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Sample records for clinical trial ptx-5

  1. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sponsors Why Are They Important How Do They Work Who Can Participate What To Expect During Benefits and Risks How They Protect Participants Finding Clinical Trials Links Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites What Are Clinical ...

  2. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers scientific ... screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

  3. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... existing treatments. Some may study new forms of psychotherapy (talk therapy). Others may study a combination of ... period. In trials that test new forms of psychotherapy, one group may be randomly assigned to a ...

  4. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... your information private 5. What happens when the study ends The Possible Risks and Benefits The trial may provide treatments or screenings, but there is no promise that your health will get better. The medicine, test, or treatment may not work for you. 6. The benefits of the treatments ...

  5. Clinical Trials - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tiếng Việt) Arabic (العربية) Expand Section Clinical Trials - English Clinical Trials - العربية (Arabic) PDF American Cancer Society ... Traditional (Cantonese dialect) (繁體中文) Expand Section Clinical Trials - English Clinical Trials - 繁體中文 (Chinese, Traditional (Cantonese dialect)) PDF ...

  6. ClinicalTrials.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of ... This Site ClinicalTrials.gov Background About the Results Database History, Policies, and Laws Media/Press Resources Linking ...

  7. How Do Clinical Trials Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work Who Can Participate What To Expect During Benefits and Risks How They Protect Participants Finding Clinical Trials Links Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites How Do Clinical Trials Work? If you take part in a clinical trial, ...

  8. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Cancer.gov

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  9. Managing clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Managing clinical trials, of whatever size and complexity, requires efficient trial management. Trials fail because tried and tested systems handed down through apprenticeships have not been documented, evaluated or published to guide new trialists starting out in this important field. For the past three decades, trialists have invented and reinvented the trial management wheel. We suggest that to improve the successful, timely delivery of important clinical trials for patient benefit, it is time to produce standard trial management guidelines and develop robust methods of evaluation. PMID:20626885

  10. [CLINICAL TRIAL DESIGN].

    PubMed

    Morita, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials/research are conducted to examine the clinical questions of practicing physicians. It is important to design trials appropriately in advance, taking their feasibility into account. A randomized, controlled trial is the ultimate design for treatment comparisons at the final confirmatory stage. However, randomized trials do not necessarily provide all answers to clinical questions. This article summarizes fundamental points of clinical trial design and the important role of randomization and contrasts superiority and noninferiority trials. In addition, it focuses on propensity score matching, a useful method to compare two treatment arms, especially in the context where randomization is infeasible. The propensity score-matching method is increasingly used in surgical clinical research.

  11. Design of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rollo, David; Machado, Sanjay; Ceschin, Mauro

    2010-09-01

    Clinical trial design for nuclear medicine diagnostic imaging radiopharmaceuticals must include a design for preclinical safety studies. These studies should establish that the investigational product (IP) does not have a toxic effect. As a further requirement, radiopharmaceutical clinical trials include a human study (phase 1) that provides biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and radiation dosimetry information. These studies demonstrate to the Food and Drug Administration that the IP either meets or exceeds the toxicology and radiation exposure safety limits. Satisfying this requirement can result in the Food and Drug Administration approving the performance of late-phase (phase 2/3) clinical trials that are designed to validate the clinical efficacy of the diagnostic imaging agent in patients who have a confirmed diagnosis for the intended application. Emphasis is placed on the most typical trial design for diagnostic imaging agents that use a comparator to demonstrate that the new IP is similar in efficacy to an established standard comparator. Such trials are called equivalence, or noninferiority, trials that attempt to show that the new IP is not less effective than the comparator by more than a statistically defined amount. Importantly, the trial design must not inappropriately favor one diagnostic imaging agent over the other. Bias is avoided by the use of a core laboratory with expert physicians who are not involved in the trial for interpreting and objectively scoring the image sets obtained at the clinical trial sites. Clinical trial design must also follow Good Clinical Practice (GCP) guidelines. GCP stipulates the clinical trial process, including protocol and Case Report Form design, analyses planning, as well as analyzing and preparing interim and final clinical trial/study reports.

  12. Clinical trial structures

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Most errors in clinical trials are a result of poor planning. Fancy statistical methods cannot rescue design flaws. Thus careful planning with clear foresight is crucial. The selection of a clinical trial design structure requires logic and creativity. Common structural designs are discussed. PMID:21423788

  13. Clinical trials of homoeopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Kleijnen, J; Knipschild, P; ter Riet, G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish whether there is evidence of the efficacy of homoeopathy from controlled trials in humans. DESIGN--Criteria based meta-analysis. Assessment of the methodological quality of 107 controlled trials in 96 published reports found after an extensive search. Trials were scored using a list of predefined criteria of good methodology, and the outcome of the trials was interpreted in relation to their quality. SETTING--Controlled trials published world wide. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Results of the trials with the best methodological quality. Trials of classical homoeopathy and several modern varieties were considered separately. RESULTS--In 14 trials some form of classical homoeopathy was tested and in 58 trials the same single homoeopathic treatment was given to patients with comparable conventional diagnosis. Combinations of several homoeopathic treatments were tested in 26 trials; isopathy was tested in nine trials. Most trials seemed to be of very low quality, but there were many exceptions. The results showed a positive trend regardless of the quality of the trial or the variety of homeopathy used. Overall, of the 105 trials with interpretable results, 81 trials indicated positive results whereas in 24 trials no positive effects of homoeopathy were found. The results of the review may be complicated by publication bias, especially in such a controversial subject as homoeopathy. CONCLUSIONS--At the moment the evidence of clinical trials is positive but not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions because most trials are of low methodological quality and because of the unknown role of publication bias. This indicates that there is a legitimate case for further evaluation of homoeopathy, but only by means of well performed trials. PMID:1825800

  14. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business Congressional Affairs Jobs Benefits Booklet Data & Statistics National ... Participation in any clinical trial is voluntary and choosing not to participate will not affect your VA ...

  15. [Globalization of clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Usami, Michiyuki; Ikeda, Tadashi; Aiba, Keisuke; Isonishi, Seiji; Ohashi, Yasuo; Saijo, Nagahiro; Sone, Saburo; Tsukagoshi, Shigeru; Tsuruo, Takashi; Kato, Masuhiro; Mikami, Osamu; Dong, Rui-Ping; von Euler, Mikael; Blackledge, George; Stribling, Don

    2003-04-01

    Based on reviews of the Japanese clinical trial situation in lung cancer, gastric cancer, prostate cancer and breast cancer, it was clear that much progress has been made in short time. There are considerable differences between Japan and the West and also differences between clinical areas in Japan. For regulatory purposes bridging studies have become increasingly important. Use of identical protocols are required for effective bridging. Participations in global phase III trials is the best way of achieving registration in Japan. For successful global trials in Japan it is important to include Japanese investigators in the preparation of the protocol and to recognise the challenges facing such a project. Clinical practice in diagnosis and treatment have many differences, thus it is recommended to have clear and detailed information in the protocol. Hard end points like survival are important since they are not biased by cultural differences. There are clear difficulties with HE or QOL outcomes. The emergence of focus on evidence based medicine is also happening in Japan and will help to harmonize documentation across the world. For large adjuvant or prevention cancer global trials are essential. To facilitate global studies further development of infrastructure is necessary in Japan. Use of electronic data capture web based communication etc. will help overcome communication difficulties. Other improvements that will make Japanese participation in global trials easier and better include establishment of clinical trial centre at each hospital, introduction of trial coordinators or study nurses and an improved collaboration with company staff. A critical issue that also need addressing is agreement of centre target recruitment. We need to introduce a new flexible system in Japan if participation in global trial is to be optimised. If we can address these issues Japanese investigators and collaborative groups should be able to initiate and lead global trials in the

  16. [Evaluation of clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Ural, Dilek

    2010-03-01

    Women are under-represented in landmark clinical trials that form the basis of evidence based management of cardiovascular diseases. Differences among male and female patients emerged in effectiveness and safety of therapeutics in some diseases. Especially in dyslipidemia, ischemic heart diseases and heart failure, trials in which women are better represented and guidelines that evaluate findings in women more detailed are needed. This article evaluates differences among men and women in some landmark trials that are used among main references in management guidelines.

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-05-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, 101M, AAV-AADC, AGN-201904-Z; Agomelatine, AN-0128, AN-2690, Arginine butyrate, Asenapine maleate; Belinostat, Bortezomib, BQ-123, BQ-788; Bucindolol hydrochloride; Certolizumab pegol; Dasatinib, Denosumab, Desvenlafaxine succinate; Ecogramostim, Esomeprazole magnesium; Homoharringtonine; huN901-DM1, Hyaluronic acid; Incyclinide; L-Arginine hydrochloride; Mepolizumab; Nematode anticoagulant protein c2, Nilotinib; Oblimersen sodium; R-115866, Raltegravir potassium, Retapamulin, Romidepsin, Rusalatide acetate; Sarcosine, SCIO-469, Soblidotin, Sorivudine; Tilarginine hydrochloride, Tipifarnib; Uracil; Vildagliptin. (c) 2007 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical Trials Corner: September 2017.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Filipe B; Wild, Edward J

    2017-01-01

    Clinical Trials Corner of Journal of Huntington's Disease will regularly review ongoing and recently completed clinical trials in Huntington's disease. In this inaugural issue, we list all currently registered and ongoing clinical trials, expand on LEGATO-HD and IONIS-HTTRx, and cover two recently finished trials: Amaryllis and Pride-HD.

  19. Clinical Trials: CSDRG Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logemann, Jeri A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent importance placed upon efficacy research has spawned the development of the Communication Sciences and Disorders Clinical Trials Research Group (CSDRG). This group, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), was organized by the American Speech Language and Hearing Association to address the need for more treatment efficacy research…

  20. Adaptive clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Chow, Shein-Chung

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the use of adaptive design methods in clinical trials based on accumulated data at interim has received much attention because of its flexibility and efficiency in pharmaceutical/clinical development. In practice, adaptive design may provide the investigators a second chance to modify or redesign the trial while the study is still ongoing. However, it is a concern that a shift in target patient population may occur after significant adaptations are made. In addition, the overall type I error rate may not be preserved. Moreover, the results may not be reliable and hence are difficult to interpret. As indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration draft guidance on adaptive design clinical trials, the adaptive design has to be a prospectively planned opportunity and should be based on information collected within the study, with or without formal statistical hypothesis testing. This article reviews the relative advantages, limitations, and feasibility of commonly considered adaptive designs in clinical trials. Statistical concerns when implementing adaptive designs are also discussed.

  1. Ethics and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Chassany, O; Duracinský, M

    1999-01-01

    The current reference guideline about ethics in clinical trials is the Declaration of Helsinki of human rights in medical research. Three major principles are emphasised: respect of the patient to accept or not to participate in a trial, the constraints and the presumed risks must be acceptable for patients included in a study, and vulnerable subjects should not participate in studies. The investigator is responsible for obtaining a free and well-informed consent from patients before their inclusion in a study. Where possible, a new drug should always first be compared to placebo in order to prove its superiority. Else, a small-sized trial comparing a new drug versus a reference treatment can lead to an erroneous conclusion of absence of difference. Moreover, good results or improvement are obtained in at least 30% of cases with placebo, whatever the disease. The use of placebo is unethical in life-threatening diseases and when an effective proved drug exists. The use of placebo is ethical in severe diseases with no efficient drug, in some severe diseases even when an active reference treatment is available, and in all moderate and functional diseases. In order to detect flawed studies, most journals now ask for any manuscript submitted and reporting results of a randomised clinical trial to join a checklist in order to verify the quality of the trial. Finally, it remains the responsibility of the doctor to decide whether or not a protocol is ethical, to participate or not and to include patients or not.

  2. Innovative Clinical Trial Designs

    PubMed Central

    Lavori, Philip W.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the 20th-century health care system sometimes seemed to be inhospitable to and unmoved by experimental research, its inefficiency and unaffordability have led to reforms that foreshadow a new health care system. We point out certain opportunities and transformational needs for innovations in study design offered by the 21st-century health care system, and describe some innovative clinical trial designs and novel design methods to address these needs and challenges. PMID:26140056

  3. Types of Treatment: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... Initiative Grant Finder Therapy Acceleration Program Academic Concierge Biotechnology Accelerator Clinical Trials Division Special Projects Beat AML ... Initiative Grant Finder Therapy Acceleration Program Academic Concierge Biotechnology Accelerator Clinical Trials Division Special Projects Beat AML ...

  4. Clinical Trials in Vision Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... the right choice for you. What are the costs of a clinical trial? All medical care provided ... Clinical trials conducted at other locations may involve costs related to standard medical care. These may or ...

  5. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-05-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 3-AP, Adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, AeroDose albuterol inhaler, agalsidase alfa, alemtuzumab, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anidulafungin, anthrax vaccine, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, BG-12, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Caspofungin acetate, ceftobiprole, certolizumab pegol, CG-53135, cilansetron; Darbepoetin alfa, degarelix acetate, dimethylfumarate, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, eletriptan, entecavir, esomeprazole magnesium, exatecan mesilate, exenatide, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fampridine, fondaparinux sodium, fontolizumab; Gefitinib, gepirone hydrochloride; Human insulin; IDEA-070, imatinib mesylate, iodine (I131) tositumomab; Lanthanum carbonate, lubiprostone; Mafosfamide cyclohexylamine salt, melatonin; NC-531, nemifitide ditriflutate, neridronic acid, nolatrexed dihydrochloride; Oral insulin; Palifermin, parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PT-141; Quercetin; Ranibizumab, renzapride hydrochloride, RSD-1235; Sabarubicin hydrochloride, semapimod hydrochloride, Semax, SHL-749; Tegaserod maleate, tenatoprazole, tetrodotoxin, tolevamer sodium, trabectedin, travoprost, travoprost/timolol; Valdecoxib, visilizumab, Xcellerated T cells, XP-828L; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. Copyright 2005 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  6. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: 4'-Thio-ara-C, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate; ABT-089, AD-237, AF-37702, alvocidib hydrochloride, apricitabine, armodafinil, atrasentan, AVE-5883, avian influenza vaccine, azimilide hydrochloride; Banoxantrone, BIBF-1120; CD34+ cells, certolizumab pegol, CHIR-258, cilansetron, CoFactor, CX-3543, cystemustine; D-003, dexloxiglumide, DMXB-anabaseine; Ecogramostim, elcometrine, elcometrine/ethinylestradiol, etravirine; Fenretinide, fingolimod hydrochloride, fospropofol disodium; Gaboxadol, gestodene, glutamine; Human insulin, hyaluronic acid; Incyclinide, indacaterol, ispronicline, istradefylline; Labradimil, lamifiban, lapatinib, L-arginine hydrochloride, liposomal cisplatin, liposome encapsulated paclitaxel, LY-517717; Manidipine hydrochloride/delapril hydrochloride, maraviroc, MBP(82-98), MD-0727, MDX-214, melanotan I, MMR vaccine; Nacystelyn, nalfurafine hydrochloride, nibentan, nilotinib, NK-105; OBI-1, oblimersen sodium, olmesartan medoxomil, olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, oregovomab; Pexelizumab, PG-116800, PG-CPT, PHA-794428, prasugrel; RC-3095, rDNA insulin, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, rhEndostatin, rhenium Re-186 etidronate, rhGM-CSF, roflumilast, romidepsin; Sarcosine, SGLU1, SGN-40, succinobucol; TAU, teduglutide, telatinib, tesofensine, tipifarnib, tirapazamine, TKA-731, tolvaptan, trabectedin; Vaccimel, vatalanib succinate, velafermin, vildagliptin, vinflunine; XP-19986; YM-155.

  7. [PRIMER FOR SURGICAL CLINICAL TRIALS].

    PubMed

    Sakamaki, Kentaro; Yamanaka, Takeharu

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials are conducted based on the development of surgical technology and are designed to answer specific research questions. In planning clinical trials population, intervention, comparison, and outcome are important elements. Sample size calculation is also central to the design of clinical trials, especially randomized, controlled ones. This article outlines study phases, four important elements of design, and sample size calculation.

  8. Evidence and Clinical Trials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Steven N.

    1989-11-01

    This dissertation explores the use of a mathematical measure of statistical evidence, the log likelihood ratio, in clinical trials. The methods and thinking behind the use of an evidential measure are contrasted with traditional methods of analyzing data, which depend primarily on a p-value as an estimate of the statistical strength of an observed data pattern. It is contended that neither the behavioral dictates of Neyman-Pearson hypothesis testing methods, nor the coherency dictates of Bayesian methods are realistic models on which to base inference. The use of the likelihood alone is applied to four aspects of trial design or conduct: the calculation of sample size, the monitoring of data, testing for the equivalence of two treatments, and meta-analysis--the combining of results from different trials. Finally, a more general model of statistical inference, using belief functions, is used to see if it is possible to separate the assessment of evidence from our background knowledge. It is shown that traditional and Bayesian methods can be modeled as two ends of a continuum of structured background knowledge, methods which summarize evidence at the point of maximum likelihood assuming no structure, and Bayesian methods assuming complete knowledge. Both schools are seen to be missing a concept of ignorance- -uncommitted belief. This concept provides the key to understanding the problem of sampling to a foregone conclusion and the role of frequency properties in statistical inference. The conclusion is that statistical evidence cannot be defined independently of background knowledge, and that frequency properties of an estimator are an indirect measure of uncommitted belief. Several likelihood summaries need to be used in clinical trials, with the quantitative disparity between summaries being an indirect measure of our ignorance. This conclusion is linked with parallel ideas in the philosophy of science and cognitive psychology.

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses, which has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the world's first drug discovery and development portal, providing information on study design, treatments, conclusions and references. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate; abciximab; abetimus sodium; adalimumab; aldesleukin; almotriptan; alteplase; amisulpride; amitriptyline hydrochloride; amoxicillin trihydrate; atenolol; atorvastatin calcium; atrasentan; Beclometasone dipropionate; bosentan; Captopril; ceftriaxone sodium; cerivastatin sodium; cetirizine hydrochloride; cisplatin; citalopram hydrobromide; Dalteparin sodium; darusentan; desirudin; digoxin; Efalizumab; enoxaparin sodium; ertapenem sodium; esomeprazole magnesium; estradiol; ezetimibe; Famotidine; farglitazar; fluorouracil; fluticasone propionate; fosamprenavir sodium; Glibenclamide; glucosamine sulfate; Heparin sodium; HSPPC-96; hydrochlorothiazide; Imatinib mesilate; implitapide; Lamivudine; lansoprazole; lisinopril; losartan potassium; l-Propionylcarnitine; Melagatran; metformin hydrochloride; methotrexate; methylsulfinylwarfarin; Nateglinide; norethisterone; Olmesartan medoxomil; omalizumab; omapatrilat; omeprazole; oseltamivir phosphate; oxatomide; Pantoprazole; piperacillin sodium; pravastatin sodium; Quetiapine hydrochloride; Rabeprazole sodium; raloxifene hydrochloride; ramosetron hydrochloride; ranolazine; rasburicase; reboxetine mesilate; recombinant somatropin; repaglinide; reteplase; rosiglitazone; rosiglitazone maleate; rosuvastatin calcium; Sertraline; simvastatin; sumatriptan succinate; Tazobactam sodium; tenecteplase; tibolone; tinidazole; tolterodine tartrate; troglitazone; Uniprost; Warfarin sodium; Ximelagatran.

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-05-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables can be retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, abarelix, abciximab, acarbose, alefacept, alteplase, amisulpride, amoxicillin trihydrate, apomorphine hydrochloride, aprepitant, argatroban monohydrate, aspirin, atenolol; Betamethasone dipropionate, betamethasone valerate, bicalutamide, bleomycin sulfate; Calcium carbonate, candesartan cilexetil, celecoxib, cetirizine hydrochloride, cisplatin, clarithromycin, clavulanate potassium, clomethiazole edisilate, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, cyclophosphamide, chorionic gonadotropin (human); Dalteparin sodium, desloratadine, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, DPC-083; Efalizumab, efavirenz, enoxaparin sodium, eprosartan mesilate, etanercept, etoposide, ezetimibe; Faropenem daloxate, fenofibrate, fluocinolone acetonide, flutamide, fluvastatin sodium, follitropin beta, fondaparinux sodium; Gabapentin, glibenclamide, goserelin, granisetron hydrochloride; Haloperidol, hydrochlorothiazide; Imiquimod, interferon beta-1a, irbesartan, iseganan hydrochloride; L-758298, lamivudine, lanoteplase, leflunomide, leuprorelin acetate, loratadine, losartan potassium; Melagatran, metformin hydrochloride, methotrexate, metronidazole, micafungin sodium, mitoxantrone hydrochloride; Nelfinavir mesilate, neutral insulin injection, nizatidine; Olopatadine hydrochloride, omeprazole, ondansetron hydrochloride; Pamidronate sodium, paracetamol, paroxetine hydrochloride, perindopril, pimecrolimus, pioglitazone hydrochloride, piroxicam, pleconaril, pralmorelin, pravastatin sodium, prednisolone, prednisone, propofol; Raloxifene hydrochloride, ranpirnase, remifentanil hydrochloride, risedronate sodium, risperidone, rofecoxib, ropinirole

  11. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, adalimumab, alefacept, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, AMGN-0007, anakinra, anti-CTLA-4 Mab, L-arginine hydrochloride, arzoxifene hydrochloride, astemizole, atazanavir sulfate, atlizumab; Belimumab, BG-9928, binodenoson, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, BufferGel; Caspofungin acetate, ciclesonide,cilomilast, ciluprevir, clofarabine, CVT-3146; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, diflomotecan, doripenem, dronedarone hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DT388-GM-CSF, duloxetine hydrochloride, E-5564, efalizumab, enfuvirtide, esomeprazole magnesium, estradiol acetate, ETC-642, exenatide, exisulind, ezetimib; Febuxostat; Gallium maltolate, ganirelix acetate, garenoxacin mesilate, gefitinib; H11, HuMax; IL-15, IDD-1, IGIV-C, imatinib mesylate, ISIS-14803, ITF-1697, ivabradine hydrochloride; KRN-5500; L-365260, levetiracetam, levosimendan, licofelone, linezolid, LJP-1082, lopinavir lumiracoxib; MCC-478, melatonin, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide, moxidectin; N-Acetylcarnosine, natalizumab, NM-702, NNC-05-1869, NSC-703940; Ocinaplon OM-89, omalizumab, omeprazole/ sodium bicarbonate, OPC-28326, ospemifene; PEG-filgrastim peginterferon alfa-2a, pegsunercept, pirfenidone, pralmorelin, pregabalin; Recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, repifermin, RSD-1235; S-8184, selodenoson, sodium dichloroacetate, suberanilohydroxamic acid; TAS-102, terfenadine, teriparatide, tipranavir troxacitabine; Ximelagatran; YM-337. (c) 2003 Prous Science

  12. Gateways to Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Adalimumab, aeroDose insulin inhaler, agomelatine, alendronic acid sodium salt, aliskiren fumarate, alteplase, amlodipine, aspirin, atazanavir; Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, basiliximab, BQ-788, bupropion hydrochloride; Cabergoline, caffeine citrate, carbamazepine, carvedilol, celecoxib, cyclosporine, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, colestyramine; Dexamethasone, diclofenac sodium, digoxin, dipyridamole, docetaxel, dutasteride; Eletriptan, enfuvirtidie, eplerenone, ergotamine tartrate, esomeprazole magnesium, estramustine phosphate sodium; Finasteride, fluticasone propionate, fosinopril sodium; Ganciclovir, GBE-761-ONC, glatiramer acetate, gliclazide, granulocyte-CSF; Heparin sodium, human isophane insulin (pyr), Hydrochlorothiazide; Ibuprofen, inhaled insulin, interferon alfa, interferon beta-1a; Laminvudine, lansoprazole, lisinopril, lonafarnib, losartan potassium, lumiracoxib; MAb G250, meloxicam methotrexate, methylprednisolone aceponate, mitomycin, mycophenolate mofetil; Naproxen sodium, natalizumab, nelfinavir mesilate, nemifitide ditriflutate, nimesulide; Omalizumab, omapatrilat, omeprazole, oxybutynin chloride; Pantoprazole sodium, paracetamol, paroxetine, pentoxifylline, pergolide mesylate, permixon, phVEGF-A165, pramipexole hydrochloride, prasterone, prednisone, probucol, propiverine hydrochloride; Rabeprazole sodium, resiniferatoxin, risedronate sodium, risperidone, rofecoxib rosiglitazone maleate, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate; Selegiline transdermal system, sertraline, sildenafil citrate, streptokinase; Tadalafil, tamsulosin hydrochloride, technosphere/Insulin, tegaserod maleate, tenofovir disoproxil

  13. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-05-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 2F5, 2G12, abetimus sodium, ABI-007, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, AE-941, alefacept, altropane, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, aminopterin, anakinra, aprinocarsen sodium, atazanavir, atlizumab, atomoxetine hydrochloride; B7-1 vaccine, bevacizumab, biricodar dicitrate, BMS-188667, brasofensine sulfate, bryostatin 1; cantuzumab mertansine, CHS-828, cinacalcet hydrochloride, cipamfylline, creatine, CVT-3146; darbepoetin alfa, DITPA, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; edatrexate, efalizumab, ENMD-0997, epoetin, erlosamide, esomeprazole magnesium, etiprednol dicloacetate, etoricoxib, everolimus, ezetimibe; fampridine, fenretinide, FTY-720; IGF-I/IGFBP-3, IL-1 cytokine trap, ilodecakin, interferon beta, ISIS-104838, ISIS-2503, ISIS-5132, ivabradine hydrochloride; lafutidine, lanthanum carbonate, l-Arginine hydrochloride, LEA29Y, lerdelimumab, levetiracetam, levobupivacaine hydrochloride, levosimendan, lopinavir; melagatran, mibefradil hydrochloride, miglustat, morphine-6-glucuronide; nesiritide; omalizumab, omapatrilat; p24-VLP, parecoxib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegsunercept, pitavastatin calcium, plevitrexed, prasterone, pregabalin, PRO-2000, prucalopride; rapacuronium bromide, rebimastat, RGA-0853, rubitecan, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate, RWJ-67657; S-16020-2, sarizotan, SLV-306, stiripentol; TA-CIN, tenecteplase, teriparatide, tezacitabine, tipifarnib, trabectedin, troglitazone; valdecoxib, vardenafil; Z-338, ziconotide.

  14. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AdGVVEGF121.10, anakinra, andolast, anidulafungin, APC-2059, l-arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arzoxifene hydrochloride, asimadoline; Bexarotene, bimatoprost, bimosiamose, bizelesin, BMS-188667, botulinum toxin type B, bromfenac sodium, bryostatin 1; Cannabidiol, cariporide mesilate, CCI-1004, CDP-571, cerivastatin sodium, clevudine; Dalbavancin, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, deligoparin sodium, diethylnorspermine, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib-vaccine; E-5564, eculizumab, edodekin alfa, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, eplerenone, esomeprazole magnesium, etaquine, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Fesoterodine, fipamezole hydrochloride, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan, fulvestrant; Gadofosveset sodium, galiximab, ghrelin (human), glufosfamide; Homoharringtonine; Idraparinux sodium, imatinib mesylate, INS-37217; KRN-7000; L-651582, lafutidine, lanthanum carbonate, lenercept, levetiracetam, lusupultide; Magnesium sulfate, melatonin, mepolizumab, midostaurin, morphine hydrochloride, mozavaptan; Natalizumab, nesiritide; OPC-51803, oregovomab, oritavancin; Peginterferon alfa-2(a), pleconaril, plevitrexed, prasterone, pregabalin; Ranibizumab, Ro-31-7453, roxifiban acetate, rubitecan; SCV-07, SHL-749, sho-saiko-to, soblidotin, solifenacin succinate; Tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, tenecteplase, theraCIM, tipifarnib, travoprost; Valdecoxib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, voriconazole; Ximelagatran; Ziprasidone hydrochloride, ZYC-00101. (c) 2003 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  15. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, abciximab, acetylcysteine, adefovir dipivoxil, alfuzosin hydrochloride, aliskiren fumarate, alosetron hydrochloride, amlodipine besilate, apomorphine hydrochloride, atazanavir, atorvastatin, atorvastatin calcium, atrasentan; Basiliximab, beraprost sodium, bevacizumab, bivalirudin, botulinum toxin type A, botulinum toxin type B; Celecoxib, cetuximab, cilansetron, cilomilast; Daclizumab, darbepoetin alfa, docetaxel, duloxetine hydrochloride; Efalizumab, efavirenz, eletriptan,, entecavir, eplerenone, epoetin alfa, eptifibatide, esomeprazole magnesium. ezetimibe; Filgrastim, finasteride, fluvastatin sodium, follitropin alfa; Gemcitabine, gemeprost, ghrelin (human); HE-2000; Infliximab, 111In-Pentetreotide, interferon alfa-2 alpha, interferon alfa-2 beta, interferon beta-1 alpha, irbesartan, irinotecan hydrochloride; Ketamine hydrochloride; L-778123, lafutidine, lamivudine, lamivudine/zidovudine, latanoprost, letrozole, licofelone, lopinavir, losartan potassium, loxiglumide, lubeluzole; Magnesium sulfate, MeGLA, meloxicam, mycophenolate mofetil; NBI-6024, nelfinavir mesilate, nesiritide, nevirapine, niacin, NN-2211; Octreotide, orlistat; PC-515, peginterferon alfa-2 alpha, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, pibrozelesin hydrochloride, pimagedine, pirfenidone, pitavastatin calcium, premarin/trimegestone, prucalopride; Rabeprazole sodium; reboxetine, risedronate sodium, ritonavir, rituximab, rofecoxib, roflumilast, rosuvastatin calcium; Sertraline, sibutramine hydrochloride monohydrate, sildenafil citrate, spironolactone, stavudine; Tacrolimus, tadalafil, tamsulosin hydrochloride

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen; Ad.muIFN-beta AD-237, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, agalsidase alfa, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, ALVAC vCP1452, alvimopan hydrate, ambrisentan, anakinra, anti-IFN-gamma MAb; Bimatoprost, BMS-188797, BMS-214662, bortezomib, bosentan, bovine lactoferrin; Caffeine, canertinib dihydrochloride, canfosfamide hydrochloride, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cH36, ChimeriVax-JE, ciclesonide, cilansetron, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clopidogrel, CpG-7909, Cypher; Daptomycin, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, denufosol tetrasodium, Dexamet, diindolemethane, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, DX-9065a; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, elacridar, eletriptan, emtricitabine, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, ezetimibe; Fludarabine, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gavestinel sodium, gefitinib, granisetron-Biochronomer; Human Albumin, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, interleukin-2 XL, isatoribine, ISS-1018, i.v. gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lanthanum carbonate, L-arginine hydrochloride, liposomal doxorubicin, LY-450139; Magnesium sulfate, melatonin, motexafin gadolinium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, nesiritide, niacin/lovastatin; OGX-011, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ospemifene; PACAP38, panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, patupilone, pegfilgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV1/SERCA2a, Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Adalimumab, Aliskiren fumarate, Ambrisentan, Aripiprazole, AT-7519, Atazanavir sulfate, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Azacitidine, Azelnidipine; Besifloxacin hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, Bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Budesonide/formoterol fumarate; CAIV-T, Carisbamate, Casopitant mesylate, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, Ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone, CTCE-9908; Dalcetrapib, Darunavir, Deferasirox, Desloratadine, Disitertide, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTA-H19, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Efalizumab, Emtricitabine, Eribulin mesilate, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, EUR-1008, Everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Exenatide; Fampridine, Fluticasone furoate, Formoterol fumarate/fluticasone propionate, Fosamprenavir calcium, Fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, GS-7904L; HPV-6/11/16/18, Human Secretin, Hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Inalimarev/Falimarev, Indacaterol, Indacaterol maleate, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin detemir, Insulin glargine, Ixabepilone; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Levocetirizine dihydrochloride, Liraglutide, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lopinavir, Loratadine/montelukast sodium, Lutropin alfa; MeNZB, Mepolizumab, Micafungin sodium, Morphine hydrochloride; Nabiximols, Nikkomycin Z; Olmesartan medoxomil, Omalizumab; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Perifosine, PF-489791, Plitidepsin, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; QAX-576; Raltegravir potassium, Ramelteon, Rasagiline

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Intergrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 249553, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase beta, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Alovudine, Amdoxovir, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, AQ-13, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, Asoprisnil, Atacicept, Atrasentan; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam; Catumaxomab, Cediranib, Cetuximab, cG250, Ciclesonide, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Curcumin, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, Denosumab, Dihydrexidine; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Febuxostat, Fenspiride hydrochloride, Fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GSK-1562902A; HSV-tk/GCV; Iclaprim, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Indacaterol, Insulinotropin, ISIS-112989; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Laropiprant; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Mipomersen sodium, Motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, Nimotuzumab; OSC, Ozarelix; PACAP-38, Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein-(1-36), Pasireotide, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plitidepsin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranolazine, Recombinant human relaxin H2, Regadenoson, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, RO-3300074, Rosuvastatin calcium; SIR-Spheres, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talabostat, Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Temsirolimus, Teriparatide, Tiotropium bromide, Tipifarnib, Tirapazamine, Tocilizumab; UCN-01, Ularitide

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM), the drug discovery and development portal, http://www.thomsonreutersintegrity.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 17-Hydroxyprogesterone caproate; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Aclidinium bromide, Adalimumab, Adefovir, Alemtuzumab, Alkaline phosphatase, Amlodipine, Apilimod mesylate, Aripiprazole, Axitinib, Azacitidine; Belotecan hydrochloride, Berberine iodide, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Bryostatin 1; Calcipotriol/hydrocortisone, Carglumic acid, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cixutumumab, Coumarin, Custirsen sodium; Darbepoetin alfa, Darifenacin hydrobromide, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Denibulin hydrochloride, Denosumab, Diacetylmorphine, Dulanermin, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eplerenone, Escitalopram oxalate, Esomeprazole sodium, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Fenofibrate/pravastatin sodium, Ferric carboxymaltose, Flavangenol, Fondaparinux sodium; Glutamine, GSK-1024850A; Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, Hib-MenC, HIV-LIPO-5; Immunoglobulin intravenous (human), Indacaterol maleate, Indibulin, Indium 111 (¹¹¹In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent vaccine, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin glulisine; Lapatinib ditosylate, Leucovorin/UFT; Maraviroc, Mecasermin, MMR-V, Morphine hydrochloride, Morphine sulfate/naltrexone hydrochloride, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium, Natalizumab; Oncolytic HSV; Paliperidone, PAN-811, Paroxetine, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Pimecrolimus, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; Raltegravir potassium, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasburicase, Rilpivirine

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 5-Methyltetrahydrofolate, 9-aminocamptothecin; AdPEDF.11, AE-37, albumin interferon alfa, alicaforsen sodium, alvocidib hydrochloride, AMG-706, arginine butyrate, avanafil, axitinib, azimilide hydrochloride; BAY-579352, belagenpumatucel-L, beta-lapachone, BHT-3009, BIBW-2992, bremelanotide, BX-471; Casopitant mesylate, cediranib, certolizumab pegol, CH-1504, ChimeriVax-West Nile, clofazimine, CpG-7909, curcumin, Cypher; Dapoxetine hydrochloride, darusentan, diflomotecan, D-methionine, dnaJP1, D-serine, DTPw-HB Hib-MenAC, DTPw-HepB-Hib; E-7010, ecogramostim, edodekin alfa, EGFRvlll peptide vaccine, elcometrine, elcometrine/ethinylestradiol, elsilimomab, enrasentan, ertumaxomab, etalocib sodium, exisulind; Fenretinide, fesoterodine, fingolimod hydrochloride, fontolizumab; Gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, ghrelin (human), GV-1001; HTU-PA, human papillomavirus vaccine; Indacaterol, indiplon, interleukin-21, intranasal insulin, irinotecan hydrochloride/floxuridine, ISIS-301012, ispinesib mesylate, ixabepilone; K562/GM-CSF; Lapatinib, L-BLP-25, linezolid, liposome encapsulated paclitaxel, LY-2124275; MC-1, MC-1/lisinopril, MDX-066, melanoma vaccine, MMR-V, multivalent (ACYW) meningitis vaccine; Nilotinib, nobori, nociceptin; Oblimersen sodium, orbofiban acetate, ospemifene; Paliperidone, panitumumab, PEG-filgrastim, PEGylated interferon alfacon-1, perflubutane, pertuzumab, phenserine tartrate, phVEGF-A165, pleconaril, prasugrel, prednisolone sodium metasulfobenzoate; R-411, recombinant malaria vaccine, rhGM-CSF, roflumilast, romidepsin, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate; Sirolimus-eluting stent, SR-4554, St. John

  2. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Know- ledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, Ad.Egr.TNF.11D, adefovir dipivoxil, AdPEDF.11, AES-14, albumex, alefacept, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvimopan hydrate, aAminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anti-IL-12 MAb, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atrasentan, avanafil; Banoxantrone, BG-12, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, caspofungin acetate, CBT-1, ciclesonide, clofarabine, conivaptan hydrochloride, CpG-7909, C-Vax, Cypher; DA-8159, DAC:GLP-1, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin, duloxetine hydrochloride; Eculizumab, efalizumab, efaproxiral sodium, EGF vaccine, eletriptan, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, ETC-642, etoricoxib, everolimus, exenatide; Gefitinib, IV gamma-globulin; Human insulin, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium; IDN-6556, iguratimod, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, ixabepilone; Laquinimod, LB-80380, lidocaine/prilocaineliraglutide, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lucinactant; MAb-14.18, melatonin, MLN-591-DM1; NC-531, neridronic acid, nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, niacin/lovastatin; Oblimersen sodium, olcegepant, oral Insulin, ORV-105; Palonosetron hydrochloride, PAmAb, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, pegvisomant, perifosine, pexelizumab, phenoxodiol, phenserine tartrate, pimecrolimus, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PRO-542, prostate cancer vaccine, PT-141; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rDNA insulin, reslizumab, rh-Lactoferrin, ribamidine hydrochloride, rosuvastatin calcium; S-8184l, SC-1, sorafenib, St. John's Wort extract, SU-11248; Taxus, telbivudine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Moral, M A; Tomillero, A

    2008-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131-I-Chlorotoxin, 423557; Abatacept, Ad.Egr.TNF.11D, Adalimumab, AE-941, Ambrisentan, AMR-001, Anacetrapib, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate; BAY-639044, Bazedoxifene acetate, Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam, Bucindolol hydrochloride; Carfilzomib, Carisbamate, CCX-282, CD20Bi, Ceftobiprole, Certolizumab pegol, CF-101, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cypher; Darifenacin hydrobromide, Degarelix acetate, Denosumab, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dexlansoprazole, Dexverapamil, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Efalizumab, EPs-7630, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib; Fluticasone furoate, Fondaparinux sodium, Fospropofol disodium; Hexadecyloxypropyl-cidofovir, HIV gp120/NefTat/AS02A, HPV-6/11/16/18; INCB-18424, Incyclinide, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin detemir; KNS-760704, KW-0761; Lacosamide, Lenalidomide, Levetiracetam, Licofelone, Lidocaine/prilocaine; mAb 216, MEDI-528, Men ACWY, Meningococcal C-CRM197 vaccine, Methylnaltrexone bromide; Nemifitide ditriflutate, Nicotine conjugate vaccine, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Octaparin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), Pegaptanib octasodium, Pitrakinra, Prasterone, Pregabalin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasagiline mesilate, Retigabine, Rimonabant, RTS,S/AS02D; Sarcosine, Sitaxentan sodium, Solifenacin succinate, Sunitinib malate; Taranabant, Taxus, Teduglutide, Teriparatide, Ticagrelor, Travoprost, TRU-015; USlipristal acetate, Urocortin 2; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate; YM-155, Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zanolimumab, Zoledronic acid monohydrate, Zotarolimus

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X

    2008-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prouse Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M, 3F8; Abatacept, ABT-263, Adalimumab, AG-7352, Agatolimod sodium, Alfimeprase, Aliskiren fumarate, Alvimopan hydrate, Aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, AT-9283, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, AVE-1642, AVE-9633, Axitinib, AZD-0530; Becocalcidiol, Belotecan hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, BG-9928, BIBF-1120, BMS-275183, Bortezomib, Bosentan; Catumaxomab, Cetuximab, CHR-2797, Ciclesonide, Clevidipine, Cypher, Cytarabine/daunorubicin; Darifenacin hydrobromide, Darunavir, Denosumab, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Disufenton sodium, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Eculizumab, Efalizumab, Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Eplerenone, Epratuzumab, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Ethynylcytidine, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Fulvestrant; Garenoxacin mesilate, Gefitinib, Gestodene; HI-164, Hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Icatibant acetate, ICX-RHY, Idraparinux sodium, Indacaterol, Ispronicline, Ivabradine hydrochloride, Ixabepilone; KB-2115, KW-2449; L-791515, Lapatinib ditosylate, LGD-4665, Licofelone, Liposomal doxorubicin, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lumiracoxib; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Miglustat, Mipomersen sodium, Mitumprotimut-T, MK-0822A, MK-0974; Nelarabine; Obatoclax mesylate, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide; Paliperidone, Palonosetron hydrochloride, Panitumumab, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pemetrexed disodium, Perospirone hydrochloride, Pertuzumab, Pimecrolimus, Pitrakinra, Pixantrone maleate, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; Quercetin; RALGA, Raltegravir

  5. Likelihood and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hill, G; Forbes, W; Kozak, J; MacNeill, I

    2000-03-01

    The history of the application of statistical theory to the analysis of clinical trials is reviewed. The current orthodoxy is a somewhat illogical hybrid of the original theory of significance tests of Edgeworth, Karl Pearson, and Fisher, and the subsequent decision theory approach of Neyman, Egon Pearson, and Wald. This hegemony is under threat from Bayesian statisticians. A third approach is that of likelihood, stemming from the work of Fisher and Barnard. This approach is illustrated using hypothetical data from the Lancet articles by Bradford Hill, which introduced clinicians to statistical theory.

  6. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-10-01

    Gateways to clinical trials is a guide to the most recent trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (+)-Dapoxetine hydrochloride, (S)-Tenatoprazole sodium salt monohydrate 19-28z, Acotiamide hydrochloride hydrate, ADV-TK, AE-37, Aflibercept, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Asenapine maleate, Axitinib; Bavituximab, Becatecarin, beta-1,3/1,6-Glucan, Bevacizumab, Bremelanotide; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Casopitant mesylate, Catumaxomab, CDX-110, Cediranib, CMD-193, Cositecan; Darinaparsin, Denosumab, DP-b99, Duloxetine hydrochloride; E75, Ecogramostim, Elacytarabine, EMD-273063, EndoTAG-1, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eplerenone, Eribulin mesilate, Esomeprazole magnesium, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Faropenem daloxate, Febuxostat, Fenretinide; Ghrelin (human); I-131 ch-TNT-1/B, I-131-3F8, Iclaprim, Iguratimod, Iloperidone, Imatinib mesylate, Inalimarev/Falimarev, Indacaterol, Ipilimumab, Iratumumab, Ispinesib mesylate, Ixabepilone; Lapatinib ditosylate, Laquinimod sodium, Larotaxel dehydrate, Linezolid, LOR-2040; Mapatumumab, MKC-1, Motesanib diphosphate, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; NK-012; Olanzapine pamoate, Oncolytic HSV, Ortataxel; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Paclitaxel poliglumex, Paliperidone palmitate, Panitumumab, Patupilone, PCV-9, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimavanserin tartrate, Pimecrolimus, Plerixafor hydrochloride, PM-02734, Poly I:CLC, PR1, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Progesterone caproate, Prucalopride, Pumosetrag hydrochloride; RAV-12, RB-006, RB-007, Recombinant human erythropoietin alfa, Rimonabant, Romidepsin; SAR-109659, Satraplatin, Sodium butyrate; Tadalafil, Talampanel, Tanespimycin, Tarenflurbil, Tariquidar

  7. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, adefovir dipivoxil, AGI-1067, alefacept, alemtuzumab, ALVAC-p53, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Anti-CTLA-4 Mab, AOD-9604, apafant, aprinocarsen sodium, arsenic trioxide; Balaglitazone, BIM-23190, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, BR-1; Canertinib dihydrochloride, CDP-850, cevimeline hydrochloride, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clenoliximab, clevudine, CN-787; D-003, darusentan, deferasirox, desloratadine dexanabinol, duloxetine hydrochloride; E-5564, edaravone, efaproxiral sodium, elvucitabine emfilermin, EN-101, enfuvirtide, entecavir, epithalon, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, eszopiclone, etilefrine pivalate hydrochloride etoricoxib, everolimus, exenatide; Fidarestat, fondaparinux sodium; Ganstigmine hydrochloride; Homoharringtonine, HuMax-IL-15, hyperimmune IVIG; Imatinib mesylate, IMC-1C11, Inhaled insulin, irofulven, iseganan hydrochloride, ISIS-14803, ISIS-5132, ivabradine hydrochloride; Keratinocyte growth factor; Lafutidine, lanthanum carbonate, LAS-34475, levocetirizine, liraglutide, LY-307161 SR; Magnesium sulfate, maribavir, melatonin, mycobacterium cell wall complex; NN-414, NO-aspirin, nociceptin, nolomirole hydrochloride; Olmesartan medoxomil oral insulin, ospemifene; PDX, perillyl alcohol, pimecrolimus, pitavastatin calcium, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PRO-542, PV-701, pyrazoloacridine; R-744, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rasburicase, rDNA insulin, resiniferatoxin, reslizumab, ridogrel, riplizumab ropivacaine, rosuvastatin calcium, roxifiban acetate, ruboxistaurin mesilate

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Activated protein C concentrate, Ad-CD154, Adeno-Interferon gamma, alemtuzumab, APC-8024, 9-aminocamptothecin, aprepitant, l-arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arsenic trioxide, asimadoline; O6-Benzylguanine, bevacizumab, Bi-20, binodenoson, biphasic insulin aspart, bivatuzumab, 186Re-bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, bryostatin 1; Carboxy- amidotriazole, caspofungin acetate, CB-1954, CC-4047, CDP-860, cerivastatin sodium, clevidipine, CTL-102; 3,4-DAP, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, desloratadine, DHA-paclitaxel, duloxetine hydrochloride; Efalizumab, EGF vaccine, eletriptan, eniluracil, ENMD-0997, eplerenone, eplivanserin, erlosamide, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, exenatide, ezetimibe; Fondaparinux sodium, FR-901228, FTY-720; Gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gepirone hydrochloride; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, iodine (I131) tositumomab, ISV-205, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Levetiracetam, levocetirizine, linezolid, liposomal NDDP, lonafarnib, lopinavir, LY-156735; Mafosfamide cyclohexylamine salt, magnesium sulfate, maxacalcitol, meclinertant, melagatran, melatonin, MENT, mepolizumab, micafungin sodium, midostaurin, motexafin gadolinium; Nesiritide, NS-1209, NSC-601316, NSC-683864; Osanetant; Palonosetron hydrochloride, parecoxib sodium, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegylated OB protein, pemetrexed disodium, perillyl alcohol, picoplatin, pimecrolimus, pixantrone maleate, plevitrexed

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, alefacept, alemtuzumab, 3-AP, AP-12009, APC-8015, L-Arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arundic acid, avasimibe; Bevacizumab, bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, BMS-184476, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, BRL-55730, bryostatin 1; CEP-1347, cetuximab, cinacalcet hydrochloride, CP-461, CpG-7909; D-003, dabuzalgron hydrochloride, darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DHA-paclitaxel, diflomotecan, DN-101, DP-b99, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, duramycin; Eculizumab, Efalizumab, EKB-569, elcometrine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, ezetimibe; Fenretinide, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan; GD2L-KLH conjugate vaccine, gefitinib, glufosfamide, GTI-2040; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin, hydroquinone, gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium; IL-4(38-37)-PE38KDEL, imatinib mesylate, indisulam, inhaled insulin, ixabepilone; KRN-5500; LY-544344; MDX-210, melatonin, mepolizumab, motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, NSC-330507, NSC-683864; 1-Octanol, omalizumab, ortataxel; Pagoclone, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, phenoxodiol, pimecrolimus, plevitrexed, polyphenon E, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PX-12; QS-21; Ragaglitazar, ranelic acid distrontium salt, RDP-58, recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, repinotan hydrochloride, rhEndostatin, rh-Lactoferrin, (R)-roscovitine; S-8184, semaxanib, sitafloxacin hydrate, sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib, synthadotin

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 81C6; Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase alfa, AGM-1470, albumin interferon alfa, alefacept, alosetron hydrochloride, anakinra, anti-CTLA-4 Mab, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atazanavir; BAY-43-9006, BBR-3438, beta-L-Fd4C, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentanBR96-doxorubicin; Caspofungin acetate, ciclesonide, cilengitide, cilomilast, COL-1621, COL-3, CpG-7909, cyclosporine; DCVax-Brain, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, dexosome vaccine (melanoma), donepezil hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTI-015, [99Tc]-DTPA-mannosyldextran, duloxetine hydrochloride; Emivirine, emtricitabine, entecavir, epothilone B, estradiol-MNP, etonogestrel/etonogestrel/ethinylestradiol, etoricoxib; Febuxostat, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, GVS-111; Heparinase I, HspE7, human alpha-glucosidase, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, INGN-241, interferon alfa B/D hybrid, interferon alfa Biphasix, ISIS-14803; Lanicemine hydrochloride, 1311-lipiodol, liposome-encapsulated mitoxantrone, lixivaptan, lumiracoxib, lupus-AHP, LY-466700; Marimastat, MEN-10755, micafungin sodium; Nitronaproxen, NSC-683864 Omalizumab, oral insulin; Palonosetron hydrochloride, peginterferon alfa-2a, pimecrolimus, pralnacasan, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, pyrazoloacridine; R-165335, ranolazine, risperidone, RPR-109881;, RSD-1235, Satraplatin, seocalcitol, sertindole, SMART anti-interferon gamma antibody, sulfasalazine; T-138067, TAK-013, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, TP-38; Valdecoxib, vatalanib succinate, voriconazole; ZD-9331.

  11. Gateways to Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the world's first drug discovery and development portal, and provides information on study design, treatments, conclusions and references. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiciximab, acetylcholine chloride, acetylcysteine, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alicaforsen, alteplase, aminopterin, amoxicillin sodium, amphotericin B, anastrozole, argatroban monohydrate, arsenic trioxide, aspirin, atazanavir, atorvastatin, augmerosen, azathioprine; Benzylpenicillin, BMS-284756, botulinum toxin type A, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, budesonide, BXT-51072; Calcium folinate, carbamazepine, carboplatin, carmustine, ceftriaxone sodium, cefuroxime axetil, chorionic gonadotropin (human), cimetidine, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, cisplatin, citalopram hydrobromide, cladribine, clarithromycin, clavulanic acid, clofarabine, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, clotrimazole, CNI-1493, colesevelam hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, cytarabine; Dalteparin sodium, daptomycin, darbepoetin alfa, debrisoquine sulfate, dexrazoxane, diaziquone, didanosine, docetaxel, donezepil, doxorubicin hydrochloride liposome injection, DX-9065a; Eberconazole, ecogramostim, eletriptan, enoxaparin sodium, epoetin, epoprostenol sodium, erlizumab, ertapenem sodium, ezetimibe; Fampridine, fenofibrate, filgrastim, fluconazole, fludarabine phosphate, fluorouracil, 5-fluorouracil/epinephrine, fondaparinux sodium, formoterol fumarate; Gabapentin, gemcitabine, gemfibrozil, glatiramer; Heparin sodium, homoharringtonine; Ibuprofen, iloprost, imatinib mesilate, imiquimod, interferon alpha-2b, interferon alpha-2c, interferon-beta; KW-6002; Lamotrigine, lanoteplase, metoprolol tartrate, mitoxantrone hydrochloride; Naproxen sodium, naratriptan, Natalizumab, nelfinavir mesilate

  12. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate; ACP-103, Ad.Egr.TNF.11 D, adalimumab, AF-IL 12, AIDSVAX gp120 B/B, alefacept, alemtuzumab, a-Galactosylceramide, ALVAC vCP 1452, alvimopan hydrate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anidulafungin, antarelix, aprepitant, aripiprazole, arsenic sulfide, asoprisnil, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BrachySil, brivudine; Caffeine, calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cannabidiol, capsaicin for injection, caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, cetuximab, CGP-36742, clofazimine, CpG-7909, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, dimethylfumarate, dronabinol/cannabidiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, eletriptan, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, esomeprazole magnesium, estradiol acetate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Fampridine, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, GPI-0100; hA 20, HTU-PA, human insulin, HuOKT 3 gamma 1(Ala 234-Ala 235), hyaluronic acid; Icatibant, imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, INKP-100, INKP-102, iodine (I131) tositumomab, istradefylline, IV gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lacosamide, landiolol, lanthanum carbonate, lasofoxifene tartrate, LB-80380, lenalidomide, lidocaine/tetracaine, linezolid, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal vincristine sulfate, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Maribavir, morphine glucuronide, MVA-5 T

  13. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com.This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABT-263, AC-2307, Aclidinium bromide, Adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, Agatolimod sodium, Alefacept, Aliskiren fumarate, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Anakinra, Apaziquone, Aprepitant, Aripiprazole, ASM-8, Atiprimod hydrochloride, AVE-0277, AVE-1642, AVE-8062, Axitinib, Azacitidine, AZD-0530; Bazedoxifene acetate, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, BI-2536, Biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-387032, BMS-663513, Bortezomib, BQ-123, Brivanib alaninate, BSI-201; Caspofungin acetate, CDX-110, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, CR-011, Cypher; Daptomycin, Darbepoetin alfa, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Denosumab, Dexlansoprazole, Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DNA-Hsp65 vaccine, Dovitinib, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hibvaccine, DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Elacytarabine, Emtricitabine, Endothelin, Entecavir, Eplivanserin fumarate, Escitalopram oxalate, Everolimus, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Farletuzumab, Fesoterodine fumarate, Fibrin sealant (human), Fulvestrant; Gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, Glufosfamide, GSK-1562902A; Hib-TT; Imatinib mesylate, IMC-11F8, Imidazoacridinone, IMP-321, INCB-18424, Indiplon, Indisulam, INNO-406, Irinotecan hydrochloride/Floxuridine, ITF-2357, Ixabepilone; KRN-951; Lasofoxifene tartrate; Lenalidomide, LGD-4665, Lonafarnib, Lubiprostone, Lumiliximab; MDX-1100, Melan-A/MART-1/gp100/IFN-alfa, Methyl-CDDO, Metreleptin, MLN-2704, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Na-ASP-2, Naproxcinod, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, NPI-2358; Oblimersen sodium, Odanacatib; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, PAN-811, Panobinostat, PBI-1402, PC-515, Peginterferon alfa

  14. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131I-labetuzumab; Abacavir sulfate, abatacept, adalimumab, ademetionine, adjuvanted influenza vaccine, alefacept, alemtuzumab, amlodipine, amphotericin B, anakinra, aripiprazole, aspirin, axitinib; Betamethasone dipropionate, bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123; Calcium folinate, canertinib dihydrochloride, carboplatin, carmustine, cetirizine hydrochloride, cetuximab, cholecalciferol, ciclesonide, ciclosporin, cinacalcet hydrochloride, cisplatin, clarithromycin, clofazimine, cold-adapted influenza vaccine trivalent, CpG-7909; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, DB-289, desloratadine, Dexamet, dicycloverine hydrochloride, dimethyl fumarate, docetaxel, dolastatin 10, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, edotecarin, efaproxiral sodium, enalapril maleate, epoetin beta, epoprostenol sodium, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, estradiol, etanercept; Fluconazole, fludarabine phosphate, fluorouracil; Gefitinib, gemcitabine, Ghrelin (human), glibenclamide, glimepiride, GTI-2040; Haloperidol, human insulin, hydrocortisone probutate; Imatinib mesylate, indisulam, influenza vaccine, inhaled insulin, insulin aspart, insulin glulisine, insulin lispro, irinotecan, ispronicline; Lamivudine, lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, lapatinib, letrozole, levocetirizine, lomustine, lonafarnib, lumiracoxib;Magnesium sulfate, MD-1100, melphalan, metformin hydrochloride, methotrexate, metoclopramide hydrochloride, mitiglinide calcium hydrate, monophosphoryl lipid A, montelukast sodium, motexafin gadolinium

  15. [Critical reading of clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Aptel, F; Cucherat, M; Blumen-Ohana, E; Denis, P

    2011-12-01

    Clinical trials are playing an increasingly crucial role in modern evidence based medicine, allowing for rigorous scientific evaluation of treatment strategies and validation of patient care. The results of clinical trials often form the rational basis from which physicians draw information used to adapt their therapeutic practices. Critical reading and analysis of trials involves the assessment of whether the available data provide enough credible evidence that the treatment will result in a clinically significant and relevant improvement. Evaluating the quality of a clinical trial is a process that draws upon sometimes complex methodological and statistical concepts, with which the reader should nonetheless be familiar in order to come to impartial conclusions regarding the raw data presented in the clinical trials. The goal of the current article is to review the methodological and statistical concepts required for the design and interpretation of clinical trials, so as to allow for a critical analysis of publications or presentations of clinical trials. The first section describes the major methodological principles of clinical trial design required for a rigorous evaluation of the treatment benefit, as well as the various pitfalls or biases that could lead to erroneous conclusions. The second section briefly describes the main statistical tests used in clinical trials, as well as certain situations that may increase the risk of false positive findings (type 1 error), such as multiple, subgroup, intermediate and non-inferiority analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical Trials Information for Patients and Caregivers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Phases of Clinical Trials Randomization Use of Placebos Research Team Members Paying for Clinical Trials Insurance ... types of clinical trials. Also, explains phases, randomization, placebo, and members of the research team. Paying for ...

  17. Improving transparency of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dal-Ré, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    Recent data reveal that subtle selective publication affects critical aspects of trial reporting, in some cases altering the interpretation of results. Timely prospective registration could help deter selective reporting and clinical trial stakeholders from government authorities to journal editors should work together to foster prospective registration of trials.

  18. The Dynamo Clinical Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2016-04-01

    The Dynamo Clinical Trial evaluates long-term stellar magnetic health through periodic X-ray examinations (by the Chandra Observatory). So far, there are only three subjects enrolled in the DTC: Alpha Centauri A (a solar-like G dwarf), Alpha Cen B (an early K dwarf, more active than the Sun), and Alpha Canis Majoris A (Procyon, a mid-F subgiant similar in activity to the Sun). Of these, Procyon is a new candidate, so it is too early to judge how it will fare. Of the other two, Alpha Cen B has responded well, with a steady magnetic heartbeat of about 8 years duration. The sickest of the bunch, Alpha Cen A, was in magnetic cardiac arrest during 2005-2010, but has begun responding to treatment in recent years, and seems to be successfully cycling again, perhaps achieving a new peak of magnetic health in the 2016 time frame. If this is the case, it has been 20 years since A's last healthful peak, significantly longer than the middle-aged Sun's 11-year magnetic heartbeat, but perhaps in line with Alpha Cen A's more senescent state (in terms of "relative evolutionary age," apparently an important driver of activity). (By the way, don't miss the exciting movie of the Alpha Cen stars' 20-year X-ray dance.)

