teachers Via Embedded Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barak, Miri; Dori, Yehudit Judy

    2009-10-01

    Testing students on higher order thinking skills may reinforce these skills among them. To research this assertion, we developed a graduate course for inservice science teachers in a framework of a “Journal Club”—a hybrid course which combines face-to-face classroom discussions with online activities, interrelating teaching, learning, and assessment. The course involves graduate students in critical evaluation of science education articles and cognitive debates, and tests them on these skills. Our study examined the learning processes and outcomes of 51 graduate students, from three consecutive semesters. Findings indicated that the students’ higher order thinking skills were enhanced in terms of their ability to (a) pose complex questions, (b) present solid opinions, (c) introduce consistent arguments, and (d) demonstrate critical thinking.

  4. Knowledge and skills retention following Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission course for final year medical students in Rwanda: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Tuyisenge, Lisine; Kyamanya, Patrick; Van Steirteghem, Samuel; Becker, Martin; English, Mike; Lissauer, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Aim To determine whether, after the Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission (ETAT+) course, a comprehensive paediatric life support course, final year medical undergraduates in Rwanda would achieve a high level of knowledge and practical skills and if these were retained. To guide further course development, student feedback was obtained. Methods Longitudinal cohort study of knowledge and skills of all final year medical undergraduates at the University of Rwanda in academic year 2011–2012 who attended a 5-day ETAT+ course. Students completed a precourse knowledge test. Knowledge and clinical skills assessments, using standardised marking, were performed immediately postcourse and 3–9 months later. Feedback was obtained using printed questionnaires. Results 84 students attended the course and re-evaluation. Knowledge test showed a significant improvement, from median 47% to 71% correct answers (p<0.001). For two clinical skills scenarios, 98% passed both scenarios, 37% after a retake, 2% failed both scenarios. Three to nine months later, students were re-evaluated, median score for knowledge test 67%, not significantly different from postcourse (p>0.1). For clinical skills, 74% passed, with 32% requiring a retake, 8% failed after retake, 18% failed both scenarios, a significant deterioration (p<0.0001). Conclusions Students performed well on knowledge and skills immediately after a comprehensive ETAT+ course. Knowledge was maintained 3–9 months later. Clinical skills, which require detailed sequential steps, declined, but most were able to perform them satisfactorily after feedback. The course was highly valued, but several short courses and more practical teaching were advocated. PMID:24925893

  5. Assessing Investigative Skills in History: A Case Study from Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Recent changes in the history syllabi stress the importance of developing an investigative/enquiry method of learning involving the framing of questions, subsequent research, and the presentation of findings. Scotland has made several attempts to assess not only the end result (the paper) but also the process itself and now uses an extended essay…

  6. Assessing Students' Writing Skills: A Comparison of Direct & Indirect Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koffler, Stephen L.

    This research examined the results from direct and indirect writing assessments to determine the most effective method of discrimination. The New Jersey State Department of Education developed a test for ninth-grade students which was designed to measure the ability to apply writing mechanics to written text and to communicate effectively in…

  7. Postemployment Needs of the Rehabilitated Client: A Skilled Assessment Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrey, Donald E.

    1980-01-01

    Offers a step-by-step guide to help rehabilitation counselors design activities to ensure client's job maintenance. Describes initial assessment process that identifies physical, emotional, and intellectual barriers to job maintenance. Discusses development of a systematic postemployment service plan. (Author)

  8. Assessing Suturing Skills in a Self-Guided Learning Setting: Absolute Symmetry Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brydges, Ryan; Carnahan, Heather; Dubrowski, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Directed self-guidance, whereby trainees independently practice a skill-set in a structured setting, may be an effective technique for novice training. Currently, however, most evaluation methods require an expert to be present during practice. The study aim was to determine if absolute symmetry error, a clinically important measure that can be…

  9. The use of simulation to address the acute care skills deficit in pre-registration nursing students: a clinical skill perspective.

