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Sample records for clinically applied hydroxylapatite

  1. Calcium Hydroxylapatite

    PubMed Central

    Yutskovskaya, Yana Alexandrovna; Philip Werschler, WM.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcium hydroxylapatite is one of the most well-studied dermal fillers worldwide and has been extensively used for the correction of moderate-to-severe facial lines and folds and to replenish lost volume. Objectives: To mark the milestone of 10 years of use in the aesthetic field, this review will consider the evolution of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine, provide a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach, and examine how the unique properties of calcium hydroxylapatite provide it with an important place in today’s market. Methods: This article is an up-to-date review of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine along with procedures for its use, including a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach by three expert injectors. Conclusion: Calcium hydroxylapatite is a very effective agent for many areas of facial soft tissue augmentation and is associated with a high and well-established safety profile. Calcium hydroxylapatite combines high elasticity and viscosity with an ability to induce long-term collagen formation making it an ideal agent for a global facial approach. PMID:25610523

  2. Presentation of Ligands on Hydroxylapatite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Barbara C. F.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1997-01-01

    Conjugates of biotin with the decamer of glutamic acid (glu(sub 10)) and the trimer of D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (I) have been synthesized, and it has been shown that they mediate the binding of avidin to hydroxylapatite. In a similar way a conjugate of methotrexate with glu(sub 10) mediates the binding of dihydrofolate reductase to the mineral. The presentation of ligands on the hydroxylapatite component of bone may find applications in clinical medicine.

  3. Hydroxylapatite Otologic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Beale, B.; Johnson, R.

    2000-01-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMER) and Smith and Nephew Richards Inc. of Bartlett, TN, was initiated in March 1997. The original completion date for the Agreement was March 25, 1998. The purpose of this work is to develop and commercialize net shape forming methods for directly creating dense hydroxylapatite (HA) ceramic otologic implants. The project includes three tasks: (1) modification of existing gelcasting formulations to accommodate HA slurries; (2) demonstration of gelcasting to fabricate green HA ceramic components of a size and shape appropriate to otologic implants: and (3) sintering and evaluation of the HA components.

  4. Zinc Incorporation Into Hydroxylapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.; Chappell, H; Dove, M; Reeder, R; Lee, Y

    2009-01-01

    By theoretical modeling and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, the local coordination structure of Zn incorporated into hydroxylapatite was examined. Density function theory (DFT) calculations show that Zn favors the Ca2 site over the Ca1 site, and favors tetrahedral coordination. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy results suggest one dominant coordination environment for the incorporated Zn, and no evidence was observed for other Zn-containing phases. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) fitting of the synthetic samples confirms that Zn occurs in tetrahedral coordination, with two P shells at 2.85-3.07 {angstrom}, and two higher Ca shells at 3.71-4.02 {angstrom}. These fit results are consistent with the most favored DFT model for Zn substitution in the Ca2 site.

  5. Processing of hydroxylapatite coatings on titanium alloy bone prostheses

    DOEpatents

    Nastasi, Michael A.; Levine, Timothy E.; Mayer, James W.; Pizziconi, Vincent B.

    1998-01-01

    Processing of hydroxylapatite sol-gel films on titanium alloy bone prostheses. A method utilizing non-line-of-sight ion beam implantation and/or rapid thermal processing to provide improved bonding of layers of hydroxylapatite to titanium alloy substrates while encouraging bone ingrowth into the hydroxylapatite layers located away from the substrate, is described for the fabrication of prostheses. The first layer of hydroxylapatite is mixed into the substrate by the ions or rapidly thermally annealed, while subsequent layers are heat treated or densified using ion implantation to form layers of decreasing density and larger crystallization, with the outermost layers being suitable for bone ingrowth.

  6. Processing of hydroxylapatite coatings on titanium alloy bone prostheses

    DOEpatents

    Nastasi, M.A.; Levine, T.E.; Mayer, J.W.; Pizziconi, V.B.

    1998-10-06

    Processing of hydroxylapatite sol-gel films on titanium alloy bone prostheses. A method utilizing non-line-of-sight ion beam implantation and/or rapid thermal processing to provide improved bonding of layers of hydroxylapatite to titanium alloy substrates while encouraging bone ingrowth into the hydroxylapatite layers located away from the substrate, is described for the fabrication of prostheses. The first layer of hydroxylapatite is mixed into the substrate by the ions or rapidly thermally annealed, while subsequent layers are heat treated or densified using ion implantation to form layers of decreasing density and larger crystallization, with the outermost layers being suitable for bone ingrowth.

  7. Template-directed oligonucleotide ligation on hydroxylapatite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Orgel, L. E.

    1986-01-01

    It has been suggested that the prebiotic synthesis of the precursors of biopolymers could have occurred on a solid surface such as that provided by clay or some other mineral. One such scheme envisages that growing polymers were localized by adsorption to a mineral surface where an activating agent or activated monomers were supplied continuously or cyclically. Here, it is reported that a sequence of reactions in which initially formed oligo(G)s are reactivated by conversion to phosphorimidazolides in the presence of poly(C) and then allowed to ligate is ideal, in that repeated cycles can be carried out on the surface of hydroxylapatite, whereas in the liquid phase the cycle could be achieved only with considerable difficulty.

  8. Hydroxylapatite nanoparticles: fabrication methods and medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Masahiro; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxylapatite (or hydroxyapatite, HAp) exhibits excellent biocompatibility with various kinds of cells and tissues, making it an ideal candidate for tissue engineering, orthopedic and dental applications. Nanosized materials offer improved performances compared with conventional materials due to their large surface-to-volume ratios. This review summarizes existing knowledge and recent progress in fabrication methods of nanosized (or nanostructured) HAp particles, as well as their recent applications in medical and dental fields. In section 1, we provide a brief overview of HAp and nanoparticles. In section 2, fabrication methods of HAp nanoparticles are described based on the particle formation mechanisms. Recent applications of HAp nanoparticles are summarized in section 3. The future perspectives in this active research area are given in section 4. PMID:27877527

  9. Hydroxylapatite nanoparticles: fabrication methods and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Masahiro; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2012-12-01

    Hydroxylapatite (or hydroxyapatite, HAp) exhibits excellent biocompatibility with various kinds of cells and tissues, making it an ideal candidate for tissue engineering, orthopedic and dental applications. Nanosized materials offer improved performances compared with conventional materials due to their large surface-to-volume ratios. This review summarizes existing knowledge and recent progress in fabrication methods of nanosized (or nanostructured) HAp particles, as well as their recent applications in medical and dental fields. In section 1, we provide a brief overview of HAp and nanoparticles. In section 2, fabrication methods of HAp nanoparticles are described based on the particle formation mechanisms. Recent applications of HAp nanoparticles are summarized in section 3. The future perspectives in this active research area are given in section 4.

  10. Host response to infection of a subperiosteal hydroxylapatite implant.

    PubMed

    Reznick, J B; Gilmore, W C

    1989-06-01

    Particulate, nonresorbable hydroxylapatite is currently a popular implant material for the augmentation of atrophic alveolar ridges. Most reports have demonstrated favorable biocompatibility with common usage, but how the host bone will respond to the implant in the presence of an infection has not yet been investigated. Hydroxylapatite was implanted subperiosteally on one side of the mandible in four New Zealand White rabbits. After 3 months were allowed to elapse for stabilization of the implant, an infection was induced in both sides of each mandible by inoculation with Bacteroides melaninogenicus. One month later the animals were put to death and both sides of each mandible were examined microscopically. On the nonaugmented side there was total resolution of the infection. The side of each mandible containing the hydroxylapatite implant showed very mild chronic inflammation throughout the medullary space and periosteum. Although the number of animals used was small, the results suggest that the presence of the hydroxylapatite implant may have interfered with the host's ability to resolve the infection in the underlying bone. The possible mechanism of this interference is discussed.

  11. Equation of State of Carbonated Hydroxylapatite at Ambient Temperature up to 10 GPa: Significance of Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    X Liu; S Shieh; M Fleet; L Zhang; Q He

    2011-12-31

    The incorporation of the carbonate ion into the crystal structure of hydroxylapatite results in the creation of vacancies, oxygen-loss, and disorder, with consequent changes in physical and chemical properties. High-pressure experimental investigation up to 10 GPa of two synthetic carbonated hydroxylapatite samples with up to 11 wt% CO3, using a diamond-anvil cell and synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction, provides the first rigorous assessment of the mechanical behavior of the carbonated hydroxylapatite. The pressure-volume data suggest that the isothermal bulk modulus of these carbonated hydroxylapatites has been significantly decreased by the presence of the carbonate (up to about 15%), which in turn will affect all the carbonated apatite-related reactions in the geosystem. Since hydroxylapatite is one of the major components of the bones and teeth, the incorporation of the carbonate in the hydroxylapatite weakens teeth and bones not only chemically, but also physically.

  12. Production of nanoparticles from natural hydroxylapatite by laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Laser ablation of solids in liquids technique has been used to obtain colloidal nanoparticles from biological hydroxylapatite using pulsed as well as a continuous wave (CW) laser. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements revealed the formation of spherical particles with size distribution ranging from few nanometers to hundred nanometers and irregular submicronic particles. High resolution TEM showed that particles obtained by the use of pulsed laser were crystalline, while those obtained by the use of CW laser were amorphous. The shape and size of particles are consistent with the explosive ejection as formation mechanism. PMID:21711800

  13. Introduction: Applying Clinical Psychological Science to Practice.

    PubMed

    Cha, Christine B; DiVasto, Katherine A

    2017-02-10

    Mental illness is a prevalent and extraordinarily complex phenomenon. Psychologists have developed distinct approaches toward understanding and treating mental illness, rooted in divergent epistemology. This introduction to the Special Issue on Clinical Psychological Science and Practice provides a brief overview of the scientist-practitioner gap, and explores one step (of many) toward bridging this divide. Seven compelling case illustrations featured in this Special Issue apply empirical findings to case formulation, treatment selection, and assessment across complex and varied clinical presentations. This issue thereby demonstrates the feasibility of integrating research and clinical expertise in mental healthcare.

  14. Ion mixing of pulsed laser deposited hydroxylapatite (HA)

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, T.L.; Russell, S.W.; Pizziconi, V.B.; Mayer, J.W.; Levine, T.E.; Nastasi, M.; Cotell, C.M.; Auyeung, R.C.Y.

    1995-12-31

    Hydroxylapatite (HA) is a calcium-phosphate-bioceramic material which has drawn much attention due to its excellent biocompatibility and tissue bioactivity properties. The use of ion-beam techniques to enhance selected properties of bioactive materials, such as the adhesion of hydroxylapatite (HA) coatings on titanium-based substrates has been investigated. In this study, very thin HA films on titanium substrates were created by pulsed laser deposition techniques. Ion irradiations were carried out using 260-keV argon ions, with fluences of 0.25--50 {times} 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, and at room temperature. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry was used to evaluate sample composition before and after irradiation. The amount of mixing was quantified by the mixing rate (the amount of atomic displacement due to an irradiation fluence). This pilot data indicates that mixing was evident after sufficient ion irradiation. The ramification of this preliminary study has provided a quantitative measure of ion mixing as a potential prosthetic biomaterial surface modification technique.

  15. Clinical practice is not applied scientific method.

    PubMed

    Cox, K

    1995-08-01

    Practice is often described as applied science, but real life is far too complex and interactive to be handled by analytical scientific methods. The limitations of usefulness of scientific method in clinical practice result from many factors. The complexity of the large number of ill-defined variables at many levels of the problem. Scientific method focuses on one variable at a time across a hundred identical animals to extract a single, generalizable 'proof' or piece of 'truth'. Clinical practice deals with a hundred variables at one time within one animal from among a clientele of non-identical animals in order to optimize a mix of outcomes intended to satisfy that particular animal's current needs and desires. Interdependence among the variables. Most factors in the illness, the disease, the patient and the setting are interdependent, and cannot be sufficiently isolated to allow their separate study. Practice as a human transaction involving at least two people is too complex to be analysed one factor at a time when the interaction stimulates unpredictable responses. Ambiguous data. Words have many usages. People not only assign different interpretations to the same words, they assign different 'meanings', especially according to the threat or hope they may imply. The perceptual data gleaned from physical examination may be difficult to specify exactly or to confirm objectively. The accuracy and precision of investigational data and their reporting can be low, and are frequently unknown. Differing goals between science and practice. Science strives for exact points of propositional knowledge, verifiable by logical argument using objective data and repetition of the experiment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Mixed mode fracture characterization of hydroxylapatite-titanium alloy interface.

    PubMed

    Mann, K A; Edidin, A A; Kinoshita, R K; Manley, M T

    1994-01-01

    Cantilever beam and four-point bend specimen geometries were used to experimentally determine the critical energy release rates for a plasma sprayed hydroxylapatite-titanium alloy (HA-Ti alloy) interface. A locus of energy release rates as a function of crack tip phase angle was determined where a 0 degree phase angle represented tensile opening (mode I) loading and a 90 degree phase angle represented in-plane shear (mode II) loading. Energy release rates were found to increase substantially with an increase in phase angle. An energy release rate of 0.108 N/mm was determined for a phase angle of 0 degrees (mode I). Energy release rates of 0.221, 0.686, and 1.212 N/mm were determined for phase angles of 66 degrees, 69 degrees, and 72 degrees, respectively. The experimental data was matched to a phenomenological model for which crack propagation depended on mode I loading alone indicating that crack propagation at the Ha-Ti alloy interface is dominated by the mode I loading component. Therefore, regions of HA coated implants that experience compressive or shear loading across the HA-Ti alloy interface may be much less likely to debond than regions that experience tensile loading.

  17. [Effect of electromagnetic fields on the chemical composition of regenerative bone under defective ceramic hydroxylapatite plastics].

    PubMed

    Luzin, V I; Pokhvalityĭ, A P; Kucherenko, S L; Berezhnyĭ, Ie P

    2003-01-01

    In experiment on white rats with the initial mass 130-150 grams researched influence of volumetric-combinative impulse electromagnetic fields (VCI EMF) with the amplitude of a magnetic field 0.04/0.05 Teslas on composition of a reclaim formative in the field of defect of a tibial bone, filled with ceramic hydroxylapatite (HAP) with a size of particles less than 63 microns. Was researched the exposure by VCI EMF boosts synthesis of organic matters in the field of a forming osteal regenerate in early periods of experiment and accelerates the processes of a mineralization of an organic matrix. was been stated it appears by increase of do the mineral component part in a reclaim. In that case, when the generated osteal defect is filled with ceramic HAP, VCI EMF boosts synthesis of a organic matrix and processes of its mineralization, that leads on to the optimization of chemical composition of a reclaim. In order to use the obtained results in clinical practice, the histological and ultra structural research of a formating reclaim are necessary too. These researches are our proximate task.

  18. [Orthogonal test analysis of compressive strength of porous hydroxylapatite prepared by gel-casting process].

    PubMed

    Han, Yanjun; Li, Musen; Lü, Yupeng; Song, Yunjing; Chen, Y; Low, H

    2004-10-01

    Porous hydroxylapatite (HA) has excellent osseous inductive ability. It has been prepared by gel-casting process, which is feasible and can make complex ceramic material. According to the result of orthogonal test based on the compressive strength, the order and the level of the factors, including monomer HA, initiator MBAM, catalyst APS and water, were dealt with. The effects of drying and sintering technique on the properties of porous hydroxylapatite were also researched. The results showed that the order of every factor in the gel-casting process is as follows, AM-APS, MBAM, H2O. Based on the determined level of each factor, the suitable slurry constituents and drying and sintering technologies were selected, and the porous hydroxylapatite with compressive strength of 6-7 MPa was produced.

  19. Applying pharmacokinetics to veterinary clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Trepanier, Lauren A

    2013-09-01

    This article describes clinical examples in which pharmacokinetic parameters can be used to optimize veterinary patient care. Specific applications include extrapolating drug dosages, optimizing therapy with therapeutic drug monitoring, interpreting pharmacokinetic information provided by drug labels and pharmaceutical companies, and adjusting drug dosages in patients with hepatic or renal failure.

  20. Applying proteomic technology to clinical virology.

    PubMed

    Mancone, C; Ciccosanti, F; Montaldo, C; Perdomo, A B; Piacentini, M; Alonzi, T; Fimia, G M; Tripodi, M

    2013-01-01

    Developing antiviral drugs, vaccines and diagnostic markers is still the most ambitious challenge in clinical virology. In the past few decades, data from high-throughput technologies have allowed for the rapid development of new antiviral therapeutic strategies, thus making a profound impact on translational research. Most of the current preclinical studies in virology are aimed at evaluating the dynamic composition and localization of the protein platforms involved in various host-virus interactions. Among the different possible approaches, mass spectrometry-based proteomics is increasingly being used to define the protein composition in subcellular compartments, quantify differential protein expression among samples, characterize protein complexes, and analyse protein post-translational modifications. Here, we review the current knowledge of the most useful proteomic approaches in the study of viral persistence and pathogenicity, with a particular focus on recent advances in hepatitis C research.

  1. Applying HIV testing guidelines in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Megan R; Fogler, Jess; Weber, Shannon; Goldschmidt, Ronald H

    2009-12-15

    An estimated one fourth of persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are not aware they are infected. Early diagnosis of HIV has the potential to ensure optimal outcomes for infected persons and to limit the spread of the virus. Important barriers to testing among physicians include insufficient time, reimbursement issues, and lack of patient acceptance. Current HIV testing guidelines address many of these barriers by making the testing process more streamlined and less stigmatizing. The opt-out consent process has been shown to improve test acceptance. Formal pretest counseling and written consent are no longer recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nevertheless, pretest discussions provide an opportunity to give information about HIV, address fears of discrimination, and identify ongoing high-risk activities. With increased HIV screening in the primary care setting, more persons with HIV could be identified earlier, receive timely and appropriate care, and get treatment to prevent clinical progression and transmission.

  2. Successful Treatment of Calcium Hydroxylapatite Nodules With Intralesional 5-Fluorouracil, Dexamethasone, and Triamcinolone.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Shino Bay; Aristizabal, Miguel; Reed, Ann

    2016-09-01

    Although infrequent, non-inflammatory nodules are potential complications associated with dermal filler injections. There is a lack of consensus in the literature regarding potential treatments to help resolve nodules associated with calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA) filler injections. This case report describes the successful treatment of a non-inflammatory nodule related to CaHA injection using a combination of 5-fluorouracil, dexamethasone, and triamcinolone.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(9):1142-1143.

  3. Oxygen Isotope and Microtextural Biosignatures of Hydroxylapatite in Karst Caves of South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S.; Blake, R. E.; Kim, S.

    2006-05-01

    Hydroxylapatite is precipitating in restricted areas of bat habitats in three karst caves (Gosu, Sungryu, and Ssang caves) in S. Korea. It covers the surfaces of carbonate speleothem and host rock forming a 0.1 to 0.5 mm thick crust. In order to elucidate the process of formation of this hydroxylapatite crust, the O isotope composition of phosphate (δ18OP), in the crust and in bat guano, as well as the O isotope compositions of calcite carbonate (δ18OC) in speleothems, and of dripping water (δ18OW) were determined together with mineralogical and textural analyses. The δ18OP values of the crust (approx. 13 permil) are between δ18OP values of bat guano (approx. 21 permil) and δ18OW values of dripping water (approx. -9.5 permil). These δ18O values and a close relation between crust distribution and bat habitat indicate that bat excretion provides phosphate for formation of the hydroxylapatite crust. The δ18OP values of the crust are in temperature-dependent isotopic equilibrium with dripping water. This suggests that the phosphate has been metabolized and has undergone oxygen isotope exchange with dripping water by enzyme-catalyzed reactions at low temperatures (13 to 16°C). The δ18OC values of speleothem calcite below the crust are approx. 9 permil higher than the δ18OP values of the crust. This suggests that both speleothem and crust have formed in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with the dripping water as a result of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Electron microscopy shows that sulfur-bearing filamentous bacteria are distributed on and within the crust. Also, four different microtextures (colloform, sea- and-island, cellular, and reticulate textures) are observed in the crust, and are produced by the distribution patterns of bacteria. Thus, both isotopic and microtextural signatures reflect bacterially-mediated biomineralization of hydroxylapatite in karst cave ecosystems.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of phosphocitric acid, a potent inhibitor of hydroxylapatite crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Tew, W P; Mahle, C; Benavides, J; Howard, J E; Lehninger, A L

    1980-04-29

    Human urine and extracts of rat liver mitochondria contain apparently identical agents capable of inhibiting the precipitation or crystallization of calcium phosphate. Its general properties, as well as 1H NMR and mass spectra, have suggested that the agent is phosphocitric acid. This paper reports the synthesis of phosphocitric acid via the phosphorylation of triethyl citrate with o-phenylene phosphochloridate, hydrogenolysis of the product to yield triethyl phosphocitrate, hydrolytic removal of the blocking ethyl groups and also chromatographic purification. An enzymatic assay of phosphocitrate is described. Synthetic phosphocitrate was found to be an exceedingly potent inhibitor of the growth of hydroxylapatite seed crystals in a medium supersaturated with respect to Ca2+ and phosphate. Comparative assays showed phosphocitrate to be much more potent than the most active precipitation-crystallization inhibitors previously reported, which include pyrophosphate and ATP. 14C-Labeled phosphocitrate was bound very tightly to hydroxylapatite crystals. Such binding appeared to be essential for its inhibitory activity on crystal growth. Citrate added before but not after, phosphocitrate greatly enhanced the inhibitory potency of the latter. This enhancement effect was not given by other tricarboxylic acids. The monoethyl ester of phosphocitrate had no inhibitory effect on hydroxylapatite crystal growth.

  5. Solubilization of the chromatin-bound estrogen receptor from chicken liver and fractionation on hydroxylapatite.

    PubMed

    Gschwendt, M

    1976-08-16

    1. High-affinity estrogen-binding sites can be solubilized from the liver chromatin of estrogenized chickens by treatment of the chromatin with 2 M KCL/5 M urea and fractionation on hydroxylapatite. Two estrogen-binding proteins are eluted from hydroxylapatite columns by 20mM phosphate (binding protein I) and 200mMphosphate (binding protein II), respectively. 2. The binding protein I is part of a non-histone protein fraction containing acid-soluble and insoluble proteins, whereas the binding protein II elutes together with high molecular weight nonhistone proteins containing acid insoluble proteins only. Both binding proteins exhibit the smae affinity for estradiol (Kd approximately 10(-9) M). 3. From chromatin of untreated chickens very small amounts of binding protein I (0.1 pmol/mg protein compared to 1.9 pmol/mg protein from estrogenized chickens) with the smae affinity for estradiol as that from estrogenized animals can be solubilized. Binding protein II is not detectable. 4. The "soluble nuclear estrogen receptor" extracted from crude liver nucleir of estrogenized chickens by 0.5 M KCL behaves on hydroxylapatite very similarly to salt/urea-dissociated chromatin with respect to the binding protein I. No binding protein II, however, can be demonstrated. 5. Chromatography of various preparations on Bio-Gel A-1.5 m indicates that the binding protein II is a residual chromatin fragment containing an unseparated binding protein-DNA complex, whereas the binding protein I represents the solubilized nucleic-acid-free chromosomal estrogen receptor. The "soluble nuclear receptor" and the binding protein I, however, are not identical with respect to their chromatographic behaviour on Bio-Gel A-1.5m, even though their estrogen binding entity remaining after trypsin treatment seems to be very similar.

  6. Investigation of xFe2O4 (x = Mn, Co) doped hydroxylapatite ferromagnetic biomaterials for the treatment of damaged bone and magnetically targeted drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Vikas; Singh, K. J.; Kaur, Kulwinder; Bhatia, Gaurav

    2016-05-01

    Magnetically attracted MnFe2O4 and CoFe2O4 doped hydroxylapatite samples have been prepared by using co-precipitation method in the laboratory. Bioactive nature of samples has been confirmed from XRD spectra. Ferromagnetic behavior of samples has been studied by using vibration sample magnetometer. Human osteoblast cell line MG63 has been used to explore the cell viability of samples. Drug carrier ability of samples has been checked with gentamycin as an antibiotic and results show that samples can be used as excellent drug carriers. Drug loaded samples can be easily targeted to specific area due to their attractive nature towards external magnetic field. Our results indicate that prepared samples possess good bioactive as well as ferromagnetic behavior with drug carrier ability and hence, our samples can be potential candidates for the clinical applications.

  7. Applying developmental programming to clinical obstetrics: my ward round.

    PubMed

    Painter, R C

    2015-10-01

    The theory of developmental programming is supported by accumulating evidence, both observational and experimental. The direct application of the principles of developmental programming by clinicians to benefit pregnant women remains an area of limited attention. Examining a selection of inpatients at an obstetric referral center, I searched for situations in which clinical decision making could be driven by the principles of developmental programming. I also looked for situations in which the clinical research agenda could be dictated by these concepts. In the decision to undertake preventive measures to avoid preeclampsia, the offspring's perspective may support more liberal application of calcium and aspirin. Consideration of the long-term health perspective of the offspring could drive choices in the management of obesity and diabetes in pregnancy. The administration of corticosteroids in women delivering by elective cesarean at term may have modest short-term benefits, but additional trials are necessary to investigate long-term offspring health. The offspring of women suffering hyperemesis gravidarum may benefit from nutritional therapy. The long-term health of the offspring could affect couples' choice for IVF or expectant management. Applying the principles of developmental programming to the management of pregnant women could drive clinical decision making and is driving the clinical research agenda. Increasingly, developmental programming concepts are becoming an integral part of clinical practice, as well as determining the choice of outcomes in trials in obstetrics and fertility medicine. The presented cases underscore the need for more research to guide clinical practice.

  8. Effects of heat treatment of wood on hydroxylapatite type mineral precipitation and biomechanical properties in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rekola, J; Lassila, L V J; Hirvonen, J; Lahdenperä, M; Grenman, R; Aho, A J; Vallittu, P K

    2010-08-01

    Wood is a natural fiber reinforced composite. It structurally resembles bone tissue to some extent. Specially heat-treated birch wood has been used as a model material for further development of synthetic fiber reinforced composites (FRC) for medical and dental use. In previous studies it has been shown, that heat treatment has a positive effect on the osteoconductivity of an implanted wood. In this study the effects of two different heat treatment temperatures (140 and 200 degrees C) on wood were studied in vitro. Untreated wood was used as a control material. Heat treatment induced biomechanical changes were studied with flexural and compressive tests on dry birch wood as well as on wood after 63 days of simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion. Dimensional changes, SBF sorption and hydroxylapatite type mineral formation were also assessed. The results showed that SBF immersion decreases the biomechanical performance of wood and that the heat treatment diminishes the effect of SBF immersion on biomechanical properties. With scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis it was shown that hydroxylapatite type mineral precipitation formed on the 200 degrees C heat-treated wood. An increased weight gain of the same material during SBF immersion supported this finding. The results of this study give more detailed insight of the biologically relevant changes that heat treatment induces in wood material. Furthermore the findings in this study are in line with previous in vivo studies.

  9. Tissue integration of the collagen-hydroxylapatite implant: histological examination in canine bone and surrounding tissues.

    PubMed

    Remacle, M; Marbaix, E; Mustin, V

    1991-01-01

    Using the dog as an animal model, we have tested an implant material composed of purified fibrillar collagen (PFC) and particulate hydroxylapatite (HA) in the mandible and in surrounding tissues. Bone and tissue samples were taken at 2, 4 and 6 months for histological study. After 2 months, the PFC was replaced by fibro-connective host tissues. After 4 months, some small areas of ossification were observed around the HA particles. After 6 months, the fibro-connective tissue was replaced by neo-formed bone in the mandible. PFC was found to increase the interfaces between the HA particles and the host tissues, permitting HA integration into the bone. The PFC/HA implant was also molded when moistened by blood or saline solution and then became mis-sharpen by local pressures exerted. These findings show that the implant should preferably be reserved for the restoration of bones not subjected to significant forces or local stresses.

  10. Energetics of Sn2+ isomorphic substitution into hydroxylapatite: First-principles predictions

    DOE PAGES

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja

    2016-11-04

    In this study, the energetics of Sn2+ substitution into the Ca2+ sublattice of hydroxylapatite (HA), Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, has been investigated within the framework of density functional theory. Calculations reveal that Sn2+ incorporation via coupled substitutions at Ca(II) sites is energetically favourable up to a composition of Sn6Ca4(PO4)6(OH)2, and further substitutions at Ca(I) sites proceed once full occupancy of Ca(II) sites by Sn2+ is achieved. Compositions of SnxCa10–x(PO4)6(OH)2 (x = 4–9) are predominant, with an optimal stoichiometry of Sn8Ca2(PO4)6(OH)2, and Sn-substituted HA follows approximately Vegard's law across the entire composition range.

  11. In vitro bioactive behavior of hydroxylapatite-coated porous Al(2)O(3).

    PubMed

    Shi, D; Jiang, G; Wen, X

    2000-09-01

    To produce bioactive materials for bone substitutes, two major deposition methods, suspension method and thermal deposition method, were employed to develop bioactive, mechanically strong, and porous ceramics. Hydroxylapatite (HA) has been uniformly coated onto inner pore surfaces of reticulated alumina substrates. It has been found that the in vitro bioactivity of HA coatings was affected by both structural crystallinity and specific surface area. Well-crystallized HA heat-treated at high temperatures has resulted in reduced bioactivity. The bio-reaction rate was found to increase with the surface area of HA. We have found that the stability of the well-crystallized HA is associated with the high driving force required for the formation of hydroxy-carbonate apatite (HCA) phase.

  12. Synthesis and solubility of Pb-Ca and P-As hydroxylapatite solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzio, Bartosz; Młynarska, Maria; Motyka, Joanna; Oknińska, Joanna; Mandelt, Agnieszka; Chlebowska, Patrycja; Kwaśniak-Kominek, Monika; Manecki, Maciej

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the study are three solid solution series: - HPY hydroxylpyromorphite Pb5(PO4)3OH - HAP hydroxylapatite Ca5(PO4)3OH - HAP hydroxylapatite Ca5(PO4)3OH - JBM johnbaumite Ca5(AsO4)3OH - JBM johnbaumite Ca5(AsO4)3OH - HMI hydroxylmimetite Pb5(AsO4)3OH The phases were synthesized from aqueous solutions at high pH (over 8) at ambient temperature by dropwise mixing of chemical reagents: Pb(NO3)2, Ca(NO3)2.4H2O, (NH4)H2PO4, and Na2AsHO4.7H2O. The products of all syntheses are crystalline, monomineral fine powders (crystal size less than 1 μm). Their chemical composition is close to theoretical. Systematic shift of XRD peaks and FTIR or Raman bands is observed within the solid solution series. Dissolution experiments were run at 5oC, 25oC, 45oC, and 65oC. An aliquot of 0.5g of each phase was dissolved in 250 mL of 0.05M NH4NO3 (pH between 3 and 5) for about 3 months. In all cases dissolution resulted in increase of pH by about 1. The systems were considered in equilibrium when three consecutive samplings (ca. two weeks apart) resulted in similar concentrations (within 3 standard deviations). The dissolution of all phases in question is incongruent. The amount of precipitating secondary phases was too small for identification. The results of HPY - HAP dissolution experiments are inconclusive due to strongly incongruent dissolution. This is partially in contrary to recent report by Zhu et al. (2015). Systematic increase of solubility is observed in HAP - JBM series. Also, the solubility of these phases increases with the increase of temperature. This is more pronounced for HAP than for JBM. Systematic increase of solubility is also observed in HMI - JBM series. This work is partially funded by AGH research grant no 11.11.140.319 and partially by Polish NCN grant No 2014/01/M/ST10/00355. Zhu,Y., Zhu, Z., Zhao, X., Liang, Y., Huang, Y., 2015. Characterization, dissolution, and solubility of lead hydroxypyromorphite Pb5(PO4)3OH at 25-45oC. Journal of Chemistry

  13. 42 CFR 55a.102 - Who is eligible to apply for a Black Lung clinics grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply for a Black Lung clinics... SERVICES GRANTS PROGRAM GRANTS FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions § 55a.102 Who is eligible to apply for a Black Lung clinics grant? Any State or public or private entity may apply for a grant under...

  14. 42 CFR 55a.102 - Who is eligible to apply for a Black Lung clinics grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply for a Black Lung clinics... SERVICES GRANTS PROGRAM GRANTS FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions § 55a.102 Who is eligible to apply for a Black Lung clinics grant? Any State or public or private entity may apply for a grant under...

  15. 42 CFR 55a.102 - Who is eligible to apply for a Black Lung clinics grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply for a Black Lung clinics... SERVICES GRANTS PROGRAM GRANTS FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions § 55a.102 Who is eligible to apply for a Black Lung clinics grant? Any State or public or private entity may apply for a grant under...

  16. 42 CFR 55a.102 - Who is eligible to apply for a Black Lung clinics grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply for a Black Lung clinics... SERVICES GRANTS PROGRAM GRANTS FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions § 55a.102 Who is eligible to apply for a Black Lung clinics grant? Any State or public or private entity may apply for a grant under...