  19. Clinical trials in cancer research.

    PubMed Central

    Gehan, E A

    1979-01-01

    This is a review paper which gives a discussion of various aspects of clinical trials in cancer research. Since the conduct of the first randomized controlled clinical trial in cancer patients in the mid-1950's, substantial progress has been made in the utilization of the clinical trial technique for the evaluation of therapeutic efficiacy. The important elements of a protocol are given with some discussion of items to be considered in designing a protocol. The types of clinical trial (phase I, II, III) are defined, and the place of each phase of study in the context of the search for new treatments is delineated. A comprehensive discussion is given of the elements in the comparative clinical trial (phase III), including objectives, consierations in planning (comparability of treatment groups stratification of patients, feasibility and size of study, and prospective versus retrospective studies). Brief descriptions are given of designs for comparative clinical trials and a trial in oat cell lung carcinoma is discussed in some detail. Finally, some comments and references are given concerning the analysis of clinical trials. PMID:232043

  20. Bayesian Clinical Trials in Action

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. Jack; Chu, Caleb T.

    2012-01-01

    Although the frequentist paradigm has been the predominant approach to clinical trial design since the 1940s, it has several notable limitations. The alternative Bayesian paradigm has been greatly enhanced by advancements in computational algorithms and computer hardware. Compared to its frequentist counterpart, the Bayesian framework has several unique advantages, and its incorporation into clinical trial design is occurring more frequently. Using an extensive literature review to assess how Bayesian methods are used in clinical trials, we find them most commonly used for dose finding, efficacy monitoring, toxicity monitoring, diagnosis/decision making, and for studying pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics. The additional infrastructure required for implementing Bayesian methods in clinical trials may include specialized software programs to run the study design, simulation, and analysis, and Web-based applications, which are particularly useful for timely data entry and analysis. Trial success requires not only the development of proper tools but also timely and accurate execution of data entry, quality control, adaptive randomization, and Bayesian computation. The relative merit of the Bayesian and frequentist approaches continues to be the subject of debate in statistics. However, more evidence can be found showing the convergence of the two camps, at least at the practical level. Ultimately, better clinical trial methods lead to more efficient designs, lower sample sizes, more accurate conclusions, and better outcomes for patients enrolled in the trials. Bayesian methods offer attractive alternatives for better trials. More such trials should be designed and conducted to refine the approach and demonstrate its real benefit in action. PMID:22711340

  1. Bayesian clinical trials in action.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Jack; Chu, Caleb T

    2012-11-10

    Although the frequentist paradigm has been the predominant approach to clinical trial design since the 1940s, it has several notable limitations. Advancements in computational algorithms and computer hardware have greatly enhanced the alternative Bayesian paradigm. Compared with its frequentist counterpart, the Bayesian framework has several unique advantages, and its incorporation into clinical trial design is occurring more frequently. Using an extensive literature review to assess how Bayesian methods are used in clinical trials, we find them most commonly used for dose finding, efficacy monitoring, toxicity monitoring, diagnosis/decision making, and studying pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics. The additional infrastructure required for implementing Bayesian methods in clinical trials may include specialized software programs to run the study design, simulation and analysis, and web-based applications, all of which are particularly useful for timely data entry and analysis. Trial success requires not only the development of proper tools but also timely and accurate execution of data entry, quality control, adaptive randomization, and Bayesian computation. The relative merit of the Bayesian and frequentist approaches continues to be the subject of debate in statistics. However, more evidence can be found showing the convergence of the two camps, at least at the practical level. Ultimately, better clinical trial methods lead to more efficient designs, lower sample sizes, more accurate conclusions, and better outcomes for patients enrolled in the trials. Bayesian methods offer attractive alternatives for better trials. More Bayesian trials should be designed and conducted to refine the approach and demonstrate their real benefit in action.

  2. Social media in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Social media has potential in clinical trials for pointing out trial issues, addressing barriers, educating, and engaging multiple groups involved in cancer clinical research. Social media is being used in clinical trials to highlight issues such as poor accrual and barriers; educate potential participants and physicians about clinical trial options; and is a potential indirect or direct method to improve accrual. We are moving from a passive "push" of information to patients to a "pull" of patients requesting information. Patients and advocates are often driving an otherwise reluctant health care system into communication. Online patient communities are creating new information repositories. Potential clinical trial participants are using the Twittersphere and other sources to learn about potential clinical trial options. We are seeing more organized patient-centric and patient-engaged forums with the potential to crowd source to improve clinical trial accrual and design. This is an evolving process that will meet many individual, institutional, and regulatory obstacles as we move forward in a changed research landscape.

  3. Designing clinical trials for amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Randomized clinical trial (RCT) study design leads to one of the highest levels of evidence, and is a preferred study design over cohort studies, because randomization reduces bias and maximizes the chance that even unknown confounding factors will be balanced between treatment groups. Recent randomized clinical trials and observational studies in amblyopia can be taken together to formulate an evidence-based approach to amblyopia treatment, which is presented in this review. When designing future clinical studies of amblyopia treatment, issues such as regression to the mean, sample size and trial duration must be considered, since each may impact study results and conclusions. PMID:25752747

  4. Designing clinical trials for amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Jonathan M

    2015-09-01

    Randomized clinical trial (RCT) study design leads to one of the highest levels of evidence, and is a preferred study design over cohort studies, because randomization reduces bias and maximizes the chance that even unknown confounding factors will be balanced between treatment groups. Recent randomized clinical trials and observational studies in amblyopia can be taken together to formulate an evidence-based approach to amblyopia treatment, which is presented in this review. When designing future clinical studies of amblyopia treatment, issues such as regression to the mean, sample size and trial duration must be considered, since each may impact study results and conclusions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Data fraud in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    George, Stephen L; Buyse, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Highly publicized cases of fabrication or falsification of data in clinical trials have occurred in recent years and it is likely that there are additional undetected or unreported cases. We review the available evidence on the incidence of data fraud in clinical trials, describe several prominent cases, present information on motivation and contributing factors and discuss cost-effective ways of early detection of data fraud as part of routine central statistical monitoring of data quality. Adoption of these clinical trial monitoring procedures can identify potential data fraud not detected by conventional on-site monitoring and can improve overall data quality. PMID:25729561

  6. Clinical trials in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Oeser, Clarissa; Lutsar, Irja; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Turner, Mark A; Heath, Paul T; Sharland, Mike

    2013-12-01

    Antibiotic licensing studies remain a problem in neonates. The classical adult clinical syndrome-based licensing studies do not apply to neonates, where sepsis is the most common infection. The main obstacle to conducting neonatal antibiotic trials is a lack of consensus on the definition of neonatal sepsis itself and the selection of appropriate endpoints. This article describes the difficulties of the clinical and laboratory definitions of neonatal sepsis and reviews the varying designs of previous neonatal sepsis trials. The optimal design of future trials of new antibiotics will need to be based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameters, combined with adequately powered clinical studies to determine safety and efficacy.

  7. Informed Consent (Clinical Trials)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Credit: National Cancer Institute Informed consent is a process through which you learn details about the trial before deciding whether to take part. This includes learning about the trial’s purpose and possible risks and ...

  8. Quality Assurance for Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Haworth, Annette; Followill, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative groups, of which the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group is one example, conduct national clinical trials that often involve the use of radiation therapy. In preparation for such a trial, the cooperative group prepares a protocol to define the goals of the trial, the rationale for its design, and the details of the treatment procedure to be followed. The Radiological Physics Center (RPC) is one of several quality assurance (QA) offices that is charged with assuring that participating institutions deliver doses that are clinically consistent and comparable. The RPC does this by conducting a variety of independent audits and credentialing processes. The RPC has compiled data showing that credentialing can help institutions comply with the requirements of a cooperative group clinical protocol. Phantom irradiations have been demonstrated to exercise an institution’s procedures for planning and delivering advanced external beam techniques (1–3). Similarly, RPC data indicate that a rapid review of patient treatment records or planning procedures can improve compliance with clinical trials (4). The experiences of the RPC are presented as examples of the contributions that a national clinical trials QA center can make to cooperative group trials. These experiences illustrate the critical need for comprehensive QA to assure that clinical trials are successful and cost-effective. The RPC is supported by grants CA 10953 and CA 81647 from the National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS. PMID:24392352

  9. Experimental studies: randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Gjorgov, A N

    1998-01-01

    There are two major approaches to medical investigations: observational studies and experimental trials. The classical application of the experimental design to studies of human populations is the randomized clinical trial of the efficacy of a new drug or treatment. A further application of the experimental studies is to the testing of hypotheses about the etiology of a disease, already tested and corroborated from various forms of observational studies. Ethical considerations and requirements for consent of the experimental subjects are of primary concern in the clinical trials, and those concerns set the first and final limits for implementing a trial. General moral principles in research with human and animal beings, defined by the "Nuremberg Code," deal with strict criteria for approval, endorsement and evaluation of a clinical trial.

  10. Clinical Trials, a Healthier Future for All

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Clinical Trials, A Healthier Future for All Past Issues / Fall 2016 Table of Contents Did ... be harmed by, the treatment. Most, but not all, clinical trials in the U.S. are approved and ...

  11. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... and effective in people. What is an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? HIV/AIDS clinical trials help researchers ... to HIV Can anyone participate in an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? It depends on the study. Some ...

  12. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us | En Español OFFERING INFORMATION ON HIV/AIDS TREATMENT, PREVENTION, AND RESEARCH Search Search Search Search Search Menu Home Guidelines Understanding HIV/AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps Home Guidelines Understanding HIV/ ...

  13. Volunteering for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mirken, B

    1999-04-01

    HIV/AIDS researchers are finding it increasingly difficult to recruit volunteers for their studies, and are working on designing studies that are more broadly applicable and palatable to the volunteers. Studies offer both opportunities and risks for people who volunteer. This overview describes the basics of trial design and practice, with the purposes of each trial phase clearly described. Participation requires informed consent, and before entering a study patients should ask, among other things, what side effects they can expect, and who will manage their treatment.

  14. Clinical trials of interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuaki

    2012-08-01

    Interventional oncology has great potential to be a good treatment modality in the field of oncology, because its procedures are minimally invasive and fairly quick. However, except for a few procedures such as percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and trans-catheter arterial chemo-embolization that have been recognized as standard treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma, most procedures have not been established as the standard treatment modality due to the limited number of clinical trials with compelling evidence. There are several common problems when performing clinical trials of interventional oncology. The first is that the outcomes of clinical trials are greatly influenced by the level of technical skill of the physicians. The second is that equipment and devices vary widely in countries and regions, and they also influence the outcomes. The third is that the methodology of clinical trials for techniques such as interventional oncology has not yet been established. The fourth is the difficulty of setting appropriate endpoints; quality of life is suitable for evaluating interventional oncology in palliative care, but it is not easy to set as the endpoint. The fifth is the difficulty of employing a blinded design, because the procedure cannot be performed without the physician's awareness. Despite such difficult situations, many multi-institutional clinical trials of interventional oncology have been carried out in Japan, with some challenging results. Establishing evidence is critical to making interventional oncology the standard treatment. Interventional radiologists should know the importance of clinical trials, and should move ahead in this direction in a step-by-step manner.

  15. Birth Control in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J.; Beyer, B. K.; Chadwick, K.; De Schaepdrijver, L.; Desai, M.; Enright, B.; Foster, W.; Hui, J. Y.; Moffat, G. J.; Tornesi, B.; Van Malderen, K.; Wiesner, L.; Chen, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee sponsored a pharmaceutical industry survey on current industry practices for contraception use during clinical trials. The objectives of the survey were to improve our understanding of the current industry practices for contraception requirements in clinical trials, the governance processes set up to promote consistency and/or compliance with contraception requirements, and the effectiveness of current contraception practices in preventing pregnancies during clinical trials. Opportunities for improvements in current practices were also considered. The survey results from 12 pharmaceutical companies identified significant variability among companies with regard to contraception practices and governance during clinical trials. This variability was due primarily to differences in definitions, areas of scientific uncertainty or misunderstanding, and differences in company approaches to enrollment in clinical trials. The survey also revealed that few companies collected data in a manner that would allow a retrospective understanding of the reasons for failure of birth control during clinical trials. In this article, suggestions are made for topics where regulatory guidance or scientific publications could facilitate best practice. These include provisions for a pragmatic definition of women of childbearing potential, guidance on how animal data can influence the requirements for male and female birth control, evidence-based guidance on birth control and pregnancy testing regimes suitable for low- and high-risk situations, plus practical methods to ascertain the risk of drug-drug interactions with hormonal contraceptives. PMID:27042398

  16. Clinical trial design in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mould, R F

    1979-07-01

    The design of clinical trials in cancer is a subject which features reasonably often among FRCR (Part 1) examination questions, and as such should be of more than passing interest to oncologists. It is also a subject which is gaining in relevance since the number of trials is increasing annually due in part to the many chemotherapeutic regimes which are being proposed. This paper which is based on a lecture given in Cambridge at the Hospital Physicists' Association Annual Conference in September 1978, is intended to act as an introduction to clinical trial design. References for further reading are given and, in particular, the extensive report on randomised clinical trials to the Medical Research Council's Leukaemia Steering Committee (Peto et al., 1977, 1978) is recommended.

  17. Malaria Diagnostics in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sean C.; Shott, Joseph P.; Parikh, Sunil; Etter, Paige; Prescott, William R.; Stewart, V. Ann

    2013-01-01

    Malaria diagnostics are widely used in epidemiologic studies to investigate natural history of disease and in drug and vaccine clinical trials to exclude participants or evaluate efficacy. The Malaria Laboratory Network (MLN), managed by the Office of HIV/AIDS Network Coordination, is an international working group with mutual interests in malaria disease and diagnosis and in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome clinical trials. The MLN considered and studied the wide array of available malaria diagnostic tests for their suitability for screening trial participants and/or obtaining study endpoints for malaria clinical trials, including studies of HIV/malaria co-infection and other malaria natural history studies. The MLN provides recommendations on microscopy, rapid diagnostic tests, serologic tests, and molecular assays to guide selection of the most appropriate test(s) for specific research objectives. In addition, this report provides recommendations regarding quality management to ensure reproducibility across sites in clinical trials. Performance evaluation, quality control, and external quality assessment are critical processes that must be implemented in all clinical trials using malaria tests. PMID:24062484

  18. Malaria diagnostics in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean C; Shott, Joseph P; Parikh, Sunil; Etter, Paige; Prescott, William R; Stewart, V Ann

    2013-11-01

    Malaria diagnostics are widely used in epidemiologic studies to investigate natural history of disease and in drug and vaccine clinical trials to exclude participants or evaluate efficacy. The Malaria Laboratory Network (MLN), managed by the Office of HIV/AIDS Network Coordination, is an international working group with mutual interests in malaria disease and diagnosis and in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome clinical trials. The MLN considered and studied the wide array of available malaria diagnostic tests for their suitability for screening trial participants and/or obtaining study endpoints for malaria clinical trials, including studies of HIV/malaria co-infection and other malaria natural history studies. The MLN provides recommendations on microscopy, rapid diagnostic tests, serologic tests, and molecular assays to guide selection of the most appropriate test(s) for specific research objectives. In addition, this report provides recommendations regarding quality management to ensure reproducibility across sites in clinical trials. Performance evaluation, quality control, and external quality assessment are critical processes that must be implemented in all clinical trials using malaria tests.

  19. SMi's Conducting Clinical Trials in Europe.

    PubMed

    Jago, Charlotte

    2009-12-01

    The Conducting Clinical Trials in Europe meeting, held in London, included topics covering new developments in the field of clinical trials and recommendations on how to best conduct a trial. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the state of affairs of trials in Europe, conducting trials in emerging markets, strategies for improving trials, trial design options, peri-approval and pediatric trials, and the role of key players, such as physicians. Company perspectives from Pfizer Inc and Nycomed are also included.

  20. Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Information about actively enrolling, ongoing, and completed clinical trials of cancer prevention, early detection, and supportive care, including phase I, II, and III agent and action trials and clinical trials management. |

  1. Clinical Trials - Participants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch: Addictive Behaviors : Carl Lejuez, Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Maryland, College Park, and Director of the Center for Addictions, Personality & Emotional Research, discusses translational research — studying the basic internal processes ...

  2. Clinical trials. A pending subject.

    PubMed

    Gil-Extremera, B; Jiménez-López, P; Mediavilla-García, J D

    2017-07-31

    Clinical trials are essential tools for the progress of clinical medicine in its diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. Since the first trial in 1948, which related tobacco use with lung cancer, there have been more than 150,000 clinical trials to date in various areas (paediatrics, cardiology, oncology, endocrinology, etc.). This article highlights the importance for all physicians to participate, over the course of their professional career, in a clinical trial, due to the inherent benefits for patients, the progress of medicine and for curricular prestige. The authors have created a synthesis of their experience with clinical trials on hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia and ischaemic heart disease over the course of almost 3 decades. Furthermore, a brief reference has been made to the characteristics of a phase I unit, as well as to a number of research studies currently underway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical trials in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Badesch, D B

    1997-01-01

    Progress in treatment of pulmonary hypertension has been impaired by the lack of formal clinical trials. This is now beginning to change, and the impact on our approach to treating patients with pulmonary hypertension in substantial. As with other relatively uncommon medical disorders, randomized, controlled, multi-center trials are needed to assess the safety and efficacy of potential therapeutic modalities. Treatments showing promise at the level of small pilot studies within a single center should be studied more rigorously.

  4. The ethics of clinical trials.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, J K

    1975-01-01

    In summary, the discussion by Professors Helmchen and Müller-Oerlinghausen of the morality of clinical trials has emphasized a point that is frequently overlooked. It is an essential to consider those situations in which it might be unethical not to conduct a trial as it is to be concerned about the ways in which trials might restrict the rights of the individuals taking part in them. They and I have dealt mainly with the first of these two issues because it has been relatively neglected. The second is, of course, equally important and has rightly received much attention. Both matters deserve further public discussion. PMID:775090

  5. The ethics of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Wing, J K

    1975-12-01

    In summary, the discussion by Professors Helmchen and Müller-Oerlinghausen of the morality of clinical trials has emphasized a point that is frequently overlooked. It is an essential to consider those situations in which it might be unethical not to conduct a trial as it is to be concerned about the ways in which trials might restrict the rights of the individuals taking part in them. They and I have dealt mainly with the first of these two issues because it has been relatively neglected. The second is, of course, equally important and has rightly received much attention. Both matters deserve further public discussion.

  6. Medical coding in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Babre, Deven

    2010-01-01

    Data generated in all clinical trial are recorded on the data collection instrument Case report Form / Electronic Case Report Form by investigators located at various sites in various countries. In multicentric clinical trials since different investigator or medically qualified experts are from different sites / centers recording the medical term(s) uniformly is a big challenge. Medical coders from clinical data management team process these terms and perform medical coding. Medical coding is performed to categorize the medical terms reported appropriately so that they can be analyzed/reviewed. This article describes process which is used for medical coding in clinical data management and two most commonly used medical dictionaries MedDRA and WHO-DDE in brief. It is expected to help medical coders to understand the process of medical coding in clinical data management. Few common issues which the medical coder faces while performing medical coding, are also highlighted.

  7. Clinical Trials in a Dish

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, David G.; Blinova, Ksenia

    2017-01-01

    Clinical trials ‘in a dish’ involve testing medical therapies for safety or effectiveness in the laboratory with human tissue. This has become possible owing to recent biotechnology advances including induced pluripotent stem cells, organs-on-a-chip, and whole-genome sequencing. We provide here an overview of the landscape and highlight steps the FDA is taking to advance the science of clinical trials in a dish and to support the development and validation of new regulatory paradigms to assess drug safety using these new technologies. PMID:27876286

  8. [Reading a clinical trial report].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, J F; Chassany, O

    2000-04-15

    To improve medical knowledge by reading clinical trial reports it is necessary to check for the respect of the methodological rules, and to analyze and criticize the results. A control group and a randomisation are always necessary. Double blind assessment, sample size calculation, intention to treat analysis, a unique primary end point are also important. The conclusions of the trial are valid only for the population included and the clinical signification of the results, depending on the control treatment, has to be evaluated. Respect of the reading rules is necessary to assess the reliability of the conclusions, in order to promote evidence-based practice.

  9. Clinical trials for predictive medicine.

    PubMed

    Simon, Richard

    2012-11-10

    Developments in biotechnology and genomics are providing a biological basis for the heterogeneity of clinical course and response to treatment that have long been apparent to clinicians. The ability to molecularly characterize human diseases presents new opportunities to develop more effective treatments and new challenges for the design and analysis of clinical trials. In oncology, treatment of broad populations with regimens that benefit a minority of patients is less economically sustainable with expensive molecularly targeted therapeutics. The established molecular heterogeneity of human diseases requires the development of new paradigms for the design and analysis of randomized clinical trials as a reliable basis for predictive medicine. We review prospective designs for the development of new therapeutics and predictive biomarkers to inform their use. We cover designs for a wide range of settings. At one extreme is the development of a new drug with a single candidate biomarker and strong biological evidence that marker negative patients are unlikely to benefit from the new drug. At the other extreme are Phase III clinical trials involving both genome-wide discovery of a predictive classifier and internal validation of that classifier. We have outlined a prediction-based approach to the analysis of randomized clinical trials that both preserves the Type I error and provides a reliable internally validated basis for predicting which patients are most likely or unlikely to benefit from the new regimen.

  10. Achieving consensus for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Blakeley, Jaishri O.; Dombi, Eva; Fisher, Michael J.; Hanemann, C. Oliver; Walsh, Karin S.; Wolters, Pamela L.; Widemann, Brigitte C.

    2013-01-01

    The neurofibromatoses (NF)—including neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2), and schwannomatosis—are related tumor-suppressor syndromes characterized by a predisposition to multiple tumor types and other disease manifestations, which often result in functional disability, reduced quality of life, pain, and, in some cases, malignancy. With increasing knowledge of the biology and pathogenesis of NF, clinical trials with targeted agents directed at NF tumors have become available. Most clinical trials for patients with NF have used designs and endpoints similar to oncology trials. However, differences in the disease manifestations and natural history of NF (compared to cancers) require the development of new designs and endpoints to perform meaningful NF clinical trials. The Response Evaluation in Neurofibromatosis and Schwannomatosis (REiNS) International Collaboration was established in 2011 at the Children's Tumor Foundation meeting to achieve consensus within the NF community about the design of future clinical trials, with a specific emphasis on endpoints. The REiNS Collaboration includes 7 working groups that focus on imaging of tumor response; functional, visual, patient-reported, and neurocognitive outcomes; whole-body MRI; and disease biomarkers. This supplement includes the first series of recommendations by the REiNS Collaboration. The hope is that these recommendations will be used by members of the group and by researchers outside of the REiNS International Collaboration to standardize the measurement of outcomes and thus improve clinical trials for patients with NF. Ultimately, we plan to engage industry partners and national regulatory agencies in this process to facilitate the approval of drugs for patients with NF. PMID:24249801

  11. Randomized phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sin-Ho; Sargent, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, Phase II trials have been conducted as single-arm trials to compare the response probabilities between an experimental therapy and a historical control. Historical control data, however, often have a small sample size, are collected from a different patient population, or use a different response assessment method, so that a direct comparison between a historical control and an experimental therapy may be severely biased. Randomized Phase II trials entering patients prospectively to both experimental and control arms have been proposed to avoid any bias in such cases. The small sample sizes for typical Phase II clinical trials imply that the use of exact statistical methods for their design and analysis is appropriate. In this article, we propose two-stage randomized Phase II trials based on Fisher's exact test, which does not require specification of the response probability of the control arm for testing. Through numerical studies, we observe that the proposed method controls the type I error accurately and maintains a high power. If we specify the response probabilities of the two arms under the alternative hypothesis, we can identify good randomized Phase II trial designs by adopting the Simon's minimax and optimal design concepts that were developed for single-arm Phase II trials.

  12. Stopping clinical trials by design.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, John

    2004-11-01

    Before any clinical trial begins, a detailed trial protocol must be prepared. The authority of the trial results will depend on the quality of this document. In many protocols, a key component is a plan for a series of interim analyses of the accumulating trial data, and a 'stopping rule' based on them. Such a rule might be intended to prevent participants from continuing to receive a drug that already seems to be unsafe, or to allow a successful drug to become generally available as soon as sufficient evidence of its advantages has been collected. There has been considerable misunderstanding of these rules, and controversies associated with them. Here, I discuss why this might be, and what can be done to promote their successful and beneficial use in the future.

  13. Economic endpoints in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Cook, John; Drummond, Michael; Heyse, Joseph F

    2004-04-01

    Healthcare decision makers are increasingly requesting information on the cost and cost-effectiveness of new medicines at the time of product launch. In order to provide this information, data on healthcare resource utilization and, in some cases, costs, may be collected in clinical trials. In this paper, we discuss some of the issues statisticians need to address when it is appropriate to include these economic endpoints in the trial. Several design issues are discussed, including the alternative types of and methods for collecting economic endpoint data, sample size and generalizability. Alternative approaches in the analysis of resource utilization, cost and cost-effectiveness are also presented. Finally, several of the analytic approaches are applied to actual data from a clinical trial.

  14. Clinical Trials in Your Community

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) is a national network of investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions, and other organizations. NCORP conducts multi-site cancer clinical trials and studies in diverse populations in community-based healthcare systems across the United States and Puerto Rico.

  15. Clinical trials on AIDS start.

    PubMed

    A 6-month clinical trial in the Philippines sought to determine the efficacy of coconut oil and of "monolaurin," a coconut oil byproduct, in killing HIV by breaking down its coating. This research is based on the theory that medium-chain fatty acids, like monolaurin, can have this effect on certain viruses. The trial involves 12 women and 3 men in the early stage of HIV infection. 10 patients will take different doses of monolaurin, and 5 will consume coconut oil. It is hypothesized that the regimen will lead to higher CD4 counts and a lower viral load. The trial was almost abandoned because it received only lukewarm approval from the Health Secretary.

  16. Clinical Trials in Noninfectious Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jane S.; Knickelbein, Jared E.; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Sen, H. Nida

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of noninfectious uveitis continues to remain a challenge for many ophthalmologists. Historically, clinical trials in uveitis have been sparse, and thus, most treatment decisions have largely been based on clinical experience and consensus guidelines. The current treatment paradigm favors initiation then tapering of corticosteroids with addition of steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents for persistence or recurrence of disease. Unfortunately, in spite of a multitude of highly unfavorable systemic effects, corticosteroids are still regarded as the mainstay of treatment for many patients with chronic and refractory noninfectious uveitis. However, with the success of other conventional and biologic immunomodulatory agents in treating systemic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, interest in targeted treatment strategies for uveitis has been renewed. Multiple clinical trials on steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents, biologic agents, intraocular corticosteroid implants, and topical ophthalmic solutions have already been completed, and many more are ongoing. This review discusses the results and implications of these clinical trials investigating both alternative and novel treatment options for noninfectious uveitis. PMID:26035763

  17. The ethics of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Nardini, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have prevailed over clinical judgement, case reports, and observational studies and became the gold evidential standard in medicine. Furthermore, during the same time frame, RCTs became a crucial part of the regulatory process whereby a new therapeutic can gain access to the drug market. Today, clinical trials are large and tightly regulated enterprises that have to comply with ethical requirements while maintaining high epistemic standards, a balance that becomes increasingly difficult as the research questions become more sophisticated. In this review, the author will discuss some of the most important ethical issues surrounding RCTs, with an eye to the most recent debates and the context of oncological research in particular. PMID:24482672

  18. Gatekeepers for pragmatic clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Whicher, Danielle M; Miller, Jennifer E; Dunham, Kelly M; Joffe, Steven

    2015-10-01

    To successfully implement a pragmatic clinical trial, investigators need access to numerous resources, including financial support, institutional infrastructure (e.g. clinics, facilities, staff), eligible patients, and patient data. Gatekeepers are people or entities who have the ability to allow or deny access to the resources required to support the conduct of clinical research. Based on this definition, gatekeepers relevant to the US clinical research enterprise include research sponsors, regulatory agencies, payers, health system and other organizational leadership, research team leadership, human research protections programs, advocacy and community groups, and clinicians. This article provides a framework to help guide gatekeepers' decision-making related to the use of resources for pragmatic clinical trials. Relevant ethical considerations for gatekeepers include (1) concern for the interests of individuals, groups, and communities affected by the gatekeepers' decisions, including protection from harm and maximization of benefits; (2) advancement of organizational mission and values; and (3) stewardship of financial, human, and other organizational resources. Separate from these ethical considerations, gatekeepers' actions will be guided by relevant federal, state, and local regulations. This framework also suggests that to further enhance the legitimacy of their decision-making, gatekeepers should adopt transparent processes that engage relevant stakeholders when feasible and appropriate. We apply this framework to the set of gatekeepers responsible for making decisions about resources necessary for pragmatic clinical trials in the United States, describing the relevance of the criteria in different situations and pointing out where conflicts among the criteria and relevant regulations may affect decision-making. Recognition of the complex set of considerations that should inform decision-making will guide gatekeepers in making justifiable choices regarding

  19. Clinical Trials in Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    NARAYAN, RAJ K.; MICHEL, MARY ELLEN; Ansell, Beth; Baethmann, Alex; Biegon, Anat; Bracken, Michael B.; Bullock, M. Ross; Choi, Sung C.; Clifton, Guy L.; Contant, Charles F.; Coplin, William M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Ghajar, Jamshid; Grady, Sean M.; Grossman, Robert G.; Hall, Edward D.; Heetderks, William; Hovda, David A.; Jallo, Jack; Katz, Russell L.; Knoller, Nachshon; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Maas, Andrew I.; Majde, Jeannine; Marion, Donald W.; Marmarou, Anthony; Marshall, Lawrence F.; McIntosh, Tracy K.; Miller, Emmy; Mohberg, Noel; Muizelaar, J. Paul; Pitts, Lawrence H.; Quinn, Peter; Riesenfeld, Gad; Robertson, Claudia S.; Strauss, Kenneth I.; Teasdale, Graham; Temkin, Nancy; Tuma, Ronald; Wade, Charles; Walker, Michael D.; Weinrich, Michael; Whyte, John; Wilberger, Jack; Young, A. Byron; Yurkewicz, Lorraine

    2006-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major public health problem globally. In the United States the incidence of closed head injuries admitted to hospitals is conservatively estimated to be 200 per 100,000 population, and the incidence of penetrating head injury is estimated to be 12 per 100,000, the highest of any developed country in the world. This yields an approximate number of 500,000 new cases each year, a sizeable proportion of which demonstrate signficant long-term disabilities. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of proven therapies for this disease. For a variety of reasons, clinical trials for this condition have been difficult to design and perform. Despite promising pre-clinical data, most of the trials that have been performed in recent years have failed to demonstrate any significant improvement in outcomes. The reasons for these failures have not always been apparent and any insights gained were not always shared. It was therefore feared that we were running the risk of repeating our mistakes. Recognizing the importance of TBI, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) sponsored a workshop that brought together experts from clinical, research, and pharmaceutical backgrounds. This workshop proved to be very informative and yielded many insights into previous and future TBI trials. This paper is an attempt to summarize the key points made at the workshop. It is hoped that these lessons will enhance the planning and design of future efforts in this important field of research. PMID:12042091

  20. [Internet use in clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Refolo, P; Sacchini, D; Minacori, R; Spagnolo, A G

    2014-01-01

    Recruiting patients is a critical point of today's clinical research and, along the years, several solutions have been proposed, even if their efficacy seems to be doubtful. On the other hand, nowadays, Internet represents a great opportunity for improving clinical trial recruitments. Nevertheless, on-line recruitment services (e-recruitment) could ensure some advantages (such as facilitating interaction between supply and demand of clinical research, time and money savings/optimizations, data entry errors reduction), but also raise some issues (such as those related to sampling, information, consent, real identity of participants and risks for data breaches). The article debates on the difficulties to recruit patients for clinical research, in general, and e-recruitment particularly, discussing some ethical issues raised by internet enrolment.

  1. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials.

  2. Potential bias in ophthalmic pharmaceutical clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Paul

    2008-01-01

    To make clinicians aware of potential sources of error in ophthalmic pharmaceutical clinical trials that can lead to erroneous interpretation of results, a critical review of the study design of various pharmaceutical ophthalmic clinical trials was completed. Discrepancies as a result of study shortcomings may explain observed differences between reported ophthalmic trial data and observed clinical results. PMID:19668731

  3. Nurses' unique roles in randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sadler, G R; Lantz, J M; Fullerton, J T; Dault, Y

    1999-01-01

    Nurses are in an ideal position to promote patients' awareness of the role played by clinical trials in the advancement of health science and the subsequent improvement of patient care. The history of clinical trials and the four phases of clinical trials are described. Nurses' professional roles in clinical trial participation, such as helping the patient to identify open clinical trials and acting as clinical interpreter and patient advocate during the patient's participation in a trial, are detailed. Professional considerations that must be addressed by the nurse are reviewed and include ensuring that the trial has received approval from an Institutional Review Board for the participation of human subjects; that the responsibilities of participation are congruent with the nurse's personal values and workplace obligations; and that once engaged, the nurse can make the commitment to sustain participation in the trial. Most important, the nurse must keep the patient's needs and values uppermost in mind during the evaluation of potential clinical trials. Nurses have a critical role to play in the promotion of clinical trials, the recruitment of patients for clinical trial participation, the education of the patient and family, and the clinical care and support of patients throughout their participation in clinical trials.

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides Under Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Greber, Katarzyna E; Dawgul, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Today microbial drug resistance has become a serious problem not only within inpatient setting but also within outpatient setting. Repeated intake and unnecessary usage of antibiotics as well as the transfer of resistance genes are the most important factors that make the microorganisms resistant to conventional antibiotics. A large number of antimicrobials successfully used for prophylaxis and therapeutic purposes have now become ineffective [1, 2]. Therefore, new molecules are being studied to be used in the treatment of various diseases. Some of these molecules are structural compounds based on a combination of peptides, for example, naturally occurring endogenous peptide antibiotics and their synthetic analogues or molecules designed de novo using QSAR (quantitative structureproperty relationships)-based methods [3]. Trying to exploit numerous advantages of antimicrobial peptides such as high potency and selectivity, broad range of targets, potentially low toxicity and low accumulation in tissues, pharmaceutical industry aims to develop them as commercially available drugs and appropriate clinical trials are being conducted [4]. In this paper we define clinical trials steps and describe current status of several antimicrobial peptides under clinical development as well as briefly depict peptide drug formulation.

  5. Credentialing for participation in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Followill, David S.; Urie, Marcia; Galvin, James M.; Ulin, Kenneth; Xiao, Ying; FitzGerald, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) clinical cooperative groups have been instrumental over the past 50 years in developing clinical trials and evidence-based clinical trial processes for improvements in patient care. The cooperative groups are undergoing a transformation process to launch, conduct, and publish clinical trials more rapidly. Institutional participation in clinical trials can be made more efficient and include the expansion of relationships with international partners. This paper reviews the current processes that are in use in radiation therapy trials and the importance of maintaining effective credentialing strategies to assure the quality of the outcomes of clinical trials. The paper offers strategies to streamline and harmonize credentialing tools and processes moving forward as the NCI undergoes transformative change in the conduct of clinical trials. PMID:23272300

  6. Clinical trials and gender medicine.

    PubMed

    Cassese, Mariarita; Zuber, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    Women use more medicines than men because they fall ill more often and suffer more from chronic diseases, but also because women pay more attention to their health and have more consciousness and care about themselves. Although medicines can have different effects on women and men, women still represent a small percentage in the first phases of trials (22%) which are essential to verify drugs dosage, side effects, and safety. Even though women are more present in trials, studies results are not presented with a gender approach. This situation is due to educational, social, ethical and economical factors. The scientific research must increase feminine presence in clinical trials in order to be equal and correct, and all the key stakeholder should be involved in this process. We still have a long way to cover and it doesn't concern only women but also children and old people. The aim is to have a medicine not only illness-focused but patient-focused: a medicine able to take into consideration all the patient characteristics and so to produce a really personalized therapy. What above described is part of the reasons why in 2005 was founded the National Observatory for Women's Health (Osservatorio Nazionale sulla Salute della Donna, ONDa) which promotes a gender health awareness and culture in Italy, at all the levels of the civil and scientific society.

  7. Enhancing Adherence in Clinical Exercise Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Heather A.; Blair, Steven N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses exercise adherence from the perspective of adhering to an exercise treatment in a controlled trial, focusing on: adherence (to intervention and measurement); the development of randomized clinical trials; exemplary randomized clinical trials in exercise science (exercise training studies and physical activity interventions); and study…

  8. Tuberculosis vaccines in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Rosalind; McShane, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Effective prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccination is a key strategy for controlling the global TB epidemic. The partial effectiveness of the existing TB vaccine, bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG), suggests effective vaccination is possible and highlights the need for an improved vaccination strategy. Clinical trials are evaluating both modifications to the existing BCG immunization methods and also novel TB vaccines, designed to replace or boost BCG. Candidate vaccines in clinical development include live mycobacterial vaccines designed to replace BCG, subunit vaccines designed to boost BCG and therapeutic vaccines designed as an adjunct to chemotherapy. There is a great need for validated animal models, identification of immunological biomarkers of protection and field sites with the capacity for large-scale efficacy testing in order to develop and license a novel TB vaccine or regimen. PMID:21604985

  9. [Practice and thought for quality control of drug clinical trial institution for clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Wu, Ping; Li, Yong; Lian, Feng-mei; Liu, Ping; Qiao, Jie

    2014-12-01

    The quality control of new drug cilnical trial is the effective guaranty for the pharmaceutical safety and effective after available on market. Enhancing the inspection and quality control of new drug clinical trials provide the crucial importance to achieve a persistent profitable standard. This paper mainly discussed the problems of current clinical trials based on annual check of drug clinical trial institution.

  10. Hyperbaric Oxygenation (HBO) Clinical Trials: A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    16 Table 3. HBO Clinical Trials: Multiple Sclerosis ..... 17 Table 4. HBO Clinical Trials: Diabetic Foot Ulcers.. .17 Table 5. HBO...treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) (table 3), and two reported on diabetic foot ulcers (table 4). The remaining seven reported on seven different...group of MS trials is convincing that HBO was not effective for MS. The diabetic foot ulcer trials are difficult to compare. They used different HBO

  11. Systematic characterization of gastrointestinal clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Magdalena; Hsieh, Antony; Hsiehchen, David

    2016-05-01

    Clinical guidelines are commonly based on inadequate evidence, suggesting deficiencies in the present portfolio of clinical research. To investigate characteristics of clinical trials examining gastrointestinal (GI) diseases registered in ClinicalTrials.gov. A cross-sectional analysis of 13,647 GI trials and 111,535 non-GI trials initiated between January 1997 and September 2013 was performed. Entries were sorted by operational status, purpose, interventions, trial design, and epochs to identify trends and interactions in trial properties. The global production of GI trials has remained static in recent years and a majority of research efforts are focused on a few diseases. While GI trials are generally produced by highly populated US states and countries, they are also seldom larger than 500 patients. The likelihood of using data monitoring committees, randomization, and double blinding in GI trials has increased over time, though a substantial fraction of GI trials still do not employ rigorous trial designs. While levels of GI trials correlate with disease burden, the explained variance of GI trials by disease burden worldwide is poor. GI trials are chiefly concentrated in few diseases and highly populated regions, exhibit heterogeneous trends and methodologies, and are sensitive to disease burdens, though more so within North America than worldwide. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The state of infectious diseases clinical trials: a systematic review of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Neela D; Pfeiffer, Christopher D; Horton, John R; Chiswell, Karen; Tasneem, Asba; Tsalik, Ephraim L

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of clinical trials informing specific questions faced by infectious diseases (ID) specialists. The ClinicalTrials.gov registry offers an opportunity to evaluate the ID clinical trials portfolio. We examined 40,970 interventional trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov from 2007-2010, focusing on study conditions and interventions to identify ID-related trials. Relevance to ID was manually confirmed for each programmatically identified trial, yielding 3570 ID trials and 37,400 non-ID trials for analysis. The number of ID trials was similar to the number of trials identified as belonging to cardiovascular medicine (n = 3437) or mental health (n = 3695) specialties. Slightly over half of ID trials were treatment-oriented trials (53%, vs. 77% for non-ID trials) followed by prevention (38%, vs. 8% in non-ID trials). ID trials tended to be larger than those of other specialties, with a median enrollment of 125 subjects (interquartile range [IQR], 45-400) vs. 60 (IQR, 30-160) for non-ID trials. Most ID studies are randomized (73%) but nonblinded (56%). Industry was the funding source in 51% of ID trials vs. 10% that were primarily NIH-funded. HIV-AIDS trials constitute the largest subset of ID trials (n = 815 [23%]), followed by influenza vaccine (n = 375 [11%]), and hepatitis C (n = 339 [9%]) trials. Relative to U.S. and global mortality rates, HIV-AIDS and hepatitis C virus trials are over-represented, whereas lower respiratory tract infection trials are under-represented in this large sample of ID clinical trials. This work is the first to characterize ID clinical trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, providing a framework to discuss prioritization, methodology, and policy.

  13. Clinical trial design in feedlots.

    PubMed

    Perino, L J; Apley, M D

    1998-07-01

    As mentioned at the outset, the ultimate test of a product or procedure must be under field conditions and is best obtained from controlled studies of field use. Economic justification for use is based on this information. Each producer places a different value on attributable benefits such as improved health or growth performance. These values also change with fluctuating market values of cattle and feed. This makes determining the cost-benefit ratio of any procedure or product a moving target. Addressing this issue requires the clinically relevant and statistically significant differences that practitioners should be able to generate if they follow the guidelines presented here. There already exists a number of unusable studies. We suggest that those interested in undertaking this challenge be uncompromising in their experimental design. To be reliable, studies must follow the recommendations outlined above. Without sound field trial design and execution which ensures that the information is reliable and statistical significance which ensures that the differences are real, clinical outcomes cannot be extrapolated to economic justification. Any other course leads to making less than optimal recommendations on product use because of a lack of clinically relevant information.

  14. [Profile of clinical trials enrolling Brazilian children].

    PubMed

    Vieira, Jean Mendes de Lucena; Lima, Elisangela da Costa; Land, Marcelo Gerardin Poirot; Ventura, Miriam; Coelho, Helena Lutescia Luna

    2017-06-12

    This study aimed to characterize the clinical trials with medicines enrolling Brazilian children and adolescents, registered in the databases of Clinical Trials and the Brazilian Clinical Trials Network (ReBEC) from 1994 to 2014. Only 462 clinical trials enrolled Brazilian children and adolescents. There was an increase in registrations beginning in 2003, with an important drop in 2011. Among these trials, 35.5% were hosted in Brazil. The international clinical trials were mostly conducted by North American companies. In both cases, multinational industry was the principal source of funding. The clinical trials were predominantly phase III with injectable and solid oral pharmaceutical forms of antiviral drugs. Domestic clinical trials showed wider variation in the pharmaceutical forms and higher percentage of liquid formulations, when compared to the international trials. In addition to heavy external dependence for conducting clinical trials, the study emphasized the challenge for pediatric care in Brazil, which presents epidemiological peculiarities in an environment prone to the use of unlicensed medicines for children.

  15. Adaptive clinical trial designs in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yong; Lee, J. Jack

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive designs have become popular in clinical trial and drug development. Unlike traditional trial designs, adaptive designs use accumulating data to modify the ongoing trial without undermining the integrity and validity of the trial. As a result, adaptive designs provide a flexible and effective way to conduct clinical trials. The designs have potential advantages of improving the study power, reducing sample size and total cost, treating more patients with more effective treatments, identifying efficacious drugs for specific subgroups of patients based on their biomarker profiles, and shortening the time for drug development. In this article, we review adaptive designs commonly used in clinical trials and investigate several aspects of the designs, including the dose-finding scheme, interim analysis, adaptive randomization, biomarker-guided randomization, and seamless designs. For illustration, we provide examples of real trials conducted with adaptive designs. We also discuss practical issues from the perspective of using adaptive designs in oncology trials. PMID:25811018

  16. Spine device clinical trials: design and sponsorship.

    PubMed

    Cher, Daniel J; Capobianco, Robyn A

    2015-05-01

    Multicenter prospective randomized clinical trials represent the best evidence to support the safety and effectiveness of medical devices. Industry sponsorship of multicenter clinical trials is purported to lead to bias. To determine what proportion of spine device-related trials are industry-sponsored and the effect of industry sponsorship on trial design. Analysis of data from a publicly available clinical trials database. Clinical trials of spine devices registered on ClinicalTrials.gov, a publicly accessible trial database, were evaluated in terms of design, number and location of study centers, and sample size. The relationship between trial design characteristics and study sponsorship was evaluated using logistic regression and general linear models. One thousand six hundred thrity-eight studies were retrieved from ClinicalTrials.gov using the search term "spine." Of the 367 trials that focused on spine surgery, 200 (54.5%) specifically studied devices for spine surgery and 167 (45.5%) focused on other issues related to spine surgery. Compared with nondevice trials, device trials were far more likely to be sponsored by the industry (74% vs. 22.2%, odds ratio (OR) 9.9 [95% confidence interval 6.1-16.3]). Industry-sponsored device trials were more likely multicenter (80% vs. 29%, OR 9.8 [4.8-21.1]) and had approximately four times as many participating study centers (p<.0001) and larger sample sizes. There were very few US-based multicenter randomized trials of spine devices not sponsored by the industry. Most device-related spine research is industry-sponsored. Multicenter trials are more likely to be industry-sponsored. These findings suggest that previously published studies showing larger effect sizes in industry-sponsored vs. nonindustry-sponsored studies may be biased as a result of failure to take into account the marked differences in design and purpose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Situation analysis for drug clinical trial institutions].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin-Ying; Wu, Ping; Wang, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Drug clinical trial is an important link in the chain of new drug research and development. The results of drug discovery and development directly depend on the extent of standardization of clinical trials. Therefore, improving the quality of drug clinical trials is of great importance, and drug clinical trial institutions play a crucial role in the quality management of drug clinical trials. After years of development, the overall level of drug clinical trials has advanced rapidly in China, and a large number of clinical trials of traditional Chinese medicine have also been carried out. However, there is still a big gap between our country and developed countries. Therefore, for the construction and management of Chinese drug clinical trial institutions, there is still a long way to go. This study aims to analyze the current development of drug clinical trial institutions in China and explore the existing problems from three aspects, including current situations of institutional organization and management, regional and professional distributions, and quality control. And some suggestions are put forward finally, including support of traditional Chinese medicine, introduction of drug-risk management system, and construction of information management.

  18. Enhancing clinical evidence by proactively building quality into clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Meeker-O'Connell, Ann; Glessner, Coleen; Behm, Mark; Mulinde, Jean; Roach, Nancy; Sweeney, Fergus; Tenaerts, Pamela; Landray, Martin J

    2016-08-01

    Stakeholders across the clinical trial enterprise have expressed concern that the current clinical trial enterprise is unsustainable. The cost and complexity of trials have continued to increase, threatening our ability to generate reliable evidence essential for making appropriate decisions concerning the benefits and harms associated with clinical interventions. Overcoming this inefficiency rests on improving protocol design, trial planning, and quality oversight. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative convened a project to evaluate methods to prospectively build quality into the scientific and operational design of clinical trials ("quality-by-design"), such that trials are feasible to conduct and important errors are prevented rather than remediated. A working group evaluated aspects of trial design and oversight and developed the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative quality-by-design principles document, outlining a series of factors generally relevant to the reliability of trial conclusions and to patient safety. These principles were then applied and further refined during a series of hands-on workshops to evaluate their utility in facilitating proactive, cross-functional dialogue, and decision-making about trial design and planning. Following these workshops, independent qualitative interviews were conducted with 19 workshop attendees to explore the potential challenges for implementing a quality-by-design approach to clinical trials. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative project team subsequently developed recommendations and an online resource guide to support implementation of this approach. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative quality-by-design principles provide a framework for assuring that clinical trials adequately safeguard participants and provide reliable information on which to make decisions on the effects of treatments. The quality-by-design workshops highlighted the value of active discussions incorporating the

  19. International Clinical Trial Day and clinical trials in Ethiopia and Africa.

    PubMed

    Fekadu, Abebaw; Teferra, Solomon; Hailu, Asrat; Gebre-Mariam, Tsige; Addissie, Adamu; Deressa, Wakgari; Yimer, Getnet; Reja, Ahmed

    2014-12-19

    Low income countries like Ethiopia are underrepresented in clinical research. As a major public commitment to clinical research, Ethiopia celebrated the International Clinical Trial Day (ICTD) for the first time on 20 May 2014 under the auspices of Addis Ababa University. The motto for the day was 'Clinical Trials for Excellence in Patient Care'. The celebration offered an opportunity to inform academic staff, researchers, students and the leadership about clinical trials being conducted and to discuss the future of clinical trials in the country. Although clear challenges to the conduct of trials abound, clinical trials registered from Ethiopia in trial registration databases is increasing. Cross-country collaborations, international funding support, motivation of academic staff to conduct clinical trials and the commitment and engagement of the leadership in research are all improving. The overall impact of clinical trials is also encouraging. For example, some of the trials conducted in Ethiopia have informed treatment guidelines. However, administrative capacity, research infrastructure as well as financial support remain weak. There is a need for enhanced university-industry linkage and translation of research findings into locally relevant evidence. Ethiopia, as well as the whole of Africa, has an unparalleled opportunity to lead the way in clinical trials, given its prospect of development and the need to have locally relevant evidence for its growing population. In this commentary we reflect on the celebration of ICTD, the status and opportunities for conducting clinical trials and the way forward for facilitating clinical trials in Ethiopia and Africa.

  20. Trial analytics--a tool for clinical trial management.

    PubMed

    Bose, Anindya; Das, Suman

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged timelines and large expenses associated with clinical trials have prompted a new focus on improving the operational efficiency of clinical trials by use of Clinical Trial Management Systems (CTMS) in order to improve managerial control in trial conduct. However, current CTMS systems are not able to meet the expectations due to various shortcomings like inability of timely reporting and trend visualization within/beyond an organization. To overcome these shortcomings of CTMS, clinical researchers can apply a business intelligence (BI) framework to create Clinical Research Intelligence (CLRI) for optimization of data collection and analytics. This paper proposes the usage of an innovative and collaborative visualization tool (CTA) as CTMS "add-on" to help overwhelm these deficiencies of traditional CTMS, with suitable examples.

  1. The Quality of Registration of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Viergever, Roderik F.; Ghersi, Davina

    2011-01-01

    Background Lack of transparency in clinical trial conduct, publication bias and selective reporting bias are still important problems in medical research. Through clinical trials registration, it should be possible to take steps towards resolving some of these problems. However, previous evaluations of registered records of clinical trials have shown that registered information is often incomplete and non-meaningful. If these studies are accurate, this negates the possible benefits of registration of clinical trials. Methods and Findings A 5% sample of records of clinical trials that were registered between 17 June 2008 and 17 June 2009 was taken from the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) database and assessed for the presence of contact information, the presence of intervention specifics in drug trials and the quality of primary and secondary outcome reporting. 731 records were included. More than half of the records were registered after recruitment of the first participant. The name of a contact person was available in 94.4% of records from non-industry funded trials and 53.7% of records from industry funded trials. Either an email address or a phone number was present in 76.5% of non-industry funded trial records and in 56.5% of industry funded trial records. Although a drug name or company serial number was almost always provided, other drug intervention specifics were often omitted from registration. Of 3643 reported outcomes, 34.9% were specific measures with a meaningful time frame. Conclusions Clinical trials registration has the potential to contribute substantially to improving clinical trial transparency and reducing publication bias and selective reporting. These potential benefits are currently undermined by deficiencies in the provision of information in key areas of registered records. PMID:21383991

  2. Data monitoring committees for pragmatic clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ellenberg, Susan S; Culbertson, Richard; Gillen, Daniel L; Goodman, Steven; Schrandt, Suzanne; Zirkle, Maryan

    2015-10-01

    In any clinical trial, it is essential to monitor the accumulating data to be sure that the trial continues to be safe for participants and that the trial is being conducted properly. Data monitoring committees, independent expert panels who undertake regular reviews of the data as the trial progresses, serve an important role in safeguarding the interests of research participants and ensuring trial integrity in many trials. Many pragmatic clinical trials, which aim to inform healthcare decisions by comparing alternate interventions in heterogeneous healthcare delivery settings, will warrant review by an independent data monitoring committee due to their potential impact on clinical practice. However, the very features that make a trial "pragmatic" may pose challenges in terms of which aspects of a trial to monitor and when it is appropriate for a data monitoring committee to intervene. Using the Pragmatic-Explanatory Continuum Indicator Summary tool that draws distinctions between pragmatic and explanatory clinical trials, we review characteristics of pragmatic clinical trials that may have implications for data monitoring committees and interim monitoring plans. These include broad eligibility criteria, a focus on subjective patient-centered outcomes, and in some cases a lack of standardized follow-up procedures across study sites. Additionally, protocol adherence is often purposefully not addressed in pragmatic trials in order to accurately represent the clinical practice setting and maintain practicability of implementation; there are differing viewpoints as to whether adherence should be assessed and acted upon by data monitoring committees in these trials. Some other issues not specifically related to the Pragmatic-Explanatory Continuum Indicator Summary criteria may also merit special consideration in pragmatic trials. Thresholds for early termination of a pragmatic clinical trial might be controversial. The distinguishing features of pragmatic clinical

  3. Clinical Trials.Gov: A Topical Analyses.

    PubMed

    Anand, Vibha; Cahan, Amos; Ghosh, Soumya

    2017-01-01

    ClinicalTrials.gov was established as a web-based registry for clinical trials of human participants in 2000. Mandatory registration started in 2008. Given more than a decade of registered trials, it's important to understand the "topic" areas and their evolution over time from this resource. This information may help in identifying current knowledge gaps. We use dynamic topic model (DTM) methods to discover topics and their evolution over last 17 years. Our model suggests that there are disease or organ specific trials such as 'Cardiovascular disorders', Heart & Brain conditions', or 'Breast & Prostate cancer' as well as trials registered for general health. General health trials are less likely to be FDA regulated, but both health and pain management, as well as surgical, heart, and brain trials have upward trend in recent years while advanced cancer trials have downward trended. Our model derives unique insights from metadata associated with each topic area.

  4. Enhancing clinical evidence by proactively building quality into clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Meeker-O’Connell, Ann; Glessner, Coleen; Behm, Mark; Mulinde, Jean; Roach, Nancy; Sweeney, Fergus; Tenaerts, Pamela; Landray, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stakeholders across the clinical trial enterprise have expressed concern that the current clinical trial enterprise is unsustainable. The cost and complexity of trials have continued to increase, threatening our ability to generate reliable evidence essential for making appropriate decisions concerning the benefits and harms associated with clinical interventions. Overcoming this inefficiency rests on improving protocol design, trial planning, and quality oversight. Methods: The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative convened a project to evaluate methods to prospectively build quality into the scientific and operational design of clinical trials (“quality-by-design”), such that trials are feasible to conduct and important errors are prevented rather than remediated. A working group evaluated aspects of trial design and oversight and developed the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative quality-by-design principles document, outlining a series of factors generally relevant to the reliability of trial conclusions and to patient safety. These principles were then applied and further refined during a series of hands-on workshops to evaluate their utility in facilitating proactive, cross-functional dialogue, and decision-making about trial design and planning. Following these workshops, independent qualitative interviews were conducted with 19 workshop attendees to explore the potential challenges for implementing a quality-by-design approach to clinical trials. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative project team subsequently developed recommendations and an online resource guide to support implementation of this approach. Conclusion: The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative quality-by-design principles provide a framework for assuring that clinical trials adequately safeguard participants and provide reliable information on which to make decisions on the effects of treatments. The quality-by-design workshops highlighted the value of

  5. Ethics of clinical trials in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Okonta, Patrick I.

    2014-01-01

    The conduct of clinical trials for the development and licensing of drugs is a very important aspect of healthcare. Drug research, development and promotion have grown to a multi-billion dollar global business. Like all areas of human endeavour involving generation and control of huge financial resources, it could be subject to deviant behaviour, sharp business practices and unethical practices. The main objective of this review is to highlight potential ethical challenges in the conduct of clinical trials in Nigeria and outline ways in which these can be avoided. Current international and national regulatory and ethical guidelines are reviewed to illustrate the requirements for ethical conduct of clinical trials. Past experiences of unethical conduct of clinical trials especially in developing countries along with the increasing globalisation of research makes it imperative that all players should be aware of the ethical challenges in clinical trials and the benchmarks for ethical conduct of clinical research in Nigeria. PMID:25013247

  6. Ethics of clinical trials in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okonta, Patrick I

    2014-05-01

    The conduct of clinical trials for the development and licensing of drugs is a very important aspect of healthcare. Drug research, development and promotion have grown to a multi-billion dollar global business. Like all areas of human endeavour involving generation and control of huge financial resources, it could be subject to deviant behaviour, sharp business practices and unethical practices. The main objective of this review is to highlight potential ethical challenges in the conduct of clinical trials in Nigeria and outline ways in which these can be avoided. Current international and national regulatory and ethical guidelines are reviewed to illustrate the requirements for ethical conduct of clinical trials. Past experiences of unethical conduct of clinical trials especially in developing countries along with the increasing globalisation of research makes it imperative that all players should be aware of the ethical challenges in clinical trials and the benchmarks for ethical conduct of clinical research in Nigeria.

  7. Innovative clinical trial design for pediatric therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Laughon, Matthew M; Benjamin, Daniel K; Capparelli, Edmund V; Kearns, Gregory L; Berezny, Katherine; Paul, Ian M; Wade, Kelly; Barrett, Jeff; Smith, Phillip Brian; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Until approximately 15 years ago, sponsors rarely included children in the development of therapeutics. US and European legislation has resulted in an increase in the number of pediatric trials and specific label changes and dosing recommendations, although infants remain an understudied group. The lack of clinical trials in children is partly due to specific challenges in conducting trials in this patient population. Therapeutics in special populations, including premature infants, obese children and children receiving extracorporeal life support, are even less studied. National research networks in Europe and the USA are beginning to address some of the gaps in pediatric therapeutics using novel clinical trial designs. Recent innovations in pediatric clinical trial design, including sparse and scavenged sampling, population pharmacokinetic analyses and ‘opportunistic’ studies, have addressed some of the historical challenges associated with clinical trials in children. PMID:21980319

  8. Prudent precaution in clinical trials of nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Gary E; Lindor, Rachel A

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials of nanotechnology medical products present complex risk management challenges that involve many uncertainties and important risk-risk trade-offs. This paper inquires whether the precautionary principle can help to inform risk management approaches to nanomedicine clinical trials. It concludes that prudent precaution may be appropriate for ensuring the safety of such trials, but that the precautionary principle itself, especially in its more extreme forms, does not provide useful guidance for specific safety measures.