    PubMed

    Nickless, Lesley J

    2011-05-01

    The increase in patient acuity in primary and secondary settings is continuing, with a corresponding increase in the need for technological competence in these areas. Evidence, however, both nationally and internationally, suggests that these expectations are not being met. This paper offers a review of the literature on acute care, with a specific focus on pre-registration nursing students and the development of acute care skills. Three themes are discussed: factors contributing to the acute care skills deficit, the knowledge and skills required to work in acute care and strategies used to support the acquisition of acute care skills. In response to the review, and based upon the evidence-based solutions identified, the clinical skills team at Bournemouth University designed and developed two teaching sessions, using simulation and role play to support the acquisition of acute care skills in pre-registration students. Student evaluations identify that their knowledge, competence and confidence in this area have increased following the teaching sessions, although caution remains regarding transferability of these skills into the practice environment.

  10. Students' perceptions of practice assessment in the skills laboratory: an evaluation study of OSCAs with immediate feedback.

    PubMed

    Rush, Sue; Ooms, Ann; Marks-Maran, Di; Firth, Terry

    2014-11-01

    Assessment of clinical skills is fundamental to undergraduate nursing programmes. However, enabling assessment to be a good learning experience as well is a challenge to nurse educators. The study presented here presents the change from using an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) for summative assessment (with feedback given to students after results had gone to the examination board--6 weeks after the OSCE) to one with immediate feedback. Because the previous OSCEs were universally disliked by students, for reasons that included absence of immediate feedback, in making this change the university re-branded the OSCE as an objective structured clinical assessment (OSCA) with immediate feedback provided to students. A survey was undertaken to measure student engagement with the OSCA, its value and impact, and its sustainability from the students' perspectives. There is little in the literature about student engagement with OSCEs and sustainability. Findings show that the OSCA with immediate feedback was perceived positively by students, was valued with regard to a number of factors, had a positively impact on student learning and confidence and was felt to be a form of assessment that this university should continue to use.

  11. Methods and tools for objective assessment of psychomotor skills in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Oropesa, Ignacio; Sánchez-González, Patricia; Lamata, Pablo; Chmarra, Magdalena K; Pagador, José B; Sánchez-Margallo, Juan A; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M; Gómez, Enrique J

    2011-11-01

    Training and assessment paradigms for laparoscopic surgical skills are evolving from traditional mentor-trainee tutorship towards structured, more objective and safer programs. Accreditation of surgeons requires reaching a consensus on metrics and tasks used to assess surgeons' psychomotor skills. Ongoing development of tracking systems and software solutions has allowed for the expansion of novel training and assessment means in laparoscopy. The current challenge is to adapt and include these systems within training programs, and to exploit their possibilities for evaluation purposes. This paper describes the state of the art in research on measuring and assessing psychomotor laparoscopic skills. It gives an overview on tracking systems as well as on metrics and advanced statistical and machine learning techniques employed for evaluation purposes. The later ones have a potential to be used as an aid in deciding on the surgical competence level, which is an important aspect when accreditation of the surgeons in particular, and patient safety in general, are considered. The prospective of these methods and tools make them complementary means for surgical assessment of motor skills, especially in the early stages of training. Successful examples such as the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery should help drive a paradigm change to structured curricula based on objective parameters. These may improve the accreditation of new surgeons, as well as optimize their already overloaded training schedules.

  12. Large-scale Assessment Yields Evidence of Minimal Use of Reasoning Skills in Traditionally Taught Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thacker, Beth

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale assessment data from Texas Tech University yielded evidence that most students taught traditionally in large lecture classes with online homework and predominantly multiple choice question exams, when asked to answer free-response (FR) questions, did not support their answers with logical arguments grounded in physics concepts. In addition to a lack of conceptual understanding, incorrect and partially correct answers lacked evidence of the ability to apply even lower level reasoning skills in order to solve a problem. Correct answers, however, did show evidence of at least lower level thinking skills as coded using a rubric based on Bloom's taxonomy. With the introduction of evidence-based instruction into the labs and recitations of the large courses and in a small, completely laboratory-based, hands-on course, the percentage of correct answers with correct explanations increased. The FR format, unlike other assessment formats, allowed assessment of both conceptual understanding and the application of thinking skills, clearly pointing out weaknesses not revealed by other assessment instruments, and providing data on skills beyond conceptual understanding for course and program assessment. Supported by National Institutes of Health (NIH) Challenge grant #1RC1GM090897-01.