  17. 42 CFR 55a.102 - Who is eligible to apply for a Black Lung clinics grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply for a Black Lung clinics... SERVICES GRANTS PROGRAM GRANTS FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions § 55a.102 Who is eligible to apply for a Black Lung clinics grant? Any State or public or private entity may apply for a grant under...

  18. Plasma-Sprayed Hydroxylapatite-Based Coatings: Chemical, Mechanical, Microstructural, and Biomedical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Robert B.

    2016-06-01

    This contribution discusses salient properties and functions of hydroxylapatite (HA)-based plasma-sprayed coatings, including the effect on biomedical efficacy of coating thickness, phase composition and distribution, amorphicity and crystallinity, porosity and surface roughness, cohesion and adhesion, micro- and nano-structured surface morphology, and residual coating stresses. In addition, it will provide details of the thermal alteration that HA particles undergo in the extremely hot plasma jet that leads to dehydroxylated phases such as oxyhydroxylapatite (OHA) and oxyapatite (OA) as well as thermal decomposition products such as tri-(TCP) and tetracalcium phosphates (TTCP), and quenched phases such as amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP). The contribution will further explain the role of ACP during the in vitro interaction of the as-deposited coatings with simulated body fluid resembling the composition of extracellular fluid (ECF) as well as the in vivo responses of coatings to the ECF and the host tissue, respectively. Finally, it will briefly describe performance profiles required to fulfill biological functions of osteoconductive bioceramic coatings designed to improve osseointegration of hip endoprostheses and dental root implants. In large parts, the content of this contribution is a targeted review of work done by the author and his students and coworkers over the last two decades. In addition, it is considered a stepping stone toward a standard operation procedure aimed at depositing plasma-sprayed bioceramic implant coatings with optimum properties.

  19. Antheraea pernyi silk sericin mediating biomimetic nucleation and growth of hydroxylapatite crystals promoting bone matrix formation.

    PubMed

    Jiayao, Zhuang; Guanshan, Zhou; Jinchi, Zhang; Yuyin, Chen; Yongqiang, Zhu

    2017-03-01

    Bone biomineralization is well-regulated processes mediated by extracellular matrix proteins. The materials that can direct nucleation of hydroxylapatite (HAp) crystals and assembly of well-structured material-minerals complex are the key to mimicking the natural mineralization. This study used sericin from Antheraea pernyi (A.pernyi), non-mulberry silkworm cocoon as template to mediate nucleation of HAp crystals. Here we find out that AS (Antheraea pernyi sericin) can nucleate the formation HAp crystals in simulated body fluid verified by XRD and FTIR observations. The HAp crystals are organized into nano-rods oriented with c-axis preferentially parallel to the long axis of AS due to hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interaction and finally aggregated into HAp globule. The cell culture of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) showed that the HAp crystals mediated by AS not only stimulate cell adhesion and proliferation but also promote 0f osteogenic differentiation, suggesting that the resultant mineralized AS biomaterial has potential in promoting bone formation. Thus our work will provide significant implication on biomineralization of A. pernyi silk sericin as a potential scaffold for tissue engineering.

  20. Energetics of Sn2+ isomorphic substitution into hydroxylapatite: First-principles predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja

    2016-11-04

    In this study, the energetics of Sn2+ substitution into the Ca2+ sublattice of hydroxylapatite (HA), Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, has been investigated within the framework of density functional theory. Calculations reveal that Sn2+ incorporation via coupled substitutions at Ca(II) sites is energetically favourable up to a composition of Sn6Ca4(PO4)6(OH)2, and further substitutions at Ca(I) sites proceed once full occupancy of Ca(II) sites by Sn2+ is achieved. Compositions of SnxCa10–x(PO4)6(OH)2 (x = 4–9) are predominant, with an optimal stoichiometry of Sn8Ca2(PO4)6(OH)2, and Sn-substituted HA follows approximately Vegard's law across the entire composition range.

  1. Applying ‘science’ in chiropractic clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, Jennifer R

    1990-01-01

    The chiropractic profession is increasingly expressing the sentiment that chiropractic clinical intervention should rest upon a scientific foundation. Before ‘scientific research’ can become meaningful in chiropractic clinical practice, it is necessary that field practitioners be conversant with research terminology. If chiropractic clinical practice is to achieve credibility as a scientific mode of health care and if the benefits of a ‘scientific’ practice model are to enhance patient care, then future chiropractic practitioners must be familiar with a currently accredited scientific frame of reference. A survey of final year chiropractic students at Phillip Institute of Technology found that respondents appreciation of the strength of diverse clinical research methodologies and their ranking of criteria for ascertaining a cause-effect association bears some similarity (RHO = 0.97 and 0.98 respectively, p < 0.05) to that of the ‘scientific’ clinical community.

  2. [Prevention of postenucleation syndrome: the hydroxylapatite silicone implant. Preliminary experimental studies and initial clinical experiences].

    PubMed

    Guthoff, R; Vick, H P; Schaudig, U

    1995-04-01

    An orbital implant after enucleation compensates for volume deficiency and increases prosthesis motility. In the literature, however, an extrusion rate of orbital implant between 10 and 25% is reported. Since the introduction of hydroxylapatic ceramics (HAC), these numbers have been reduced considerably. The HAC, which is derived from corals, has a rough surface and requires a scleral covering for implantation. The HAC, which is made in the laboratory, can be produced with smoother surfaces, so that a homoplastic covering is no longer mandatory. A composite implant was developed to improve prosthesis motility further. This consists of artificial HAC at its anterior surface to guarantee safe tissue integration; the posterior part of the implant is manufactured from silicon rubber to create a jointlike structure in Tenon's capsule. Integration of the porous HAC in the orbital soft tissues has been tested and confirmed by animal experiments. After 30 full HAC implants and 25 composite implants, only one extrusion occurred. In all other cases, compatibility proved to be excellent; transmission of the motility to the prosthesis was moderate to good. Examinations comparing prosthesis motility and computer tomographically evaluated implant motility enabled the analysis of deficits in motility transmission of the implant for the artificial eye.

  3. Spectroscopic analyses on sonocatalytic damage to bovine serum albumin (BSA) induced by ZnO/hydroxylapatite (ZnO/HA) composite under ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqiu; Li, Ying; Wang, Jun; Zou, Mingming; Gao, Jingqun; Kong, Yumei; Li, Kai; Han, Guangxi

    2012-08-01

    ZnO/hydroxylapatite (ZnO/HA) composite with HA molar content of 6.0% was prepared by the method of precipitation and heat-treated at 500°C for 40min and was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The sonocatalytic activities of ZnO/HA composite was carried out through the damage of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution. Furthermore, the effects of several factors on the damage of BSA molecules were evaluated by means of UV-vis and fluorescence spectra. Experimental results indicated that the damage degree of BSA aggravated with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time, irradiation power and ZnO/HA addition amount, but weakened with the increase of solution acidity and ionic strength. In addition, the damage site to BSA was also studied by synchronous fluorescence technology and the damage site was mainly at tryptophan (Trp) residue. This paper provides a valuable reference for driving sonocatalytic method to treat tumor in clinic application.

  4. Applying a user centered design methodology in a clinical context.

    PubMed

    Kashfi, Hajar

    2010-01-01

    A clinical decision support system (CDSS) is an interactive application that is used to facilitate the process of decisionmaking in a clinical context. Developing a usable CDSS is a challenging process; mostly because of the complex nature of domain knowledge and the context of use of those systems. This paper describes how a user centered design (UCD) approach can be used in a clinical context for developing a CDSS. In our effort, a design-based research methodology has been used. The outcomes of this work are as follow; a customized UCD approach is suggested that combines UCD and openEHR. Moreover, the GUI developed in the design phase and the result of the GUI evaluation is briefly presented.

  5. Adsorption of arsenic with struvite and hydroxylapatite in phosphate-bearing solutions.

    PubMed

    Rouff, Ashaki A; Ma, Ning; Kustka, Adam B

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic sorption at above neutral pH is relevant when considering contaminant mobility in alkaline, phosphorus-bearing wastewaters, and may be viable in the presence phosphate minerals. Arsenic adsorption on struvite (MgNH4PO4 · 6H2O, MAP) and hydroxylapatite (Ca5(PO4)3OH, HAP) was evaluated at pH 8-11 from solutions with 2.7-0.125 mM phosphate and 0.05 mM As(III) or As(V). Over 7 d, As(III) removal from solution was minimal, but As(V) removal increased with pH, and was higher in the presence of MAP compared to HAP with a maximum of 74% removal in pH 11 MAP-bearing solutions. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) analysis of solids recovered from pH 10-11 solutions revealed different mechanisms of As(V) sorption with MAP and HAP. Arsenic forms monodentate mononuclear surface complexes with MAP through the formation of a Mg-O-As bond, but is incorporated at the near-surface of HAP forming a johnbaumite-like (Ca5(AsO4)3OH) structure. Experiments using radioactive (33)P at pH 10-11 revealed faster exchange of P at the HAP surface, which could promote more facile As incorporation. Near-surface incorporated As in HAP may be less susceptible to remobilization compared to surface adsorbates formed with MAP. Overall, both MAP and HAP may sorb As at high pH in the presence of phosphate. This is relevant to the fate of As in alkaline contaminated waters in contact with phosphate mineral phases.

  6. [Genetics applied to clinical practice in neurodevelopmental disorders].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Jaén, Alberto; Cigudosa, Juan C; Martín Fernández-Mayoralas, Daniel; Suela, Javier; Fernández-Perrone, Ana L; Calleja-Pérez, Beatriz; López-Martín, Sara

    2014-02-24

    The medical literature contains a wide body of evidence supporting genetic involvement in neurodevelopmental disorders. Advances made in genetics and technology have increased the diagnostic cost-effectiveness of current studies from 3-5% to 30-40% in patients with intellectual disability or autism spectrum disorders. In this regard, chromosomal microarray studies display greater diagnostic power than conventional techniques (karyotype, subtelomeric analyses, etc.). The latest protocols in the biomedical field of the genetic study of these disorders cite chromosomal microarrays as the first-line analysis, while also recommending other specific studies depending on the patient's clinical features (fragile X syndrome, PTEN mutation, etc.). In the evaluation of other neurodevelopmental disorders (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, learning disorders, etc.), the number of genetic tests carried out is limited and conditioned by the clinical characteristics or the patient's familial or personal history. Even in these situations, there are no genetic referral or evaluation protocols.

  7. Good clinical practice in developing countries: applying recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bompart, François; Hirsch, François; Bertoye, Pierre-Henri; Vray, Muriel

    2008-01-01

    The recommendations for clinical research in developing countries were published in 2007 and the present article deals with issues which were not initially raised or discussed in depth. In particular, we discuss specific questions linked to trials conducted in developing countries with regard to informed consent, research project review by two ethics committees, standards of care, management of biological samples, study follow-up committees, notification of Serious Adverse Events, paediatric trials, and Contract Research Organizations.

  8. Applying Novel Nutrient Drink to Clinical Trial of Functional Dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chul-Hyun; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Baeg, Myong Ki; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Cho, Yu Kyung; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Kyu Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The drink test has been regarded as a surrogate marker of gastric accommodation. The aims of this study were to develop a novel nutrient drink test (NDT) protocol and investigate its potential for application to a clinical trial of functional dyspepsia (FD). Methods A novel NDT was designed, involving drinking 125 mL of nutrient 4 times at 5-minute intervals or until maximal tolerability. Healthy volunteers and patients with FD rated their symptoms every 5 minutes for 20 minutes in a developmental study. Patients with FD were enrolled in an open trial of itopride for 4 weeks. NDT was performed before and after treatment. Improvement of integrative symptoms score during NDT after treatment for more than 50% compared with baseline was defined as responder. Results Total aggregate symptom scores, sum of symptom scores measured during NDT, were higher in FD patients (n = 40, 368.1 ± 245.3) than in controls (n = 19, 215.9 ± 171.2) (P = 0.018) in a developmental study. In an open trial of itopride, symptom scores measured during NDT decreased significantly at all time points after treatment in responders (n = 49), whereas did not in non-responders (n = 25). Total aggregate symptom score for NDT correlated significantly with integrative dyspeptic symptom score, sum of 8 symptom scores of NDI questionnaire, at baseline (r = 0.374, P = 0.001) and after treatment (r = 0.480, P < 0.001). Conclusions Our novel NDT can quantify dyspeptic symptoms and reflected therapeutic effects of itopride treatment in a clinical trial of FD patients. This NDT can be used as an effective parameter in clinical trials or drug development programs for assessing effects of novel therapies on postprandial symptoms. PMID:24840374

  9. The Psychiatric Cultural Formulation: Applying Medical Anthropology in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers revisions to the DSM-IV Outline for Cultural Formulation from the perspective of clinical practice. First, the paper explores the theoretical development of the Cultural Formulation. Next, a case presentation demonstrates challenges in its actual implementation. Finally, the paper recommends a set of questions for the clinician on barriers to care and countertransference. The development of a standardized, user-friendly format can increase the Cultural Formulation’s utilization among all psychiatrists beyond those specializing in cultural psychiatry. PMID:22418398

  10. Clinically applied models of bone regeneration in tissue engineering research.

    PubMed

    Einhorn, T A

    1999-10-01

    The development of new strategies for the engineering of bone regeneration requires appropriate model systems. Selection of the best model for testing a new technology depends on a host of factors. In general, the best model system is the one which most closely mimics the clinical situation for which this technology is being developed, will not heal spontaneously unless the technology is used, and will not heal when another technology is used if that technology is less advanced than the one being tested. For the purposes of developing new strategies for bone regeneration, systems which can be considered include those which model normal fracture healing, the segmental loss of bone or critical size defects, and various forms of nonunions in which fracture healing is perturbed either by mechanical, metabolic, or neurologic means. Careful experimental design and selection of the appropriate model system will enhance scientific efforts in bone regeneration research.

  11. Ultrasound in anesthesia: applying scientific principles to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Falyar, Christian R

    2010-08-01

    The use of ultrasound as an adjunct to invasive anesthesia procedures is becoming commonplace. The U.S. Agency for Health Care Quality and the United Kingdom National Institute for Clinical Excellence have identified the role of ultrasound in improving patient safety. Numerous studies have demonstrated the benefits of ultrasound, yet there have also been articles inferring it may not offer additional benefits to traditional landmark techniques. The major disadvantage often cited is that success is user-dependent, and using ultrasound is a unique skill that requires training and experience to become proficient. Modern ultrasound systems incorporate 2 sound technologies to provide users with specific information about what is being viewed. Brightness mode imaging and pulsed-wave Doppler can be combined to reduce potential complications associated with central venous access and regional anesthesia. Human tissue is also an important factor in ultrasound imaging. The different densities of soft tissues, bone, fluid, and air all interact with sound, creating distinctive images that can aid and potentially hinder accuracy. Comprehension of basic ultrasound principles and how it is affected by tissue will enable anesthetists to better understand what is being seen and reduce the potential for errors.

  12. Adherence of oral streptococci: evidence for nonspecific adsorption to saliva-coated hydroxylapatite surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Staat, R H; Peyton, J C

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed that binding of oral streptococci to saliva-coated hydroxylapatite (SHA) surfaces is a multifactorial process involving both specific and nonspecific receptors. In this context, specific binding is described as a high-affinity, saturable interaction between the cell and binding surface. Conversely, nonspecific binding is considered to be a nonsaturable, generalized, low-affinity reaction. Experimental differentiation of specific binding from nonspecific binding was achieved with a competition assay which utilized a large excess of nonradiolabeled bacteria to compete with the 3H-labeled cells for attachment to receptors on 1.5 mg of SHA crystals. Competition assays of Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mitis adhesion clearly demonstrated that the total binding isotherm was composed of a saturable specific binding reaction and a minor nonspecific binding component. This was further substantiated by analysis of nonlinear Scatchard plots of the total binding data. The competition data for Streptococcus mutans binding indicated that ca. 50% of the S. mutans binding appeared to be specific, although saturation of the SHA surfaces with bacterial cells could not be demonstrated. Experiments measuring desorption of radiolabeled cells from SHA crystals into buffer showed that ca. 50% of the bound S. mutans cells were removed after 4 h, whereas less than 5% of the S. sanguis cells were eluted from the SHA surfaces. The kinetics of attachment were studied by using an extract of Persea americana as a noncompetitive inhibitor of adherence. The total cell binding data for these experiments suggested a very rapid binding reaction followed by a slower rate of attachment. It was concluded from these three different experimental approaches that adherence of selected oral streptococci to SHA surfaces involves specific, high-affinity and nonspecific, low-affinity binding reactions. The concept is developed that in vitro streptococcal attachment to SHA can be

  13. Semantic Web Technology for Mapping and Applying Clinical Functional Assessment Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0010 TITLE: Semantic Web Technology for Mapping and Applying Clinical Functional Assessment Information PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE Semantic Web Technology for Mapping and Applying Clinical 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-2-0010 Functional Assessment Information 5b. GRANT...International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). We developed the mechanisms to generate programmatically data-acquisition Web forms

  14. Multimodal tissue perfusion imaging using multi-spectral and thermographic imaging systems applied on clinical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Nelisse, Martin; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Noordmans, Herke Jan

    2013-03-01

    Clinical interventions can cause changes in tissue perfusion, oxygenation or temperature. Real-time imaging of these phenomena could be useful for surgical strategy or understanding of physiological regulation mechanisms. Two noncontact imaging techniques were applied for imaging of large tissue areas: LED based multispectral imaging (MSI, 17 different wavelengths 370 nm-880 nm) and thermal imaging (7.5 to 13.5 μm). Oxygenation concentration changes were calculated using different analyzing methods. The advantages of these methods are presented for stationary and dynamic applications. Concentration calculations of chromophores in tissue require right choices of wavelengths The effects of different wavelength choices for hemoglobin concentration calculations were studied in laboratory conditions and consequently applied in clinical studies. Corrections for interferences during the clinical registrations (ambient light fluctuations, tissue movements) were performed. The wavelength dependency of the algorithms were studied and wavelength sets with the best results will be presented. The multispectral and thermal imaging systems were applied during clinical intervention studies: reperfusion of tissue flap transplantation (ENT), effectiveness of local anesthetic block and during open brain surgery in patients with epileptic seizures. The LED multispectral imaging system successfully imaged the perfusion and oxygenation changes during clinical interventions. The thermal images show local heat distributions over tissue areas as a result of changes in tissue perfusion. Multispectral imaging and thermal imaging provide complementary information and are promising techniques for real-time diagnostics of physiological processes in medicine.

  15. Case Study: Applying OpenEHR Archetypes to a Clinical Data Repository in a Chinese Hospital.

    PubMed

    Min, Lingtong; Wang, Li; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong

    2015-01-01

    openEHR is a flexible and scalable modeling methodology for clinical information and has been widely adopted in Europe and Australia. Due to the reasons of differences in clinical process and management, there are few research projects involving openEHR in China. To investigate the feasibility of openEHR methodology for clinical information modelling in China, this paper carries out a case study to apply openEHR archetypes to Clinical Data Repository (CDR) in a Chinese hospital. The results show that a set of 26 archetypes are found to cover all the concepts used in the CDR. Of all these, 9 (34.6%) are reused without change, 10 are modified and/or extended, and 7 are newly defined. The reasons for modification, extension and newly definition have been discussed, including granularity of archetype, metadata-level versus data-level modelling, and the representation of relationships between archetypes.

  16. Applying a Conceptual Framework to Maximize the Participation of Diverse Populations in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Napoles, A; Cook, E; Ginossar, T; Knight, K D; Ford, M E

    2017-01-01

    The underrepresentation of ethnically diverse populations in cancer clinical trials results in the inequitable distribution of the risks and benefits of this research. Using a case study approach, we apply a conceptual framework of factors associated with the participation of diverse population groups in cancer clinical trials developed by Dr. Jean Ford and colleagues to increase understanding of the specific strategies, and barriers and promoters addressed by these strategies, that resulted in marked success in accrual of racially and ethnically diverse populations in cancer clinical research. Results indicate that the studies presented were able to successfully engage minority participants due to the creation and implementation of multilevel, multifaceted strategies that included: culturally and linguistically appropriate outreach, education, and research studies that were accessible in local communities; infrastructure to support engagement of key stakeholders, clinicians, and organizations serving minority communities; testimonials by ethnically diverse cancer survivors; availability of medical interpretation services; and providing infrastructure that facilitated the engagement in clinical research of clinicians who care for minority patient populations. These strategic efforts were effective in addressing limited awareness of trials, lack of opportunities to participate, and acceptance of engagement in cancer clinical trials. Careful attention to the context and population characteristics in which cancer clinical trials are conducted will be necessary to address disparities in research participation and cancer outcomes. These studies illustrate that progress on minority accrual into clinical research requires intentional efforts to overcome barriers at all three stages of the accrual process: awareness, opportunity, and acceptance of participation.

  17. From the galleries to the clinic: applying art museum lessons to patient care.

    PubMed

    Miller, Alexa; Grohe, Michelle; Khoshbin, Shahram; Katz, Joel T

    2013-12-01

    Increasingly, medical educators integrate art-viewing into curricular interventions that teach clinical observation-often with local art museum educators. How can cross-disciplinary collaborators explicitly connect the skills learned in the art museum with those used at the bedside? One approach is for educators to align their pedagogical approach using similar teaching methods in the separate contexts of the galleries and the clinic. We describe two linked pedagogical exercises--Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) in the museum galleries and observation at the bedside--from "Training the Eye: Improving the Art of Physical Diagnosis," an elective museum-based course at Harvard Medical School. It is our opinion that while strategic interactions with the visual arts can improve skills, it is essential for students to apply them in a clinical context with faculty support-requiring educators across disciplines to learn from one another.

  18. Understanding and applying pharmacometric modelling and simulation in clinical practice and research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the dose–concentration–effect relationship is a fundamental component of clinical pharmacology. Interpreting data arising from observations of this relationship requires the use of mathematical models; i.e. pharmacokinetic (PK) models to describe the relationship between dose and concentration and pharmacodynamic (PD) models describing the relationship between concentration and effect. Drug development requires several iterations of pharmacometric model‐informed learning and confirming. This includes modelling to understand the dose–response in preclinical studies, deriving a safe dose for first‐in‐man, and the overall analysis of Phase I/II data to optimise the dose for safety and efficacy in Phase III pivotal trials. However, drug development is not the boundary at which PKPD understanding and application stops. PKPD concepts will be useful to anyone involved in the prescribing and administration of medicines for purposes such as determining off‐label dosing in special populations, individualising dosing based on a measured biomarker (personalised medicine) and in determining whether lack of efficacy or unexpected toxicity maybe solved by adjusting the dose rather than the drug. In clinical investigator‐led study design, PKPD can be used to ensure the optimal dose is used, and crucially to define the expected effect size, thereby ensuring power calculations are based on sound prior information. In the clinical setting the most likely people to hold sufficient expertise to advise on PKPD matters will be the pharmacists and clinical pharmacologists. This paper reviews fundamental PKPD principles and provides some real‐world examples of PKPD use in clinical practice and applied clinical research. PMID:27567102

  19. Applying knowledge-anchored hypothesis discovery methods to advance clinical and translational research: the OAMiner project

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Rebecca D; Best, Thomas M; Borlawsky, Tara B; Lai, Albert M; James, Stephen; Gurcan, Metin N

    2012-01-01

    The conduct of clinical and translational research regularly involves the use of a variety of heterogeneous and large-scale data resources. Scalable methods for the integrative analysis of such resources, particularly when attempting to leverage computable domain knowledge in order to generate actionable hypotheses in a high-throughput manner, remain an open area of research. In this report, we describe both a generalizable design pattern for such integrative knowledge-anchored hypothesis discovery operations and our experience in applying that design pattern in the experimental context of a set of driving research questions related to the publicly available Osteoarthritis Initiative data repository. We believe that this ‘test bed’ project and the lessons learned during its execution are both generalizable and representative of common clinical and translational research paradigms. PMID:22647689

  20. Method to integrate clinical guidelines into the electronic health record (EHR) by applying the archetypes approach.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Diego; Moro, Claudia Maria Cabral; Cicogna, Paulo Eduardo; Carvalho, Deborah Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Clinical guidelines are documents that assist healthcare professionals, facilitating and standardizing diagnosis, management, and treatment in specific areas. Computerized guidelines as decision support systems (DSS) attempt to increase the performance of tasks and facilitate the use of guidelines. Most DSS are not integrated into the electronic health record (EHR), ordering some degree of rework especially related to data collection. This study's objective was to present a method for integrating clinical guidelines into the EHR. The study developed first a way to identify data and rules contained in the guidelines, and then incorporate rules into an archetype-based EHR. The proposed method tested was anemia treatment in the Chronic Kidney Disease Guideline. The phases of the method are: data and rules identification; archetypes elaboration; rules definition and inclusion in inference engine; and DSS-EHR integration and validation. The main feature of the proposed method is that it is generic and can be applied toany type of guideline.

  1. Applying a family systems lens to proxy decision making in clinical practice and research.

    PubMed

    Rolland, John S; Emanuel, Linda L; Torke, Alexia M

    2017-03-01

    When patients are incapacitated and face serious illness, family members must make medical decisions for the patient. Medical decision sciences give only modest attention to the relationships among patients and their family members, including impact that these relationships have on the decision-making process. A review of the literature reveals little effort to systematically apply a theoretical framework to the role of family interactions in proxy decision making. A family systems perspective can provide a useful lens through which to understand the dynamics of proxy decision making. This article considers the mutual impact of family systems on the processes and outcomes of proxy decision making. The article first reviews medical decision science's evolution and focus on proxy decision making and then reviews a family systems approach, giving particular attention to Rolland's Family Systems Illness Model. A case illustrates how clinical practice and how research would benefit from bringing family systems thinking to proxy decisions. We recommend including a family systems approach in medical decision science research and clinical practices around proxy decisions making. We propose that clinical decisions could be less conflicted and less emotionally troubling for families and clinicians if family systems approaches were included. This perspective opens new directions for research and novel approaches to clinical care. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Applying and testing the conveniently optimized enzyme mismatch cleavage method to clinical DNA diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Niida, Yo; Kuroda, Mondo; Mitani, Yusuke; Okumura, Akiko; Yokoi, Ayano

    2012-11-01

    Establishing a simple and effective mutation screening method is one of the most compelling problems with applying genetic diagnosis to clinical use. Because there is no reliable and inexpensive screening system, amplifying by PCR and performing direct sequencing of every coding exon is the gold standard strategy even today. However, this approach is expensive and time consuming, especially when gene size or sample number is large. Previously, we developed CEL nuclease mediated heteroduplex incision with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining (CHIPS) as an ideal simple mutation screening system constructed with only conventional apparatuses and commercially available reagents. In this study, we evaluated the utility of CHIPS technology for genetic diagnosis in clinical practice by applying this system to screening for the COL2A1, WRN and RPS6KA3 mutations in newly diagnosed patients with Stickler syndrome (autosomal dominant inheritance), Werner syndrome (autosomal recessive inheritance) and Coffin-Lowry syndrome (X-linked inheritance), respectively. In all three genes, CHIPS detected all DNA variations including disease causative mutations within a day. Direct sequencing of all coding exons of these genes confirmed 100% sensitivity and specificity. We demonstrate high sensitivity, high cost performance and reliability of this simple system, with compatibility to all inheritance modes. Because of its low technology, CHIPS is ready to use and potentially disseminate to any laboratories in the world.

  3. Constructivism applied to psychiatric-mental health nursing: an alternative to supplement traditional clinical education.

    PubMed

    DeCoux Hampton, Michelle

    2012-02-01

    With the popularity of accelerated pre-licensure nursing programmes and the growth in nursing student enrolments, traditional clinical education continues to be a challenge to deliver. Nursing faculty members are required to develop and implement educational innovations that achieve effective learning outcomes, while using fewer resources. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the effectiveness of a constructivism-based learning project to achieve specific learning outcomes and to supplement approximately 30 clinical hours in a psychiatric-mental health nursing course. Students participated in a 10-week, multistage project that examined life histories, treatment resources, and evidence-based practice, as applied to a single individual with a mental illness. Students reported increased understanding of mental health and illness, developed personal relevance associated with the knowledge gained, and learned to problem solve with regard to nursing care of individuals diagnosed with mental illness. For many students, there also appeared to be a reduction in stigmatized attitudes towards mental illness. Constructivism-based learning is a promising alternative to supplement clinical hours, while effectively achieving learning outcomes. Future research is needed to further validate the use of this method for the learning of course content, as well as the reduction of stigma.

  4. Clinical analysis of the rap stress stimulator applied for crus fracture after skeletal external fixation

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Ping; Hong, Jiayuan; Chen, Wei; Wu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Open crus fracture is still difficult in clinical treatment because of the delayed fracture union and high rate of nonunion after the operation. A consensus has been reached that mechanical stress can promote fracture healing. We independently developed a stress stimulator, which can provide longitudinal pressure for the fixed fracture end of the lower legs to promote fracture healing. The purpose of this study is to explore the advantages and clinical effect of the rap stress stimulator applied for open crus fracture after skeletal external fixation. Material and methods One hundred and sixty-five patients (183 limbs) who suffered from open tibia and fibula fracture received skeletal external fixation, of which 108 limbs were treated with the rap stress stimulator after external fixation and 75 limbs were treated with regular functional exercises of muscle contraction and joint activity only. Then the fracture healing time and rate of nonunion were compared between the two groups. Results The mean fracture healing time and rate of nonunion in the group treated with the rap stress stimulator were 138.27 ±4.45 days and 3.70% respectively, compared to 153.43 ±4.89 days and 10.67% in the group treated without the stimulator. Conclusions The rap stress stimulator significantly shortened the fracture healing time and reduced the rate of nonunion for treating open tibia and fibula fractures. PMID:26170856

  5. Applying Automated MR-Based Diagnostic Methods to the Memory Clinic: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Klöppel, Stefan; Peter, Jessica; Ludl, Anna; Pilatus, Anne; Maier, Sabrina; Mader, Irina; Heimbach, Bernhard; Frings, Lars; Egger, Karl; Dukart, Juergen; Schroeter, Matthias L; Perneczky, Robert; Häussermann, Peter; Vach, Werner; Urbach, Horst; Teipel, Stefan; Hüll, Michael; Abdulkadir, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that fully automated pattern recognition methods applied to structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) aid in the diagnosis of dementia, but these conclusions are based on highly preselected samples that significantly differ from that seen in a dementia clinic. At a single dementia clinic, we evaluated the ability of a linear support vector machine trained with completely unrelated data to differentiate between Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), Lewy body dementia, and healthy aging based on 3D-T1 weighted MRI data sets. Furthermore, we predicted progression to AD in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at baseline and automatically quantified white matter hyperintensities from FLAIR-images. Separating additionally recruited healthy elderly from those with dementia was accurate with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.97 (according to Fig. 4). Multi-class separation of patients with either AD or FTD from other included groups was good on the training set (AUC >  0.9) but substantially less accurate (AUC = 0.76 for AD, AUC = 0.78 for FTD) on 134 cases from the local clinic. Longitudinal data from 28 cases with MCI at baseline and appropriate follow-up data were available. The computer tool discriminated progressive from stable MCI with AUC = 0.73, compared to AUC = 0.80 for the training set. A relatively low accuracy by clinicians (AUC = 0.81) illustrates the difficulties of predicting conversion in this heterogeneous cohort. This first application of a MRI-based pattern recognition method to a routine sample demonstrates feasibility, but also illustrates that automated multi-class differential diagnoses have to be the focus of future methodological developments and application studies.

  6. Clinical usefulness of the clock drawing test applying rasch analysis in predicting of cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Doo Han; Lee, Jae Shin

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the clinical usefulness of the clock drawing test applying Rasch analysis for predicting the level of cognitive impairment. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 187 stroke patients with cognitive impairment were enrolled in this study. The 187 patients were evaluated by the clock drawing test developed through Rasch analysis along with the mini-mental state examination of cognitive evaluation tool. An analysis of the variance was performed to examine the significance of the mini-mental state examination and the clock drawing test according to the general characteristics of the subjects. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to determine the cutoff point for cognitive impairment and to calculate the sensitivity and specificity values. [Results] The results of comparison of the clock drawing test with the mini-mental state showed significant differences in according to gender, age, education, and affected side. A total CDT of 10.5, which was selected as the cutoff point to identify cognitive impairement, showed a sensitivity, specificity, Youden index, positive predictive, and negative predicive values of 86.4%, 91.5%, 0.8, 95%, and 88.2%. [Conclusion] The clock drawing test is believed to be useful in assessments and interventions based on its excellent ability to identify cognitive disorders.