  9. Design of oncology clinical trials: a review.

    PubMed

    Ananthakrishnan, Revathi; Menon, Sandeep

    2013-10-01

    Cancer is a disease that occurs due to the uncontrolled multiplication of cells that invade nearby tissues and can spread to other parts of the body. An increased incidence of cancer in the world has led to an increase in oncology research and in the number of oncology trials. Well designed oncology clinical trials are a key part of developing effective anti-cancer drugs. This review focuses on statistical considerations in the design and analysis of oncology clinical trials.

  10. Clinical Trials: Key to Medical Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... to control high blood pressure. There are clinical trials going on all the time in nearly every area of medical research. To Find Out More To find out more about clinical trials and how to participate, go to: www.clinicaltrials. ...

  11. Lessons Learned from Radiation Oncology Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei-Fei; Okunieff, Paul; Bernhard, Eric J.; Stone, Helen B.; Yoo, Stephen; Coleman, C. Norman; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Brown, Martin; Buatti, John; Guha, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    A Workshop entitled “Lessons Learned from Radiation Oncology Trials” was held on December 7–8th, 2011 in Bethesda, MD, to present and discuss some of the recently conducted Radiation Oncology clinical trials with a focus on those that failed to refute the null hypothesis. The objectives of this Workshop were to summarize and examine the questions that these trials provoked, to assess the quality and limitations of the pre-clinical data that supported the hypotheses underlying these trials, and to consider possible solutions to these challenges for the design of future clinical trials. Several themes emerged from the discussions, including the: a) opportunities to learn from null-hypothesis trials through tissue and imaging studies; b) value of pre-clinical data supporting the design of combinatorial therapies; c) significance of validated biomarkers; d) necessity of quality assurance in radiotherapy delivery; e) conduct of sufficiently-powered studies to address the central hypothesis; and f) importance of publishing results of the trials regardless of the outcome. The fact that well-designed hypothesis-driven clinical trials produce null or negative results is expected given the limitations of trial design, and complexities of cancer biology. It is important to understand the reasons underlying such null results however, in order to effectively merge the technological innovations with the rapidly evolving biology for maximal patient benefit, through the design of future clinical trials. PMID:24043463

  12. Clinical trials in Russia: achieving excellence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, Robert S.; Ichim, Thomas E.; Petrov, Vladimir; Reznik, Boris N.

    2005-06-01

    The Russian population offers a unique opportunity for conducting clinical trials in general, and specifically in the area of Medical Devices. Although the regulatory framework for approval of clinical trials and eventual marketing registration is based on an American-style format, details of operating in the Russian framework are very different. Understanding and leveraging the unique characteristics of the Russian system on the patient side, the investigator side, and the regulatory side is important in extracting optimum value out of clinical trials in Russia. Having performed Medical Device research and clinical trials in Russia, the authors overview the present system and describe various strategies for working in this growing but still under-utilized clinical trials arena.

  13. Methodology Series Module 4: Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    In a clinical trial, study participants are (usually) divided into two groups. One group is then given the intervention and the other group is not given the intervention (or may be given some existing standard of care). We compare the outcomes in these groups and assess the role of intervention. Some of the trial designs are (1) parallel study design, (2) cross-over design, (3) factorial design, and (4) withdrawal group design. The trials can also be classified according to the stage of the trial (Phase I, II, III, and IV) or the nature of the trial (efficacy vs. effectiveness trials, superiority vs. equivalence trials). Randomization is one of the procedures by which we allocate different interventions to the groups. It ensures that all the included participants have a specified probability of being allocated to either of the groups in the intervention study. If participants and the investigator know about the allocation of the intervention, then it is called an “open trial.” However, many of the trials are not open – they are blinded. Blinding is useful to minimize bias in clinical trials. The researcher should familiarize themselves with the CONSORT statement and the appropriate Clinical Trials Registry of India. PMID:27512184

  14. Varied acceptance of clinical trial results.

    PubMed

    Klimt, C R

    1989-12-01

    The subject of varied acceptance of clinical trial results is discussed in the context of review of trials with which I have been involved and my subjective evaluation of their impact on the practice of clinical medicine. My experience goes back to 1949 and a World Health Organization trial of hyperimmune gamma globulin against rabies. This was followed by a large trial of secondary prevention of poliomyelitis. I participated in the planning and initiation of the first chronic disease trial, the University Group Diabetes Program (UGDP). The latter lasted for 15 years and its ramifications continue to this day. My next trial was the Coronary Drug Project (CDP), a complex trial with more than 8,000 patients. The trials of aspirin and aspirin combined with persantine (the CDPA, AMIS, PARIS I, and PARIS II) followed. My last three trials were a trial of photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy (DRS), a six-country trial of the antiarrhythmic drug mexiletine (IMPACT), and a study involving two diagnostic procedures for pulmonary embolism (PIOPED). When one considers, in retrospect, the plethora of trials one is struck by the uniform absence of a priori considerations of the impact on medical practice, or likely lack thereof, of possible outcomes.

  15. When to conduct a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Boutrand, J P

    2004-10-01

    A clinical trial is designed to provide clinical evidence of compliance with the medical device Directives. Clinical evidence can also be based on systematic and objective literature review. This article highlights when to use the clinical or the literature route to demonstrate the safety and performance of a medical device.

  16. Funding oncology clinical trials: are cooperative group trials sustainable?

    PubMed

    Seow, Hsien-Yeang; Whelan, Patrick; Levine, Mark N; Cowan, Kathryn; Lysakowski, Barbara; Kowaleski, Brenda; Snider, Anne; Xu, Rebecca Y; Arnold, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Many oncology clinical trials departments (CTDs) are in serious fiscal deficit and their sustainability is in jeopardy. This study investigates whether the payment models used to fund industry versus cooperative group trials contribute to the fiscal deficit of a CTD. We examined the lifetime costs of all cooperative group and industry trials activated in the CTD of a cancer center between 2007 and 2011. A trial's lifetime is defined as being from the date the first patient was accrued until the last patient's actual or projected final follow-up visit. For each trial, we calculated the lifetime monthly net income, which was defined as monthly revenue minus monthly costs. Data sources included study protocols, trial budgets, and accrual data. Of the 97 trials analyzed, 64 (66%) were cooperative group trials. The pattern of lifetime net income for cooperative group trials has a positive peak during patient accrual followed by a negative trough during follow-up. In contrast, the pattern for industry trials resembled an "l" shape. The patterns reflect the differing payment models: upfront lump-sum payments (cooperative group) versus milestone payments (industry). The negative trough in the lifetime net income of a cooperative group trial occurs because follow-up costs are typically not funded or are underfunded. CTDs accrue more patients in new trials to offset that deficit. The CTD uses revenue from accrual to existing trials to cross-subsidize past trials in follow-up. As the number of patients on follow-up increases, the fiscal deficit grows larger each year, perpetuating the cycle.

  17. Sample Size Estimation in Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sakpal, Tushar Vijay

    2010-01-01

    Every clinical trial should be planned. This plan should include the objective of trial, primary and secondary end-point, method of collecting data, sample to be included, sample size with scientific justification, method of handling data, statistical methods and assumptions. This plan is termed as clinical trial protocol. One of the key aspects of this protocol is sample size estimation. The aim of this article is to discuss how important sample size estimation is for a clinical trial, and also to understand the effects of sample size over- estimation or under-estimation on outcome of a trial. Also an attempt is made to understand importance of minimum sample to detect a clinically important difference. This article is also an attempt to provide inputs on different parameters that impact sample size and basic rules for these parameters with the help of some simple examples. PMID:21829786

  18. Paperless clinical trials: Myth or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sandeep K.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to expedite the time-to-market for new drugs and to make the approval process simpler. But clinical trials are a complex process and the increased complexity leads to decreased efficiency. Hence, pharmaceutical organizations want to move toward a more technology-driven clinical trial process for recording, analyzing, reporting, archiving, etc., In recent times, the progress has certainly been made in developing paperless systems that improve data capture and management. The adaptation of paperless processes may require major changes to existing procedures. But this is in the best interests of these organizations to remain competitive because a paperless clinical trial would lead to a consistent and streamlined framework. Moreover, all major regulatory authorities also advocate adoption of paperless trial. But challenges still remain toward implementation of paperless clinical trial process. PMID:26288464

  19. Terminating a long-term clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Klimt, C R

    1981-05-01

    Long-term clinical trials often include more than one active treatment group. These may be discontinued independently if found to be ineffective or possibly harmful. Certain subgroups of patients may be discovered, in the course of a clinical trial, who do not respond satisfactorily and are, therefore, excluded during the course of a trial. Yet another kind of termination comes when we have a therapeutic breakthrough or when hope has to be abandoned for demonstrating beneficial effects for one, several, or all treatments included in a trial. Examples from the authors' experience are presented, as are successful and unsuccessful techniques in managing terminations of various types.

  20. Microbicide clinical trial adherence: insights for introduction

    PubMed Central

    Woodsong, Cynthia; MacQueen, Kathleen; Amico, K Rivet; Friedland, Barbara; Gafos, Mitzy; Mansoor, Leila; Tolley, Elizabeth; McCormack, Sheena

    2013-01-01

    After two decades of microbicide clinical trials it remains uncertain if vaginally- delivered products will be clearly shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in women and girls. Furthermore, a microbicide product with demonstrated clinical efficacy must be used correctly and consistently if it is to prevent infection. Information on adherence that can be gleaned from microbicide trials is relevant for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, pre-licensure implementation trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery. Drawing primarily from data and experience that has emerged from the large-scale microbicide efficacy trials completed to-date, the paper identifies six broad areas of adherence lessons learned: (1) Adherence measurement in clinical trials, (2) Comprehension of use instructions/Instructions for use, (3) Unknown efficacy and its effect on adherence/Messages regarding effectiveness, (4) Partner influence on use, (5) Retention and continuation and (6) Generalizability of trial participants' adherence behavior. Each is discussed, with examples provided from microbicide trials. For each of these adherence topics, recommendations are provided for using trial findings to prepare for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery programs. PMID:23561044

  1. Clinical Trials and the Role of the Oncology Clinical Trials Nurse.

    PubMed

    Ness, Elizabeth A; Royce, Cheryl

    2017-03-01

    Clinical trials are paramount to improving human health. New trial designs and informed consent issues are emerging as a result of genomic profiling and the development of molecularly targeted agents. Many groups and individuals are responsible for ensuring the protection of research participants and the quality of the data produced. The specialty role of the clinical trials nurse (CTN) is critical to clinical trials. Oncology CTNs have competencies that can help guide their practice; however, not all oncology clinical trials are supervised by a nurse. Using the process of engagement, one organization has restructured oncology CTNs under a nurse-supervised model.

  2. Allocation Rules for Sequential Clinical Trials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    AD-AIN 354 STANFORD UNIV CA DEPT OF STATISTICS F/V 12/1 ALLOCATION RULES FOR SEQUENTIAL CLINICAL TRIALS .(U) JUL 82 D SIEGMUND N00V11577-C-V306...UNCLASSIFIED TR 18 NL ALLOCATION RULES FOR SEQUENTIAL CLINICAL TRIALS BY D. SIEGMUND TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 18 JULY 1982 PREPARED UNDER CONTRACT N00014-77-C...at all. Rere me. discuss (I) and (11) or mes"s 9f a Monte Carlo experiment. The advantages of randomization in clinical trials has been discussed at

  3. A primer on clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Ellimoottil, Chad; Vijan, Sandeep; Flanigan, Robert C

    2015-03-01

    A well-designed and executed clinical trial is the gold standard of evidence-based medicine. It is important for readers to understand the rationale for the study design, identify common pitfalls, and scrutinize limitations. Herein, we present a brief overview of types of designs used for clinical trials and discuss the use of appropriate end points, the selection of study participants, randomization, sample size calculation, blinding, and analysis of data. Finally, we emphasize the importance of accurate and transparent reporting. Our goal is to provide a primer for practicing urologists to enhance their understanding of the clinical trial literature.

  4. Disease-mongering through clinical trials.

    PubMed

    González-Moreno, María; Saborido, Cristian; Teira, David

    2015-06-01

    Our goal in this paper is to articulate a precise concept of at least a certain kind of disease-mongering, showing how pharmaceutical marketing can commercially exploit certain diseases when their best definition is given through the success of a treatment in a clinical trial. We distinguish two types of disease-mongering according to the way they exploit the definition of the trial population for marketing purposes. We argue that behind these two forms of disease-mongering there are two well-known problems in the statistical methodology of clinical trials (the reference class problem and the distinction between statistical and clinical significance). Overcoming them is far from simple.

  5. Justifying clinical trials for porcine islet xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Cara E; Korbutt, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Edmonton Protocol encouraged a great deal of optimism that a cell-based cure for type I diabetes could be achieved. However, donor organ shortages prevent islet transplantation from being a widespread solution as the supply cannot possibly equal the demand. Porcine islet xenotransplantation has the potential to address these shortages, and recent preclinical and clinical trials show promising scientific support. Consequently, it is important to consider whether the current science meets the ethical requirements for moving toward clinical trials. Despite the potential risks and the scientific unknowns that remain to be investigated, there is optimism regarding the xenotransplantation of some types of tissue, and enough evidence has been gathered to ethically justify clinical trials for the most safe and advanced area of research, porcine islet transplantation. Researchers must make a concerted effort to maintain a positive image for xenotransplantation, as a few well-publicized failed trials could irrevocably damage public perception of xenotransplantation. Because all of society carries the burden of risk, it is important that the public be involved in the decision to proceed. As new information from preclinical and clinical trials develops, policy decisions should be frequently updated. If at any point evidence shows that islet xenotransplantation is unsafe, then clinical trials will no longer be justified and they should be halted. However, as of now, the expected benefit of an unlimited supply of islets, combined with adequate informed consent, justifies clinical trials for islet xenotransplantation.

  6. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design and conduct of clinical trials of rehabilitation interventions for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, G K; Hinman, R S; Zeni, J; Risberg, M A; Snyder-Mackler, L; Bennell, K L

    2015-05-01

    A Task Force of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) has previously published a set of guidelines for the conduct of clinical trials in osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee. Limited material available on clinical trials of rehabilitation in people with OA has prompted OARSI to establish a separate Task Force to elaborate guidelines encompassing special issues relating to rehabilitation of OA. The Task Force identified three main categories of rehabilitation clinical trials. The categories included non-operative rehabilitation trials, post-operative rehabilitation trials, and trials examining the effectiveness of devices (e.g., assistive devices, bracing, physical agents, electrical stimulation, etc.) that are used in rehabilitation of people with OA. In addition, the Task Force identified two main categories of outcomes in rehabilitation clinical trials, which include outcomes related to symptoms and function, and outcomes related to disease modification. The guidelines for rehabilitation clinical trials provided in this report encompass these main categories. The report provides guidelines for conducting and reporting on randomized clinical trials. The topics include considerations for entering patients into trials, issues related to conducting trials, considerations for selecting outcome measures, and recommendations for statistical analyses and reporting of results. The focus of the report is on rehabilitation trials for hip, knee and hand OA, however, we believe the content is broad enough that it could be applied to rehabilitation trials for other regions as well.

  7. Logistics and management of clinical trials.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, G

    1982-01-01

    This chapter is concerned with some of the more mundane aspects of the day to day design, planning, documentation, and management of clinical trials, rather than with the finer points of trial design which are dealt with in detail elsewhere. The points considered here, taken individually, seem obvious and trivial but it is hoped that some may be helpful in obtaining the maximum return for the work invested in running a trial. PMID:7104166

  8. Marketing and clinical trials: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Francis, David; Roberts, Ian; Elbourne, Diana R; Shakur, Haleema; Knight, Rosemary C; Garcia, Jo; Snowdon, Claire; Entwistle, Vikki A; McDonald, Alison M; Grant, Adrian M; Campbell, Marion K

    2007-01-01

    Background Publicly funded clinical trials require a substantial commitment of time and money. To ensure that sufficient numbers of patients are recruited it is essential that they address important questions in a rigorous manner and are managed well, adopting effective marketing strategies. Methods Using methods of analysis drawn from management studies, this paper presents a structured assessment framework or reference model, derived from a case analysis of the MRC's CRASH trial, of 12 factors that may affect the success of the marketing and sales activities associated with clinical trials. Results The case study demonstrates that trials need various categories of people to buy in – hence, to be successful, trialists must embrace marketing strategies to some extent. Conclusion The performance of future clinical trials could be enhanced if trialists routinely considered these factors. PMID:18028537

  9. Marketing and clinical trials: a case study.

    PubMed

    Francis, David; Roberts, Ian; Elbourne, Diana R; Shakur, Haleema; Knight, Rosemary C; Garcia, Jo; Snowdon, Claire; Entwistle, Vikki A; McDonald, Alison M; Grant, Adrian M; Campbell, Marion K

    2007-11-20

    Publicly funded clinical trials require a substantial commitment of time and money. To ensure that sufficient numbers of patients are recruited it is essential that they address important questions in a rigorous manner and are managed well, adopting effective marketing strategies. Using methods of analysis drawn from management studies, this paper presents a structured assessment framework or reference model, derived from a case analysis of the MRC's CRASH trial, of 12 factors that may affect the success of the marketing and sales activities associated with clinical trials. The case study demonstrates that trials need various categories of people to buy in - hence, to be successful, trialists must embrace marketing strategies to some extent. The performance of future clinical trials could be enhanced if trialists routinely considered these factors.

  10. What Are the Possible Benefits and Risks of Clinical Trials?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sponsors Why Are They Important How Do They Work Who Can Participate What To Expect During Benefits and Risks How They Protect Participants Finding Clinical Trials Links Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites What Are the ...

  11. [Clinical trials. Some general ethical questions].

    PubMed

    Melo, J A

    1999-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the main problems that ethics committees deal with when analysing clinical trials. Some characteristics of the different phases are discussed as well as some particular problems of the Portuguese law.

  12. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research.

  13. Monitoring clinical trials: a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Síle F; Henley, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the processes and procedures involved in planning, conducting and reporting monitoring activities for large Clinical Trials of Investigational Medicinal Products (CTIMPs), focusing on those conducted in resource-limited settings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Scientific Review in Cancer Clinical Trials

    Cancer.gov

    Scientific review ensures that studies are based on sound science, which contributes to the safety of clinical trial participants. Learn about the role of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), Data and Safety Monitoring Boards (DSMBs), and government agenci

  15. Characteristics of clinical trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Califf, Robert M; Zarin, Deborah A; Kramer, Judith M; Sherman, Rachel E; Aberle, Laura H; Tasneem, Asba

    2012-05-02

    Recent reports highlight gaps between guidelines-based treatment recommendations and evidence from clinical trials that supports those recommendations. Strengthened reporting requirements for studies registered with ClinicalTrials.gov enable a comprehensive evaluation of the national trials portfolio. To examine fundamental characteristics of interventional clinical trials registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov database. A data set comprising 96,346 clinical studies from ClinicalTrials.gov was downloaded on September 27, 2010, and entered into a relational database to analyze aggregate data. Interventional trials were identified and analyses were focused on 3 clinical specialties-cardiovascular, mental health, and oncology-that together encompass the largest number of disability-adjusted life-years lost in the United States. Characteristics of registered clinical trials as reported data elements in the trial registry; how those characteristics have changed over time; differences in characteristics as a function of clinical specialty; and factors associated with use of randomization, blinding, and data monitoring committees (DMCs). The number of registered interventional clinical trials increased from 28,881 (October 2004-September 2007) to 40,970 (October 2007-September 2010), and the number of missing data elements has generally declined. Most interventional trials registered between 2007 and 2010 were small, with 62% enrolling 100 or fewer participants. Many clinical trials were single-center (66%; 24,788/37,520) and funded by organizations other than industry or the National Institutes of Health (NIH) (47%; 17,592/37,520). Heterogeneity in the reported methods by clinical specialty; sponsor type; and the reported use of DMCs, randomization, and blinding was evident. For example, reported use of DMCs was less common in industry-sponsored vs NIH-sponsored trials (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.11; 95% CI, 0.09-0.14), earlier-phase vs phase 3 trials (adjusted OR, 0

  16. Compliance with mandatory reporting of clinical trial results on ClinicalTrials.gov: cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Prayle, Andrew P; Hurley, Matthew N; Smyth, Alan R

    2012-01-03

    To examine compliance with mandatory reporting of summary clinical trial results (within one year of completion of trial) on ClinicalTrials.gov for studies that fall under the recent Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act (FDAAA) legislation. Registry based study of clinical trial summaries. ClinicalTrials.gov, searched on 19 January 2011, with cross referencing with Drugs@FDA to determine for which trials mandatory reporting was required within one year. Selection criteria Studies registered on ClinicalTrials.gov with US sites which completed between 1 January and 31 December 2009. Proportion of trials for which results had been reported. The ClinicalTrials.gov registry contained 83,579 entries for interventional trials, of which 5642 were completed within the timescale of interest. We identified trials as falling within the mandatory reporting rules if they were covered by the FDAAA (trials of a drug, device, or biological agent, which have at least one US site, and are of phase II or later) and if they investigated a drug that already had approval from the Food and Drug Administration. Of these, 163/738 (22%) had reported results within one year of completion of the trial compared with 76/727 (10%) trials that were not subject to mandatory reporting (95% confidence interval for the difference in proportions 7.8% to 15.5%; χ(2) test, P = 2.6 × 10(-9)). Later phase trials were more likely to report results (P = 4.4 × 10(-11)), as were industry funded trials (P = 2.2 × 10(-16)). Most trials subject to mandatory reporting did not report results within a year of completion.

  17. Terminating a long-term clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Klimt, C R; Canner, P L

    1979-05-01

    Long-term trials often include more than one active treatment group. These may be discontinued independently if found ineffective or possibly harmful. Certain subgroups of patients may be discovered, in the course of a clinical trial, who do not respond satisfactorily and are, therefore, excluded during the course of a trial. Yet anouther kind of termination comes when we have a therapeutic breakthrough or when hope has to be abandoned for demonstrating beneficial effects for one, several, or all treatments included in a trial. Examples from the authors' experience are presented, as are successful and unsuccessful techniques in managing terminations of various types.

  18. The behavioral dynamics of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, H; Nerenz, D R; Leventhal, E A; Love, R R; Bendena, L M

    1991-01-01

    Two ways of approaching the design of long-term clinical trials are presented and contrasted. The first, termed the "static" view, emphasizes close adherence to formal rules of study design. The second, termed the "dynamic" view, emphasizes the behavioral aspects of patient participation in trials of long duration. The dynamic view is discussed in detail, with discussion of how recruitment of participants, random assignment to conditions, compliance with protocol, and measurement of outcomes are affected by behavioral dynamics. Data from a recently completed tamoxifen toxicity trial are used to illustrate the points and to focus the discussion of behavioral dynamics on the design of a chemoprevention trial for breast cancer using tamoxifen.

  19. Strategic physician communication and oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, T L; Blanchard, C; Ruckdeschel, J C; Coovert, M; Strongbow, R

    1999-10-01

    Clinical trials are the primary means for determining new, effective treatments for cancer patients, yet the number of patients that accrue is relatively limited. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between physician behavior and patient accrual to a clinical trial by videotaping the interaction. Forty-eight patient-physician interactions involving 12 different oncologists were videotaped in several clinics at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute (Tampa, FL). The purpose of each interaction was to present the possibility of a clinical trial to the patient. A coding system, the Moffitt Accrual Analysis System, was developed by the authors to code behaviors that represented both the legal-informational and social influence models of communication behavior. Thirty-two patients agreed to participate in the clinical trial. Videotaping was found to be a viable, valid, and reliable method for studying the interaction. Physicians who were observed to use both models of influence were found to enroll more patients. Thus, patients were more likely to accrue to the trial when their physician verbally presented items normally included in an informed consent document and when they behaved in a reflective, patient-centered, supportive, and responsive manner. Discussion of benefits, side effects, patient concerns and resources to manage the concerns were all associated with accrual. This research has implications for modifying physician behavior and, thus, increasing the numbers of patients accruing to oncology clinical trials.

  20. Hyperthermia-related clinical trials on cancer treatment within the ClinicalTrials.gov registry.

    PubMed

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; van Rhoon, Gerard; Crezee, Hans; Aebersold, Daniel M; Bodis, Stephan; Beck, Marcus; Nadobny, Jacek; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia has been shown to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer. This paper summarises all recent clinical trials registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov registry. The records of 175,538 clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were downloaded on 29 September 2014 and a database was established. We searched this database for hyperthermia or equivalent words. A total of 109 trials were identified in which hyperthermia was part of the treatment regimen. Of these, 49 trials (45%) had hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy after cytoreductive surgery (HIPEC) as the primary intervention, and 14 other trials (13%) were also testing some form of intraperitoneal hyperthermic chemoperfusion. Seven trials (6%) were testing perfusion attempts to other locations (thoracic/pleural n = 4, limb n = 2, hepatic n = 1). Sixteen trials (15%) were testing regional hyperthermia, 13 trials (12%) whole body hyperthermia, seven trials (6%) superficial hyperthermia and two trials (2%) interstitial hyperthermia. One remaining trial tested laser hyperthermia. In contrast to the general opinion, this analysis shows continuous interest and ongoing clinical research in the field of hyperthermia. Interestingly, the majority of trials focused on some form of intraperitoneal hyperthermic chemoperfusion. Despite the high number of active clinical studies, HIPEC is a topic with limited attention at the annual meetings of the European Society for Hyperthermic Oncology and the Society of Thermal Medicine. The registration of on-going clinical trials is of paramount importance for the achievement of a comprehensive overview of available clinical research activities involving hyperthermia.

  1. Randomized Clinical Trials in Localized Anal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clayton A; Kachnic, Lisa A

    2017-10-01

    Management of anal carcinoma began as abdominoperineal resection and has evolved to combined chemotherapy and radiation. Early randomized trials demonstrated superior clinical outcomes of combined modality therapy over radiotherapy alone. Subsequent trials investigated alterations in the standard backbone of radiotherapy concurrent with 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C with intent to maintain clinical outcomes while reducing treatment-related morbidity. The addition of intensity-modulated radiotherapy to radiation planning and delivery has subsequently reduced acute toxicity and detrimental treatment breaks. Ongoing and future trials are aimed at reducing therapy in favorable patient populations to decrease morbidity while intensifying treatment in patients with negative prognostic factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Characteristics of pediatric cardiovascular clinical trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kevin D; Chiswell, Karen; Califf, Robert M; Pearson, Gail; Li, Jennifer S

    2014-06-01

    ClinicalTrials.gov is an National Institutes of Health-sponsored registry of federally and privately funded trials. We sought to determine fundamental characteristics of registered pediatric cardiovascular trials (PCVTs). A data set including 68,134 interventional clinical trials was downloaded from ClinicalTrials.gov and entered into a relational database. Aggregate data from PCVTs were compared with other trial specialties. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with improved trial quality metrics including blinding and randomization. Between July 1, 2005, and September 27, 2010, 5035 (7%) registered trials targeted pediatric populations, including 213 PCVTs (4.2%), 1,176 pediatric infectious disease trials (23%), 664 pediatric mental health trials (13%), and 346 pediatric hematology/oncology trials (7%). Median (interquartile range) PCVT enrollment was 65 subjects (36-186) and median study duration was 2.3 years (1.3-3.7). The most common PCVTs targeted acquired diseases including hypertension (n = 41, 14%), obesity (n = 26, 9%), pulmonary hypertension (n = 25, 9%), and dyslipidemia (n = 19, 7%). Important factors associated with improved quality metrics included National Institutes of Health as opposed to industry funding (OR, 1.9; P < .0001); trial location (trials with both US and foreign enrollment vs trials with US only or foreign only enrollment, P = .02) and trials restricted to younger children as opposed to trials including adolescents (OR, 1.4; P < .0001). PCVTs represent a small proportion of clinical trials relative to other pediatric subspecialties. Most PCVTs tend to parallel adult morbidities while there is a relative paucity of trials focused on congenital heart disease. These data may be useful to stakeholders in informing decisions regarding the conduct of PCVTs, and to provide insight into mechanisms to advance PCVT infrastructure. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical trials profile: professionals and sites.

    PubMed

    Paschoale, Helena S; Barbosa, Fernanda R; Nita, Marcelo E; Carrilho, Flair J; Ono-Nita, Suzane Kioko

    2010-09-01

    Clinical trial is considered a breakthrough method in medicine and essential to the development of new drugs. Clinical trials that comply with international and national regulations require an appropriate infrastructure and team qualification. The goal of this study was to evaluate clinical trial groups in Brazil: professional qualification, site structure regulatory knowledge and Good Clinical Practice (GCP) adherence. This is a transversal study with investigators (PI) and sub investigator (SI). PI and SI data were initially identified from Curriculum Lattes from National Advice of Scientific and Technological Development. The study participants were submitted to a questionnaire, which was composed of qualitative and quantitative questions. A hundred PI and SI were interviewed. The most representative Brazilian regions were Southeast (68%) and South (18%). The main institutions involved were HCFMUSP complex and UNIFESP among others institutions. Academic graduation is observed in 86% of them and the higher degree is Doctorate (62%). 91% had GCP knowledge although only 74% had formal training. About the team, all of them are multidisciplinary with majority of nurses and pharmaceuticals. 88% had GCP knowledge although only 77% had formal training. 36%, 60% and 44% of clinical trials were in phase II, III and IV. In conclusion, researchers have appropriate skills and knowledge to perform clinical studies however there is still a need for training. The centers where the researchers work, have trained staff and adequate infrastructure for conducting clinical trials phase II, III and IV.

  4. Swiss regulations for controlling clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Zanini, G M

    1998-04-01

    Switzerland has recently issued regulations designed to control all trials with drugs in human subjects, namely the 'Regolamento dell'Ufficio Intercantonale per il controllo dei medicamenti in fase di studio clinico' (Intercantonal Regulations Controlling Drugs used in Clinical Trials), which have been operating since 1st January 1995. These new regulations are generally consistent with other international regulations and have introduced the concept of good clinical practice (GCP) into Switzerland. There are other regulations in Switzerland, such as Federal regulations on immunobiological products, special rules governing the administration of radiolabelled drugs to humans, drugs of abuse and medical devices. Any gap in the central regulations must be filled by cantonal regulations, where they exist. This is a comprehensive review of the regulations governing clinical trials in Switzerland, with special attention being devoted to trials with therapeutic compounds and to compatibility between Swiss and international procedures.

  5. Active Clinical Trials for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Minsker, Stanislav; Zhao, Ying-Qi; Cheng, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Individualized treatment rules (ITRs) tailor treatments according to individual patient characteristics. They can significantly improve patient care and are thus becoming increasingly popular. The data collected during randomized clinical trials are often used to estimate the optimal ITRs. However, these trials are generally expensive to run, and, moreover, they are not designed to efficiently estimate ITRs. In this article, we propose a cost-effective estimation method from an active learning perspective. In particular, our method recruits only the “most informative” patients (in terms of learning the optimal ITRs) from an ongoing clinical trial. Simulation studies and real-data examples show that our active clinical trial method significantly improves on competing methods. We derive risk bounds and show that they support these observed empirical advantages. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. PMID:28018014

  6. [Performing clinical trials efficiently in Japan--independent clinical trials and GCP].

    PubMed

    Kanai, Masatoshi; Suzuki-Nishimura, Tamiko

    2007-06-01

    Part of the revision of the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law in 2002 included the establishment of a system for independent clinical trials. According to the partial revision of the Guideline for Good Clinical Practice (GCP), MHLW Ministerial Ordinance No. 106 dated June 12, 2003, independent clinical trials are now recognized in Japan. MHLW promotes to resolve the issues about compliance with good clinical practice (GCP) guideline and the management of the clinical trials, including independent clinical trials. For our nation, more effective and safer new drug applications based on domestic independent clinical trial documents will soon be reviewed by the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA). For the protection of human rights, important issues about quality control and quality assurance raised by GCP Audit consist of both GCP on-site review and Document-based Conformity Review by the Office of Conformity Audit of the PMDA are studied.

  7. An analysis of registered clinical trials in otolaryngology from 2007 to 2010: ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Witsell, David L; Schulz, Kristine A; Lee, Walter T; Chiswell, Karen

    2013-11-01

    To describe the conditions studied, interventions used, study characteristics, and funding sources of otolaryngology clinical trials from the ClinicalTrials.gov database; compare this otolaryngology cohort of interventional studies to clinical visits in a health care system; and assess agreement between clinical trials and clinical activity. Database analysis. Trial registration data downloaded from ClinicalTrials.gov and administrative data from the Duke University Medical Center from October 1, 2007 to September 27, 2010. Data extraction from ClinicalTrials.gov was done using MeSH and non-MeSH disease condition terms. Studies were subcategorized to create the following groupings for descriptive analysis: ear, nose, allergy, voice, sleep, head and neck cancer, thyroid, and throat. Duke Health System visits were queried by using selected ICD-9 codes for otolaryngology and non-otolaryngology providers. Visits were grouped similarly to ClinicalTrials.gov for further analysis. Chi-square tests were used to explore differences between groups. A total of 1115 of 40,970 registered interventional trials were assigned to otolaryngology. Head and neck cancer trials predominated. Study models most frequently incorporated parallel design (54.6%), 2 study groups (46.6%), and randomization (69.1%). Phase 2 or 3 studies constituted 46.4% of the cohort. Comparison of the ClinicalTrials.gov database with administrative health system visit data by disease condition showed discordance between national research activity and clinical visit volume for patients with otolaryngology complaints. Analysis of otolaryngology-related clinical research as listed in ClinicalTrials.gov can inform patients, physicians, and policy makers about research focus areas. The relative burden of otolaryngology-associated conditions in our tertiary health system exceeds research activity within the field.

  8. An Analysis of Registered Clinical Trials in Otolaryngology from 2007 to 2010: ClinicalTrials.gov

    PubMed Central

    Witsell, David L.; Schulz, Kristine A.; Lee, Walter T.; Chiswell, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the conditions studied, interventions used, study characteristics, and funding sources of otolaryngology clinical trials from the ClinicalTrials.gov database; compare this otolaryngology cohort of interventional studies to clinical visits in a health care system; and assess agreement between clinical trials and clinical activity. Study Design Database analysis. Setting Trial registration data downloaded from Clinical Trials.gov and administrative data from the Duke University Medical Center from October 1, 2007 to September 27, 2010. Methods Data extraction from ClinicalTrials.gov was done using MeSH and non-MeSH disease condition terms. Studies were subcategorized to create the following groupings for descriptive analysis: ear, nose, allergy, voice, sleep, head and neck cancer, thyroid, and throat. Duke Health System visits were queried by using selected ICD-9 codes for otolaryngology and non-otolaryngology providers. Visits were grouped similarly to ClinicalTrials.gov for further analysis. Chi-square tests were used to explore differences between groups. Results A total of 1115 of 40,970 registered interventional trials were assigned to otolaryngology. Head and neck cancer trials predominated. Study models most frequently incorporated parallel design (54.6%), 2 study groups (46.6%), and randomization (69.1%). Phase 2 or 3 studies constituted 46.4% of the cohort. Comparison of the ClinicalTrials.gov database with administrative health system visit data by disease condition showed discordance between national research activity and clinical visit volume for patients with otolaryngology complaints. Conclusions Analysis of otolaryngology-related clinical research as listed in ClinicalTrials.gov can inform patients, physicians, and policy makers about research focus areas. The relative burden of otolaryngology-associated conditions in our tertiary health system exceeds research activity within the field. PMID:24107478

  9. Current status and perspectives of interventional clinical trials for glioblastoma - analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; Minniti, Giuseppe; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Mathier, Etienne; Soldatovic, Ivan; Jeremic, Branislav; Ghadjar, Pirus; Elicin, Olgun; Lössl, Kristina; Aebersold, Daniel M; Belka, Claus; Herrmann, Evelyn; Niyazi, Maximilian

    2017-01-03

    The records of 208.777 (100%) clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were downloaded on the 19th of February 2016. Phase II and III trials including patients with glioblastoma were selected for further classification and analysis. Based on the disease settings, trials were classified into three groups: newly diagnosed glioblastoma, recurrent disease and trials with no differentiation according to disease setting. Furthermore, we categorized trials according to the experimental interventions, the primary sponsor, the source of financial support and trial design elements. Trends were evaluated using the autoregressive integrated moving average model. Two hundred sixteen (0.1%) trials were selected for further analysis. Academic centers (investigator initiated trials) were recorded as primary sponsors in 56.9% of trials, followed by industry 25.9%. Industry was the leading source of monetary support for the selected trials in 44.4%, followed by 25% of trials with primarily academic financial support. The number of newly initiated trials between 2005 and 2015 shows a positive trend, mainly through an increase in phase II trials, whereas phase III trials show a negative trend. The vast majority of trials evaluate forms of different systemic treatments (91.2%). In total, one hundred different molecular entities or biologicals were identified. Of those, 60% were involving drugs specifically designed for central nervous system malignancies. Trials that specifically address radiotherapy, surgery, imaging and other therapeutic or diagnostic methods appear to be rare. Current research in glioblastoma is mainly driven or sponsored by industry, academic medical oncologists and neuro-oncologists, with the majority of trials evaluating forms of systemic therapies. Few trials reach phase III. Imaging, radiation therapy and surgical procedures are underrepresented in current trials portfolios. Optimization in research portfolio for glioblastoma is needed.

  10. Quantitative Imaging in Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Mankoff, David A.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Lieberman, Frank S.; Buatti, John M.; Mountz, James M.; Erickson, Bradley J.; Fennessy, Fiona M.M.; Huang, Wei; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Wahl, Richard L.; Linden, Hannah M.; Kinahan, Paul; Zhao, Binsheng; Hylton, Nola M.; Gillies, Robert J.; Clarke, Laurence; Nordstrom, Robert; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    As anti-cancer therapies designed to target specific molecular pathways have been developed, it has become critical to develop methods to assess the response induced by such agents. While traditional, anatomic CT and MRI exams are useful in many settings, there is increasing evidence that these methods cannot answer the fundamental biological and physiological questions essential for assessment and, eventually, prediction of treatment response in the clinical trial setting, especially in the critical period soon after treatment is initiated. To optimally apply advances in quantitative imaging methods to trials of targeted cancer therapy, new infrastructure improvements are needed that incorporate these emerging techniques into the settings where they are most likely to have impact. In this review, we first elucidate the needs for therapeutic response assessment in the era of molecularly targeted therapy and describe how quantitative imaging can most effectively provide scientifically and clinically relevant data. We then describe the tools and methods required to apply quantitative imaging and provide concrete examples of work making these advances practically available for routine application in clinical trials. We conclude by proposing strategies to surmount barriers to wider incorporation of these quantitative imaging methods into clinical trials and, eventually, clinical practice. Our goal is to encourage and guide the oncology community to deploy standardized quantitative imaging techniques in clinical trials to further personalize care for cancer patients, and to provide a more efficient path for the development of improved targeted therapies. PMID:26773162

  11. Public information about clinical trials and research.

    PubMed

    Plétan, Yannick; Zannad, Faïez; Jaillon, Patrice

    2003-01-01

    Be it to restore the confused image of clinical research in relation to the lay public, or to develop new ways of accruing healthy volunteers or patients for clinical trials, there is a need to draft some guidance on how best to provide information on research. Although the French legal and regulatory armamentarium in this area is essentially liberal, there is currently little-justified reluctance among study sponsors to advertise publicly. A group of academic and pharmaceutical industry researchers, assembled for a workshop, together with regulators, journalists, representatives from ethics committees, social security, patient and health consumer groups and other French institutional bodies, has suggested the following series of recommendations: there is no need for additional legal or regulatory constraints; sponsors should be aware of and make use of direct public information on trials; a 'good practice charter' on public communication about clinical trials should be developed; all professionals should be involved in this communication platform; communication in the patient's immediate vicinity should be preferred (primary-care physician, local press); clinical databases and websites accessible to professionals, but also to patients and non-professionals, should be developed; genuine instruction on clinical trials for physicians and health professionals unfamiliar with such trials should be developed and disseminated; media groups should receive at least some training in the fundamentals of clinical research.

  12. Quantitative Imaging in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; Mankoff, David A; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Lieberman, Frank S; Buatti, John M; Mountz, James M; Erickson, Bradley J; Fennessy, Fiona M M; Huang, Wei; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Wahl, Richard L; Linden, Hannah M; Kinahan, Paul E; Zhao, Binsheng; Hylton, Nola M; Gillies, Robert J; Clarke, Laurence; Nordstrom, Robert; Rubin, Daniel L

    2016-01-15

    As anticancer therapies designed to target specific molecular pathways have been developed, it has become critical to develop methods to assess the response induced by such agents. Although traditional, anatomic CT, and MRI examinations are useful in many settings, increasing evidence suggests that these methods cannot answer the fundamental biologic and physiologic questions essential for assessment and, eventually, prediction of treatment response in the clinical trial setting, especially in the critical period soon after treatment is initiated. To optimally apply advances in quantitative imaging methods to trials of targeted cancer therapy, new infrastructure improvements are needed that incorporate these emerging techniques into the settings where they are most likely to have impact. In this review, we first elucidate the needs for therapeutic response assessment in the era of molecularly targeted therapy and describe how quantitative imaging can most effectively provide scientifically and clinically relevant data. We then describe the tools and methods required to apply quantitative imaging and provide concrete examples of work making these advances practically available for routine application in clinical trials. We conclude by proposing strategies to surmount barriers to wider incorporation of these quantitative imaging methods into clinical trials and, eventually, clinical practice. Our goal is to encourage and guide the oncology community to deploy standardized quantitative imaging techniques in clinical trials to further personalize care for cancer patients and to provide a more efficient path for the development of improved targeted therapies.

  13. India's growing participation in global clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Yogendra K; Padhy, Biswa M

    2011-06-01

    Lower operational costs, recent regulatory reforms and several logistic advantages make India an attractive destination for conducting clinical trials. Efforts for maintaining stringent ethical standards and the launch of Pharmacovigilance Program of India are expected to maximize the potential of the country for clinical research. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Implementing personalized cancer genomics in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Simon, Richard; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2013-05-01

    The recent surge in high-throughput sequencing of cancer genomes has supported an expanding molecular classification of cancer. These studies have identified putative predictive biomarkers signifying aberrant oncogene pathway activation and may provide a rationale for matching patients with molecularly targeted therapies in clinical trials. Here, we discuss some of the challenges of adapting these data for rare cancers or molecular subsets of certain cancers, which will require aligning the availability of investigational agents, rapid turnaround of clinical grade sequencing, molecular eligibility and reconsidering clinical trial design and end points.

  15. [Clinical trials: principles of the method].

    PubMed

    Aboulker, J P

    2000-04-15

    Comparative judgement, which is seminal to any kind of science performing measurements, has been applied to clinical reasoning for many centuries. The need for systematizing the observational methods used in medicine in order to draw more reliable inferences about the effects of therapies has been active all along the 19th century. This has resulted in controlled studies which yielded important advances in clinical and therapeutic knowledge, although their designs were not fully satisfactory. Clinical trials have gained their status of "hard science", methodology allowing causal inference, by the end of the 1940s after having adopted the statistical theories developed in the 1930s by Fisher for experimental design in agronomy. A long way has been run since the first controlled randomized trial. However, half a century later, modern clinical trial remains essentially a controlled randomized prospective study using methods to limit potential biases and to establish statistical significance.

  16. Involving South Asian patients in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hussain-Gambles, M; Leese, B; Atkin, K; Brown, J; Mason, S; Tovey, P

    2004-10-01

    To investigate how South Asian patients conceptualise the notion of clinical trials and to identify key processes that impact on trial participation and the extent to which communication difficulties, perceptions of risk and attitudes to authority influence these decisions. Also to identify whether 'South Asian' patients are homogeneous in these issues, and which factors differ between different South Asian subgroups and finally how professionals regard the involvement of South Asian patients and their views on strategies to increase participation. A review of the literature on minority ethnic participation in clinical trials was followed by three qualitative interview studies. Interviews were taped and transcribed (and translated if required) and subjected to framework analysis. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 25 health professionals; 60 South Asian lay people who had not taken part in a trial and 15 South Asian trial participants. Motivations for trial participation were identified as follows: to help society, to improve own health or that of family and friends, out of obligation to the doctor and to increase scientific knowledge. Deterrents were concerns about drug side-effects, busy lifestyles, language, previous bad experiences, mistrust and feelings of not belonging to British society. There was no evidence of antipathy amongst South Asians to the concept of clinical trials and, overall, the younger respondents were more knowledgeable than the older ones. Problems are more likely to be associated with service delivery. Lack of being approached was a common response. Lay-reported factors that might affect South Asian participation in clinical trials include age, language, social class, feeling of not belonging/mistrust, culture and religion. Awareness of clinical trials varied between each group. There are more similarities than differences in attitudes towards clinical trial participation between the South Asian and the general population

  17. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design and conduct of clinical trials for hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lane, N E; Hochberg, M C; Nevitt, M C; Simon, L S; Nelson, A E; Doherty, M; Henrotin, Y; Herontin, Y; Flechsenhar, K

    2015-05-01

    The ability to assess the efficacy and effectiveness of an intervention for the treatment of hip osteoarthritis (OA) requires strong clinical trial methodology. This consensus paper provides recommendations based on a narrative literature review and best judgment of the members of the committee for clinical trials of hip OA. We provide recommendations on clinical trial design, outcome measures, including structural (radiography), and patient and physician global assessments, performance based measures, molecular markers and experimental endpoints including MRI imaging. This information can be utilized by sponsors of trials for new therapeutic agents for hip OA.

  18. [Role of government in clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Mazzetti, Pilar; Silva-Paredes, Gustavo; Cornejo-Olivas, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of clinical trials by the Government is a process of continuous change and adaptation, current challenge is to ensure the safety of participants and get balance of administrative procedures. Development and regulation of clinical trials in different countries vary according to the situation, context national or international execution, determining the insufficiency of national regulation requiring review of international regulation. The aim of this publication is to present a comprehensive overview of the role of Government in the regulation of clinical trials in different realities. It includes a review of the regulation in The European Union, The United States and some Latin American countries and finally the regulation in Peru. Contemporary trends in the regulation of clinical trials, are characterized by increasing standards of quality, ensuring the safety of the participants, promote transparency, lower bureaucratic processes and strengthening ethics IRB committees in the framework of open democratic processes, involving all stakeholders in dynamic processes based on current knowledge and changing tendencies. The challenge is to promote the development of clinical trials from the government institutions (universities, research centers, institutes, hospitals, etc.) priorizing local needs including orphan drugs, prevalent and neglected diseases, and therapeutic use of active components of local native plants.

  19. Quality of clinical trials: A moving target

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Quality of clinical trials depends on data integrity and subject protection. Globalization, outsourcing and increasing complexicity of clinical trials have made the target of achieving global quality challenging. The quality, as judged by regulatory inspections of the investigator sites, sponsors/contract research organizations and Institutional Review Board, has been of concern to the US Food and Drug Administration, as there has been hardly any change in frequency and nature of common deficiencies. To meet the regulatory expectations, the sponsors need to improve quality by developing systems with specific standards for each clinical trial process. The quality systems include: personnel roles and responsibilities, training, policies and procedures, quality assurance and auditing, document management, record retention, and reporting and corrective and preventive action. With an objective to improve quality, the FDA has planned new inspection approaches such as risk-based inspections, surveillance inspections, real-time oversight, and audit of sponsor quality systems. The FDA has partnered with Duke University for Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative, which will conduct research projects on design principles, data quality and quantity including monitoring, study start-up, and adverse event reporting. These recent initiatives will go a long way in improving quality of clinical trials. PMID:22145122

  20. Patient-centeredness in the design of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mullins, C Daniel; Vandigo, Joseph; Zheng, Zhiyuan; Wicks, Paul

    2014-06-01

    Evidence from clinical trials should contribute to informed decision making and a learning health care system. People frequently, however, find participating in clinical trials meaningless or disempowering. Moreover, people often do not incorporate trial results directly into their decision making. The lack of patient centeredness in clinical trials may be partially addressed through trial design. For example, Bayesian adaptive trials designed to adjust in a prespecified manner to changes in clinical practice could motivate people and their health care providers to view clinical trials as more applicable to real-world clinical decisions. The way in which clinical trials are designed can transform the evidence generation process to be more patient centered, providing people with an incentive to participate or continue participating in clinical trials. To achieve the transformation to patient-centeredness in clinical trial decisions, however, there is a need for transparent and reliable methods and education of trial investigators and site personnel.

  1. Patient-centeredness in the design of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, C. Daniel; Vandigo, Joseph E.; Zheng, Jason; Wicks, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from clinical trials should contribute to informed decision making and a learning health care system. People frequently, however, find participating in clinical trials meaningless or disempowering. Moreover, people often do not incorporate trial results directly into their decision making. The lack of patient centeredness in clinical trials may be partially addressed through trial design. For example, Bayesian adaptive trials designed to adjust in a pre-specified manner to changes in clinical practice could motivate people and their health care providers to view clinical trials as more applicable to real-world clinical decisions. The way in which clinical trials are designed can transform the evidence generation process to be more patient centered, providing people with an incentive to participate or continue participating in clinical trials. In order to achieve the transformation to patient-centeredness in clinical trial decisions, however, there is a need for transparent and reliable methods and education of trial investigators and site personnel. PMID:24969009

  2. RECENT CLINICAL TRIALS IN LUPUS NEPHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Recent clinical trials have provided evidence for the efficacy of low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide and mycophenolate mofetil as induction treatment for patients with proliferative lupus nephritis in comparative trials with standard-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide. Trials of maintenance treatments have had more variable results, but suggest that mycophenolate mofetil may be similar to quarterly standard-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide and somewhat more efficacious than azathioprine. Differential responses to mycophenolate mofetil based on ethnicity suggest that it may be more effective in black and Hispanic patients. Rituximab was not efficacious as an adjunct to induction treatment with mycophenolate mofetil. PMID:25034160

  3. Clinical trial networks in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rangan, A; Jefferson, L; Baker, P; Cook, L

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to review the role of clinical trial networks in orthopaedic surgery. A total of two electronic databases (MEDLINE and EMBASE) were searched from inception to September 2013 with no language restrictions. Articles related to randomised controlled trials (RCTs), research networks and orthopaedic research, were identified and reviewed. The usefulness of trainee-led research collaborations is reported and our knowledge of current clinical trial infrastructure further supplements the review. Searching yielded 818 titles and abstracts, of which 12 were suitable for this review. Results are summarised and presented narratively under the following headings: 1) identifying clinically relevant research questions; 2) education and training; 3) conduct of multicentre RCTs and 4) dissemination and adoption of trial results. This review confirms growing international awareness of the important role research networks play in supporting trials in orthopaedic surgery. Multidisciplinary collaboration and adequate investment in trial infrastructure are crucial for successful delivery of RCTs. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:169-74. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  4. Developing antitussives: the ideal clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Birring, Surinder S

    2009-04-01

    Antitussive drugs are amongst the most widely used medications worldwide; however no new class of drugs have been introduced into the market for many years. Trials showing patient benefit are scarce and have been hampered by the lack of objective and validated outcome measures. Recent improvements in the assessment of cough will facilitate better trials and aid the development of antitussive drugs. When conducting a trial, patient selection is of paramount importance. Patients with unexplained chronic cough and sub-acute cough following upper respiratory tract infection are ideal because they represent an unmet clinical need and an untapped market for pharmaceutical companies. Patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are less suitable since cough suppression is not always desirable and the findings of trials may not be generalisable to all patients with cough. Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trials are obviously the gold standard. The choice of placebo, whether inert or active, depends on the incidence and severity of drug side-effects. The primary outcome measure should be objective and cough monitors are the ideal tool. Subjective outcome measures should be used to assess symptoms and health related quality of life. Properly conducted clinical trials are an opportunity to evaluate the benefits of currently available therapies and aid advances in the antitussive drug market.

  5. Clinical Trials in Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Seanna R.; Finn, Avni; Papakostas, Thanos D.; Eliott, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Research development is burgeoning for genetic and cellular therapy for retinal dystrophies. These dystrophies are the focus of many research efforts due to the unique biology and accessibility of the eye, the transformative advances in ocular imaging technology that allows for in vivo monitoring, and the potential benefit people would gain from success in the field – the gift of renewed sight. Progress in the field has revealed the immense complexity of retinal dystrophies and the challenges faced by researchers in the development of this technology. This study reviews the current trials and advancements in genetic and cellular therapy in the treatment of retinal dystrophies and also discusses the current and potential future challenges. PMID:26957839

  6. Advances in cardiology: clinical trial update.

    PubMed

    Howe, Andrew J; Shand, James A; Menown, Ian B A

    2011-05-01

    Multiple key cardiology trials have been presented or published over recent months, several with the potential to change clinical practice. In this article, we summarize and place in clinical context new trial findings regarding anticoagulation in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (enoxaparin, fondaparinux and unfractionated heparin), the implications of genetic polymorphisms and functional testing for antiplatelet therapy (clopidogrel and ticagrelor), new oral anticoagulants for use in atrial fibrillation (apixiban and rivaroxaban), optimal pacing strategies and pharmacological agents in heart failure (ivabradine, eplerenone, cardiac resynchronization therapy, telemonitoring and intracoronary bone marrow stem cell infusion). Clinical trials in percutaneous structural intervention (transcatheter aortic valve implantation, MONARC™ mitral annular implant, STARFlex(®) patent foramen ovale device) and advanced percutaneous coronary intervention (everolimus-eluting stents, biodegradable polymer/polymer-free technologies and contemporary use of intravascular ultrasound) are also discussed.

  7. Tooth whitening clinical trials: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Robert W

    2007-09-01

    Tooth whitening has been the subject of extensive clinical trials research since the introduction of the first hydrogen-peroxide whitening strips in 2000. Availability of digital image analysis, an unambiguous and reproducible method for assessing color change, has contributed to global clinical research and product development on whitening strips. The research has included a series of global randomized controlled trials in distinct sites and cultures, involving 6-6.5% hydrogen peroxide whitening strips used for 7-21 days. These studies, conducted at research hospitals, dental schools, and private dental practice, demonstrated significant color improvement with whitening strips relative to baseline and/or various controls without serious adverse events. This integrated clinical trials research provides important evidence of long-term safety and effectiveness of tooth whitening with 6-6.5% hydrogen peroxide whitening strips.

  8. Veterinary oncology clinical trials: design and implementation.

    PubMed

    Thamm, Douglas H; Vail, David M

    2015-08-01

    There has been a recent increase in interest among veterinarians and the larger biomedical community in the evaluation of novel cancer therapies in client-owned (pet) animals with spontaneous cancer. This includes novel drugs designed to be veterinary therapeutics, as well as agents for which data generated in animals with tumors may inform human clinical trial design and implementation. An understanding of the process involved in moving a therapeutic agent through the stages of clinical evaluation is critical to the successful implementation of clinical investigations, as well as interpretation of the veterinary oncology literature. This review outlines considerations in the design and conduct of the various phases of oncology clinical trials, along with recent adaptations/modifications of these basic designs that can enhance the generation of timely and meaningful clinical data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Industry funded clinical trials: bias and quality.

    PubMed

    Del Parigi, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    The quality of the clinical data supporting the development and ultimately the approval for medical use of new drugs is often challenged. Many share the perception that the business goals of the pharmaceutical industry overrule the best scientific efforts to accrue critical knowledge on a new molecule, in order to inform investment of resources, regulatory approvals and appropriate use by patients. Despite this common belief, few scientists have attempted to assess objectively the quality of industry funded (IF) clinical trials by measuring it and comparing it with non-industry funded (NIF) clinical trials in a data-driven fashion. Overall, the average quality of IF clinical research has been reported to be higher than the quality of NIF clinical research.

  10. Ethical Issues in Clinical Trials Involving Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.; Tinkle, Sally S.

    2009-01-01

    Nanomedicine shows tremendous promise for improving medical diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, but it also raises a variety of ethical concerns. Because of the paucity of data on the physicochemical properties of nanoscale materials in biological systems, clinical trials of nanomedicine products present some unique challenges related to risk minimization, management and communication involving human subjects. Although these clinical trials do not raise any truly novel ethical issues, the rapid development of nanotechnology and its potentially profound social and environmental impacts, add a sense of urgency to the problems that arise. PMID:17166777

  11. Ibn Sina and the clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Mohammad M; Mansouri, Davood; Sajadi, Mohamad-Reza M

    2009-05-05

    Approximately 1000 years ago, a physician by the name of Ibn Sina, known in the West as "Avicenna," wrote 7 conditions for "The recognition of the strengths of the characteristics of medicines through experimentation." Ibn Sina proposed applying logic to the testing of drugs, and in doing so, he wrote the earliest known treatise related to clinical trials. This article presents an overview and the historical context of Ibn Sina's life and work. In addition, the authors provide a translation of his treatise on drug testing and discuss its similarity to modern concepts of pharmacology and clinical trials.

  12. Clinical Trial Design in Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Daniel M; Yao, James C

    2016-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) present tremendous opportunities for productive clinical investigation, but substantial challenges as well. Investigators must be aware of common pitfalls in study design, informed by an understanding of the history of trials in the field, to make the best use of available data and our patient volunteers. We believe the salient issues in clinical trial design and interpretation in the NET field are patient homogeneity, standardized response assessment, and rigorous design and execution. Whether designing or interpreting a study in patients with NET, these principles should drive assessment.

  13. Implications of Look AHEAD for Clinical Trials and Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Rena R.

    2014-01-01

    Look AHEAD was a randomized clinical trial designed to examine the long-term health effects of weight loss in overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. The primary result was that the incidence of cardiovascular events over a median follow up of 9.6 years was not reduced in the intensive lifestyle group relative to the control group. This finding is discussed, with emphasis on its implications for design of clinical trials and clinical treatment of obese people with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24853636

  14. Clinical Trials in the Genomic Era.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Erel; Iasonos, Alexia; Younes, Anas

    2017-03-20

    Personalization of therapy to target specific molecular pathways has been placed in the forefront of cancer research. Initial reports from clinical trials designed to select patients for appropriate treatment on the basis of tumor characteristics not only have generated considerable excitement but also have identified several challenges. These challenges include the overcoming of regulatory and logistic difficulties, identification of the best selection biomarkers and diagnostic platforms that can be applied in the clinical setting, definition of relevant outcomes in small preselected patient populations, and the design of methods that facilitate rapid enrollment and interpretation of clinical trials by aggregating data across histologically diverse malignancies with common genetic alterations. Furthermore, because our knowledge of the functional consequences of many genetic alterations lags, investigators and sponsors struggle with choosing between ideal clinical trial designs and more practical ones. These challenges are amplified when more than one biomarker is used to select patients for a combination of targeted agents. This review summarizes the current status and challenges of clinical trials in the genomic era and proposes ways to address these challenges.