  13. Assessing nursing students' knowledge and skills in performing venepuncture and inserting peripheral venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Ahlin, C; Klang-Söderkvist, B; Johansson, E; Björkholm, M; Löfmark, A

    2017-01-27

    Venepuncture and the insertion of peripheral venous catheters are common tasks in health care, and training in these procedures is included in nursing programmes. Evidence of nursing students' knowledge and skills in these procedures is limited. The main aim of this study was to assess nursing students' knowledge and skills when performing venepuncture and inserting peripheral venous catheters. Potential associations between level of knowledge and skills, self-training, self-efficacy, and demographic characteristics were also investigated. The assessment was performed by lecturers at a university college in Sweden using the two previously tested instruments "Assess Venepuncture" and "Assess Peripheral Venous Catheter Insertion". Between 81% and 100% of steps were carried out correctly by the students. The step with the highest rating was "Uses gloves", and lowest rating was 'Informs the patients about the possibility of obtaining local anaesthesia'. Significant correlations between degree of self-training and correct performance were found in the group of students who registered their self-training. No associations between demographic characteristics and correct performances were found. Assessing that students have achieved adequate levels of knowledge and skills in these procedures at different levels of the nursing education is of importance to prevent complications and support patient safety.

  14. The Effect of Student Self-Video of Performance on Clinical Skill Competency: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Stephen; Storr, Michael; Morgan, Prue; Ilic, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Emerging technologies and student information technology literacy are enabling new methods of teaching and learning for clinical skill performance. Facilitating experiential practice and reflection on performance through student self-video, and exposure to peer benchmarks, may promote greater levels of skill competency. This study examines the…

  15. Assessment of the potential forecasting skill of a global hydrological model in reproducing the occurrence of monthly flow extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candogan Yossef, N.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Kwadijk, J. C. J.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2012-11-01

    As an initial step in assessing the prospect of using global hydrological models (GHMs) for hydrological forecasting, this study investigates the skill of the GHM PCR-GLOBWB in reproducing the occurrence of past extremes in monthly discharge on a global scale. Global terrestrial hydrology from 1958 until 2001 is simulated by forcing PCR-GLOBWB with daily meteorological data obtained by downscaling the CRU dataset to daily fields using the ERA-40 reanalysis. Simulated discharge values are compared with observed monthly streamflow records for a selection of 20 large river basins that represent all continents and a wide range of climatic zones. We assess model skill in three ways all of which contribute different information on the potential forecasting skill of a GHM. First, the general skill of the model in reproducing hydrographs is evaluated. Second, model skill in reproducing significantly higher and lower flows than the monthly normals is assessed in terms of skill scores used for forecasts of categorical events. Third, model skill in reproducing flood and drought events is assessed by constructing binary contingency tables for floods and droughts for each basin. The skill is then compared to that of a simple estimation of discharge from the water balance (P-E). The results show that the model has skill in all three types of assessments. After bias correction the model skill in simulating hydrographs is improved considerably. For most basins it is higher than that of the climatology. The skill is highest in reproducing monthly anomalies. The model also has skill in reproducing floods and droughts, with a markedly higher skill in floods. The model skill far exceeds that of the water balance estimate. We conclude that the prospect for using PCR-GLOBWB for monthly and seasonal forecasting of the occurrence of hydrological extremes is positive. We argue that this conclusion applies equally to other similar GHMs and LSMs, which may show sufficient skill to forecast

  16. A Two-Stage Multi-Agent Based Assessment Approach to Enhance Students' Learning Motivation through Negotiated Skills Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadli, Abdelhafid; Bendella, Fatima; Tranvouez, Erwan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an Agent-based evaluation approach in a context of Multi-agent simulation learning systems. Our evaluation model is based on a two stage assessment approach: (1) a Distributed skill evaluation combining agents and fuzzy sets theory; and (2) a Negotiation based evaluation of students' performance during a training…