  7. Applying the recent clinical trials on primary open angle glaucoma: the developing world perspective.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ravi; Kumar, Rajesh S; Chandrasekhar, G; Parikh, Rajul

    2005-08-01

    Recent clinical trials have provided scientific guidelines for the treatment of ocular hypertension and primary open angle glaucoma. The developing world need to apply these trials in a sensible and cost effective manner. The number needed to treat (NNT) attempts to tailor treatment to the individual patient. The NNT for the average ocular hypertensive is 20. Those with intraocular pressure > or =26 mm Hg have an NNT of 6. Restricting treatment to those with lower central corneal thickness and or high cup disc ratios can further lower NNT and make treatment more cost effective. The NNT for the average patient with early POAG is 5. Targeting those at higher risk for progression, (bilateral POAG, higher IOP and or pseudo-exfoliation) can further reduce NNT. As far as the modality of treatment is concerned, provided quality can be ensured, collaborative initial glaucoma treatment study (CIGTS) could be interpreted to justify primary surgery in the developing world context. Population attributable risk percentage (PAR), a measure that reflects the public health importance of a disease was used to extrapolate results to the overall population. Ocular hypertension has an "effective" PAR of 8.5%, a value not considered high enough to warrant public health intervention. POAG had an "effective" PAR of 16%, perhaps high enough to be considered a public health problem and justify inclusion as a target disease in the Vision 2020 program. However the logistics and opportunity costs of diagnosis and treatment would probably prevent inclusion of POAG in public health budgets of most developing countries.

  8. Patients’, who applied to the anesthesia clinic, perceptions and knowledge about anesthesia in Türkiye

    PubMed Central

    Sagün, Aslinur; Birbiçer, Handan; Yapici, Gulcin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pre-operative evaluation includes determining the patient's physiological and psychological situation, taking information about pharmacological and therapeutic history, laboratory examinations, and identifying the anesthesia risks. The aim of this study is to learn the patients’, who planned for elective surgery, knowledge and perception about anesthesia, to determine the causes of fears, to investigate whether age, gender, education level, and history of operation affect the outcome of the survey. Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 21 questions was asked to fill by the patients who applied to the anesthesia clinic. In our study, totally 250 patients, aged between 16 and 75 were included. The questionnaire consists of two parts: The first part includes demographic data such as age, gender, education level, occupation; the second part includes the questions about anesthesia experience and knowledge. Results: Of the 250 patients studied, 59% were females and 41% were males. Of these patients, 37.6% had secondary education. As occupation, the highest percentage was belonging to the housewives (33.6%). In the second part of the questionnaire, it was showed that having an anesthesia experience and high education status statistically significantly affect the level of information about anesthesia (P=0.001; P=0.001). Conclusion: In this study, it was showed that there is an important relationship between education and past anesthesia experience and having information about anesthesia and anesthetists. But, generally it was also showed that the patients not having adequate information about anesthesia and anesthetists and to provide the public more informed about anesthesia, with hospital policies and studies of increasing education level, the individual attempts of anesthetists and continuous studies for anesthesia displaying are needed. PMID:23956718

  9. Practicing Handoffs Early: Applying a Clinical Framework in the Anatomy Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Michelle D.; Dos Santos, Jason A.; Haidet, Paul M.; Whitcomb, Tiffany L.

    2016-01-01

    The anatomy laboratory provides an ideal environment for the integration of clinical contexts as the willed-donor is often regarded as a student's "first patient." This study evaluated an innovative approach to peer teaching in the anatomy laboratory using a clinical handoff context. The authors introduced the "Situation,…

  10. Venlafaxine versus applied relaxation for generalized anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled study on clinical and electrophysiological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zullino, Daniele; Chatton, Anne; Fresard, Emmanuelle; Stankovic, Miroslava; Bondolfi, Guido; Borgeat, François; Khazaal, Yasser

    2015-03-01

    Some components of generalized anxiety disorder, such as physical symptoms, are thought to reflect autonomic nervous system arousal. This study primarily assessed the relationships between psychophysiological and clinical measures using venlafaxine extended release or applied relaxation, and secondarily, the impact of combination treatment in patients not remitting after 8 weeks. Fifty-eight patients were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of treatment with either venlafaxine or applied relaxation (Phase I). Non-remitted patients received combination treatment for an additional 8 weeks (Phase II). Assessments included the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A), Beck Depression Inventory, Penn State Worry Questionnaire and the Stroop Color-Word Task coupled with electrophysiological measures (skin conductance and frontalis electromyography (EMG)). In Phase 1, a time effect was found for the clinical and skin conductance measures. Thirteen patients from each group were in remission. In Phase 2, seven additional patients remitted. Baseline psychophysiological measures were not associated with baseline clinical variables or with clinical outcomes. Independently of treatment allocation, a reduction in frontal EMG values at week 4 was significantly associated with a decrease in HAM-A scores at week 8. At week 4, responders from the applied relaxation group had lower electrophysiological activity than the venlafaxine group. Baseline psychophysiological measures were not linked with clinical measures at study inclusion or with treatment response. Frontal EMG response at week 4 is a possible predictor of treatment response. Treatment combination enhances treatment response after initial failure.

  11. Applying Senge's concepts of organizational learning to clinical outcomes research and practice.

    PubMed

    Wallace, C J

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to use Senge's concepts of organizational learning as a framework for discussing issues and challenges in clinical outcomes research. Clinical outcomes research is about learning how to improve clinical practice. A learning organization balances attention to the structure and the culture in order to produce effective results. Future health care leaders will need to understand and attend to the importance of the organization's structure, but their greatest contribution will be in attending to the organizational culture to produce enduring organizational change.

  12. Clinical studies involving probiotics: when FDA's investigational new drug rubric applies-and when it may not.

    PubMed

    Degnan, Fred H

    2012-01-01

    Researchers from a diverse array of scientific disciplines have focused and continue to focus on opportunities and areas for responsible clinical research involving the possible beneficial health effects of "probiotics." Investigators and researchers should be aware that not all clinical research involving probiotics reasonably falls within the requirements of the "investigational new drug" (IND) rubric administered and enforced by the US Food and Drug Administration. In determining whether an IND application is required before a clinical study may lawfully commence, investigators and researchers as well as institutional review boards should consider the regulatory classification, e.g., "drug," "new drug," "food," "food additive," "dietary supplement," etc. that applies to the substance under investigation. A potential probiotic product can fall along a continuum of regulatory classifications, each having implications on the nature and degree of regulatory requirements for clinical research and, ultimately, for claim substantiation and market access.

  13. Feasibility of Applying the Extended ICF Core Set for Stroke to Clinical Settings in Rehabilitation: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyu Yong; Kim, Hyo Jong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential feasibility of application of the extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for stroke. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 40 stroke outpatients (>6 months after onset) admitted to the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine for comprehensive rehabilitation. Clinical information of the patients were respectively evaluated to link to the 166 second-level categories of the extended ICF Core Set for stroke. Results Clinical information could be linked to 111 different ICF categories, 58 categories of the body functions component, eight categories of the body structures component, 38 categories of the activities and participation component, and seven categories of the environmental factors component. Conclusion The body functions component might be feasible for application of the extended ICF Core Set for stroke to clinical settings. The activities and participation component and environmental factors component may not be directly applied to clinical settings without additional evaluation tools including interview and questionnaire. PMID:25750873

  14. Applying active learning to assertion classification of concepts in clinical text.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Mani, Subramani; Xu, Hua

    2012-04-01

    Supervised machine learning methods for clinical natural language processing (NLP) research require a large number of annotated samples, which are very expensive to build because of the involvement of physicians. Active learning, an approach that actively samples from a large pool, provides an alternative solution. Its major goal in classification is to reduce the annotation effort while maintaining the quality of the predictive model. However, few studies have investigated its uses in clinical NLP. This paper reports an application of active learning to a clinical text classification task: to determine the assertion status of clinical concepts. The annotated corpus for the assertion classification task in the 2010 i2b2/VA Clinical NLP Challenge was used in this study. We implemented several existing and newly developed active learning algorithms and assessed their uses. The outcome is reported in the global ALC score, based on the Area under the average Learning Curve of the AUC (Area Under the Curve) score. Results showed that when the same number of annotated samples was used, active learning strategies could generate better classification models (best ALC-0.7715) than the passive learning method (random sampling) (ALC-0.7411). Moreover, to achieve the same classification performance, active learning strategies required fewer samples than the random sampling method. For example, to achieve an AUC of 0.79, the random sampling method used 32 samples, while our best active learning algorithm required only 12 samples, a reduction of 62.5% in manual annotation effort.

  15. Quantitative assessment of the benefits of specific information technologies applied to clinical studies in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Avilés, William; Ortega, Oscar; Kuan, Guillermina; Coloma, Josefina; Harris, Eva

    2008-02-01

    Clinical studies and trials require accessibility of large amounts of high-quality information in a timely manner, often daily. The integrated application of information technologies can greatly improve quality control as well as facilitate compliance with established standards such as Good Clinical Practice (GCP) and Good Laboratory Practice (GLP). We have customized and implemented a number of information technologies, such as personal data assistants (PDAs), geographic information system (GIS), and barcode and fingerprint scanning, to streamline a pediatric dengue cohort study in Managua, Nicaragua. Quantitative data was obtained to assess the actual contribution of each technology in relation to processing time, accuracy, real-time access to data, savings in consumable materials, and time to proficiency in training sessions. In addition to specific advantages, these information technologies benefited not only the study itself but numerous routine clinical and laboratory processes in the health center and laboratories of the Nicaraguan Ministry of Health.

  16. Applying extracellular vesicles based therapeutics in clinical trials – an ISEV position paper

    PubMed Central

    Lener, Thomas; Gimona, Mario; Aigner, Ludwig; Börger, Verena; Buzas, Edit; Camussi, Giovanni; Chaput, Nathalie; Chatterjee, Devasis; Court, Felipe A.; del Portillo, Hernando A.; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Fais, Stefano; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Fraile, Lorenzo; Gho, Yong Song; Görgens, André; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Hendrix, An; Hermann, Dirk M.; Hill, Andrew F.; Hochberg, Fred; Horn, Peter A.; de Kleijn, Dominique; Kordelas, Lambros; Kramer, Boris W.; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Laner-Plamberger, Sandra; Laitinen, Saara; Leonardi, Tommaso; Lorenowicz, Magdalena J.; Lim, Sai Kiang; Lötvall, Jan; Maguire, Casey A.; Marcilla, Antonio; Nazarenko, Irina; Ochiya, Takahiro; Patel, Tushar; Pedersen, Shona; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Pluchino, Stefano; Quesenberry, Peter; Reischl, Ilona G.; Rivera, Francisco J.; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Schallmoser, Katharina; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke; Strunk, Dirk; Tonn, Torsten; Vader, Pieter; van Balkom, Bas W. M.; Wauben, Marca; Andaloussi, Samir El; Théry, Clotilde; Rohde, Eva; Giebel, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes and microvesicles, are released by different cell types and participate in physiological and pathophysiological processes. EVs mediate intercellular communication as cell-derived extracellular signalling organelles that transmit specific information from their cell of origin to their target cells. As a result of these properties, EVs of defined cell types may serve as novel tools for various therapeutic approaches, including (a) anti-tumour therapy, (b) pathogen vaccination, (c) immune-modulatory and regenerative therapies and (d) drug delivery. The translation of EVs into clinical therapies requires the categorization of EV-based therapeutics in compliance with existing regulatory frameworks. As the classification defines subsequent requirements for manufacturing, quality control and clinical investigation, it is of major importance to define whether EVs are considered the active drug components or primarily serve as drug delivery vehicles. For an effective and particularly safe translation of EV-based therapies into clinical practice, a high level of cooperation between researchers, clinicians and competent authorities is essential. In this position statement, basic and clinical scientists, as members of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) and of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) program of the European Union, namely European Network on Microvesicles and Exosomes in Health and Disease (ME-HaD), summarize recent developments and the current knowledge of EV-based therapies. Aspects of safety and regulatory requirements that must be considered for pharmaceutical manufacturing and clinical application are highlighted. Production and quality control processes are discussed. Strategies to promote the therapeutic application of EVs in future clinical studies are addressed. PMID:26725829

  17. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Applied to College Students: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistorello, Jacqueline; Fruzzetti, Alan E.; MacLane, Chelsea; Gallop, Robert; Iverson, Katherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: College counseling centers (CCCs) are increasingly being called upon to treat highly distressed students with complex clinical presentations. This study compared the effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for suicidal college students with an optimized control condition and analyzed baseline global functioning as a…

  18. Critical action research applied in clinical placement development in aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lily D; Kelton, Moira; Paterson, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop quality clinical placements in residential aged care facilities for undergraduate nursing students undertaking their nursing practicum topics. The proportion of people aged over 65 years is expected to increase steadily from 13% in 2006 to 26% of the total population in Australia in 2051. However, when demand is increasing for a nursing workforce competent in the care of older people, studies have shown that nursing students generally lack interest in working with older people. The lack of exposure of nursing students to quality clinical placements is one of the key factors contributing to this situation. Critical action research built on a partnership between an Australian university and five aged care organisations was utilised. A theoretical framework informed by Habermas' communicative action theory was utilised to guide the action research. Multiple research activities were used to support collaborative critical reflection and inform actions throughout the action research. Clinical placements in eight residential aged care facilities were developed to support 179 nursing students across three year-levels to complete their practicum topics. Findings were presented in three categories described as structures developed to govern clinical placement, learning and teaching in residential aged care facilities.

  19. Automatic Domain Adaptation of Word Sense Disambiguation Based on Sublanguage Semantic Schemata Applied to Clinical Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Domain adaptation of natural language processing systems is challenging because it requires human expertise. While manual effort is effective in creating a high quality knowledge base, it is expensive and time consuming. Clinical text adds another layer of complexity to the task due to privacy and confidentiality restrictions that hinder the…

  20. Experiences of Master's Students Regarding Clinical Supervision in an Applied Psychology Programme in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nel, Lindi; Fouche, Paul

    2017-01-01

    This study explored and described the experiences regarding clinical supervision of master's students in professional psychology programmes in South Africa. Four participants were purposively selected from four different universities. The participants engaged in reflective writings and in-depth interviews over a one-year span. Data were analysed…

  1. Interactive Anatomical and Surgical Live Stream Lectures Improve Students' Academic Performance in Applied Clinical Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiozawa, Thomas; Butz, Benjamin; Herlan, Stephan; Kramer, Andreas; Hirt, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Tuebingen's "Sectio Chirurgica" (TSC) is an innovative, interactive, multimedia, and transdisciplinary teaching method designed to complement dissection courses. The Tuebingen's "Sectio Chirurgica" (TSC) allows clinical anatomy to be taught via interactive live stream surgeries moderated by an anatomist. This method aims to…

  2. Treatment of pediatric overweight: an examination of feasibility and effectiveness in an applied clinical setting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effectiveness and feasibility of an evidence-based treatment for weight loss in children. METHODS: A total of 41 children who were overweight and their families were provided a modified version of the Traffic Light Diet (TLD) in an applied setting. Children who received tr...

  3. Applied cognitive psychology: Implications of cognitive psychology for clinical psychology and psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Eysenck, Michael W

    2004-04-01

    Cognitive psychology has made numerous contributions to clinical psychology, and these contributions are considered especially with reference to the anxiety disorders. It is argued that there are four major contributions that can be identified. First, the cognitive approach has led to the development of complex models showing the main cognitive processes and structures of relevance to an understanding of anxiety disorders. Second, controlled laboratory studies permit a more detailed investigation of cognitive biases in anxious patients than generally is feasible in more naturalistic settings. Third, the cognitive approach provides relevant evidence with respect to the issue of whether cognitive biases play a role in the development and maintenance of anxiety disorders. Fourth, the enhanced understanding of the anxiety disorders that has arisen from the cognitive approach has had beneficial effects on therapeutic practice in a number of significant ways. In sum, it is claimed that clinical psychology has benefited considerably from cognitive theory and research.

  4. Applying non-synchronized e-learning to the nursing clinical ladder system.

    PubMed

    Leu, Li-Jung; Liao, Hsueh-Chih; Chang, I-Chiu; Su, Zhi-Yuan

    2010-10-01

    The time and spatial constraints of face-to-face learning often affect nursing staff's inclination to enroll in ladder system training classes. Hence, their competence in clinical care may be unable to meet the requirements of the hospitals they work at. The e-learning mechanism offers a way to overcome such constraints. However, the differences in learners' achievement and satisfaction between traditional face-to-face and non-synchronized e-learning classes in the nursing clinical ladder system have not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, 155 nursing personnel serving at the case hospital, enrolled in N1/N2 ladder courses, were invited to participate as the subjects. The results showed that those who attended face-to-face learning classes reported higher satisfaction but achieved less in class than those in the e-learning class. The factors which influence the subjects' satisfaction with e-learning were investigated and summarized.

  5. A comparative study of supervised learning as applied to acronym expansion in clinical reports.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mahesh; Pakhomov, Serguei; Pedersen, Ted; Chute, Christopher G

    2006-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) constitute a valuable resource of patient specific information and are increasingly used for clinical practice and research. Acronyms present a challenge to retrieving information from the EMR because many acronyms are ambiguous with respect to their full form. In this paper we perform a comparative study of supervised acronym disambiguation in a corpus of clinical notes, using three machine learning algorithms: the naïve Bayes classifier, decision trees and Support Vector Machines (SVMs). Our training features include part-of-speech tags, unigrams and bigrams in the context of the ambiguous acronym. We find that the combination of these feature types results in consistently better accuracy than when they are used individually, regardless of the learning algorithm employed. The accuracy of all three methods when using all features consistently approaches or exceeds 90%, even when the baseline majority classifier is below 50%.

  6. Clinical use of vaginal or rectally applied microbicides in patients suffering from HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Satish Kumar; Nutan

    2013-01-01

    Microbicides, primarily used as topical pre-exposure prophylaxis, have been proposed to prevent sexual transmission of HIV. This review covers the trends and challenges in the development of safe and effective microbicides to prevent sexual transmission of HIV Initial phases of microbicide development used such surfactants as nonoxynol-9 (N-9), C13G, and sodium lauryl sulfate, aiming to inactivate the virus. Clinical trials of microbicides based on N-9 and C31G failed to inhibit sexual transmission of HIV. On the contrary, N-9 enhanced susceptibility to sexual transmission of HIV-1. Subsequently, microbicides based on polyanions and a variety of other compounds that inhibit the binding, fusion, or entry of virus to the host cells were evaluated for their efficacy in different clinical setups. Most of these trials failed to show either safety or efficacy for prevention of HIV transmission. The next phase of microbicide development involved antiretroviral drugs. Microbicide in the form of 1% tenofovir vaginal gel when tested in a Phase IIb trial (CAPRISA 004) in a coitally dependent manner revealed that tenofovir gel users were 39% less likely to become HIV-infected compared to placebo control. However, in another trial (VOICE MTN 003), tenofovir gel used once daily in a coitally independent mode failed to show any efficacy to prevent HIV infection. Tenofovir gel is currently in a Phase III safety and efficacy trial in South Africa (FACTS 001) employing a coitally dependent dosing regimen. Further, long-acting microbicide-delivery systems (vaginal ring) for slow release of such antiretroviral drugs as dapivirine are also undergoing clinical trials. Discovering new markers as correlates of protective efficacy, novel long-acting delivery systems with improved adherence in the use of microbicides, discovering new compounds effective against a broad spectrum of HIV strains, developing multipurpose technologies incorporating additional features of efficacy against other

  7. Applied Proteogenomics OrganizationaL Learning and Outcomes (APOLLO) Network - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In the spirit of collaboration inspired by the Vice President’s Cancer Moonshot, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the Department of Defense (DoD), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) are proud to announce a new tri-agency coalition (APOLLO Network — Applied Proteogenomics OrganizationaL Learning and Outcomes) that will help cancer patients by enabling their oncologists to more rapidly and accurately identify effective drugs to treat cancer based on a patient’s unique proteogenomic profile.

  8. Interactive tele-education applied to a distant clinical microbiology specialization university course.

    PubMed

    Andreazzi, Denise B; Rossi, Flávia; Wen, Chao L

    2011-09-01

    The microbiology laboratory provides a strategic support for infectious disease diagnosis and also alerts the medical community about bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The microbiologists' training is a challenge in Brazil, a country with an extensive territory, a diverse population, and disparity of resource allocation. The aim of this study was to implement an interactive tele-educational course in clinical microbiology to reach distant laboratory workers and to improve their professional skills. The course scientific content was defined according to competences associated, distributed in 560 h, with laboratory practices (knowledge matrix-contextual education). The 11-module course structure comprised 70% distance learning, 22% on campus (integrated modules), and 8% monographs. The group included 7 physicians and 21 microbiologists from 20 different Brazilian cities. The time flexibility and location were the two main reasons for student participation, thus decreasing absences to the workplace, different from the traditional teaching methodologies. The group performance was measured by monthly evaluations, and 1 year postcourse, the researcher visited their workplace. There was significant improvement in microbiological practices performed before compared with after group participation. Therefore, 76.9% of laboratory practices were modified because of the knowledge acquired in the course. Students showed behavioral changes in relation to performance in infection control as well as on the dissemination of their knowledge. This specialization course using distance education did not compromise the quality. This educational methodology represents an alternative to teach clinical microbiology to laboratory workers from remote hospitals, as a nationwide continuing educational strategy.

  9. The Palliative Outcome Scale (POS) applied to clinical practice and research: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Rugno, Fernanda Capella; Carlo, Marysia Mara Rodrigues do Prado De

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and evaluate the evidence found in the international scientific literature on the application of the Palliative Outcome Scale (POS) in clinical practice and research in Palliative Care (PC). Method: integrative literature review, through the search of publications in journals indexed in PubMed / MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO and CINAHL databases, between the years 1999 and 2014. Results: the final sample consisted of 11 articles. In the data analysis, the articles were classified into 2 units of analysis (studies using the POS as a resource in research and studies using the POS in clinical practice), in which the information was presented in the form of sub-themes related to publications of the selected studies, highlighting the synthesis of the results. Conclusion: POS emerged as an important tool for measuring outcomes to assess the quality of life of patients and families, of the quality of care provided and the PC service organization. The international scientific literature on the application of POS proved to be relevant to the advancement and consolidation of the field of knowledge related to PC. PMID:27533273

  10. Clinical trials and E-health: impact of new information technology applied to clinical trials (including source data-medical records) and to human and drug research.

    PubMed

    Béhier, Jehan-Michel; Reynier, Jean-Charles; Bertoye, Pierre-Henri; Vray, Muriel

    2010-01-01

    Within the last few years, new technology has come to play an important part in our professional and private daily environment. Healthcare has not escaped this progressive mutation with computers reaching the bedside. Clinical research has also shown growing interest in these new tools available to the clinical investigator, the patient, as well as to specialist departments for diagnosis and follow-up of patients, and to the different professions in clinical research. If the use of new technology seems to make life easier, by centralizing data or by simplifying data-sharing between different teams, it is still a matter of private data which must remain reliable, confidential and secure, whether it is being used in ordinary healthcare or in academic or industrial research. The aim of the round table was to estimate the impact of new information technology applied to clinical trials (including source data-medical records) and to human and drug research. First, an inventory was made of the development of these new technologies in the healthcare system. The second point developed was identification of expected benefits in order to issue guidelines for their good use and hazard warnings in clinical trials. Finally, the impact of these new technologies on the investigator as well as the project manager was analysed.

  11. Applying Process Improvement Methods to Clinical and Translational Research: Conceptual Framework and Case Examples.

    PubMed

    Daudelin, Denise H; Selker, Harry P; Leslie, Laurel K

    2015-12-01

    There is growing appreciation that process improvement holds promise for improving quality and efficiency across the translational research continuum but frameworks for such programs are not often described. The purpose of this paper is to present a framework and case examples of a Research Process Improvement Program implemented at Tufts CTSI. To promote research process improvement, we developed online training seminars, workshops, and in-person consultation models to describe core process improvement principles and methods, demonstrate the use of improvement tools, and illustrate the application of these methods in case examples. We implemented these methods, as well as relational coordination theory, with junior researchers, pilot funding awardees, our CTRC, and CTSI resource and service providers. The program focuses on capacity building to address common process problems and quality gaps that threaten the efficient, timely and successful completion of clinical and translational studies.

  12. Terror management theory applied clinically: implications for existential-integrative psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Adam M

    2014-01-01

    Existential psychotherapy and Terror Management Theory (TMT) offer explanations for the potential psychological effects of death awareness, although their respective literatures bases differ in clarity, research, and implications for treating psychopathology. Existential therapy is often opaque to many therapists, in part due to the lack of consensus on what constitutes its practice, limited published practical examples, and few empirical studies examining its efficacy. By contrast, TMT has an extensive empirical literature base, both within social psychology and spanning multiple disciplines, although previously unexplored within clinical and counseling psychology. This article explores the implications of a proposed TMT integrated existential therapy (TIE), bridging the gap between disciplines in order to meet the needs of the aging population and current challenges facing existential therapists.

  13. Clinical experience in applying endoscopic Nd:YAG laser to treat 451 esophagostenotic cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-Zhong; Wang, Zhen-he; Lu, Kuang-sheng; Yang, Xiao-zhi; Lu, Bo-kao

    1991-07-01

    This paper is to report and analyze our clinical experience in ap].ying endosoopi. c Nd:YAG laser to treat 451 esophagostenoses (1197 peraon times) including all kinds of then. All kinds of esophagostexiosis were mainly characterized by having difficulties swallowing foods. Some of their esophagus were even oompletely obstructed and could not drink even a drop of water On the basis of experint&xts in animals, fresh organs of the body, we started to treat all kinds of esophagostenosis with endoscopio Nd:YAG laser in 1985. By the end of 1989, 451 patients bad been treated in our hospital. Boh the patients and we felt satisfactory with the results we gain.

  14. Applying Process Improvement Methods to Clinical and Translational Research: Conceptual Framework and Case Examples

    PubMed Central

    Daudelin, Denise H.; Selker, Harry P.; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing appreciation that process improvement holds promise for improving the quality and efficiency across the translational research continuum but frameworks for such programs are not often described. The purpose of this paper is to present a framework and case examples of a Research Process Improvement Program implemented at Tufts CTSI. To promote research process improvement, we developed online training seminars, workshops, and in-person consultation models to describe core process improvement principles and methods, demonstrate the use of improvement tools, and illustrate the application of these methods in case examples. We implemented these methods, as well as relational coordination theory, with junior researchers, pilot funding awardees, our CTRC, and CTSI resource and service providers. The program focuses on capacity building to address common process problems and quality gaps that threaten the efficient, timely and successful completion of clinical and translational studies. PMID:26332869

  15. Parenting Coordination: Applying Clinical Thinking to the Management and Resolution of Post-Divorce Conflict.

    PubMed

    Demby, Steven L

    2016-05-01

    There is a small but significant number of parents who remain stuck in a high level of conflict with each other after the legal conclusion of their divorce. Exposure to chronically high levels of parental conflict is a strong risk factor negatively affecting both children's short- and long-term adjustment. Parenting coordination is a nonadversarial, child-focused dispute-resolution process designed to help divorced parents contain their conflict to protect children from its negative effect. Parenting coordination is a hybrid role combining different skills and conflict-resolution approaches. In high-conflict divorce, each parent's internalization of relationship patterns constructed from past experiences contributes to the intractable nature of the interparent conflict. A case presentation illustrates how this clinical perspective enhances the parenting coordinator's ability to work with parents to manage and contain their parenting conflicts with each other.

  16. Structure and Measurement of Depression in Youth: Applying Item Response Theory to Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Cole, David A.; Cai, Li; Martin, Nina C.; Findling, Robert L; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Garber, Judy; Curry, John F.; Hyde, Janet S.; Essex, Marilyn J.; Compas, Bruce E.; Goodyer, Ian M.; Rohde, Paul; Stark, Kevin D.; Slattery, Marcia J.; Forehand, Rex

    2013-01-01

    Goals of the paper were to use item response theory (IRT) to assess the relation of depressive symptoms to the underlying dimension of depression and to demonstrate how IRT-based measurement strategies can yield more reliable data about depression severity than conventional symptom counts. Participants were 3403 clinic and nonclinic children and adolescents from 12 contributing samples, all of whom received the Kiddie Schedule of Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for school-aged children. Results revealed that some symptoms reflected higher levels of depression and were more discriminating than others. Results further demonstrated that utilization of IRT-based information about symptom severity and discriminability in the measurement of depression severity can reduce measurement error and increase measurement fidelity. PMID:21534696

  17. Audio spectrum analysis of umbilical artery Doppler ultrasound signals applied to a clinical material.

    PubMed

    Thuring, Ann; Brännström, K Jonas; Jansson, Tomas; Maršál, Karel

    2014-12-01

    Analysis of umbilical artery flow velocity waveforms characterized by pulsatility index (PI) is used to evaluate fetoplacental circulation in high-risk pregnancies. However, an experienced sonographer may be able to further differentiate between various timbres of Doppler audio signals. Recently, we have developed a method for objective audio signal characterization; the method has been tested in an animal model. In the present pilot study, the method was for the first time applied to human pregnancies. Doppler umbilical artery velocimetry was performed in 13 preterm fetuses before and after two doses of 12 mg betamethasone. The auditory measure defined by the frequency band where the spectral energy had dropped 15 dB from its maximum level (MAXpeak-15 dB ), increased two days after betamethasone administration (p = 0.001) parallel with a less pronounced decrease in PI (p = 0.04). The new auditory parameter MAXpeak-15 dB reflected the changes more sensitively than the PI did.

  18. Clinical efficiency of applying low-intensity laser therapy in treating dyscirculatory encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putilina, M. V.; Kozlov, V. I.; Vakhtin, V. I.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made of applying laser therapy combined with drug preparations in treating 300 patients affected by dyscirculatory encephalopathy. Neurological and neuropsychological examinations together with electroencephalography, rheoencephalography, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were used to assess the patients' states prior to and after the treatment. It was found that the combined application of laser therapy and drug preparations produced a more pronounced therapeutic effect as compared with that produced by the separate application of laser therapy and drug preparations. The results obtained allowed us to conclude that the 0.89 micrometers laser infrared radiation increased patients' susceptibility to drugs. Moreover, the combined laser therapy improved the cerebral bloodflow and activated the metabolic and plastic functions of neurons. This decreased or eliminated late complications provoked by the cerebral blood circulation insufficiency.

  19. Dogs'olfactory diagnostics applied on human species: state of the art and clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, B; Nardo, B; Lippi, G; Palmieri, L; Vadalà, M; Laurino, C

    2016-01-01

    Dogs'smell ability is about 10000-100000 more developed than humans' one. Dogs smell is usually exploited in forensic medicine, to find missing people and specific substances showing peculiar sensorial features. In clinic, there is the possibility to take advantage of dogs smell, which are conveniently trained, for the screening of cancers and other diseases. The common feature is the presence of molecules in organic samples that may be considered as biomarkers of a specific pathology. In cancer, scientific evidences exist about screening of melanoma, lung, breast, rectum, ovarian, prostate and bladder cancer. Instead, other pathologies manifest the presence of organic volatile compounds in biologic materials, such as spit, faeces and urine that may be studied by dogs smell in order to identify the presence of a specific disease. This review shows the state of the art of actual dogs' olfactory ability based on scientific principles and the advantages and the disadvantages of this method. The authors also reveal some potential pathologies joined by the presence of organic volatile compounds, which may be investigated by dogs smell.

  20. [Selective digestive decontamination. Why don't we apply the evidence in the clinical practice?].

    PubMed

    Taylor, N; van Saene, H K F; Abella, A; Silvestri, L; Vucic, M; Peric, M

    2007-04-01

    Selective digestive decontamination (SDD) is a prophylactic strategy whose objective is to reduce the incidence of infections, mainly mechanical ventilation associated pneumonia in patients who require intensive cares, preventing or eradicating the oropharyngeal and gastrointestinal carrier state of potentially pathogenic microorganisms. Fifty-four randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and 9 meta-analysis have evaluated SDD. Thirty eight RCTs show a significant reduction of the infections and 4 of mortality. All the meta-analyses show a significant reduction of the infections and 5 out of the 9 meta-analyses report a significant reduction in mortality. Thus, 5 patients from the ICU with SDD must be treated to prevent pneumonia and 12 patients from the ICU should be treated to prevent one death. The data that show benefit of the SDD on mortality have an evidence grade 1 or recommendation grade A (supported by at least two level 1 investigations). The aim of this review is to explain the pathogeny of infections in critical patients, describe selective digestive decontamination, analyze the evidence available on it efficacy and the potential adverse effects and discuss the reasons published by the experts who advise against the use of SDD, even though it is recognized as the best intervention evaluated in intensive cares to reduce morbidity and mortality of the infections.

  1. Tissue spectrophotometry and thermographic imaging applied to routine clinical prediction of amputation level viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Jon M.; Harrison, David K.; Hawthorn, Ian E.