  15. Clinical designs of recent robot rehabilitation trials.

    PubMed

    Lo, Albert C

    2012-11-01

    Rehabilitation robots are increasingly being tested and promoted for clinical neurorehabilitation. Compared with conventional and manual methods, robots allow for a variety of advantages, particularly in the areas of interventional control and the ability to provide a high volume of facilitated movement. Since 1997, there have been more than 60 clinical trials reporting the use of two dozen different robots for neurorehabilitation. Although there are a number of smaller pilot studies, there are only few larger clinical trials. There may be a number of reasons why pilot robot studies do not materialize into larger studies. Beyond devices that failed to perform as intended, what are the clinical design issues that have limited these studies? Some basic considerations include randomization, inclusion of a control group, power calculation based on a clinically meaningful outcome, and finally, reproducible descriptions of the intervention being tested. Although many of these issues are general challenges presented for all rehabilitation studies, there are clinical design features that would likely greatly improve interpretation of results and better position robot devices toward the next clinical trial step. On the other hand, the absence of these elements, even in the setting of a pilot study, may significantly hamper the interpretation of results and not yield sufficient information on treatment effects, adverse event rates, dropout rate, and so on, to allow further testing to proceed to follow-up Food and Drug Administration phase II and III studies. Development of rehabilitation robots for clinical use needs to occur hand in hand with well-conducted clinical trials to provide evidence of efficacy while also taking into account costs.

  16. Conducting Clinical Trials in the Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Toole, Tom; Logeman, Jeri A.; Baum, Herbert M.

    1998-01-01

    Examines issues related to designing and conducting randomized studies of speech/language treatment effects (clinical trials) in the public school setting and provides suggestions regarding how such studies can be effectively organized and implemented in schools by clinicians. The work of the Communication Sciences and Disorders Research Group in…

  17. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    ending in blindness. In the United States, the total number of individuals affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other forms of rare inherited...AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-07-1-0720 TITLE: Inherited Retinal Degenerative...Final 3. DATES COVERED 27 Sep 2007 – 29 Sep 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

  18. Lung Cancer Clinical Trials: Advances in Immunotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    New treatments for lung cancer and aspects of joining a clinical trial are discussed in this 30-minute Facebook Live event, hosted by NCI’s Dr. Shakun Malik, head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, and Janet Freeman-Daily, lung cancer patient activist and founding member of #LCSM.

  19. Building data quality into clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Crerand, William J; Lamb, Jana; Rulon, Vera; Karal, Bilun; Mardekian, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Meaningful data begin with the collection process. Pharmaceutical companies are using several different strategies in clinical trials to ensure the highest quality of data. This article will examine these approaches, with an emphasis on case report form development through database release.

  20. Phase I (first-in-man) prophylactic vaccine's clinical trials: Selecting a clinical trial site

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Shantanu; Goyal, Vishal; Singh, Kavita

    2015-01-01

    An appropriately equipped and staffed Phase I unit is critical for smooth conduct of a first-in-man clinical trial. The first-in-man prophylactic vaccine trial(s) requires basic infrastructure of clinical trial site, experienced and dedicated site staff and healthy adults as volunteers. The facility should have access to equipment, emergency services, laboratory, pharmacy and archiving. In terms of design, infrastructure, workflow and manpower, a Phase I unit for testing a novel vaccine or drug are quite similar. However, there are some important attributes, which should be taken into consideration, while performing pre-trial site selection for conducting phase I trial with a new or novel vaccine. PMID:25878951

  1. Clinical trials in peripheral vascular disease: pipeline and trial designs: an evaluation of the ClinicalTrials.gov database.

    PubMed

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Patel, Manesh R; Chiswell, Karen; Tidemann-Miller, Beth A; Jones, W Schuyler; Conte, Michael S; White, Christopher J; Bhatt, Deepak L; Laird, John R; Hiatt, William R; Tasneem, Asba; Califf, Robert M

    2014-11-11

    Tremendous advances have occurred in therapies for peripheral vascular disease (PVD); until recently, however, it has not been possible to examine the entire clinical trial portfolio of studies for the treatment of PVD (both arterial and venous disease). We examined interventional trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov from October 2007 through September 2010 (n=40,970) and identified 676 (1.7%) PVD trials (n=493 arterial only, n=170 venous only, n=13 both arterial and venous). Most arterial studies investigated lower-extremity peripheral artery disease and acute stroke (35% and 24%, respectively), whereas most venous studies examined deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolus prevention (42%) or venous ulceration (25%). A placebo-controlled trial design was used in 27% of the PVD trials, and 4% of the PVD trials excluded patients >65 years of age. Enrollment in at least 1 US site decreased from 51% of trials in 2007 to 41% in 2010. Compared with noncardiology disciplines, PVD trials were more likely to be double-blinded, to investigate the use of devices and procedures, and to have industry sponsorship and assumed funding source, and they were less likely to investigate drug and behavioral therapies. Geographic access to PVD clinical trials within the United States is limited to primarily large metropolitan areas. PVD studies represent a small group of trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, despite the high prevalence of vascular disease in the general population. This low number, compounded by the decreasing number of PVD trials in the United States, is concerning and may limit the ability to inform current clinical practice of patients with PVD. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Clinical Trials in Peripheral Vascular Disease: Pipeline and Trial Designs: An Evaluation of the ClinicalTrials.gov Database

    PubMed Central

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Patel, Manesh R.; Chiswell, Karen; Tidemann-Miller, Beth A.; Jones, W. Schuyler; Conte, Michael S.; White, Christopher J.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Laird, John R.; Hiatt, William R.; Tasneem, Asba; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tremendous advances have occurred in therapies for peripheral vascular disease (PVD); however, until recently it has not been possible to examine the entire clinical trial portfolio of studies for treatment of PVD (both arterial and venous disease). Methods and Results We examined interventional trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov from October 2007 through September 2010 (n=40,970) and identified 676 (1.7%) PVD trials (n=493 arterial only, n=170 venous only, n=13 both arterial and venous). Most arterial studies investigated lower extremity peripheral artery disease and acute stroke (35% and 24%, respectively), while most venous studies examined deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolus prevention (42%) or venous ulceration (25%). A placebo-controlled trial design was used in 27% of the PVD trials, and 4% of the PVD trials excluded patients aged >65 years. Enrollment in at least 1 US site decreased from 51% in 2007 to 41% of trials in 2010. Compared with non-cardiology disciplines, PVD trials were more likely to be double-blinded, investigate use of devices and procedures, and have industry sponsorship and assumed funding source, and less likely to investigate drug and behavioral therapies. Geographic access to PVD clinical trials within the United States is limited to primarily large metropolitan areas. Conclusions PVD studies represent a small group of trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, despite the high prevalence of vascular disease in the general population. This low number, compounded by the decreasing number of PVD trials in the United States, is concerning and may limit the ability to inform current clinical practice of patients with PVD. PMID:25239436

  3. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design and conduct of clinical trials for hand osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kloppenburg, M; Maheu, E; Kraus, V B; Cicuttini, F; Doherty, M; Dreiser, R-L; Henrotin, Y; Jiang, G-L; Mandl, L; Martel-Pelletier, J; Nelson, A E; Neogi, T; Pelletier, J-P; Punzi, L; Ramonda, R; Simon, L S; Wang, S

    2015-05-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a very frequent disease, but yet understudied. However, a lot of works have been published in the past 10 years, and much has been done to better understand its clinical course and structural progression. Despite this new knowledge, few therapeutic trials have been conducted in hand OA. The last OARSI recommendations for the conduct of clinical trials in hand OA dates back to 2006. The present recommendations aimed at updating previous recommendations, by incorporating new data. The purpose of this expert opinion, consensus driven exercise is to provide evidence-based guidance on the design, execution and analysis of clinical trials in hand OA, where published evidence is available, supplemented by expert opinion, where evidence is lacking, to perform clinical trials in hand OA, both for symptom and for structure-modification. They indicate core outcome measurement sets for studies in hand OA, and list the methods and instruments that should be used to measure symptoms or structure. For both symptom- and structure-modification, at least pain, physical function, patient global assessment, HR-QoL, joint activity and hand strength should be assessed. In addition, for structure-modification trials, structural progression should be measured by radiographic changes. We also provide a research agenda listing many unsolved issues that seem to most urgently need to be addressed from the perspective of performing "good" clinical trials in hand OA. These updated OARSI recommendations should allow for better standardizing the conduct of clinical trials in hand OA in the next future.

  4. Portfolio of prospective clinical trials including brachytherapy: an analysis of the ClinicalTrials.gov database.

    PubMed

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; Miguelez, Cristina Gutierrez; Strnad, Vratislav; Soldatovic, Ivan; Ghadjar, Pirus; Jeremic, Branislav; Dal Pra, Alan; Aebersold, Daniel M; Lössl, Kristina

    2016-03-22

    To evaluate the current status of prospective interventional clinical trials that includes brachytherapy (BT) procedures. The records of 175,538 (100 %) clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were downloaded on September 2014 and a database was established. Trials using BT as an intervention were identified for further analyses. The selected trials were manually categorized according to indication(s), BT source, applied dose rate, primary sponsor type, location, protocol initiator and funding source. We analyzed trials across 8 available trial protocol elements registered within the database. In total 245 clinical trials were identified, 147 with BT as primary investigated treatment modality and 98 that included BT as an optional treatment component or as part of the standard treatment. Academic centers were the most frequent protocol initiators in trials where BT was the primary investigational treatment modality (p < 0.01). High dose rate (HDR) BT was the most frequently investigated type of BT dose rate (46.3 %) followed by low dose rate (LDR) (42.0 %). Prostate was the most frequently investigated tumor entity in trials with BT as the primary treatment modality (40.1 %) followed by breast cancer (17.0 %). BT was rarely the primary investigated treatment modality for cervical cancer (6.8 %). Most clinical trials using BT are predominantly in early phases, investigator-initiated and with low accrual numbers. Current investigational activities that include BT mainly focus on prostate and breast cancers. Important questions concerning the optimal usage of BT will not be answered in the near future.

  5. Sufficient trial size to inform clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Manski, Charles F.; Tetenov, Aleksey

    2016-01-01

    Medical research has evolved conventions for choosing sample size in randomized clinical trials that rest on the theory of hypothesis testing. Bayesian statisticians have argued that trials should be designed to maximize subjective expected utility in settings of clinical interest. This perspective is compelling given a credible prior distribution on treatment response, but there is rarely consensus on what the subjective prior beliefs should be. We use Wald’s frequentist statistical decision theory to study design of trials under ambiguity. We show that ε-optimal rules exist when trials have large enough sample size. An ε-optimal rule has expected welfare within ε of the welfare of the best treatment in every state of nature. Equivalently, it has maximum regret no larger than ε. We consider trials that draw predetermined numbers of subjects at random within groups stratified by covariates and treatments. We report exact results for the special case of two treatments and binary outcomes. We give simple sufficient conditions on sample sizes that ensure existence of ε-optimal treatment rules when there are multiple treatments and outcomes are bounded. These conditions are obtained by application of Hoeffding large deviations inequalities to evaluate the performance of empirical success rules. PMID:27601679

  6. Prostate cancer vaccines in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lubaroff, David M

    2012-07-01

    This review presents important information about the current state of the art for vaccine immunotherapy of prostate cancer. It includes important preclinical research for each of the important prostate cancer vaccines to have reached clinical trials. To date, the only prostate cancer vaccine that has completed Phase III trials and has been approved and licensed by the US FDA is Sipuleucel-T, which immunizes patients against the prostate-associated antigen prostatic acid phosphatase. The benefits and concerns associated with the vaccine are presented. A current Phase III trial is currently underway using the vaccinia-based prostate-specific antigen vaccine Prostvac-TRICOM. Other immunotherapeutic vaccines in trials include the Ad/prostate-specific antigen vaccine Ad5-prostate-specific antigen and the DNA/prostatic acid phosphatase vaccine. A cellular vaccine, GVAX, has been in clinical trials but has not seen continuous study. This review also delves into the multiple immune regulatory elements that must be overcome in order to obtain strong antitumor-associated antigen immune responses capable of effectively destroying prostate tumor cells.

  7. Implications of Look AHEAD for clinical trials and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Wing, R R

    2014-12-01

    Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) was a randomized clinical trial designed to examine the long-term health effects of weight loss in overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. The primary result was that the incidence of cardiovascular events over a median follow-up of 9.6 years was not reduced in the Intensive Lifestyle Group relative to the control group. This finding is discussed, with emphasis on its implications for design of trials and clinical treatment of obese persons with type 2 diabetes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Optimizing biologically targeted clinical trials for neurofibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, David H; Blakeley, Jaishri O; Korf, Bruce R; Packer, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The neurofibromatoses (neurofibromatosis type 1, NF1 and neurofibromatosis type 2, NF2) comprise the most common inherited conditions in which affected children and adults develop tumors of the central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, the authors discuss how the establishment of the Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium (NFCTC) has positively impacted on the design and execution of treatment studies for individuals with NF1 and NF2. Areas covered Using an extensive PUBMED search in collaboration with select NFCTC members expert in distinct NF topics, the authors discuss the clinical features of NF1 and NF2, the molecular biology of the NF1 and NF2 genes, the development and application of clinically relevant Nf1 and Nf2 genetically engineered mouse models and the formation of the NFCTC to enable efficient clinical trial design and execution. Expert opinion The NFCTC has resulted in a more seamless integration of mouse preclinical and human clinical trials efforts. Leveraging emerging enabling resources, current research is focused on identifying subtypes of tumors in NF1 and NF2 to deliver the most active compounds to the patients most likely to respond to the targeted therapy. PMID:23425047

  9. Optimizing biologically targeted clinical trials for neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, David H; Blakeley, Jaishri O; Korf, Bruce R; Packer, Roger J

    2013-04-01

    The neurofibromatoses (neurofibromatosis type 1, NF1 and neurofibromatosis type 2, NF2) comprise the most common inherited conditions in which affected children and adults develop tumors of the central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, the authors discuss how the establishment of the Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium (NFCTC) has positively impacted on the design and execution of treatment studies for individuals with NF1 and NF2. Using an extensive PUBMED search in collaboration with select NFCTC members expert in distinct NF topics, the authors discuss the clinical features of NF1 and NF2, the molecular biology of the NF1 and NF2 genes, the development and application of clinically relevant Nf1 and Nf2 genetically engineered mouse models and the formation of the NFCTC to enable efficient clinical trial design and execution. The NFCTC has resulted in a more seamless integration of mouse preclinical and human clinical trials efforts. Leveraging emerging enabling resources, current research is focused on identifying subtypes of tumors in NF1 and NF2 to deliver the most active compounds to the patients most likely to respond to the targeted therapy.

  10. Handling clinical comorbidity in randomized clinical trials in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Ruth; Beaudreau, Sherry A; Gould, Christine E; Froehlich, Wendy; Kraemer, Helena C

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to a) outline the importance of including patients with clinical comorbidities in Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs) of psychiatric treatments; and b) to propose a specific approach for best handling, analyzing and interpreting the data on clinical comorbidities in terms of their impact on treatment outcomes. To do this we first define and describe clinical comorbidity and differentiate it from other forms of comorbidity. We then describe the methodological and analytical problems associated with excluding patients with clinically comorbid conditions from RCTs, including the impact on the outcomes of RCTs in psychiatry and the impact on evidence-based clinical decision-making. We then address the challenges inherent to including patients with clinical comorbidities in RCTs. Finally, we propose a methodological and analytic approach to deal with these issues in RCTs which aims to significantly improve the information yielded from RCTs in psychiatry, and thus improve clinical decision-making.

  11. Dialogues on diversifying clinical trials: successful strategies for engaging women and minorities in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Coakley, Meghan; Fadiran, Emmanuel Olutayo; Parrish, L Jo; Griffith, Rachel A; Weiss, Eleanor; Carter, Christine

    2012-07-01

    There is mounting scientific evidence pointing to genetic or physiologic distinctions between genders and among racial and ethnic groups that influence disease risk and severity and response to treatment. The diverse enrollment of subjects engaged in clinical trials research is, thus, critical to developing safer and more effective drugs and medical devices. However, in the United States, there are striking disparities in clinical trial participation. To address this problem, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Office of Women's Health and the Society for Women's Health Research (SWHR) together convened the 2-day meeting, Dialogues on Diversifying Clinical Trials. The conference was held in Washington, DC, on September 22-23, 2011, and brought together a wide range of speakers from clinical research, industry, and regulatory agencies. Here, we present the major findings discussed at this meeting about female and minority patients and physicians and their willingness to participate in clinical trials and the barriers that sponsors face in recruiting a diverse trial population. We also discuss some recommendations for improving trial diversity through new technologies and greater efficiency in trial regulation and review.

  12. Using e-technologies in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Carmen; Campbell, Aimee N C; Miele, Gloria M; Brunner, Meg; Winstanley, Erin L

    2015-11-01

    Clinical trials have been slow to incorporate e-technology (digital and electronic technology that utilizes mobile devices or the Internet) into the design and execution of studies. In the meantime, individuals and corporations are relying more on electronic platforms and most have incorporated such technology into their daily lives. This paper provides a general overview of the use of e-technologies in clinical trials research, specifically within the last decade, marked by rapid growth of mobile and Internet-based tools. Benefits of and challenges to the use of e-technologies in data collection, recruitment and retention, delivery of interventions, and dissemination are provided, as well as a description of the current status of regulatory oversight of e-technologies in clinical trials research. As an example of ways in which e-technologies can be used for intervention delivery, a summary of e-technologies for treatment of substance use disorders is presented. Using e-technologies to design and implement clinical trials has the potential to reach a wide audience, making trials more efficient while also reducing costs; however, researchers should be cautious when adopting these tools given the many challenges in using new technologies, as well as threats to participant privacy/confidentiality. Challenges of using e-technologies can be overcome with careful planning, useful partnerships, and forethought. The role of web- and smartphone-based applications is expanding, and the increasing use of those platforms by scientists and the public alike make them tools that cannot be ignored. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Using e-technologies in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Carmen; Campbell, Aimee N. C.; Miele, Gloria M.; Brunner, Meg; Winstanley, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials have been slow to incorporate e-technology (digital and electronic technology that utilizes mobile devices or the Internet) into the design and execution of studies. In the meantime, individuals and corporations are relying more on electronic platforms and most have incorporated such technology into their daily lives. This paper provides a general overview of the use of e-technologies in clinical trials research, specifically within the last decade, marked by rapid growth of mobile and Internet-based tools. Benefits of and challenges to the use of e-technologies in data collection, recruitment and retention, delivery of interventions, and dissemination are provided, as well as a description of the current status of regulatory oversight of e-technologies in clinical trials research. As an example of ways in which e-technologies can be used for intervention delivery, a summary of e-technologies for treatment of substance use disorders is presented. Using e-technologies to design and implement clinical trials has the potential to reach a wide audience, making trials more efficient while also reducing costs; however, researchers should be cautious when adopting these tools given the many challenges in using new technologies, as well as threats to participant privacy/confidentiality. Challenges of using e-technologies can be overcome with careful planning, useful partnerships, and forethought. The role of web- and smartphone-based applications is expanding, and the increasing use of those platforms by scientists and the public alike make them tools that cannot be ignored. PMID:26176884

  14. Surgeons: A Future Role in Clinical Trials?

    PubMed

    Rusch

    1997-01-01

    Clinical trials, particularly large cooperative group trials, establish the standards that we use to treat many of our cancer patients. The process by which multi-institutional clinical trials are developed, performed and peer-reviewed in the United States is equaled by few other countries around the world. Our clinical cooperative groups should be considered an important national resource. However, they stand at an embattled crossroads. Traditionally, only two to three percent of cancer patients have been entered onto clinical trials. In the past few years, national accrual has declined even further-from approximately 22,000 to 16,000 patients annually. The reasons for this decline are unclear. Although it could simply reflect a hiatus in the activity of some groups (such as the recent reorganization of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project [NSABP]), it more likely reflects changes in our health care environment. Few managed care insurance plans permit patient entry into clinical studies on the premise that trials increase patient care costs. Yet, individualized patient care not delivered according to strict peer-reviewed standards may cost more. While this remains undetermined, oncologists in both academic and private practice are being pressured to work harder for fewer rewards. They are being told that investigational treatments are not allowed even if trials evaluating these treatments may ultimately lead to better and more cost-effective patient care. This is a sad state of affairs at a time when, on one hand, treatment for many solid tumors remains desperately inadequate and, on the other hand, new insights into tumor biology promise to alter fundamentally our approach to cancer care. Where do surgeons fit into this picture? The cooperative groups were initiated in the mid-1950s, primarily to evaluate the potential role of chemotherapy in cancer treatment. During the past forty years, surgeons have usually played a supporting role in

  15. Centralized National Ethical Review of Clinical Trials in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Vitezić, Dinko; Lovrek, Maja; Tomić, Siniša

    2009-01-01

    Aim To present the Croatian system of ethical review of clinical trials and assessment outcomes of the applications reviewed by the Croatian Central Ethics Committee. Methods Clinical trial applications reviewed by the Croatian Central Ethics Committee, which has the legal mandate to review clinical trials of medicinal products and medical devices, were retrospectively analyzed from May 2004 to the end of 2008 according to the number, research area, and type of opinion issued. Applications from 2008 were analyzed separately according to the study phase, participants (adult trials vs pediatric trials), and sponsor (commercial trials vs academic trials). Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results Since its establishment in 2004, the Croatian Central Ethics Committee has reviewed 407 trials. The greatest number of clinical trials was in the field of oncology (n = 69), mental and behavioral disorders (n = 52), and endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic diseases (n = 50). In the initial assessment of clinical trials, 60% applications received a conditionally positive opinion. In 28% of applications, the opinion had to be postponed because additional documentation or explanations were required. In 2008, the Croatian Central Ethics Committee reviewed 99 trials, most of which were phase III trials (n = 57). Five clinical trials included pediatric population and 3 were academic clinical trials. Conclusion The model of centralized clinical trial review seems to be appropriate for the current number of clinical trials conducted in Croatia. The efficient and standardized review process of clinical trials by the Central Ethics Committee may positively affect the increasing number of clinical trials conducted in Croatia. Future development includes the transparency of the clinical trials through a publically available database and establishing the basis for conducting academic clinical trials. PMID:19399943

  16. Clinical trials for stem cell therapies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, clinical trials with stem cells have taken the emerging field in many new directions. While numerous teams continue to refine and expand the role of bone marrow and cord blood stem cells for their vanguard uses in blood and immune disorders, many others are looking to expand the uses of the various types of stem cells found in bone marrow and cord blood, in particular mesenchymal stem cells, to uses beyond those that could be corrected by replacing cells in their own lineage. Early results from these trials have produced mixed results often showing minor or transitory improvements that may be attributed to extracellular factors. More research teams are accelerating the use of other types of adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells for diseases where beneficial outcome could result from either in-lineage cell replacement or extracellular factors. At the same time, the first three trials using cells derived from pluripotent cells have begun. PMID:21569277

  17. Privacy and confidentiality in pragmatic clinical trials.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Deven; Greene, Sarah M; Miner, Caroline S; Staman, Karen L; Welch, Mary Jane; Rubel, Alan

    2015-10-01

    With pragmatic clinical trials, an opportunity exists to answer important questions about the relative risks, burdens, and benefits of therapeutic interventions. However, concerns about protecting the privacy of this information are significant and must be balanced with the imperative to learn from the data gathered in routine clinical practice. Traditional privacy protections for research uses of identifiable information rely disproportionately on informed consent or authorizations, based on a presumption that this is necessary to fulfill ethical principles of respect for persons. But frequently, the ideal of informed consent is not realized in its implementation. Moreover, the principle of respect for persons—which encompasses their interests in health information privacy—can be honored through other mechanisms. Data anonymization also plays a role in protecting privacy but is not suitable for all research, particularly pragmatic clinical trials. In this article, we explore both the ethical foundation and regulatory framework intended to protect privacy in pragmatic clinical trials. We then review examples of novel approaches to respecting persons in research that may have the added benefit of honoring patient privacy considerations. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Clinical trials integrity: a CRO perspective.

    PubMed

    Beach, J E

    2001-01-01

    When contract research organizations (CROs) were first formed, pharmaceutical companies outsourced to them only certain aspects of the conduct of their clinical trials. At first CROs were highly specialized entities, providing, for example, either biostatistical advice, clinical research associates who monitored investigational sites for regulatory compliance, or regulatory support. Gradually, full service CROs emerged, offering a full range of services for clinical trials, including the selection of investigators and investigational sites, assistance with patient recruitment, safety surveillance and reporting, site audits, and data management and biostatistics. This evolving relationship between CROs and the pharmaceutical and medical device industries has resulted in CROs assuming more and more of the regulatory and ethical risks and responsibilities inherent in the conduct of clinical trials. In this full service role, CROs, unlike sponsors, are not interested in the outcome of study, but like sponsors, are subject to heavy regulation by the federal government, must follow applicable state laws, must respect international guidelines, and are obliged to follow their own operating procedures. Moreover, they are judged by the industry on the basis of the scope and quality of services provided, including the degree of adherence to the research protocol, regulatory requirements, and timelines; the quality of the professional working relationships with investigators and institutions, both academic and community-based; and the validity of the data. Further, CROs are subject to comprehensive audits by sponsoring companies, FDA, and other regulatory authorities. For all these reasons, CROs are being tasked with strict vigilance of all stages of the clinical trial process to ensure that the laws, regulations, and industry standards designed for the protection of human subjects and data integrity are maintained.

  19. Activating clinical trials: a process improvement approach.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Diego A; Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Yalcin, Ali; Zayas-Castro, José L; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2016-02-24

    The administrative process associated with clinical trial activation has been criticized as costly, complex, and time-consuming. Prior research has concentrated on identifying administrative barriers and proposing various solutions to reduce activation time, and consequently associated costs. Here, we expand on previous research by incorporating social network analysis and discrete-event simulation to support process improvement decision-making. We searched for all operational data associated with the administrative process of activating industry-sponsored clinical trials at the Office of Clinical Research of the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida. We limited the search to those trials initiated and activated between July 2011 and June 2012. We described the process using value stream mapping, studied the interactions of the various process participants using social network analysis, and modeled potential process modifications using discrete-event simulation. The administrative process comprised 5 sub-processes, 30 activities, 11 decision points, 5 loops, and 8 participants. The mean activation time was 76.6 days. Rate-limiting sub-processes were those of contract and budget development. Key participants during contract and budget development were the Office of Clinical Research, sponsors, and the principal investigator. Simulation results indicate that slight increments on the number of trials, arriving to the Office of Clinical Research, would increase activation time by 11 %. Also, incrementing the efficiency of contract and budget development would reduce the activation time by 28 %. Finally, better synchronization between contract and budget development would reduce time spent on batching documentation; however, no improvements would be attained in total activation time. The presented process improvement analytic framework not only identifies administrative barriers, but also helps to devise and evaluate potential improvement scenarios. The strength

  20. Evaluation of Pancreatic Cancer Clinical Trials and Benchmarks for Clinically Meaningful Future Trials: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Rahib, Lola; Fleshman, Julie M; Matrisian, Lynn M; Berlin, Jordan D

    2016-09-01

    Progress in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma has been minimal; it remains the only major cancer type with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. To explore why a large proportion of advanced pancreatic cancer clinical trials executed over the past 25 years have had negative results and to identify benchmarks that could have predicted success. Phase 3 studies of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were identified by searching clinicaltrials.gov and the scientific literature. Thirty-two phase 3 studies in 13 675 chemotherapy-naive patients resulted in 3 agents or combinations being considered clinically meaningful. Nineteen agents or combinations (70%) were tested in phase 2 trials preceding the phase 3 trial. In cases with paired phase 2 and 3 results, meeting the primary end point of the phase 2 trial predicted the outcome of the phase 3 trial 76% of the time but proceeded despite phase 2 negative results in 10 cases. We applied criteria for a clinically meaningful result identified by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Cancer Research Committee to these historical cases. Overall, progression-free and 1-year survival of experimental arms was compared with time period-controlled median values of control arms to normalize for the observed increase in response to gemcitabine over time. Applying the benchmark of a 50% improvement in overall survival as the primary end point to phase 2 data, or secondary end points of a 90% increase in 1-year survival or an 80% to 100% increase in progression-free survival, showed the greatest ability to predict a clinically meaningful phase 3 trial. Had these criteria been applied to these trials over the past 25 years, more than 11 571 patients enrolled in phase 3 trials that did not meet the primary end point could theoretically have been diverted to earlier-stage trials in an attempt to more rapidly advance the field.

  1. How do researchers decide early clinical trials?

    PubMed

    Grankvist, Hannah; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Launch of clinical investigation represents a substantial escalation in commitment to a particular clinical translation trajectory; it also exposes human subjects to poorly understood interventions. Despite these high stakes, there is little to guide decision-makers on the scientific and ethical evaluation of early phase trials. In this article, we review policies and consensus statements on human protections, drug regulation, and research design surrounding trial launch, and conclude that decision-making is largely left to the discretion of research teams and sponsors. We then review what is currently understood about how research teams exercise this discretion, and close by laying out a research agenda for characterizing the way investigators, sponsors, and reviewers approach decision-making in early phase research.

  2. Medicare reimbursement for clinical trial services: understanding Medicare coverage in establishing a clinical trial budget.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Mark; Korn, Jerald

    2005-01-01

    In designing and setting up a clinical trial, investigators and private sponsors must take into account what costs will or will not be covered by third-party insurers and government payment programs like Medicare and Medicaid. Failure to "cost out" the clinical trials accurately can yield one of two results: either third-party payors are billed improperly, or even illegally, for experimental care, or significant research-related care is not billed, with either the investigating institution, or the research subjects themselves, shouldering the cost. Unfortunately, because Medicare has established different coverage principles to be applied depending on the type of trial being conducted, costing out the trial is not an easy task. This Article looks at the various Medicare coverage principles as they apply to clinical trials, including the 2000 National Coverage Decision and the recent expansion in coverage for Class A Investigational Devices created by the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003. The Article then examines how the Medicare secondary payor rule, which states that providers may not bill Medicare for items or services when another party has primary responsibility for those services, relates to clinical trails in light of recent commentary. The Article concludes with the presentation of a general framework that investigators can use to establish a clinical trial budgeting and billing system.

  3. Novel ocular antihypertensive compounds in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, June; Runyan, Stephen A; Robinson, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Glaucoma is a multifactorial disease characterized by progressive optic nerve injury and visual field defects. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the most widely recognized risk factor for the onset and progression of open-angle glaucoma, and IOP-lowering medications comprise the primary treatment strategy. IOP elevation in glaucoma is associated with diminished or obstructed aqueous humor outflow. Pharmacotherapy reduces IOP by suppressing aqueous inflow and/or increasing aqueous outflow. Purpose: This review focuses on novel non-FDA approved ocular antihypertensive compounds being investigated for IOP reduction in ocular hypertensive and glaucoma patients in active clinical trials within approximately the past 2 years. Methods: The mode of IOP reduction, pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of these new agents were assessed. Relevant drug efficacy and safety trials were identified from searches of various scientific literature databases and clinical trial registries. Compounds with no specified drug class, insufficient background information, reformulations, and fixed-combinations of marketed drugs were not considered. Results: The investigational agents identified comprise those that act on the same targets of established drug classes approved by the FDA (ie, prostaglandin analogs and β-adrenergic blockers) as well as agents belonging to novel drug classes with unique mechanisms of action. Novel targets and compounds evaluated in clinical trials include an actin polymerization inhibitor (ie, latrunculin), Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitors, adenosine receptor analogs, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, cannabinoid receptor agonists, and a serotonin receptor antagonist. Conclusion: The clinical value of novel compounds for the treatment of glaucoma will depend ultimately on demonstrating favorable efficacy and benefit-to-risk ratios relative to currently approved prostaglandin analogs and β-blockers and/or having complementary

  4. How ethical is your clinical trial?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L; Folayan, M; Allman, D; Nkala, B; Kasirye, L M; Mingote, L R; Calazans, G; Mburu, R; Ntombela, F; Ditmore, M

    2010-01-01

    Is Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval and a rigorous informed consent process enough? It is our view that this is no longer the case. Conventional research ethics emphasise the importance of weighing the risks and benefits for prospective participants as one of the key determinants of deeming a clinical trial ethical. We support the notion that ethical obligations of research should include considerations not only at the individual level, but also at the community level (1,2). PMID:20561091

  5. ClinicalTrials.gov | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Clinical Trials.gov Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents “...a ... help with a clinical trial: Visit www.clinicaltrials.gov Brought to you by the National Library of ...

  6. Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... that work in people, and there are clinical trials going on all the time in virtually every area of medical research. People who volunteer to take part in clinical trials do so for several reasons, including the chance ...

  7. Trials, tricks and transparency: how disclosure rules affect clinical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Dahm, Matthias; González, Paula; Porteiro, Nicolás

    2009-12-01

    Scandals of selective reporting of clinical trial results by pharmaceutical firms have underlined the need for more transparency in clinical trials. We provide a theoretical framework which reproduces incentives for selective reporting and yields three key implications concerning regulation. First, a compulsory clinical trial registry complemented through a voluntary clinical trial results database can implement full transparency (the existence of all trials as well as their results is known). Second, full transparency comes at a price. It has a deterrence effect on the incentives to conduct clinical trials, as it reduces the firms' gains from trials. Third, in principle, a voluntary clinical trial results database without a compulsory registry is a superior regulatory tool; but we provide some qualified support for additional compulsory registries when medical decision-makers cannot anticipate correctly the drug companies' decisions whether to conduct trials.

  8. [Evidence from large clinical trials for Japanese hypertensive patients].

    PubMed

    Okura, Takafumi; Higaki, Jitsuo

    2011-11-01

    Large-scale clinical trials for the hypertensive patients have been carried out in Japan. Double-blind, placebo-controlled large clinical trials in Europe and USA showed that antihypertensive drugs prevented cardiovascular disease. Recently large clinical trials carried out in Japan. These clinical trials have shown that the onset rate of the heart vascular disease in Japanese hypertensive patients, the factor which influenced the onset of the cardiovascular disease, and the suppressant effect of cardiovascular disease of different antihypertensive drug class.

  9. Statistical significance testing and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Krause, Merton S

    2011-09-01

    The efficacy of treatments is better expressed for clinical purposes in terms of these treatments' outcome distributions and their overlapping rather than in terms of the statistical significance of these distributions' mean differences, because clinical practice is primarily concerned with the outcome of each individual client rather than with the mean of the variety of outcomes in any group of clients. Reports of the obtained outcome distributions for the comparison groups of all competently designed and executed randomized clinical trials should be publicly available no matter what the statistical significance of the mean differences among these groups, because all of these studies' outcome distributions provide clinically useful information about the efficacy of the treatments compared.

  10. Interpreting clinical trial results by deductive reasoning: In search of improved trial design.

    PubMed

    Kurbel, Sven; Mihaljević, Slobodan

    2017-10-01

    Clinical trial results are often interpreted by inductive reasoning, in a trial design-limited manner, directed toward modifications of the current clinical practice. Deductive reasoning is an alternative in which results of relevant trials are combined in indisputable premises that lead to a conclusion easily testable in future trials. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Systematic review of interventional sickle cell trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Lebensburger, Jeffrey D; Hilliard, Lee M; Pair, Lauren E; Oster, Robert; Howard, Thomas H; Cutter, Gary R

    2015-12-01

    The registry ClinicalTrials.gov was created to provide investigators and patients an accessible database of relevant clinical trials. To understand the state of sickle cell disease clinical trials, a comprehensive review of all 174 "closed," "interventional" sickle cell trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov was completed in January 2015. The majority of registered sickle cell disease clinical trials listed an academic center as the primary sponsor and were an early phase trial. The primary outcome for sickle cell disease trials focused on pain (23%), bone marrow transplant (BMT) (13%), hydroxyurea (8%), iron overload (8%), and pulmonary hypertension (8%). A total of 52 trials were listed as terminated or withdrawn, including 25 (14% of all trials) terminated for failure to enroll participants. At the time of this review, only 19 trials uploaded results and 29 trials uploaded a manuscript in the ClinicalTrials.gov database. A systematic review of pubmed.gov revealed that only 35% of sickle cell studies completed prior to 2014 resulted in an identified manuscript. In comparison, of 80 thalassemia trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, four acknowledged failure to enroll participants as a reason for trial termination or withdrawal, and 48 trials (60%) completed prior to 2014 resulted in a currently identified manuscript. ClinicalTrials.gov can be an important database for investigators and patients with sickle cell disease to understand the current available research trials. To enhance the validity of the website, investigators must update their trial results and upload trial manuscripts into the database. This study, for the first time, quantifies outcomes of sickle cell disease trials and provides support to the belief that barriers exist to successful completion, publication, and dissemination of sickle cell trial results. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Impact of the European clinical trials directive on prospective academic clinical trials associated with BMT.

    PubMed

    Frewer, L J; Coles, D; van der Lans, I A; Schroeder, D; Champion, K; Apperley, J F

    2011-03-01

    The European Clinical Trials Directive (EU 2001; 2001/20/EC) was introduced to improve the efficiency of commercial and academic clinical trials. Concerns have been raised by interested organizations and institutions regarding the potential for negative impact of the Directive on non-commercial European clinical research. Interested researchers within the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) were surveyed to determine whether researcher experiences confirmed this view. Following a pilot study, an internet-based questionnaire was distributed to individuals in key research positions in the European haemopoietic SCT community. Seventy-one usable questionnaires were returned from participants in different EU member states. The results indicate that the perceived impact of the European Clinical Trials Directive has been negative, at least in the research areas of interest to the EBMT.

  13. Clinical trial designs for therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Simon, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines have characteristics that require a new paradigm for phase I and phase II clinical development. Effective development plans may take advantage of some of the following observations: Dose ranging safety trials are not appropriate for many cancer vaccines. Dose ranging trials to establish an optimal biologic dose are often not practical. We have presented an efficient design of Korn et al. (4) to identify an immunogenic dose. Vaccine efficacy can be efficiently evaluated with tumor response as endpoint utilizing a two stage design with only 9 patients in the first stage. If no partial or complete responses are observed in the initial 9 patients, accrual to the trial is terminated. Optimization of vaccine delivery by comparing results of single arm phase II studies using immunological response as endpoint is problematic because of assay variation and potential non-comparability of patients in different studies. Randomized screening studies can be used to efficiently optimize vaccine immunogenicity. Efficiency in use of patients depends on having assay variation and inter-patient variability small relative to the difference in immunogenicity to be detected. Phase II studies using time to progression as endpoint are most interpretable if they employ randomized designs with a no-vaccine control group. Such designs may use an inflated type 1 error rate, and need not be prohibitively large if patients with rapidly progressive disease are studied. Interim monitoring plans may effectively limit the size of the trials by terminating accrual early when results are not consistent with the targeted improvement.

  14. Adaptive enrichment designs for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Simon, Noah; Simon, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Modern medicine has graduated from broad spectrum treatments to targeted therapeutics. New drugs recognize the recently discovered heterogeneity of many diseases previously considered to be fairly homogeneous. These treatments attack specific genetic pathways which are only dysregulated in some smaller subset of patients with the disease. Often this subset is only rudimentarily understood until well into large-scale clinical trials. As such, standard practice has been to enroll a broad range of patients and run post hoc subset analysis to determine those who may particularly benefit. This unnecessarily exposes many patients to hazardous side effects, and may vastly decrease the efficiency of the trial (especially if only a small subset of patients benefit). In this manuscript, we propose a class of adaptive enrichment designs that allow the eligibility criteria of a trial to be adaptively updated during the trial, restricting entry to patients likely to benefit from the new treatment. We show that our designs both preserve the type 1 error, and in a variety of cases provide a substantial increase in power.

  15. Status of the pediatric clinical trials enterprise: an analysis of the US ClinicalTrials.gov registry.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Sara K; Lam, Wendy K; Chiswell, Karen; Kemper, Alex R; Li, Jennifer S

    2012-11-01

    Clinical trials are the gold standard for generating evidence-based knowledge in medicine. Recent legislation requiring trials to be registered at ClinicalTrials.gov has enabled evaluation of the clinical trial enterprise as a whole, which was previously not possible. The purpose of this study was to create a snapshot of the pediatric clinical trial portfolio. All interventional trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov from July 2005 to September 2010 were included. Pediatric (ie, enrolling patients aged 0-18 years) trial characteristics, therapeutic area, location, and funding were described. Secondary objectives included describing pediatric trials over time and comparison with nonpediatric trials. During this time, 5035 pediatric trials were registered compared with >10 times as many nonpediatric trials. Neonates/infants were eligible for enrollment in 46.6% of trials versus children (77.9%) and adolescents (45.2%). Nearly one-half of pediatric trials enrolled <100 subjects, and more pediatric trials versus nonpediatric trials evaluated preventive therapies. The proportion of pediatric trials evaluating a drug intervention declined over time, and there were fewer Phase 0 to II versus Phase III to IV trials. Infectious disease/vaccine studies (23%) were the most common, followed by psychiatric/mental health (13%) studies. Many trials enrolled patients outside the United States, and <15% of trials were sponsored by the National Institutes of Health or other US federal agencies. Analysis of the ClinicalTrials.gov data set allows description of the current scope of pediatric trials. These data may be useful to stakeholders in informing decisions regarding the conduct of trials in children and provide insight into mechanisms to advance pediatric trial infrastructure and methodology toward improving child health.

  16. From ClinicalTrials.gov trial registry to an analysis-ready database of clinical trial results.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, M Soledad; Lobanov, Victor; Berlin, Jesse A

    2013-04-01

    The ClinicalTrials.gov web site provides a convenient interface to look up study results, but it does not allow downloading data in a format that can be readily used for quantitative analyses. To develop a system that automatically downloads study results from ClinicalTrials.gov and provides an interface to retrieve study results in a spreadsheet format ready for analysis. Sherlock(®) identifies studies by intervention, population, or outcome of interest and in seconds creates an analytic database of study results ready for analyses. The outcome classification algorithms used in Sherlock were validated against a classification by an expert. Having a database ready for analysis that can be updated automatically, dramatically extends the utility of the ClinicalTrials.gov trial registry. It increases the speed of comparative research, reduces the need for manual extraction of data, and permits answering a vast array of questions.

  17. Clinical trial registration in fertility trials - a case for improvement?

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Cynthia M; Showell, Marian G; Showell, Emily A E; Beetham, Penny; Baak, Nora; Mourad, Selma; Jordan, Vanessa M B

    2017-09-01

    What is the prevalence and source of prospectively and retrospectively registered and unregistered trials in fertility treatments? Trial registration is low and does not appear to be changing over the 5 years studied. Trial registration is associated with lower risk of bias than in unregistered trials. The Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group's specialised register was searched on 5 November 2015 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published from January 2010 to December 2014. Eligible trials included randomised women or men for fertility treatments, were published in full text, and written in English. Two reviewers independently assessed trial registration status for each trial, by searching the publication, trial registries, and by contacting the original authors. Of 693 eligible RCTS, only 44% were registered trials. Of 309 registered trials, 21.7% were prospectively registered, 15.8% were registered within 6 months of first patient enrolment and 62.5% were retrospectively registered trials. Prospective trial registration by country varied from 0% to 100%. The highest frequency of prospective trial registration amongst the top 10 publishing countries was 31% in the Netherlands. Only English language trials were included in this review. Prospective trial registration is still low. Journals, funders and ethics committees could have a greater role to increase trial registration. University of Auckland. No competing interests.

  18. Treatment of blepharitis: recent clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Karpecki, Paul M; Perez, Victor L

    2014-10-01

    Blepharitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the eyelids that is frequently encountered in clinical practice. The etiology of the disorder is complex and not fully understood, but the general consensus is that bacteria and inflammation contribute to the pathology. Blepharitis can be classified into anterior blepharitis, involving the anterior lid margin and eyelashes, and posterior blepharitis, characterized by dysfunction of the meibomian glands. Long-term management of symptoms may include daily eyelid cleansing routines and the use of therapeutic agents that reduce infection and inflammation. A cure is not possible in most cases, and subjective symptoms may persist even when a clinical assessment of signs indicates that the condition has improved. There are no established guidelines regarding therapeutic regimens, but recent clinical trials have shown that antibiotics and topical corticosteroids can produce significant improvement in signs and symptoms of blepharitis. Fixed combinations of a topical antibiotic and a corticosteroid offer an effective and convenient treatment modality that addresses both infectious and inflammatory components of the disease. Further clinical trials are needed to determine optimal therapies for managing blepharitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Soluble biomarker assessments in clinical trials in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M; Henrotin, Y; Lohmander, L S; Losina, E; Önnerfjord, P; Persiani, S

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this work was to describe requirements for inclusion of soluble biomarkers in osteoarthritis (OA) clinical trials and progress toward OA-related biomarker qualification. The Guidelines for Biomarkers Working Group, representing experts in the field of OA biomarker research from both academia and industry, convened to discuss issues related to soluble biomarkers and to make recommendations for their use in OA clinical trials based on current knowledge and anticipated benefits. This document summarizes current guidance on use of biomarkers in OA clinical trials and their utility at five stages, including preclinical development and phase I to phase IV trials. As demonstrated by this summary, biomarkers can provide value at all stages of therapeutics development. When resources permit, we recommend collection of biospecimens in all OA clinical trials for a wide variety of reasons but in particular, to determine whether biomarkers are useful in identifying those individuals most likely to receive clinically important benefits from an intervention; and to determine whether biomarkers are useful for identifying individuals at earlier stages of OA in order to institute treatment at a time more amenable to disease modification.

  20. Clinical Trials: Discerning Hype From Substance

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    The interest in being able to interpret and report results in clinical trials as being favorable is pervasive throughout health care research. This important source of bias needs to be recognized, and approaches need to be implemented to effectively address it. The prespecified primary analyses of the primary and secondary end points of a clinical trial should be clearly specified when disseminating results in press releases and journal publications. There should be a focus on these analyses when interpreting the results. A substantial risk for biased conclusions is produced by conducting exploratory analyses with an intention to establish that the benefit-to-risk profile of the experimental intervention is favorable, rather than to determine whether it is. In exploratory analyses, P values will be misleading when the actual sampling context is not presented to allow for proper interpretation, and the effect sizes of outcomes having particularly favorable estimates are probably overestimated because of “random high” bias. Performing exploratory analyses should be viewed as generating hypotheses that usually require reassessment in prospectively conducted confirmatory trials. Awareness of these issues will meaningfully improve our ability to be guided by substance, not hype, in making evidence-based decisions about medical care. PMID:20855804

  1. A matched crossover design for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Simon, Laura J; Chinchilli, Vernon M

    2007-09-01

    Two design principles are used frequently in clinical trials: 1) A subject is "matched" or "paired" with a similar subject to reduce the chance that other variables obscure the primary comparison of interest. 2) A subject serves as his/her own control by "crossing over" from one treatment to another during the course of an experiment. There are situations in which it may be advantageous to use the two design principles - crossing over and matching - simultaneously. That is, it may be advantageous to conduct a "paired crossover design," in which each subject, while paired with a similar subject, crosses over and receives each experimental treatment. In this paper, we describe two clinical trials conducted by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's Asthma Clinical Research Network that used a paired 2x2 crossover design. The Beta Adrenergic Response by GEnotype (BARGE) Study compared the effects of regular use of inhaled albuterol on mildly asthmatic patients with different genotypes at the 16th position of the beta-agonist receptor gene. The Smoking Modulates Outcomes of Glucocorticoid (SMOG) Therapy in Asthma Study evaluated the hypothesis that smoking reduces the response to inhaled corticosteroids. For such paired crossover designs, the primary parameter of interest is typically the treatment-by-pairing interaction term. In evaluating the relative efficiency of the paired 2x2 crossover design to two independent crossover designs with respect to this interaction term, we show that the paired 2x2 crossover design is more efficient if the correlations between the paired members on the same treatments are greater than their correlations on different treatments. This condition should hold in most circumstances, and therefore the paired crossover design deserves serious consideration for any clinical trial in which the crossing over and matching of subjects is deemed simultaneously beneficial.

  2. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Hand imaging in clinical trials in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, D J; Arden, N; Cicuttini, F; Crema, M D; Dardzinski, B; Duryea, J; Guermazi, A; Haugen, I K; Kloppenburg, M; Maheu, E; Miller, C G; Martel-Pelletier, J; Ochoa-Albíztegui, R E; Pelletier, J-P; Peterfy, C; Roemer, F; Gold, G E

    2015-05-01

    Tremendous advances have occurred in our understanding of the pathogenesis of hand osteoarthritis (OA) and these are beginning to be applied to trials targeted at modification of the disease course. The purpose of this expert opinion, consensus driven exercise is to provide detail on how one might use and apply hand imaging assessments in disease modifying clinical trials. It includes information on acquisition methods/techniques (including guidance on positioning for radiography, sequence/protocol recommendations/hardware for MRI); commonly encountered problems (including positioning, hardware and coil failures, sequences artifacts); quality assurance/control procedures; measurement methods; measurement performance (reliability, responsiveness, validity); recommendations for trials; and research recommendations.

  3. The Joys of Clinical Trials: A Case Study of a Multicenter Pharmaceutical Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soronson, Bryan M.; Shaw, Diana V.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of clinical trials in the pharmaceutical industry describes typical processes and administrative issues, then presents a case in which a foreign pharmaceutical company negotiated with a university for sponsorship of a multicenter clinical trial of a new drug therapy. Problems and important considerations in clinical trials are…

  4. The Joys of Clinical Trials: A Case Study of a Multicenter Pharmaceutical Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soronson, Bryan M.; Shaw, Diana V.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of clinical trials in the pharmaceutical industry describes typical processes and administrative issues, then presents a case in which a foreign pharmaceutical company negotiated with a university for sponsorship of a multicenter clinical trial of a new drug therapy. Problems and important considerations in clinical trials are…

  5. Gender Analysis of Moxifloxacin Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Cantero, Ma Teresa; Pardo, Ma Angeles

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To determine the inclusion of women and the sex-stratification of results in moxifloxacin Clinical Trials (CTs), and to establish whether these CTs considered issues that specifically affect women, such as pregnancy and use of hormonal therapies. Previous publications about women's inclusion in CTs have not specifically studied therapeutic drugs. Although this type of drug is taken by men and women at a similar rate, adverse effects occur more frequently in the latter. Methods: We reviewed 158 published moxifloxacin trials on humans, retrieved from MedLine and the Cochrane Library (1998–2010), to determine whether they complied with the gender recommendations published by U.S. Food and Drug Administration Guideline. Results: Of a total of 80,417 subjects included in the moxifloxacin CTs, only 33.7% were women in phase I, in contrast to phase II, where women accounted for 45%, phase III, where they represented 38.3% and phase IV, where 51.3% were women. About 40.9% (n=52) of trials were stratified by sex and 15.3% (n=13) and 9% (n=7) provided data by sex on efficacy and adverse effects, respectively. We found little information about the influence of issues that specifically affect women. Only 3 of the 59 journals that published the moxifloxacin CTs stated that authors should stratify their results by sex. Conclusions: Women are under-represented in the published moxifloxacin trials, and this trend is more marked in phase I, as they comprise a higher proportion in the other phases. Data by sex on efficacy and adverse effects are scarce in moxifloxacin trials. These facts, together with the lack of data on women-specific issues, suggest that the therapeutic drug moxifloxacin is only a partially evidence-based medicine. PMID:24180298

  6. Clustering clinical trials with similar eligibility criteria features.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tianyong; Rusanov, Alexander; Boland, Mary Regina; Weng, Chunhua

    2014-12-01

    To automatically identify and cluster clinical trials with similar eligibility features. Using the public repository ClinicalTrials.gov as the data source, we extracted semantic features from the eligibility criteria text of all clinical trials and constructed a trial-feature matrix. We calculated the pairwise similarities for all clinical trials based on their eligibility features. For all trials, by selecting one trial as the center each time, we identified trials whose similarities to the central trial were greater than or equal to a predefined threshold and constructed center-based clusters. Then we identified unique trial sets with distinctive trial membership compositions from center-based clusters by disregarding their structural information. From the 145,745 clinical trials on ClinicalTrials.gov, we extracted 5,508,491 semantic features. Of these, 459,936 were unique and 160,951 were shared by at least one pair of trials. Crowdsourcing the cluster evaluation using Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk), we identified the optimal similarity threshold, 0.9. Using this threshold, we generated 8806 center-based clusters. Evaluation of a sample of the clusters by MTurk resulted in a mean score 4.331±0.796 on a scale of 1-5 (5 indicating "strongly agree that the trials in the cluster are similar"). We contribute an automated approach to clustering clinical trials with similar eligibility features. This approach can be potentially useful for investigating knowledge reuse patterns in clinical trial eligibility criteria designs and for improving clinical trial recruitment. We also contribute an effective crowdsourcing method for evaluating informatics interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gateways to clinical trials. March 2003.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-03-01

    Gateways to clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and devlopment protal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV-CF, adalimumab, ademetionine, afeletecan hydrochloride, agomelatine, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, amdoxovir, aplidine, aranose, arsenic sulfide, atazanavir, atlizumab; Bimatoprost, BMS-181176, BMS-188667, bortezomib, bryostatin 1; Combretastatin A-4 phosphate; Darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, deferasirox, desloratadine, DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib-vaccine, DTI-0009; Eculizumab, edodekin alfa, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, epoetin, esomeprazole magnesium etoricoxib; Fampridine, fenretinide, FR-146687; Galiximab, gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, ganirelix acetate, gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gimatecan; HEA125xOKT3, hIL-13-PE38QQR, HSV-2 theracine, Hu14.18-IL-2, human gammaglobulin; Idraparinux sodium, imatinib mesylate, IMiD3, insulin detemir, interleukin-4, irofulven, ISAtx-247; JT-1001; Levetiracetam, levosimendan, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal vincristine sulfate, lixivaptan, lopinavir, lumiracoxib; Maxacalcitol, melatonin, midostaurin, MLN-518; Neridronic acid, nesiritide, nitronaproxen; Oblimersen sodium, oregovomab; PEG-filgrastim polyglutamate paclitaxel, prasterone, pregabalin; Rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine hydrochloride; SGN-30; T-1249, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, tiotropium bromide, tipranavir, TMC-114, trabectedin, transdermal selegiline; UK-427857; Valdecoxib, valganciclovir hydrochloride, vardenafil, vatalanib succinate, vincristine sulfate TCS; Zofenopril calcium.

  8. Meta-Analysis in Clinical Trials Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laird, Nan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit a 1986 article we published in this Journal, Meta-Analysis in Clinical Trials, where we introduced a random-effect model to summarize the evidence about treatment efficacy from a number of related clinical trials. Because of its simplicity and ease of implementation, our approach has been widely used (with more than 12,000 citations to date) and the “DerSimonian and Laird method” is now often referred to as the ‘standard approach’ or a ‘popular’ method for meta-analysis in medical and clinical research. The method is especially useful for providing an overall effect estimate and for characterizing the heterogeneity of effects across a series of studies. Here, we review the background that led to the original 1986 article, briefly describe the random-effects approach for meta-analysis, explore its use in various settings and trends over time and recommend a refinement to the method using a robust variance estimator for testing overall effect. We conclude with a discussion of repurposing the method for Big Data meta-analysis and Genome Wide Association Studies for studying the importance of genetic variants in complex diseases. PMID:26343745

  9. Strategies to Encourage Adoption in Multi-Site Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Guydish, Joseph; Tajima, Barbara; Manser, Sarah; Jessup, Martha

    2012-01-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) is intended to test promising drug abuse treatment models in multi-site clinical trials, and to support adoption of new interventions into clinical practice. Using qualitative research methods we studied adoption in the context of two multi-site clinical trials, one outside the CTN and one within the CTN. A total of 71 participants, representing 8 organizational levels ranging from clinic staff to clinical trial leaders, were interviewed about their role in the clinical trial, its interactions with clinics, and intervention adoption. Drawing on conceptual themes identified in these interviews, we report strategies that could be applied in planning, development and implementation of multi-site studies to better support adoption of tested interventions in study clinics after the trial has ended. Planning for adoption in the early stages of protocol development will enhance integration of new interventions into practice. PMID:17306726

  10. The Changing Landscape of Randomized Clinical Trials in Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, W Schuyler; Roe, Matthew T; Antman, Elliott M; Pletcher, Mark J; Harrington, Robert A; Rothman, Russell L; Oetgen, William J; Rao, Sunil V; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Curtis, Lesley H; Hernandez, Adrian F; Masoudi, Frederick A

    2016-10-25

    Large randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular disease have proliferated over the past 3 decades, with results that have influenced every aspect of cardiology practice. Despite these advances, there remains a substantial need for more high-quality evidence to inform cardiovascular clinical practice, given the increasing prevalence of cardiovascular disease around the world. Traditional clinical trials are increasingly challenging due to rising costs, increasing complexity and length, and burdensome institutional and regulatory requirements. This review will examine the current landscape of cardiovascular clinical trials in the United States, highlight recently conducted registry-based clinical trials, and discuss the potential attributes of the recently launched pragmatic clinical trial by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute's National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network, called the ADAPTABLE (Aspirin Dosing: A Patient-centric Trial Assessing the Benefits and Long-term Effectiveness) trial.

  11. From Laboratory Research to a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Keevil, C. William; Salgado, Cassandra D.; Schmidt, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This is a translational science article that discusses copper alloys as antimicrobial environmental surfaces. Bacteria die when they come in contact with copper alloys in laboratory tests. Components made of copper alloys were also found to be efficacious in a clinical trial. Background: There are indications that bacteria found on frequently touched environmental surfaces play a role in infection transmission. Methods: In laboratory testing, copper alloy samples were inoculated with bacteria. In clinical trials, the amount of live bacteria on the surfaces of hospital components made of copper alloys, as well as those made from standard materials, was measured. Finally, infection rates were tracked in the hospital rooms with the copper components and compared to those found in the rooms containing the standard components. Results: Greater than a 99.9% reduction in live bacteria was realized in laboratory tests. In the clinical trials, an 83% reduction in bacteria was seen on the copper alloy components, when compared to the surfaces made from standard materials in the control rooms. Finally, the infection rates were found to be reduced by 58% in patient rooms with components made of copper, when compared to patients' rooms with components made of standard materials. Conclusions: Bacteria die on copper alloy surfaces in both the laboratory and the hospital rooms. Infection rates were lowered in those hospital rooms containing copper components. Thus, based on the presented information, the placement of copper alloy components, in the built environment, may have the potential to reduce not only hospital-acquired infections but also patient treatment costs. PMID:26163568

  12. Estimands in clinical trials - broadening the perspective.

    PubMed

    Akacha, Mouna; Bretz, Frank; Ruberg, Stephen

    2017-01-15

    Defining the scientific questions of interest in a clinical trial is crucial to align its planning, design, conduct, analysis, and interpretation. However, practical experience shows that oftentimes specific choices in the statistical analysis blur the scientific question either in part or even completely, resulting in misalignment between trial objectives, conduct, analysis, and confusion in interpretation. The need for more clarity was highlighted by the Steering Committee of the International Council for Harmonization (ICH) in 2014, which endorsed a Concept Paper with the goal of developing a new regulatory guidance, suggested to be an addendum to ICH guideline E9. Triggered by these developments, we elaborate in this paper what the relevant questions in drug development are and how they fit with the current practice of intention-to-treat analyses. To this end, we consider the perspectives of patients, physicians, regulators, and payers. We argue that despite the different backgrounds and motivations of the various stakeholders, they all have similar interests in what the clinical trial estimands should be. Broadly, these can be classified into estimands addressing (a) lack of adherence to treatment due to different reasons and (b) efficacy and safety profiles when patients, in fact, are able to adhere to the treatment for its intended duration. We conclude that disentangling adherence to treatment and the efficacy and safety of treatment in patients that adhere leads to a transparent and clinical meaningful assessment of treatment risks and benefits. We touch upon statistical considerations and offer a discussion of additional implications. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Conducting multiple-site clinical trials in medical rehabilitation research.