  17. Navigating Uncertainty: Health Professionals' Knowledge, Skill, and Confidence in Assessing and Managing Pain in Children with Profound Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    There is limited evidence to underpin the assessment and management of pain in children with profound cognitive impairment and these children are vulnerable to poor pain assessment and management. Health professionals working with children with profound cognitive impairment from a single paediatric tertiary referral centre in England were interviewed to explore how they develop and acquire knowledge and skills to assess and manage pain in children with cognitive impairment. The interviews were transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Nineteen health professionals representing different professional groups and different levels of experience participated in the study. A metatheme “navigating uncertainty; deficits in knowledge and skills” and two core themes “framing as different and teasing things out” and “the settling and unsettling presence of parents” were identified. Uncertainty about aspects of assessing and managing the pain of children with cognitive impairment tended to erode professional confidence and many discussed deficits in their skill and knowledge set. Uncertainty was managed through engaging with other health professionals and the child's parents. Most health professionals stated they would welcome more education and training although many felt that this input should be clinical and not classroom oriented. PMID:28096710

  18. A mini-OSCE for formative assessment of diagnostic and radiographic skills at a dental college in India.

    PubMed

    Lele, Shailesh M

    2011-12-01

    The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) is being widely used for assessment of skills in dental education around the world. In India, OSCE awareness is rising, and a few exploratory attempts have been made in its implementation. This article describes use of a five-station mini-OSCE for formative assessment of dental diagnostic and radiographic skills in an undergraduate curriculum. Besides gaining experience in OSCEs, the purpose of this project was to study their validity, objectivity, feasibility, acceptability to students and faculty, and impact on student performance. The mini-OSCE was found to be a fairly valid and reliable tool for formative assessment, though it required more planning, preparation, and resources than other means of assessment. A specially developed orientation module improved its feasibility. The nineteen students perceived it to be a meaningful examination and a fair method due to uniformity of tasks and time allocation; they found the scoring to be transparent and objective. The specific and immediate feedback received was appreciated by both students and faculty members.

  19. Development and Assessment of Modules to Integrate Quantitative Skills in Introductory Biology Courses.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Kathleen; Leupen, Sarah; Dowell, Kathy; Kephart, Kerrie; Leips, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Redesigning undergraduate biology courses to integrate quantitative reasoning and skill development is critical to prepare students for careers in modern medicine and scientific research. In this paper, we report on the development, implementation, and assessment of stand-alone modules that integrate quantitative reasoning into introductory biology courses. Modules are designed to improve skills in quantitative numeracy, interpreting data sets using visual tools, and making inferences about biological phenomena using mathematical/statistical models. We also examine demographic/background data that predict student improvement in these skills through exposure to these modules. We carried out pre/postassessment tests across four semesters and used student interviews in one semester to examine how students at different levels approached quantitative problems. We found that students improved in all skills in most semesters, although there was variation in the degree of improvement among skills from semester to semester. One demographic variable, transfer status, stood out as a major predictor of the degree to which students improved (transfer students achieved much lower gains every semester, despite the fact that pretest scores in each focus area were similar between transfer and nontransfer students). We propose that increased exposure to quantitative skill development in biology courses is effective at building competency in quantitative reasoning.

  20. Development and Assessment of Modules to Integrate Quantitative Skills in Introductory Biology Courses

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kathleen; Leupen, Sarah; Dowell, Kathy; Kephart, Kerrie; Leips, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Redesigning undergraduate biology courses to integrate quantitative reasoning and skill development is critical to prepare students for careers in modern medicine and scientific research. In this paper, we report on the development, implementation, and assessment of stand-alone modules that integrate quantitative reasoning into introductory biology courses. Modules are designed to improve skills in quantitative numeracy, interpreting data sets using visual tools, and making inferences about biological phenomena using mathematical/statistical models. We also examine demographic/background data that predict student improvement in these skills through exposure to these modules. We carried out pre/postassessment tests across four semesters and used student interviews in one semester to examine how students at different levels approached quantitative problems. We found that students improved in all skills in most semesters, although there was variation in the degree of improvement among skills from semester to semester. One demographic variable, transfer status, stood out as a major predictor of the degree to which students improved (transfer students achieved much lower gains every semester, despite the fact that pretest scores in each focus area were similar between transfer and nontransfer students). We propose that increased exposure to quantitative skill development in biology courses is effective at building competency in quantitative reasoning. PMID:27146161