    2002-06-01

    About 5% of British males over 50 years develop peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Of these about 2% ultimately require lower limb amputation. In 1995 we proposed a new technique using lightguide spectrophotometry to measure the oxygen saturation level of haemoglobin (SO2) in the skin as a method for predicting tissue viability. This technique, in combination with thermographic imaging, was compared with skin blood flow measurements using the I125)4- Iodoantipyrine (IAP) clearance technique. The optical techniques gave a sensitivity and selectivity of 1.0 for the prediction of successful outcome of a below knee amputation compared with a specificity of 93% using the traditional IAP technique at a below knee to above knee amputation ratio (BKA:AKA) of 75%. The present study assesses the routine clinical application of these optical techniques. The study is ongoing, but the data to date comprises 22 patients. 4 patients were recommended for above knee amputation (AKA) and 18 patients for below knee amputation on the basis of thermographic and tissue SO2 measurements. All but one of the predicted BKA amputations healed. The study to date produces evidence of 94% healing rate (specificity) for a BKA:AKA ratio of 82%. This compares favorably with the previous figures given above.

  2. Applying Independent Component Analysis to Clinical fMRI at 7 T

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Simon Daniel; Schöpf, Veronika; Cardoso, Pedro; Geissler, Alexander; Fischmeister, Florian Ph. S.; Wurnig, Moritz; Trattnig, Siegfried; Beisteiner, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Increased BOLD sensitivity at 7 T offers the possibility to increase the reliability of fMRI, but ultra-high field is also associated with an increase in artifacts related to head motion, Nyquist ghosting, and parallel imaging reconstruction errors. In this study, the ability of independent component analysis (ICA) to separate activation from these artifacts was assessed in a 7 T study of neurological patients performing chin and hand motor tasks. ICA was able to isolate primary motor activation with negligible contamination by motion effects. The results of General Linear Model (GLM) analysis of these data were, in contrast, heavily contaminated by motion. Secondary motor areas, basal ganglia, and thalamus involvement were apparent in ICA results, but there was low capability to isolate activation in the same brain regions in the GLM analysis, indicating that ICA was more sensitive as well as more specific. A method was developed to simplify the assessment of the large number of independent components. Task-related activation components could be automatically identified via these intuitive and effective features. These findings demonstrate that ICA is a practical and sensitive analysis approach in high field fMRI studies, particularly where motion is evoked. Promising applications of ICA in clinical fMRI include presurgical planning and the study of pathologies affecting subcortical brain areas. PMID:24032007

  3. The clinical utility of force/displacement analysis of muscle testing in applied kinesiology.

    PubMed

    Caruso, W; Leisman, G

    2001-01-01

    Manual muscle testing procedures are the subject of a force and displacement analysis. Equipment was fabricated, tested, and employed to gather force, displacement, and time data for examining muscle test parameters as practiced by applied kinesiology (A.K.) clinicians. Simple mathematical procedures are used to process the data in an effort to find potential patterns of force and displacement which would correspond to the testing of strong and weak muscles on healthy subjects. Particular attention is paid to the leading edge of the force pulses, as most clinicians report that they derive most of their assessment from the initial thrust imparted on the patient's limb. An analysis of the simple linear regression of the slope of the leading edge of a force pulse reveals that a high dx/dF is indicative of a weak muscle test result (as perceived by the tester), and a low dx/dF is indicative of a strong muscle test. Thresholds for dx/dF are determined to discriminate between inhibited and facilitated muscle test results. The data lay the groundwork for future studies that examine the objectivity of A.K. muscle testing.

  4. Selection of clinical features for pattern recognition applied to gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Altilio, Rosa; Paoloni, Marco; Panella, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    This paper deals with the opportunity of extracting useful information from medical data retrieved directly from a stereophotogrammetric system applied to gait analysis. A feature selection method to exhaustively evaluate all the possible combinations of the gait parameters is presented, in order to find the best subset able to classify among diseased and healthy subjects. This procedure will be used for estimating the performance of widely used classification algorithms, whose performance has been ascertained in many real-world problems with respect to well-known classification benchmarks, both in terms of number of selected features and classification accuracy. Precisely, support vector machine, Naive Bayes and K nearest neighbor classifiers can obtain the lowest classification error, with an accuracy greater than 97 %. For the considered classification problem, the whole set of features will be proved to be redundant and it can be significantly pruned. Namely, groups of 3 or 5 features only are able to preserve high accuracy when the aim is to check the anomaly of a gait. The step length and the swing speed are the most informative features for the gait analysis, but also cadence and stride may add useful information for the movement evaluation.

  5. PhysioNet: physiologic signals, time series and related open source software for basic, clinical, and applied research.

    PubMed

    Moody, George B; Mark, Roger G; Goldberger, Ary L

    2011-01-01

    PhysioNet provides free web access to over 50 collections of recorded physiologic signals and time series, and related open-source software, in support of basic, clinical, and applied research in medicine, physiology, public health, biomedical engineering and computing, and medical instrument design and evaluation. Its three components (PhysioBank, the archive of signals; PhysioToolkit, the software library; and PhysioNetWorks, the virtual laboratory for collaborative development of future PhysioBank data collections and PhysioToolkit software components) connect researchers and students who need physiologic signals and relevant software with researchers who have data and software to share. PhysioNet's annual open engineering challenges stimulate rapid progress on unsolved or poorly solved questions of basic or clinical interest, by focusing attention on achievable solutions that can be evaluated and compared objectively using freely available reference data.

  6. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Applied to College Students: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pistorello, Jacqueline; Fruzzetti, Alan E.; MacLane, Chelsea; Gallop, Robert; Iverson, Katherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective College counseling centers (CCCs) are increasingly being called upon to treat highly distressed students with complex clinical presentations. This study compared the effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for suicidal college students to an optimized control condition, and analyzed baseline global functioning as a moderator. Method The intent-to-treat (ITT) sample included 63 college students between the ages of 18 and 25 who were suicidal at baseline, reported at least one lifetime non-suicidal self-injurious (NSSI) act or suicide attempt, and met three or more borderline personality disorder (BPD) diagnostic criteria. Participants were randomly assigned to DBT (n = 31) or an optimized Treatment as Usual (O-TAU) control condition (n = 32). Treatment was provided by trainees, supervised by experts in both treatments. Both treatments lasted 7–12 months and included both individual and group components. Assessments were conducted at pretreatment, 3-months, 6-months, 9-months, 12-months, and 18-months (follow-up). Results Mixed effects analyses (ITT sample) revealed that DBT, compared to the control condition, showed significantly greater decreases in suicidality, depression, number of NSSI events (if participant had self-injured), BPD criteria, and psychotropic medication use, and significantly greater improvements in social adjustment. Most of these treatment effects were observed at follow-up. No treatment differences were found for treatment dropout. Moderation analyses showed that DBT was particularly effective for suicidal students who were lower functioning at pretreatment. Conclusions DBT is an effective treatment for suicidal, multi-problem college students. Future research should examine the implementation of DBT in CCCs in a stepped care approach. PMID:22730955

  7. Health Technology Assessment of pathogen reduction technologies applied to plasma for clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Cicchetti, Americo; Berrino, Alexandra; Casini, Marina; Codella, Paola; Facco, Giuseppina; Fiore, Alessandra; Marano, Giuseppe; Marchetti, Marco; Midolo, Emanuela; Minacori, Roberta; Refolo, Pietro; Romano, Federica; Ruggeri, Matteo; Sacchini, Dario; Spagnolo, Antonio G.; Urbina, Irene; Vaglio, Stefania; Grazzini, Giuliano; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.

    2016-01-01

    Although existing clinical evidence shows that the transfusion of blood components is becoming increasingly safe, the risk of transmission of known and unknown pathogens, new pathogens or re-emerging pathogens still persists. Pathogen reduction technologies may offer a new approach to increase blood safety. The study is the output of collaboration between the Italian National Blood Centre and the Post-Graduate School of Health Economics and Management, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. A large, multidisciplinary team was created and divided into six groups, each of which addressed one or more HTA domains. Plasma treated with amotosalen + UV light, riboflavin + UV light, methylene blue or a solvent/detergent process was compared to fresh-frozen plasma with regards to current use, technical features, effectiveness, safety, economic and organisational impact, and ethical, social and legal implications. The available evidence is not sufficient to state which of the techniques compared is superior in terms of efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness. Evidence on efficacy is only available for the solvent/detergent method, which proved to be non-inferior to untreated fresh-frozen plasma in the treatment of a wide range of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders. With regards to safety, the solvent/detergent technique apparently has the most favourable risk-benefit profile. Further research is needed to provide a comprehensive overview of the cost-effectiveness profile of the different pathogen-reduction techniques. The wide heterogeneity of results and the lack of comparative evidence are reasons why more comparative studies need to be performed. PMID:27403740

  8. Health Technology Assessment of pathogen reduction technologies applied to plasma for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Cicchetti, Americo; Berrino, Alexandra; Casini, Marina; Codella, Paola; Facco, Giuseppina; Fiore, Alessandra; Marano, Giuseppe; Marchetti, Marco; Midolo, Emanuela; Minacori, Roberta; Refolo, Pietro; Romano, Federica; Ruggeri, Matteo; Sacchini, Dario; Spagnolo, Antonio G; Urbina, Irene; Vaglio, Stefania; Grazzini, Giuliano; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M

    2016-07-01

    Although existing clinical evidence shows that the transfusion of blood components is becoming increasingly safe, the risk of transmission of known and unknown pathogens, new pathogens or re-emerging pathogens still persists. Pathogen reduction technologies may offer a new approach to increase blood safety. The study is the output of collaboration between the Italian National Blood Centre and the Post-Graduate School of Health Economics and Management, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. A large, multidisciplinary team was created and divided into six groups, each of which addressed one or more HTA domains.Plasma treated with amotosalen + UV light, riboflavin + UV light, methylene blue or a solvent/detergent process was compared to fresh-frozen plasma with regards to current use, technical features, effectiveness, safety, economic and organisational impact, and ethical, social and legal implications. The available evidence is not sufficient to state which of the techniques compared is superior in terms of efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness. Evidence on efficacy is only available for the solvent/detergent method, which proved to be non-inferior to untreated fresh-frozen plasma in the treatment of a wide range of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders. With regards to safety, the solvent/detergent technique apparently has the most favourable risk-benefit profile. Further research is needed to provide a comprehensive overview of the cost-effectiveness profile of the different pathogen-reduction techniques. The wide heterogeneity of results and the lack of comparative evidence are reasons why more comparative studies need to be performed.

  9. Diagnosing major depressive disorder V: applying the DSM-IV exclusion criteria in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; McGlinchey, Joseph B; Chelminski, Iwona; Young, Diane

    2006-07-01

    To be diagnosed with DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD), a patient must meet five out of nine symptom criteria, one of which is depressed mood or pervasive loss of interest or pleasure. Once a patient has reached this symptom threshold, there are several exclusionary criteria that need to be passed to receive the diagnosis. The symptoms must cause significant distress or impairment in functioning, the symptoms cannot be caused by substance use or a general medical condition, and the symptoms cannot be better accounted for by bereavement. Finally, the presence of psychotic symptoms not coincident with the depressive symptoms excludes the diagnosis. We are not aware of any studies of psychiatric patients that have examined the impact of all of these exclusionary rules on the diagnosis of MDD in clinical practice. It is important for clinicians to know how often each of these factors might exclude the diagnosis of MDD so that they can be more or less vigilant to their presence. The goal of the present report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services project was to examine the impact of the DSM-IV exclusion rules on the diagnosis of MDD. In total, 38 (3.0%) of the 947 patients meeting the DSM-IV symptom inclusion criteria were excluded from a diagnosis of MDD or bipolar depression. These results suggest that the DSM-IV exclusion criteria for MDD had only a modest impact on diagnosis in psychiatric outpatients. It is likely that the results of a study of the impact of the DSM-IV depression exclusion criteria will depend on where the study is conducted. The potential influence of different settings on diagnostic exclusion is discussed.

  10. Environmental risk assessment of replication competent viral vectors applied in clinical trials: potential effects of inserted sequences.

    PubMed

    van den Akker, Eric; van der Vlugt, Cecile J B; Bleijs, Diederik A; Bergmans, Hans E

    2013-12-01

    Risk assessments of clinical applications involving genetically modified viral vectors are carried out according to general principles that are implemented in many national and regional legislations, e.g., in Directive 2001/18/EC of the European Union. Recent developments in vector design have a large impact on the concepts that underpin the risk assessments of viral vectors that are used in clinical trials. The use of (conditionally) replication competent viral vectors (RCVVs) may increase the likelihood of the exposure of the environment around the patient, compared to replication defective viral vectors. Based on this assumption we have developed a methodology for the environmental risk assessment of replication competent viral vectors, which is presented in this review. Furthermore, the increased likelihood of exposure leads to a reevaluation of what would constitute a hazardous gene product in viral vector therapies, and a keen interest in new developments in the inserts used. One of the trends is the use of inserts produced by synthetic biology. In this review the implications of these developments for the environmental risk assessment of RCVVs are highlighted, with examples from current clinical trials. The conclusion is drawn that RCVVs, notwithstanding their replication competency, can be applied in an environmentally safe way, in particular if adequate built-in safeties are incorporated, like conditional replication competency, as mitigating factors to reduce adverse environmental effects that could occur.

  11. Can Clinical Scenario Videos Improve Dental Students' Perceptions of the Basic Sciences and Ability to Apply Content Knowledge?

    PubMed

    Miller, Cynthia Jayne; Metz, Michael James

    2015-12-01

    Dental students often have difficulty understanding the importance of basic science classes, such as physiology, for their future careers. To help alleviate this problem, the aim of this study was to create and evaluate a series of video modules using simulated patients and custom-designed animations that showcase medical emergencies in the dental practice. First-year students in a dental physiology course formatively assessed their knowledge using embedded questions in each of the three videos; 108 to 114 of the total 120 first-year students answered the questions, for a 90-95% response rate. These responses indicated that while the students could initially recognize the cause of the medical emergency, they had difficulty in applying their knowledge of physiology to the scenario. In two of the three videos, students drastically improved their ability to answer high-level clinical questions at the conclusion of the video. Additionally, when compared to the previous year of the course, there was a significant improvement in unit exam scores on clinically related questions (6.2% increase). Surveys were administered to the first-year students who participated in the video modules and fourth-year students who had completed the course prior to implementation of any clinical material. The response rate for the first-year students was 96% (115/120) and for the fourth-year students was 57% (68/120). The first-year students indicated a more positive perception of the physiology course and its importance for success on board examinations and their dental career than the fourth-year students. The students perceived that the most positive aspects of the modules were the clear applications of physiology to real-life dental situations, the interactive nature of the videos, and the improved student comprehension of course concepts. These results suggest that online modules may be used successfully to improve students' perceptions of the basic sciences and enhance their ability to

  12. Clinical Effects of a Topically Applied Toll-like Receptor 9 Agonist in Active Moderate-to-Severe Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Atreya, Raja; Bloom, Stuart; Scaldaferri, Franco; Gerardi, Viviana; Admyre, Charlotte; Karlsson, Åsa; Knittel, Thomas; Kowalski, Jan; Lukas, Milan; Löfberg, Robert; Nancey, Stephane; Petryka, Robert; Rydzewska, Grazyna; Schnabel, Robert; Seidler, Ursula; Neurath, Markus F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Toll-like receptors [TLRs] are potential drug targets for immunomodulation. We determined the safety and efficacy of the TLR-9 agonist DNA-based immunomodulatory sequence 0150 [DIMS0150] in ulcerative colitis [UC] patients refractory to standard therapy. Methods: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 131 patients with moderate-to-severe active UC were randomized to receive two single doses of the oligonucleotide DIMS0150 [30 mg] or placebo administered topically during lower GI endoscopy at baseline and Week 4. The primary endpoint was clinical remission, defined as Clinical Activity Index [CAI] ≤4, at Week 12. Secondary endpoints included mucosal healing and symptomatic remission of key patient-reported outcomes [absence of blood in stool and weekly stool frequency <35]. Results: There was no statistical significant difference between the groups in the induction of clinical remission at Week 12, with 44.4% in the DIMS0150 group vs. 46.5% in the placebo group. However, the proportion of patients who achieved symptomatic remission was 32.1% in the DIMS0150 group vs. 14.0% in the placebo group at Week 4 [p = 0.020], and 44.4% vs. 27.9% at Week 8 [p = 0.061]. More patients on DIMS0150 compared with those on placebo had mucosal healing [34.6% vs. 18.6%; p = 0.09] and histological improvement regarding the Geboes score [30.9% vs. 9.3%; p = 0.0073] at Week 4. Significantly more patients on DIMS0150 were in clinical remission with mucosal healing at Week 4: 21% vs. 4.7% in the placebo group [p = 0.02]. DIMS0150 was well tolerated, and no safety signals compared with placebo were evident. Conclusions: Therapy with the topically applied TLR-9 agonist DIMS0150 is a promising and well-tolerated novel therapeutic option for treatment-refractory, chronic active UC patients, warranting further clinical trials. PMID:27208386

  13. Making good theory practical: five lessons for an Applied Social Identity Approach to challenges of organizational, health, and clinical psychology.

    PubMed

    Haslam, S Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Social identity research was pioneered as a distinctive theoretical approach to the analysis of intergroup relations but over the last two decades it has increasingly been used to shed light on applied issues. One early application of insights from social identity and self-categorization theories was to the organizational domain (with a particular focus on leadership), but more recently there has been a surge of interest in applications to the realm of health and clinical topics. This article charts the development of this Applied Social Identity Approach, and abstracts five core lessons from the research that has taken this forward. (1) Groups and social identities matter because they have a critical role to play in organizational and health outcomes. (2) Self-categorizations matter because it is people's self-understandings in a given context that shape their psychology and behaviour. (3) The power of groups is unlocked by working with social identities not across or against them. (4) Social identities need to be made to matter in deed not just in word. (5) Psychological intervention is always political because it always involves some form of social identity management. Programmes that seek to incorporate these principles are reviewed and important challenges and opportunities for the future are identified.

  14. Analyzing Patients' Values by Applying Cluster Analysis and LRFM Model in a Pediatric Dental Clinic in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Yen; Liu, Chih-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study combines cluster analysis and LRFM (length, recency, frequency, and monetary) model in a pediatric dental clinic in Taiwan to analyze patients' values. A two-stage approach by self-organizing maps and K-means method is applied to segment 1,462 patients into twelve clusters. The average values of L, R, and F excluding monetary covered by national health insurance program are computed for each cluster. In addition, customer value matrix is used to analyze customer values of twelve clusters in terms of frequency and monetary. Customer relationship matrix considering length and recency is also applied to classify different types of customers from these twelve clusters. The results show that three clusters can be classified into loyal patients with L, R, and F values greater than the respective average L, R, and F values, while three clusters can be viewed as lost patients without any variable above the average values of L, R, and F. When different types of patients are identified, marketing strategies can be designed to meet different patients' needs. PMID:25045741

  15. Analyzing patients' values by applying cluster analysis and LRFM model in a pediatric dental clinic in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Shih-Yen; Liu, Chih-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study combines cluster analysis and LRFM (length, recency, frequency, and monetary) model in a pediatric dental clinic in Taiwan to analyze patients' values. A two-stage approach by self-organizing maps and K-means method is applied to segment 1,462 patients into twelve clusters. The average values of L, R, and F excluding monetary covered by national health insurance program are computed for each cluster. In addition, customer value matrix is used to analyze customer values of twelve clusters in terms of frequency and monetary. Customer relationship matrix considering length and recency is also applied to classify different types of customers from these twelve clusters. The results show that three clusters can be classified into loyal patients with L, R, and F values greater than the respective average L, R, and F values, while three clusters can be viewed as lost patients without any variable above the average values of L, R, and F. When different types of patients are identified, marketing strategies can be designed to meet different patients' needs.

  16. Potential workload in applying clinical practice guidelines for patients with chronic conditions and multimorbidity: a systematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buffel du Vaure, Céline; Ravaud, Philippe; Baron, Gabriel; Barnes, Caroline; Gilberg, Serge; Boutron, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the potential workload for patients with multimorbidity when applying existing clinical practice guidelines. Design Systematic analysis of clinical practice guidelines for chronic conditions and simulation modelling approach. Data sources National Guideline Clearinghouse index of US clinical practice guidelines. Study selection We identified the most recent guidelines for adults with 1 of 6 prevalent chronic conditions in primary care (ie hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease (CHD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), osteoarthritis and depression). Data extraction From the guidelines, we extracted all recommended health-related activities (HRAs) such as drug management, self-monitoring, visits to the doctor, laboratory tests and changes of lifestyle for a patient aged 45–64 years with moderate severity of conditions. Simulation modelling approach For each HRA identified, we performed a literature review to determine the potential workload in terms of time spent on this HRA. Then, we used a simulation modelling approach to estimate the potential workload needed to comply with these recommended HRAs for patients with several of these chronic conditions. Results Depending on the concomitant chronic condition, patients with 3 chronic conditions complying with all the guidelines would have to take a minimum of 6 to a maximum of 13 medications per day, visit a health caregiver a minimum of 1.2 to a maximum of 5.9 times per month and spend a mean (SD) of 49.6 (27.3) to 71.0 (34.5) h/month in HRAs. The potential workload increased greatly with increasing number of concomitant conditions, rising to 18 medications per day, 6.6 visits per month and 80.7 (35.8) h/month in HRAs for patients with 6 chronic conditions. PMID:27006342

  17. Applying psychological theory to evidence-based clinical practice: identifying factors predictive of taking intra-oral radiographs.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Debbie; Pitts, Nigel B; Eccles, Martin; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Johnston, Marie; Steen, Nick; Glidewell, Liz; Thomas, Ruth; Maclennan, Graeme; Clarkson, Jan E; Walker, Anne

    2006-10-01

    This study applies psychological theory to the implementation of evidence-based clinical practice. The first objective was to see if variables from psychological frameworks (developed to understand, predict and influence behaviour) could predict an evidence-based clinical behaviour. The second objective was to develop a scientific rationale to design or choose an implementation intervention. Variables from the Theory of Planned Behaviour, Social Cognitive Theory, Self-Regulation Model, Operant Conditioning, Implementation Intentions and the Precaution Adoption Process were measured, with data collection by postal survey. The primary outcome was the number of intra-oral radiographs taken per course of treatment collected from a central fee claims database. Participants were 214 Scottish General Dental Practitioners. At the theory level, the Theory of Planned Behaviour explained 13% variance in the number of radiographs taken, Social Cognitive Theory explained 7%, Operant Conditioning explained 8%, Implementation Intentions explained 11%. Self-Regulation and Stage Theory did not predict significant variance in radiographs taken. Perceived behavioural control, action planning and risk perception explained 16% of the variance in number of radiographs taken. Knowledge did not predict the number of radiographs taken. The results suggest an intervention targeting predictive psychological variables could increase the implementation of this evidence-based practice, while influencing knowledge is unlikely to do so. Measures which predicted number of radiographs taken also predicted intention to take radiographs, and intention accounted for significant variance in behaviour (adjusted R(2)=5%: F(1,166)=10.28, p<.01), suggesting intention may be a possible proxy for behavioural data when testing an intervention prior to a service-level trial. Since psychological frameworks incorporate methodologies to measure and change component variables, taking a theory-based approach

  18. Multicultural Training Applied in Clinical Practice: Reflections from a Euro-American Female Counselor-in-Training Working with Mexican Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paynter, Clara K.; Estrada, Diane

    2009-01-01

    The clinical experience of a Euro-American female counselor-in-training providing bilingual family therapy services to Mexican immigrants is described. Cultural themes encountered when applying academic discourse to clinical work are raised in the context of case studies in which the student therapist works from a postmodern client-as-expert…

  19. Towards Quantitative Whole Organ Thermoacoustics with a Clinical Array plus One Very Low Frequency Channel Applied to Prostate Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Patch, Sarah K.; Hull, David; See, William A.; Hanson, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoacoustics has the potential to provide quantitative images of intrinsic tissue properties, most notably electrical conductivity in Siemens/meter, much as shear wave elastography provides tissue stiffness in kPa. Although thermoacoustic imaging with optical excitation has been commercialized for small animals, it has not yet made the transition to clinic for whole organ imaging in humans. The purpose of this work was to develop and validate specifications for a clinical ultrasound array for quantitative whole organ thermoacoustic imaging. Imaging a large organ requires exciting thermoacoustic pulses throughout the volume and broadband detection of those pulses because tomographic image reconstruction preserves frequency content. Applying the half-wavelength limit to a 200-micron inclusion inside a 7.5 cm diameter organ requires measurement sensitivity to frequencies ranging from 4 MHz down to 10 kHz, respectively. A dual-transducer system utilizing a P4-1 array connected to a Verasonics V1 system as well as a focused single element transducer sensitive to lower frequencies was developed. Very high frequency (VHF) irradiation generated thermoacoustic pulses throughout a 6 × 6 × 5 cm3 volume. In the VHF regime, electrical conductivity drives thermoacoustic signal production. Simultaneous acquisition of thermoacoustic pulses by both transducers enabled comparison of transducer performance. Data from the clinical array generated a stack of 96-images with separation of 0.3 mm, whereas the single element transducer imaged only in a single plane. In-plane resolution and quantitative accuracy were quantified at isocenter. The array provided volumetric imaging capability with superior resolution whereas the single element transducer provided superior quantitative accuracy in axial images. Combining axial images from both transducers preserved resolution of the P4-1 array and improved image contrast. Neither transducer was sensitive to frequencies below 50 k

  20. Why Uninsured Free Clinic Patients Don't Apply for Affordable Care Act Health Insurance in a Non-expanding Medicaid State.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Akiko; Tabler, Jennifer; Chernenko, Alla; Aguilera, Guadalupe; Nourian, Maziar M; Prudencio, Liana; Ashby, Jeanie

    2016-02-01

    Even after the introduction of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), uninsured visits remain high, especially in states that opted out of Medicaid expansion. Since the ACA does not provide universal coverage, free clinics serve as safety nets for the un- or under-insured, and will likely continue serving underserved populations. The purpose of this study is to examine factors influencing intentions to not apply for health insurance via the ACA among uninsured free clinic patients in a state not expanding Medicaid. Uninsured primary care patients utilizing a free clinic (N = 551) completed a self-administered survey in May and June 2015. Difficulty obtaining information, lack of instruction to apply, and cost, are major factors influencing intention not to apply for health insurance through the ACA. US born English speakers, non-US born English speakers, and Spanish speakers reported different kinds of perceived barriers to applying for health insurance through the ACA. Age is an important factor impacting individuals' intentions not to apply for health insurance through the ACA, as older patients in particular need assistance to obtain relevant information about the ACA and other resources. A number of unchangeable factors limit the free clinics' ability to promote enrollment of health insurance through the ACA. Yet free clinics could be able to provide some educational programs or the information of resources to patients. In particular, non-US born English speakers, Spanish speakers, and older adults need specific assistance to better understand health insurance options available to them.

  1. Radiosynovectomy of the elbow joint synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis treated with Lutetium - 177 labeled hydroxylapatite (Lu-177 HA) particulates; first case report and image of Lu -177 HA in the elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajamani, Venkataraman; Thirumalaisamy, Subbiah Gounder; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Kalarikal, Radhakrishnan; Mohanan, Vyshakh; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease that is mainly characterized by asymmetric erosive synovitis, particularly affecting the peripheral joints. Radiation synovectomy or radiosynovectomy, also known as radiosynoviorthesis was first described in 1950's as a adjuvant treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Radiosynovectomy is based on the irradiation of the joint synovium by the intra-articular administration of various β-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. Lu-177 has presence of gamma photons of imagable energy with low abundance which provides the additional benefit of carrying out simultaneous scintigraphy. We describe the first case report of use of Lu-177 hydroxylapatite particulates in a 35-year-old female patient who was presented with elbow joint synovitis due to rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Metering Self-Reported Adherence to Clinical Outcomes in Malaysian Patients with Hypertension: Applying the Stages of Change Model to Healthful Behaviors in the CORFIS Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karupaiah, Tilakavati; Wong, Kimberly; Chinna, Karuthan; Arasu, Kanimolli; Chee, Winnie Siew Swee

    2015-01-01

    The CORFIS ("Community-Based Cardiovascular Risk Factors Intervention Strategies") program was piloted in community clinics in Malaysia to address the lack of health education in chronic disease management. The stages of change model was applied in a multicenter quasi-experimental design to evaluate adherence to advocated behaviors in…

  3. Developing a Technology for the Use of Operant Extinction in Clinical Settings: An Examination of Basic and Applied Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Dorothea C.; Iwata, Brian A.

    1996-01-01

    Basic and applied research on variables that influence the extinction of operant behaviors is reviewed and applied to the treatment of behavior disorders. The potential value of a general technology for the use of behavioral extinction is discussed. The paper concludes that current research findings are not sufficient for the development of a…

  4. Design of a nursing clinical decision support system applying nursing diagnosis and nursing evaluation model based data mining.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungyung; Kim, Insook; Chae, Yougmoon

    2006-01-01

    This study a methodological study; to acquire knowledge on the nursing process by steps of knowledge definition, collection, and representation; then, to design a data warehouse and nursing process clinical decision support system.

  5. Applying MetaMap to Medline for identifying novel associations in a large clinical dataset: a feasibility analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hanauer, David A; Saeed, Mohammed; Zheng, Kai; Mei, Qiaozhu; Shedden, Kerby; Aronson, Alan R; Ramakrishnan, Naren

    2014-01-01

    Objective We describe experiments designed to determine the feasibility of distinguishing known from novel associations based on a clinical dataset comprised of International Classification of Disease, V.9 (ICD-9) codes from 1.6 million patients by comparing them to associations of ICD-9 codes derived from 20.5 million Medline citations processed using MetaMap. Associations appearing only in the clinical dataset, but not in Medline citations, are potentially novel. Methods Pairwise associations of ICD-9 codes were independently identified in both the clinical and Medline datasets, which were then compared to quantify their degree of overlap. We also performed a manual review of a subset of the associations to validate how well MetaMap performed in identifying diagnoses mentioned in Medline citations that formed the basis of the Medline associations. Results The overlap of associations based on ICD-9 codes in the clinical and Medline datasets was low: only 6.6% of the 3.1 million associations found in the clinical dataset were also present in the Medline dataset. Further, a manual review of a subset of the associations that appeared in both datasets revealed that co-occurring diagnoses from Medline citations do not always represent clinically meaningful associations. Discussion Identifying novel associations derived from large clinical datasets remains challenging. Medline as a sole data source for existing knowledge may not be adequate to filter out widely known associations. Conclusions In this study, novel associations were not readily identified. Further improvements in accuracy and relevance for tools such as MetaMap are needed to realize their expected utility. PMID:24928177

  6. Simulation for clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials applying a peak-and-trough sampling design to estimate oral clearance.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kazuya; Kayano, Yuichiro; Taguchi, Masato; Hashimoto, Yukiya

    2007-11-01

    We performed a simulation for the clinical pharmacokinetic study, in which blood was sampled at two time points corresponding to the peak concentration (C(peak)) and trough concentration (C(trough)) following repetitive oral drug administration to subjects. We estimated the approximate oral clearance (CL/F(approx)) as 2.D/(C(peak).tau+C(trough).tau), where D is the dose, and tau is the dosing interval. The CL/F(approx) value was accurate for drugs with a long-elimination half-life, and the estimation error of the CL/F value was slightly increased for drugs with a shorter elimination half-life. The accuracy of CL/F(approx) in each subject was not affected by the magnitude of the interindividual pharmacokinetic variability, but was significantly decreased by the larger measurement error of drug concentrations (or intraindividual pharmacokinetic variability). We further performed several computer simulations to mimic statistical hypothesis testing following the clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials. The statistical power to detect the difference of oral clearance between two groups was marginally dependent on the measurement error of drug concentration, but was highly dependent on the interindividual pharmacokinetic variability. These findings suggested that the peak-and-trough sampling design to estimate the CL/F(approx) value is useful for clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials, and that the study design and protocol should be evaluated carefully by computer simulation prior to a real clinical trial.