    PubMed

    Fuhrer, Marcus J

    2005-11-01

    This article examines the distinctive opportunities and challenges of multiple-site clinical trials, as distinguished from trials conducted by a single program. Among the topics discussed are: the role of clinical trials generally in medical rehabilitation research; definitions of "clinical trials" and "multiple site"; the distinction between exploratory and capstone trials; the potential advantages and disadvantages of multiple-site trials; planning issues in terms of sampling designs, the choice of outcome measures, approaches to dealing with intervention fidelity, organizational structures, authorship, and the conduct of collateral studies; and implementation issues in terms of pilot-testing procedures, handling emerging issues, and optimizing communication.

  14. Economic advantage of pharmacogenomics - clinical trials with genetic information.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Wataru; Mizushima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the benefit and loss for the pharmaceutical companies when they adopt introducing pharmacogenomics in their clinical trials (in the following description, clinical trials by using pharmacogenomics is called "pgx clinical trial"), that is, when they use genetic information in their clinical trials. Particularly, the benefit for the pharmaceutical companies in terms of following two points is analyzed. 1. Development cost of new drug and period of clinical trial can be reduced because a clinical trial needs less subjects, 2. The new drug can be placed on the market earlier because the development period can be shortened. A survey conducted by Japan Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association revealed that the pharmaceutical companies in Japan are interested in "pgx clinical trial". Specifically, 95% of the member companies (n=19) of the Association replied that the establishment of a guideline for pgx clinical trial by regulatory authorities are highly desirable. However, 65% of them (n=13) also replied that pgx clinical trial is difficult for the time being. It can be concluded that the pharmaceutical companies are positive about pgx clinical trial, but they cannot take a step towards it for several reasons: some of them may be worried their sales for non-responders will be reduced, poor understanding of pgx among the concerned parties, and not matured methodology of pgx clinical trial. This study shows that the advantage of pgx clinical trial outweighs its disadvantage. The sales may decrease because the drug is not used for non-responders, however, the number of subjects necessary for a clinical trial can be reduced, study period can be shortened and the drug can be marketed earlier. Furthermore, adverse events (AE) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) during the clinical trial and post-marketing phase can be markedly reduced. This represents a great benefit for the patients, pharmaceutical companies and the society as a whole.

  15. Globalization of clinical trials - where are we heading?

    PubMed

    George, Melvin; Selvarajan, Sandhiya; S, Suresh-Kumar; Dkhar, Steven A; Chandrasekaran, Adithan

    2013-05-01

    The last decade has witnessed a greater transparency in clinical research with the advent of clinical trial registries. The aim of the study was to describe the trends in the globalization of clinical trials in the last five years. We performed an internet search using the WHO International clinical trials registry platform (WHO ICTRP) to identify the clinical trials conducted from January 2007 to December 31, 2011 among 25 countries. Among the 25 countries, the United States, Japan and Germany occupy the top positions in the total number of clinical trials conducted. Clinical trials in the US (36312) constituted 31.5% of the total number of trials performed during this period. However over a period of five years both US and Western Europe appear to show a decline, while the emerging countries show a rise in clinical trials registered. Among the emerging countries China, India and Republic of Korea are most active regions involved in clinical trials. Cancer, diabetes and respiratory diseases were most widely researched areas overall. Although the study confirms the transition in the clinical trials research towards emerging countries, the developed regions of the world still contribute to more than 70% of the trials registered worldwide.

  16. Adherence in AIDS clinical trials: a framework for clinical research and clinical care.

    PubMed

    Ickovics, J R; Meisler, A W

    1997-04-01

    Assessment of adherence within AIDS clinical trials is a critical component of the successful evaluation of therapeutic outcomes. Poor medication adherence can result in the misinterpretation of clinical trial data. Research on factors affecting adherence in AIDS clinical trials has been scarce, and few investigations have evaluated strategies for enhancing patient participation. One reason may be the absence of a conceptual framework to guide research. Consistent with previous research on medical adherence, we propose a framework whereby factors affecting adherence in AIDS clinical trials can be categorized as characteristics of the: (a) individual, (b) treatment regimen, (c) patient-provider relationship, (d) clinical setting, and (e) disease. This framework is used as a heuristic for reviewing studies that examine factors affecting adherence in AIDS clinical trials. Suggestions for future research and clinical intervention are provided. These efforts are timely because adherence is now the center of attention in discourse about the efficacy of the new class of protease inhibitor drugs; non-adherence has been linked to viral resistance and drug failure. Efforts to identify factors that influence adherence to AIDS clinical trials can inform future attempts to improve adherence and retention. Better adherence protects the scientific integrity of AIDS clinical trials, promoting more efficient and accurate evaluations of therapeutic value. Accelerated access to new treatments may follow, ultimately enhancing patient care.

  17. Linking ClinicalTrials.gov and PubMed to Track Results of Interventional Human Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Huser, Vojtech; Cimino, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In an effort to understand how results of human clinical trials are made public, we analyze a large set of clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, the world’s largest clinical trial registry. Materials and Methods We considered two trial result artifacts: (1) existence of a trial result journal article that is formally linked to a registered trial or (2) the deposition of a trial’s basic summary results within the registry. Results The study sample consisted of 8907 completed, interventional, phase 2-or-higher clinical trials that were completed in 2006-2009. The majority of trials (72.2%) had no structured trial-article link present. Atotal of 2367 trials (26.6%) deposited basic summary results within the registry. Ofthose, 969 trials (10.9%) were classified as trials with extended results and 1398 trials (15.7%) were classified as trials with only required basic results. The majority of the trials (54.8%) had no evidence of results, based on either linked result articles or basic summary results (silent trials), while a minimal number (9.2%) report results through both registry deposition and publication. Discussion Our study analyzes the body of linked knowledge around clinical trials (which we refer to as the “trialome”). Our results show that most trials do not report results and, for those that do, there is minimal overlap in the types of reporting. We identify several mechanisms by which the linkages between trials and their published results can be increased. Conclusion Our study shows that even when combining publications and registry results, and despite availability of several information channels, trial sponsors do not sufficiently meet the mandate to inform the public either via a linked result publication or basic results submission. PMID:23874614

  18. Clinical trials for stem cell transplantation: when are they needed?

    PubMed

    Van Pham, Phuc

    2016-04-27

    In recent years, both stem cell research and the clinical application of these promising cells have increased rapidly. About 1000 clinical trials using stem cells have to date been performed globally. More importantly, more than 10 stem cell-based products have been approved in some countries. With the rapid growth of stem cell applications, some countries have used clinical trials as a tool to diminish the rate of clinical stem cell applications. However, the point at which stem cell clinical trials are essential remains unclear. This commentary discusses when stem cell clinical trials are essential for stem cell transplantation therapies.

  19. What Are Clinical Trials? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of medical research are being conducted all the time. The Different Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials related to drugs are classified into ... not a contract. You may withdraw from the trial at any time. Fall 2010 Issue: Volume 5 Number 3 Page ...

  20. Clinical Trials: A Congressional Focus of Need.

    PubMed

    Coltman

    1997-01-01

    Senator Specter, Honorable Members of the Committee, it is my high privilege to speak on behalf of a subject near and dear to my heart. I have been involved in the care of patients with cancer and in cancer clinical trials for the past 34 years. I chair the Southwest Oncology Group, the largest National Cancer Institute-supported cancer clinical research organization. In 1996, this Group enrolled 6,359 patients to therapeutic cancer clinical trials from all 50 states (Fig. 1), and completed the randomization of 18,867 normal, healthy men into the intergroup Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. Cancer clinical trials are always designed to improve the outcomes of cancer patients. However, only 2%-3% of all eligible cancer patients in this country are treated on these cutting-edge trials. It is clear that this number must increase dramatically in order for us to be able to translate the monumental advances emanating from the basic cancer research laboratories into effective diagnosis, prevention and treatment strategies for patients with and at high risk for cancer. This low accrual is related to multiple factors: First, managed care has had a negative impact related to its refusal to reimburse for the clinical care aspects of patients on cancer clinical trials. During my presentation to the President's Cancer Panel in San Antonio in September, I shared three thoughts as to what the Panel should be asking as they pursue the question of "Managed Care's Role in the War on Cancer": &bul; "Should managed care bear a portion of the costs of clinical research as a form of R & D?" &bul; "What State or Federal legislation is needed to assure that managed care patients have access to cancer clinical research?" &bul; "Will there be any future for cancer clinical research when the managed care tidal wave finally reaches Chicago and New York?" The NCI-Department of Defense and the NCI-Department of Veterans Affairs Interagency Agreements are superb models of what needs to be done

  1. Lessons in hypertension from new clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Shawna D

    2009-11-01

    Three important principles have emerged from recent epidemiologic and clinical studies in hypertension. First, patients with hypertension most often have other cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity and diabetes. Second, hypertension remains grossly undertreated. Third, at blood pressure levels once considered "high-normal," early organ damage may already be taking place in patients with multiple risk factors that, without treatment, can eventually lead to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The concept of evaluating global or overall risk is gaining wide acceptance, and US treatment guidelines may soon reflect these findings and assist clinicians in identifying individuals who are most likely to benefit from therapy. Results from clinical trials suggest that among the various pharmacologic agents available to treat hypertension, blockers of the renin-angiotensin system are effective in type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease, conditions that often occur in conjunction with hypertension.

  2. Patient Engagement in Neurological Clinical Trials Design: A Conference Summary.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Enesha M; Meurer, William; Harney, Deneil; Silbergleit, Robert; Lake, Bray Patrick; Clark, Christina; Gipson, Debbie; Barsan, William

    2015-12-01

    The conference objectives included educating patients and advocates about clinical trials, educating the clinical research community about patient perspectives on participating in clinical trial design, and identifying strategies to increase participation in clinical trial design for neurological disorders. Observations were noted during a 1-day conference attended by patients, patient advocates, clinical trial staff, and investigators. The conference offered didactic sessions, small, and large group discussions. Conference participants were patients, patient advocates, clinical trial staff, students, and investigators interested in engaging patients in clinical trial design for neurological disorders. Conference participants were asked to consider lessons learned that could increase patient engagement in clinical trial design. We found that there is growing interest in including patients in the design of clinical trials for neurological disorders. Several themes emerged on how to move forward: networking; the multifaceted roles of advocates in research; training and education; creating patient-researcher partnerships; and clinical trials regulation issues. The conference provided a forum for dialogue regarding stakeholder engagement in the design of clinical trials for neurological disorders. This experience provides a template for replication and dissemination of this conference and informs next steps to accelerate the pathway from dialogue to action. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. ClinicalTrials.gov Turns 10! | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials ClinicalTrials.gov Turns 10! Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of ... and whom to contact for more information. ClinicalTrials.gov's Helpful Features ClinicalTrials.gov has many helpful consumer ...

  4. Treatment of chytridiomycosis requires urgent clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Berger, Lee; Speare, Rick; Pessier, Allan; Voyles, Jamie; Skerratt, Lee F

    2010-11-01

    Effective and safe treatments of amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), are needed to prevent mortality in captive programs, reduce the risk of disease spread, and better manage the disease in threatened wild populations. Bd is susceptible to a range of antifungal agents and low levels of heat (>30 degrees C) when tested in vitro, but there are few proven methods for clearing adult amphibians of Bd, and acute drug toxicity is a problem for tadpoles and juveniles. In postmetamorphic animals, heat (32 and 37 degrees C) is the only well-supported treatment. Antifungal drugs have not undergone rigorous testing--for example, trials were small or lacked controls and thorough post-treatment testing. In addition, pharmacokinetic studies have not been performed so there are no data on blood or tissue levels of antifungal agents. However, itraconazole baths have been widely used in amphibian rescue and conservation programs and anecdotal evidence suggests that they are effective for adults and subadults. In an experimental trial with tadpoles, a low dose of itraconazole cleared Bd but may have been associated with cutaneous depigmentation. Fluconazole appeared safe for tadpoles as it did not cause mortality, and future attempts to find an effective dose may be worthwhile. Palliative restoration of blood sodium and potassium levels by administration of electrolyte solutions appears useful in frogs with clinical chytridiomycosis. Randomised and blinded clinical trials, which include basic pharmacological studies, are urgently needed to provide comparable evidence for the safety and efficacy of treatment options which are likely to vary with amphibian species. Priorities are to validate and optimize the use of heat and itraconazole regimes.

  5. [Clinical trials: vulnerability and ethical relativism].

    PubMed

    Lima, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    Research in human beings is an important chapter of medical ethics. In recent years, investigation has been taken over by profit driven corporations that must guarantee the medical and commercial application of results. This new model of investigation has generated conflicts of interest in doctor-patient, researcher-subject relationship. The inevitable debate and media reaction has led. These trials of controversial design to regions of the globe where the vulnerability of the populations continues to allow their undertaking. This article includes a historical perspective on experimentation in human beings and the conditions that led to its regulation: the Nuremberg CODE, followed by the Helsinky Declaration in its different versions, and the Belmont Report, that defend the subject according to the ethic of principles used in western medicine. There is then a review of the attempts to change international regulation to reintroduce clinical trials with placebo--which since 1996 is only permitted where there are no therapeutic or diagnostic methods--on populations that would otherwise have no access to treatment. This then leads on to the issue of double standards in medical investigation defended by many investigators and some official entities. The article concludes that it may be prudent to allow local ethical commissions to approve deviation from the established norm if such is necessary to resolve urgent questions of health in the country, but it is unacceptable that any such emergency is used as a reason to reduce the ethical prerequisites, in clinical trials. It also concludes that true urgency is in making available to all who need it the effective products already in existence. Furthermore, that the acceptance of ethical relativism can result in the exploitation of vulnerable third world populations for research programmes that cannot be undertaken in their sponsoring countries due to the ethical restrictions in place.

  6. Registration Quality Assessment of Acupuncture Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jing; Zhao, Ye; Wang, Xiaogang; Jiang, Jianjun; Tian, Jinhui; Yang, Kehu

    2013-01-01

    Background Registration can help with transparency of acupuncture clinical trials (ACTs) by making protocol information and results available to the public. Recently, the number of registered ACTs has increased greatly, but only a few researchers have focused on the quality of ACTs registration. This review provides the first assessment of the registration quality of ACTs and the baseline information for future development. Methods All records of ACTs registered in the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) were collected. Data was extracted and input to Excel spreadsheets. The current 20 items of the WHO Trial Registration Data Set (TRDS) and the special prepared items for acupuncture intervention details were used to assess the registration quality of ACTs. Results A total of 740 records, found in 11 registries, were examined. The number of registered ACTs increased rapidly and involved a number of different diseases. The completeness of 20 items was not too poor due to 16 of them had a higher reported percentage (>85%). The completeness of the 20 items was different among registries. For example, the average registration percentage of 20 items in Clinicaltrials.gov, ChiCTR, ISRCTN and ANZCTR were 89.6%, 92.2%, 82.4% and 91.6% respectively. Detailed information regarding acupuncture intervention was seriously insufficient. Among the 740 registration records, 89.2% lacked information on the style of acupuncture, 80.8% did not contain details regarding the needles used, 53.5% lacked information on the treatment regimen and 76.2% did not give details of other interventions administered with acupuncture. Conclusions The overall registration quality of ACTs is not high enough due to the serious lack of information on the specifics of acupuncture intervention. It is vital that a number of special items be set regarding acupuncture in order to develop a suitable system for the registration of ACTs. PMID:23555686

  7. Analyzing incomplete longitudinal clinical trial data.

    PubMed

    Molenberghs, Geert; Thijs, Herbert; Jansen, Ivy; Beunckens, Caroline; Kenward, Michael G; Mallinckrodt, Craig; Carroll, Raymond J

    2004-07-01

    Using standard missing data taxonomy, due to Rubin and co-workers, and simple algebraic derivations, it is argued that some simple but commonly used methods to handle incomplete longitudinal clinical trial data, such as complete case analyses and methods based on last observation carried forward, require restrictive assumptions and stand on a weaker theoretical foundation than likelihood-based methods developed under the missing at random (MAR) framework. Given the availability of flexible software for analyzing longitudinal sequences of unequal length, implementation of likelihood-based MAR analyses is not limited by computational considerations. While such analyses are valid under the comparatively weak assumption of MAR, the possibility of data missing not at random (MNAR) is difficult to rule out. It is argued, however, that MNAR analyses are, themselves, surrounded with problems and therefore, rather than ignoring MNAR analyses altogether or blindly shifting to them, their optimal place is within sensitivity analysis. The concepts developed here are illustrated using data from three clinical trials, where it is shown that the analysis method may have an impact on the conclusions of the study.

  8. Citation Sentiment Analysis in Clinical Trial Papers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wu, Yonghui; Wang, Jingqi; Dong, Xiao; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In scientific writing, positive credits and negative criticisms can often be seen in the text mentioning the cited papers, providing useful information about whether a study can be reproduced or not. In this study, we focus on citation sentiment analysis, which aims to determine the sentiment polarity that the citation context carries towards the cited paper. A citation sentiment corpus was annotated first on clinical trial papers. The effectiveness of n-gram and sentiment lexicon features, and problem-specified structure features for citation sentiment analysis were then examined using the annotated corpus. The combined features from the word n-grams, the sentiment lexicons and the structure information achieved the highest Micro F-score of 0.860 and Macro-F score of 0.719, indicating that it is feasible to use machine learning methods for citation sentiment analysis in biomedical publications. A comprehensive comparison between citation sentiment analysis of clinical trial papers and other general domains were conducted, which additionally highlights the unique challenges within this domain.

  9. Statistical reasoning in clinical trials: hypothesis testing.

    PubMed

    Kelen, G D; Brown, C G; Ashton, J

    1988-01-01

    Hypothesis testing is based on certain statistical and mathematical principles that allow investigators to evaluate data by making decisions based on the probability or implausibility of observing the results obtained. However, classic hypothesis testing has its limitations, and probabilities mathematically calculated are inextricably linked to sample size. Furthermore, the meaning of the p value frequently is misconstrued as indicating that the findings are also of clinical significance. Finally, hypothesis testing allows for four possible outcomes, two of which are errors that can lead to erroneous adoption of certain hypotheses: 1. The null hypothesis is rejected when, in fact, it is false. 2. The null hypothesis is rejected when, in fact, it is true (type I or alpha error). 3. The null hypothesis is conceded when, in fact, it is true. 4. The null hypothesis is conceded when, in fact, it is false (type II or beta error). The implications of these errors, their relation to sample size, the interpretation of negative trials, and strategies related to the planning of clinical trials will be explored in a future article in this journal.

  10. Citation Sentiment Analysis in Clinical Trial Papers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wu, Yonghui; Wang, Jingqi; Dong, Xiao; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In scientific writing, positive credits and negative criticisms can often be seen in the text mentioning the cited papers, providing useful information about whether a study can be reproduced or not. In this study, we focus on citation sentiment analysis, which aims to determine the sentiment polarity that the citation context carries towards the cited paper. A citation sentiment corpus was annotated first on clinical trial papers. The effectiveness of n-gram and sentiment lexicon features, and problem-specified structure features for citation sentiment analysis were then examined using the annotated corpus. The combined features from the word n-grams, the sentiment lexicons and the structure information achieved the highest Micro F-score of 0.860 and Macro-F score of 0.719, indicating that it is feasible to use machine learning methods for citation sentiment analysis in biomedical publications. A comprehensive comparison between citation sentiment analysis of clinical trial papers and other general domains were conducted, which additionally highlights the unique challenges within this domain. PMID:26958274

  11. Future Clinical Trials in DIPG: Bringing Epigenetics to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Morales La Madrid, Andres; Hashizume, Rintaro; Kieran, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    In spite of major recent advances in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) molecular characterization, this body of knowledge has not yet translated into better treatments. To date, more than 250 clinical trials evaluating radiotherapy along with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy as well as newer biologic agents have failed to improve the dismal outcome when compared to palliative radiation alone. The biology of DIPG remained unknown until recently when the neurosurgical expertise along with the recognition by the scientific and clinical community of the importance of tissue sampling at diagnosis; ideally, in the context of a clinical trial and by trained neurosurgical teams to maximize patient safety. These pre-treatment tumor samples, and others coming from tissue obtained post-mortem, have yielded new insights into DIPG molecular pathogenesis. We now know that DIPG comprises a heterogeneous disease with variable molecular phenotypes, different from adult high-grade glioma, other non-pontine pediatric high-grade gliomas, and even between pontine gliomas. The discovery of histone H3.3 or H3.1 mutations has been an important step forward in understanding tumor formation, maintenance, and progression. Pharmacologic reversal of DIPG histone demethylation therefore offers an important potential intervention strategy for the treatment of DIPG. To date, clinical trials of newly diagnosed or progressive DIPG with epigenetic (histone) modifiers have been unsuccessful. Whether this failure represents limited activity of the agents used, their CNS penetration, redundant pathways within the tumor, or the possibility that histone mutations are necessary only to initiate DIPGs but not maintain their growth, suggest that a great deal still needs to be elucidated in both the underlying biology of these pathways and the drugs designed to target them. In this review, we will discuss the role of both epigenetic and genetic mutations within DIPG and the development of treatment

  12. Adding value to clinical trial registries: insights from Australian Cancer Trials Online, a website for consumers.

    PubMed

    Dear, Rachel; Barratt, Alexandra; Askie, Lisa; McGeechan, Kevin; Arora, Sheena; Crossing, Sally; Currow, David; Tattersall, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Clinical trials registries are now operating in the USA, Europe, Australia, China, and India and more are planned. Trial registries could be an excellent source of information about clinical trials for patients and others affected by cancer as well as health care professionals, but may be difficult for patients to navigate and use. An opportunity arose in Australia to develop a consumer friendly cancer clinical trials website (Australian Cancer Trials Online (ACTO), www.australiancancertrials.gov.au) using an automated data feed from two large clinical trial registries. In this article, we describe aspects of this new website, and explore ways in which such a website may add value to clinical trial data which are already collected and held by trial registries. The development of ACTO was completed by a Web company working in close association with staff at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR), and with consumer representatives. Data for the website were sourced directly and only from clinical trial registries, thus avoiding the creation of an additional trials database. It receives an automated, daily data feed of newly registered cancer clinical trials from both the ANZCTR and Clinical Trials.gov. The development of ACTO exemplifies the advantage of a local clinical trial registry working with consumers to provide accessible information about cancer clinical trials to meet consumers' information needs. We found that the inclusion of a lay summary added substantial value for consumers, and recommend that consideration be given to adding a lay summary to the mandatory data items collected by all trial registries. Furthermore, improved navigation, decision support tools, and consistency in data collection between clinical trial registries will also enable consumer websites to provide additional value for users. Clinical trial registration is not compulsory in Australia. If the additional cancer items (including a lay summary) are not provided

  13. SPIRIT 2013 Statement: defining standard protocol items for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Chan, An-Wen; Tetzlaff, Jennifer M; Altman, Douglas G; Laupacis, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Krle A-Jerić, Karmela; Hrobjartsson, Asbjørn; Mann, Howard; Dickersin, Kay; Berlin, Jesse A; Dore, Caroline J; Parulekar, Wendy R; Summerskill, William S M; Groves, Trish; Schulz, Kenneth F; Sox, Harold C; Rockhold, Frank W; Rennie, Drummond; Moher, David

    2015-12-01

    The protocol of a clinical trial serves as the foundation for study planning, conduct, reporting, and appraisal. However, trial protocols and existing protocol guidelines vary greatly in content and quality. This article describes the systematic development and scope of SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials) 2013, a guideline for the minimum content of a clinical trial protocol. The 33-item SPIRIT checklist applies to protocols for all clinical trials and focuses on content rather than format. The checklist recommends a full description of what is planned; it does not prescribe how to design or conduct a trial. By providing guidance for key content, the SPIRIT recommendations aim to facilitate the drafting of high-quality protocols. Adherence to SPIRIT would also enhance the transparency and completeness of trial protocols for the benefit of investigators, trial participants, patients, sponsors, funders, research ethics committees or institutional review boards, peer reviewers, journals, trial registries, policymakers, regulators, and other key stakeholders.

  14. SPIRIT 2013 statement: defining standard protocol items for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Chan, An-Wen; Tetzlaff, Jennifer M; Altman, Douglas G; Laupacis, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Krleža-Jerić, Karmela; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Mann, Howard; Dickersin, Kay; Berlin, Jesse A; Doré, Caroline J; Parulekar, Wendy R; Summerskill, William S M; Groves, Trish; Schulz, Kenneth F; Sox, Harold C; Rockhold, Frank W; Rennie, Drummond; Moher, David

    2013-02-05

    The protocol of a clinical trial serves as the foundation for study planning, conduct, reporting, and appraisal. However, trial protocols and existing protocol guidelines vary greatly in content and quality. This article describes the systematic development and scope of SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials) 2013, a guideline for the minimum content of a clinical trial protocol.The 33-item SPIRIT checklist applies to protocols for all clinical trials and focuses on content rather than format. The checklist recommends a full description of what is planned; it does not prescribe how to design or conduct a trial. By providing guidance for key content, the SPIRIT recommendations aim to facilitate the drafting of high-quality protocols. Adherence to SPIRIT would also enhance the transparency and completeness of trial protocols for the benefit of investigators, trial participants, patients, sponsors, funders, research ethics committees or institutional review boards, peer reviewers, journals, trial registries, policymakers, regulators, and other key stakeholders.

  15. Transparency and public accessibility of clinical trial information in Croatia: how it affects patient participation in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Šolić, Ivana; Stipčić, Ana; Pavličević, Ivančica; Marušić, Ana

    2017-06-15

    Despite increased visibility of clinical trials through international trial registries, patients often remain uninformed of their existence, especially if they do not have access to adequate information about clinical research, including the language of the information. The aim of this study was to describe the context for transparency of clinical trials in Croatia in relation to countries in Central and Eastern Europe, and to assess how informed Croatian patients are about clinical trials and their accessibility. We assessed the transparency of clinical trials from the data available in the public domain. We also conducted an anonymous survey on a convenience sample of 257 patients visiting two family medicine offices or an oncology department in south Croatia, and members of national patients' associations. Despite legal provisions for transparency of clinical trials in Croatia, they are still not sufficiently visible in the public domain. Among countries from Central and Eastern Europe, Croatia has the fewest number of registered trials in the EU Clinical Trials Registry. 66% of the patients in the survey were aware of the existence of clinical trials but only 15% were informed about possibilities of participating in a trial. Although 58% of the respondents were willing to try new treatments, only 6% actually participated in a clinical trial. Only 2% of the respondents were aware of publicly available trial registries. Our study demonstrates that there is low transparency of clinical trials in Croatia, and that Croatian patients are not fully aware of clinical trials and the possibilities of participating in them, despite reported availability of Internet resources and good communication with their physicians. There is a need for active policy measures to increase the awareness of and access to clinical trials to patients in Croatia, particularly in their own language.

  16. [Features of Clinical Register of Chinese Medicine and Pharmacy Based on ClinicalTrials.gov. (USA)].

    PubMed

    Lu, Peng-fei; Liao, Xing; Xie, Yan-ming; Wang, Zhi-guo

    2015-11-01

    In recent 10 years, clinical trials of Chinese medicine and pharmacy (cMP) at clinicalTrials.gov.(USA) are gradually increasing. In order to analyze features of CMP clinical register, ClinicalTrials.gov register database were comprehensively retrieved in this study. Included clinical trials were input one item after another using EXCEL. A final of 348 CMP clinical trials were included. Results showed that China occupied the first place in CMP clinical register, followed by USA. CMP clinical trials, sponsored mainly by colleges/universities and hospitals, mostly covered interventional studies on evaluating safety/effectiveness of CMP. The proportions of studies, sponsored by mainland China and companies, recruitment trials and multi-center clinical trials in interventional trials were increasing. The proportions of studies sponsored by Hong Kong and Taiwan, research completed trials, unclear research status, phase III clinical trials, and published research trials in interventional trials were decreasing. Published ratios of CMP clinical trials were quite low. There were more missing types and higher proportions in trial register information.

  17. Empowering natural clinical trial advocates: nurses and outreach workers.

    PubMed

    Mitschke, Diane B; Cassel, Kevin; Higuchi, Paula

    2007-03-01

    Cancer clinical trials are essential to advancing the prevention and treatment of cancer, yet adult participation rates in clinical trials remain abysmal. Despite the essential contributions of clinical trials to science and medicine, adult participation in clinical trials remains exceedingly low, with only 2%-4% of all adult patients with cancer in the U.S. participating in clinical trials. Clinical trials accrual rates in Hawai'i follow this national trend of less than 3% of eligible patients participating in trials. Recognizing the need to increase awareness about clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service-Pacific Region, through the Hawai'i Clinical Trials Education Coalition, has employed strategic dissemination plans to train and educate key target audiences, including registered nurses, nursing students, and community outreach workers about the availability of over 90 cancer clinical trials in Hawai'i. Previous research suggests that nurses often play a vital role in increasing a patient's understanding of clinical trials and may also act as a patient advocate in regards to participation in a clinical trial. A train-the-trainer model curriculum was developed using the Clinical Trials Education Series (CTES), a collection of multi-level resources designed by the National Cancer Institute, to educate various constituents about clinical trials. The training curriculum and workshop format is adapted based on both formal and informal needs assessments conducted with audiences prior to the planned training, yet key elements remain central to the training model. In addition, an interactive, internet-based case study was developed using local place names and cultural cues to allow training participants to engage in realistic and practical methods for locating and sharing information about clinical trials with patients and the public. This training model has been implemented in a variety of settings including three statewide nursing

  18. Registering Randomized Clinical Trials and the Case for CONSORT

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Timothy R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent controversies in medical research and the increasing reliance on randomized clinical trials to inform evidence-based practice have prompted coordinated attempts to standardize reporting and register information about trials for consistency and transparency. The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials guidelines (D. G. Altman et al., 2001) and trial registry are described in this article, and the implications for clinical and experimental research in psychopharmacology are discussed. PMID:18179303

  19. Design and conduct of clinical trials in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Altman, R D

    1990-01-01

    Clinical features of osteoarthritis (OA) require that general recommendations for the design and conduct of clinical trials be modified in order to apply these concepts to clinical trials in OA. A format has been devised for design of clinical trials in OA. In order to assess the applicability of this format, it has been compared to a published clinical trial: chondroprotective agents versus standard treatment of OA of the knee. The published study appeared reliably designed and conducted in a manner that provided an answer to most of the questions posed. The study appears to form a sound basis for additional studies.

  20. Investigator experiences with financial conflicts of interest in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Paula A; Sekeres, Melanie; Hoey, John; Lexchin, Joel; Ferris, Lorraine E; Moher, David; Wu, Wei; Kalkar, Sunila R; Van Laethem, Marleen; Gruneir, Andrea; Gold, Jennifer; Maskalyk, James; Streiner, David L; Taback, Nathan; Chan, An-Wen

    2011-01-12

    Financial conflicts of interest (fCOI) can introduce actions that bias clinical trial results and reduce their objectivity. We obtained information from investigators about adherence to practices that minimize the introduction of such bias in their clinical trials experience. Email survey of clinical trial investigators from Canadian sites to learn about adherence to practices that help maintain research independence across all stages of trial preparation, conduct, and dissemination. The main outcome was the proportion of investigators that reported full adherence to preferred trial practices for all of their trials conducted from 2001-2006, stratified by funding source. 844 investigators responded (76%) and 732 (66%) provided useful information. Full adherence to preferred clinical trial practices was highest for institutional review of signed contracts and budgets (82% and 75% of investigators respectively). Lower rates of full adherence were reported for the other two practices in the trial preparation stage (avoidance of confidentiality clauses, 12%; trial registration after 2005, 39%). Lower rates of full adherence were reported for 7 practices in the trial conduct (35% to 43%) and dissemination (53% to 64%) stages, particularly in industry funded trials. 269 investigators personally experienced (n = 85) or witnessed (n = 236) a fCOI; over 70% of these situations related to industry trials. Full adherence to practices designed to promote the objectivity of research varied across trial stages and was low overall, particularly for industry funded trials.

  1. Investigator experiences with financial conflicts of interest in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Financial conflicts of interest (fCOI) can introduce actions that bias clinical trial results and reduce their objectivity. We obtained information from investigators about adherence to practices that minimize the introduction of such bias in their clinical trials experience. Methods Email survey of clinical trial investigators from Canadian sites to learn about adherence to practices that help maintain research independence across all stages of trial preparation, conduct, and dissemination. The main outcome was the proportion of investigators that reported full adherence to preferred trial practices for all of their trials conducted from 2001-2006, stratified by funding source. Results 844 investigators responded (76%) and 732 (66%) provided useful information. Full adherence to preferred clinical trial practices was highest for institutional review of signed contracts and budgets (82% and 75% of investigators respectively). Lower rates of full adherence were reported for the other two practices in the trial preparation stage (avoidance of confidentiality clauses, 12%; trial registration after 2005, 39%). Lower rates of full adherence were reported for 7 practices in the trial conduct (35% to 43%) and dissemination (53% to 64%) stages, particularly in industry funded trials. 269 investigators personally experienced (n = 85) or witnessed (n = 236) a fCOI; over 70% of these situations related to industry trials. Conclusion Full adherence to practices designed to promote the objectivity of research varied across trial stages and was low overall, particularly for industry funded trials. PMID:21226951

  2. Bacteriophage Therapy: Advances in Formulation Strategies and Human Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Lavigne, Rob; Brüssow, Harald

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a number of phage therapy phase I and II safety trials have been concluded, showing no notable safety concerns associated with the use of phage. Though hurdles for efficient treatment remain, these trials hold promise for future phase III clinical trials. Interestingly, most phage formulations used in these clinical trials are straightforward phage suspensions, and not much research has focused on the processing of phage cocktails in specific pharmaceutical dosage forms. Additional research on formulation strategies and the stability of phage-based drugs will be of key importance, especially with phage therapy advancing toward phase III clinical trials.

  3. Attitudes toward clinical trials among patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Carlton; Lanzkron, Sophie; Diener-West, Marie; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer; Strouse, John J; Bediako, Shawn; Onojobi, Gladys; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2014-06-01

    Background A substantial number of planned clinical trials for sickle cell disease (SCD) have terminated early due to insufficient patient enrollment. Purpose To describe attitudes toward clinical trials among a sample of adults with SCD and identify patient-level factors associated with these attitudes. Methods Our data came from a sample (N = 291) of primarily adults with SCD participating in the Improving Patient Outcomes with Respect and Trust (IMPORT) study, which is a federally funded observational study of SCD patient experiences in seeking healthcare. Attitudes toward clinical trials were assessed using items from the Perceptions of Participation in Clinical Research instrument. Patient factors examined as potential correlates of clinical trial attitudes were demographics, disease severity, engagement in self-care, trust, healthcare experience ratings, and prior history of participation in clinical trials. Multiple regression analyses were used to identify patient-level correlates of clinical trial attitudes. Results Our sample of SCD patients expressed overwhelmingly favorable attitudes about clinical trials, with 77%-92% of our sample expressing agreement with a series of positive statements about clinical trials in general. Demographics, engagement in self-care, healthcare experience ratings, and prior trial participation each explained significant portions of the variability in clinical trial attitudes. Limitations The generalizability of our results to the entire SCD population may be of concern as the study participants were all receiving care at comprehensive sickle cell centers and already participating in clinical research. Conclusion Our results suggest that, in principle, adults with SCD enrolled in an observational study express very positive general attitudes about clinical trial participation and that specific factors attached to particular clinical trial opportunities may play a greater role in a SCD patient's decision to participate than a

  4. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Hip imaging in clinical trials in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gold, G E; Cicuttini, F; Crema, M D; Eckstein, F; Guermazi, A; Kijowski, R; Link, T M; Maheu, E; Martel-Pelletier, J; Miller, C G; Pelletier, J-P; Peterfy, C G; Potter, H G; Roemer, F W; Hunter, D J

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of hip in osteoarthritis (OA) has seen considerable progress in the past decade, with the introduction of new techniques that may be more sensitive to structural disease changes. The purpose of this expert opinion, consensus driven recommendation is to provide detail on how to apply hip imaging in disease modifying clinical trials. It includes information on acquisition methods/techniques (including guidance on positioning for radiography, sequence/protocol recommendations/hardware for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)); commonly encountered problems (including positioning, hardware and coil failures, artifacts associated with various MRI sequences); quality assurance/control procedures; measurement methods; measurement performance (reliability, responsiveness, and validity); recommendations for trials; and research recommendations.

  5. Advancing the educational and career pathway for clinical trials nurses.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kathleen; White, Kathryn; Roydhouse, Jessica K

    2013-04-01

    Clinical trials nurses play a pivotal role in the conduct of clinical research, but the educational and career pathway for these nurses remains unclear. This article reports findings from a survey of nurses working in cancer clinical trials research in Australia. Most participants held postgraduate qualifications (42 of 61); however, clinical trials education was primarily attained through short professional development courses. Interest in pursuing trial-specific postgraduate education was high, but barriers were identified, including cost, time, and unclear benefit for career advancement. Job titles varied substantially, which is indicative of an unclear employment pathway. These findings suggest that initiatives to improve the educational and career pathway for clinical trials nurses are needed and should include the following: formal educational preparation, greater consistency in employment status, and clearer career progression. These strategies should be underpinned by broad professional recognition of the clinical trials nurse as a specialized nursing role.

  6. Trial design and endpoints in clinical transplant research.

    PubMed

    Knight, Simon R; Morris, Peter J; Schneeberger, Stefan; Pengel, Liset H M

    2016-08-01

    The number of clinical trials in solid organ transplantation is progressively increasing year on year, but the quality of design and reporting still varies considerably. The constraints on organ availability, improving short-term outcomes, ethics and timescales involved in organ transplantation present unique challenges for trials in this field. An understanding of the methodology and potential pitfalls in clinical research is essential both to interpret trial results and to design robust studies. This review summarizes the scope and quality of reporting in existing transplant clinical trials and details aspects of clinical trial methodology with particular relevance to transplantation. We highlight initiatives designed to improve the quality of this process to ensure that the results of clinical trials are robust, well reported and of use in everyday clinical practice. © 2016 Steunstichting ESOT.

  7. Clinical trial of sparfloxacin for lepromatous leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, G P; Garcia-Ignacio, B Y; Chavez, V E; Livelo, J B; Jimenez, C L; Parrilla, M L; Franzblau, S G

    1994-01-01

    Nine previously untreated patients with lepromatous leprosy were treated with 200 mg of sparfloxacin daily for 12 weeks to determine whether this drug is bactericidal for Mycobacterium leprae in humans. The efficacy of therapy was monitored both clinically and by measuring changes in morphological index, mouse footpad infectivity, and the radiorespirometric activity of M. leprae organisms obtained from serial biopsy specimens and also by determining titers of phenolic glycolipid-I in serum. Most patients showed clinical improvement within 2 weeks of treatment; this was accompanied by significant reductions in the morphological index, mouse footpad infectivity, and bacillary radiorespirometric activity. After 4 weeks of treatment, all patients had a morphological index of zero and specimens from most patients were noninfectious for mice, while the median decrease in radiorespirometric activity was > 99%. Overall results by the rapid radiorespirometric assay paralleled those of the mouse footpad and morphological index assays. Sparfloxacin given at 200 mg once daily appears to be rapidly bactericidal in humans, with activity similar to that observed in a previous clinical trial with 400 mg of ofloxacin. PMID:8141581

  8. Clinical Trials in Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Panakanti, Tandava Krishnan; Chhablani, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) is the second most common retinal vascular disorder. The management of macular edema has changed considerably over time. The laser is considered the gold standard treatment for over two decades. However, visual recovery with laser is usually slow and incomplete. The advent of intravitreal agents, specifically anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) have heralded a new era which promises rapid recovery of vision and quality of vision. Randomized clinical trials have reported optimal results with anti-VEGF agents (ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept) compared to laser therapy or steroids. However, nearly 50% of the patients require repeat intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy up to 4 years after initiating therapy to sustain the visual gains. The adverse events (systemic and ocular) of these agents are minimal. Monotherapy with anti-VEGF agents have been found to provide better results than any combination with laser. This review article summarizes evidence from randomized controlled trials evaluating treatment options for the treatment of macular edema secondary to BRVO with a special focus on anti-VEGF therapy. PMID:26957837

  9. Guidelines for the conduct of clinical trials for spinal cord injury as developed by the ICCP panel: clinical trial design

    PubMed Central

    Lammertse, D; Tuszynski, MH; Steeves, JD; Curt, A; Fawcett, JW; Rask, C; Ditunno, JF; Fehlings, MG; Guest, JD; Ellaway, PH; Kleitman, N; Blight, AR; Dobkin, BH; Grossman, R; Katoh, H; Privat, A; Kalichman, M

    2014-01-01

    The International Campaign for Cures of Spinal Cord Injury Paralysis established a panel tasked with reviewing the methodology for clinical trials for spinal cord injury (SCI), and making recommendations on the conduct of future trials. This is the fourth of four papers. Here, we examine the phases of a clinical trial program, the elements, types, and protocols for valid clinical trial design. The most rigorous and valid SCI clinical trial would be a prospective double-blind randomized control trial utilizing appropriate placebo control subjects. However, in specific situations, it is recognized that other trial procedures may have to be considered. We review the strengths and limitations of the various types of clinical trials with specific reference to SCI. It is imperative that the design and conduct of SCI clinical trials should meet appropriate standards of scientific inquiry to insure that meaningful conclusions about efficacy and safety can be achieved and that the interests of trial subjects are protected. We propose these clinical trials guidelines for use by the SCI clinical research community. PMID:17179970

  10. Challenging Issues in Clinical Trial Design: Part 4 of a 4-Part Series on Statistics for Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Pocock, Stuart J; Clayton, Tim C; Stone, Gregg W

    2015-12-29

    As a sequel to last week's paper on the fundamentals of clinical trial design, this paper tackles related controversial issues: noninferiority trials, the value of factorial designs, the importance and challenges of strategy trials, Data Monitoring Committees (including when to stop a trial early), and the role of adaptive designs. All topics are illustrated by relevant examples from cardiology trials. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Publication bias in clinical trials of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Vawdrey, David K; Hripcsak, George

    2013-02-01

    To measure the rate of non-publication and assess possible publication bias in clinical trials of electronic health records. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov to identify registered clinical trials of electronic health records and searched the biomedical literature and contacted trial investigators to determine whether the results of the trials were published. Publications were judged as positive, negative, or neutral according to the primary outcome. Seventy-six percent of trials had publications describing trial results; of these, 74% were positive, 21% were neutral, and 4% were negative (harmful). Of unpublished studies for which the investigator responded, 43% were positive, 57% were neutral, and none were negative; the lower rate of positive results was significant (p<0.001). The rate of non-publication in electronic health record studies is similar to that in other biomedical studies. There appears to be a bias toward publication of positive trials in this domain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical trial awareness: Changes over time and sociodemographic disparities.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Amanda; Diefenbach, Michael A; Doucette, John; Oh, William K; Galsky, Matthew D

    2015-06-01

    Lack of clinical trial awareness is a known obstacle to clinical trial enrollment. We sought to define the prevalence of clinical trial awareness in the US population, determine characteristics associated with increased trial awareness, and explore potential disparities in trial awareness. We utilized data from the Health Information National Trends Survey from 2008 and 2012. Logistic regression was utilized to assess predictors of clinical trial awareness, particularly sociodemographic variables and information-seeking preferences. Trial awareness and information-seeking preferences were compared in patient subgroups and between the two time periods. Clinical trial awareness increased from 68% to 74% between 2008 and 2012. In the 2012 dataset, higher education level (odds ratio: 3.52, 95% confidence interval: 2.16-5.74), higher yearly income category (odds ratio: 1.84, 95% confidence interval: 1.17-2.89), and Internet use (odds ratio: 2.13, 95% confidence interval: 1.52-3.00) were significantly associated with clinical trial awareness. Hispanic ethnicity (odds ratio: 0.41, 95% confidence interval: 0.25-0.68) was significantly associated with decreased awareness. Clinical trial awareness increased in African-American/Blacks (Δ10.6%) and Hispanics (Δ10.7%) between 2008 and 2012, as did Internet use in both subgroups (Δ14.2%, Δ18.1%, respectively). Overall clinical trial awareness has increased between 2008 and 2012, although a large subset of the population still lacks general awareness of clinical trials. Racial and ethnic disparities in trial awareness exist, although disparities may be decreasing among the Black population. These findings may help target educational efforts and inform approaches to increasing trial awareness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Clinical trial awareness: Changes over time and sociodemographic disparities

    PubMed Central

    Leiter, Amanda; Diefenbach, Michael A; Doucette, John; Oh, William K; Galsky, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Lack of clinical trial awareness is a known obstacle to clinical trial enrollment. We sought to define the prevalence of clinical trial awareness in the United States population, determine characteristics associated with increased trial awareness, and explore potential disparities in trial awareness. Methods We utilized data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) from 2008 and 2012. Logistic regression was utilized to assess predictors of clinical trial awareness, particularly socio-demographic variables and information-seeking preferences. Trial awareness and information seeking preferences were compared in patient subgroups and between the two time periods. Results Clinical trial awareness increased from 68% to 74% between 2008 and 2012. In the 2012 dataset, higher education level (odds ratio (OR) 3.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.16–5.74), higher yearly income category (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.17–2.89), and Internet-use (OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.52–3.00) were significantly associated with clinical trial awareness. Hispanic ethnicity (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.25–0.68) was significantly associated with decreased awareness. Clinical trial awareness increased in African-American/blacks (Δ10.6%) and Hispanics (Δ10.7%) between 2008 and 2012, as did Internet-use in both subgroups (Δ14.2%, Δ18.1%, respectively). Conclusions Overall clinical trial awareness has increased between 2008 and 2012, though a large subset of the population still lacks general awareness of clinical trials. Racial and ethnic disparities in trial awareness exist, though disparities may be decreasing among the black population. These findings may help target educational efforts and inform approaches to increasing trial awareness. PMID:25673636

  14. Spinal Cord Injury and Related Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kee-Yong; Kim, Sang-Il

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has been considered an incurable condition and it often causes devastating sequelae. In terms of the pathophysiology of SCI, reducing secondary damage is the key to its treatment. Various researches and clinical trials have been performed, and some of them showed promising results; however, there is still no gold standard treatment with sufficient evidence. Two therapeutic concepts for SCI are neuroprotective and neuroregenerative strategies. The neuroprotective strategy modulates the pathomechanism of SCI. The purpose of neuroprotective treatment is to minimize secondary damage following direct injury. The aim of neuroregenerative treatment is to enhance the endogenous regeneration process and to alter the intrinsic barrier. With advancement in biotechnology, cell therapy using cell transplantation is currently under investigation. This review discusses the pathophysiology of SCI and introduces the therapeutic candidates that have been developed so far. PMID:28261421

  15. Newer Antibacterials in Therapy and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Paknikar, Simi S; Narayana, Sarala

    2012-01-01

    In order to deal with the rising problem of antibiotic resistance, newer antibacterials are being discovered and added to existing pool. Since the year 2000, however, only four new classes of antibacterials have been discovered. These include the oxazolidinones, glycolipopeptides, glycolipodepepsipeptide and pleuromutilins. Newer drugs were added to existing classes of antibiotics, such as streptogramins, quinolones, beta-lactam antibiotics, and macrolide-, tetracycline- and trimethoprim-related drugs. Most of the antibacterials are directed against resistant S. aureus infections, with very few against resistant gram-negative infections. The following article reviews the antibacterials approved by the FDA after the year 2000 as well as some of those in clinical trials. Data was obtained through a literature search via Pubmed and google as well as a detailed search of our library database. PMID:23181224

  16. Bayesian methods for phase I clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Gatsonis, C; Greenhouse, J B

    1992-07-01

    Phase I clinical trials are conducted to determine the dose-response curve of a new drug with respect to toxic side effects and, in particular, to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). In this paper we take a Bayesian approach to the problem of making inferences about the MTD. Working with broad classes of priors, we obtain the posterior distribution of the MTD and study its properties. We also address the question of providing updated assessments of the risk of toxicity for new patients entering the study at a specific dose level. These assessments would be useful in deciding issues of study management and ethics. Our analysis pays particular attention to the sensitivity of the inferences and risk assessments to the choice of prior and the choice of model for the dose-response relationship.

  17. Comparison of reporting phase I trial results in ClinicalTrials.gov and matched publications.

    PubMed

    Shepshelovich, D; Goldvaser, H; Wang, L; Abdul Razak, A R; Bedard, P L

    2017-09-14

    Background Data on completeness of reporting of phase I cancer clinical trials in publications are lacking. Methods The ClinicalTrials.gov database was searched for completed adult phase I cancer trials with reported results. PubMed was searched for matching primary publications published prior to November 1, 2016. Reporting in primary publications was compared with the ClinicalTrials.gov database using a 28-point score (2=complete; 1=partial; 0=no reporting) for 14 items related to study design, outcome measures and safety profile. Inconsistencies between primary publications and ClinicalTrials.gov were recorded. Linear regression was used to identify factors associated with incomplete reporting. Results After a review of 583 trials in ClinicalTrials.gov , 163 matching primary publications were identified. Publications reported outcomes that did not appear in ClinicalTrials.gov in 25% of trials. Outcomes were upgraded, downgraded or omitted in publications in 47% of trials. The overall median reporting score was 23/28 (interquartile range 21-25). Incompletely reported items in >25% publications were: inclusion criteria (29%), primary outcome definition (26%), secondary outcome definitions (53%), adverse events (71%), serious adverse events (80%) and dates of study start and database lock (91%). Higher reporting scores were associated with phase I (vs phase I/II) trials (p<0.001), multicenter trials (p<0.001) and publication in journals with lower impact factor (p=0.004). Conclusions Reported results in primary publications for early phase cancer trials are frequently inconsistent or incomplete compared with ClinicalTrials.gov entries. ClinicalTrials.gov may provide more comprehensive data from new cancer drug trials.

  18. Comparative clinical trial of two antigingivitis mouthrinses.

    PubMed

    Witt, Jon J; Walters, Patricia; Bsoul, Samer; Gibb, Roger; Dunavent, John; Putt, Mark

    2005-07-01

    To compare the safety and the antiplaque and antigingivitis efficacy of two oral rinses. A randomized, double-blind, parallel groups, single-center study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a high bioavailable, alcohol-free 0.07% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) rinse (Crest Pro-Health Rinse) and a positive control rinse containing essential oils (EO) and 21.6% ethyl alcohol (Cool Mint Listerine). Seventy-eight healthy adults were enrolled in a modified experimental gingivitis clinical trial. Four weeks before the baseline visit, subjects received a prophylaxis and were instructed to brush twice daily in a manner to approach optimum gingival health. At the end of the 4-week period, subjects were randomly assigned to treatment and instructed to use 20 ml of their assigned product for 30 seconds after brushing twice daily during a 21-day treatment phase. Plaque removal by brushing was prevented during the treatment phase for one mandibular quadrant (experimental gingivitis region) by means of a specially-manufactured tooth shield. Safety and efficacy measurements were obtained at baseline and at the end-of-treatment using the Modified Gingival Index (MGI), Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI), and Modified Quigley-Hein Plaque Index (MQH). At all visits, an oral soft tissue examination was performed for each subject. The efficacy data obtained in the experimental gingivitis region were analyzed with analysis of covariance. Seventy-five subjects completed the study and were included in the data analyses. No statistically significant differences were detected between the two treatment groups for MGI, GBI or MQH measures. Results were similar for shielded interproximal sites. Both treatments were well-tolerated. This randomized, controlled comparative clinical trial demonstrated that rinsing twice daily with the experimental alcohol-free 0.07% CPC rinse provides antiplaque and antigingivitis efficacy similar to that of the positive control EO rinse, a recognized

  19. Using Clinical Trial Simulators to Analyse the Sources of Variance in Clinical Trials of Novel Therapies for Acute Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Vegvari, Carolin; Cauët, Emilie; Hadjichrysanthou, Christoforos; Lawrence, Emma; Weverling, Gerrit-Jan; de Wolf, Frank; Anderson, Roy M

    2016-01-01

    About 90% of drugs fail in clinical development. The question is whether trials fail because of insufficient efficacy of the new treatment, or rather because of poor trial design that is unable to detect the true efficacy. The variance of the measured endpoints is a major, largely underestimated source of uncertainty in clinical trial design, particularly in acute viral infections. We use a clinical trial simulator to demonstrate how a thorough consideration of the variability inherent in clinical trials of novel therapies for acute viral infections can improve trial design. We developed a clinical trial simulator to analyse the impact of three different types of variation on the outcome of a challenge study of influenza treatments for infected patients, including individual patient variability in the response to the drug, the variance of the measurement procedure, and the variance of the lower limit of quantification of endpoint measurements. In addition, we investigated the impact of protocol variation on clinical trial outcome. We found that the greatest source of variance was inter-individual variability in the natural course of infection. Running a larger phase II study can save up to $38 million, if an unlikely to succeed phase III trial is avoided. In addition, low-sensitivity viral load assays can lead to falsely negative trial outcomes. Due to high inter-individual variability in natural infection, the most important variable in clinical trial design for challenge studies of potential novel influenza treatments is the number of participants. 100 participants are preferable over 50. Using more sensitive viral load assays increases the probability of a positive trial outcome, but may in some circumstances lead to false positive outcomes. Clinical trial simulations are powerful tools to identify the most important sources of variance in clinical trials and thereby help improve trial design.

  20. Pharmacotherapy of Obesity: Clinical Trials to Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Gadde, Kishore M; Pritham Raj, Y

    2017-05-01

    This review provides an overview of the current state of drug therapy for obesity, with a focus on four new drug therapies-lorcaserin, phentermine/topiramate, naltrexone/bupropion, and liraglutide 3.0 mg-which have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for long-term management of obesity since 2012. Topics discussed in this paper include rationale for pharmacotherapy, history of antiobesity drugs, and efficacy and safety data from randomized controlled trials with implications for clinical practice. Weight loss achieved by currently approved drugs ranges from approximately 3 to 9%, above and beyond weight loss with lifestyle counseling alone, after a year. Response and attrition rates in clinical trials indicate that the benefits of pharmacotherapy range from substantial for some patients, modest for others, and no benefits for others still. Decisions regarding selection of a suitable drug from the available pharmacotherapy options and duration of treatment should be based on the expected and observed benefit-to-risk balance and tailored to the needs of each individual patient using the principles of shared decision-making.

  1. Trial Publication after Registration in ClinicalTrials.Gov: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph S.; Mulvey, Gregory K.; Hines, Elizabeth M.; Nissen, Steven E.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2009-01-01

    Background ClinicalTrials.gov is a publicly accessible, Internet-based registry of clinical trials managed by the US National Library of Medicine that has the potential to address selective trial publication. Our objectives were to examine completeness of registration within ClinicalTrials.gov and to determine the extent and correlates of selective publication. Methods and Findings We examined reporting of registration information among a cross-section of trials that had been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov after December 31, 1999 and updated as having been completed by June 8, 2007, excluding phase I trials. We then determined publication status among a random 10% subsample by searching MEDLINE using a systematic protocol, after excluding trials completed after December 31, 2005 to allow at least 2 y for publication following completion. Among the full sample of completed trials (n = 7,515), nearly 100% reported all data elements mandated by ClinicalTrials.gov, such as intervention and sponsorship. Optional data element reporting varied, with 53% reporting trial end date, 66% reporting primary outcome, and 87% reporting trial start date. Among the 10% subsample, less than half (311 of 677, 46%) of trials were published, among which 96 (31%) provided a citation within ClinicalTrials.gov of a publication describing trial results. Trials primarily sponsored by industry (40%, 144 of 357) were less likely to be published when compared with nonindustry/nongovernment sponsored trials (56%, 110 of 198; p<0.001), but there was no significant difference when compared with government sponsored trials (47%, 57 of 122; p = 0.22). Among trials that reported an end date, 75 of 123 (61%) completed prior to 2004, 50 of 96 (52%) completed during 2004, and 62 of 149 (42%) completed during 2005 were published (p = 0.006). Conclusions Reporting of optional data elements varied and publication rates among completed trials registered within ClinicalTrials.gov were low

  2. Trial publication after registration in ClinicalTrials.Gov: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Ross, Joseph S; Mulvey, Gregory K; Hines, Elizabeth M; Nissen, Steven E; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2009-09-01

    ClinicalTrials.gov is a publicly accessible, Internet-based registry of clinical trials managed by the US National Library of Medicine that has the potential to address selective trial publication. Our objectives were to examine completeness of registration within ClinicalTrials.gov and to determine the extent and correlates of selective publication. We examined reporting of registration information among a cross-section of trials that had been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov after December 31, 1999 and updated as having been completed by June 8, 2007, excluding phase I trials. We then determined publication status among a random 10% subsample by searching MEDLINE using a systematic protocol, after excluding trials completed after December 31, 2005 to allow at least 2 y for publication following completion. Among the full sample of completed trials (n = 7,515), nearly 100% reported all data elements mandated by ClinicalTrials.gov, such as intervention and sponsorship. Optional data element reporting varied, with 53% reporting trial end date, 66% reporting primary outcome, and 87% reporting trial start date. Among the 10% subsample, less than half (311 of 677, 46%) of trials were published, among which 96 (31%) provided a citation within ClinicalTrials.gov of a publication describing trial results. Trials primarily sponsored by industry (40%, 144 of 357) were less likely to be published when compared with nonindustry/nongovernment sponsored trials (56%, 110 of 198; p<0.001), but there was no significant difference when compared with government sponsored trials (47%, 57 of 122; p = 0.22). Among trials that reported an end date, 75 of 123 (61%) completed prior to 2004, 50 of 96 (52%) completed during 2004, and 62 of 149 (42%) completed during 2005 were published (p = 0.006). Reporting of optional data elements varied and publication rates among completed trials registered within ClinicalTrials.gov were low. Without greater attention to reporting of all data elements

  3. Recruitment and Retention of Patients into Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Cofield, Stacey; Conwit, Robin; Barsan, William; Quinn, James

    2010-01-01

    The emergency medicine and pre-hospital environments are unlike any other clinical environments and require special consideration to allow the successful implementation of clinical trials. This article reviews the specific issues involved in Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials (EMCT), and provides strategies from emergency medicine and non-emergency medicine trials to maximize recruitment and retention. While the evidence supporting some of these strategies is deficient, addressing recruitment and retention issues with specific strategies will help researchers deal with these issues in their funding applications and in turn develop the necessary infrastructure to participate in emergency medicine clinical trials. PMID:21040112

  4. Contribution of clinical trials to gross domestic product in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Kaló, Zoltán; Antal, János; Pénzes, Miklós; Pozsgay, Csilla; Szepezdi, Zsuzsanna; Nagyjánosi, László

    2014-10-01

    To determine the contribution of clinical trials to the gross domestic product (GDP) in Hungary. An anonymous survey of pharmaceutical companies and clinical research organizations (CROs) was conducted to estimate their clinical trial-related employment and revenues. Clinical trial documents at the National Institute of Pharmacy (NIP) were analyzed to estimate trial-related revenues at health care institutions and the value of investigational medical products (IMPs) based on avoided drug costs. Financial benefits were calculated as 2010 US $ purchasing power parity (PPP) values. Clinical trials increased the revenue of Hungarian health care providers by 1 US $65.6 million. The value of IMPs was US $67.0 million. Clinical trial operation and management activities generated 900 jobs and US $166.9 million in revenue among CROs and pharmaceutical companies. The contribution of clinical trials to the Hungarian GDP in 2010 amounted to 0.2%. Participation in international clinical trials may result in health, financial, and intangible benefits that contribute to the sustainability of health care systems, especially in countries with severe resource constraints. Although a conservative approach was employed to estimate the economic benefits of clinical trials, further research is necessary to improve the generalizability of our findings.