  1. Dynamic Assessment of Word Learning Skills: Identifying Language Impairment in Bilingual Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapantzoglou, Maria; Restrepo, M. Adelaida; Thompson, Marilyn S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Bilingual children are often diagnosed with language impairment, although they may simply have fewer opportunities to learn English than English-speaking monolingual children. This study examined whether dynamic assessment (DA) of word learning skills is an effective method for identifying bilingual children with primary language…

  2. An Assessment of Post-Professional Athletic Training Students' Critical Thinking Skills and Dispositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Jessica Marie

    2013-01-01

    The need for outcome measures in critical thinking skills and dispositions for post-professional athletic training programs (PPATPs) is significant. It has been suggested that athletic trainers who are competent and disposed towards thinking critically will be successful in the profession. The purpose of this study is to assess critical thinking…

  3. Video Review in Self-Assessment of Pharmacy Students' Communication Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volino, Lucio R.; Das, Rolee Pathak

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a student self-assessment activity of a video-recorded counseling session and evaluate its impact on student self-perceptions of specific communication skills. This activity was incorporated into a core-communications course within the third professional year of a Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum. Student…

  4. Assessment of Communication Skills of Physical Education and Sport Students in Turkish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Ali Dursun

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the communication skills of the students studying in physical education and sports schools in various universities in Turkey. A total of 1,854 Physical Education and Sports students in five Turkish universities participated in the study. The instrument used to gather information for this study comprised the demographic…

  5. Development and Assessment of Modules to Integrate Quantitative Skills in Introductory Biology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Kathleen; Leupen, Sarah; Dowell, Kathy; Kephart, Kerrie; Leips, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Redesigning undergraduate biology courses to integrate quantitative reasoning and skill development is critical to prepare students for careers in modern medicine and scientific research. In this paper, we report on the development, implementation, and assessment of stand-alone modules that integrate quantitative reasoning into introductory…

  6. Developing a Process-Oriented Translation Test for Assessing English-Arabic Basic Translation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdellah, Antar Solhy

    2007-01-01

    The study reviews translation validated tests and proposes a process-oriented translation test for assessing basic translation skills for freshmen English majors at the faculty of Education. The proposed test is developed based on the process approach to translating and translation teaching, and is confined to translation from English to Arabic.…

  7. Assessment of Laboratory Skills of Science Teachers via a Multi-Methods Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Patricia

    A science laboratory skills performance assessment for elementary and secondary school science teachers in California, using a multi-methods approach, is described. Seven domains of teacher performance identified included: pedagogy, content, materials and equipment, management, knowledge of students, climate, and communication. Within each domain,…

  8. 21st Century Skills: What Are They and How Do We Assess Them?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geisinger, Kurt F.

    2016-01-01

    One of the "hottest" topics in the educational measurement community in the past decade has been the assessment of 21st century skills. This special issue demonstrates work being performed in this realm. The present article provides a context for the four primary articles that follow and a brief but broad view of some models of 21st…

  9. Faculty Mentors', Graduate Students', and Performance-Based Assessments of Students' Research Skill Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldon, David F.; Maher, Michelle A.; Hurst, Melissa; Timmerman, Briana

    2015-01-01

    Faculty mentorship is thought to be a linchpin of graduate education in STEM disciplines. This mixed-method study investigates agreement between student mentees' and their faculty mentors' perceptions of the students' developing research knowledge and skills in STEM. We also compare both assessments against independent ratings of the students'…

  10. Measuring Primary Students' Graph Interpretation Skills via a Performance Assessment: A Case Study in Instrument Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, Karen; Cranston, Kayla A.; Pryor, Marie; Kermish-Allen, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This case study was conducted within the context of a place-based education project that was implemented with primary school students in the USA. The authors and participating teachers created a performance assessment of standards-aligned tasks to examine 6-10-year-old students' graph interpretation skills as part of an exploratory research…