  7. Now or Later?: An Empirical Investigation of When and Why Students Apply to Clinical Psychology PhD Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimak, Eric H.; Edwards, Katie M.; Johnson, Shannon M.; Suhr, Julie

    2011-01-01

    This study used a national sample of PhD students in clinical psychology (N = 1,034) to explore when students decided to pursue their graduate degree, reasons for their decisions, and associated satisfaction. Results indicated that immediately after completing their undergraduate degree, 57% of current graduate students reported postponing…

  8. Applying the wisdom of stepping down inhaled corticosteroids in patients with COPD: a proposed algorithm for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Alan G

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines for the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) recommend limiting the use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) to patients with more severe disease and/or increased exacerbation risk. However, there are discrepancies between guidelines and real-life practice, as ICS are being overprescribed. In light of the increasing concerns about the clinical benefit and long-term risks associated with ICS use, therapy needs to be carefully weighed on a case-by-case basis, including in patients already on ICS. Several studies sought out to determine the effects of withdrawing ICS in patients with COPD. Early studies have deterred clinicians from reducing ICS in patients with COPD as they reported that an abrupt withdrawal of ICS precipitates exacerbations, and results in a deterioration in lung function and symptoms. However, these studies were fraught with numerous methodological limitations. Recently, two randomized controlled trials and a real-life prospective study revealed that ICS can be safely withdrawn in certain patients. Of these, the WISDOM (Withdrawal of Inhaled Steroids During Optimized Bronchodilator Management) trial was the largest and first to examine stepwise withdrawal of ICS in patients with COPD receiving maintenance therapy of long-acting bronchodilators (ie, tiotropium and salmeterol). Even with therapy being in line with the current guidelines, the findings of the WISDOM trial indicate that not all patients benefit from including ICS in their treatment regimen. Indeed, only certain COPD phenotypes seem to benefit from ICS therapy, and validated markers that predict ICS response are urgently warranted in clinical practice. Furthermore, we are now better equipped with a larger armamentarium of novel and more effective long-acting β2-agonist/long-acting muscarinic antagonist combinations that can be considered by clinicians to optimize bronchodilation and allow for safer ICS withdrawal. In addition to providing a review of

  9. Routing cancer immunology and immunotherapy from the lab to the clinic 4–5 th March 2014, Center for Applied Medical Research and University Clinic, Pamplona, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    New approaches to generate effective anticancer responses by either inducing immune responses or inhibiting immunosuppression are under development to improve efficacy in patients. On March 4-5th, 2014, a symposium was held in Pamplona, Spain, to report the new strategies showing preclinical and clinical results regarding translational research efforts on the topic. Participants interacted through oral presentations of 15 speakers and further discussions on topics that included novel therapeutic agents for cancer immunotherapy, viral vectors and interferon-based approaches, experimental tumor imaging and immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies. Promising agents to target cancer cells and therapeutic approaches that are under translation from bench to patients were presented. PMID:25060862

  10. Routing cancer immunology and immunotherapy from the lab to the clinic 4-5 th March 2014, Center for Applied Medical Research and University Clinic, Pamplona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Aznar, M Ángela; Melero, Ignacio; Quetglas, José I

    2014-07-24

    New approaches to generate effective anticancer responses by either inducing immune responses or inhibiting immunosuppression are under development to improve efficacy in patients. On March 4-5th, 2014, a symposium was held in Pamplona, Spain, to report the new strategies showing preclinical and clinical results regarding translational research efforts on the topic. Participants interacted through oral presentations of 15 speakers and further discussions on topics that included novel therapeutic agents for cancer immunotherapy, viral vectors and interferon-based approaches, experimental tumor imaging and immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies. Promising agents to target cancer cells and therapeutic approaches that are under translation from bench to patients were presented.

  11. [Subtypes of cocaine addicts with and without associated problematic alcohol use: towards a neuropsychology of personality applied to clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Pedrero Pérez, Eduardo J; Ruiz Sánchez de León, José M

    2012-01-01

    It is important to know which personality factors are associated with addiction so to distinguish addicts that require specialized treatment from those who do not, and to identify those addicts who achieve abstinence from those who continue their substance use despite the negative consequences. Cloninger's model includes biological and psychosocial variables that can be characterized in neuropsychological terms. Two samples were analyzed: individuals who had begun cocaine addiction treatment (n=183) and a non-clinical population sample (n = 183), matched for sex, age and educational level. Alcohol abuse/dependence was monitored as an independent variable. Significant differences and large effect size were found between addicts and non-clinical population in Novelty Seeking and Self-Directedness, and to a lesser extent, in Harm Avoidance. These differences increase when problematic use of alcohol is added. According to the profile of traits, clusters of addicts were established and differences were obtained in variables such as functional/dysfunctional impulsivity, dysexecutive symptoms and perceived stress. Six clusters were identified, some of minor severity, the most severely problematic clusters being characterized by higher levels of dysfunctional impulsivity, more dysexecutive symptoms and higher levels of perceived stress. Self-Directedness seems to reflect the deficit of prefrontal systems in the regulation of behavior, as well as in emotion and impulse control. It is proposed that evaluation of the personality is more useful than the mere assessment of symptoms for classifying addicts, determining their needs and designing a therapeutic itinerary.

  12. Stereoscopic three-dimensional visualization applied to multimodal brain images: clinical applications and a functional connectivity atlas

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Gonzalo M.; Gálvez, Marcelo; Vega Potler, Natan; Craddock, R. Cameron; Margulies, Daniel S.; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Milham, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Effective visualization is central to the exploration and comprehension of brain imaging data. While MRI data are acquired in three-dimensional space, the methods for visualizing such data have rarely taken advantage of three-dimensional stereoscopic technologies. We present here results of stereoscopic visualization of clinical data, as well as an atlas of whole-brain functional connectivity. In comparison with traditional 3D rendering techniques, we demonstrate the utility of stereoscopic visualizations to provide an intuitive description of the exact location and the relative sizes of various brain landmarks, structures and lesions. In the case of resting state fMRI, stereoscopic 3D visualization facilitated comprehension of the anatomical position of complex large-scale functional connectivity patterns. Overall, stereoscopic visualization improves the intuitive visual comprehension of image contents, and brings increased dimensionality to visualization of traditional MRI data, as well as patterns of functional connectivity. PMID:25414626

  13. MO-F-304-01: Applying PDSA to a Practical Clinical Problem: Variation in Procedural Doses Among Interventional Radiologists

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.

    2015-06-15

    With the current Maintenance of Certification (MOC) requirement for a practice quality improvement (PQI) project every 3 years, we all (well, most of us) find ourselves searching for projects that are both manageable and likely to have a positive impact on our clinical practice. In this session we will walk through the use of the Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) cycle to address a common finding in practices where fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) are performed: variation in procedural doses among physicians. We will also examine strategies to secure physician support using carrots, not sticks. Learning Objectives: Review the PDSA cycle and its application to PQI. Discuss strategies for action in the example presented. Examine strategies for successful group PQI projects. A. Kyle Jones: Owner, FluoroSafety Joseph R. Steele: Consultant, FluoroSafety.

  14. Stereoscopic three-dimensional visualization applied to multimodal brain images: clinical applications and a functional connectivity atlas.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Gonzalo M; Gálvez, Marcelo; Vega Potler, Natan; Craddock, R Cameron; Margulies, Daniel S; Castellanos, F Xavier; Milham, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Effective visualization is central to the exploration and comprehension of brain imaging data. While MRI data are acquired in three-dimensional space, the methods for visualizing such data have rarely taken advantage of three-dimensional stereoscopic technologies. We present here results of stereoscopic visualization of clinical data, as well as an atlas of whole-brain functional connectivity. In comparison with traditional 3D rendering techniques, we demonstrate the utility of stereoscopic visualizations to provide an intuitive description of the exact location and the relative sizes of various brain landmarks, structures and lesions. In the case of resting state fMRI, stereoscopic 3D visualization facilitated comprehension of the anatomical position of complex large-scale functional connectivity patterns. Overall, stereoscopic visualization improves the intuitive visual comprehension of image contents, and brings increased dimensionality to visualization of traditional MRI data, as well as patterns of functional connectivity.

  15. Applying PET to Broaden the Diagnostic Utility of the Clinically Validated CA19.9 Serum Biomarker for Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Viola-Villegas, Nerissa Therese; Rice, Samuel L.; Carlin, Sean; Wu, Xiaohong; Evans, Michael J.; Sevak, Kuntal K.; Drobjnak, Marija; Ragupathi, Govind; Sawada, Ritsuko; Scholz, Wolfgang W.; Livingston, Philip O.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite their considerable advantages, many circulating biomarkers have well-documented limitations. One prominent shortcoming in oncology is a high frequency of false-positive indications for malignant disease in upfront diagnosis. Because one common cause of false positivism is biomarker production from benign disorders in unrelated host tissues, we hypothesized that probing the sites of biomarker secretion with an imaging tool could be a broadly useful strategy to deconvolute the meaning of foreboding but inconclusive circulating biomarker levels. Methods In preparation to address this hypothesis clinically, we developed 89Zr-5B1, a fully human, antibody-based radiotracer targeting tumor-associated CA19.9 in the preclinical setting. Results 89Zr-5B1 localized to multiple tumor models representing diseases with undetectable and supraphysiologic serum CA19.9 levels. Among these, 89Zr-5B1 detected orthotopic models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, an elusive cancer for which the serum assay is measured in humans but with limited specificity in part because of the frequency of CA19.9 secretion from benign hepatic pathologies. Conclusion In this report, a general strategy to supplement some of the shortcomings of otherwise highly useful circulating biomarkers with immunoPET is described. To expedite the clinical validation of this model, a human monoclonal antibody to CA19.9 (a highly visible but partially flawed serum biomarker for several cancers) was radiolabeled and evaluated, and the compelling preclinical evidence suggests that the radiotracer may enhance the fidelity of diagnosis and staging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, a notoriously occult cancer. PMID:24029655

  16. The secret of the care of the patient is in knowing and applying the evidence about effective clinical communication.

    PubMed

    Frankel, R M; Sherman, H B

    2015-11-01

    American physicians and dentists conduct approximately 140 000-160 000 patient interviews in a practice lifetime, making the interview the most frequently performed medical procedure. Over the past 75 years, a steadily growing stream of scientific research has confirmed the fact that patient-clinician communication affects the course, direction, and both biomedical and functional outcomes of care. The field of clinical communication research has matured from anecdotes and aphorisms about 'bedside manner' to sophisticated randomized control trials and evidence-based outcomes that have been translated into reliable practice guidelines. Several key skills or habits of practice have been identified and studied in terms of their efficacy and effectiveness. These include the importance of agenda-setting, eliciting patients' perspectives about the nature of their ailments, communicating caring and concern, and testing for patient comprehension and agreement with proposed treatments. In addition to being effective, interpersonal communication can be deeply satisfying as well as offering a lower probability of law suits in the event of an adverse outcome.

  17. Optimizing Clinical Drug Product Performance: Applying Biopharmaceutics Risk Assessment Roadmap (BioRAM) and the BioRAM Scoring Grid.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Paul A; Kesisoglou, Filippos; Flanagan, Talia; Martinez, Marilyn N; Mistry, Hitesh B; Crison, John R; Polli, James E; Cruañes, Maria T; Serajuddin, Abu T M; Müllertz, Anette; Cook, Jack A; Selen, Arzu

    2016-11-01

    The aim of Biopharmaceutics Risk Assessment Roadmap (BioRAM) and the BioRAM Scoring Grid is to facilitate optimization of clinical performance of drug products. BioRAM strategy relies on therapy-driven drug delivery and follows an integrated systems approach for formulating and addressing critical questions and decision-making (J Pharm Sci. 2014,103(11): 3777-97). In BioRAM, risk is defined as not achieving the intended in vivo drug product performance, and success is assessed by time to decision-making and action. Emphasis on time to decision-making and time to action highlights the value of well-formulated critical questions and well-designed and conducted integrated studies. This commentary describes and illustrates application of the BioRAM Scoring Grid, a companion to the BioRAM strategy, which guides implementation of such an integrated strategy encompassing 12 critical areas and 6 assessment stages. Application of the BioRAM Scoring Grid is illustrated using published literature. Organizational considerations for implementing BioRAM strategy, including the interactions, function, and skillsets of the BioRAM group members, are also reviewed. As a creative and innovative systems approach, we believe that BioRAM is going to have a broad-reaching impact, influencing drug development and leading to unique collaborations influencing how we learn, and leverage and share knowledge.

  18. Virtual reality, augmented reality, and robotics applied to digestive operative procedures: from in vivo animal preclinical studies to clinical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Luc; Marescaux, Jacques

    2006-04-01

    Technological innovations of the 20 th century provided medicine and surgery with new tools, among which virtual reality and robotics belong to the most revolutionary ones. Our work aims at setting up new techniques for detection, 3D delineation and 4D time follow-up of small abdominal lesions from standard mecial images (CT scsan, MRI). It also aims at developing innovative systems making tumor resection or treatment easier with the use of augmented reality and robotized systems, increasing gesture precision. It also permits a realtime great distance connection between practitioners so they can share a same 3D reconstructed patient and interact on a same patient, virtually before the intervention and for real during the surgical procedure thanks to a telesurgical robot. In preclinical studies, our first results obtained from a micro-CT scanner show that these technologies provide an efficient and precise 3D modeling of anatomical and pathological structures of rats and mice. In clinical studies, our first results show the possibility to improve the therapeutic choice thanks to a better detection and and representation of the patient before performing the surgical gesture. They also show the efficiency of augmented reality that provides virtual transparency of the patient in real time during the operative procedure. In the near future, through the exploitation of these systems, surgeons will program and check on the virtual patient clone an optimal procedure without errors, which will be replayed on the real patient by the robot under surgeon control. This medical dream is today about to become reality.

  19. Applying risk adjusted cost-effectiveness (RAC-E) analysis to hospitals: estimating the costs and consequences of variation in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Karnon, Jonathan; Caffrey, Orla; Pham, Clarabelle; Grieve, Richard; Ben-Tovim, David; Hakendorf, Paul; Crotty, Maria

    2013-06-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis is well established for pharmaceuticals and medical technologies but not for evaluating variations in clinical practice. This paper describes a novel methodology--risk adjusted cost-effectiveness (RAC-E)--that facilitates the comparative evaluation of applied clinical practice processes. In this application, risk adjustment is undertaken with a multivariate matching algorithm that balances the baseline characteristics of patients attending different settings (e.g., hospitals). Linked, routinely collected data are used to analyse patient-level costs and outcomes over a 2-year period, as well as to extrapolate costs and survival over patient lifetimes. The study reports the relative cost-effectiveness of alternative forms of clinical practice, including a full representation of the statistical uncertainty around the mean estimates. The methodology is illustrated by a case study that evaluates the relative cost-effectiveness of services for patients presenting with acute chest pain across the four main public hospitals in South Australia. The evaluation finds that services provided at two hospitals were dominated, and of the remaining services, the more effective hospital gained life years at a low mean additional cost and had an 80% probability of being the most cost-effective hospital at realistic cost-effectiveness thresholds. Potential determinants of the estimated variation in costs and effects were identified, although more detailed analyses to identify specific areas of variation in clinical practice are required to inform improvements at the less cost-effective institutions.

  20. Applying self-determination theory for improved understanding of physiotherapists' rationale for using research in clinical practice: a qualitative study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Dannapfel, Petra; Peolsson, Anneli; Ståhl, Christian; Öberg, Birgitta; Nilsen, Per

    2014-01-01

    Physiotherapists are generally positive to evidence-based practice (EBP) and the use of research in clinical practice, yet many still base clinical decisions on knowledge obtained during their initial education and/or personal experience. Our aim was to explore motivations behind physiotherapists' use of research in clinical practice. Self-Determination Theory was applied to identify the different types of motivation for use of research. This theory posits that all behaviours lie along a continuum of relative autonomy, reflecting the extent to which a person endorses their actions. Eleven focus group interviews were conducted, involving 45 physiotherapists in various settings in Sweden. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis and the findings compared with Self-Determination Theory using a deductive approach. Motivations underlying physiotherapists use of research in clinical practice were identified. Most physiotherapists expressed autonomous forms of motivation for research use, but some exhibited more controlled motivation. Several implications about how more evidence-based physiotherapy can be achieved are discussed, including the potential to tailor educational programs on EBP to better account for differences in motivation among participants, using autonomously motivated physiotherapists as change agents and creating favourable conditions to encourage autonomous motivation by way of feelings of competence, autonomy and a sense of relatedness.

  1. Applying clinically proven human techniques for contraception and fertility to endangered species and zoo animals: a review.

    PubMed

    Silber, Sherman J; Barbey, Natalie; Lenahan, Kathy; Silber, David Z

    2013-12-01

    Reversible contraception that does not alter natural behavior is a critical need for managing zoo populations. In addition to reversible contraception, other fertility techniques perfected in humans may be useful, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) or oocyte and embryo banking for endangered species like amphibians and Mexican wolves (Canis lupus baileyi). Furthermore, the genetics of human fertility can give a better understanding of fertility in more exotic species. Collaborations were established to apply human fertility techniques to the captive population. Reversible vasectomy might be one solution for reversible contraception that does not alter behavior. Reversible approaches to vasectomy, avoiding secondary epididymal disruption, were attempted in South American bush dogs (Speothos venaticus), chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), Przewalski's horse (Equus przewalski poliakov), and Sika deer (Cervus nippon) in a variety of zoos around the world. These techniques were first perfected in > 4,000 humans before attempting them in zoo animals. In vitro fertilization with gestational surrogacy was used to attempt to break the vicious cycle of hand rearing of purebred orangutans, and egg and ovary vitrification in humans have led to successful gamete banking for Mexican wolves and disappearing amphibians. The study of the human Y chromosome has even explained a mechanism of extinction related to global climate change. The best results with vasectomy reversal (normal sperm counts, pregnancy, and live offspring) were obtained when the original vasectomy was performed "open-ended," so as to avoid pressure-induced epididymal disruption. The attempt at gestational surrogacy for orangutans failed because of severe male infertility and the lack of success with human ovarian hyperstimulation protocols. Vitrification of oocytes is already being employed for the Amphibian Ark Project and for Mexican wolves. Vasectomy can be a reversible contraception

  2. Dependence of Hearing Changes on the Dose of Intratympanically-Applied Gentamicin: A Metaanalysis using Mathematical Simulations of Clinical Drug Delivery Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Salt, Alec N.; Gill, Ruth M.; Plontke, Stefan K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To establish safe dosing protocols for the treatment of Meniere’s patients with intratympanic gentamicin. Study Design A validated computer model of gentamicin dispersion in the inner ear fluids was used to calculate cochlear drug levels resulting from specific clinical delivery protocols. Dosing in the cochlea was compared with changes of hearing sensitivity for 568 patients following 19 clinical protocols. Methods Cochlear drug levels were calculated based on the concentration and volume of gentamicin applied, the time the drug remained in the middle ear, and on the specific timing of injections. Time courses were quantified in terms of the maximum concentration (Cmax) and the area under the curve (AUC) of the drug at specific cochlear locations. Results Drug levels resulting from single, “one-shot” injections were typically lower than those from repeated or continuous application protocols. Comparison of hearing sensitivity changes with gentamicin dosing revealed a flat curve with a near-zero mean for lower doses, suggesting that hearing changes with doses over this range were probably unrelated to the applied drug. Higher intracochlear doses were generated with repeated or continuous delivery protocols, which in some cases caused substantial hearing losses and an increased incidence of deafened ears. Conclusions One-shot application protocols produce gentamicin doses in the cochlea that have minimal risk to hearing at the frequencies tested. Repeated or continuous application protocols result in higher doses that in some cases damage hearing. The high variability of hearing changes even with low gentamicin doses, calls into question the rationale for using individual hearing changes to titrate the applied dose. PMID:18806480

  3. Designing evidence-based medicine training to optimize the transfer of skills from the classroom to clinical practice: applying the four component instructional design model.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Lauren A; Cate, Olle Ten; Irby, David M; O'Brien, Bridget C

    2015-11-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) skills, although taught in medical schools around the world, are not optimally practiced in clinical environments because of multiple barriers, including learners' difficulty transferring EBM skills learned in the classroom to clinical practice. This lack of skill transfer may be partially due to the design of EBM training. To facilitate the transfer of EBM skills from the classroom to clinical practice, the authors explore one instructional approach, called the Four Component Instructional Design (4C/ID) model, to guide the design of EBM training. On the basis of current cognitive psychology, including cognitive load theory, the premise of the 4C/ID model is that complex skills training, such as EBM training, should include four components: learning tasks, supportive information, procedural information, and part-task practice. The combination of these four components can inform the creation of complex skills training that is designed to avoid overloading learners' cognitive abilities; to facilitate the integration of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to execute a complex task; and to increase the transfer of knowledge to new situations. The authors begin by introducing the 4C/ID model and describing the benefits of its four components to guide the design of EBM training. They include illustrative examples of educational practices that are consistent with each component and that can be applied to teaching EBM. They conclude by suggesting that medical educators consider adopting the 4C/ID model to design, modify, and/or implement EBM training in classroom and clinical settings.

  4. Medical students’ satisfaction with the Applied Basic Clinical Seminar with Scenarios for Students, a novel simulation-based learning method in Greece

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The integration of simulation-based learning (SBL) methods holds promise for improving the medical education system in Greece. The Applied Basic Clinical Seminar with Scenarios for Students (ABCS3) is a novel two-day SBL course that was designed by the Scientific Society of Hellenic Medical Students. The ABCS3 targeted undergraduate medical students and consisted of three core components: the case-based lectures, the ABCDE hands-on station, and the simulation-based clinical scenarios. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the general educational environment of the course, as well as the skills and knowledge acquired by the participants. Methods: Two sets of questions were distributed to the participants: the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaire and an internally designed feedback questionnaire (InEv). A multiple-choice examination was also distributed prior to the course and following its completion. A total of 176 participants answered the DREEM questionnaire, 56 the InEv, and 60 the MCQs. Results: The overall DREEM score was 144.61 (±28.05) out of 200. Delegates who participated in both the case-based lectures and the interactive scenarios core components scored higher than those who only completed the case-based lecture session (P=0.038). The mean overall feedback score was 4.12 (±0.56) out of 5. Students scored significantly higher on the post-test than on the pre-test (P<0.001). Conclusion: The ABCS3 was found to be an effective SBL program, as medical students reported positive opinions about their experiences and exhibited improvements in their clinical knowledge and skills. PMID:27012313

  5. Prophylactic vertebroplasty procedure applied with a resorbable bone cement can decrease the fracture risk of sandwich vertebrae: long-term evaluation of clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Pu; Tang, Hai; Chen, Hao; Bao, Li; Feng, Fei; Yang, He; Li, Jinjun

    2017-01-01

    A sandwich vertebra is formed after multiple osteoporotic vertebral fractures treated by percutaneous vertebroplasty, which has a risk of developing new fractures. The purpose of our study was to (i) investigate the occurrence of new fractures in sandwich vertebra after cement augmentation procedures and to (ii) evaluate the clinical outcomes after prophylactic vertebral reinforcement applied with resorbable bone cement. From June 2011 to 2014, we analysed 55 patients with at least one sandwich vertebrae and treated with percutaneous vertebroplasty. Eighteen patients were treated by prophylactic vertebroplasty with a resorbable bone cement to strengthen the sandwich vertebrae as the prevention group. The others were the non-prevention group. All patients were examined by spinal radiographs within 1 day, 6 months, 12 months, 24 months and thereafter. The incidence of sandwich vertebra is 8.25% (55/667) in our study. Most sandwich vertebrae (69.01%, 49/71) are distributed in the thoracic–lumbar junction. There are 24 sandwich vertebrae (18 patients) and 47 sandwich vertebrae (37 patients) in either prevention group or non-prevention group, respectively. No significant difference is found between age, sex, body mass index, bone mineral density, cement disk leakage, sandwich vertebrae distribution or Cobb angle in the two groups. In the follow-up, 8 out of 37 (21.6%) patients (with eight sandwich vertebrae) developed new fractures in non-prevention’ group, whereas no new fractures were detected in the prevention group. Neither Cobb angle nor vertebral compression rate showed significant change in the prevention group during the follow-up. However, in the non-prevention group, we found that Cobb angle increased and vertebral height lost significantly (P < 0.05). Prophylactic vertebroplasty procedure applied with resorbable bone cement could decrease the rate of new fractures of sandwich vertebrae. PMID:28149529

  6. Toward Quantitative Whole Organ Thermoacoustics With a Clinical Array Plus One Very Low-Frequency Channel Applied to Prostate Cancer Imaging.

    PubMed

    Patch, Sarah K; Hull, David; See, William A; Hanson, George W

    2016-02-01

    Thermoacoustics has the potential to provide quantitative images of intrinsic tissue properties, most notably electrical conductivity in Siemens/meter, much as shear wave elastography provides tissue stiffness in kilopascal. Although thermoacoustic imaging with optical excitation has been commercialized for small animals, it has not yet made the transition to clinic for whole organ imaging in humans. The purpose of this work was to develop and validate specifications for a clinical ultrasound array for quantitative whole organ thermoacoustic imaging. Imaging a large organ requires exciting thermoacoustic pulses throughout the volume and broadband detection of those pulses because tomographic image reconstruction preserves frequency content. Applying the half-wavelength limit to a [Formula: see text] inclusion inside a 7.5-cm diameter organ requires measurement sensitivity to frequencies ranging from 4 MHz to 10 kHz, respectively. A dual-transducer system utilizing a P4-1 array connected to a Verasonics V1 system as well as a focused single-element transducer sensitive to lower frequencies was developed. Very high-frequency (VHF) irradiation generated thermoacoustic pulses throughout a [Formula: see text] volume. In the VHF regime, electrical conductivity drives thermoacoustic signal production. Simultaneous acquisition of thermoacoustic pulses by both transducers enabled comparison of transducer performance. Data from the clinical array generated a stack of 96 images with a separation of 0.3 mm, whereas the single-element transducer imaged only in a single plane. In-plane resolution and quantitative accuracy were quantified at isocenter. The array provided volumetric imaging capability with superior resolution whereas the single-element transducer provided superior quantitative accuracy in axial images. Combining axial images from both transducers preserved resolution of the P4-1 array and improved image contrast. Neither transducer was sensitive to frequencies

  7. A clinical education program for speech-language pathologists applying reflective practice, evidence-based practice and case-based learning.

    PubMed

    Meilijson, Sara; Katzenberger, Irit

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive clinical education program for speech-language pathology students while considering the learning process and gradual acquisition of knowledge and skills for becoming a practicing speech-language pathologist. It describes the clinical speech and language education program for speech-language pathology students at Hadassah Academic College Jerusalem (HAC) based on three facets of learning: reflective practice, evidence-based practice and case-based learning. Also described are the choice of the model of learning and its implementation. The clinical education program presented reflects the professional development of the faculty at HAC as well as recent trends in clinical education methods.

  8. Is the Information about a Test Important? Applying the Methods of Evidence-Based Medicine to the Clinical Examination of Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbek, John C.; McCullough, Gary H.; Wertz, Robert T.

    2004-01-01

    A hotly debated topic in oropharyngeal dysphagia is the Clinical Swallowing Examination's (CSE) importance in clinical practice. That debate can profit from the application of evidence-based medicine's (EBM) principles and procedures. These can guide both appropriate data collection and interpretation as will be demonstrated in the present report.…

  9. Clinical Evaluation of self and professionally applied desensitizing agents in relieving dentin hypersensitivity after a single topical application: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Sachin G.; Acharya, Shashidhar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of self and professionally applied desensitizing agents in relieving dentinal hypersensitivity after single direct topical application. Study Design: This was a randomized controlled trial conducted among 57 patients. 8% Arginine paste was self-applied by the subject and Gluma desensitizer was applied by investigator. Numeric rating scale was used to measure hypersensitivity after tactile stimulus, Schiff scale was used for cold and air blast stimuli respectively. Scores were recorded at baseline, immediately, 15 and 30 days after the application. Friedman, Wilcoxon test as post hoc was used to analyze within group differences, between group differences analyzed using Mann Whitney U test (P<0.05 considered significant). Results: 8% Arginine paste elicited significantly higher reductions in sensitivity (P<0.05) than that of Gluma group at all follow ups. There was a significant decrease in hypersensitivity for both the groups from baseline till final follow-up (P<0.05) for all three stimuli. 8% Arginine paste was found to be more effective than Gluma desensitizer in providing immediate relief from dentine hypersensitivity and also sustained the effect significantly for a period of 30 days. Conclusions: Self applied 8% Arginine paste is effective than professionally applied Gluma desensitizer in relieving dentinal hypersensitivity immediately and over a period of one month. Key words:Dentine hypersensitivity, arginine, gluma, desensitizing agents. PMID:25593653

  10. Applied Stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Spencer G.

    Stratigraphy is a cornerstone of the Earth sciences. The study of layered rocks, especially their age determination and correlation, which are integral parts of stratigraphy, are key to fields as diverse as geoarchaeology and tectonics. In the Anglophile history of geology, in the early 1800s, the untutored English surveyor William Smith was the first practical stratigrapher, constructing a geological map of England based on his own applied stratigraphy. Smith has, thus, been seen as the first “industrial stratigrapher,” and practical applications of stratigraphy have since been essential to most of the extractive industries from mining to petroleum. Indeed, gasoline is in your automobile because of a tremendous use of applied stratigraphy in oil exploration, especially during the latter half of the twentieth century. Applied stratigraphy, thus, is a subject of broad interest to Earth scientists.

  11. Comparison of Clinical Success of Applying a Kind of Fissure Sealant on the Lower Permanent Molar Teeth in Dry and Wet Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Eskandarian, Tahereh; Baghi, Saeid; Alipoor, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Fissure sealant therapy is among the most effective methods of preventing dental caries. However, it is lengthy and isolation of the teeth is difficult in this procedure especially in young children. Using new hydrophilic fissure sealant may reduce such problems. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the clinical success of a hydrophilic fissure sealant on the lower permanent molar teeth in dry and wet conditions. Materials and Method This clinical trial assessed 31 patients (mean age 8.13±1.77 years) who needed fissure sealant therapy on their first or second mandibular permanent molar. Having performed dental prophylaxis, the teeth were etched and rinsed. Then one of the two was randomly selected and sealed with smartseal & loc in isolated and dry conditions; while, the other was wetted on the etched enamel by using a saliva-contaminated micro brush, and was then sealed with the same fissure as the first tooth. Six and 12 months later, two independent observers examined the clinical success of sealant through checking the marginal integrity, marginal discoloration, and anatomical form. Data were analyzed by using SPSS software, version 16. The bivariate Chi-square and Exact Fisher tests were used to compare the clinical success of the two treatment methods. Results There was a high interpersonal reliability between the two examiners (K= 0.713). After 12 months, 90.3% clinical success was observed in dry conditions and 83.9% in wet conditions for smartseal & loc; however, the difference was not statistically significant (p= 0.0707). Conclusion According to the results of this study, it seems that using new hydrophilic fissure sealant can reduce technical sensitivities and consequently decreases the apprehensions on saliva contamination of etched enamel during treatment procedures. PMID:26331144

  12. Applied oceanography

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    This book combines oceanography principles and applications such as marine pollution, resources, and transportation. It is divided into two main parts treating the basic principles of physical oceanography, and presenting a unique systems framework showing how physical oceanography, marine ecology, economics, and government policy may be combined to define the newly developing field of applied oceanography.

  13. Applied Enzymology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manoharan, Asha; Dreisbach, Joseph H.

    1988-01-01

    Describes some examples of chemical and industrial applications of enzymes. Includes a background, a discussion of structure and reactivity, enzymes as therapeutic agents, enzyme replacement, enzymes used in diagnosis, industrial applications of enzymes, and immobilizing enzymes. Concludes that applied enzymology is an important factor in…

  14. A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparison between Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) and Structured Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Intervention for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadzaheri, Fereshteh; Koegel, Lynn Kern; Rezaee, Mohammad; Rafiee, Seyed Majid

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating studies are documenting specific motivational variables that, when combined into a naturalistic teaching paradigm, can positively influence the effectiveness of interventions for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The purpose of this study was to compare two applied behavior analysis (ABA) intervention procedures, a…

  15. Systematic Care Management: A Comprehensive Approach to Catastrophic Injury Management Applied to a Catastrophic Burn Injury Population - Clinical, Utilization, Economic, and Outcome Data in Support of the Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    pected neonatal sepsis : a costly problem in neonatal intensive care. J Perinatol 2005;25:265–9. 15. Fetteroff D, Holt AE, Tucker T, Khan K...clinical factors that also commonly impacted the health status of the patients included pneumonia (38%), sepsis (31%), inhalation injury (19%), adult... neonates , end of life care, and complex cancers).13–15 With the evolution of health care reforms and the health care system, it will be increasingly

  16. Additional notes on clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials applying a peak-and-trough sampling design to estimate oral clearance.

    PubMed

    Takaai, Mari; Kayano, Yuichiro; Shimizu, Takako; Taguchi, Masato; Hashimoto, Yukiya

    2008-01-01

    In the previous study, we performed a simulation of a clinical pharmacokinetic trial, in which blood was sampled at two time points corresponding to the peak concentration (C(peak)) and trough concentration (C(trough)) following repetitive oral administration at the dose, D, and dosing interval, tau. The approximate oral clearance (CL/F(approx)), estimated as 2 x D/(C(peak) x tau+C(trough) x tau), is accurate for drugs with an elimination half-life comparative to or longer than tau; however, it was suggested that we might not use CL/F(approx) for drugs with a considerably short elimination half-life relative to tau. In the present study, we evaluated the accuracy of the alternative oral clearance (CL/F(exp)) estimated by the simple monoexponential model. In contrast to CL/F(approx), CL/F(exp) was accurate for drugs with a short elimination half-life relative to tau. The present finding in conjunction with our previous study suggested that the peak-and-trough sampling design is promising for the clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trial for drugs with not only slow but also rapid elimination from the body. We think that the accuracy and precision of the two analysis methods to estimate oral clearance (CL/F(approx) and CL/F(exp)) for a target drug should be evaluated carefully before and after a real clinical trial.