  5. Contribution of clinical trials to gross domestic product in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Kaló, Zoltán; Antal, János; Pénzes, Miklós; Pozsgay, Csilla; Szepezdi, Zsuzsanna; Nagyjánosi, László

    2014-01-01

    Aim To determine the contribution of clinical trials to the gross domestic product (GDP) in Hungary. Methods An anonymous survey of pharmaceutical companies and clinical research organizations (CROs) was conducted to estimate their clinical trial-related employment and revenues. Clinical trial documents at the National Institute of Pharmacy (NIP) were analyzed to estimate trial-related revenues at health care institutions and the value of investigational medical products (IMPs) based on avoided drug costs. Financial benefits were calculated as 2010 US $ purchasing power parity (PPP) values. Results Clinical trials increased the revenue of Hungarian health care providers by US $165.6 million. The value of IMPs was US $67.0 million. Clinical trial operation and management activities generated 900 jobs and US $166.9 million in revenue among CROs and pharmaceutical companies. Conclusions The contribution of clinical trials to the Hungarian GDP in 2010 amounted to 0.2%. Participation in international clinical trials may result in health, financial, and intangible benefits that contribute to the sustainability of health care systems, especially in countries with severe resource constraints. Although a conservative approach was employed to estimate the economic benefits of clinical trials, further research is necessary to improve the generalizability of our findings. PMID:25358877

  6. Exploring Willingness to Participate in Clinical Trials by Ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Pariera, Katrina L; Murphy, Sheila T; Meng, Jingbo; McLaughlin, Margaret L

    2016-09-07

    African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans are disproportionately affected by cancer, yet underrepresented in cancer clinical trials. Because of this, it is important to understand how attitudes and beliefs about clinical trials vary by ethnicity. A national, random sample of 860 adults was given an online survey about attitudes toward clinical trials. We examined willingness to participate in clinical trials, attitudes toward clinical trials, trust in doctors, attitudes toward alternative and complementary medicine, and preferred information channels. Results indicate that African-American and Hispanic-American participants have more negative attitudes about clinical trials, more distrust toward doctors, more interest in complementary and alternative medicine, and less willingness to participate in clinical trials than white/non-Hispanics, although specific factors affecting willingness to participate vary. The channels people turn to for information on clinical trials also varied by ethnicity. These results help explain the ethnic disparities in cancer clinical trial enrollment by highlighting some potential underlying causes and drawing attention to areas of importance to these groups.

  7. New rules for clinical trial-related injury and compensation.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Khushboo; Ghooi, Ravindra

    2013-01-01

    The rules for compensation for injury and death in clinical trials have recently been notified. These rules clarify that medical management of all injuries in clinical trials is mandatory and in cases in which injury or death is related to the clinical trial, the subject (or nominee) is entitled to compensation over and above the medical management. They also specify procedures and timelines for reporting serious adverse events. These require simplification. The rules will hopefully make clinical trial safer for subjects and investigators alike. However, they suffer from certain inconsistencies that should be reconsidered. They need to be modified so that they do not damage the industry.

  8. The Egyptian clinical trials' registry profile: Analysis of three trial registries (International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry and clinicaltrials.gov).

    PubMed

    Zeeneldin, Ahmed A; Taha, Fatma M

    2016-01-01

    Registering clinical trials (CTs) in public domains enhances transparency, increases trust in research, improves participation and safeguards against publication bias. This work was done to study the profile of clinical research in Egypt in three CT registries with different scopes: the WHO International CT Registry Platform (ICTRP), the continental Pan-African CT Registry (PACTR) and the US clinicaltrials.gov (CTGR). In March 2014, ICTRP, PACTR and CTGR were searched for clinical studies conducted in Egypt. It was found that the number of studies conducted in Egypt (percentage) was 686 (0.30%) in ICTRP, 56 (11.3%) in PACTR and 548 (0.34%) in CTGR. Most studies were performed in universities and sponsored by university/organization, industry or individual researchers. Inclusion of adults from both genders predominated. The median number of participants per study in the three registries ranged between 63 and 155. The conditions researched differed among the three registries and study purpose was mostly treatment followed by prevention. Endpoints were mostly efficacy followed by safety. Observational:Interventional studies (i.e. clinical trials) represented 15.5%:84.5% in ICTRP, 0%:100% in PACTR and 16.4%:83.6% in CTGR. Most interventions were drugs or procedures. Observational studies were mostly prospective and cohort studies. Most CTs were phase 3 and tested drugs or procedures. Parallel group assignment and random allocation predominated. Blinding was implemented in many of trials and was mostly double-blind. We conclude that CTs from Egypt in trial registries are apparently low and do not accurately reflect clinical research conducted in Egypt or its potential. Development of an Egyptian CT registry is eagerly needed. Registering all Egyptian CTs in public domains is highly recommended.

  9. A comparison of interventional clinical trials in rare versus non-rare diseases: an analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Bell, Stuart A; Tudur Smith, Catrin

    2014-11-26

    To provide a comprehensive characterisation of rare disease clinical trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, and compare against characteristics of trials in non-rare diseases. Registry based study of ClinicalTrials.gov registration entries. The ClinicalTrials.gov registry comprised 133,128 studies registered to September 27, 2012. By annotating medical subject heading descriptors to condition terms we could identify rare and non-rare disease trials. A total of 24,088 Interventional trials registered after January 1, 2006, conducted in the United States, Canada and/or the European Union were categorised as rare or non-rare. Characteristics of the respective trials were extracted and summarised with comparative statistics calculated where appropriate. Characteristics of interventional trials reported in the database categorised by rare and non-rare conditions to allow comparison. Of the 24,088 trials categorised 2,759 (11.5%) were classified as rare disease trials and 21,329 (88.5%) related to non-rare conditions. Despite the limitations of the database we found that rare disease trials differed to non-rare disease trials across all characteristics that we examined. Rare disease trials enrolled fewer participants (median 29 vs. 62), were more likely to be single arm (63.0% vs. 29.6%), non-randomised (64.5% vs. 36.1%) and open label (78.7% vs. 52.2%). A higher proportion of rare disease trials were terminated early (13.7% vs. 6.3%) and proportionally fewer rare disease studies were actively pursuing, or waiting to commence, enrolment (15.9% vs. 38.5%). Rare disease interventional trials differ from those in non-rare conditions with notable differences in enrolment, design, blinding and randomisation. However, clinical trials should aim to implement the highest trial design standards possible, regardless of whether diseases are rare or not.

  10. [How to share results of clinical trials with study participants?].

    PubMed

    Sarradon-Eck, Aline; Mancini, Julien; Genre, Dominique; Sakoyan, Juliette; Desclaux, Alice; Julian-Reynier, Claire

    2012-03-01

    Informing research participants of the results of clinical trials in which they were enrolled is in agreement with patients' rights and human dignity; such feedback is considered an ethical standard applied to clinical research. Cancer patients who participate in a clinical trial usually want to know the results. Here we analysed the literature about the different ways of disclosure of clinical trial results to participants, questioning their expectations and the meanings they give to the results. We describe some of the dilemma and intertwining between clinical care and clinical research. We highlight how the standardisation of sharing such results to participants could raise difficulties particularly for the relationship between doctor and patients.

  11. [Acupuncture clinical trials published in high impact factor journals].

    PubMed

    Hu, Min; Liu, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Ke

    2014-12-01

    Acupuncture clinical trials are designed to provide reliable evidence of clinical efficacy, and SCI papers is one of the high-quality clinical efficacy of acupuncture research. To analyze these papers published in high impact factor journals on acupuncture clinical trials, we can study clinical trials from design to implementation, the efficacy of prevention and cure, combined with international standard practices to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture. That is the core of acupuncture clinical trials, as well as a prerequisite for outstanding academic output. A scientific and complete acupuncture clinical trial should be topically novel, designed innovative, logically clear, linguistically refining, and the most important point lies in a great discovery and solving the pragmatic problem. All of these are critical points of papers to be published in high impact factor journal, and directly affect international evaluation and promotion of acupuncture.

  12. Dental hygiene work in a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Luís, H S; Morgado, I; Assunção, V; Bernardo, M F; Leroux, B; Martin, M D; DeRouen, T A; Leitão, J

    2008-08-01

    Dental hygiene activities were developed as part of a randomized clinical trial designed to assess the safety of low-level mercury exposure from dental amalgam restorations. Along with dental-hygiene clinical work, a community programme was implemented after investigators noticed the poor oral hygiene habits of participants, and the need for urgent action to minimize oral health problems in the study population. Clinical and community activity goal was to promote oral health and prevent new disease. Community activities involved participants and their fellow students and were aimed at providing education on oral health in a school environment. Dental hygienists developed clinical work with prophylaxis, sealants application and topical fluoride and implemented the community programme with in-class sessions on oral health themes. Twice a month fluoride mouthrinses and bi-annual tooth brushing instructional activity took place. Participation at dental-hygiene activities, sealed teeth with no need of restoration and dental-plaque-index were measures used to evaluate success of the programme for the participants. Improvement in dental hygiene is shown by the decrease in dental plaque index scores (P < 0.0001); also sealants integrity is achieved in 86.3% of teeth. 888 (13.7%) teeth with sealants had to be restored or were lost. Children participated actively on dental hygiene activities. Teachers became aware of the problem and included oral-health in school curricula. Dental hygiene activities have shown to be helpful to promote dental hygiene, promote oral health and to provide school-age children with education on habits that will be important for their future good health.

  13. Risk-proportionate clinical trial monitoring: an example approach from a non-commercial trials unit.

    PubMed

    Tudur Smith, Catrin; Williamson, Paula; Jones, Ashley; Smyth, Alan; Hewer, Simon Langton; Gamble, Carrol

    2014-04-16

    Some level of monitoring is usually required during a clinical trial to protect the rights and safety of trial participants and to safeguard the quality and reliability of trial results. Although there is increasing support for the use of risk-proportionate approaches to achieve these aims, the variety of methods and lack of an empirical evidence base can present challenges for clinical trial practitioners. This paper describes the monitoring methods and procedures that are utilised by a non-commercial clinical trials unit which coordinates a range of clinical trials across a variety of clinical areas with different associated risks. Monitoring activities and approaches should be selected to be proportionate to the risks identified within a trial. A risk-proportionate approach to monitoring is described giving details of methods that may be considered by clinical trial practitioners during the development of a trial monitoring plan. An example risk assessment and corresponding monitoring plan for a low risk (type A in the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) classification system) pediatric trial is provided for illustration. We present ideas for developing a monitoring plan for a clinical trial of an investigational medicinal product based on our experience. Alternative approaches may be relevant or preferable in other settings based on inherent risk.

  14. Risk-proportionate clinical trial monitoring: an example approach from a non-commercial trials unit

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Some level of monitoring is usually required during a clinical trial to protect the rights and safety of trial participants and to safeguard the quality and reliability of trial results. Although there is increasing support for the use of risk-proportionate approaches to achieve these aims, the variety of methods and lack of an empirical evidence base can present challenges for clinical trial practitioners. Methods This paper describes the monitoring methods and procedures that are utilised by a non-commercial clinical trials unit which coordinates a range of clinical trials across a variety of clinical areas with different associated risks. Results Monitoring activities and approaches should be selected to be proportionate to the risks identified within a trial. A risk-proportionate approach to monitoring is described giving details of methods that may be considered by clinical trial practitioners during the development of a trial monitoring plan. An example risk assessment and corresponding monitoring plan for a low risk (type A in the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) classification system) pediatric trial is provided for illustration. Conclusion We present ideas for developing a monitoring plan for a clinical trial of an investigational medicinal product based on our experience. Alternative approaches may be relevant or preferable in other settings based on inherent risk. PMID:24739398

  15. Increasing support for the next generation of clinical trials leaders.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Peter; Fenton, James; Cotterill, Lisa; Neilson, James P

    2016-01-01

    The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) has identified a gap in the number of people it funds who are on a pathway to become future leaders of clinical trials, compared to how much the NIHR invests in clinical trials. In order to support the clinical trials of tomorrow, it is vital that the right people are supported now to lead these trials. To address this issue, NIHR organised a workshop with key stakeholders to understand the barriers to embarking on a clinical trials career and explore initiatives to increase capacity and capability in clinical trials. The output from the workshop was a set of recommendations which NIHR is now considering to shape future support.

  16. Efficient clinical trials in Japan: Bridging studies versus participation in global clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Shirotani, Mari; Suwa, Toshio; Kurokawa, Tatsuo; Chiba, Koji

    2014-04-01

    The required number of Japanese subjects was compared between the Bridging (BG) filing strategy described in ICH-E5 for drugs approved from 1998 to 2012, in which foreign phase 3 results were used together with a BG study conducted to confirm optimum Japanese dose, and global clinical trial (GCT) strategies in which the number was simulated from the foreign phase 3 studies. The simulated number from the GCT strategy was smaller than that of the BG, suggesting that the GCT strategy could be expected to reduce Japanese clinical trial costs. However, two exceptions were found, namely for preventive drugs and drugs for children, because of the large scales of foreign phase 3 studies.

  17. Open-access clinical trial registries: the Italian scenario.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, Paola; Roberto, Anna

    2012-10-18

    Citizens, patients and their representatives are increasingly insisting on working with health professionals to organize and discuss research protocols. The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors recommended setting up a public clinical trial registry where anyone can find key information about a trial. Around the world, governments have, in fact, now begun to legislate mandatory disclosure of all clinical trials. The aims of the present survey were to assess the availability of clinical trial registries for Italian citizens and to examine the transparency of the data items reported. The availability of open-access clinical trial registries was surveyed on a sample of 182 websites, including research institutes and centers of excellence (IRCCS-teaching hospitals), hospitals and associations. For each registry we downloaded a sample of two trials to assess the correspondence of the data items reported. Results from the Italian and international registries were compared. Fifteen percent of the sample had an open-access registry of clinical trials. Comparison of the data items available, in terms of completeness and transparency, from institutional and international registries indicated wide variability. Italian citizens, patients and their associations have scant access to local registries of clinical trials, and international registries are generally more informative. On the European level, advocacy and lobby actions are needed among citizens and patients to boost the diffusion of open-access clinical trial registries without language barriers, thereby facilitating participation, access to information, and the coordination of clinical research.

  18. MRI Biomarkers in Oncology Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Richard G.; Arlinghaus, Lori; Dula, Adrienne; Quarles, C. Chad; Stokes, Ashley; Weis, Jared; Whisenant, Jennifer; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Zhukov, Igor; Williams, Jason; Yankeelov, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have the ability to quantitatively report various pathophysiological processes associated with cancer. These measures have been shown to provide complementary information to that typically obtained from standard morphologically based criteria (e.g., size) and, furthermore, have been shown to outperform sized based measures in certain applications. In this review, we discuss eight areas of quantitative MRI that are either currently employed in clinical trials, or are emerging as promising techniques for both diagnosing cancer as well as assessing—or even predicting—the response of cancer to various therapies. The currently employed methods include the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST), dynamic susceptibility MRI (DSC-MRI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). The emerging techniques covered are chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI (CEST-MRI), elastography, hyperpolarized MRI, and multi-parameter MRI. After a brief introduction to each technique, we present a small number of illustrative applications before noting the existing limitations of each method and what must be done to move each to more routine clinical application. PMID:26613873

  19. Privacy and confidentiality in pragmatic clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Deven; Greene, Sarah M.; Miner, Caroline S.; Staman, Karen L.; Welch, Mary Jane; Rubel, Alan

    2015-01-01

    With pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs) an opportunity exists to answer important questions about the relative risks, burdens, and benefits of therapeutic interventions. However, concerns about protecting the privacy of this information are significant and must be balanced with the imperative to learn from the data gathered in routine clinical practice. Traditional privacy protections for research uses of identifiable information rely disproportionately on informed consent or authorizations, based on a presumption that this is necessary to fulfill ethical principles of respect for persons. But frequently the ideal of informed consent is not realized in its implementation. Moreover, the principle of respect for persons,—which encompasses their interests in health information privacy,—can be honored through other mechanisms. Data anonymization also plays a role in protecting privacy but is not suitable for all research, particularly PCTs. In this paper we explore both the ethical foundation and regulatory framework intended to protect privacy in PCTs. We then review examples of novel approaches to respecting persons in research that may have the added benefit of honoring patient privacy considerations. PMID:26374682

  20. Reinforcement learning design for cancer clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yufan; Kosorok, Michael R.; Zeng, Donglin

    2009-01-01

    Summary We develop reinforcement learning trials for discovering individualized treatment regimens for life-threatening diseases such as cancer. A temporal-difference learning method called Q-learning is utilized which involves learning an optimal policy from a single training set of finite longitudinal patient trajectories. Approximating the Q-function with time-indexed parameters can be achieved by using support vector regression or extremely randomized trees. Within this framework, we demonstrate that the procedure can extract optimal strategies directly from clinical data without relying on the identification of any accurate mathematical models, unlike approaches based on adaptive design. We show that reinforcement learning has tremendous potential in clinical research because it can select actions that improve outcomes by taking into account delayed effects even when the relationship between actions and outcomes is not fully known. To support our claims, the methodology's practical utility is illustrated in a simulation analysis. In the immediate future, we will apply this general strategy to studying and identifying new treatments for advanced metastatic stage IIIB/IV non-small cell lung cancer, which usually includes multiple lines of chemotherapy treatment. Moreover, there is significant potential of the proposed methodology for developing personalized treatment strategies in other cancers, in cystic fibrosis, and in other life-threatening diseases. PMID:19750510

  1. Trial design innovations: Clinical trials for treatment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, K

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. Recent progress has been made with clinical trials, advancing new therapies for psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD), agitation in AD, and apathy in AD. Definitions have emerged for agitation and apathy in patients with cognitive impairment, facilitating recruitment of clinical trial populations. Progress in clinical trial design and the agents being assessed promise to advance therapies for disabling symptoms and improve quality of life for patients and caregivers. PMID:26206713

  2. Trial design innovations: Clinical trials for treatment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cummings, J; Zhong, K

    2015-11-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. Recent progress has been made with clinical trials, advancing new therapies for psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD), agitation in AD, and apathy in AD. Definitions have emerged for agitation and apathy in patients with cognitive impairment, facilitating recruitment of clinical trial populations. Progress in clinical trial design and the agents being assessed promise to advance therapies for disabling symptoms and improve quality of life for patients and caregivers.

  3. Minorities and Clinical Trials: Patients, Physicians, Clinical Trial Characteristics, and Their Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    the RTM Survey indicate that most clinical trial sites have language interpretation available, but primarily by bilingual staff rather than...by bilingual staff 1 2 3 b. Professional language interpretation onsite 1 2 3 c. Professional language interpretation by telephone 1 2 3 d...CELIA.KAPLAN@UCSF.EDU END CALL. UCSF BOX 0856 SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94143 DOD Prostate: Patient Survey_7/15/2011 3 LANGUAGE & HEALTH First

  4. Reinventing clinical trials: a review of innovative biomarker trial designs in cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ja-An; He, Pei

    2015-06-01

    Recently, new clinical trial designs involving biomarkers have been studied and proposed in cancer clinical research, in the hope of incorporating the rapid growing basic research into clinical practices. Journal articles related to various biomarkers and their role in cancer clinical trial, articles and books about statistical issues in trial design, and regulatory website, documents, and guidance for submission of targeted cancer therapies. The drug development process involves four phases. The confirmatory Phase III is essential in regulatory approval of a special treatment. Regulatory agency has restrictions on confirmatory trials 'using adaptive designs'. No rule of thumb to pick the most appropriate design for biomarker-related trials. Statistical issues to solve in new designs. Regulatory acceptance of the 'newly proposed trial designs'. Biomarker-related trial designs that can resolve the statistical issues and satisfy the regulatory requirement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. End points and clinical trial design in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Badesch, David B; Delcroix, Marion; Fleming, Thomas R; Gaine, Sean P; Galiè, Nazzareno; Gibbs, J Simon R; Kim, Nick H; Oudiz, Ronald J; Peacock, Andrew; Provencher, Steeve; Sitbon, Olivier; Tapson, Victor F; Seeger, Werner

    2009-06-30

    New and emerging therapies might provide benefit in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Their efficacy and safety will be compared with existing combination therapies in randomized clinical trials. Appropriate end points for these trials need to be identified: these will include exercise testing, the composite end point of time to clinical worsening, and hemodynamic markers, including advanced imaging modalities and biomarkers. Quality-of-life questionnaires are useful and important secondary end points; pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific questionnaires are currently being developed. Advantages and disadvantages of various trial designs, including placebo-controlled monotherapy or add-on trials, noninferiority studies, and withdrawal trials are also discussed.

  6. Ethical Considerations for Clinical Trials in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Samuel; Siegler, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Although advancements in the field of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include effective therapies for many patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, there remains a large unmet need, and there is a large number of investigational agents in the pipeline. Drug development through clinical trials is critical to understanding the safety and efficacy of new therapies in the affected human population, and the need for ethical trial design is of the utmost importance. This paper explores the ethical issues of clinical trials in IBD, focusing on placebo-controlled trials, vulnerable patients, exposure to monoclonal antibodies, globalization of trials, and surgical advances. PMID:24799837

  7. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    McAlindon, T E; Driban, J B; Henrotin, Y; Hunter, D J; Jiang, G-L; Skou, S T; Wang, S; Schnitzer, T

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this document is to update the original OARSI recommendations specifically for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). To develop recommendations for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials for knee OA we initially drafted recommendations through an iterative process. Members of the working group included representatives from industry and academia. After the working group members reviewed a final draft, they scored the appropriateness for recommendations. After the members voted we calculated the median score among the nine members of the working group who completed the score. The document includes 25 recommendations regarding randomization, blocking and stratification, blinding, enhancing accuracy of patient-reported outcomes (PRO), selecting a study population and index knee, describing interventions, patient-reported and physical performance measures, structural outcome measures, biochemical biomarkers, and reporting recommendations. In summary, the working group identified 25 recommendations that represent the current best practices regarding clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee OA. These updated recommendations incorporate novel technologies (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) and strategies to address the heterogeneity of knee OA.

  8. Factors predicting publication of spinal cord injury trials registered on www.ClinicalTrials. gov.

    PubMed

    DePasse, J Mason; Park, Sara; Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-08-11

    Treatment options for spinal cord injuries are currently limited, but multiple clinical trials are underway for a variety of interventions, drugs, and devices. The Food and Drug Administration website www.ClinicalTrials.gov catalogues these trials and includes information on the status of the trial, date of initiation and completion, source of funding, and region. This investigation assesses the factors associated with publication and the publication rate of spinal cord injury trials. Retrospective analysis of publically available data on www.ClinicalTrials.gov. The www.ClinicalTrials.gov was queried for all trials on patients with spinal cord injury, and these trials were assessed for status, type of intervention, source of funding, and region. Multiple literature searches were performed on all completed trials to determine publication status. There were 626 studies identified concerning the treatment of patients with spinal cord injury, of which 250 (39.9%) were completed. Of these, only 119 (47.6%) were published. There was no significant difference in the rate of publication between regions (p> 0.16) or by study type (p> 0.29). However, trials that were funded by the NIH were more likely to be published than trials funded by industry (p= 0.01). The current publication rate of spinal cord injury trials is only 47.6%, though this rate is similar to the publication rate for trials in other fields. NIH-funded trials are significantly more likely to become published than industry-funded trials, which could indicate that some trials remain unpublished due to undesirable results. However, it is also likely that many trials on spinal cord injury yield negative results, as treatments are often ineffective.

  9. Timing and completeness of trial results posted at ClinicalTrials.gov and published in journals.

    PubMed

    Riveros, Carolina; Dechartres, Agnes; Perrodeau, Elodie; Haneef, Romana; Boutron, Isabelle; Ravaud, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act requires results from clinical trials of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs to be posted at ClinicalTrials.gov within 1 y after trial completion. We compared the timing and completeness of results of drug trials posted at ClinicalTrials.gov and published in journals. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov on March 27, 2012, for randomized controlled trials of drugs with posted results. For a random sample of these trials, we searched PubMed for corresponding publications. Data were extracted independently from ClinicalTrials.gov and from the published articles for trials with results both posted and published. We assessed the time to first public posting or publishing of results and compared the completeness of results posted at ClinicalTrials.gov versus published in journal articles. Completeness was defined as the reporting of all key elements, according to three experts, for the flow of participants, efficacy results, adverse events, and serious adverse events (e.g., for adverse events, reporting of the number of adverse events per arm, without restriction to statistically significant differences between arms for all randomized patients or for those who received at least one treatment dose). From the 600 trials with results posted at ClinicalTrials.gov, we randomly sampled 50% (n = 297) had no corresponding published article. For trials with both posted and published results (n = 202), the median time between primary completion date and first results publicly posted was 19 mo (first quartile = 14, third quartile = 30 mo), and the median time between primary completion date and journal publication was 21 mo (first quartile = 14, third quartile = 28 mo). Reporting was significantly more complete at ClinicalTrials.gov than in the published article for the flow of participants (64% versus 48% of trials, p<0.001), efficacy results (79% versus 69%, p = 0.02), adverse events (73% versus 45

  10. Timing and Completeness of Trial Results Posted at ClinicalTrials.gov and Published in Journals

    PubMed Central

    Riveros, Carolina; Dechartres, Agnes; Perrodeau, Elodie; Haneef, Romana; Boutron, Isabelle; Ravaud, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background The US Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act requires results from clinical trials of Food and Drug Administration–approved drugs to be posted at ClinicalTrials.gov within 1 y after trial completion. We compared the timing and completeness of results of drug trials posted at ClinicalTrials.gov and published in journals. Methods and Findings We searched ClinicalTrials.gov on March 27, 2012, for randomized controlled trials of drugs with posted results. For a random sample of these trials, we searched PubMed for corresponding publications. Data were extracted independently from ClinicalTrials.gov and from the published articles for trials with results both posted and published. We assessed the time to first public posting or publishing of results and compared the completeness of results posted at ClinicalTrials.gov versus published in journal articles. Completeness was defined as the reporting of all key elements, according to three experts, for the flow of participants, efficacy results, adverse events, and serious adverse events (e.g., for adverse events, reporting of the number of adverse events per arm, without restriction to statistically significant differences between arms for all randomized patients or for those who received at least one treatment dose). From the 600 trials with results posted at ClinicalTrials.gov, we randomly sampled 50% (n = 297) had no corresponding published article. For trials with both posted and published results (n = 202), the median time between primary completion date and first results publicly posted was 19 mo (first quartile = 14, third quartile = 30 mo), and the median time between primary completion date and journal publication was 21 mo (first quartile = 14, third quartile = 28 mo). Reporting was significantly more complete at ClinicalTrials.gov than in the published article for the flow of participants (64% versus 48% of trials, p<0.001), efficacy results (79% versus 69%, p = 0

  11. Primer: measuring the effects of treatment in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ward, Michael M

    2007-05-01

    The results of clinical trials are often used as the basis for changes in clinical practice. Proper execution and interpretation of the results of trials are, therefore, of paramount importance to the welfare of patients. The results of a clinical trial are based on four key elements: the choice of the primary study end point, the method used to compare end points between groups, the clinically meaningful difference in the primary end point selected a priori by the investigators, and the power of the study to detect as statistically significant a difference between groups that is as large as the preselected clinically meaningful difference. These key elements directly follow from the primary hypothesis tested by the trial. This article reviews the basic features of these four elements, and the influence they have on the interpretation of clinical trials.

  12. [Multinational clinical trial in Japan and Korea on detrusitol].

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Yukio

    2009-02-01

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active comparator-controlled study was conducted in 69 centers to compare detrusitol and oxybutynin with placebo in Japanese and Korean patients with an overactive bladder (OAB). Detrusitol had similar efficacy but was better tolerated than oxybutynin in Japanese and Korean patients with OAB. The study result was acknowledged as pivotal data in the clinical data package when NDA was filed and successfully approved both in Japan and Korea. Some differences were found in the efficacy and safety of the drug between the Japanese and Korean data, though. We therefore investigated the differences through stratified analysis; however exact causes could not be identified. This study is positioned as a first multinational clinical trial conducted in East Asia. From the aspects of utilization of interoperable data obtained from such multinational clinical trials for NDA filing and earliest possible registration of drugs in the participating countries, we believe it is important to accumulate more experiences in conducting multinational clinical trials. At this time, it is our prime task to minimize the "drug lag" in Japan; I think improving the speed of clinical trials is one of the factors to solve the issue. Global clinical trials involving Western and Asian countries make it possible to use the study data effectively and commonly in many countries. Moreover, from the viewpoint of revitalization of clinical trials, conducting global clinical trials is critically important; so we intend to continue accumulation of our experiences in global clinical trials.

  13. Outcome reporting among drug trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Florence T; Murthy, Srinivas; Mandl, Kenneth D

    2010-08-03

    Clinical trial registries are in widespread use to promote transparency around trials and their results. To describe characteristics of drug trials listed in ClinicalTrials.gov and examine whether the funding source of these trials is associated with favorable published outcomes. An observational study of safety and efficacy trials for anticholesteremics, antidepressants, antipsychotics, proton-pump inhibitors, and vasodilators conducted between 2000 and 2006. ClinicalTrials.gov, a Web-based registry of clinical trials launched in 1999. Publications resulting from the trials for the 5 drug categories of interest were identified, and data were abstracted on the trial record and publication, including timing of registration, elements of the study design, funding source, publication date, and study outcomes. Assessments were based on the primary funding categories of industry, government agencies, and nonprofit or nonfederal organizations. Among 546 drug trials, 346 (63%) were primarily funded by industry, 74 (14%) by government sources, and 126 (23%) by nonprofit or nonfederal organizations. Trials funded by industry were more likely to be phase 3 or 4 trials (88.7%; P < 0.001 across groups), to use an active comparator in controlled trials (36.8%; P = 0.010 across groups), to be multicenter (89.0%; P < 0.001 across groups), and to enroll more participants (median sample size, 306 participants; P < 0.001 across groups). Overall, 362 (66.3%) trials had published results. Industry-funded trials reported positive outcomes in 85.4% of publications, compared with 50.0% for government-funded trials and 71.9% for nonprofit or nonfederal organization-funded trials (P < 0.001). Trials funded by nonprofit or nonfederal sources with industry contributions were also more likely to report positive outcomes than those without industry funding (85.0% vs. 61.2%; P = 0.013). Rates of trial publication within 24 months of study completion ranged from 32.4% among industry-funded trials

  14. The challenge of comorbidity in clinical trials for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron; Sormani, Maria Pia; Thompson, Alan; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Trojano, Maria; O'Connor, Paul; Reingold, Stephen; Cohen, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to provide recommendations for addressing comorbidity in clinical trial design and conduct in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We held an international workshop, informed by a systematic review of the incidence and prevalence of comorbidity in MS and an international survey about research priorities for studying comorbidity including their relation to clinical trials in MS. Results: We recommend establishing age- and sex-specific incidence estimates for comorbidities in the MS population, including those that commonly raise concern in clinical trials of immunomodulatory agents; shifting phase III clinical trials of new therapies from explanatory to more pragmatic trials; describing comorbidity status of the enrolled population in publications reporting clinical trials; evaluating treatment response, tolerability, and safety in clinical trials according to comorbidity status; and considering comorbidity status in the design of pharmacovigilance strategies. Conclusion: Our recommendations will help address knowledge gaps regarding comorbidity that interfere with the ability to interpret safety in monitored trials and will enhance the generalizability of findings from clinical trials to “real world” settings where the MS population commonly has comorbid conditions. PMID:26888986

  15. Compliance with results reporting at ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Monique L; Chiswell, Karen; Peterson, Eric D; Tasneem, Asba; Topping, James; Califf, Robert M

    2015-03-12

    The Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act (FDAAA) mandates timely reporting of results of applicable clinical trials to ClinicalTrials.gov. We characterized the proportion of applicable clinical trials with publicly available results and determined independent factors associated with the reporting of results. Using an algorithm based on input from the National Library of Medicine, we identified trials that were likely to be subject to FDAAA provisions (highly likely applicable clinical trials, or HLACTs) from 2008 through 2013. We determined the proportion of HLACTs that reported results within the 12-month interval mandated by the FDAAA or at any time during the 5-year study period. We used regression models to examine characteristics associated with reporting at 12 months and throughout the 5-year study period. From all the trials at ClinicalTrials.gov, we identified 13,327 HLACTs that were terminated or completed from January 1, 2008, through August 31, 2012. Of these trials, 77.4% were classified as drug trials. A total of 36.9% of the trials were phase 2 studies, and 23.4% were phase 3 studies; 65.6% were funded by industry. Only 13.4% of trials reported summary results within 12 months after trial completion, whereas 38.3% reported results at any time up to September 27, 2013. Timely reporting was independently associated with factors such as FDA oversight, a later trial phase, and industry funding. A sample review suggested that 45% of industry-funded trials were not required to report results, as compared with 6% of trials funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and 9% of trials that were funded by other government or academic institutions. Despite ethical and legal obligations to disclose findings promptly, most HLACTs did not report results to ClinicalTrials.gov in a timely fashion during the study period. Industry-funded trials adhered to legal obligations more often than did trials funded by the NIH or other government or academic

  16. Interactive financial decision support for clinical research trials.

    PubMed

    Holler, Benjamin; Forgione, Dana A; Baisden, Clinton E; Abramson, David A; Calhoon, John H

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a decision support approach useful for evaluating proposals to conduct clinical research trials. Physicians often do not have the time or background to account for all the expenses of a clinical trial. Their evaluation process may be limited and driven by factors that do not indicate the potential for financial losses that a trial may impose. We analyzed clinical trial budget templates used by hospitals, health science centers, research universities, departments of medicine, and medical schools. We compiled a databank of costs and reviewed recent research trials conducted by the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery in a major academic health science center. We then developed an interactive spreadsheet-based budgetary decision support approach that accounts for clinical trial income and costs. It can be tailored to provide quick and understandable data entry, accurate cost rates per subject, and clear go/no-go signals for the physician.

  17. Phases I–III Clinical Trials Using Adult Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Gutiérrez Ibañes, Enrique; Arranz, Adolfo Villa; Fernández Santos, María Eugenia; Fernández, Pedro L. Sánchez; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    First randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that stem cell therapy can improve cardiac recovery after the acute phase of myocardial ischemia and in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease. Nevertheless, some trials have shown that conflicting results and uncertainties remain in the case of mechanisms of action and possible ways to improve clinical impact of stem cells in cardiac repair. In this paper we will examine the evidence available, analyze the main phase I and II randomized clinical trials and their limitations, discuss the key points in the design of future trials, and depict new directions of research in this fascinating field. PMID:21076533

  18. Adaptive clinical trials for new drug applications in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yuki; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Uyama, Yoshiaki

    2011-02-01

    Adaptive design is regarded as an efficient method for clinical trials in order to increase the success rate of a new drug in development, and recently has been actively discussed among regulatory agencies, industry and academia. Since adaptive design involves interim analyses and is more complex than traditional fixed design, some points such as possibility of introducing statistical and operational bias should be considered when planning and implementing such trials. In this article, we share our perspectives in the consideration of adaptive design clinical trials based on our experiences discussing adaptive design in clinical trial consultation meetings in Japan.

  19. Reporting clinical trial information: colorectal cancer trials at Sydney Cancer Centre.

    PubMed

    Chua, W; Horvath, L; Beale, P; Clarke, S J

    2012-04-01

    Clinical trial units are integral to the functioning of a medical oncology department with patient access to clinical trials an important component in patient care. There has been a paucity of potential key performance indicators in medical oncology and clinical trial information may be utilised for this purpose. The aim of this study was to record retrospectively and collate prospectively collected information regarding basic demographics, response rate, progression and survival plus grade 3 or 4 toxicity in patients enrolled in clinical trials for metastatic colorectal cancer at the Sydney Cancer Centre between 1999 and 2007. Baseline patient demographics, clinical response, progression dates, grade 3 or 4 toxicities plus treatment-related fatalities were collected from individual clinical trials. Outcome measures were clinical response, progression-free survival and overall survival. There was a total of 14 trials undertaken during the defined period for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. There was available information for 243 patient trials with sufficient information regarding response rates, toxicity, progression and survival. Tumour response rates ranged from 27% to 66% for first line chemotherapy trials and 0% to 20% for non-first line chemotherapy trials. The overall progression-free survival was 6.4 months and overall survival 14.0 months for all trials. There was one treatment-related fatality on clinical trial during this period. Results of our clinical database have been used here to illustrate the concept and value of reporting clinical trial information in medical oncology. Public reporting of such information may allow for comparisons between units and for quality improvement. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  20. Implementation of the NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is launching a new clinical trials research network intended to improve treatment for the more than 1.6 million Americans diagnosed with cancer each year. The new system, NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), will facilitate the rapid initia

  1. Establishing a clinical trial battery for Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Jane S.; Long, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The success of clinical trials in Huntington disease (HD) will depend to a large degree on the quality of the outcome measures. Using data from the TRACK-HD study, a recent publication proposes a battery of assessments that could be used as outcomes in future clinical trials in patients with early HD. PMID:22487747

  2. Drug Cost Avoidance in Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Calvin-Lamas, M; Portela-Pereira, P; Rabuñal-Alvarez, M T; Martinez-Breijo, S; Martín-Herranz, M I; Gómez-Veiga, F

    2015-11-01

    Economic impact of prostate cancer is increasing in relation to its increased incidence and increased patient survival. Clinical trials are essential to evaluate the efficacy and safety of new treatments but may also result in economic benefits by avoiding the cost of the drug. Our objective is to determine the avoided cost in investigational drugs in clinical trials of prostate cancer conducted in a period of 18 years in a tertiary center. We carried out an observational of prevalence study with retrospective collected data of clinical trials involving currently marketed drugs and cost avoidance during the study period (1996-2013) was calculated. We include in this review five clinical trials on prostate cancer that met selection criteria of 18 performed. All of them were phase III, multicenter, international and with current marketed drugs. 136 patients were included. Total cost avoidance of 696,002€ and an average cost avoidance by clinical trial of 139,200€ were obtained. Average cost avoidance per patient was 5,118€. Cost avoidance in investigational drugs is a tangible benefit of clinical trials, whose realization is a source of economic benefits for the hospital, not only by directly generated by each trial. Clinical trials are an exceptional framework for progress in clinical research and real savings for the health system. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Ebola Virus Disease Candidate Vaccines Under Evaluation in Clinical Trials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-02

    medical countermeasures. Viruses , 4(10), 2312-2316 (2012). 101. Bradfute SB. Duration of immune responses after Ebola virus vaccination. Lancet Infect Dis...Geisbert JB et al. Vesicular stomatitis virus -based vaccines protect nonhuman primates against aerosol challenge with Ebola and Marburg viruses ...Ebola virus vaccines 1 Ebola Virus Disease Candidate Vaccines Under Evaluation in Clinical Trials Keywords: candidate vaccine; clinical trial

  4. Clinical Research Trials and You: Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov. This is a searchable registry and results database of federally and privately supported clinical trials conducted in the United States and around the world. ClinicalTrials.gov gives you information about a trial’s purpose, who may participate, locations, and phone numbers for ...

  5. The NIDA Methamphetamine Clinical Trials Group: a strategy to increase clinical trials research capacity.

    PubMed

    Elkashef, Ahmed; Rawson, Richard A; Smith, Edwina; Pearce, Valerie; Flammino, Frank; Campbell, Jan; Donovick, Roger; Gorodetzky, Charles; Haning, William; Mawhinney, Joseph; McCann, Michael; Weis, Dennis; Williams, Lorie; Ling, Walter; Vocci, Frank

    2007-04-01

    In order to increase the number of investigative teams and sites conducting research on pharmacological treatments for methamphetamine use disorders, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) established an infrastructure of clinical sites in areas where methamphetamine addiction is prevalent. This multi-site infrastructure would serve to run multiple Phases II and III protocols effectively and expeditiously. NIDA collaborated with investigators from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) to set up the Methamphetamine Clinical Trials Group (MCTG). This paper describes the development process, as well as data from a test trial to assess the capability of research-naive sites to recruit research participants and conduct study procedures according to research protocol. Subsequent trials are also described. A total of 151 candidates signed consent; 65 individuals were enrolled and 35 (53.8%) completed the 12 weeks' behavioral trial. Self-reported substance use report (SUR) showed comparable use of methamphetamine across sites with the individual site means ranging from 59% (site 5) to 80% (site 3). Drug use as measured by urinalysis was greatly reduced at week 13 compared to the baseline measure; the average rate of methamphetamine-free urine samples across all participants in sites at week 13 was 53%. The highest percentage of methamphetamine-free samples was 85% at site 5; the lowest was at site 1 (40%). Addiction severity index (ASI) composite scores at baseline and protocol completion for all participants demonstrated improvement in all categories over time, except for the medical composite score. The largest composite score reduction in baseline-protocol completion was in the drug domain (0.23 versus 0.15). The changes in the ASI scores from baseline to week 13 were consistent across all five sites. Outcomes of the behavioral trial indicated that the MCTG recruited well; collected study data accurately and reliably; and created a vehicle that can

  6. Pediatric Clinical Trials Conducted in South Korea from 2006 to 2015: An Analysis of the South Korean Clinical Research Information Service, US ClinicalTrials.gov and European Clinical Trials Registries.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sheung-Nyoung; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Song, In-Kyung; Kim, Eun-Hee; Kim, Jin-Tae; Kim, Hee-Soo

    2017-08-02

    The status of pediatric clinical trials performed in South Korea in the last decade, including clinical trials of drugs with unapproved indications for children, has not been previously examined. The aim was to provide information regarding the current state of pediatric clinical trials and create a basis for future trials performed in South Korea by reviewing three databases of clinical trials registrations. We searched for pediatric clinical studies (participants <18 years old) conducted in South Korea between 2006 and 2015 registered on the Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS), ClinicalTrials.gov, and the European Clinical Trials Registry (EuCTR). Additionally, we reviewed whether unapproved indications were involved in each trial by comparing the trials with a list of authorized trials provided by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS). The primary and secondary outcomes were to determine the change in number of pediatric clinical trials with unapproved indications over time and to assess the status of unauthorized pediatric clinical trials from the MFDS and the publication of articles after these clinical trials, respectively. We identified 342 clinical studies registered in the CRIS (n = 81), ClinicalTrials.gov (n = 225), and EuCTR (n = 36), of which 306 were reviewed after excluding duplicate registrations. Among them, 181 studies were interventional trials dealing with drugs and biological agents, of which 129 (71.3%) involved unapproved drugs. Of these 129 trials, 107 (82.9%) were authorized by the MFDS. Pediatric clinical trials in South Korea aiming to establish the safety and efficacy of drugs in children are increasing; however, non-MFDS-authorized studies remain an issue.

  7. Are explanatory trials ethical? Shifting the burden of justification in clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Borgerson, Kirstin

    2013-08-01

    Most phase III clinical trials today are explanatory. Because explanatory, or efficacy, trials test hypotheses under "ideal" conditions, they are not well suited to providing guidance on decisions made in most clinical care contexts. Pragmatic trials, which test hypotheses under "usual" conditions, are often better suited to this task. Yet, pragmatic, or effectiveness, trials are infrequently carried out. This mismatch between the design of clinical trials and the needs of health care professionals is frustrating for everyone involved, and explains some of the challenges inherent in attempts to enhance knowledge translation and encourage evidence-based practice. The situation is more than simply frustrating, however; it is potentially unethical. Clinical trials must be socially valuable in order to (1) warrant the risks they impose on human research subjects and (2) fairly and efficiently assess new clinical interventions. Most bioethicists would agree that trials that have no social value, for instance, because their results do not have the potential to advance clinical care, should not be performed. What is less widely appreciated is that given limited research resources, trials that are more socially valuable should be preferred to trials that are less socially valuable when all else is equal. With respect to clinical trial design, I argue that while explanatory trials often have some social value, many have less social value than their pragmatic counterparts. On the basis of this general ethical assessment, I provide a preliminary defense of the position that clinical researchers should aim to conduct pragmatic trials, that is, that researchers face a burden of justification related to any idealizing elements added to trial designs.

  8. Placebos used in clinical trials for Chinese herbal medicine.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guan D; We, Ding A; Chung, Leung P; Fai, Cheng K

    2008-06-01

    One of the important components in randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) is blinding. The gold standard of clinical trials is to achieve a double blind design. However, only a small number of randomized controlled trials in traditional Chinese medicine have been reported, most of them are of poor quality in methodology including placebo preparation and verification. The purpose of the article is to review the validity of placebo used in blinded clinical trials for Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) in recent years and related patents. We searched the Wanfang Database (total of 827 Chinese journals of medicine and/or pharmacy, from 1999 to 2005) and 598 full-length articles related to placebo clinical trials were found. 77 placebo blinded clinical trials for Chinese medicine were extracted by manual search from the 598 articles. After reviewing the 77 full-length articles, we found that nearly half of the clinical trials did not pay attention to the physical quality of the testing drug and placebo and whether they were of comparable physical quality. The rest provided very limited placebo information so that blinding assurance could not be assumed. Only 2 articles (2.6%) specifically validated the comparability between the testing drug and the placebo. Researchers in Chinese medicine commonly ignored the quality of the placebo in comparison to the test drug. This may be causing bias in the clinical trials. Quality specifications and evaluation of the placebo should deserve special attention to reduce bias in randomized controlled trials in TCM study.

  9. The duty to disclose adverse clinical trial results.

    PubMed

    Liao, S Matthew; Sheehan, Mark; Clarke, Steve

    2009-08-01

    Participants in some clinical trials are at risk of being harmed and sometimes are seriously harmed as a result of not being provided with available, relevant risk information. We argue that this situation is unacceptable and that there is a moral duty to disclose all adverse clinical trial results to participants in clinical trials. This duty is grounded in the human right not to be placed at risk of harm without informed consent. We consider objections to disclosure grounded in considerations of commercial interest, and we argue that these concerns are insufficient to override the moral duty to disclose adverse clinical trial results. However, we also develop a proposal that enables commercial interests to be protected, while promoting the duty to disclose adverse clinical trial results.

  10. Mitigating the Effects of Nonadherence in Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Shiovitz, Thomas M; Bain, Earle E; McCann, David J; Skolnick, Phil; Laughren, Thomas; Hanina, Adam; Burch, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Accounting for subject nonadherence and eliminating inappropriate subjects in clinical trials are critical elements of a successful study. Nonadherence can increase variance, lower study power, and reduce the magnitude of treatment effects. Inappropriate subjects (including those who do not have the illness under study, fail to report exclusionary conditions, falsely report medication adherence, or participate in concurrent trials) confound safety and efficacy signals. This paper, a product of the International Society for CNS Clinical Trial Methodology (ISCTM) Working Group on Nonadherence in Clinical Trials, explores and models nonadherence in clinical trials and puts forth specific recommendations to identify and mitigate its negative effects. These include statistical analyses of nonadherence data, novel protocol design, and the use of biomarkers, subject registries, and/or medication adherence technologies. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  11. ADULTS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Krupa N.; Majeed, Zahraa; Yoruk, Yilmaz B.; Yang, Hongmei; Hilton, Tiffany N.; McMahon, James M.; Hall, William J.; Walck, Donna; Luque, Amneris E.; Ryan, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected older adults (HOA) are at risk of functional decline. Interventions promoting physical activity that can attenuate functional decline and are easily translated into the HOA community are of high priority. We conducted a randomized, controlled clinical trial to evaluate whether a physical activity counseling intervention based on self-determination theory (SDT) improves physical function, autonomous motivation, depression and the quality of life (QOL) in HOA. Methods A total of 67 community-dwelling HOA with mild-to-moderate functional limitations were randomized to one of two groups: a physical activity counseling group or the usual care control group. We used SDT to guide the development of the experimental intervention. Outcome measures that were collected at baseline and final study visits included a battery of physical function tests, levels of physical activity, autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL. Results The study participants were similar in their demographic and clinical characteristics in both the treatment and control groups. Overall physical performance, gait speed, measures of endurance and strength, and levels of physical activity improved in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.05). Measures of autonomous regulation such as identified regulation, and measures of depression and QOL improved significantly in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.05). Across the groups, improvement in intrinsic regulation and QOL correlated with an improvement in physical function (p<0.05). Conclusion Our findings suggest that a physical activity counseling program grounded in SDT can improve physical function, autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL in HOA with functional limitations. PMID:26867045

  12. Gender indexing in publications of clinical trials: 1991-2008.

    PubMed

    Drye, Lea T; Meinert, Jill L; Meinert, Curtis L

    2010-12-01

    In 1993 Congress passed the NIH Revitalization Act, which instructed the Director of the NIH to ensure that phase III clinical trials are 'designed and carried out in a manner sufficient to provide for a valid analysis of whether the variables being studied in the trial affect females or members of minority groups, as the case may be, differently than other subjects in the trial.' The purpose of this article is to track the PubMed indexing of gender in clinical trial publications since 1991 with a view toward assessing the impact of the legislation on the number of gender specific trials. We searched PubMed for full-length publications from years 1991 to 2008 of research on humans indexed as publication type 'clinical trial', 'randomized clinical trial' and multicenter randomized trial ('multicenter study' AND 'randomized clinical trial'), and counted the number of trials indexed as male-only, female-only, male and female, and gender unknown in PubMed. The majority of trial publications were indexed in PubMed as including both genders. The proportion of publications indexed as including both genders has increased while the number of publications not indexed with respect to gender and the number of publications indexed as male-only have decreased. In 2005, approximately 13% of NIH expenditures were for female specific or related research compared to 6% for male specific or related research. The proportion of clinical trial publications that were indexed in PubMed as including females began to increase before the legislation so it is difficult to conclude that changes in the number of female-only or male-only trials are due to the legislation. PubMed listings do not include gender enrollment, so female and male enrollment totals could not be compared. The NIH policy should be rewritten to be made gender neutral to bring it in line with the principle of justice as embodied in the Belmont Report.

  13. Clinical Trial: Marine Lipid Suppositories as Laxatives

    PubMed Central

    Ormarsson, Orri Thor; Geirsson, Thormodur; Bjornsson, Einar Stefan; Jonsson, Tomas; Moller, Pall; Loftsson, Thorsteinn; Stefansson, Einar

    2012-01-01

    Cod-liver oil and other marine products containing polyunsaturated fatty acids have anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-viral effects and may be useful in the treatment of various inflammatory and infectious diseases. We developed suppositories and ointment with 30% free fatty acid (FFA) extract from omega-3 fish oil. Our purpose was to evaluate the safety of marine lipid suppositories and ointment in healthy volunteers and to explore the laxative effect of the suppositories. Thirty healthy volunteers were randomized either to a study group administrating 30% FFA suppositories and applying 30% FFA ointment to the perianal region twice per day for two weeks, or to a control group using placebo suppositories and ointment in a double blinded manner. Results: No serious toxic effects or irritation were observed. In the study group 93% felt the urge to defecate after administration of the suppositories as compared to 37% in the control group (P = 0.001). Subsequently 90% in the study group defecated, compared to 33% in the control group (P = 0.001). Conclusion: The marine lipid suppositories and ointment were well tolerated with no significant toxic side effects observed during the study period. The suppositories have a distinct laxative effect and we aim to explore this effect in further clinical trials. PMID:23118720

  14. Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Endpoints in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hannah, William N.; Torres, Dawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the leading cause of liver disease in developed countries, and the rates of NAFLD continue to rise in conjunction with the obesity pandemic. While the majority of patients with isolated steatosis generally have a benign course, a diagnosis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) carries a significantly higher risk for progression of disease, cirrhosis, and death. Pharmacologic therapeutic interventions in NASH have largely proven to be ineffective or unappealing due to long-term side-effect profiles, and the majority of patients cannot achieve or sustain targeted weight loss goals, necessitating an urgent need for therapeutic trials and drug development. The complex molecular mechanisms leading to NASH and the long duration of time to develop complications of disease are challenges to developing meaningful clinical endpoints. Because of these challenges, surrogate endpoints that are linked to all-cause mortality, liver-related death, and complications of cirrhosis are much more likely to be beneficial in the majority of patients. PMID:28035202

  15. Clinical evidence for Japanese population based on prospective studies--linking clinical trials and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hisao; Kojima, Sunao

    2009-10-01

    "Evidence-based medicine (EBM)" implies effective and high quality practice for patients based on well-grounded medical science. The success of clinical trials in Japan is essential to build original evidence specific for Japanese patients. Based on this concept, we have performed several large-scale clinical trials to provide EBM, including the Japanese Antiplatelets Myocardial Infarction Study [JAMIS; clinical improvement in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients with antiplatelet therapy], the Japanese beta-Blockers and Calcium Antagonists Myocardial Infarction (JBCMI; comparison of the effects of beta-blockers and calcium antagonists on cardiovascular events in post-AMI patients), a multicenter study for aggressive lipid-lowering strategy by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors in patients with AMI (MUSASHI; effects of statin therapy on cardiovascular events in patients with AMI), and the Japanese Primary Prevention of Atherosclerosis with Aspirin for Diabetes (JPAD trial; efficacy of low-dose aspirin therapy for primary prevention of atherosclerotic events in type 2 diabetic patients). The results of these prospective studies were directly linked with clinical practice. We have acquired the know-how of large-scale clinical trials; an important point is to have passion for "buildup evidence specific for the Japanese" and to recruit subjects for enrollment after explaining the significance of "clinical trials for the Japanese".

  16. Clinical Trial Results Vary Widely, But Always Advance Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Clinical Trial Results Vary Widely, But Always Advance Research ... very emotional." Should You Be Interested in a Clinical Trial People volunteer to take part in clinical ...

  17. Cognitive assessment in Huntington disease clinical drug trials.

    PubMed

    Stout, Julie C; Andrews, Sophie C; Glikmann-Johnston, Yifat

    2017-01-01

    Several Huntington disease (HD) clinical trials are in progress and on the horizon. Potential treatments are increasingly being targeted at ameliorating the cognitive decline in HD. This necessitates a careful consideration of trial designs, including endpoint strategies suitable for testing cognitive function. The aim of this chapter is to evaluate and consider the use of cognitive measures in HD clinical trials. We first consider the role of cognition in clinical trial endpoint models, including a review of previous HD clinical trials that have included cognitive measures. We evaluate strategies for selecting cognitive tools for HD clinical trials, and consider cognitive assessments that have been used in other neuropsychiatric disorders, namely Alzheimer disease and schizophrenia. Next, we describe a general framework for selecting patient-based outcomes in clinical trials, and apply this framework to the selection of cognitive outcomes. Using the HD-Cognitive Assessment Battery (HD-CAB), a new cognitive battery designed for clinical trials, we illustrate the evaluation of cognitive outcomes in terms of their responsivity, reliability, validity, appropriateness, precision, interpretability, feasibility, and acceptability. Finally, we articulate a pathway for continued development of cognitive tools that would pave the way for finding treatments that ameliorate cognitive decline in HD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Automatic Clinical Trial: Leveraging the Electronic Medical Record in Multi-site Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Judy; Crowley, John

    2012-01-01

    Submission of data into clinical trial electronic data capture (EDC) systems currently requires redundant entry of data that already exist in the electronic medical record (EMR). Being able to automatically transfer data from the EMR to the EDC would save many hours of arduous effort, especially for multi-site data-intensive oncology trials. Standardization of the way in which data is stored and retrieved in the medical record and techniques for mining data from the unstructured narrative will provide opportunities for transferring data from EMR to EDC. As different EMRs proliferate, other technology in the form of data mining or middle tier applications are certain to provide assistance in this effort. PMID:22907283

  19. Tools in a clinical information system supporting clinical trials at a Swiss University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Weisskopf, Michael; Bucklar, Guido; Blaser, Jürg

    2014-12-01

    Issues concerning inadequate source data of clinical trials rank second in the most common findings by regulatory authorities. The increasing use of electronic clinical information systems by healthcare providers offers an opportunity to facilitate and improve the conduct of clinical trials and the source documentation. We report on a number of tools implemented into the clinical information system of a university hospital to support clinical research. In 2011/2012, a set of tools was developed in the clinical information system of the University Hospital Zurich to support clinical research, including (1) a trial registry for documenting metadata on the clinical trials conducted at the hospital, (2) a patient-trial-assignment-tool to tag patients in the electronic medical charts as participants of specific trials, (3) medical record templates for the documentation of study visits and trial-related procedures, (4) online queries on trials and trial participants, (5) access to the electronic medical records for clinical monitors, (6) an alerting tool to notify of hospital admissions of trial participants, (7) queries to identify potentially eligible patients in the planning phase as trial feasibility checks and during the trial as recruitment support, and (8) order sets to facilitate the complete and accurate performance of study visit procedures. The number of approximately 100 new registrations per year in the voluntary trial registry in the clinical information system now matches the numbers of the existing mandatory trial registry of the hospital. Likewise, the yearly numbers of patients tagged as trial participants as well as the use of the standardized trial record templates increased to 2408 documented trial enrolments and 190 reports generated/month in the year 2013. Accounts for 32 clinical monitors have been established in the first 2 years monitoring a total of 49 trials in 16 clinical departments. A total of 15 months after adding the optional feature of

  20. Addressing missing participant outcome data in dental clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Spineli, Loukia M; Fleming, Padhraig S; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2015-06-01

    Missing outcome data are common in clinical trials and despite a well-designed study protocol, some of the randomized participants may leave the trial early without providing any or all of the data, or may be excluded after randomization. Premature discontinuation causes loss of information, potentially resulting in attrition bias leading to problems during interpretation of trial findings. The causes of information loss in a trial, known as mechanisms of missingness, may influence the credibility of the trial results. Analysis of trials with missing outcome data should ideally be handled with intention to treat (ITT) rather than per protocol (PP) analysis. However, true ITT analysis requires appropriate assumptions and imputation of missing data. Using a worked example from a published dental study, we highlight the key issues associated with missing outcome data in clinical trials, describe the most recognized approaches to handling missing outcome data, and explain the principles of ITT and PP analysis.