  11. Using the Communication Matrix to Assess Expressive Skills in Early Communicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Charity

    2011-01-01

    Many children born with severe and multiple disabilities have complex communication needs and may use no speech or only minimal speech to communicate. Meaningful assessment of their expressive skills to identify communication strengths along a developmental trajectory is an essential first step toward appropriate intervention. This article…

  12. The Investigation of the Effects of Authentic Assessment Approach on Prospective Teachers' Problem-Solving Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinay, Ismail; Bagçeci, Birsen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of authentic assessment, an approach used in Scientific Research Methods, on problem solving skills of prospective classroom teachers. The participant groups of the study consisted of sophomore prospective teachers who study at Dicle University in the Ziya Gökalp Education Faculty Classroom…

  13. Developing Teachers' Knowledge and Skills at the Intersection of English Language Learners and Language Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Téllez, Kip; Mosqueda, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The growth of teachers' professional knowledge and skills has been the topic of policy, research, and even philosophy for many decades. The assessment of English Learners (ELs), a more specific concern, has become an interest of the educational community in just the past 40 years (e.g., Harris, 1969). The authors' task in this chapter is to…

  14. From Log Files to Assessment Metrics: Measuring Students' Science Inquiry Skills Using Educational Data Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gobert, Janice D.; Sao Pedro, Michael; Raziuddin, Juelaila; Baker, Ryan S.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for assessing science inquiry performance, specifically for the inquiry skill of designing and conducting experiments, using educational data mining on students' log data from online microworlds in the Inq-ITS system (Inquiry Intelligent Tutoring System; www.inq-its.org). In our approach, we use a 2-step process: First we use…

  15. Teaching Thinking Skills in Context-Based Learning: Teachers' Challenges and Assessment Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avargil, Shirly; Herscovitz, Orit; Dori, Yehudit Judy

    2012-01-01

    For an educational reform to succeed, teachers need to adjust their perceptions to the reform's new curricula and strategies and cope with new content, as well as new teaching and assessment strategies. Developing students' scientific literacy through context-based chemistry and higher order thinking skills was the framework for establishing a new…

  16. Assessing Early Communication Skills at 12 Months: A Retrospective Study of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Nathaniel Robert; Eadie, Patricia Ann; Prior, Margot Ruth; Reilly, Sheena

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early identification of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is currently limited by the absence of reliable biological markers for the disorder, as well as the reliability of screening and assessment tools for children aged between 6 and 18 months. Ongoing research has demonstrated the importance of early social communication skills in…

  17. Assessing the Communication Skills of Carers Working with Multiple Learning Disabilities: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koski, Katja; Launonen, Kaisa

    2012-01-01

    Background: Speech and language therapists (SLTs) working with adults who have multiple learning disabilities and complex communication needs often deliver their care via indirect therapy where SLTs train carers to communicate with their clients. Yet, very little is known about how SLTs assess the carers' communication skills prior to the training…

  18. Implementation and Initial Validation of the Combined English Language Skills Assessment (CELSA) at Golden West College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isonio, Steven

    During spring 1992, the Combined English Language Skills Assessment (CELSA) test was piloted with a sample of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) classes at Golden West College (GWC) in Huntington Beach, California. The CELSA, which utilizes a cloze format including parts of conversations and short dialogues, combines items from beginning,…

  19. Integrating Soft Skills Assessment through University, College, and Programmatic Efforts at an AACSB Accredited Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Debbie; Schwieger, Dana; Surendran, Ken

    2008-01-01

    The growing demand for verification that students are, indeed, learning what they need to learn is driving institutions and programs to develop tools for assessing the level of knowledge and skills of their graduating students. One such tool, the Information Systems Analyst (ISA) certification, is a recently developed instrument for measuring…

  20. Developing Team Skills with Self- and Peer Assessment: Are Benefits Inversely Related to Team Function?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Keith; Gardner, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Self- and peer assessment has proved effective in promoting the development of teamwork and other professional skills in undergraduate students. However, in previous research approximately 30 percent of students reported that its use produced no perceived improvement in their teamwork experience. It was hypothesised that a significant…