  17. Applied Nanotoxicology

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, David W.; Roberts, Stephen M.; Shvedova, Anna A.; Warheit, David B.; Hinkley, Georgia K.; Guy, Robin C.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials, including nanoparticles and nanoobjects, are being incorporated into everyday products at an increasing rate. These products include consumer products of interest to toxicologists such as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, food, food packaging, household products, and so on. The manufacturing of products containing or utilizing nanomaterials in their composition may also present potential toxicologic concerns in the workplace. The molecular complexity and composition of these nanomaterials are ever increasing, and the means and methods being applied to characterize and perform useful toxicologic assessments are rapidly advancing. This article includes presentations by experienced toxicologists in the nanotoxicology community who are focused on the applied aspect of the discipline toward supporting state of the art toxicologic assessments for food products and packaging, pharmaceuticals and medical devices, inhaled nanoparticle and gastrointestinal exposures, and addressing occupational safety and health issues and concerns. This symposium overview article summarizes 5 talks that were presented at the 35th Annual meeting of the American College of Toxicology on the subject of “Applied Nanotechnology.” PMID:26957538

  18. Using Anatomic Magnetic Resonance Image Information to Enhance Visualization and Interpretation of Functional Images: A Comparison of Methods Applied to Clinical Arterial Spin Labeling Images.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Dai, Weiying; Soman, Salil; Hackney, David B; Wong, Eric T; Robson, Philip M; Alsop, David C

    2017-02-01

    Functional imaging provides hemodynamic and metabolic information and is increasingly being incorporated into clinical diagnostic and research studies. Typically functional images have reduced signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution compared to other non-functional cross sectional images obtained as part of a routine clinical protocol. We hypothesized that enhancing visualization and interpretation of functional images with anatomic information could provide preferable quality and superior diagnostic value. In this work, we implemented five methods (frequency addition, frequency multiplication, wavelet transform, nonsubsampled contourlet transform and intensity-hue-saturation) and a newly proposed ShArpening by Local Similarity with Anatomic images (SALSA) method to enhance the visualization of functional images, while preserving the original functional contrast and quantitative signal intensity characteristics over larger spatial scales. Arterial spin labeling blood flow MR images of the brain were visualization enhanced using anatomic images with multiple contrasts. The algorithms were validated on a numerical phantom and their performance on images of brain tumor patients were assessed by quantitative metrics and neuroradiologist subjective ratings. The frequency multiplication method had the lowest residual error for preserving the original functional image contrast at larger spatial scales (55%-98% of the other methods with simulated data and 64%-86% with experimental data). It was also significantly more highly graded by the radiologists (p<0.005 for clear brain anatomy around the tumor). Compared to other methods, the SALSA provided 11%-133% higher similarity with ground truth images in the simulation and showed just slightly lower neuroradiologist grading score. Most of these monochrome methods do not require any prior knowledge about the functional and anatomic image characteristics, except the acquired resolution. Hence, automatic implementation on

  19. Applied breath analysis: an overview of the challenges and opportunities in developing and testing sensor technology for human health monitoring in aerospace and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gary W; Dweik, Raed A

    2008-09-01

    The aerospace industry requires the development of a range of chemical sensor technologies for such applications as leak detection, emission monitoring, fuel leak detection, environmental monitoring, and fire detection. A family of chemical sensors are being developed based on micromachining and microfabrication technology to fabricate microsensors with minimal size, weight, and power consumption, and the use of nanomaterials and structures to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. However, individual sensors are limited in the amount of information that they can provide in environments that contain multiple chemical species. Thus, sensor arrays are being developed to address detection needs in such multi-species environments. These technologies and technical approaches have direct relevance to breath monitoring for clinical applications. This paper gives an overview of developing cutting-edge sensor technology and possible barriers to new technology implementation. This includes lessons learned from previous microsensor development, recent work in development of a breath monitoring system, and future directions in the implementation of cutting edge sensor technology. Clinical applications and the potential impact to the biomedical field of miniaturized smart gas sensor technology are discussed.

  20. Application of the threshold of toxicological concern concept when applied to pharmaceutical manufacturing operations intended for short-term clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bercu, Joel P; Dolan, David G

    2013-02-01

    In the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, if a multiproduct facility shares equipment amongst drug substances/products it is incumbent upon the manufacturer to demonstrate removal of the pharmaceutical through a robust cleaning validation/verification program. Removal must be to below limits considered acceptable from a quality and toxicological perspective. In order to address the toxicological concerns, an acceptable daily exposure (ADE) was developed which is the "dose that is unlikely to cause an adverse effect if...exposed, by any route...at or below this dose every day for a lifetime" (ISPE, 2010). For compounds in development, defaulted ADEs were proposed by Dolan et al. (2005) and adopted by the International Society of Pharmaceutical Engineers (ISPE) as conservative cutoffs for compounds with limited data. In Phase 1 clinical trials, exposure is typically short-term (single dose or repeated doses for ≤30 days) compared to the chronic doses used to derive ADE and defaulted ADEs. An analysis of publicly available databases for toxicological and pharmacological effects supports the use of 10-fold higher defaulted values when the residual drug substance is in a developmental pharmaceutical intended for Phase 1 clinical trials (exposure ≤30 days).

  1. A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparison Between Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) and Structured Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Intervention for Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzaheri, Fereshteh; Koegel, Lynn Kern; Rezaee, Mohammad; Rafiee, Seyed Majid

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating studies are documenting specific motivational variables that, when combined into a naturalistic teaching paradigm, can positively influence the effectiveness of interventions for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The purpose of this study was to compare two ABA intervention procedures, a naturalistic approach, Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) with a structured ABA approach in a school setting. A Randomized Clinical Trial design using two groups of children, matched according to age, sex and mean length of utterance was used to compare the interventions. The data showed that the PRT approach was significantly more effective in improving targeted and untargeted areas after three months of intervention. The results are discussed in terms of variables that produce more rapid improvements in communication for children with ASD. PMID:24840596

  2. A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparison Between Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) and Adult-Driven Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Intervention on Disruptive Behaviors in Public School Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzaheri, Fereshteh; Koegel, Lynn Kern; Rezaei, Mohammad; Bakhshi, Enayatolah

    2015-09-01

    Children with autism often demonstrate disruptive behaviors during demanding teaching tasks. Language intervention can be particularly difficult as it involves social and communicative areas, which are challenging for this population. The purpose of this study was to compare two intervention conditions, a naturalistic approach, Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) with an adult-directed ABA approach on disruptive behavior during language intervention in the public schools. A randomized clinical trial design was used with two groups of children, matched according to age, sex and mean length of utterance. The data showed that the children demonstrated significantly lower levels of disruptive behavior during the PRT condition. The results are discussed with respect to antecedent manipulations that may be helpful in reducing disruptive behavior.

  3. A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparison Between Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) and Adult-Driven Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Intervention on Disruptive Behaviors in Public School Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzaheri, Fereshteh; Koegel, Lynn Kern; Rezaei, Mohammad; Bakhshi, Enayatolah

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism often demonstrate disruptive behaviors during demanding teaching tasks. Language intervention can be particularly difficult as it involves social and communicative areas, which are challenging for this population. The purpose of this study was to compare two intervention conditions, a naturalistic approach, Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) with a structured ABA approach on disruptive behavior during language intervention in the public schools. A Randomized Clinical Trial (RCT) design was used with two groups of children, matched according to age, sex and mean length of utterance. The data showed that the children demonstrated significantly lower levels of disruptive behavior during the PRT condition. The results are discussed with respect to antecedent manipulations that may be helpful in reducing disruptive behavior. PMID:25953148

  4. Applied investigation of person-specific and context-specific factors on postoperative recovery and clinical outcomes of patients undergoing gastrointestinal cancer surgery: multicentre European study

    PubMed Central

    Markar, Sheraz R; Mavroveli, Stella; Petrides, Konstantinos V; Scarpa, Marco; Christophe, Veronique; Castoro, Carlo; Mariette, Christophe; Lagergren, Pernilla; Hanna, George B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer treatments have greatly advanced over the past two decades causing survival improvements and reduced complications from cancer surgery. However, the cancer diagnosis and the effects of treatment modalities pose a major risk to patients' psychological well-being. Given current interest and emerging evidence about the importance of psychological and social factors on cancer survival and coping with cancer treatments, this study will build and expand research in order to identify key modifiable psychosocial variables that contribute to better physical and mental health following gastrointestinal cancer (GIC) surgery. Objectives To elucidate the incidence of postoperative psychiatric morbidity within 6 months following GIC surgery. To identify key measurable modifiable preoperative psychological factors that can significantly affect postoperative psychiatric morbidity in patients undergoing surgery for GIC. To clarify the changes seen in a patient's psychological well-being during their treatment pathway for GIC. Methods and analysis This multicentre study has an observational longitudinal study design. In total, 1000 patients will be screened with a multicomponent psychological questionnaire at four different time points: at diagnosis, preoperatively, 1 and 6 months after surgery. Data from this questionnaire will be linked to postoperative complications including psychiatric morbidity, length of hospital stay and recovery to normal activity. Ethics and dissemination NHS Health Research Authority approval was gained on (REC reference 15.LO/1847) for the completion of this study. Multiple platforms will be used for the dissemination of the research data, including international clinical and patient group presentations and publication of research outputs in a high impact clinical journal. PMID:27798009

  5. Applied geodesy

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is based on the proceedings of the CERN Accelerator School's course on Applied Geodesy for Particle Accelerators held in April 1986. The purpose was to record and disseminate the knowledge gained in recent years on the geodesy of accelerators and other large systems. The latest methods for positioning equipment to sub-millimetric accuracy in deep underground tunnels several tens of kilometers long are described, as well as such sophisticated techniques as the Navstar Global Positioning System and the Terrameter. Automation of better known instruments such as the gyroscope and Distinvar is also treated along with the highly evolved treatment of components in a modern accelerator. Use of the methods described can be of great benefit in many areas of research and industrial geodesy such as surveying, nautical and aeronautical engineering, astronomical radio-interferometry, metrology of large components, deformation studies, etc.

  6. Histomorhological and clinical evaluation of maxillary alveolar ridge reconstruction after craniofacial trauma by applying combination of allogeneic and autogenous bone graft.

    PubMed

    De Ponte, Francesco Saverio; Falzea, Roberto; Runci, Michele; Siniscalchi, Enrico Nastro; Lauritano, Floriana; Bramanti, Ennio; Cervino, Gabriele; Cicciu, Marco

    2017-02-01

    A variety of techniques and materials for the rehabilitation and reconstruction of traumatized maxillary ridges prior to dental implants placement have been described in literature. Autogenous bone grafting is considered ideal by many researchers and it still remains the most predictable and documented method. The aim of this report is to underline the effectiveness of using allogeneic bone graft for managing maxillofacial trauma. A case of a 30-year-old male with severely atrophic maxillary ridge as a consequence of complex craniofacial injury is presented here. Augmentation procedure in two stages was performed using allogeneic and autogenous bone grafts in different areas of the osseous defect. Four months after grafting, during the implants placement surgery, samples of both sectors were withdrawn and submitted to histological evaluation. On the examination of the specimens, treated by hematoxylin and eosin staining, the morphology of integrated allogeneic bone grafts was revealed to be similar to the autologous bone. Our clinical experience shows how the allogeneic bone graft presented normal bone tissue architecture and is highly vascularized, and it can be used for reconstruction of severe trauma of the maxilla.

  7. Applying Joint Mobilization at Different Cervical Vertebral Levels does not Influence Immediate Pain Reduction in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Rafaela L; Caires, Priscila M; Furtado, Fernanda C; Loureiro, Aline V; Ferreira, Paulo H; Ferreira, Manuela L

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of applying joint mobilization at symptomatic and asymptomatic cervical levels in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. Forty-eight patients aged between 18 and 65 years and presenting nonspecific neck pain with a minimum duration of 3 months were recruited for the study. Included patients were randomized to one of two treatment groups: (i) control group: the most symptomatic vertebral level was mobilized; (ii) experimental group: a randomly selected vertebral level was chosen and mobilized. All patients received one treatment session. Pain intensity in resting position during the most painful active cervical movement as well as during vertebral palpation was quantified using an 11-point pain scale. Follow-up measures were taken immediately after intervention by a blinded assessor. The results showed no significant difference in pain intensity immediately after treatment between groups (symptomatic level treated vs. randomly chosen cervical vertebral level treated) during resting position, painful active movement, or vertebral palpation. Within-group comparisons showed significant pain relief after treatment during the most painful active movement as well as during vertebral palpation for both groups, but not during resting position. Significant change in immediate pain intensity during painful active movement and vertebral palpation was achieved after vertebral mobilization. however, both groups presented similar pain reductions suggesting that pain reduction due to joint mobilization is not specific to the vertebral level being mobilized. PMID:20046551

  8. Clinical update: transendoscopic laser surgery for treatment of epiglottic entrapment: Nd:YAG and 808-nm diode laser applied individually and in combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Lloyd P.; Tudor, R. A.

    1999-06-01

    Hospital records reviewed from 1986-1998 determined that 18 horses were presented for correction of epiglottic entrapment by the aryepiglottic fold. All horses had a history of an abnormal respiratory noise and/or exercise intolerance. In conjunction with epiglottic entrapment, 10 horses had dorsal displacement of the soft palate. Initial confirmation of the epiglottic entrapment was made by endoscopic examination. In addition, 3 horses had radiographs taken of the larynx and pharyngeal region to determine the length of the epiglottis.Laser surgical treatment was performed on the horses in a standing position under sedation. The treatment consisted of axially dividing the aryepiglottic fold from the base of the epiglottis to the tip or beyond by means of a laser fiber introduced through the biopsy channel of an endoscope. The Nd:YAG laser was applied transendoscopically to 11 horses using free fiber technique. Three horses received transendoscopic laser correction using the 808-nm diode laser with the fiber in contact configuration. A combination of both 808-nm diode laser and Nd:YAG lasers were used to facilitate correction in the last 4 horses. Partial re-entrapment occurred in 2 out of the 3 cases in which the 808-nm diode laser was used as a single modality for correction. This did not occur in the horses that received either the Nd:YAG laser treatment or Nd:YAG laser treatment in combination with the 808-nm diode laser. Horses that received either 808-nm diode laser irradiation alone or 808-nm diode laser irradiation in combination with Nd:YAG laser appeared to have less swelling than those that received only Nd:YAG irradiation.

  9. Implementing health research through academic and clinical partnerships: a realistic evaluation of the Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The English National Health Service has made a major investment in nine partnerships between higher education institutions and local health services called Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC). They have been funded to increase capacity and capability to produce and implement research through sustained interactions between academics and health services. CLAHRCs provide a natural 'test bed' for exploring questions about research implementation within a partnership model of delivery. This protocol describes an externally funded evaluation that focuses on implementation mechanisms and processes within three CLAHRCs. It seeks to uncover what works, for whom, how, and in what circumstances. Design and methods This study is a longitudinal three-phase, multi-method realistic evaluation, which deliberately aims to explore the boundaries around knowledge use in context. The evaluation funder wishes to see it conducted for the process of learning, not for judging performance. The study is underpinned by a conceptual framework that combines the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services and Knowledge to Action frameworks to reflect the complexities of implementation. Three participating CLARHCS will provide in-depth comparative case studies of research implementation using multiple data collection methods including interviews, observation, documents, and publicly available data to test and refine hypotheses over four rounds of data collection. We will test the wider applicability of emerging findings with a wider community using an interpretative forum. Discussion The idea that collaboration between academics and services might lead to more applicable health research that is actually used in practice is theoretically and intuitively appealing; however the evidence for it is limited. Our evaluation is designed to capture the processes and impacts of collaborative approaches for implementing research, and

  10. MO-G-BRE-05: Clinical Process Improvement and Billing in Radiation Oncology: A Case Study of Applying FMEA for CPT Code 77336 (continuing Medical Physics Consultation)

    SciTech Connect

    Spirydovich, S; Huq, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The improvement of quality in healthcare can be assessed by Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA). In radiation oncology, FMEA, as applied to the billing CPT code 77336, can improve both charge capture and, most importantly, quality of the performed services. Methods: We created an FMEA table for the process performed under CPT code 77336. For a given process step, each member of the assembled team (physicist, dosimetrist, and therapist) independently assigned numerical values for: probability of occurrence (O, 1–10), severity (S, 1–10), and probability of detection (D, 1–10) for every failure mode cause and effect combination. The risk priority number, RPN, was then calculated as a product of O, S and D from which an average RPN was calculated for each combination mentioned above. A fault tree diagram, with each process sorted into 6 categories, was created with linked RPN. For processes with high RPN recommended actions were assigned. 2 separate R and V systems (Lantis and EMR-based ARIA) were considered. Results: We identified 9 potential failure modes and corresponding 19 potential causes of these failure modes all resulting in unjustified 77336 charge and compromised quality of care. In Lantis, the range of RPN was 24.5–110.8, and of S values – 2–10. The highest ranking RPN of 110.8 came from the failure mode described as “end-of-treatment check not done before the completion of treatment”, and the highest S value of 10 (RPN=105) from “overrides not checked”. For the same failure modes, within ARIA electronic environment with its additional controls, RPN values were significantly lower (44.3 for end-of-treatment missing check and 20.0 for overrides not checked). Conclusion: Our work has shown that when charge capture was missed that also resulted in some services not being performed. Absence of such necessary services may result in sub-optimal quality of care rendered to patients.

  11. PSYCHOANALYSIS AS APPLIED AESTHETICS.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Stephen H

    2016-07-01

    The question of how to place psychoanalysis in relation to science has been debated since the beginning of psychoanalysis and continues to this day. The author argues that psychoanalysis is best viewed as a form of applied art (also termed applied aesthetics) in parallel to medicine as applied science. This postulate draws on a functional definition of modernity as involving the differentiation of the value spheres of science, art, and religion. The validity criteria for each of the value spheres are discussed. Freud is examined, drawing on Habermas, and seen to have erred by claiming that the psychoanalytic method is a form of science. Implications for clinical and metapsychological issues in psychoanalysis are discussed.

  12. Applying Clinical Neuropsychology in the Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federhar, David B.

    Neuropsychology is an area in which the functioning or integrity of the brain is linked to measurable human behavior. This paper describes the use of the Reitan batteries (Reitan and Davison; 1974) in public school settings for documenting and prescribing appropriate academic programs. Three individual case studies are presented. Case 1 is a 16…

  13. Mentoring concepts applied to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Parker, D

    1992-08-01

    An alternative to traditional forms of orientation using mentoring or related concepts is one possible solution to motivate and inspire nurses during a time when this profession is faced with nursing shortages and burnout. This article will address the advantages and disadvantages to mentoring based on a literature review and personal experience.

  14. Determination of Clinical and Socio-demographical Differences of Adolescents Applying to a Treatment Center with Family Encouragement or the Decision of the Probation Office and Determination of Predictive Factors in Maintaining Soberness among Probation Cases

    PubMed Central

    YÜNCÜ, Zeki; AYDIN, Rezzan; AYDIN, Cahide; ÖZBARAN, Burcu; KÖSE, Sezen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study has two objectives. The first objective of this study was the determination of some basic clinical and socio-demographical differences among the adolescents with substance abuse who apply to a treatment center with support from their family or by order of the probation office. The other objective of this study was the determination of the predictive factors in maintaining soberness among adolescents who successfully complete the probation treatment process. Methods The target population of this study is young adults under 19 years of age who apply to a substance addiction center for adolescents as a result of encouragement from their family or ordered by the Probation Office between 2005 and 2013. These two groups were analyzed in terms of socio-demographical characteristics such as age, the age at which they tried the substance, the age at which they applied to the treatment center, sex, substances they used, education period, employment history, and street life experience. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 18.0 software was used for the statistical analysis. Results It was detected that among the cases who applied to the treatment center with family support, their education period was longer than probation (PR) cases (p<0.0001), and the rates of previous treatment, their mother being alive, and having street life experiences were more frequent (p values: <0.0001; =0.010; =0.027; <0.0001, respectively) and employment history was higher among PR cases (p<0.0001). In terms of the substances used, ecstasy, alcohol, inhalants, and volatile substances are more common among those applying with family support (p=0.018; 0.001; <0.0001, respectively). However, use of cannabis was found to be more common among PR cases (p<0.0001). It was found that PR cases who successfully completed their treatment process had married parents (p=0.008) and had more years of education (p=0.004). It can be predicted that if the subject is well

  15. Determination of methylphenidate and ritalinic acid in blood, plasma and oral fluid from adolescents and adults using protein precipitation and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry--a method applied on clinical and forensic investigations.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, Martin; Rydberg, Irene

    2011-07-15

    A validated, accurate and sensitive LC-MS/MS method for determination of racemic methylphenidate and its metabolite ritalinic acid has been developed. The analytes were quantified by tandem mass spectrometry operating in positive electrospray ionization mode with multiple reaction monitoring. Blood, plasma and oral fluid samples of 100μl were prepared by simple precipitation with 200μl of an aqueous solution of zinc sulphate in methanol. Corresponding deuterated internal standards were used for quantification. Calibrations for methylphenidate and ritalinic acid were linear within the selected range of 0.2-30ng/ml and 10-1500ng/ml in blood or plasma and in the range of 1-500ng/ml and 0.25-125ng/ml in oral fluid, respectively. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of samples from patients treated with methylphenidate in the dose range of 36-72mg/day and some representative ante mortem and post mortem samples from clinical and forensic toxicological investigations. A three to fourfold higher concentration of methylphenidate was found in oral fluid compared with blood while for ritalinic acid the concentrations were about 25-fold lower in oral fluid.

  16. 42 CFR 55a.107 - What other regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions § 55a.107 What other regulations apply? Other regulations which apply to the Black Lung Clinics Program include, but are not limited to, the following: 42...

  17. 42 CFR 55a.107 - What other regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions § 55a.107 What other regulations apply? Other regulations which apply to the Black Lung Clinics Program include, but are not limited to, the following: 42...

  18. 42 CFR 55a.107 - What other regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions § 55a.107 What other regulations apply? Other regulations which apply to the Black Lung Clinics Program include, but are not limited to, the following: 42...

  19. 42 CFR 55a.107 - What other regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions § 55a.107 What other regulations apply? Other regulations which apply to the Black Lung Clinics Program include, but are not limited to, the following: 42...

  20. 42 CFR 55a.107 - What other regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions § 55a.107 What other regulations apply? Other regulations which apply to the Black Lung Clinics Program include, but are not limited to, the following: 42...

  1. Clinical research: up from 'clinical epidemiology'.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Olli S; Bachmann, Lucas M; Steurer, Johann

    2009-12-01

    Clinical research must be understood to be the foundation of scientific medicine of the clinical type. But the essence of scientific clinical medicine remains a matter of profound confusion, even in clinical academia, and so does the essence of clinical research. The confusion now revolves, principally, around 'clinical epidemiology'. We address clinical research in the meaning of quintessentially 'applied' clinical research, which we take to be the foundation of the scientific knowledge base of clinical medicine, of gnosis (dia-, etio-, pro-) in it. More specifically, we address the essence, priorities, and status quo of this research - and argue that the requisite theory of this is not a matter of 'clinical epidemiology' but of theory of clinical research endogenous to clinical (rather than epidemiological) academia.

  2. Applying microfluidics to electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Eddington, David T

    2007-01-01

    Microfluidics can be integrated with standard electrophysiology techniques to allow new experimental modalities. Specifically, the motivation for the microfluidic brain slice device is discussed including how the device docks to standard perfusion chambers and the technique of passive pumping which is used to deliver boluses of neuromodulators to the brain slice. By simplifying the device design, we are able to achieve a practical solution to the current unmet electrophysiology need of applying multiple neuromodulators across multiple regions of the brain slice. This is achieved by substituting the standard coverglass substrate of the perfusion chamber with a thin microfluidic device bonded to the coverglass substrate. This was then attached to the perfusion chamber and small holes connect the open-well of the perfusion chamber to the microfluidic channels buried within the microfluidic substrate. These microfluidic channels are interfaced with ports drilled into the edge of the perfusion chamber to access and deliver stimulants. This project represents how the field of microfluidics is transitioning away from proof-of concept device demonstrations and into practical solutions for unmet experimental and clinical needs.

  3. Following the Rules Set by Accreditation Agencies and Governing Bodies to Maintain In-Compliance Status: Applying Critical Thinking Skills When Evaluating the Need for Change in the Clinical Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Karen M; Levy, Kimberly Y; Reese, Erika M

    2016-05-01

    Maintaining an in-compliance clinical laboratory takes continuous awareness and review of standards, regulations, and best practices. A strong quality assurance program and well informed leaders who maintain professional networks can aid in this necessary task. This article will discuss a process that laboratories can follow to interpret, understand, and comply with the rules and standards set by laboratory accreditation bodies.

  4. The Applied Mathematics Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Martha J.

    This report describes the Applied Mathematics Laboratory (AML) operated by the Department of Mathematics at Towson State University, Maryland. AML is actually a course offered to selected undergraduates who are given the opportunity to apply their skills in investigating industrial and governmental problems. By agreement with sponsoring…

  5. Applied Physics at Strathclyde.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, H.; Twidell, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Outlines and describes the content of an applied physics course offered for the four year honors and the three year pass degrees. The course stresses three components: principal subjects, industrial projects, and subsidiary subjects. (GA)

  6. Compensation: How to Apply

    MedlinePlus

    ... Benefit Rates Education & Training Education & Training Home For Students Get Started Get Started Home Apply for Benefits ... make a claims decision. Learn more about VA's responsibilities for obtaining evidence to support your disability ... Directory EMAIL UPDATES Email Address Button ...

  7. Geomorphology: Pure and applied

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The book summarizes the history of intellectual debate in geomorphology and describes modern developments both ''pure'' and ''applied.'' The history begins well before W.M. Davis and follows through to such debates as those concerned with the Pleistocene. Modern developments in pure geomorphology are cast in terms of chapters on form, process, materials, and methods analysis. The applied chapters concentrate on environmental hazards and resources, and their management.

  8. Applied Learning Networks (ALN)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    AFRL-IF-RS-TR-2007-7 Final Technical Report January 2007 APPLIED LEARNING NETWORKS (ALN) University of Southern California...any other person or corporation; or convey any rights or permission to manufacture, use, or sell any patented invention that may relate to them...1-0051 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE APPLIED LEARNING NETWORKS (ALN) 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62301E 5d. PROJECT NUMBER T981 5e. TASK NUMBER US

  9. Applied Music (Individual Study).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Background information and resources to help students in grades 9-12 in Texas pursue an individual study contract in applied music is presented. To fulfill a contract students must publicly perform from memory, with accompaniment as specified, three selections from a list of approved music for their chosen field (instrument or voice). Material…

  10. Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szapacs, Cindy

    2006-01-01

    Teaching strategies that work for typically developing children often do not work for those diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. However, teaching strategies that work for children with autism do work for typically developing children. In this article, the author explains how the principles and concepts of Applied Behavior Analysis can be…

  11. Signals: Applying Academic Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Kimberly E.

    2010-01-01

    Academic analytics helps address the public's desire for institutional accountability with regard to student success, given the widespread concern over the cost of higher education and the difficult economic and budgetary conditions prevailing worldwide. Purdue University's Signals project applies the principles of analytics widely used in…

  12. Essays on Applied Microeconomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mejia Mantilla, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Each chapter of this dissertation studies a different question within the field of Applied Microeconomics. The first chapter examines the mid- and long-term effects of the 1998 Asian Crisis on the educational attainment of Indonesian children ages 6 to 18, at the time of the crisis. The effects are identified as deviations from a linear trend for…

  13. Applied Vocational Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    Developed for use in teaching a two-semester, one-unit course, this course guide is intended to aid the high school instructor in teaching mathematical problem-solving and computational skills to vocational education students. The state-adopted textbook for general mathematics III, "Applied General Mathematics" serves as the major…

  14. Applied Linguistics in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bot, Kees

    2004-01-01

    In this contribution developments in Applied Linguistics in Europe are linked to major social changes that have taken place over the last decades. These include: The decline of the USSR and the end of the cold war; The development of the EEC and the EU and fading of borders; The economic growth of Western Europe; Labor migration from the south to…

  15. Africa and Applied Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makoni, Sinfree, Ed.; Meinhof, Ulrike H., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This collection of articles includes: "Introducing Applied Linguistics in Africa" (Sinfree Makoni and Ulrike H. Meinhof); "Language Ideology and Politics: A Critical Appraisal of French as Second Official Language in Nigeria" (Tope Omoniyi); "The Democratisation of Indigenous Languages: The Case of Malawi" (Themba…

  16. Applied Algebra Curriculum Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Technical Coll., Marshall.

    This collection of 11 applied algebra curriculum modules can be used independently as supplemental modules for an existing algebra curriculum. They represent diverse curriculum styles that should stimulate the teacher's creativity to adapt them to other algebra concepts. The selected topics have been determined to be those most needed by students…

  17. Applied research on glucansucrases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although glycansucrases have been known for over 70 years, they remain relatively unknown except to a small group of researchers. Practical, applied research on glycansucrases has been focused on certain key areas. The earliest of these was the development of blood plasma extenders from dextran, d...

  18. Applied Statistics with SPSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huizingh, Eelko K. R. E.

    2007-01-01

    Accessibly written and easy to use, "Applied Statistics Using SPSS" is an all-in-one self-study guide to SPSS and do-it-yourself guide to statistics. What is unique about Eelko Huizingh's approach is that this book is based around the needs of undergraduate students embarking on their own research project, and its self-help style is designed to…

  19. [Implantation of collagen coated hydroxyapatite particles. A clinical-histological study in humans].

    PubMed

    Sanz, M; Bascones, A; Kessler, A; García Nuñez, J; Newman, M G; Robertson, M A; Carranza, F A

    1989-05-01

    In this study, histologic behaviour of collagen coated hydroxylapatite particles implanted in human periodontal osseous defects has been analyzed. This material was surgically implanted in four patients, and reentry and block biopsies were carried out 4 and 6 months later. The histologic results demonstrate that this material is well tolerated by surrounding tissues, not eliciting an inflammatory reaction. At four months, the hydroxylapatite particles appear encapsulated by a very cellular connective tissue and at 6 months are found in direct contact with osteoid and mature bone. This material acts as a filler material, being fully biocompatible and stimulating an osseoconductive reaction of the adjacent alveolar bone.

  20. Clinical neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, S.; Mazziotta, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Designed for practicing neurologists and neurosurgeons, this reference focuses on the newest techniques in computed assisted tomography. Text material covers basic principles of computed tomography, as well as the clinical advantages and disadvantages of each modality. The anatomical and/or physiological processes measured by XCT, PET, SPECT and MRI are first discussed in terms of the normal patient, and then applied to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurological disease (primarily of the brain). Emphasis is placed on areas of difficult diagnosis, such as differentiating recurrent tumor from radiation necrosis, early diagnosis of dementia, selection of patients for extracranial-intracranial bypass procedures, and localization of epileptic foci.

  1. Scientific methodology applied.

    PubMed

    Lussier, A

    1975-04-01

    The subject of this symposium is naproxen, a new drug that resulted from an investigation to find a superior anti-inflammatory agent. It was synthesized by Harrison et al. in 1970 at the Syntex Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biological Sciences. How can we chart the evolution of this or any other drug? Three steps are necessary: first, chemical studies (synthesis, analysis); second, animal pharmacology; third, human pharmacology. The last step can additionally be divided into four phases: metabolism and toxicology of the drug in normal volunteers; dose titration and initial clinical trials with sick subjects (pharmacometry); confirmatory clinical trials when the drug is accepted on the market and revaluation (familiarization trials). To discover the truth about naproxen, we must all participate actively with a critical mind, following the principles of scientific methodology. We shall find that the papers to be presented today all deal with the third step in the evaluation process--clinical pharmacology. It is quite evident that the final and most decisive test must be aimed at the most valuable target: the human being. The end product of this day's work for each of us should be the formation of an opinion based on solid scientific proofs. And let us hope that we will all enjoy fulfilling the symposium in its entire etymological meaning this evening. In vino veritas.

  2. Quality in applied science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sten, T.

    1993-12-01

    Science is in many senses a special kind of craft and only skilled craftsmen are able to distinguish good work from bad. Due to the variation in approaches, methods and even philosophical basis, it is nearly impossible to derive a general set of quality criteria for scientific work outside specific research traditions. Applied science introduces a new set of quality criteria having to do with the application of results in practical situations and policy making. A scientist doing basic research relates mainly to the scientific community of which he is a member, while in applied contract research the scientist has to consider the impact of his results both for the immediate users and upon interest groups possibly being affected. Application thus raises a whole new set of requirements having to do with business ethics, policy consequences and societal ethics in general.