  1. Reporting of statistically significant results at ClinicalTrials.gov for completed superiority randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Dechartres, Agnes; Bond, Elizabeth G; Scheer, Jordan; Riveros, Carolina; Atal, Ignacio; Ravaud, Philippe

    2016-11-30

    Publication bias and other reporting bias have been well documented for journal articles, but no study has evaluated the nature of results posted at ClinicalTrials.gov. We aimed to assess how many randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with results posted at ClinicalTrials.gov report statistically significant results and whether the proportion of trials with significant results differs when no treatment effect estimate or p-value is posted. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov in June 2015 for all studies with results posted. We included completed RCTs with a superiority hypothesis and considered results for the first primary outcome with results posted. For each trial, we assessed whether a treatment effect estimate and/or p-value was reported at ClinicalTrials.gov and if yes, whether results were statistically significant. If no treatment effect estimate or p-value was reported, we calculated the treatment effect and corresponding p-value using results per arm posted at ClinicalTrials.gov when sufficient data were reported. From the 17,536 studies with results posted at ClinicalTrials.gov, we identified 2823 completed phase 3 or 4 randomized trials with a superiority hypothesis. Of these, 1400 (50%) reported a treatment effect estimate and/or p-value. Results were statistically significant for 844 trials (60%), with a median p-value of 0.01 (Q1-Q3: 0.001-0.26). For the 1423 trials with no treatment effect estimate or p-value posted, we could calculate the treatment effect and corresponding p-value using results reported per arm for 929 (65%). For 494 trials (35%), p-values could not be calculated mainly because of insufficient reporting, censored data, or repeated measurements over time. For the 929 trials we could calculate p-values, we found statistically significant results for 342 (37%), with a median p-value of 0.19 (Q1-Q3: 0.005-0.59). Half of the trials with results posted at ClinicalTrials.gov reported a treatment effect estimate and/or p-value, with significant

  2. Impact of a cancer clinical trials web site on discussions about trial participation: a cluster randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Dear, R F; Barratt, A L; Askie, L M; Butow, P N; McGeechan, K; Crossing, S; Currow, D C; Tattersall, M H N

    2012-07-01

    Cancer patients want access to reliable information about currently recruiting clinical trials. Oncologists and their patients were randomly assigned to access a consumer-friendly cancer clinical trials web site [Australian Cancer Trials (ACT), www.australiancancertrials.gov.au] or to usual care in a cluster randomized controlled trial. The primary outcome, measured from audio recordings of oncologist-patient consultations, was the proportion of patients with whom participation in any clinical trial was discussed. Analysis was by intention-to-treat accounting for clustering and stratification. Thirty medical oncologists and 493 patients were recruited. Overall, 46% of consultations in the intervention group compared with 34% in the control group contained a discussion about clinical trials (P=0.08). The mean consultation length in both groups was 29 min (P=0.69). The proportion consenting to a trial was 10% in both groups (P=0.65). Patients' knowledge about randomized trials was lower in the intervention than the control group (mean score 3.0 versus 3.3, P=0.03) but decisional conflict scores were similar (mean score 42 versus 43, P=0.83). Good communication between patients and physicians is essential. Within this context, a web site such as Australian Cancer Trials may be an important tool to encourage discussion about clinical trial participation.

  3. [International clinical trials: perspectives of clinical research coordinators].

    PubMed

    Aotani, Eriko

    2007-02-01

    There are several different task roles among the co-medicals who are involved in international clinical trials (ICTs). In this review article, several issues related with ICTs from the view point of clinical research coordinators (CRCs) will be discussed. The discussions include interview results from eight CRCs of four institutions who have been involved in ICTs, current status of education for co-medicals in the field of ICTs, and future perspectives of ICTs from the CRC's view point. The following topics are especially focused in the discussion. 1) It is necessary to establish the infra-structure for free discussion among the ICT team so that opinions of co-medicals as the operation managers of the participating institutions can be openly shared and importantly taken into account. 2) It is also important for co-medicals to conduct research studies to clarify the problems in the current ICT support systems. 3) Lastly, the significance of early involvement of CRCs into the ICT protocol development must be emphasized, because the quality of protocols will be better improved by the practical insight of CRCs, and consequently, the accomplishment of the ICT, such as the speed and the data quality, may be accelerated.

  4. Clinical research in surgical oncology: an analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Amber S; Barnes, Alison; Scheer, Adena S; Martel, Guillaume; Moloo, Husein; Boushey, Robin P; Sabri, Elham; Auer, Rebecca C

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a descriptive analysis of registered clinical trials in surgical oncology at ClinicalTrials.gov. Data was extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov using the following search engine criteria: "Cancer" as Condition, "Surgery OR Operation OR Resection" as Intervention, and Non-Industry sponsored. The search was limited to Canada and the United States and included trials registered from January 1, 2001 to January 1, 2011. Of 9,961 oncology trials, 1,049 (10.5%) included any type of surgical intervention. Of these trials, 125 (11.9%, 1.3% of all oncology trials) assessed a surgical variable, 773 (73.7%) assessed adjuvant/neoadjuvant therapies, and 151 (14.4%) were observational studies. Of the trials assessing adjuvant therapies, systemic treatment (362 trials, 46.8%) and multimodal therapy (129 trials, 16.7%) comprised a large focus. Of the 125 trials where surgery was the intervention, 59 trials (47.2%) focused on surgical techniques or devices, 45 trials (36.0%) studied invasive diagnostic methods, and 21 trials (16.8%) evaluated surgery versus no surgery. The majority of the 125 trials were nonrandomized (72, 57.6%). The number of registered surgical oncology trials is small in comparison to oncology trials as a whole. Clinical trials specifically designed to assess surgical interventions are vastly outnumbered by trials focusing on adjuvant therapies. Randomized surgical oncology trials account for <1% of all registered cancer trials. Barriers to the design and implementation of randomized trials in surgical oncology need to be clarified in order to facilitate higher-level evidence in surgical decision-making.

  5. 77 FR 35407 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Clinical Mythteries: A Video Game About Clinical Trials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ...: A Video Game About Clinical Trials SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2... Collection: Title: Clinical Mythteries: A Video Game About Clinical Trials. Type of Information Collection... video game'' for adolescents about clinical studies which: (1) Incorporates core learning...

  6. The role of clinical trials in veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Burton, Jenna; Khanna, Chand

    2014-09-01

    Clinical trials for companion animals are becoming more common and more accessible to pet owners as veterinary oncologists seek to expand their knowledge of tumor biology in companion animal species and improve the way they diagnose and treat cancer for these animals. Many owners enroll their pets because they wish to participate in clinical cancer research that may ultimately benefit pets and people. Understanding the goals, benefits, and risks of clinical trials participation provides the knowledge needed by primary care veterinarians to counsel their clients as to whether clinical trial participation is a good choice for them and their pets.

  7. Biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored global clinical trials in emerging countries.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Lenio Souza; Martins, Elisabeth Nogueira

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials placed in countries previously described as emerging regions for clinical research, and potential differences for those placed in Brazil. Data regarding recruitment of subjects for clinical trials were retrieved from www.clinicaltrials.gov on February 2nd 2009. Proportions of sites in each country were compared among emerging countries. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to evaluate whether trial placement in Brazil could be predicted by trial location in other countries and/or by trial features. A total of 8,501 trials were then active and 1,170 (13.8%) included sites in emerging countries (i.e., Argentina, Brazil, China, Czech Republic, Hungary, India, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, and South Africa). South Korea and China presented a significantly higher proportion of sites when compared to other countries (p<0.05). Multiple logistic regressions detected no negative correlation between placement in other countries when compared to Brazil. Trials involving subjects with less than 15 years of age, those with targeted recruitment of at least 1,000 subjects, and seven sponsors were identified as significant predictors of trial placement in Brazil. No clear direct competition between Brazil and other emerging countries was detected. South Korea showed the higher proportion of sites and ranked third in total number of trials, appearing as a major player in attractiveness for biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials.

  8. Statistical challenges for central monitoring in clinical trials: a review.

    PubMed

    Oba, Koji

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the complexity and costs of clinical trials have increased dramatically, especially in the area of new drug development. Risk-based monitoring (RBM) has been attracting attention as an efficient and effective trial monitoring approach, which can be applied irrespectively of the trial sponsor, i.e., academic institution or pharmaceutical company. In the RBM paradigm, it is expected that a statistical approach to central monitoring can help improve the effectiveness of on-site monitoring by prioritizing and guiding site visits according to central statistical data checks, as evidenced by examples of actual trial datasets. In this review, several statistical methods for central monitoring are presented. It is important to share knowledge about the role and performance capabilities of statistical methodology among clinical trial team members (i.e., sponsors, investigators, data managers, monitors, and biostatisticians) in order to adopt central statistical monitoring for assessing data quality in the actual clinical trial.

  9. New generation of breast cancer clinical trials implementing molecular profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zardavas, Dimitrios; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of molecular profiling technologies in oncology deepens our knowledge for the molecular landscapes of cancer diagnoses, identifying aberrations that could be linked with specific therapeutic vulnerabilities. In particular, there is an increasing list of molecularly targeted anticancer agents undergoing clinical development that aim to block specific molecular aberrations. This leads to a paradigm shift, with an increasing list of specific aberrations dictating the treatment of patients with cancer. This paradigm shift impacts the field of clinical trials, since the classical approach of having clinico-pathological disease characteristics dictating the patients' enrolment in oncology trials shifts towards the implementation of molecular profiling as pre-screening step. In order to facilitate the successful clinical development of these new anticancer drugs within specific molecular niches of cancer diagnoses, there have been developed new, innovative trial designs that could be classified as follows: i) longitudinal cohort studies that implement (or not) "nested" downstream trials, 2) studies that assess the clinical utility of molecular profiling, 3) "master" protocol trials, iv) "basket" trials, v) trials following an adaptive design. In the present article, we review these innovative study designs, providing representative examples from each category and we discuss the challenges that still need to be addressed in this era of new generation oncology trials implementing molecular profiling. Emphasis is put on the field of breast cancer clinical trials. PMID:27458530

  10. New generation of breast cancer clinical trials implementing molecular profiling.

    PubMed

    Zardavas, Dimitrios; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine

    2016-06-01

    The implementation of molecular profiling technologies in oncology deepens our knowledge for the molecular landscapes of cancer diagnoses, identifying aberrations that could be linked with specific therapeutic vulnerabilities. In particular, there is an increasing list of molecularly targeted anticancer agents undergoing clinical development that aim to block specific molecular aberrations. This leads to a paradigm shift, with an increasing list of specific aberrations dictating the treatment of patients with cancer. This paradigm shift impacts the field of clinical trials, since the classical approach of having clinico-pathological disease characteristics dictating the patients' enrolment in oncology trials shifts towards the implementation of molecular profiling as pre-screening step. In order to facilitate the successful clinical development of these new anticancer drugs within specific molecular niches of cancer diagnoses, there have been developed new, innovative trial designs that could be classified as follows: i) longitudinal cohort studies that implement (or not) "nested" downstream trials, 2) studies that assess the clinical utility of molecular profiling, 3) "master" protocol trials, iv) "basket" trials, v) trials following an adaptive design. In the present article, we review these innovative study designs, providing representative examples from each category and we discuss the challenges that still need to be addressed in this era of new generation oncology trials implementing molecular profiling. Emphasis is put on the field of breast cancer clinical trials.

  11. Clinical Perspectives from Randomized Phase 3 Trials on Prostate Cancer: An Analysis of the ClinicalTrials.gov Database.

    PubMed

    Tsikkinis, Alexandros; Cihoric, Nikola; Giannarini, Gianluca; Hinz, Stefan; Briganti, Alberto; Wust, Peter; Ost, Piet; Ploussard, Guillaume; Massard, Christophe; Surcel, Cristian I; Sooriakumaran, Prasanna; Isbarn, Hendrik; De Visschere, Peter J L; Futterer, Jurgen J; van der Bergh, Roderick C N; Dal Pra, Alan; Aebersold, Daniel M; Budach, Volker; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2015-09-01

    It is not easy to overview pending phase 3 trials on prostate cancer (PCa), and awareness of these trials would benefit clinicians. To identify all phase 3 trials on PCa registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov database with pending results. On September 29, 2014, a database was established from the records for 175 538 clinical trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov. A search of this database for the substring "prostat" identified 2951 prostate trials. Phase 3 trials accounted for 441 studies, of which 333 concerned only PCa. We selected only ongoing or completed trials with pending results, that is, for which the primary endpoint had not been published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. We identified 123 phase 3 trials with pending results. Trials were conducted predominantly in North America (n=63; 51%) and Europe (n=47; 38%). The majority were on nonmetastatic disease (n=82; 67%), with 37 (30%) on metastatic disease and four trials (3%) including both. In terms of intervention, systemic treatment was most commonly tested (n=71; 58%), followed by local treatment 34 (28%), and both systemic and local treatment (n=11; 9%), with seven (6%) trials not classifiable. The 71 trials on systemic treatment included androgen deprivation therapy (n=34; 48%), chemotherapy (n=15; 21%), immunotherapy (n=9; 13%), other systemic drugs (n=9; 13%), radiopharmaceuticals (n=2; 3%), and combinations (n=2; 3%). Local treatments tested included radiation therapy (n=27; 79%), surgery (n=5; 15%), and both (n=2; 2%). A limitation is that not every clinical trial is registered on ClinicalTrials.gov. There are many PCa phase 3 trials with pending results, most of which address questions regarding systemic treatments for both nonmetastatic and metastatic disease. Radiation therapy and androgen deprivation therapy are the interventions most commonly tested for local and systemic treatment, respectively. This report describes all phase 3 trials on prostate cancer registered in the ClinicalTrials

  12. Clinical Trials Registration and Results Information Submission. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-09-21

    This final rule details the requirements for submitting registration and summary results information, including adverse event information, for specified clinical trials of drug products (including biological products) and device products and for pediatric postmarket surveillances of a device product to ClinicalTrials.gov, the clinical trial registry and results data bank operated by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This rule provides for the expanded registry and results data bank specified in Title VIII of the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA) to help patients find trials for which they might be eligible, enhance the design of clinical trials and prevent duplication of unsuccessful or unsafe trials, improve the evidence base that informs clinical care, increase the efficiency of drug and device development processes, improve clinical research practice, and build public trust in clinical research. The requirements apply to the responsible party (meaning the sponsor or designated principal investigator) for certain clinical trials of drug products (including biological products) and device products that are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and for pediatric postmarket surveillances of a device product that are ordered by FDA.

  13. Assessing the readability of ClinicalTrials.gov

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Danny TY; Hanauer, David A; Mei, Qiaozhu; Clark, Patricia M; An, Lawrence C; Proulx, Joshua; Zeng, Qing T; Vydiswaran, VG Vinod; Collins-Thompson, Kevyn

    2016-01-01

    Objective ClinicalTrials.gov serves critical functions of disseminating trial information to the public and helping the trials recruit participants. This study assessed the readability of trial descriptions at ClinicalTrials.gov using multiple quantitative measures. Materials and Methods The analysis included all 165 988 trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as of April 30, 2014. To obtain benchmarks, the authors also analyzed 2 other medical corpora: (1) all 955 Health Topics articles from MedlinePlus and (2) a random sample of 100 000 clinician notes retrieved from an electronic health records system intended for conveying internal communication among medical professionals. The authors characterized each of the corpora using 4 surface metrics, and then applied 5 different scoring algorithms to assess their readability. The authors hypothesized that clinician notes would be most difficult to read, followed by trial descriptions and MedlinePlus Health Topics articles. Results Trial descriptions have the longest average sentence length (26.1 words) across all corpora; 65% of their words used are not covered by a basic medical English dictionary. In comparison, average sentence length of MedlinePlus Health Topics articles is 61% shorter, vocabulary size is 95% smaller, and dictionary coverage is 46% higher. All 5 scoring algorithms consistently rated CliniclTrials.gov trial descriptions the most difficult corpus to read, even harder than clinician notes. On average, it requires 18 years of education to properly understand these trial descriptions according to the results generated by the readability assessment algorithms. Discussion and Conclusion Trial descriptions at CliniclTrials.gov are extremely difficult to read. Significant work is warranted to improve their readability in order to achieve CliniclTrials.gov’s goal of facilitating information dissemination and subject recruitment. PMID:26269536

  14. Assessing the readability of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Wu, Danny T Y; Hanauer, David A; Mei, Qiaozhu; Clark, Patricia M; An, Lawrence C; Proulx, Joshua; Zeng, Qing T; Vydiswaran, V G Vinod; Collins-Thompson, Kevyn; Zheng, Kai

    2016-03-01

    ClinicalTrials.gov serves critical functions of disseminating trial information to the public and helping the trials recruit participants. This study assessed the readability of trial descriptions at ClinicalTrials.gov using multiple quantitative measures. The analysis included all 165,988 trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as of April 30, 2014. To obtain benchmarks, the authors also analyzed 2 other medical corpora: (1) all 955 Health Topics articles from MedlinePlus and (2) a random sample of 100,000 clinician notes retrieved from an electronic health records system intended for conveying internal communication among medical professionals. The authors characterized each of the corpora using 4 surface metrics, and then applied 5 different scoring algorithms to assess their readability. The authors hypothesized that clinician notes would be most difficult to read, followed by trial descriptions and MedlinePlus Health Topics articles. Trial descriptions have the longest average sentence length (26.1 words) across all corpora; 65% of their words used are not covered by a basic medical English dictionary. In comparison, average sentence length of MedlinePlus Health Topics articles is 61% shorter, vocabulary size is 95% smaller, and dictionary coverage is 46% higher. All 5 scoring algorithms consistently rated CliniclTrials.gov trial descriptions the most difficult corpus to read, even harder than clinician notes. On average, it requires 18 years of education to properly understand these trial descriptions according to the results generated by the readability assessment algorithms. Trial descriptions at CliniclTrials.gov are extremely difficult to read. Significant work is warranted to improve their readability in order to achieve CliniclTrials.gov's goal of facilitating information dissemination and subject recruitment. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association 2015. This work is written by US Government

  15. Desiderata for Major Eligibility Criteria in Breast Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Matthew L.; Weng, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Use of major eligibility criteria is a popular but unstudied folk practice for improving patient screening efficiency for clinical studies. This mixed-methods research study derived the desiderata for major eligibility criteria in breast cancer clinical trials. We randomly selected thirty interventional breast cancer clinical trials conducted at The New York-Presbyterian Hospital on the Columbia University Medical Center campus to create training (N=20) and testing (N=10) datasets. We utilized the Think-aloud protocol to gauge how clinical researchers identify and use major eligibility criteria to prescreen patients for clinical trials during an audio-recorded interview. A focus group session was held to understand the current prescreening process and investigate how it could be optimized to maximize recruitment rates. Using the grounded theory method, we annotated transcriptions to discover user rationale and desiderata behind major eligibility criteria in breast cancer clinical trials, which were later evaluated in a follow-up survey. PMID:26958302

  16. Money and morals: ending clinical trials for financial reasons.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Margaret L; Kwon, Brian K; Scott, Christopher Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Too often, biopharmaceutical companies stop their clinical trials solely for financial reasons. In this chapter, we discuss this phenomenon against the backdrop of a 2011 decision by Geron Corporation to abandon its stem cell clinical trial for spinal cord injury (SCI), the preliminary results of which were released in May 2014. We argue that the resultant harms are widespread and are different in nature from the consequences of stopping trials for scientific or medical reasons. We examine the ethical and social effects that arise from such decisions and discuss them in light of ethical frameworks, including duties of individual stakeholders and corporate sponsors. We offer ways that sponsors and clinical sites can ensure that trials are responsibly started, and once started adequately protect the interests of participants. We conclude with recommendations that industry sponsors of clinical trials should adopt in order to advance a collective and patient-centered research ethic.

  17. Mitigating the Effects of Nonadherence in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Earle E.; McCann, David J.; Skolnick, Phil; Laughren, Thomas; Hanina, Adam; Burch, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Accounting for subject nonadherence and eliminating inappropriate subjects in clinical trials are critical elements of a successful study. Nonadherence can increase variance, lower study power, and reduce the magnitude of treatment effects. Inappropriate subjects (including those who do not have the illness under study, fail to report exclusionary conditions, falsely report medication adherence, or participate in concurrent trials) confound safety and efficacy signals. This paper, a product of the International Society for CNS Clinical Trial Methodology (ISCTM) Working Group on Nonadherence in Clinical Trials, explores and models nonadherence in clinical trials and puts forth specific recommendations to identify and mitigate its negative effects. These include statistical analyses of nonadherence data, novel protocol design, and the use of biomarkers, subject registries, and/or medication adherence technologies. PMID:26634893

  18. [Placebo control and clinical trial of Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing

    2010-10-01

    World Health Organization aims to develop safe, effective and practical traditional medicine. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and other complementary and alternative medicine are being recognized in the whole world nowadays. However, the definite effect of Chinese medicine is still in need of scientific research proof. Placebo control is of equal importance to active control and blank control in clinical trial of TCM. This article briefly reviewed the importance of placebo control and commented on its present situation in clinical trial of TCM. This article also brought up the preliminary proposals of placebo application in TCM clinical trial. We should emphasize scientific placebo preparation and good design of placebo-controlled trial, which are directed by International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. A good clinical trial project will avoid unnecessary wastes and provide safe and effective treatment for people.

  19. The conduct and principles of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Klimt, C R

    1981-05-01

    Some of the guiding principles as well as the pitfall of long-term randomized clinical trials are presented. Examples have been chosen from trials in the cardiovascular field. A typical long-term clinical trial is divided into five phases: planning, preparation, recruitment, clinical follow-up and termination, and finally analysis. Administrative, legal, and ethical aspects of a trial are discussed, as well as the cost of clinical trials. Organization patterns are described and some prevalent ones are criticized. Further, practical matters such as recruitment techniques, obtaining informed consent from the patients, determining drug dosage and formulation as well as the problem of interaction with nonstudy drugs are referred to. Adherence testing remains a problem, because of our inability to test for placebo adherence.

  20. Balancing multiple baseline characteristics in randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Su, Zheng

    2011-07-01

    It is of vital importance to the success of a randomized clinical trial to maintain the balance of baseline characteristics (covariates) that could potentially confound the outcomes of the trial. Various randomization methods have been proposed to increase the likelihood of having balanced covariates at the end of a trial, most of which only apply to categorical covariates. An optimization approach to maintaining the balance of multiple covariates in randomized clinical trials is proposed, which is applicable to both continuous and categorical covariates and allows the covariates to be ranked according to their clinical importance as perceived by the clinical trial practitioners. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm significantly outperforms the standard randomization approach via flipping an unbiased coin. The proposed randomization method can be easily implemented and generalized for cases where there are multiple treatment arms with equal or unequal randomization probabilities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence of primary outcome changes in clinical trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ramagopalan, Sreeram; Skingsley, Andrew P; Handunnetthi, Lahiru; Klingel, Michelle; Magnus, Daniel; Pakpoor, Julia; Goldacre, Ben

    2014-01-01

    An important principle in the good conduct of clinical trials is that a summary of the trial protocol, with a pre-defined primary outcome, should be freely available before the study commences. The clinical trials registry ClinicalTrials.gov provides one method of doing this, and once the trial is registered, any changes made to the primary outcome are documented. The objectives of this study were: to assess the proportion of registered trials on ClinicalTrials.gov that had the primary outcome changed; to assess when the primary outcome was changed in relation to the listed study start and end dates and to assess whether the primary outcome change had any relation to the study sponsor. A cross-sectional analysis of all interventional clinical trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov as of 25 October 2012 was performed. The main outcome was any change made to the initially listed primary outcome and the time of the change in relation to the trial start and end date. Our analysis showed that 28229 of 89204 (31.7%) registered studies had their primary outcome changed.  Industry funding was associated with all primary outcome changes, odds ratio (OR)= 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.31-1.41, p<0.001; with primary outcome changes after study start date OR=1.37, 95% CI=1.32-1.42, p<0.001; with primary outcome changes after primary completion date OR=1.84, 95% CI=1.75-1.94, p<0.001 and with primary outcome changes after study completion date OR=1.82, 95% CI=1.73-1.91, p<0.001.  Conclusions A significant proportion of interventional trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov have their primary outcomes altered after the listed study start and completion dates. These changes are associated with funding source.

  2. Learning from hackers: open-source clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Adam G; Day, Richard O; Mandl, Kenneth D; Coiera, Enrico

    2012-05-02

    Open sharing of clinical trial data has been proposed as a way to address the gap between the production of clinical evidence and the decision-making of physicians. A similar gap was addressed in the software industry by their open-source software movement. Here, we examine how the social and technical principles of the movement can guide the growth of an open-source clinical trial community.

  3. DICOM Structured Reporting and Cancer Clinical Trials Results

    PubMed Central

    Clunie, David A

    2007-01-01

    The use of biomarkers derived from radiological images as surrogate end-points in therapeutic cancer clinical trials is well established. DICOM is the ubiquitous standard for the interchange of images for both clinical use as well as research. It also has capabilities for the exchange of image-related information, including categorical and quantitative information derived from images. The use of DICOM Structured Reporting for the encoding and interchange of clinical trial results in a standard manner is reviewed. PMID:19390663

  4. Clinical trial network for the promotion of clinical research for rare diseases in Japan: muscular dystrophy clinical trial network.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Reiko; Ogata, Katsuhisa; Tamaura, Akemi; Kimura, En; Ohata, Maki; Takeshita, Eri; Nakamura, Harumasa; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Komaki, Hirofumi

    2016-07-11

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most commonly inherited neuromuscular disease. Therapeutic agents for the treatment of rare disease, namely "orphan drugs", have recently drawn the attention of researchers and pharmaceutical companies. To ensure the successful conduction of clinical trials to evaluate novel treatments for patients with rare diseases, an appropriate infrastructure is needed. One of the effective solutions for the lack of infrastructure is to establish a network of rare diseases. To accomplish the conduction of clinical trials in Japan, the Muscular dystrophy clinical trial network (MDCTN) was established by the clinical research group for muscular dystrophy, including the National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, as well as national and university hospitals, all which have a long-standing history of research cooperation. Thirty-one medical institutions (17 national hospital organizations, 10 university hospitals, 1 national center, 2 public hospitals, and 1 private hospital) belong to this network and collaborate to facilitate clinical trials. The Care and Treatment Site Registry (CTSR) calculates and reports the proportion of patients with neuromuscular diseases in the cooperating sites. In total, there are 5,589 patients with neuromuscular diseases in Japan and the proportion of patients with each disease is as follows: DMD, 29 %; myotonic dystrophy type 1, 23 %; limb girdle muscular dystrophy, 11 %; Becker muscular dystrophy, 10 %. We work jointly to share updated health care information and standardized evaluations of clinical outcomes as well. The collaboration with the patient registry (CTSR), allows the MDCTN to recruit DMD participants with specific mutations and conditions, in a remarkably short period of time. Counting with a network that operates at a national level is important to address the corresponding national issues. Thus, our network will be able to contribute with international research activity, which can lead to

  5. Good Clinical Practice Guidance and Pragmatic Clinical Trials: Balancing the Best of Both Worlds.

    PubMed

    Mentz, Robert J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Berdan, Lisa G; Rorick, Tyrus; O'Brien, Emily C; Ibarra, Jenny C; Curtis, Lesley H; Peterson, Eric D

    2016-03-01

    Randomized, clinical trials are commonly regarded as the highest level of evidence to support clinical decisions. Good Clinical Practice guidelines have been constructed to provide an ethical and scientific quality standard for trials that involve human subjects in a manner aligned with the Declaration of Helsinki. Originally designed to provide a unified standard of trial data to support submission to regulatory authorities, the principles may also be applied to other studies of human subjects. Although the application of Good Clinical Practice principles generally led to improvements in the quality and consistency of trial operations, these principles have also contributed to increasing trial complexity and costs. Alternatively, the growing availability of electronic health record data has facilitated the possibility for streamlined pragmatic clinical trials. The central tenets of Good Clinical Practice and pragmatic clinical trials represent potential tensions in trial design (stringent quality and highly efficient operations). In the present article, we highlight potential areas of discordance between Good Clinical Practice guidelines and the principles of pragmatic clinical trials and suggest strategies to streamline study conduct in an ethical manner to optimally perform clinical trials in the electronic age. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Cancer Clinical Trials at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... to call the NCI research team conducting the trial at any time to discuss patient treatment plans and care. Related Resources Taking Part in Cancer Treatment Research Studies Clinical Trials Information for Patients and Caregivers Steps to Find ...

  7. MAIN ETHICAL BREACHES IN MULTICENTER CLINICAL TRIALS REGULATIONS OF TURKEY

    PubMed Central

    Ekmekci, P. Elif

    2017-01-01

    Turkey has been a growing market for multicenter clinical trials for the last ten years and is considered among the top ten countries in terms of potential study subject populations. The objective of increasing the share of Turkey in multicenter clinical trials is strongly supported. This ambitious goal of Turkey raises the need to have regulations in compliance with other leading countries conducting clinical trials. The latest published Turkish regulations on clinical trials are structured in compliance with the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) Guidelines and in harmony with the regulations of other leading countries in clinical research, such as the US. There are still flaws in Turkish regulation with the risk of violating human subjects’ rights and issues with responsible conduct of research. The aim of this article is to compare Turkish clinical trials regulations with those of the US, to determine if there exists any incompatibility between the countries’ regulations and, if so, how to ameliorate these. The main flaws in Turkish clinical trials regulations are identified as follows: lack of definition of the term “human subject; absence of explicit referral to the unacceptability of Conflict of Interest (COI) and taking measures to avoid it; exiguity of emphasis on plurality of the IRB members; nonexistence of a clear expression that this is research; and clinical equipoise, regarding the treatment of the existing clinical problem and lack of integration with international accreditation systems for Institutional Review Boards.

  8. MAIN ETHICAL BREACHES IN MULTICENTER CLINICAL TRIALS REGULATIONS OF TURKEY.

    PubMed

    Ekmekci, P Elif

    2016-01-01

    Turkey has been a growing market for multicenter clinical trials for the last ten years and is considered among the top ten countries in terms of potential study subject populations. The objective of increasing the share of Turkey in multicenter clinical trials is strongly supported. This ambitious goal of Turkey raises the need to have regulations in compliance with other leading countries conducting clinical trials. The latest published Turkish regulations on clinical trials are structured in compliance with the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) Guidelines and in harmony with the regulations of other leading countries in clinical research, such as the US. There are still flaws in Turkish regulation with the risk of violating human subjects' rights and issues with responsible conduct of research. The aim of this article is to compare Turkish clinical trials regulations with those of the US, to determine if there exists any incompatibility between the countries' regulations and, if so, how to ameliorate these. The main flaws in Turkish clinical trials regulations are identified as follows: lack of definition of the term "human subject; absence of explicit referral to the unacceptability of Conflict of Interest (COI) and taking measures to avoid it; exiguity of emphasis on plurality of the IRB members; nonexistence of a clear expression that this is research; and clinical equipoise, regarding the treatment of the existing clinical problem and lack of integration with international accreditation systems for Institutional Review Boards.

  9. Health literacy and usability of clinical trial search engines.

    PubMed

    Utami, Dina; Bickmore, Timothy W; Barry, Barbara; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Several web-based search engines have been developed to assist individuals to find clinical trials for which they may be interested in volunteering. However, these search engines may be difficult for individuals with low health and computer literacy to navigate. The authors present findings from a usability evaluation of clinical trial search tools with 41 participants across the health and computer literacy spectrum. The study consisted of 3 parts: (a) a usability study of an existing web-based clinical trial search tool; (b) a usability study of a keyword-based clinical trial search tool; and (c) an exploratory study investigating users' information needs when deciding among 2 or more candidate clinical trials. From the first 2 studies, the authors found that users with low health literacy have difficulty forming queries using keywords and have significantly more difficulty using a standard web-based clinical trial search tool compared with users with adequate health literacy. From the third study, the authors identified the search factors most important to individuals searching for clinical trials and how these varied by health literacy level.

  10. Is religiosity related to attitudes toward clinical trials participation?

    PubMed

    Daverio-Zanetti, Svetlana; Schultz, Kathryn; del Campo, Miguel A Martin; Malcarne, Vanessa; Riley, Natasha; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2015-06-01

    Research indicates that a low percentage of cancer patients enroll in cancer clinical trials. This is especially true among minority groups such as Hispanic Americans. Considering the importance of religion in the Hispanic American community, it is important to understand its relationship to perceptions of clinical trials. Five hundred and three Latina women completed the Barriers to Clinical Trials Participation Scale and the Duke University Religion Index. For the total sample, higher organizational and intrinsic religiosity was significantly associated with a perceived lack of community support for clinical trials participation. In subgroup analysis, the relationship between organizational religiosity and lack of support was stronger among Latinas who were Spanish language preferred and Latinas who were Catholic. Intrinsic religiosity was associated with mistrust among Spanish language-preferred Latinas, and both organizational and intrinsic religiosities were associated with a lack of familiarity with clinical trials among Christian (non-Catholic) Latinas. These results indicate that religious institutions that serve Latinas may be an effective venue for disseminating clinical trial education programs to improve attitudes toward clinical trials participation.

  11. Automated information extraction of key trial design elements from clinical trial publications.

    PubMed

    de Bruijn, Berry; Carini, Simona; Kiritchenko, Svetlana; Martin, Joel; Sim, Ida

    2008-11-06

    Clinical trials are one of the most valuable sources of scientific evidence for improving the practice of medicine. The Trial Bank project aims to improve structured access to trial findings by including formalized trial information into a knowledge base. Manually extracting trial information from published articles is costly, but automated information extraction techniques can assist. The current study highlights a single architecture to extract a wide array of information elements from full-text publications of randomized clinical trials (RCTs). This architecture combines a text classifier with a weak regular expression matcher. We tested this two-stage architecture on 88 RCT reports from 5 leading medical journals, extracting 23 elements of key trial information such as eligibility rules, sample size, intervention, and outcome names. Results prove this to be a promising avenue to help critical appraisers, systematic reviewers, and curators quickly identify key information elements in published RCT articles.

  12. Can emergency medicine research benefit from adaptive design clinical trials?

    PubMed

    Flight, Laura; Julious, Steven A; Goodacre, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Adaptive design clinical trials use preplanned interim analyses to determine whether studies should be stopped or modified before recruitment is complete. Emergency medicine trials are well suited to these designs as many have a short time to primary outcome relative to the length of recruitment. We hypothesised that the majority of published emergency medicine trials have the potential to use a simple adaptive trial design. We reviewed clinical trials published in three emergency medicine journals between January 2003 and December 2013. We determined the proportion that used an adaptive design as well as the proportion that could have used a simple adaptive design based on the time to primary outcome and length of recruitment. Only 19 of 188 trials included in the review were considered to have used an adaptive trial design. A total of 154/165 trials that were fixed in design had the potential to use an adaptive design. Currently, there seems to be limited uptake in the use of adaptive trial designs in emergency medicine despite their potential benefits to save time and resources. Failing to take advantage of adaptive designs could be costly to patients and research. It is recommended that where practical and logistical considerations allow, adaptive designs should be used for all emergency medicine clinical trials. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Clinical trials and SCID row: the ethics of phase 1 trials in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2007-12-01

    Relatively little has been written about the ethics of conducting early phase clinical trials involving subjects from the developing world. Below, I analyze ethical issues surrounding one of gene transfer's most widely praised studies conducted to date: in this study, Italian investigators recruited two subjects from the developing world who were ineligible for standard of care because of economic considerations. Though the study seems to have rendered a cure in these two subjects, it does not appear to have complied with various international guidelines that require that clinical trials conducted in the developing world be responsive to their populations' health needs. Nevertheless, policies devised to address large scale, late stage trials, such as the AZT short-course placebo trials, map somewhat awkwardly to early phase studies. I argue that interest in conducting translational research in the developing world, particularly in the context of hemophilia trials, should motivate more rigorous ethical thinking around clinical trials involving economically disadvantaged populations.

  14. Clinical trial registration in oral health journals.

    PubMed

    Smaïl-Faugeron, V; Fron-Chabouis, H; Durieux, P

    2015-03-01

    Prospective registration of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) represents the best solution to reporting bias. The extent to which oral health journals have endorsed and complied with RCT registration is unknown. We identified journals publishing RCTs in dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine in the Journal Citation Reports. We classified journals into 3 groups: journals requiring or recommending trial registration, journals referring indirectly to registration, and journals providing no reference to registration. For the 5 journals with the highest 2012 impact factors in each group, we assessed whether RCTs with results published in 2013 had been registered. Of 78 journals examined, 32 (41%) required or recommended trial registration, 19 (24%) referred indirectly to registration, and 27 (35%) provided no reference to registration. We identified 317 RCTs with results published in the 15 selected journals in 2013. Overall, 73 (23%) were registered in a trial registry. Among those, 91% were registered retrospectively and 32% did not report trial registration in the published article. The proportion of trials registered was not significantly associated with editorial policies: 29% with results in journals that required or recommended registration, 15% in those that referred indirectly to registration, and 21% in those providing no reference to registration (P = 0.05). Less than one-quarter of RCTs with results published in a sample of oral health journals were registered with a public registry. Improvements are needed with respect to how journals inform and require their authors to register their trials. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  15. Clinical Trials For Cytoprotection In Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Labiche, Lise A.; Grotta, James C.

    2004-01-01

    Summary: To date, many cytoprotective drugs have reached the stage of pivotal phase 3 efficacy trials in acute stroke patients. (Table 1) Unfortunately, throughout the neuroprotective literature, the phrase “failure to demonstrate efficacy” prevails as a common thread among the many neutral or negative trials, despite the largely encouraging results encountered in preclinical studies. The reasons for this discrepancy are multiple, and have been discussed by Dr. Zivin in his review. Many of the recent trials have addressed deficiencies of the previous ones with more rigorous trial design, including more specific patient selection criteria (ensure homogeneity of stroke location and severity), stratified randomization algorithms (time-to-treat), narrowed therapeutic time-window and pharmacokinetic monitoring. Current trials have also incorporated biologic surrogate markers of toxicity and outcome such as drug levels and neuroimaging. Lastly, multi-modal therapies and coupled cytoprotection/reperfusion strategies are being investigated to optimize tissue salvage. This review will focus on individual therapeutic strategies and we will emphasize what we have learned from these trials both in terms of trial design and the biologic effect (or lack thereof) of these agents. PMID:15717007

  16. Geographic proximity and racial disparities in cancer clinical trial participation.

    PubMed

    Kanarek, Norma F; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Metzger-Gaud, Sharon; Damron, Dorothy; Guseynova, Alla; Klamerus, Justin F; Rudin, Charles M

    2010-12-01

    This study assessed the effects of race and place of residence on clinical trial participation by patients seen at a designated NCI comprehensive cancer center. Clinical trial accrual to cancer case ratios were evaluated using a database of residents at the continental United States seen at The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins from 2005 to 2007. Place of residence was categorized into 3 nonoverlapping geographic areas: Baltimore City, non-Baltimore City catchment area, and non-catchment area. Controlling for age, sex, county poverty level, and cancer site, significant race and place of residence differences were seen in therapeutic or nontherapeutic clinical trials participation. White non-Baltimore City catchment area residents, the designated reference group, achieved the highest participation rate. Although the test of interaction (control group compared with all others) was not significant, some race-geographic area group differences were detected. In therapeutic trials, most race-place of residence group levels were statistically lower and different from reference; in nontherapeutic trials, race-specific Baltimore City groups participated at levels similar to reference. Baltimore City residents had lower participation rates only in therapeutic trials, irrespective of race. County poverty level was not significant but was retained as a confounder. Place of residence and race were found to be significant predictors of participation in therapeutic and nontherapeutic clinical trials, although patterns differed somewhat between therapeutic and nontherapeutic trials. Clinical trial accruals are not uniform across age, sex, race, place of residence, cancer site, or trial type, underscoring that cancer centers must better understand their source patients to enhance clinical trial participation.

  17. Inclusion of patient-reported outcome measures in registered clinical trials: Evidence from ClinicalTrials.gov (2007-2013).

    PubMed

    Vodicka, E; Kim, K; Devine, E B; Gnanasakthy, A; Scoggins, J F; Patrick, D L

    2015-07-01

    Patient reported outcomes (PROs) have gained a prominent place in clinical research. Previous estimates suggest that PRO measures are used in 14% of clinical trials. Online registries, such as ClinicalTrials.gov, may be useful in evaluating extent of PRO use. To estimate the proportion of clinical trials using at least one PRO measure and to examine associations between trial characteristics and use of PRO measures. A copy of the ClinicalTrials.gov database was made, containing all data from November 2007 to December 2013. Content was searched for use of PRO measures. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate possible associations between trial-level characteristics and use of PRO measures. Of 96,736 registered trials, 26,337 (27%) were identified as using one or more PRO measures. Among oncology trials, 29% (3947/13,584) were identified as using a PRO measure, compared to 27% (22,390/83,152) of non-oncology trials. A greater proportion of trials using PRO measures were more likely to be sponsored by university/research organizations (29%) or the US government (33%), compared to industry (22%); Phase III (35%); non-randomized (32%); and evaluating devices (30%), procedures (31%) or behaviors (50%), compared to drugs (24%). Fewer were FDA-regulated (23%). Evidence suggests that between 2007 and 2013, there has been an increase in the number of trials that use a PRO measure, particularly in oncology trials. With initiatives such as the Patient-Focused Drug Development and FDA PRO Guidance, the trend in the use of PRO measures in clinical research will likely increase further. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antiepileptic drug trials: the view from the clinic.

    PubMed

    Faught, Edward

    2012-06-01

    A golden age of antiepileptic drug development has yielded over a dozen useful new compounds, but the nature of clinical trials has made translation to practical use in the clinic difficult. Most clinical trials are designed for regulatory purposes and fail to answer critical clinical questions. These questions include: which drug is best as initial therapy, which drugs work as monotherapy, what are good drug combinations, what is the best starting dose and titration schedule, what is a reasonable target dose, what is the shape of the dose-response curve and does it vary significantly between patients, what is the true incidence of side effects, and what is the long-term efficacy of the drug? Most of these questions could be answered by changing trial designs, but many changes would entail additional time and money. There are encouraging signs that trials with procedures more directly applicable to the clinic are becoming common. These include direct comparative trials, longer trials with emphasis on seizure freedom, and trials with more flexible dosing schedules. In the past, funding of longer and more naturalistic trials has fallen to government agencies, but commercial funding has been obtained for several recent studies. Better quality control, innovative endpoints, structured searching for side effects, and standardisation of data collection are also promising topics for development.

  19. Modeling the dissemination and uptake of clinical trials results

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, Scott R.; Schouten, Jeffrey T.; Cope, Marie T.; Kagan, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    A select set of highly cited publications from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Networks was used to illustrate the integration of time interval and citation data, modeling the progression, dissemination, and uptake of primary research findings. Following a process marker approach, the pace of initial utilization of this research was measured as the time from trial conceptualization, development and implementation, through results dissemination and uptake. Compared to earlier studies of clinical research, findings suggest that select HIV/AIDS trial results are disseminated and utilized relatively rapidly. Time-based modeling of publication results as they meet specific citation milestones enabled the observation of points at which study results were present in the literature summarizing the evidence in the field. Evaluating the pace of clinical research, results dissemination, and knowledge uptake in synthesized literature can help establish realistic expectations for the time course of clinical trials research and their relative impact toward influencing clinical practice. PMID:24808630

  20. 'Cloud computing' and clinical trials: report from an ECRIN workshop.

    PubMed

    Ohmann, Christian; Canham, Steve; Danielyan, Edgar; Robertshaw, Steve; Legré, Yannick; Clivio, Luca; Demotes, Jacques

    2015-07-29

    Growing use of cloud computing in clinical trials prompted the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network, a European non-profit organisation established to support multinational clinical research, to organise a one-day workshop on the topic to clarify potential benefits and risks. The issues that arose in that workshop are summarised and include the following: the nature of cloud computing and the cloud computing industry; the risks in using cloud computing services now; the lack of explicit guidance on this subject, both generally and with reference to clinical trials; and some possible ways of reducing risks. There was particular interest in developing and using a European 'community cloud' specifically for academic clinical trial data. It was recognised that the day-long workshop was only the start of an ongoing process. Future discussion needs to include clarification of trial-specific regulatory requirements for cloud computing and involve representatives from the relevant regulatory bodies.

  1. Perspectives on Clinical Trials in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Kissel, John T.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Bromberg, Mark B.; Acsadi, Gyula; D'Anjou, Guy; Krosschell, Kristin J.; Reyna, Sandra P.; Schroth, Mary K.; Scott, Charles B.; Simard, Louise R.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is one of the most heterogeneous of the single-gene neuromuscular disorders. The broad spectrum of severity, with onset from the prenatal period to adulthood, presents unique challenges in the design and implementation of clinical trials. The clinical classification of subjects into severe (type 1), intermediate (type 2), and mild (type 3) subtypes has proved useful both in enhancing communication among clinicians internationally and in forging the collaborative development of outcome measures for clinical trials. Ideally, clinical trial design in spinal muscular atrophy must take into account the spinal muscular atrophy type, patient age, severity-of-affection status, nature of the therapeutic approach, timing of the proposed intervention relative to disease progression, and relative homogeneity of the cohort to be studied. Following is an overview of the challenges and opportunities, current and future therapeutic strategies, and progress to date in clinical trials in spinal muscular atrophy. PMID:17761650

  2. Comparison of arthroplasty trial publications after registration in ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Smith, Holly N; Bhandari, Mohit; Mahomed, Nizar N; Jan, Meryam; Gandhi, Rajiv

    2012-08-01

    In 2005, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors established a mandatory trial registration before study enrollment for publication in member journals. Our primary objective was to evaluate the publication rates of arthroplasty trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (CTG). We further aimed to examine the consistency of registration summaries with that of final publications. We searched CTG for all trials related to joint arthroplasty and conducted a thorough search for publications resulting from registered closed trials. Of 101 closed and completed trials, we found 23 publications, for an overall publication rate of 22.8%. Registration of arthroplasty trials in CTG does not consistently result in publication or disclosure of results. In addition, changes are frequently made to the final presentation of the data that are not reflected in the trial registry.

  3. Challenges in recruitment and retention of clinical trial subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Rashmi Ashish; Borde, Sanghratna Umakant; Madas, Sapna Amol; Salvi, Sundeep Santosh; Limaye, Sneha Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Successful recruitment of patients is known to be one of the most challenging aspects in conduct of randomized controlled trials. Inadequate patient retention during conduct of trial affects conclusive results. Objective: To assess the level of challenges faced by Indian investigators in recruitment and retention of trial subjects. Methods: We developed a survey questionnaire on challenges encountered by investigators in subject recruitment and retention which was hosted on a web portal. Results: Seventy-three investigators from India participated in the survey. The frequently encountered challenges in subject recruitment were complexity of study protocol (38%), lack of awareness about clinical trials in patients (37%), and sociocultural issues related to trial participation (37%). About 63% of participants strongly agreed that creating a positive awareness about clinical trials among people through press and media, having a dedicated clinical research coordinator for trial (50.7%), and designing a recruitment strategy prior to study initiation (46.6%) would enhance recruitment. Almost 50.7% of participants agreed that interacting with medical community in vicinity of the study site and educating patients about clinical trials during routine outpatient department visits (46.6%) would enhance recruitment. Experiencing a serious adverse event, subject's fear for study procedures (47%) and side effects (44%) were thought to have a moderate effect on subject retention. Conclusion: Our survey has put forth factors related to negative publicity by media, lack of patient education about clinical trials; complex study designs are barriers to clinical trial recruitment in India. It is essential to devise innovative and effective strategies focusing on education of public and mass media about clinical research in India. PMID:27453831

  4. Challenges in recruitment and retention of clinical trial subjects.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Rashmi Ashish; Borde, Sanghratna Umakant; Madas, Sapna Amol; Salvi, Sundeep Santosh; Limaye, Sneha Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Successful recruitment of patients is known to be one of the most challenging aspects in conduct of randomized controlled trials. Inadequate patient retention during conduct of trial affects conclusive results. To assess the level of challenges faced by Indian investigators in recruitment and retention of trial subjects. We developed a survey questionnaire on challenges encountered by investigators in subject recruitment and retention which was hosted on a web portal. Seventy-three investigators from India participated in the survey. The frequently encountered challenges in subject recruitment were complexity of study protocol (38%), lack of awareness about clinical trials in patients (37%), and sociocultural issues related to trial participation (37%). About 63% of participants strongly agreed that creating a positive awareness about clinical trials among people through press and media, having a dedicated clinical research coordinator for trial (50.7%), and designing a recruitment strategy prior to study initiation (46.6%) would enhance recruitment. Almost 50.7% of participants agreed that interacting with medical community in vicinity of the study site and educating patients about clinical trials during routine outpatient department visits (46.6%) would enhance recruitment. Experiencing a serious adverse event, subject's fear for study procedures (47%) and side effects (44%) were thought to have a moderate effect on subject retention. Our survey has put forth factors related to negative publicity by media, lack of patient education about clinical trials; complex study designs are barriers to clinical trial recruitment in India. It is essential to devise innovative and effective strategies focusing on education of public and mass media about clinical research in India.

  5. DO CANCER CLINICAL TRIAL POPULATIONS TRULY REPRESENT CANCER PATIENTS? A COMPARISON OF OPEN CLINICAL TRIALS TO THE CANCER GENOME ATLAS.

    PubMed

    Geifman, Nophar; Butte, Atul J

    2016-01-01

    Open clinical trial data offer many opportunities for the scientific community to independently verify published results, evaluate new hypotheses and conduct meta-analyses. These data provide a springboard for scientific advances in precision medicine but the question arises as to how representative clinical trials data are of cancer patients overall. Here we present the integrative analysis of data from several cancer clinical trials and compare these to patient-level data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Comparison of cancer type-specific survival rates reveals that these are overall lower in trial subjects. This effect, at least to some extent, can be explained by the more advanced stages of cancer of trial subjects. This analysis also reveals that for stage IV cancer, colorectal cancer patients have a better chance of survival than breast cancer patients. On the other hand, for all other stages, breast cancer patients have better survival than colorectal cancer patients. Comparison of survival in different stages of disease between the two datasets reveals that subjects with stage IV cancer from the trials dataset have a lower chance of survival than matching stage IV subjects from TCGA. One likely explanation for this observation is that stage IV trial subjects have lower survival rates since their cancer is less likely to respond to treatment. To conclude, we present here a newly available clinical trials dataset which allowed for the integration of patient-level data from many cancer clinical trials. Our comprehensive analysis reveals that cancer-related clinical trials are not representative of general cancer patient populations, mostly due to their focus on the more advanced stages of the disease. These and other limitations of clinical trials data should, perhaps, be taken into consideration in medical research and in the field of precision medicine.

  6. Challenges in launching multinational oncology clinical trials in India

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Kamal S.; Agarwal, Gaurav; Jagannathan, Ramesh; Metzger-Filho, Otto; Saini, Monika L.; Mistry, Khurshid; Ali, Raghib; Gupta, Sudeep

    2013-01-01

    In the recent past, there has been an impressive growth in the number of clinical trials launched worldwide, including India. Participation in well-designed oncology clinical trials is of advantage to Indian healthcare system in general, and cancer patients in particular. However, the number of clinical trials being run in India is not commensurate with the cancer burden prevailing in the country. In this article, the authors investigate the reasons for this discrepancy, highlight critical bottlenecks, and propose ways to ameliorate the situation. PMID:24455545

  7. Study design considerations for irritable bowel syndrome clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials of therapies intended to alleviate symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are prevalent. However, the ideal study design remains elusive since there is no obvious pathophysiological target and no universally accepted endpoint to assess symptom improvement in IBS. The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss the most problematic issues in the design of clinical trials intended to evaluate the effectiveness of treatments for IBS symptoms. Lack of standardized diagnostic criteria, symptom variability, heterogeneous subject characteristics, large placebo effects, lack of statistical power, inappropriate endpoint selection, and poorly selected study design are the most critical issues that may confound study outcomes in IBS clinical trials. PMID:25330749

  8. [International clinical trials for a medical oncologist in Japan].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2007-02-01

    It is very important to participate into international clinical trials for cancer treatment not only for contribution to worldwide development of new anticancer agents but also for escape from social isolation out of new drug development. Here, we discussed about international clinical trials in Japan as an aspect of medical oncologist in medical school. And also, according to only one our experience of international clinical trial, IDEAL 1, which was a randomized phase II study of gefitinib for patients with previously treated metastatic non-small cell lung cancer, I tried to consider about current challenges of study investigators for cancer treatment, study conducting institution, pharmaceutical company, and regulatory agent in Japan.

  9. Statistical Controversies in Reporting of Clinical Trials: Part 2 of a 4-Part Series on Statistics for Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Pocock, Stuart J; McMurray, John J V; Collier, Tim J

    2015-12-15

    This paper tackles several statistical controversies that are commonly faced when reporting a major clinical trial. Topics covered include: multiplicity of data, interpreting secondary endpoints and composite endpoints, the value of covariate adjustment, the traumas of subgroup analysis, assessing individual benefits and risks, alternatives to analysis by intention to treat, interpreting surprise findings (good and bad), and the overall quality of clinical trial reports. All is put in the context of topical cardiology trial examples and is geared to help trialists steer a wise course in their statistical reporting, thereby giving readers a balanced account of trial findings.

  10. Respiratory Tract Infection Clinical Trials from 2007 to 2012. A Systematic Review of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Ruopp, Marcus; Chiswell, Karen; Thaden, Joshua T; Merchant, Kunal; Tsalik, Ephraim L

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory tract infections are highly prevalent and variable, and confer considerable morbidity and mortality. There is a growing need for new treatments for such infections, particularly in the setting of worsening antibacterial resistance. We analyzed data from ClinicalTrials.gov to summarize activity in respiratory infection trials, identify gaps in research activity, and inform efforts to address disparities between antimicrobial resistance and development of new antibacterial drugs. We examined 69,779 interventional trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov from 2007 to 2012, focusing on study conditions and interventions to identify respiratory infection-related trials. Programmatic identification with manual confirmation yielded 6,253 infectious disease trials, 1,377 respiratory infection trials, and 270 lower respiratory tract infection trials for analysis. The 1,377 respiratory infection trials accounted for 2% of all trials and 22% of infectious diseases trials. Such trials (54.8%) were more likely than either nonrespiratory infectious diseases trials (48.1%) or noninfectious disease trials (42.8%) to receive industry funding. Stratification of respiratory infection trials by registration year demonstrated declining industry funding: 181 (64.9%) in 2007-2008 to 110 (46.0%) in 2011-2012. Respiratory infection trials more frequently evaluated vaccines (52.7 vs. 15.5% of nonrespiratory tract infection trials). Lower respiratory tract infection trials (excluding tuberculosis) focused primarily on bacterial pathogens (78.5%) followed by viral (12.6%), fungal (5.6%), and nontuberculous mycobacterial (3.0%) pathogens. Approximately 40% of 120 lower respiratory tract infection trials that were completed or terminated published results in the literature. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, a treatment focus was associated with decreased odds of publishing results (odds ratio, 0.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.82; P = 0.02). There were also

  11. Project Management of Randomized Clinical Trials: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzynejad, Hamidreza; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    Context: A well-structured protocol for a clinical trial may be able to answer clinical questions, but it cannot be deemed enough to ensure success in the face of incompetent management of time as well as human and economic resources. To address this problem, in this article, we present our literature review on evidence as to how a good knowledge of proper management among researchers can enhance the likelihood of the success of clinical trial projects. Evidence Acquisition: Using multiple search strategies, we conducted a literature review on published studies in the English language from 2002 to 2012 by searching the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and EMBASE. Results: Our review suggests that a successful trial requires a work plan or work scope as well as a timeline. The trial manager should subsequently manage the study in accordance with the plan and the timeline. Many research units have called for a clinical project manager with scientific background and regulatory skills to effect coordination among various aspects of a clinical trial. Conclusions: Project management may benefit both the managerial and scientific aspects of medical projects and reduce fund waste. However, little has been written to date on project management in the context of clinical research. The suggestions represent the views of the individual authors. To provide a high level of evidence in this regard, we recommend that a randomized controlled trial be performed to compare trial projects progressed with and without the use of project management. PMID:26430517

  12. The placebo mystique: Implications for clinical trial methodology.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Vanessa

    2011-06-01

    The World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki states that the use of a placebo in a clinical trial can only be justified ethically when no proven active treatment is available as a comparison. Despite this, placebos remain a popular choice as controls in clinical trials. Recent literature reviews have suggested that reliance on placebos may, in part, be because of methodological misconceptions about the need for placebos to control for the 'placebo effect'. This study aimed to assess doctors' understanding of the requirements for placebo use in clinical trials. Two hundred doctors working in tertiary hospitals in Melbourne, Australia were surveyed in regards to their understanding of the role of the placebo and placebo effects in clinical trials. There was a 72% response rate. Doctors were specifically asked if a placebo was required in a randomised clinical trial, in preference to another form of control, to control for the 'placebo effect'. The majority of respondents (62%) incorrectly believed that placebos are essential to control for the 'placebo effect' in a randomised clinical trial. Misconceptions about the methodological requirement for placebos in randomised controlled trials may influence researcher decisions to use placebo controls in unethical situations. © 2011 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  13. Randomized Trial of a Web-Based Intervention to Address Barriers to Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Meropol, Neal J; Wong, Yu-Ning; Albrecht, Terrance; Manne, Sharon; Miller, Suzanne M; Flamm, Anne Lederman; Benson, Al Bowen; Buzaglo, Joanne; Collins, Michael; Egleston, Brian; Fleisher, Linda; Katz, Michael; Kinzy, Tyler G; Liu, Tasnuva M; Margevicius, Seunghee; Miller, Dawn M; Poole, David; Roach, Nancy; Ross, Eric; Schluchter, Mark D

    2016-02-10

    Lack of knowledge and negative attitudes have been identified as barriers to participation in clinical trials by patients with cancer. We developed Preparatory Education About Clinical Trials (PRE-ACT), a theory-guided, Web-based, interactive computer program, to deliver tailored video educational content to patients in an effort to overcome barriers to considering clinical trials as a treatment option. A prospective, randomized clinical trial compared PRE-ACT with a control condition that provided general clinical trials information produced by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in text format. One thousand two hundred fifty-five patients with cancer were randomly allocated before their initial visit with an oncologist to PRE-ACT (n = 623) or control (n = 632). PRE-ACT had three main components: assessment of clinical trials knowledge and attitudinal barriers, values assessment with clarification back to patients, and provision of a video library tailored to address each patient's barriers. Outcomes included knowledge and attitudes and preparation for decision making about clinical trials. Both PRE-ACT and control interventions improved knowledge and attitudes (all P < .001) compared with baseline. Patients randomly allocated to PRE-ACT showed a significantly greater increase in knowledge (P < .001) and a significantly greater decrease in attitudinal barriers (P < .001) than did their control (text-only) counterparts. Participants in both arms significantly increased their preparedness to consider clinical trials (P < .001), and there was a trend favoring the PRE-ACT group (P < .09). PRE-ACT was also associated with greater patient satisfaction than was NCI text alone. These data show that patient education before the first oncologist visit improves knowledge, attitudes, and preparation for decision making about clinical trials. Both text and tailored video were effective. The PRE-ACT interactive video program was more effective than NCI text in improving

  14. Supporting patient screening to identify suitable clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bucur, Anca; Van Leeuwen, Jasper; Chen, Njin-Zu; Claerhout, Brecht; De Schepper, Kristof; Perez-Rey, David; Alonso-Calvo, Raul; Pugliano, Lina; Saini, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    To support the efficient execution of post-genomic multi-centric clinical trials in breast cancer we propose a solution that streamlines the assessment of the eligibility of patients for available trials. The assessment of the eligibility of a patient for a trial requires evaluating whether each eligibility criterion is satisfied and is often a time consuming and manual task. The main focus in the literature has been on proposing different methods for modelling and formalizing the eligibility criteria. However the current adoption of these approaches in clinical care is limited. Less effort has been dedicated to the automatic matching of criteria to the patient data managed in clinical care. We address both aspects and propose a scalable, efficient and pragmatic patient screening solution enabling automatic evaluation of eligibility of patients for a relevant set of trials. This covers the flexible formalization of criteria and of other relevant trial metadata and the efficient management of these representations.

  15. Ethics of randomized clinical trials and the 'ALARA' approach.

    PubMed

    Zwitter, M

    1999-01-01

    A balanced discussion on the ethics of randomized clinical trials should not be based on a single ethical aspect such as respect for the patient's autonomy. Rather, the analysis should consider the four ethical principles--respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice--as applicable to all groups of persons concerned. We present the ethical benefits and costs of the present practice of randomized clinical trials for four groups: patients involved in clinical trials, patients not involved in trials, participating physicians and society. The ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) approach is then introduced and practical measures to achieve a positive balance between ethical benefits and costs of randomized trials are proposed.

  16. Trial Steering Committees in randomised controlled trials: A survey of registered clinical trials units to establish current practice and experiences.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Elizabeth J; Harman, Nicola L; Lane, J Athene; Lewis, Steff C; Murray, Gordon; Norrie, John; Sydes, Matt R; Gamble, Carrol

    2015-12-01

    The Medical Research Council Guidelines for Good Clinical Practice outlines a three-committee trial oversight structure--the day-to-day Trial Management Group, the Data Monitoring Committee and the Trial Steering Committee. In this model, the Trial Steering Committee is the executive committee that oversees the trial and considers the recommendations from the Data Monitoring Committee. There is yet to be in-depth consideration establishing the Trial Steering Committee's role and functionality. A survey to establish Trial Steering Committee's current practices, role and the use and opinion on the Medical Research Council guidelines was undertaken within UK Clinical Research Collaborative registered Clinical Trials Units. Completed surveys were obtained from 38 of 47 fully and partially registered Units. Individual items in the survey were analysed and reported spanning current Trial Steering Committee practices including its role, requirement and experience required for membership; methods to identify members; and meeting frequency. Terms (a document describing the committee's remit, objectives and functionality) were obtained and analysed from 21 of 33 Units with documents in place at their Unit. A total of 20 responders suggested aspects of the current Medical Research Council Guidelines that need improvement. We present the first survey reporting on practices within UK Clinical Research Collaborative registered Clinical Trials Units on the experience and remits of Trial Steering Committees. We have identified a widespread adoption of Medical Research Council Guidelines for Trial Steering Committees in the United Kingdom, but limitations in this existing provision have been identified that need to be addressed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Advances in designs for Alzheimer's disease clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Gould, Heath; Zhong, Kate

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for the rapidly growing population of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Innovations in clinical trial designs many help to reduce development time, provide more definitive answers regarding drug efficacy, and facilitate prioritizing compounds to be advanced to Phase III clinical trials. Standard designs compare drug and placebo changes from baseline on a rating scale. Baysian adaptive clinical trials allow the use of data collected in the trial to modify doses, sample size, trial duration, and entry criteria in an ongoing way as the data are collected. Disease-modification is supported by findings on staggered start and delayed withdrawal designs. Futility designs can use historical controls and may shorten trial duration. Combination therapy designs may allow investigation of additive or synergistic treatment effects. Novel trial selection criteria allow investigation of treatment effects in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic, prodromal AD populations. The Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SOB) can be considered as a single trial outcome in early disease populations. Alternate forms of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Portion (ADAS-cog), computerized measures, and pharmacoeconomic scales provide new and relevant information on drug effects. Comparative dose strategies are used in trials of symptomatic agents, and novel methods including withdrawal designs, symptom emergence analyses, and sequential designs are being utilized to assess the efficacy of putative psychotropic agents. The choice of trial design is driven by the question to be answered by the clinical trial; an increasing number of design approaches are available and may be useful in accelerating and refining AD drug development.

  18. Advances in designs for Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Gould, Heath; Zhong, Kate

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for the rapidly growing population of people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Innovations in clinical trial designs many help to reduce development time, provide more definitive answers regarding drug efficacy, and facilitate prioritizing compounds to be advanced to Phase III clinical trials. Standard designs compare drug and placebo changes from baseline on a rating scale. Baysian adaptive clinical trials allow the use of data collected in the trial to modify doses, sample size, trial duration, and entry criteria in an ongoing way as the data are collected. Disease-modification is supported by findings on staggered start and delayed withdrawal designs. Futility designs can use historical controls and may shorten trial duration. Combination therapy designs may allow investigation of additive or synergistic treatment effects. Novel trial selection criteria allow investigation of treatment effects in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic, prodromal AD populations. The Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SOB) can be considered as a single trial outcome in early disease populations. Alternate forms of the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Portion (ADAS-cog), computerized measures, and pharmacoeconomic scales provide new and relevant information on drug effects. Comparative dose strategies are used in trials of symptomatic agents, and novel methods including withdrawal designs, symptom emergence analyses, and sequential designs are being utilized to assess the efficacy of putative psychotropic agents. The choice of trial design is driven by the question to be answered by the clinical trial; an increasing number of design approaches are available and may be useful in accelerating and refining AD drug development. PMID:23383393

  19. Using the Internet to search for cancer clinical trials: a comparative audit of clinical trial search tools.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Nancy L; Saperstein, Sandra L; Massett, Holly A; Leonard, Colleen Ryan; Grama, Lakshmi; Manrow, Rick

    2008-07-01

    Advancing the clinical trial research process to improve cancer treatment necessitates helping people with cancer identify and enroll in studies, and researchers are using the power of the Internet to facilitate this process. This study used a content analysis of online cancer clinical trial search tools to understand what people with cancer might encounter. The content analysis revealed that clinical trial search tools were easy to identify using a popular search engine, but their functionality and content varied greatly. Most required that users be fairly knowledgeable about their medical condition and sophisticated in their web navigation skills. The ability to search by a specific health condition or type of cancer was the most common search strategy. The more complex tools required that users input detailed information about their personal medical history and have knowledge of specific clinical trial terminology. Search tools, however, only occasionally advised users to consult their doctors regarding clinical trial decision-making. This, along with the complexity of the tools suggests that online search tools may not adequately facilitate the clinical trial recruitment process. Findings from this analysis can be used as a framework from which to systematically examine actual consumer experience with online clinical trial search tools.

  20. Feasibility of feature-based indexing, clustering, and search of clinical trials: A case study of breast cancer trials from ClinicalTrials.gov

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Mary Regina; Miotto, Riccardo; Gao, Junfeng; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background When standard therapies fail, clinical trials provide experimental treatment opportunities for patients with drug-resistant illnesses or terminal diseases. Clinical Trials can also provide free treatment and education for individuals who otherwise may not have access to such care. To find relevant clinical trials, patients often search online; however, they often encounter a significant barrier due to the large number of trials and in-effective indexing methods for reducing the trial search space. Objectives This study explores the feasibility of feature-based indexing, clustering, and search of clinical trials and informs designs to automate these processes. Methods We decomposed 80 randomly selected stage III breast cancer clinical trials into a vector of eligibility features, which were organized into a hierarchy. We clustered trials based on their eligibility feature similarities. In a simulated search process, manually selected features were used to generate specific eligibility questions to filter trials iteratively. Results We extracted 1,437 distinct eligibility features and achieved an inter-rater agreement of 0.73 for feature extraction for 37 frequent features occurring in more than 20 trials. Using all the 1,437 features we stratified the 80 trials into six clusters containing trials recruiting similar patients by patient-characteristic features, five clusters by disease-characteristic features, and two clusters by mixed features. Most of the features were mapped to one or more Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts, demonstrating the utility of named entity recognition prior to mapping with the UMLS for automatic feature extraction. Conclusions It is feasible to develop feature-based indexing and clustering methods for clinical trials to identify trials with similar target populations and to improve trial search efficiency. PMID:23666475

  1. Feasibility of feature-based indexing, clustering, and search of clinical trials. A case study of breast cancer trials from ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Boland, M R; Miotto, R; Gao, J; Weng, C

    2013-01-01

    When standard therapies fail, clinical trials provide experimental treatment opportunities for patients with drug-resistant illnesses or terminal diseases. Clinical Trials can also provide free treatment and education for individuals who otherwise may not have access to such care. To find relevant clinical trials, patients often search online; however, they often encounter a significant barrier due to the large number of trials and in-effective indexing methods for reducing the trial search space. This study explores the feasibility of feature-based indexing, clustering, and search of clinical trials and informs designs to automate these processes. We decomposed 80 randomly selected stage III breast cancer clinical trials into a vector of eligibility features, which were organized into a hierarchy. We clustered trials based on their eligibility feature similarities. In a simulated search process, manually selected features were used to generate specific eligibility questions to filter trials iteratively. We extracted 1,437 distinct eligibility features and achieved an inter-rater agreement of 0.73 for feature extraction for 37 frequent features occurring in more than 20 trials. Using all the 1,437 features we stratified the 80 trials into six clusters containing trials recruiting similar patients by patient-characteristic features, five clusters by disease-characteristic features, and two clusters by mixed features. Most of the features were mapped to one or more Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts, demonstrating the utility of named entity recognition prior to mapping with the UMLS for automatic feature extraction. It is feasible to develop feature-based indexing and clustering methods for clinical trials to identify trials with similar target populations and to improve trial search efficiency.

  2. Sponsorship and design characteristics of trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Roumiantseva, Dina; Carini, Simona; Sim, Ida; Wagner, Todd H

    2013-03-01

    We examine the extent to which ClinicalTrials.gov is meeting its goal of providing oversight and transparency of clinical trials with human subjects. We analyzed the ClinicalTrials.gov database contents as of June 2011, comparing interventions, medical conditions, and trial characteristics by sponsor type. We also conducted a detailed analysis of incomplete data. Among trials with only government sponsorship (N=9252), 36% were observational and 64% interventional; in contrast, almost all (90%) industry-only sponsored trials were interventional. Industry-only sponsored interventional trials (N=30,036) were most likely to report a drug intervention (81%), followed by biologics (9%) and devices (8%). Government-only interventional trials (N=5886) were significantly more likely to test behavioral interventions (28%) and procedures (13%) than industry-only trials (p<0.001). Medical conditions most frequently studied in industry-only trials were cancer (19%), cardiovascular conditions (12%) and endocrine/metabolic disorders (11%). Government-only funded trials were more likely to study mental health (19% vs. 7% for industry, p<.001), and viral infections, including HIV (15% vs 7% for industry, p<.001). Government-funded studies are significantly more likely to be missing data about study design and intervention arms in the registry. For all studies, we report ambiguous and contradictory data entries. Industry-sponsored studies differ systematically from government-sponsored studies in study type, choice of interventions, conditions studied, and completeness of submitted information. Imprecise study design information, incomplete coding of conditions, out-of-date or unspecified enrollment numbers, and other missing data continue to hinder robust analyses of trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Trends in Canadian respiratory clinical trials from 2001 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Tacon, Claire Elizabeth; Abbas, Hina; Zhang, Shiyuan; Nicholls, Barbara; Crater, Glenn; Su, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research bridges patients’ unmet medical need with innovative medicines, increases knowledge acquisition by clinicians, and creates solutions to improve the sustainability and quality of the Canadian health care system and economy. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Canadian Lung Association have recently raised concerns over declining research activities within the Canadian respiratory community. While there are currently >3000 ongoing clinical trials in Canada, the number of trials investigating common respiratory diseases is unknown. The objective of the present study was to monitor the trends in industry- and non-industry-sponsored respiratory clinical trials in Canada from 2001 to 2011. Trialtrove 2012 (Citeline, an Informa UK business), a database containing summarized clinical trial information regarding pharmaceutical products, was searched using common chronic respiratory disease terms: “allergic rhinitis”, “asthma”, “chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)”, “cystic fibrosis”, “respiratory infections”, “pulmonary fibrosis” and “smoking cessation”. Over the past 10 years, the number of respiratory clinical trials conducted in Canada has increased (4.49 per year; P=0.004). From 2001 to 2011, the majority of trials were performed in asthma, followed closely by respiratory infections and COPD. Over the past decade, the number of trials investigating COPD and respiratory infections increased (P<0.05), while asthma trials showed a declining trend since 2007. Of the clinical trials performed during this 10-year period, the majority were in phase III, with a significant increase in the number of phase II trials (2.49 per year; P=0.008). However, certain trends observed are concerning and warrant further monitoring in the coming years. PMID:24367793

  4. Factors associated with clinical trial screening failures in gynecologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Manders, Dustin B; Paulsen, Annette; Richardson, Debra L; Kehoe, Siobhan M; Miller, David S; Lea, Jayanthi S

    2014-09-01

    Low enrollment of adult cancer patients in clinical trials is an ongoing challenge in cancer research. We sought to determine factors associated with clinical trial screening failures in women with gynecologic malignancies at a large urban university health system. A retrospective review was conducted of women with gynecologic malignancies who presented to an urban university system between 12/2009 and 12/2012. Data collected included demographic, clinico-pathologic and trial-related factors, as well as reasons for non-participation. Two hundred twenty-one patients were eligible for a clinical trial. Of these, 44% participated while 56% did not. There were more screening failures when trials were offered at the time of primary treatment than at recurrence (62% vs. 38%, p=0.001). There was no significant difference in participation based on age, ethnicity, hospital setting, payor status, family history, comorbidities, prior treatment, substance abuse, recent surgery or trial type. Of the non-participants, 62% declined the study due to perceived harm and 10% due to socio-economic barriers while 20% were excluded due to co-morbidities and 8% due to noncompliance. Significantly more screening failures for clinical trials occurred when trials were offered at the time of primary treatment. The majority of patients declined based on perceived harm from enrolling in a clinical trial, although 20% of eligible patients were not offered enrollment despite not meeting any exclusion criteria. Our findings underscore the importance of appropriate counseling when offering clinical trials, as well as overcoming physician biases in deciding who is an appropriate candidate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Decision aids for people considering taking part in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Katie; Cotton, Seonaidh C; Brehaut, Jamie C; Politi, Mary C; Skea, Zoe

    2015-11-27

    Several interventions have been developed to promote informed consent for participants in clinical trials. However, many of these interventions focus on the content and structure of information (e.g. enhanced information or changes to the presentation format) rather than the process of decision making. Patient decision aids support a decision making process about medical options. Decision aids support the decision process by providing information about available options and their associated outcomes, alongside information that enables patients to consider what value they place on particular outcomes, and provide structured guidance on steps of decision making. They have been shown to be effective for treatment and screening decisions but evidence on their effectiveness in the context of informed consent for clinical trials has not been synthesised. To assess the effectiveness of decision aids for clinical trial informed consent compared to no intervention, standard information (i.e. usual practice) or an alternative intervention on the decision making process. We searched the following databases and to March 2015: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (OvidSP) (from 1950); EMBASE (OvidSP) (from 1980); PsycINFO (OvidSP) (from 1806); ASSIA (ProQuest) (from 1987); WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/); ClinicalTrials.gov; ISRCTN Register (http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/). We also searched reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews. We contacted study authors and other experts. There were no language restrictions. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing decision aids in the informed consent process for clinical trials alone, or in conjunction with standard information (such as written or verbal) or alongside alternative interventions (e.g. paper-based versus web-based decision aids). Included trials involved

  6. Unique perception of clinical trials by Korean cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the past few years, the number of clinical trials has increased rapidly in East Asia, especially for gastric and hepatobiliary cancer that are prevalent in Asian populations. However, the actual degree of understanding or perceptions of clinical trials by cancer patients in East Asian countries have seldom been studied. Methods Between July 1st and November 30th of 2011, we conducted a prospective study to survey cancer patients regarding their awareness of, and willingness to participate in, a clinical trial. Patients with gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary cancer who visited the Hematology-Oncology outpatient clinic at Samsung Medical Center (SMC) were enrolled. A total of 21 questions were asked including four questions which used the Visual analogue scale (VAS) score. Results In this survey study, 1,000 patients were asked to participate and 675 patients consented to participate (67.5%). The awareness of clinical trials was substantially higher in patients who had a higher level of education (p<0.001), were married (p=0.004), and had a higher economic status (p=0.001). However, the willingness to participate in a clinical trial was not affected by the level of education or economic status of patients. The most influential factors for patient willingness to participate were a physician recommendation (n=181, 26.8%), limited treatment options (n=178, 26.4%), and expectations of effectiveness of new anti-cancer drugs (n=142, 21.0%). Patients with previous experience in clinical trials had a greater willingness to participate in clinical trials compared to patients without previous experience (p<0.001). Conclusions This large patient cohort survey study showed that Korean cancer patients are more aware of clinical trials, but awareness did not translate into willingness to participate. PMID:23234342

  7. COP - Pet Owners - Open Clinical Trials | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Current Open Clinical Trials If you are interested in learning more about the eligibility requirements for any of open studies listed below, please contact the nearest participating University or Christina Mazcko. To search studies being conducted by other groups please visit Vet Cancer Trials. This will allow you to search by location and tumor type.

  8. Poor medication adherence in clinical trials: consequences and solutions.

    PubMed

    Breckenridge, Alasdair; Aronson, Jeffrey K; Blaschke, Terrence F; Hartman, Dan; Peck, Carl C; Vrijens, Bernard

    2017-03-01

    Poor adherence to medicines in clinical trials can undermine the value of the trials; for example, by compromising estimates of the benefits and risks of a medicine. In this article, we highlight such consequences and also discuss approaches to tackle this problem.

  9. Reforms speed initiation of NCI-sponsored clinical trials

    Cancer.gov

    The process of opening a cancer clinical trial for patient accrual often takes years, and research has shown that trials which are slow to register patients often fail to finish. Following a thorough review, NCI’s Operational Efficiency Working Group prod

  10. Pragmatic Clinical Trials in CKD: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Ian H; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Navaneethan, Sankar D; Peralta, Carmen A; Tuot, Delphine S; Vazquez, Miguel A; Crews, Deidra C

    2016-10-01

    Randomized controlled trials in CKD lag in number behind those of other chronic diseases, despite the high morbidity and mortality experienced by patients with kidney disease and the exorbitant costs of their health care. Observational studies of CKD frequently yield seemingly paradoxic associations of traditional risk factors with outcomes, making it difficult to extrapolate the results of trials conducted in people with normal kidney function to patients with CKD. However, many completed trials in CKD have been limited by intermediate outcomes of unclear clinical significance or narrow eligibility criteria that limit external validity, and implementation of proven therapies remains a challenge. It is therefore imperative that the nephrology community capitalize on recent interest in novel approaches to trial design, such as pragmatic clinical trials. These trials are meant to promote research within real world settings to yield clinically relevant results with greater applicability than those of traditional trials, while maintaining many advantages, such as controlling for potential sources of bias. We provide a description of pragmatic clinical trials and a discussion of advantages, disadvantages, and practical challenges inherent to this study design, in the context of specific scientific questions relevant to patients with CKD.

  11. The implications of surgical quality assurance in cancer clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Haase, G M

    1994-11-01

    Prospective clinical trials are used to evaluate therapeutic interventions. Because surgery is involved in the diagnosis, staging, and therapy of solid malignancies, active surgical leadership in these cancer studies is important. There are currently barriers to widespread surgical participation in clinical trials. This report defines the obstacles as well as documents efforts to overcome them and improve surgical quality assurance in cooperative group research. The surgical leadership of several clinical cooperative groups sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) were interviewed. Cooperative group reports were analyzed with respect to internal audits, quality assurance and activities of surgical monitoring committees. Minutes from meetings of the NCI's workshops on "Surgeons in Clinical Trials" were reviewed. Six concerns present impediments to surgical quality in clinical trials. To address these, substantive surgical leadership is being developed throughout the cooperative group system. Surgical co-principal investigators for institutions and protocols are being appointed. Uniform surgical standards and operative guidelines are being developed. Surgical data review occur at the local institution as well as through central audits and surgical monitoring committees. Coordinators in surgical data management are being trained. Surgical education is organized at cooperative group meetings and disseminated to the surgical community by seminars, workshops, audiovisual teaching sessions, and scientific publications. Surgeons are playing increasing leadership roles in the cancer trials performed by cooperative groups. Surgical leaders are dedicated to a broad-scale quality assurance effort. Enhanced surgical commitment, widespread clinical participation, and focused leadership should affect a high level of surgical quality care in clinical trials research.

  12. Systematic identification of pharmacogenomics information from clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiao; Lu, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in high-throughput genomic technologies has shifted pharmacogenomic research from candidate gene pharmacogenetics to clinical pharmacogenomics (PGx). Many clinical related questions may be asked such as ‘what drug should be prescribed for a patient with mutant alleles?’ Typically, answers to such questions can be found in publications mentioning the relationships of the gene–drug–disease of interest. In this work, we hypothesize that ClinicalTrials.gov is a comparable source rich in PGx related information. In this regard, we developed a systematic approach to automatically identify PGx relationships between genes, drugs and diseases from trial records in ClinicalTrials.gov. In our evaluation, we found that our extracted relationships overlap significantly with the curated factual knowledge through the literature in a PGx database and that most relationships appear on average 5 years earlier in clinical trials than in their corresponding publications, suggesting that clinical trials may be valuable for both validating known and capturing new PGx related information in a more timely manner. Furthermore, two human reviewers judged a portion of computer-generated relationships and found an overall accuracy of 74% for our text-mining approach. This work has practical implications in enriching our existing knowledge on PGx gene–drug–disease relationships as well as suggesting crosslinks between ClinicalTrials.gov and other PGx knowledge bases. PMID:22546622

  13. Randomized Trial of a Web-Based Intervention to Address Barriers to Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yu-Ning; Albrecht, Terrance; Manne, Sharon; Miller, Suzanne M.; Flamm, Anne Lederman; Benson, Al Bowen; Buzaglo, Joanne; Collins, Michael; Egleston, Brian; Fleisher, Linda; Katz, Michael; Kinzy, Tyler G.; Liu, Tasnuva M.; Margevicius, Seunghee; Miller, Dawn M.; Poole, David; Roach, Nancy; Ross, Eric; Schluchter, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lack of knowledge and negative attitudes have been identified as barriers to participation in clinical trials by patients with cancer. We developed Preparatory Education About Clinical Trials (PRE-ACT), a theory-guided, Web-based, interactive computer program, to deliver tailored video educational content to patients in an effort to overcome barriers to considering clinical trials as a treatment option. Patients and Methods A prospective, randomized clinical trial compared PRE-ACT with a control condition that provided general clinical trials information produced by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in text format. One thousand two hundred fifty-five patients with cancer were randomly allocated before their initial visit with an oncologist to PRE-ACT (n = 623) or control (n = 632). PRE-ACT had three main components: assessment of clinical trials knowledge and attitudinal barriers, values assessment with clarification back to patients, and provision of a video library tailored to address each patient’s barriers. Outcomes included knowledge and attitudes and preparation for decision making about clinical trials. Results Both PRE-ACT and control interventions improved knowledge and attitudes (all P < .001) compared with baseline. Patients randomly allocated to PRE-ACT showed a significantly greater increase in knowledge (P < .001) and a significantly greater decrease in attitudinal barriers (P < .001) than did their control (text-only) counterparts. Participants in both arms significantly increased their preparedness to consider clinical trials (P < .001), and there was a trend favoring the PRE-ACT group (P < .09). PRE-ACT was also associated with greater patient satisfaction than was NCI text alone. Conclusion These data show that patient education before the first oncologist visit improves knowledge, attitudes, and preparation for decision making about clinical trials. Both text and tailored video were effective. The PRE-ACT interactive video program was

  14. [Why multi-national clinical trials now?--Industry perspective].

    PubMed

    Miki, Satoshi

    2007-02-01

    Clinical trial environment in Japan has issues such as high clinical development cost, resource-intensive and time-consuming preparation for clinical trial conduct in each clinical site, long "White Space" and slow speed in pt.recruitment. As a result of the Guideline revision in Nov., 2005, overseas' Phase III data is now usable as pivotal data for NDA submissions. Therefore, acceleration of "hollowing out of clinical trails for registration in Japan has been the significant concern. Under such circumstances, the possible solution would be to participate in the Multi-National Clinical Trials." While other Asian countries, EU and the US have rich precedents and experiences in conducting Multi-National Clinical Trials, Japan was left alone and other Asian countries do not need any collaboration with Japan. It is proposed that Japan take initiative to set up the network such as "Asian Clinical Trial Group" and collaborate with other Asian countries from the beginning of early stage development. Eventually, Asia should become the third region to create clinical evidence, same as to EU and the US.

  15. Establishment of a clinical trials office at a children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Abzug, M J; Esterl, E A

    2001-11-01

    To create a clinical trials office (CTO) at a children's hospital and assess its impact. Meetings with faculty and clinical trials groups were undertaken to develop a conceptual plan for an exclusively pediatric CTO designed to be a 1-stop office for sponsors, contract research organizations, and investigators. Guiding principles, eg, use of the CTO would be voluntary and paid for on a fee-for-service basis, were defined, and a business plan was developed. The CTO opened in October 1997, offering a broad menu of services. Initial marketing efforts have been followed by steadily increasing use of the CTO, measured in a number of studies and investigators who use CTO services. Commensurate growth in CTO staffing has been required. Since the CTO's opening, the number of and revenues from industry-sponsored clinical trials performed at the hospital have been significantly greater than the pre-CTO baseline and have exceeded business plan projections. In addition, the proportion of industry-sponsored clinical research at the hospital that is administered by the CTO has expanded (now >50%). The increase in hospital revenues from industry-sponsored clinical trials has exceeded the cost of running the CTO. Studies performed by the CTO have involved a mix of general pediatric clinic/private office patients, subspecialty clinic patients, and hospitalized children. A CTO dedicated to pediatric clinical research can enhance the ability of a children's hospital to participate in the growing number of pediatric clinical trials.

  16. CliniProteus: A flexible clinical trials information management system

    PubMed Central

    Mathura, Venkatarajan S; Rangareddy, Mahendiranath; Gupta, Pankaj; Mullan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Clinical trials involve multi-site heterogeneous data generation with complex data input-formats and forms. The data should be captured and queried in an integrated fashion to facilitate further analysis. Electronic case-report forms (eCRF) are gaining popularity since it allows capture of clinical information in a rapid manner. We have designed and developed an XML based flexible clinical trials data management framework in .NET environment that can be used for efficient design and deployment of eCRFs to efficiently collate data and analyze information from multi-site clinical trials. The main components of our system include an XML form designer, a Patient registration eForm, reusable eForms, multiple-visit data capture and consolidated reports. A unique id is used for tracking the trial, site of occurrence, the patient and the year of recruitment. Availability http://www.rfdn.org/bioinfo/CTMS/ctms.html. PMID:21670796

  17. Temporal knowledge representation for scheduling tasks in clinical trial protocols.

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chunhua; Kahn, Michael; Gennari, John

    2002-01-01

    Clinical trial protocols include detailed temporal constraints on treatment and associated tasks. Unlike health-care guidelines, protocols are highly prescriptive. Therefore, informatics applications that enforce such temporal constraints are more directly useful with protocols than with guidelines. Although there are some temporal knowledge representation efforts for health-care guidelines, we find these to be insufficiently expressive for clinical trial protocols. In this paper, we focus on temporal knowledge representation for clinical trial protocols and the task of patient-specific scheduling in protocols. We define a temporal ontology, use it to encode clinical trial protocols, and describe a prototype tool to carry out patient-specific scheduling for the tasks in protocols. We predict that an expressive temporal knowledge representation can support a number of scheduling and management tasks for protocol-based care. PMID:12463951

  18. FDA Encourages More Participation, Diversity in Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... or older and people from certain racial and ethnic groups. That’s why the FDA is encouraging more ... clinical trials, especially people of different ages, races, ethnic groups, and genders. Read on to learn more ...

  19. Processes for quality improvements in radiation oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, T J; Urie, Marcia; Ulin, Kenneth; Laurie, Fran; Yorty, Jeffrey; Hanusik, Richard; Kessel, Sandy; Jodoin, Maryann Bishop; Osagie, Gani; Cicchetti, M Giulia; Pieters, Richard; McCarten, Kathleen; Rosen, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Quality assurance in radiotherapy (RT) has been an integral aspect of cooperative group clinical trials since 1970. In early clinical trials, data acquisition was nonuniform and inconsistent and computational models for radiation dose calculation varied significantly. Process improvements developed for data acquisition, credentialing, and data management have provided the necessary infrastructure for uniform data. With continued improvement in the technology and delivery of RT, evaluation processes for target definition, RT planning, and execution undergo constant review. As we move to multimodality image-based definitions of target volumes for protocols, future clinical trials will require near real-time image analysis and feedback to field investigators. The ability of quality assurance centers to meet these real-time challenges with robust electronic interaction platforms for imaging acquisition, review, archiving, and quantitative review of volumetric RT plans will be the primary challenge for future successful clinical trials.

  20. Immunotherapy Shown Safe in Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Trial

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_167692.html Immunotherapy Shown Safe in Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Trial Next step is to see if ... and Human Services. More Health News on Diabetes Diabetes Type 1 Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Diabetes ...

  1. Strategies for dealing with fraud in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Herson, Jay

    2016-02-01

    Research misconduct and fraud in clinical research is an increasing problem facing the scientific community. This problem is expected to increase due to discoveries in central statistical monitoring and with the increase in first-time clinical trial investigators in the increasingly global reach of oncology clinical trials. This paper explores the most common forms of fraud in clinical trials in order to develop offensive and defensive strategies to deal with fraud. The offensive strategies are used when fraud is detected during a trial and the defensive strategies are those design strategies that seek to minimize or eliminate the effect of fraud. This leads to a proposed fraud recovery plan (FRP) that would be specified before the start of a clinical trial and would indicate actions to be taken upon detecting fraud of different types. Statistical/regulatory issues related to fraud include: dropping all patients from a site that committed fraud, or just the fraudulent data (perhaps replacing the latter through imputation); the role of intent-to-treat analysis; effect on a planned interim analysis; effect on stratified analyses and model adjustment when fraud is detected in covariates; effect on trial-wide randomization, etc. The details of a typical defensive strategy are also presented. It is concluded that it is best to follow a defensive strategy and to have an FRP in place to follow if fraud is detected during the trial.

  2. Informed consent for paediatric clinical trials in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Lepola, Pirkko; Needham, Allison; Mendum, Jo; Sallabank, Peter; Neubauer, David; de Wildt, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Paediatric clinical trials are often conducted as multinational trials. Informed consent or assent is part of the ethics committee approval for clinical trials. The consent requirements vary between countries due to national laws and regulations, which are not harmonised in Europe. These discrepancies can present challenges for paediatric clinical trials. The aim of this study was to assemble these consent and assent requirements across the European Economic Area. The collated national requirements have not been publicly available before, despite a real need for this data. Methods National consent and assent requirements for paediatric clinical trials were analysed and collated for 25 European Union Member States and 2 European Free Trade Association countries until the end of 2014. The data were retrieved from existing databases and through communication with the competent authorities and selected ethics committees. Results from a literature search for international or national guidelines, declarations and conventions and academic societies' publications served as comparison material. Results Consent and assent requirements are heterogeneous across these countries. We compiled our findings in ‘The Informed Consent and Assent Tool Kit’, a table including 27 national consent and assent requirements listed by individual country. Conclusions Wide variation in paediatric consents and assents presents challenges for multinational paediatric trials in Europe. The toolkit is available for all those involved in paediatric clinical trials and ethics committees, providing a new platform for proactive feedback on informed consent requirements, and may finally lead to a needed harmonisation process, including uniform standards accepted across Europe. PMID:27226526

  3. Clinical trials in systemic sclerosis: lessons learned and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Steen, Virginia D; Furst, Daniel E; Seibold, James R

    2007-01-01

    The pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is complex and largely unclear. The clinical heterogeneity of the disease and its progression over a number of years makes the choice of endpoints in the design of clinical trials difficult. The overwhelming need in this disease is to diagnose it early and identify those patients who will benefit most from early, aggressive treatment that potentially can alter the clinical disease course. To achieve this, innumerable challenges must be overcome. This article reviews data from recent clinical trials and the lessons derived from retrospective observational studies, databases, and patient registries. Taken together, these observations will help to improve our understanding of the diverse clinical course of SSc and permit refinement of existing outcome measures for the design of future clinical trials, in which the likelihood of observing a positive treatment effect with the drugs at our disposal will be maximized. PMID:17767745

  4. Immunotherapy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: an overview of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Alessandro; Merkow, Justin; Edil, Barish H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and current therapeutic strategies are often unsatisfactory. Identification and development of more efficacious therapies is urgently needed. Immunotherapy offered encouraging results in preclinical models during the last decades, and several clinical trials have explored its therapeutic application in PDAC. The aim of this review is to summarize the results of clinical trials conducted to evaluate the future perspective of immunotherapy in the treatment of PDAC. PMID:26361407

  5. Experiences of establishing an academic early phase clinical trials unit.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sarah R; Sherratt, Debbie; Booth, Gill; Brown, Julia; Collinson, Fiona; Gregory, Walter; Flanagan, Louise

    2017-08-01

    Early phase trials are essential in drug development, determining appropriate dose levels and assessing preliminary activity. These trials are undertaken by industry and academia, with increasing collaborations between the two. There is pressure to perform these trials quickly, safely, and robustly. However, there are inherent differences between developing and managing early phase, compared to late phase, drug trials. This article describes an approach to establishing an academically led early phase trial portfolio, highlighting lessons learned and sharing experiences. In 2009, the University of Leeds Clinical Trials Research Unit became the Clinical Trials Coordinating Office for Myeloma UK's phase I and II trials. We embarked on a transition from working extensively in phase III to early phase trials development and conduct. This involved evaluating and revising our well-established standard operating procedures, visiting other academic early phase units, and developing essential new documentation and processes. A core team of trial and data managers and statisticians was established to facilitate expertise and knowledge retention. A detailed training plan was implemented focussing on essential standard practices for early phase. These included pharmacovigilance, recruitment, trial design and set-up, data and site monitoring, and oversight committees. Training in statistical methods for early phase trials was incorporated. Initial scoping of early phase trial management and conduct was essential in establishing this early phase portfolio. Many of the processes developed were successful. However, regular review and evaluation were implemented to enable changes and ensure efficiencies. It is recommended that others embarking on this venture build on the experiences described in this article.

  6. 78 FR 7437 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN); The Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of... publication. Proposed Collection: The Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database, 0925-0600,...

  7. Pharmacogenomic biomarkers as inclusion criteria in clinical trials of oncology-targeted drugs: a mapping of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Vivot, Alexandre; Li, Jacques; Zeitoun, Jean-David; Mourah, Samia; Crequit, Perrine; Ravaud, Philippe; Porcher, Raphaël

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe pharmacogenomics-based inclusion criteria (enrichment) and the main characteristics of clinical trials involving oncology-targeted therapies. Clinical trials of oncology-targeted therapies approved after 2005 with pharmacogenomic testing required or recommended in their label were retrieved from a mapping of the ClinicalTrials.gov database. We examined information for 12 drugs and 858 trials. Overall, 434 trials (51%) were enriched on the biomarker first mentioned in the label and 145 (17%) were enriched on another biomarker, whereas 270 trials (31%) included all patients. The median proportion of trials corresponding to both the drug's indication and drug's target was 35%. Of the 361 trials that tested drugs in another disease than the first one in the label, 219 (61%) were without enrichment and 87 (24%) were actually enriched but on another biomarker than the first one in the label. Several drugs have been tested in trials enriched on many different biomarkers. Nonetheless, most targeted therapies have been developed only using biomarker-positive patients; therefore, exclusion of biomarker-negative patients from treatment relies on only preclinical data and on biological understanding of the disease and target.Genet Med 18 8, 796-805.

  8. The Clinical Trials Network of the Society of Nuclear Medicine.

    PubMed

    Graham, Michael M

    2010-09-01

    The Clinical Trials Network of the Society of Nuclear Medicine was formed to provide quality assurance of both imaging and radiopharmaceutical manufacturing in clinical trials. The intention is to register and qualify a large number (>200) of sites, both in the United States and internationally, to be able to do the positron emission tomography imaging part of clinical trials. Initially, the types of trials to be supported include evaluation of novel radiopharmaceuticals and trials that use approved or experimental radiopharmaceuticals for early assessment of tumor response to novel chemotherapy agents. The Clinical Trials Network is organized into 7 committees that provide overall oversight and strategic guidance, database management, site qualification and monitoring, scanner validation, clinical site orientation, technologist education, trial design, and a manufacturer's registry. At the end of the first year, more than 200 potential clinical trial sites and more than 125 manufacturing sites have expressed interest in participating. The qualification process is well underway. Funding is being provided by 3 large pharmaceutical companies. An investigational new drug application has been obtained for F-18 fluorothymidine that is held by Society of Nuclear Medicine to allow simplification of data management during multisite trials with F-18 fluorothymidine. A second investigational new drug application is in preparation for F-18 fluoromisonidazole. A supply of oncology chest phantoms has been manufactured and have been shipped to numerous sites for scanner validation. Educational materials are being developed for the physicians, technologists, and research coordinators at the sites. This is an important initiative that is likely to help significantly expand the role of molecular imaging and will help bring the right treatment to the right patient at the right time. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Systems Approach to Designing Effective Clinical Trials Using Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Fusaro, Vincent A.; Patil, Prasad; Chi, Chih-Lin; Contant, Charles F.; Tonellato, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pharmacogenetics in warfarin clinical trials have failed to show a significant benefit compared to standard clinical therapy. This study demonstrates a computational framework to systematically evaluate pre-clinical trial design of target population, pharmacogenetic algorithms, and dosing protocols to optimize primary outcomes. Methods and Results We programmatically created an end-to-end framework that systematically evaluates warfarin clinical trial designs. The framework includes options to create a patient population, multiple dosing strategies including genetic-based and non-genetic clinical-based, multiple dose adjustment protocols, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) modeling and international normalization ratio (INR) prediction, as well as various types of outcome measures. We validated the framework by conducting 1,000 simulations of the CoumaGen clinical trial primary endpoints. The simulation predicted a mean time in therapeutic range (TTR) of 70.6% and 72.2% (P = 0.47) in the standard and pharmacogenetic arms, respectively. Then, we evaluated another dosing protocol under the same original conditions and found a significant difference in TTR between the pharmacogenetic and standard arm (78.8% vs. 73.8%; P = 0.0065), respectively. Conclusions We demonstrate that this simulation framework is useful in the pre-clinical assessment phase to study and evaluate design options and provide evidence to optimize the clinical trial for patient efficacy and reduced risk. PMID:23261867

  10. Intricacy of missing data in clinical trials: Deterrence and management.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Richa; Rana, Rakesh

    2014-09-01

    Missing data is frequently encountered in clinical studies. Unfortunately, they are often neglected or not properly handled during data analysis and this may significantly bias the results of the study, reduce study power and lead to invalid conclusions. Substantial instances of missing data are a serious problem that undermines the scientific trustworthiness of causal conclusions from clinical trials. The assumption that statistical analysis methods can compensate for such missing data is not justified. Hence aspects of clinical trial design that limit the probability of missing data should be an important objective, while planning a clinical trial. In addition to specific aspects of trial design, many components of clinical trial conduct can also limit the extent of missing data. The topic of missing data is often not a major concern until it is time for data collection and data analysis. This article discusses some basic issues about missing data as well as prospective "watch outs" which could reduce the occurrence of missing data. It provides some possible design considerations that should be considered in order to alleviate patients from dropping out of a clinical trial. In addition to these the concept of the missing data mechanism has also been discussed. Three types of missing data mechanisms missing completely at random, missing at random and not missing at random have been discussed in detail.

  11. Quality assessment of randomized clinical trial in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Giulliano Peixoto; Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; Barbosa, Luciano Timbó; Duarte, José Lira

    2009-03-01

    A randomized clinical trial is a prospective study that compares the effect and value of interventions in human beings, of one or more groups vs. a control group. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of published randomized clinical trials in Intensive care in Brazil. All randomized clinical trials in intensive care found by manual search in Revista Brasileira de Terapia Intensiva from January 2001 to March 2008 were assessed to evaluate their description by the quality scale. Descriptive statistics and a 95 % confidence interval were used for the primary outcome. Our primary outcome was the randomized clinical trial quality. Our search found 185 original articles, of which 14 were randomized clinical trials. Only one original article (7.1%) showed good quality. There was no statistical significance between the collected data and the data shown in the hypothesis of this search. It can be concluded that in the sample of assessed articles 7% of the randomized clinical trials in intensive care published in a single intensive care journal in Brazil, present good methodological quality.

  12. Comparing community and specialty provider-based recruitment in a randomized clinical trial: clinical trial in fecal incontinence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recruitment of participants to clinical trials remains a significant challenge, especially for research addressing topics of a sensitive nature such as fecal incontinence (FI). The Fiber Study, a randomized controlled trial on symptom management for FI, successfully enrolled 189 community-living adu...

  13. Meta-analysis of five photodisinfection clinical trials for periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Roger C.; Loebel, Nicolas G.; Andersen, Dane M.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy(PDT) has been demonstrated to effectively kill human periopathogens in vitro. To evaluate the efficacy of PDT in vivo a series of clinical trials was carried out in multiple centers and populations. Clinical parameters including clinical attachment level, pocket probing depth and bleeding on probing were all evaluated. All groups received the standard of care, scaling and root planing, and the treatment group additionally received a single treatment of PDT. Of the total 309 patients and over 40,000 pockets treated in these 5 trials it was determined that photodynamic therapy provided a statistically significant improvement in clinical parameters over scaling and root planing alone.

  14. Qualitative research within trials: developing a standard operating procedure for a clinical trials unit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Qualitative research methods are increasingly used within clinical trials to address broader research questions than can be addressed by quantitative methods alone. These methods enable health professionals, service users, and other stakeholders to contribute their views and experiences to evaluation of healthcare treatments, interventions, or policies, and influence the design of trials. Qualitative data often contribute information that is better able to reform policy or influence design. Methods Health services researchers, including trialists, clinicians, and qualitative researchers, worked collaboratively to develop a comprehensive portfolio of standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the West Wales Organisation for Rigorous Trials in Health (WWORTH), a clinical trials unit (CTU) at Swansea University, which has recently achieved registration with the UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC). Although the UKCRC requires a total of 25 SOPs from registered CTUs, WWORTH chose to add an additional qualitative-methods SOP (QM-SOP). Results The qualitative methods SOP (QM-SOP) defines good practice in designing and implementing qualitative components of trials, while allowing flexibility of approach and method. Its basic principles are that: qualitative researchers should be contributors from the start of trials with qualitative potential; the qualitative component should have clear aims; and the main study publication should report on the qualitative component. Conclusions We recommend that CTUs consider developing a QM-SOP to enhance the conduct of quantitative trials by adding qualitative data and analysis. We judge that this improves the value of quantitative trials, and contributes to the future development of multi-method trials. PMID:23433341

  15. Qualitative research within trials: developing a standard operating procedure for a clinical trials unit.

    PubMed

    Rapport, Frances; Storey, Mel; Porter, Alison; Snooks, Helen; Jones, Kerina; Peconi, Julie; Sánchez, Antonio; Siebert, Stefan; Thorne, Kym; Clement, Clare; Russell, Ian

    2013-02-21

    Qualitative research methods are increasingly used within clinical trials to address broader research questions than can be addressed by quantitative methods alone. These methods enable health professionals, service users, and other stakeholders to contribute their views and experiences to evaluation of healthcare treatments, interventions, or policies, and influence the design of trials. Qualitative data often contribute information that is better able to reform policy or influence design. Health services researchers, including trialists, clinicians, and qualitative researchers, worked collaboratively to develop a comprehensive portfolio of standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the West Wales Organisation for Rigorous Trials in Health (WWORTH), a clinical trials unit (CTU) at Swansea University, which has recently achieved registration with the UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC). Although the UKCRC requires a total of 25 SOPs from registered CTUs, WWORTH chose to add an additional qualitative-methods SOP (QM-SOP). The qualitative methods SOP (QM-SOP) defines good practice in designing and implementing qualitative components of trials, while allowing flexibility of approach and method. Its basic principles are that: qualitative researchers should be contributors from the start of trials with qualitative potential; the qualitative component should have clear aims; and the main study publication should report on the qualitative component. We recommend that CTUs consider developing a QM-SOP to enhance the conduct of quantitative trials by adding qualitative data and analysis. We judge that this improves the value of quantitative trials, and contributes to the future development of multi-method trials.

  16. Characteristics of pediatric pulmonary hypertension trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Awerbach, Jordan D; Krasuski, Richard A; Hill, Kevin D

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of pediatric pulmonary hypertension (PH) drugs has been identified as a high priority by the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH). Studying pediatric PH is challenging due to the rare and heterogeneous nature of the disease. We sought to define the pediatric PH clinical trials landscape, to evaluate areas of trial success or failure, and to identify potential obstacles to the study of pediatric PH drugs. Interventional pediatric (ages 0-17 years) PH trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov from June 2005 through December 2014 were analyzed. There were 45 pediatric PH trials registered during the study period. Median (IQR) projected trial enrollment was 40 (24-63), with seven trials (16%) targeting > 100 participants. Industry was the most common trial sponsor (n = 23, 50%), with only two (4.4%) NIH-sponsored trials. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors were the most frequently studied drug (n = 18, 39%). Single group study designs were used in 44% (n = 20) with an active comparator (parallel, factorial, or cross-over designs) in 25 trials, including 22 with randomization and ten that were double-blinded. Study outcomes varied markedly with inconsistent use of known surrogate and composite endpoints. One-third of trials (n = 15, 33%) were terminated, predominantly due to poor participant enrollment. Of the 17 completed trials, 11 had published results and only three efficacy trials met their primary endpoint. There are unique challenges to drug development in pediatric PH, including enrolling patients, identifying appropriate study endpoints, and conducting randomized, controlled, double-blind trials where the likelihood of meeting the study endpoint is optimized.

  17. Clinical trial registries: more international, converging efforts are needed.

    PubMed

    Pansieri, Claudia; Pandolfini, Chiara; Bonati, Maurizio

    2017-02-27

    Clinical trial registries are being increasingly acknowledged worldwide. We searched for possibly trustworthy online registries that are not already included in the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform to evaluate whether other useful trial data sources exist and whether they could potentially be consulted, since the strategy search within this platform has recently been questioned. Fifty-nine registries were initially identified, and 11 of them fit the criteria applied and were analyzed for quality and usability. Four additional, potentially reliable registries were identified that researchers could exploit in order to obtain a more global view of the issue being investigated.

  18. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Clinical Trials Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Network PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Patricia Zilliox., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Foundation Fighting Blindness Clinical Research...fightblindness.org 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Foundation Fighting Blindness Clinical Research Institute

  19. Lung-MAP Launches: First Precision Medicine Trial From National Clinical Trials Network

    Cancer.gov

    A unique public-private collaboration today announced the initiation of the Lung Cancer Master Protocol (Lung-MAP) trial, a multi-drug, multi-arm, biomarker-driven clinical trial for patients with advanced squamous cell lung cancer. Squamous cell carcinom

  20. Adherence and the Lie in a HIV Prevention Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Jonathan; Scorgie, Fiona; van der Straten, Ariane; Saethre, Eirik

    2016-01-01

    The lie has been presented as a performance that protects identities against moral judgment in the context of power imbalances. We explore this assertion from the perspective of a pre-exposure prophylaxis trial to prevent HIV for African women in South Africa, in which context biological evidence of widespread lying about product adherence was produced, resulting in a moral discourse that opposed altruistic and selfish motivations. In this article, we seek to understand the meaning of the lie from the perspective of women trial participants. Seeing the trial as representing a hopeful future, and perfect adherence as sustaining their investment in this, participants recited scripted accounts of adherence and performed the role of the perfect adherer, while identifying other participants as dishonest. Given that clinical trials create moral orders and adherence is key to this, we argue that women embraced the apparatus of the clinical trial to assert their moral subjectivities. PMID:26575611

  1. Clinical trials of antiangiogenic therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-04-01

    Angiogenesis is a promising therapeutic target to inhibit tumor growth. This review summarizes data from clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents in hepatocellular carcinoma. A systematic search of PubMed was performed to identify clinical trials of specific antiangiogenic agents in hepatocellular carcinoma treatment, particularly phase III trials involving treatment guidelines for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Sorafenib is the only systemic drug approved for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Two large-scale, randomized phase III trials using sorafenib involving patients with unresectable HCC showed a significant survival benefit compared with placebo control groups. However, subsequent phase III trials of antiangiogenic agents in hepatocellular carcinoma have failed to improve survival compared with standard treatment protocols using sorafenib. The efficacy of antiangiogenic agents in combination with other drugs, transarterial chemoembolization, and surgical resection is currently being investigated. Future research is expected to optimize antiangiogenic therapies in combination with standard treatment with sorafenib.

  2. Innovative clinical trial designs to rationalize TB vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Ellis, R D; Hatherill, M; Tait, D; Snowden, M; Churchyard, G; Hanekom, W; Evans, T; Ginsberg, A M

    2015-05-01

    A recent trial of a leading tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidate in 3000 South African infants failed to show protection over that from BCG alone, and highlights the difficulties in clinical development of TB vaccines. Progression of vaccine candidates to efficacy trials against TB disease rests on demonstration of safety and immunogenicity in target populations and protection against challenge in preclinical models, but immunologic correlates of protection are unknown, and animal models may not be predictive of results in humans. Even in populations most heavily affected by TB the sample sizes required for Phase 2b efficacy trials using TB disease as an endpoint are in the thousands. Novel clinical trial models have been developed to evaluate candidate TB vaccines in selected populations using biologically relevant outcomes and innovative statistical approaches. Such proof of concept studies can be used to more rationally select vaccine candidates for advancement to large scale trials against TB disease.

  3. Adherence and the Lie in a HIV Prevention Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Jonathan; Scorgie, Fiona; van der Straten, Ariane; Saethre, Eirik

    2016-01-01

    The lie has been presented as a performance that protects identities against moral judgment in the context of power imbalances. We explore this assertion from the perspective of a pre-exposure prophylaxis trial to prevent HIV for African women in South Africa, in which context biological evidence of widespread lying about product adherence was produced, resulting in a moral discourse that opposed altruistic and selfish motivations. In this article, we seek to understand the meaning of the lie from the perspective of women trial participants. Seeing the trial as representing a hopeful future, and perfect adherence as sustaining their investment in this, participants recited scripted accounts of adherence and performed the role of the perfect adherer, while identifying other participants as dishonest. Given that clinical trials create moral orders and adherence is key to this, we argue that women embraced the apparatus of the clinical trial to assert their moral subjectivities.

  4. Unfulfilled translation opportunities in industry sponsored clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Smed, Marie; Getz, Kenneth A

    2013-05-01

    Knowledge generated by site representatives through their participation in clinical trials is valuable for testing new products in use and obtaining final market approval. The leverage of this important knowledge is however challenged as the former direct relationships between in-house staff in the industry and site representatives are changing. The process of clinical trials has increased in complexity over the years, resulting in additional management layers. Besides an increase in internal management layers, sponsors often also outsource various tasks related to clinical trials to a CRO (Contract Research Organization) and thereby adding another link in the relationships between site and sponsor. These changes are intended to optimize the time-consuming and costly trial phases; however, there is a need to study whether valuable knowledge and experience is compromised in the process. Limited research exists on the full range of clinical practice insights obtained by investigators during and after clinical trials and how well these insights are transferred to study sponsors. This study explores the important knowledge-transfer processes between sites and sponsors and to what extent sites' knowledge gained in clinical trials is utilized by the industry. Responses from 451 global investigative site representatives are included in the study. The analysis of the extensive dataset reveals that the current processes of collaboration between sites and the industry restrict the leverage of valuable knowledge gained by physicians in the process of clinical trials. These restrictions to knowledge-transfer between site and sponsor are further challenged if CRO partners are integrated in the trial process.

  5. A national strategy to develop pragmatic clinical trials infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Concannon, Thomas W; Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Dolor, Rowena J; Meissner, Paul; Tunis, Sean; Krishnan, Jerry A; Pace, Wilson D; Saltz, Joel; Hersh, William R; Michener, Lloyd; Carey, Timothy S

    2014-04-01

    An important challenge in comparative effectiveness research is the lack of infrastructure to support pragmatic clinical trials, which compare interventions in usual practice settings and subjects. These trials present challenges that differ from those of classical efficacy trials, which are conducted under ideal circumstances, in patients selected for their suitability, and with highly controlled protocols. In 2012, we launched a 1-year learning network to identify high-priority pragmatic clinical trials and to deploy research infrastructure through the NIH Clinical and Translational Science Awards Consortium that could be used to launch and sustain them. The network and infrastructure were initiated as a learning ground and shared resource for investigators and communities interested in developing pragmatic clinical trials. We followed a three-stage process of developing the network, prioritizing proposed trials, and implementing learning exercises that culminated in a 1-day network meeting at the end of the year. The year-long project resulted in five recommendations related to developing the network, enhancing community engagement, addressing regulatory challenges, advancing information technology, and developing research methods. The recommendations can be implemented within 24 months and are designed to lead toward a sustained national infrastructure for pragmatic trials.

  6. A General Framework for the Evaluation of Clinical Trial Quality

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Vance W.; Alperson, Sunny Y.

    2009-01-01

    Flawed evaluation of clinical trial quality allows flawed trials to thrive (get funded, obtain IRB approval, get published, serve as the basis of regulatory approval, and set policy). A reasonable evaluation of clinical trial quality must recognize that any one of a large number of potential biases could by itself completely invalidate the trial results. In addition, clever new ways to distort trial results toward a favored outcome may be devised at any time. Finally, the vested financial and other interests of those conducting the experiments and publishing the reports must cast suspicion on any inadequately reported aspect of clinical trial quality. Putting these ideas together, we see that an adequate evaluation of clinical quality would need to enumerate all known biases, update this list periodically, score the trial with regard to each potential bias on a scale of 0% to 100%, offer partial credit for only that which can be substantiated, and then multiply (not add) the component scores to obtain an overall score between 0% and 100%. We will demonstrate that current evaluations fall well short of these ideals. PMID:19463104

  7. A National Strategy to Develop Pragmatic Clinical Trials Infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Guise, Jeanne‐Marie; Dolor, Rowena J.; Meissner, Paul; Tunis, Sean; Krishnan, Jerry A.; Pace, Wilson D.; Saltz, Joel; Hersh, William R.; Michener, Lloyd; Carey, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract An important challenge in comparative effectiveness research is the lack of infrastructure to support pragmatic clinical trials, which compare interventions in usual practice settings and subjects. These trials present challenges that differ from those of classical efficacy trials, which are conducted under ideal circumstances, in patients selected for their suitability, and with highly controlled protocols. In 2012, we launched a 1‐year learning network to identify high‐priority pragmatic clinical trials and to deploy research infrastructure through the NIH Clinical and Translational Science Awards Consortium that could be used to launch and sustain them. The network and infrastructure were initiated as a learning ground and shared resource for investigators and communities interested in developing pragmatic clinical trials. We followed a three‐stage process of developing the network, prioritizing proposed trials, and implementing learning exercises that culminated in a 1‐day network meeting at the end of the year. The year‐long project resulted in five recommendations related to developing the network, enhancing community engagement, addressing regulatory challenges, advancing information technology, and developing research methods. The recommendations can be implemented within 24 months and are designed to lead toward a sustained national infrastructure for pragmatic trials. PMID:24472114

  8. Design and execution of clinical trials in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mundi, R.; Chaudhry, H.; Mundi, S.; Godin, K.; Bhandari, M.

    2014-01-01

    High-quality randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating surgical therapies are fundamental to the delivery of evidence-based orthopaedics. Orthopaedic clinical trials have unique challenges; however, when these challenges are overcome, evidence from trials can be definitive in its impact on surgical practice. In this review, we highlight several issues that pose potential challenges to orthopaedic investigators aiming to perform surgical randomised controlled trials. We begin with a discussion on trial design issues, including the ethics of sham surgery, the importance of sample size, the need for patient-important outcomes, and overcoming expertise bias. We then explore features surrounding the execution of surgical randomised trials, including ethics review boards, the importance of organisational frameworks, and obtaining adequate funding. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:161–8. PMID:24869465

  9. Efficiencies of platform clinical trials: A vision of the future.

    PubMed

    Saville, Benjamin R; Berry, Scott M

    2016-06-01

    A "platform trial" is a clinical trial with a single master protocol in which multiple treatments are evaluated simultaneously. Adaptive platform designs offer flexible features such as dropping treatments for futility, declaring one or more treatments superior, or adding new treatments to be tested during the course of a trial. A simulation study explores the efficiencies of various platform trial designs relative to a traditional two-arm strategy. Platform trials can find beneficial treatments with fewer patients, fewer patient failures, less time, and with greater probability of success than a traditional two-arm strategy. In an era of personalized medicine, platform trials provide the innovation needed to efficiently evaluate modern treatments. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Clinical trials: active control vs placebo--what is ethical?

    PubMed

    Spławiński, Jacek; Kuźniar, Jerzy

    2004-01-01

    The quest for effective medicines is very old. In modern times two important tools have been developed to evaluate efficacy of drugs, superiority and non-inferiority types of clinical trials. The former tests the null hypothesis of micro (the difference between a tested drug and