  3. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Lambert, Winifred; Wheeler, Mark; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the second quarter of Fiscal Year 2007 (January - March 2007). Tasks reported on are: Obiective Lightning Probability Tool, Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting, Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida, Anvil Threat Corridor Forecast Tool in AWIPS, Volume Averaqed Heiqht lnteq rated Radar Reflectivity (VAHIRR), Tower Data Skew-t Tool, and Weather Research and Forecastini (WRF) Model Sensitivity Study

  4. Nanoengineering Applied to Tungsten

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    and R. Z. Valiev ARL-RP- 123 May 2006 A reprint from the Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tungsten, Refractory...Ground, MD 21005-5066 ARL-RP- 123 May 2006 Nanoengineering Applied to Tungsten Q. Wei University of North Carolina-Charlotte B. E...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER ARL-RP- 123 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 11. SPONSOR

  5. Applied science. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Bud, Robert

    2012-09-01

    Such categories as applied science and pure science can be thought of as "ideological." They have been contested in the public sphere, exposing long-term intellectual commitments, assumptions, balances of power, and material interests. This group of essays explores the contest over applied science in Britain and the United States during the nineteenth century. The essays look at the concept in the context of a variety of neighbors, including pure science, technology, and art. They are closely related and connected to contemporary historiographic debate. Jennifer Alexander links the issues raised to a recent paper by Paul Forman. Paul Lucier and Graeme Gooday deal with the debates in the last quarter of the century in the United States and Britain, respectively. Robert Bud deals with the earlier part of the nineteenth century, with an eye specifically on the variety of concepts hybridized under the heading of "applied science." Eric Schatzberg looks at the erosion of the earlier concept of art. As a whole, the essays illuminate both long-term changes and nuanced debate and are themselves intended to provoke further reflection on science in the public sphere.

  6. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela; Wheeler, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2010 (October - December 2009). A detailed project schedule is included in the Appendix. Included tasks are: (1) Peak Wind Tool for User Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), (2) Objective Lightning Probability Tool, Phase III, (3) Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting, Phase II, (4) Upgrade Summer Severe Weather Tool in Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS), (5) Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS) Update and Maintainability, (5) Verify 12-km resolution North American Model (MesoNAM) Performance, and (5) Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) Graphical User Interface.

  7. NASA Applied Sciences Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Martin

    2006-01-01

    This presentation highlights the NASA Applied Sciences Program. The goal of the program is to extend the results of scientific research and knowledge beyond the science community to contribute to NASA's partners' applications of national priority, such as agricultural efficiency, energy management and Homeland Security. Another purpose of the program's scientific research is to increase knowledge of the Earth-Sun system to enable improved predictions of climate, weather, and natural hazards. The program primarily optimizes benefits for citizens by contributing to partnering on applications that are used by state, local and tribal governments.

  8. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., Jr.; Crawford, Winifred; Short, David; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the second quarter of Fiscal Year 2008 (January - March 2008). Projects described are: (1) Peak Wind Tool for User Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), (2) Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting, (3) Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida. Phase III, (4) Volume Averaged Height Integrated Radar Reflectivity (VAHIRR), (5) Impact of Local Sensors, (6) Radar Scan Strategies for the PAFB WSR-74C Replacement and (7) WRF Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base.

  9. Applied Impact Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickert, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    Applied impact physics research is based on the capability to examine impact processes for a wide range of impact conditions with respect to velocity as well as mass and shape of the projectile. For this reason, Fraunhofer EMI operates a large variety of launchers that address velocities up to ordnance velocities as single stage powder gun but which can also be operated as two-stage light gas guns achieving the regime of low earth orbital velocity. Thereby for projectile masses of up to 100 g hypervelocity impact phenomena up to 7.8 km/s can be addressed. Advanced optical diagnostic techniques like microsecond video are used as commercial systems but - since impact phenomena are mostly related with debris or dust - specialized diagnostics are developed in-house like x-ray cinematography and x-ray tomography. Selected topics of the field of applied impact physics will be presented like the interesting behavior of long rods penetrating low-density materials or experimental findings at hypervelocity for this class of materials as well as new x-ray diagnositic techniques.

  10. [Echinocandins: Applied pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Azanza Perea, José Ramón

    2016-01-01

    The echinocandins share pharmacodynamic properties, although there are some interesting differences in their pharmacokinetic behaviour in the clinical practice. They are not absorbed by the oral route. They have a somewhat special distribution in the organism, as some of them can reach high intracellular concentrations while, with some others, the concentration is reduced. They are highly bound to plasma proteins, thus it is recommended to administer a loading dose for anidulafungin and caspofungin, although this procedure is not yet clear with micafungin. Echinocandins are excreted via a non-microsomal metabolism, so the urinary concentration is very low. Some carrier proteins that take part in the biliary clearance process are probably involved in the interactions described with caspofungin and micafungin. These two drugs must be used with caution in patients with severely impaired hepatic function, while all of them can be used without special precautions when there is renal impairment or the patient requires renal replacement therapy.

  11. Applied Routh approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The Routh approximation technique for reducing the complexity of system models was applied in the frequency domain to a 16th order, state variable model of the F100 engine and to a 43d order, transfer function model of a launch vehicle boost pump pressure regulator. The results motivate extending the frequency domain formulation of the Routh method to the time domain in order to handle the state variable formulation directly. The time domain formulation was derived and a characterization that specifies all possible Routh similarity transformations was given. The characterization was computed by solving two eigenvalue-eigenvector problems. The application of the time domain Routh technique to the state variable engine model is described, and some results are given. Additional computational problems are discussed, including an optimization procedure that can improve the approximation accuracy by taking advantage of the transformation characterization.

  12. NASA Applied Sciences Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Sue M.; Haynes, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's strategic Goals: a) Develop a balanced overall program of science, exploration, and aeronautics consistent with the redirection of human spaceflight program to focus on exploration. b) Study Earth from space to advance scientific understanding and meet societal needs. NASA's partnership efforts in global modeling and data assimilation over the next decade will shorten the distance from observations to answers for important, leading-edge science questions. NASA's Applied Sciences program will continue the Agency's efforts in benchmarking the assimilation of NASA research results into policy and management decision-support tools that are vital for the Nation's environment, economy, safety, and security. NASA also is working with NOAH and inter-agency forums to transition mature research capabilities to operational systems, primarily the polar and geostationary operational environmental satellites, and to utilize fully those assets for research purposes.

  13. Applying robotics to HAZMAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.; Edmonds, Gary O.

    1994-01-01

    The use of robotics in situations involving hazardous materials can significantly reduce the risk of human injuries. The Emergency Response Robotics Project, which began in October 1990 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is developing a teleoperated mobile robot allowing HAZMAT (hazardous materials) teams to remotely respond to incidents involving hazardous materials. The current robot, called HAZBOT III, can assist in locating characterizing, identifying, and mitigating hazardous material incidents without risking entry team personnel. The active involvement of the JPL Fire Department HAZMAT team has been vital in developing a robotic system which enables them to perform remote reconnaissance of a HAZMAT incident site. This paper provides a brief review of the history of the project, discusses the current system in detail, and presents other areas in which robotics can be applied removing people from hazardous environments/operations.

  14. Applied antineutrino physics workshop.

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, James C.

    2008-01-01

    This workshop is the fourth one of a series that includes the Neutrino Geophysics Conference at Honolulu, Hawaii, which I attended in 2005. This workshop was organized by the Astro-Particle and Cosmology laboratory in the recently opened Condoret building of the University of Paris. More information, including copies of the presentations, on the workshop is available on the website: www.apc.univ-paris7.fr/AAP2007/. The workshop aims at opening neutrino physics to various fields such that it can be applied in geosciences, nuclear industry (reactor and spent fuel monitoring) and non-proliferation. The workshop was attended by over 60 people from Europe, USA, Asia and Brazil. The meeting was also attended by representatives of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The workshop also included a workshop dinner on board of a river boat sailing the Seine river.

  15. Methods of applied dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rheinfurth, M. H.; Wilson, H. B.

    1991-01-01

    The monograph was prepared to give the practicing engineer a clear understanding of dynamics with special consideration given to the dynamic analysis of aerospace systems. It is conceived to be both a desk-top reference and a refresher for aerospace engineers in government and industry. It could also be used as a supplement to standard texts for in-house training courses on the subject. Beginning with the basic concepts of kinematics and dynamics, the discussion proceeds to treat the dynamics of a system of particles. Both classical and modern formulations of the Lagrange equations, including constraints, are discussed and applied to the dynamic modeling of aerospace structures using the modal synthesis technique.

  16. Applied computational aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The present volume discusses the original development of the panel method, the mapping solutions and singularity distributions of linear potential schemes, the capabilities of full-potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes schemes, the use of the grid-generation methodology in applied aerodynamics, subsonic airfoil design, inverse airfoil design for transonic applications, the divergent trailing-edge airfoil innovation in CFD, Euler and potential computational results for selected aerodynamic configurations, and the application of CFD to wing high-lift systems. Also discussed are high-lift wing modifications for an advanced-capability EA-6B aircraft, Navier-Stokes methods for internal and integrated propulsion system flow predictions, the use of zonal techniques for analysis of rotor-stator interaction, CFD applications to complex configurations, CFD applications in component aerodynamic design of the V-22, Navier-Stokes computations of a complete F-16, CFD at supersonic/hypersonic speeds, and future CFD developments.

  17. Lessons learned and applied

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Corey Joseph; Hall, Corey M.; Odoms, La’ Nyia J.

    2012-01-01

    Most vaccines available in the United States (US) have been incorporated into vaccination schedules for infants and young children, age groups particularly at risk of contracting infectious diseases. High universal vaccination coverage is responsible for substantially reducing or nearly eliminating many of the diseases that once killed thousands of children each year in the US. Despite the success of infant vaccinations, periods of low vaccination coverage and the limited immunogenicity and duration of protection of certain vaccines have resulted in sporadic outbreaks, allowing some diseases to spread in communities. These challenges suggest that expanded vaccination coverage to younger infants and adolescents, and more immunogenic vaccines, may be needed in some instances. This review focuses on the importance of infant immunization and explores the successes and challenges of current early childhood vaccination programs and how these lessons may be applied to other invasive diseases, such as meningococcal disease. PMID:22617834

  18. Instructions for Applying | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This is NOT a grant application - if successful, funds will not be transferred to your institution to support your project. Rather, this is an application to access the scientific capabilities and resources of the NCI with the goal of moving promising cancer chemopreventive agents into clinical testing. If successful, you will partner with the NCI in developing a drug development pipeline. | Apply to access the scientific capabilities and resources of the NCI with the goal of moving promising cancer chemopreventive agents into clinical testing.

  19. Learning and applying biosciences to clinical practice in nursing.

    PubMed

    Smales, K

    The study of biosciences by nursing students, while perceived by most as relevant, presents particular challenges for many during pre- registration programmes. This article describes a literature review of the teaching and learning of biosciences in nursing curricula. Four areas are explored: the relevance of bioscience in pre-registration nursing; difficulties experienced by nursing students learning biosciences; lecturer attributes in facilitating learning; and teaching and assessment methods.

  20. Applying Evolutionary Anthropology

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Mhairi A; Lawson, David W

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary anthropology provides a powerful theoretical framework for understanding how both current environments and legacies of past selection shape human behavioral diversity. This integrative and pluralistic field, combining ethnographic, demographic, and sociological methods, has provided new insights into the ultimate forces and proximate pathways that guide human adaptation and variation. Here, we present the argument that evolutionary anthropological studies of human behavior also hold great, largely untapped, potential to guide the design, implementation, and evaluation of social and public health policy. Focusing on the key anthropological themes of reproduction, production, and distribution we highlight classic and recent research demonstrating the value of an evolutionary perspective to improving human well-being. The challenge now comes in transforming relevance into action and, for that, evolutionary behavioral anthropologists will need to forge deeper connections with other applied social scientists and policy-makers. We are hopeful that these developments are underway and that, with the current tide of enthusiasm for evidence-based approaches to policy, evolutionary anthropology is well positioned to make a strong contribution. PMID:25684561

  1. Applying evolutionary anthropology.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Mhairi A; Lawson, David W

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary anthropology provides a powerful theoretical framework for understanding how both current environments and legacies of past selection shape human behavioral diversity. This integrative and pluralistic field, combining ethnographic, demographic, and sociological methods, has provided new insights into the ultimate forces and proximate pathways that guide human adaptation and variation. Here, we present the argument that evolutionary anthropological studies of human behavior also hold great, largely untapped, potential to guide the design, implementation, and evaluation of social and public health policy. Focusing on the key anthropological themes of reproduction, production, and distribution we highlight classic and recent research demonstrating the value of an evolutionary perspective to improving human well-being. The challenge now comes in transforming relevance into action and, for that, evolutionary behavioral anthropologists will need to forge deeper connections with other applied social scientists and policy-makers. We are hopeful that these developments are underway and that, with the current tide of enthusiasm for evidence-based approaches to policy, evolutionary anthropology is well positioned to make a strong contribution.

  2. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sponsors Why Are They Important How Do They Work Who Can Participate What To Expect During Benefits and Risks How They Protect Participants Finding Clinical Trials Links Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites What Are Clinical ...

  3. Essays in applied microeconomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoting

    In this dissertation I use Microeconomic theory to study firms' behavior. Chapter One introduces the motivations and main findings of this dissertation. Chapter Two studies the issue of information provision through advertisement when markets are segmented and consumers' price information is incomplete. Firms compete in prices and advertising strategies for consumers with transportation costs. High advertising costs contribute to market segmentation. Low advertising costs promote price competition among firms and improves consumer welfare. Chapter Three also investigates market power as a result of consumers' switching costs. A potential entrant can offer a new product bundled with an existing product to compensate consumers for their switching cost. If the primary market is competitive, bundling simply plays the role of price discrimination, and it does not dominate unbundled sales in the process of entry. If the entrant has market power in the primary market, then bundling also plays the role of leveraging market power and it dominates unbundled sales. The market for electric power generation has been opened to competition in recent years. Chapter Four looks at issues involved in the deregulated electricity market. By comparing the performance of the competitive market with the social optimum, we identify the conditions under which market equilibrium generates socially efficient levels of electric power. Chapter Two to Four investigate the strategic behavior among firms. Chapter Five studies the interaction between firms and unemployed workers in a frictional labor market. We set up an asymmetric job auction model, where two types of workers apply for two types of job openings by bidding in auctions and firms hire the applicant offering them the most profits. The job auction model internalizes the determination of the share of surplus from a match, therefore endogenously generates incentives for an efficient division of the matching surplus. Microeconomic

  4. Applied Historical Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, F. Richard

    2014-01-01

    F. Richard Stephenson has spent most of his research career -- spanning more than 45 years -- studying various aspects of Applied Historical Astronomy. The aim of this interdisciplinary subject is the application of historical astronomical records to the investigation of problems in modern astronomy and geophysics. Stephenson has almost exclusively concentrated on pre-telescopic records, especially those preserved from ancient and medieval times -- the earliest reliable observations dating from around 700 BC. The records which have mainly interested him are of eclipses (both solar and lunar), supernovae, sunspots and aurorae, and Halley's Comet. The main sources of early astronomical data are fourfold: records from ancient and medieval East Asia (China, together with Korea and Japan); ancient Babylon; ancient and medieval Europe; and the medieval Arab world. A feature of Stephenson's research is the direct consultation of early astronomical texts in their original language -- either working unaided or with the help of colleagues. He has also developed a variety of techniques to help interpret the various observations. Most pre-telescopic observations are very crude by present-day standards. In addition, early motives for skywatching were more often astrological rather than scientific. Despite these drawbacks, ancient and medieval astronomical records have two remarkable advantages over modern data. Firstly, they can enable the investigation of long-term trends (e.g. in the terrestrial rate of rotation), which in the relatively short period covered by telescopic observations are obscured by short-term fluctuations. Secondly, over the lengthy time-scale which they cover, significant numbers of very rare events (such as Galactic supernovae) were reported, which have few -- if any-- counterparts in the telescopic record. In his various researches, Stephenson has mainly focused his attention on two specific topics. These are: (i) long-term changes in the Earth's rate of

  5. Applied large eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Paul G; Lardeau, Sylvain

    2009-07-28

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is now seen more and more as a viable alternative to current industrial practice, usually based on problem-specific Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods. Access to detailed flow physics is attractive to industry, especially in an environment in which computer modelling is bound to play an ever increasing role. However, the improvement in accuracy and flow detail has substantial cost. This has so far prevented wider industrial use of LES. The purpose of the applied LES discussion meeting was to address questions regarding what is achievable and what is not, given the current technology and knowledge, for an industrial practitioner who is interested in using LES. The use of LES was explored in an application-centred context between diverse fields. The general flow-governing equation form was explored along with various LES models. The errors occurring in LES were analysed. Also, the hybridization of RANS and LES was considered. The importance of modelling relative to boundary conditions, problem definition and other more mundane aspects were examined. It was to an extent concluded that for LES to make most rapid industrial impact, pragmatic hybrid use of LES, implicit LES and RANS elements will probably be needed. Added to this further, highly industrial sector model parametrizations will be required with clear thought on the key target design parameter(s). The combination of good numerical modelling expertise, a sound understanding of turbulence, along with artistry, pragmatism and the use of recent developments in computer science should dramatically add impetus to the industrial uptake of LES. In the light of the numerous technical challenges that remain it appears that for some time to come LES will have echoes of the high levels of technical knowledge required for safe use of RANS but with much greater fidelity.

  6. Basic and applied research on choice responding.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, W W; Mazur, J E

    1997-01-01

    Choice responding refers to the manner in which individuals allocate their time or responding among available response options. In this article, we first review basic investigations that have identified and examined variables that influence choice responding, such as response effort and reinforcement rate, immediacy, and quality. We then describe recent bridge and applied studies that illustrate how the results of basic research on choice responding can help to account for human behavior in natural environments and improve clinical assessments and interventions. PMID:9316255

  7. Applying incentive sensitization models to behavioral addiction.

    PubMed

    Rømer Thomsen, Kristine; Fjorback, Lone O; Møller, Arne; Lou, Hans C

    2014-09-01

    The incentive sensitization theory is a promising model for understanding the mechanisms underlying drug addiction, and has received support in animal and human studies. So far the theory has not been applied to the case of behavioral addictions like Gambling Disorder, despite sharing clinical symptoms and underlying neurobiology. We examine the relevance of this theory for Gambling Disorder and point to predictions for future studies. The theory promises a significant contribution to the understanding of behavioral addiction and opens new avenues for treatment.

  8. Essays in Applied Microeconomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Qi

    This dissertation consists of three self-contained applied microeconomics essays on topics related to behavioral economics and industrial organization. Chapter 1 studies how sentiment as a result of sports event outcomes affects consumers' tipping behavior in the presence of social norms. I formulate a model of tipping behavior that captures consumer sentiment following a reference-dependent preference framework and empirically test its relevance using the game outcomes of the NBA and the trip and tipping data on New York City taxicabs. While I find that consumers' tipping behavior responds to unexpected wins and losses of their home team, particularly in close game outcomes, I do not find evidence for loss aversion. Coupled with the findings on default tipping, my empirical results on the asymmetric tipping responses suggest that while social norms may dominate loss aversion, affect and surprises can result in freedom on the upside of tipping. Chapter 2 utilizes a novel data source of airline entry and exit announcements and examines how the incumbent airlines adjust quality provisions as a response to their competitors' announcements and the role of timing in such responses. I find no evidence that the incumbents engage in preemptive actions when facing probable entry and exit threats as signaled by the competitors' announcements in either short term or long term. There is, however, evidence supporting their responses to the competitors' realized entry or exit. My empirical findings underscore the role of timing in determining preemptive actions and suggest that previous studies may have overestimated how the incumbent airlines respond to entry threats. Chapter 3, which is collaborated with Benjamin Ho, investigates the habit formation of consumers' thermostat setting behavior, an often implicitly made decision and yet a key determinant of home energy consumption and expenditures. We utilize a high frequency dataset on household thermostat usage and find that

  9. Essays in applied economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arano, Kathleen

    Three independent studies in applied economics are presented. The first essay looks at the US natural gas industrial sector and estimates welfare effects associated with the changes in natural gas regulatory policy over the past three decades. Using a disequilibrium model suited to the natural gas industry, welfare transfers and deadweight losses are calculated. Results indicate that deregulation policies, beginning with the NGPA of 1978, have caused the industry to become more responsive to market conditions. Over time, regulated prices converge toward the estimated equilibrium prices. As a result of this convergence, deadweight losses associated with regulation are also diminished. The second essay examines the discounted utility model (DU), the standard model used for intertemporal decision-making. Prior empirical studies challenge the descriptive validity of the model. This essay addresses the four main inconsistencies that have been raised: domain dependence, magnitude effects, time effects, and gain/loss asymmetries. These inconsistencies, however, may be the result of the implicit assumption of linear utility and not a failure of the DU model itself. In order to test this hypothesis, data was collected from in-class surveys of economics classes at Mississippi State University. A random effects model for panel data estimation which accounts for individual specific effects was then used to impute discount rates measured in terms of dollars and utility. All four inconsistencies were found to be present when the dollar measures were used. Using utility measures of the discount rate resolved the inconsistencies in some cases. The third essay brings together two perspectives in the study of religion and economics: modeling religious behavior using economic tools and variables, and modeling economic behavior using religious variables. A system of ordered probit equations is developed to simultaneously model religious activities and economic outcomes. Using data

  10. Applied physiology of swimming.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, J M; Montpetit, R R

    1986-01-01

    Scientific research in swimming over the past 10 to 15 years has been oriented toward multiple aspects that relate to applied and basic physiology, metabolism, biochemistry, and endocrinology. This review considers recent findings on: 1) specific physical characteristics of swimmers; 2) the energetics of swimming; 3) the evaluation of aerobic fitness in swimming; and 4) some metabolic and hormonal aspects related to swimmers. Firstly, the age of finalists in Olympic swimming is not much different from that of the participants from other sports. They are taller and heavier than a reference population of the same age. The height bias in swimming may be the reason for lack of success from some Asian and African countries. Experimental data point toward greater leanness, particularly in female swimmers, than was seen 10 years ago. Overall, female swimmers present a range of 14 to 19% body fat whereas males are much lower (5 to 10%). Secondly, the relationship between O2 uptake and crawl swimming velocity (at training and competitive speeds) is thought to be linear. The energy cost varies between strokes with a dichotomy between the 2 symmetrical and the 2 asymmetrical strokes. Energy expenditure in swimming is represented by the sum of the cost of translational motion (drag) and maintenance of horizontal motion (gravity). The cost of the latter decreases as speed increases. Examination of the question of size-associated effects on the cost of swimming using Huxley's allometric equation (Y = axb) shows an almost direct relationship with passive drag. Expressing energy cost in litres of O2/m/kg is proposed as a better index of technical swimming ability than the traditional expression of VO2/distance in L/km. Thirdly, maximal direct conventional techniques used to evaluate maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) in swimming include free swimming, tethered swimming, and flume swimming. Despite the individual peculiarities of each method, with similar experimental conditions

  11. Clinical Instruction for Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Greg; Sexton, Patrick; Guyer, M. Susan; Willeford, K. Sean; Levy, Linda S.; Barnum, Mary G.; Fincher, A. Louise

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To present the principles of adult learning and mentoring to help clinical instructors better educate athletic training students (ATSs) during their clinical experiences, with the end result being a better prepared, competent entry-level practitioner. Background: The principles of adult learning must be applied to ATS clinical education…

  12. Topically applied vitamins and their cutaneous effects.

    PubMed

    Grammaticopoulos, George T; Furtunopoulos, Demetrios G; Zisova, Lilia G

    2004-01-01

    The number of cosmetic products which include vitamins as a constituent has increased three-fold since 1991. Vitamins are commonly used as ingredients of products designed to improve the appearance and health of the skin; for this reason the cutaneous benefits of such products are actively researched by dermatologists and chemists. The present study does a review of the action of topically applied vitamins for local use which improves the function of the skin. We specifically consider the biologic activity of topically applied vitamins, their stability and usefulness. Ways of stabilizing different kinds of vitamins, as well as their stability to oxygen, light, temperature, acids, and bases, are shown. The conclusion suggested by the review is that the efficiency of topically applied vitamins is dependent not only on their good stabilization and concentration but also on the clinical individual tests that can determine the best product for each particular patient.

  13. 42 CFR 52d.8 - Other HHS regulations that apply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Other HHS regulations that apply. 52d.8 Section 52d.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE CLINICAL CANCER EDUCATION PROGRAM § 52d.8 Other HHS regulations that apply....

  14. 42 CFR 52d.8 - Other HHS regulations that apply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Other HHS regulations that apply. 52d.8 Section 52d.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE CLINICAL CANCER EDUCATION PROGRAM § 52d.8 Other HHS regulations that apply....

  15. 42 CFR 52d.8 - Other HHS regulations that apply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Other HHS regulations that apply. 52d.8 Section 52d.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE CLINICAL CANCER EDUCATION PROGRAM § 52d.8 Other HHS regulations that apply....

  16. 42 CFR 52d.8 - Other HHS regulations that apply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other HHS regulations that apply. 52d.8 Section 52d.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE CLINICAL CANCER EDUCATION PROGRAM § 52d.8 Other HHS regulations that apply....

  17. 42 CFR 52d.8 - Other HHS regulations that apply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Other HHS regulations that apply. 52d.8 Section 52d.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE CLINICAL CANCER EDUCATION PROGRAM § 52d.8 Other HHS regulations that apply....

  18. The Routledge Applied Linguistics Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Li, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "The Routledge Applied Linguistics Reader" is an essential collection of readings for students of Applied Linguistics. Divided into five sections: Language Teaching and Learning, Second Language Acquisition, Applied Linguistics, Identity and Power and Language Use in Professional Contexts, the "Reader" takes a broad…

  19. Motivating employees. Applying motivational theories to nursing.

    PubMed

    Pustai, I

    1989-12-01

    Managers provide the critical link between the delivery of nursing care and the administration. It is vital for nurse managers to provide a work environment that supports professional nursing practices. Staff nurses are taught how to carry out clinical functions. For them to develop and practice advanced clinical skills, managers have to buffer the pressures of daily operations. They must ask themselves, "Am I committed to my employees?" "Am I an enthusiastic role model for my employees?" "Do I use positive motivating techniques?" "Do I know each of my employees personally as a unique individual?" "What can I do to create an environment that supports my employees?" and "How can I make each of my employees feel respected and worthy?" If the manager, whether experienced or not, can answer these questions honestly and apply motivational techniques differently, he or she will be the best kind of manager: a true leader.

  20. The Fleming Applied Projects Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spasov, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Applied Projects is a program where every technology student engages in an intensive team project full time during the final academic semester. A wide range of enterprises provide the real-world problems that form the basis of student projects. This article describes the program and how Fleming College uses this program for applied research. To…

  1. An Option in Applied Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, William E., III

    1988-01-01

    Describes a program option for undergraduate chemical engineering students interested in biotechnology. Discusses how this program is deployed at the University of Southern Florida. Lists courses which apply to this program. Discusses the goals of teaching applied microbiology to engineering majors. (CW)

  2. Development of the Applied Baccalaureate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Barbara K.; Bragg, Debra D.; Ruud, Collin M.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing demands for economic competitiveness and educational effectiveness have led states and institutions to implement new approaches to facilitating baccalaureate completion. This study examined one of these approaches, the applied baccalaureate degree, which is designed to incorporate applied associate course work and degrees once…

  3. Situational Supervision for Athletic Training Clinical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Linda S.; Gardner, Greg; Barnum, Mary G.; Willeford, K. Sean; Sexton, Patrick; Guyer, M. Susan; Fincher, A. Louise

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The medical education model provides the basis for athletic training students to learn theoretical and practical skills. Clinical rotations are completed where they apply what they have learned under the direct supervision of a clinical instructor (CI) or approved clinical instructor (ACI). Approved clinical instructors are taught…

  4. Applied Linguistics in Society. Papers from the Annual Meeting of the British Association for Applied Linguistics (20th, Nottingham, England, United Kingdom, September 1987). British Studies in Applied Linguistics, 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunwell, Pamela, Ed.

    A selection of papers from the 1987 meeting of the applied linguistics association includes the following: "Applied Linguistics in Society" (John Trim); "European Developments in Applied Linguistics" (Theo van Els); "Translation and Interpretation: Retrospect and Prospect" (Peter Newmark); "Clinical Linguistics:…

  5. Communities of clinical practice: the social organization of clinical learning.

    PubMed

    Egan, Tony; Jaye, Chrystal

    2009-01-01

    The social organization of clinical learning is under-theorized in the sociological literature on the social organization of health care. Professional scopes of practice and jurisdictions are formally defined by professional principles and standards and reflected in legislation; however, these are mediated through the day-to-day clinical activities of social groupings of clinical teams. The activities of health service providers typically occur within communities of clinical practice. These are also major sites for clinical curriculum delivery, where clinical students learn not only clinical skills but also how to be health professionals. In this article, we apply Wenger's model of social learning within organizations to curriculum delivery within a health service setting. Here, social participation is the basis of learning. We suggest that it offers a powerful framework for recognizing and explaining paradox and incongruence in clinical teaching and learning, and also for recognizing opportunities, and devising means, to add value to students' learning experiences.

  6. Applied photonic therapy in veterinary medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Terry R.; McLaren, Brian C.

    2005-04-01

    There can be no question that specific systemic physiological results occur, when red light (660nm) is applied to the skin, it is now more a question of detailed mechanisms. Before gathering statistically signifcant clinical trial data, it is important to first enumerate the type of results observed in practice. Case histories are presented highlighting the use of photonic therapy in veterinary medicine. Over 900 surgical procedures have been performed and documented, utilizing the principles of photonic therapy, and while hemostasis, pain relief, and nausea relief, were the primary goals, the peri-operative death rate, the post-operative seroma, and post-operative infection were reduced to almost zero, and there was a noticeable increase in the healing rate. Scientifically applied photonic therapy, rather than supplanting conventional veterinary medicine, compliments and increases the veterinarian's set of skills. This paper proposes a hypothesis of how 660 nm light applied to specific points on the skin, produces various physiological changes in animals. By using animals, there can be no placebo, hypnotic or psychosomatic confounding effects.

  7. Applying Sociology to the Teaching of Applied Sociology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Richard Cheever

    A college-level applied sociology course in which students use sociological theory or research methodology to solve social problems is described. Guidelines for determining appropriate projects are: (1) the student must feel there is a substantial need for the project; (2) the project must be approachable through recognized sociological…

  8. Basic research vs. applied research.

    PubMed

    Reulen, H J

    2002-01-01

    Research rotation is an important component in the education of a neurosurgical resident. The selection of the area of research is essential. There are many arguments in favour of selecting research projects to be close to the individual trainee's clinical interest. Studies far away from the individual's clinical interest in most cases are less productive and will not be pursued later. There are also many advantages if a cooperation is planned with other institutions. The programme director or staff members play an important role in the selection of the research project, of an appropriate laboratory or institution, and in the process of financing a research rotation.

  9. From art to applied science.

    PubMed

    Schatzberg, Eric

    2012-09-01

    Before "applied science" and "technology" became keywords, the concept of art was central to discourse about material culture and its connections to natural knowledge. By the late nineteenth century, a new discourse of applied science had replaced the older discourse of art. This older discourse of art, especially as presented in Enlightenment encyclopedias, addressed the relationship between art and science in depth. But during the nineteenth century the concept of fine art gradually displaced the broader meanings of "art," thus undermining the utility of the term for discourse on the relationship between knowledge and practice. This narrowed meaning of "art" obscured key aspects of the industrial world. In effect, middle-class agents of industrialism, including "men of science," used the rhetoric of "applied science" and, later, "technology" to cement the exclusion of artisanal knowledge from the discourse of industrial modernity.

  10. Women in applied behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    McSweeney, Frances K.; Donahoe, Patricia; Swindell, Samantha

    2000-01-01

    The status of women in applied behavior analysis was examined by comparing the participation of women in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA) to their participation in three similar journals. For all journals, the percentage of articles with at least one female author, the percentage of authors who are female, and the percentage of articles with a female first author increased from 1978 to 1997. Participation by women in JABA was equal to or greater than participation by women in the comparison journals. However, women appeared as authors on papers in special sections of Behavior Modification substantially more often when the editor was female than when the editor was male. In addition, female membership on the editorial boards of JABA, Behavior Modification, and Behaviour Research and Therapy failed to increase from 1978 to 1997. We conclude that a “glass ceiling” reduces the participation of women at the highest levels of applied behavior analysis and related fields. PMID:22478351

  11. Applied Remote Sensing Program (ARSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. D.; Foster, K. E.; Mouat, D. A.; Miller, D. A.; Conn, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    The activities and accomplishments of the Applied Remote Sensing Program during FY 1975-1976 are reported. The principal objective of the Applied Remote Sensing Program continues to be designed projects having specific decision-making impacts as a principal goal. These projects are carried out in cooperation and collaboration with local, state and federal agencies whose responsibilities lie with planning, zoning and environmental monitoring and/or assessment in the application of remote sensing techniques. The end result of the projects is the use by the involved agencies of remote sensing techniques in problem solving.

  12. World Englishes and Applied Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kachru, Braj B.

    This paper addresses the issue of the relationship between World Englishes (WE) and applied linguistics. The diffusion of English is seen in terms of three concentric circles: the Inner Circle (first-language varieties, e.g., the United States, United Kingdom), the Outer Circle (English-as-a-Second-Language varieties), and the Expanding Circle…

  13. Applied Remote Sensing Program (ARSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouat, D. A.; Johnson, J. D.; Foster, K. E.

    1977-01-01

    Descriptions of projects engaged by the Applied Remote Sensors Program in the state of Arizona are contained in an annual report for the fiscal year 1976-1977. Remote sensing techniques included thermal infrared imagery in analog and digital form and conversion of data into thermograms. Delineation of geologic areas, surveys of vegetation and inventory of resources were also presented.

  14. Applied aerodynamics: Challenges and expectations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Victor L.; Smith, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Aerospace is the leading positive contributor to this country's balance of trade, derived largely from the sale of U.S. commercial aircraft around the world. This powerfully favorable economic situation is being threatened in two ways: (1) the U.S. portion of the commercial transport market is decreasing, even though the worldwide market is projected to increase substantially; and (2) expenditures are decreasing for military aircraft, which often serve as proving grounds for advanced aircraft technology. To retain a major share of the world market for commercial aircraft and continue to provide military aircraft with unsurpassed performance, the U.S. aerospace industry faces many technological challenges. The field of applied aerodynamics is necessarily a major contributor to efforts aimed at meeting these technological challenges. A number of emerging research results that will provide new opportunities for applied aerodynamicists are discussed. Some of these have great potential for maintaining the high value of contributions from applied aerodynamics in the relatively near future. Over time, however, the value of these contributions will diminish greatly unless substantial investments continue to be made in basic and applied research efforts. The focus: to increase understanding of fluid dynamic phenomena, identify new aerodynamic concepts, and provide validated advanced technology for future aircraft.

  15. Case Studies in Applied Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematical Association of America, Washington, DC.

    This collection of nine case studies in applied mathematics was written primarily for the use of the instructor by a Conference sponsored by the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM). Each chapter contains exercises of varying degrees of difficulty and several include student projects. The materials were used on a trial…

  16. Applied Learning for Middle Schoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Paula; And Others

    1995-01-01

    From leading garden tours to planning a visit for Japanese teachers and participating in community theater, middle schoolers at Fort Worth's Applied Learning Academy learn academic content by working on community projects. Students' writing skills soared as they developed, edited, and field-tested brochures and trail-guide maps for their botanical…

  17. Toward an Applied Administrative Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Roger L. M.

    1983-01-01

    A study of 65 articles from the 1981 volumes of "Administrative Science Quarterly" and "Harvard Business Review," using smallest space analysis, found that the few studies adopting subjective (instead of objective) approaches to analyzing organizational change were most likely to provide a basis for an applied administrative…

  18. Applying Creativity Research to Cooking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beghetto, Ronald A.; Kaufman, James C.; Hatcher, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    What, if any, benefit might there be to applying creativity research to cooking? The purpose of this paper was to address this question. Specifically, we draw on concepts and theories from creativity research to help clarify what is meant by creative cooking. This includes exploring creative cooking through the lens of the 4-C and Propulsion…

  19. Applied Linguistics Research on Asianness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Yoko

    2011-01-01

    As China is increasingly occupying the world's attention, its explosively expanding economical and political clout has also been felt in the applied linguistics domain, with the discussion on China's/Chinese language issues growing by leaps and bounds (e.g. China's English education policies, Chinese language classes in the West). Amid the world's…

  20. The Representation of Applied Psychology Areas in Introductory Psychology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haselhuhn, Charlotte W.; Clopton, Kerri L.

    2008-01-01

    Many psychology majors indicate helping others as a reason for majoring in psychology, yet many enter positions not closely related to the field. This discrepancy may be due to a lack of student knowledge of the applied areas of psychology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the coverage of clinical, counseling,…

  1. Topical and Applied Interests of Introductory Psychology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalder, Daniel R.; Stec, Deborah A.

    2007-01-01

    Using forced-choice and continuous measures, introductory psychology students reported highest interest for the topical areas of clinical and social psychology (over biological, cognitive, and developmental) and for the applied areas of education and health (over business, environment, and law) at both the beginning and end of semesters. Among…

  2. 42 CFR 68a.3 - Who is eligible to apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply? 68a.3 Section 68a.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUALS...

  3. 42 CFR 68a.3 - Who is eligible to apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply? 68a.3 Section 68a.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUALS...

  4. 42 CFR 68a.3 - Who is eligible to apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply? 68a.3 Section 68a.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUALS...

  5. Defining and Applying a Functionality Approach to Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckasson, R.; Schalock, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The current functional models of disability do not adequately incorporate significant changes of the last three decades in our understanding of human functioning, and how the human functioning construct can be applied to clinical functions, professional practices and outcomes evaluation. Methods: The authors synthesise current…

  6. Clinical research: regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Wermeling, D P

    1999-02-01

    The regulatory issues faced by institutions performing clinical research are described. Many institutions do not have on staff an expert who understands the regulatory issues involved in managing investigational new drug research and who knows the institution's obligations under the federal rules. Because pharmacists understand the FDA regulations that apply to the management of drugs in clinical research, institutions are asking pharmacists to expand their role and manage clinical research offices. Many authorities govern various aspects of investigational drug research. FDA has published regulations for good clinical practice (GCP), and the International Conference on Harmonisation is developing an international standard for the proper management of clinical trials. The guidelines published by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations aim to protect patients who are in the institution to receive health care and also participate in clinical trials. The Social Security Administration Acts specifically state that only items and services that are reasonable and necessary for the diagnosis and treatment of injury or disease can be billed to the government; research-related billings are excluded from coverage. Proper management of drug research is crucial to the success of a research program that is integrated with patient care.

  7. Modeling Applied to Problem Solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawl, Andrew; Barrantes, Analia; Pritchard, David E.

    2009-10-01

    Modeling Applied to Problem Solving (MAPS) is a pedagogy that helps students transfer instruction to problem solving in an expert-like manner. Declarative and Procedural syllabus content is organized and learned (not discovered) as a hierarchy of General Models. Students solve problems using an explicit Problem Modeling Rubric that begins with System, Interactions and Model (S.I.M.). System and Interactions are emphasized as the key to a strategic description of the system and the identification of the appropriate General Model to apply to the problem. We have employed the pedagogy in a three-week review course for students who received a D in mechanics. The course was assessed by a final exam retest as well as pre and post C-LASS surveys, yielding a one standard deviation improvement in the students' ability to solve final exam problems and a statistically significant positive shift in 7 of the 9 categories in the C-LASS.

  8. NIIEFA accelerators for applied purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorogushin, M. F.; Strokach, A. P.; Filatov, O. G.

    2016-12-01

    Since the foundation of the institute, we have designed and delivered more than three hundred different accelerators to Russia and abroad: cyclotrons, linear accelerators, and neutron generators. The technical characteristics of our equipment makes it competitive on the international market. Here we present the application, main parameters, and status of accelerators manufactured by NIIEFA, as well as prospects for the development of electrophysical systems for applied purposes.

  9. An Applied Physicist Does Econometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taff, L. G.

    2010-02-01

    The biggest problem those attempting to understand econometric data, via modeling, have is that economics has no F = ma. Without a theoretical underpinning, econometricians have no way to build a good model to fit observations to. Physicists do, and when F = ma failed, we knew it. Still desiring to comprehend econometric data, applied economists turn to mis-applying probability theory---especially with regard to the assumptions concerning random errors---and choosing extremely simplistic analytical formulations of inter-relationships. This introduces model bias to an unknown degree. An applied physicist, used to having to match observations to a numerical or analytical model with a firm theoretical basis, modify the model, re-perform the analysis, and then know why, and when, to delete ``outliers'', is at a considerable advantage when quantitatively analyzing econometric data. I treat two cases. One is to determine the household density distribution of total assets, annual income, age, level of education, race, and marital status. Each of these ``independent'' variables is highly correlated with every other but only current annual income and level of education follow a linear relationship. The other is to discover the functional dependence of total assets on the distribution of assets: total assets has an amazingly tight power law dependence on a quadratic function of portfolio composition. Who knew? )

  10. Towards "open applied" Earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, C. R.; Schildhauer, M.

    2014-12-01

    Concepts of open science -- in the context of cyber/digital technology and culture -- could greatly benefit applied and secondary Earth science efforts. However, international organizations (e.g., environmental agencies, conservation groups and sustainable development organizations) that are focused on applied science have been slow to incorporate open practices across the spectrum of scientific activities, from data to decisions. Myriad benefits include transparency, reproducibility, efficiency (timeliness and cost savings), stakeholder engagement, direct linkages between research and environmental outcomes, reduction in bias and corruption, improved simulation of Earth systems and improved availability of science in general. We map out where and how open science can play a role, providing next steps, with specific emphasis on applied science efforts and processes such as environmental assessment, synthesis and systematic reviews, meta-analyses, decision support and emerging cyber technologies. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the organizations for which they work and/or represent.

  11. Implementing Peer Evaluation of Clinical Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laske, Rita Ann

    2013-01-01

    Clinical education provides the nursing student opportunities to learn the practice of nursing. In the clinical setting, the nursing student applies classroom knowledge to the real patient care situation. The clinical instructor facilitates this important process by assisting students to integrate knowledge into their practice, improve their…

  12. Applied physiology at the bedside to drive resuscitation algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Andre L.; Pinsky, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamic instability is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Goal-directed therapeutic algorithms have been used in various clinical settings to reverse or prevent organ damage and death that could occur with a low oxygen delivery state. Most current resuscitative algorithms use static physiologic measures to determine if a patient will respond to proven therapies. While static parameters are useful in identifying the potential for clinical instability, they cannot tell us how patients will respond to an intervention. Applied physiology, through the use of functional hemodynamic monitoring can predict the body's reaction to therapy because they are based on cardiovascular dynamics. A growing body of evidence supports the use of applied physiologic principles in goal directed therapeutic algorithms for appropriate and effective resuscitation/optimization. Over time, applied physiology should be incorporated into standardized protocol-driven care to improve outcomes in patients experiencing, or at risk for hemodynamic instability. PMID:25479921

  13. Nose: Applied Aspects in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Dammaningala Venkataramaiah; Shilpa, Kanathur; Nataraja, Holavanahally Veerabhadrappa; Divya, Kallapa Gorur

    2016-01-01

    Nose is the most prominent part of the mid-face and has important physiological, aesthetic and psychological functions. Skin diseases on the nose are commonly seen by dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, and plastic surgeons. Because of its exposed, highly visible localization, lesions on the skin of the nose are often noticed by patients themselves, typically very early in the course of the disease. Similarly, the dermatological lexicon is well known with descriptive terminologies, synonyms, acronyms, eponyms, toponyms, misnomers. We have tried to compile the anatomical applications of nose in cosmetology and dermatosurgery subspecialities with nasal eponyms and signs encountered in clinical dermatology that would be helpful for residents. PMID:27057038

  14. Applying critical thinking to nursing.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    2015-08-19

    Critical thinking and writing are skills that are not easy to acquire. The term 'critical' is used differently in social and clinical contexts. Nursing students need time to master the inquisitive and ruminative aspects of critical thinking that are required in academic environments. This article outlines what is meant by critical thinking in academic settings, in relation to both theory and reflective practice. It explains how the focus of a question affects the sort of critical thinking required and offers two taxonomies of learning, to which students can refer when analysing essay requirements. The article concludes with examples of analytical writing in reference to theory and reflective practice.

  15. Clinical Semiotics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shands, Harley C.; Meltzer, James D.

    1975-01-01

    Clinical semiotics is defined and discussed as the discipline having to do with the interrelation between specifically human methods of communicating and processing information and specifically human psychiatric and psychosomatic disorders. (Author/RM)

  16. Clinical photography.

    PubMed

    Jakowenko, Janelle

    2009-01-01

    Digital cameras, when used correctly, can provide the basis for telemedicine services. The increasing sophistication of digital cameras, combined with the improved speed and availability of the Internet, make them an instrument that every health-care professional should be familiar with. Taking satisfactory images of patients requires clinical photography skills. Photographing charts, monitors, X-ray films and specimens also requires expertise. Image capture using digital cameras is often done with insufficient attention, which can lead to inaccurate study results. The procedures in clinical photography should not vary from camera to camera, or from country to country. Taking a photograph should be a standardised process. There are seven main scenarios in clinical photography and health professionals who use cameras should be familiar with all of them. Obtaining informed consent prior to photography should be a normal part of the clinical photography routine.

  17. Applying STAMP in Accident Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy; Daouk, Mirna; Dulac, Nicolas; Marais, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Accident models play a critical role in accident investigation and analysis. Most traditional models are based on an underlying chain of events. These models, however, have serious limitations when used for complex, socio-technical systems. Previously, Leveson proposed a new accident model (STAMP) based on system theory. In STAMP, the basic concept is not an event but a constraint. This paper shows how STAMP can be applied to accident analysis using three different views or models of the accident process and proposes a notation for describing this process.

  18. Fire retardancy using applied materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, R.

    1971-01-01

    An example of advanced technology transfer from the Little Joe, Surveyor, Comsat, re-entry and Apollo age to everyday fire protection needs is presented. Utilizing the principle of sublimation cooling for thermostatic temperature control, the material meets a wide range of fire retardancy and heat transmission control requirements. Properties vary from flexible tape for conduits and electrical cables to rigid coatings for column protection, with a broad spectrum of sublimation temperatures available. The material can be applied in the field or in the factory, utilizing mass production techniques, yielding a product that is reliable, effective, widely available and low in cost.

  19. Aerospace reliability applied to biomedicine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Vargo, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is presented that indicates that the reliability and quality assurance methodology selected by NASA to minimize failures in aerospace equipment can be applied directly to biomedical devices to improve hospital equipment reliability. The Space Electric Rocket Test project is used as an example of NASA application of reliability and quality assurance (R&QA) methods. By analogy a comparison is made to show how these same methods can be used in the development of transducers, instrumentation, and complex systems for use in medicine.

  20. Applying quantum principles to psychology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busemeyer, Jerome R.; Wang, Zheng; Khrennikov, Andrei; Basieva, Irina

    2014-12-01

    This article starts out with a detailed example illustrating the utility of applying quantum probability to psychology. Then it describes several alternative mathematical methods for mapping fundamental quantum concepts (such as state preparation, measurement, state evolution) to fundamental psychological concepts (such as stimulus, response, information processing). For state preparation, we consider both pure states and densities with mixtures. For measurement, we consider projective measurements and positive operator valued measurements. The advantages and disadvantages of each method with respect to applications in psychology are discussed.

  1. Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Applied to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In September 2013, EPA announced the availability of the final report, Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Applied to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Flame-Retardant Coatings in Upholstery Textiles: A Case Study Presenting Priority Research Gaps for Future Risk Assessments. This final report presents a case study of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs); it focuses on the specific example of MWCNTs as used in flame-retardant coatings applied to upholstery textiles. This case study is organized around the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework, which structures available information pertaining to the product life cycle, environmental transport and fate, exposure-dose in receptors (i.e., humans, ecological populations, and the environment), and potential impacts in these receptors. A group of experts representing multiple disciplines and multiple sector perspectives used an earlier draft of the case study in conjunction with a structured workshop process to identify and prioritize research gaps that, if pursued, could inform future MWCNT assessment efforts. The final report is not a health, risk, or exposure assessment and as such does not draw conclusions about potential risks, or present an exhaustive review of the literature. Rather, it presents the MWCNT research priorities that experts identified in this application of CEA in order to aid research planning throughout the scientific community. The outcomes of these research efforts may subsequ

  2. Sorption of cadmium and copper ions on natural and synthetic hydroxylapatite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fernane, F.; Mecherri, M.O.; Sharrock, P. Hadioui, M.; Lounici, H.; Fedoroff, M.

    2008-05-15

    The sorption of divalent cadmium and copper ions from aqueous solutions on natural and synthetic hydroxyapatite was investigated by the batch method and under dynamic conditions in columns at 22 deg. C and pH 5. The effect of cadmium and copper concentration on sorption was studied. Both types of apatites are efficient, despite their different composition and morphology. The sorption mechanism involves an ion exchange for Cd(II), while Cu(II) leads to precipitation of a newly formed solid. Thus, the sorption efficiency depends on the experimental conditions and the specific physicochemical properties of the apatites used. The sorption isotherms were fitted to the Langmuir equation.

  3. Exercise, muscle, and the applied load-bone strength balance.

    PubMed

    Giangregorio, L; El-Kotob, R

    2017-01-01

    A fracture occurs when the applied load is greater than the bone can withstand. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of osteoporosis include recommendations for exercise; one of the few therapies where the proposed anti-fracture mechanisms that include effects on both bone strength and applied loads, where applied loads can come in the form of a fall, externally applied loads, body weight, or muscle forces. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the clinical evidence pertaining to the potential efficacy of exercise for preventing fractures in older adults, including its direct effects on outcomes along the causal pathway to fractures (e.g., falls, posture, bone strength) and the indirect effects on muscle or the muscle-bone relationship. The evidence is examined as it pertains to application in clinical practice. Considerations for future research are discussed, such as the need for trials in individuals with low bone mass or students that evaluate whether changes in muscle mediate changes in bone. Future trials should also consider adequacy of calorie or protein intake, the confounding effect of exercise-induced weight loss, or the most appropriate therapeutic goal (e.g., strength, weight bearing, or hypertrophy) and outcome measures (e.g., fracture, disability, cost-effectiveness).

  4. Implementing an Applied Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Presson, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The work implied in the NASA Applied Science Program requires a delicate balancing act for the those doing it. At the implementation level there are multiple tensions intrinsic to the program. For example each application of an existing product to a decision support process requires deep knowledge about the data and deep knowledge about the decision making process. It is highly probable no one person has this range of knowledge. Otherwise the decision making process would already be using the data. Therefore, a team is required. But building a team usually requires time, especially across agencies. Yet the program mandates efforts of relatively short duration. Further, those who know the data are scientists, which makes them essential to the program. But scientists are evaluated on their publication record. Anything which diverts a scientist from the research for his next publication is an anathema to him and potential death to their career. Trying to get another agency to use NASA data does not strike most scientists as material inherently suitable for publication. Also, NASA wishes to rapidly implement often substantial changes to another agency's process. For many reasons, such as budget and program constraints, speed is important. But the owner of a decision making process is tightly constrained, usually by law, regulation, organization and custom. Changes when made are slow, cautious, even hesitant, and always done according a process specific to the situation. To manage this work MSFC must balance these and other tensions. Some things we have relatively little control over, such as budget. These we try to handle by structural techniques. For example by insisting all of our people work on multiple projects simultaneously we inherently have diversification of funding for all of our people. In many cases we explicitly use some elements of tension to be productive. For example the need for the scientists to constantly publish is motivation to keep tasks short and

  5. Applied public-key steganography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillon, Pierre; Furon, Teddy; Duhamel, Pierre

    2002-04-01

    We consider the problem of hiding information in a steganographic framework, i.e. embedding a binary message within an apparently innocuous content, in order to establish a suspicion-free digital communication channel. The adversary is passive as no intentional attack is foreseen. The only threat is that she discovers the presence of a hidden communication. The main goal of this article is to find if the Scalar Costa Scheme, a recently published embedding method exploiting side information at the encoder, is suitable for that framework. We justify its use assessing its security level with respect to the Cachin's criterion. We derive a public-key stego-system following the ideas of R. Anderson and P. Petitcolas. This technique is eventually applied to PCM audio contents. Experimental performances are detailed in terms of bit-rate and Kullback-Leibler distance.

  6. Data Understanding Applied to Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray; Shilman, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research is to explore and develop software for supporting visualization and data analysis of search and optimization. Optimization is an ever-present problem in science. The theory of NP-completeness implies that the problems can only be resolved by increasingly smarter problem specific knowledge, possibly for use in some general purpose algorithms. Visualization and data analysis offers an opportunity to accelerate our understanding of key computational bottlenecks in optimization and to automatically tune aspects of the computation for specific problems. We will prototype systems to demonstrate how data understanding can be successfully applied to problems characteristic of NASA's key science optimization tasks, such as central tasks for parallel processing, spacecraft scheduling, and data transmission from a remote satellite.

  7. Applying adult learning practices in medical education.

    PubMed

    Reed, Suzanne; Shell, Richard; Kassis, Karyn; Tartaglia, Kimberly; Wallihan, Rebecca; Smith, Keely; Hurtubise, Larry; Martin, Bryan; Ledford, Cynthia; Bradbury, Scott; Bernstein, Henry Hank; Mahan, John D

    2014-07-01

    The application of the best practices of teaching adults to the education of adults in medical education settings is important in the process of transforming learners to become and remain effective physicians. Medical education at all levels should be designed to equip physicians with the knowledge, clinical skills, and professionalism that are required to deliver quality patient care. The ultimate outcome is the health of the patient and the health status of the society. In the translational science of medical education, improved patient outcomes linked directly to educational events are the ultimate goal and are best defined by rigorous medical education research efforts. To best develop faculty, the same principles of adult education and teaching adults apply. In a systematic review of faculty development initiatives designed to improve teaching effectiveness in medical education, the use of experiential learning, feedback, effective relationships with peers, and diverse educational methods were found to be most important in the success of these programs. In this article, we present 5 examples of applying the best practices in teaching adults and utilizing the emerging understanding of the neurobiology of learning in teaching students, trainees, and practitioners. These include (1) use of standardized patients to develop communication skills, (2) use of online quizzes to assess knowledge and aid self-directed learning, (3) use of practice sessions and video clips to enhance significant learning of teaching skills, (4) use of case-based discussions to develop professionalism concepts and skills, and (5) use of the American Academy of Pediatrics PediaLink as a model for individualized learner-directed online learning. These examples highlight how experiential leaning, providing valuable feedback, opportunities for practice, and stimulation of self-directed learning can be utilized as medical education continues its dynamic transformation in the years ahead.

  8. CLINICAL PEARL

    PubMed Central

    Mazefsky, Carla A.; Minshew, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are defined behaviorally by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) IV-TR based on abnormal development in social interaction and communication and restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behaviors and interests that are evident before the age of 3. After decades of debate, research has demonstrated that the distinctions among autism, Asperger disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified are neither clinically reliable nor based on valid neurobiological or genetic differences. The fifth edition of the DSM therefore proposes to collapse all of the clinical syndromes under the single diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). PMID:23186793

  9. The Clinical Global Impressions Scale

    PubMed Central

    Targum, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This paper reviews the potential value in daily clinical practice of an easily applied research tool, the Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) Scale, for the nonresearcher clinician to quantify and track patient progress and treatment response over time. Method: The instrument is described and sample patient scenarios are provided with scoring rationales and a practical charting system. Conclusion: The CGI severity and improvement scales offer a readily understood, practical measurement tool that can easily be administered by a clinician in a busy clinical practice setting. PMID:20526405

  10. Clinical cytomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárnok, Attila; Mittag, Anja; Lenz, Dominik

    2006-02-01

    The goal of predictive medicine is the detection of changes in patient's state prior to the clinical manifestation of the deterioration of the patients current status. Therefore, both the diagnostic of diseases like cancer, coronary atherosclerosis or congenital heart failure and the prognosis of the effect specific therapeutics on patients outcome are the main fields of predictive medicine. Clinical Cytomcs is based on the analysis of specimens from the patient by Cytomic technologies that are mainly imaging based techniques and their combinations with other assays. Predictive medicine aims at the recognition of the "fate" of each individual patients in order to yield unequivocal indications for decision making (i.e. how does the patient respond to therapy, react to medication etc.). This individualized prediction is based on the Predictive Medicine by Clinical Cytomics concept. These considerations have recently stimulated the idea of the Human Cytome Project. A major focus of the Human Cytome Project is multiplexed cy-tomic analysis of individual cells of the patient, extraction of predictive information and individual prediction that merges into individualized therapy. Although still at the beginning, Clinical Cytomics is a promising new field that may change therapy in the near future for the benefit of the patients.

  11. Modeling Applied to Problem Solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawl, Andrew; Barrantes, Analia; Pritchard, David E.

    2009-11-01

    We describe a modeling approach to help students learn expert problem solving. Models are used to present and hierarchically organize the syllabus content and apply it to problem solving, but students do not develop and validate their own Models through guided discovery. Instead, students classify problems under the appropriate instructor-generated Model by selecting a system to consider and describing the interactions that are relevant to that system. We believe that this explicit System, Interactions and Model (S.I.M.) problem modeling strategy represents a key simplification and clarification of the widely disseminated modeling approach originated by Hestenes and collaborators. Our narrower focus allows modeling physics to be integrated into (as opposed to replacing) a typical introductory college mechanics course, while preserving the emphasis on understanding systems and interactions that is the essence of modeling. We have employed the approach in a three-week review course for MIT freshmen who received a D in the fall mechanics course with very encouraging results.

  12. Data compression applied to HHVT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, William K.

    1990-01-01

    A task order was written by the High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video Technology (HHVT) project engineers to study data compression techniques that could be applied to the HHVT system. Specifically, the goals of the HHVT data compression study are to accomplish the following: (1) Determine the downlink capabilities of the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom to support HHVT data (i.e., determine the maximum data rates and link availability); (2) Determine current and projected capabilities of high speed storage media to support HHVT data by determining their maximum data acquisition/transmission rates and volumes; (3) Identify which experiment in the HHVT Users' Requirement data base need data compression, based on the experiments' imaging requirements; (4) Select the best data compression technique for each of these users by identifying a technique that provides compression but minimizes distortion; and (5) Investigate state-of-the-art technologies for possible implementation of selected data compression techniques. Data compression will be needed because of the high data rates and larger volumes of data that will result from the use of digitized video onboard the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom.

  13. Intelligence Applied to Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Robert; Gross, Anthony R.; Fletcher, L. Skip; Zornetzer, Steven (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The exponential growth in information technology has provided the potential for air vehicle capabilities that were previously unavailable to mission and vehicle designers. The increasing capabilities of computer hardware and software, including new developments such as neural networks, provide a new balance of work between humans and machines. This paper will describe several NASA projects, and review results and conclusions from ground and flight investigations where vehicle intelligence was developed and applied to aeronautical and space systems. In the first example, flight results from a neural network flight control demonstration will be reviewed. Using, a highly-modified F-15 aircraft, a NASA/Dryden experimental flight test program has demonstrated how the neural network software can correctly identify and respond to changes in aircraft stability and control characteristics. Using its on-line learning capability, the neural net software would identify that something in the vehicle has changed, then reconfigure the flight control computer system to adapt to those changes. The results of the Remote Agent software project will be presented. This capability will reduce the cost of future spacecraft operations as computers become "thinking" partners along with humans. In addition, the paper will describe the objectives and plans for the autonomous airplane program and the autonomous rotorcraft project. Technologies will also be developed.

  14. Applying research to practice: exploring the barriers.

    PubMed

    Hewitt-Taylor, Jaqui; Heaslip, Vanessa; Rowe, Nicholas E

    Nurses are not averse to applying research findings to their clinical practice; however, there appears to be a number of barriers to achieving this. Generally, barriers include lack of time and the need to provide more education surrounding the use of research. While these are both valid points, the authors suggest that perhaps the solution to the problem is looking at how research is 'sold' to practitioners. For example, the use of jargon in research is off-putting to many practitioners, which creates an impression that research is associated with academia, rather than a tool for practitioners. Also, there may be an unrealistic expectation of what 'using research' might mean. Research is seen as the pinnacle of evidence, and not a part of evidence-based practice. In this article, the authors propose that teaching and expectations of research should focus on the application of research to practice. Reviewing and critiquing of research should serve the purpose of helping to make decisions about its practical applications, rather than for academic use.

  15. Regenerative medicine as applied to general surgery.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Giuseppe; Wood, Kathryn J; De Coppi, Paolo; Baptista, Pedro M; Binder, Kyle W; Bitar, Khalil N; Breuer, Christopher; Burnett, Luke; Christ, George; Farney, Alan; Figliuzzi, Marina; Holmes, James H; Koch, Kenneth; Macchiarini, Paolo; Mirmalek Sani, Sayed-Hadi; Opara, Emmanuel; Remuzzi, Andrea; Rogers, Jeffrey; Saul, Justin M; Seliktar, Dror; Shapira-Schweitzer, Keren; Smith, Tom; Solomon, Daniel; Van Dyke, Mark; Yoo, James J; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Atala, Anthony; Stratta, Robert J; Soker, Shay

    2012-05-01

    The present review illustrates the state of the art of regenerative medicine (RM) as applied to surgical diseases and demonstrates that this field has the potential to address some of the unmet needs in surgery. RM is a multidisciplinary field whose purpose is to regenerate in vivo or ex vivo human cells, tissues, or organs to restore or establish normal function through exploitation of the potential to regenerate, which is intrinsic to human cells, tissues, and organs. RM uses cells and/or specially designed biomaterials to reach its goals and RM-based therapies are already in use in several clinical trials in most fields of surgery. The main challenges for investigators are threefold: Creation of an appropriate microenvironment ex vivo that is able to sustain cell physiology and function in order to generate the desired cells or body parts; identification and appropriate manipulation of cells that have the potential to generate parenchymal, stromal and vascular components on demand, both in vivo and ex vivo; and production of smart materials that are able to drive cell fate.

  16. Blood viscometer applying electromagnetically spinning method.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Kazuyoshi; Onuki, Masaya; Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Hirano, Taichi; Sakai, Keiji; Ohgoe, Yasuharu; Katoh, Ayako; Yaguchi, Toshiyuki; Funakubo, Akio; Fukui, Yasuhiro

    2013-09-01

    Viscosity is an important parameter which affects hemodynamics during extracorporeal circulation and long-term cardiac support. In this study, we have aimed to develop a novel viscometer with which we can easily measure blood viscosity by applying the electromagnetically spinning (EMS) method. In the EMS method, we can rotate an aluminum ball 2 mm in diameter indirectly in a test tube with 0.3 ml sample of a liquid by utilizing the moment caused by the Lorentz force as well as separate the test tube from the viscometer body. First, we calibrated the EMS viscometer by means of liquid samples with known viscosities and computational fluid dynamics. Then, when we measured the viscosity of 9.4 mPa s silicone oil in order to evaluate the performance of the EMS viscometer, the mean viscosity was found to be 9.55 ± 0.10 mPa s at available shear rates from 10 to 240 s(-1). Finally, we measured the viscosity of bovine blood. We prepared four blood samples whose hematocrit levels were adjusted to 23, 45, 50, and 70% and a plasma sample without hemocyte components. As a result, the measurements of blood viscosities showed obedience to Casson's equation. We found that the viscosity was approximately constant in Newtonian silicone oil, whereas the viscosity decreased with increasing shear rate in non-Newtonian bovine blood. These results suggest that the EMS viscometer will be useful to measure blood viscosity at the clinical site.

  17. REGENERATIVE MEDICINE AS APPLIED TO GENERAL SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Giuseppe; Wood, Kathryn J; De Coppi, Paolo; Baptista, Pedro M; Binder, Kyle W; Bitar, Khalil N; Breuer, Christopher; Burnett, Luke; Christ, George; Farney, Alan; Figliuzzi, Marina; Holmes, James H; Koch, Kenneth; Macchiarini, Paolo; Sani, Sayed-Hadi Mirmalek; Opara, Emmanuel; Remuzzi, Andrea; Rogers, Jeffrey; Saul, Justin M; Seliktar, Dror; Shapira-Schweitzer, Keren; Smith, Tom; Solomon, Daniel; Van Dyke, Mark; Yoo, James J; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Atala, Anthony; Stratta, Robert J; Soker, Shay

    2012-01-01

    The present review illustrates the state of the art of regenerative medicine (RM) as applied to surgical diseases and demonstrates that this field has the potential to address some of the unmet needs in surgery. RM is a multidisciplinary field whose purpose is to regenerate in vivo or ex vivo human cells, tissues or organs in order to restore or establish normal function through exploitation of the potential to regenerate, which is intrinsic to human cells, tissues and organs. RM uses cells and/or specially designed biomaterials to reach its goals and RM-based therapies are already in use in several clinical trials in most fields of surgery. The main challenges for investigators are threefold: Creation of an appropriate microenvironment ex vivo that is able to sustain cell physiology and function in order to generate the desired cells or body parts; identification and appropriate manipulation of cells that have the potential to generate parenchymal, stromal and vascular components on demand, both in vivo and ex vivo; and production of smart materials that are able to drive cell fate. PMID:22330032

  18. Bias in clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Theodorsson, Elvar; Magnusson, Bertil; Leito, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Clinical chemistry uses automated measurement techniques and medical knowledge in the interest of patients and healthy subjects. Automation has reduced repeatability and day-to-day variation considerably. Bias has been reduced to a lesser extent by reference measurement systems. It is vital to minimize clinically important bias, in particular bias within conglomerates of laboratories that measure samples from the same patients. Small and variable bias components will over time show random error properties and conventional random-error based methods for calculating measurement uncertainty can then be applied. The present overview of bias presents the general principles of error and uncertainty concepts, terminology and analysis, and suggests methods to minimize bias and measurement uncertainty in the interest of healthcare.

  19. A Multiple Approach to Evaluating Applied Academics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Changhua; Owens, Thomas

    The Boeing Company is involved in partnerships with Washington state schools in the area of applied academics. Over the past 3 years, Boeing offered grants to 57 high schools to implement applied mathematics, applied communication, and principles of technology courses. Part 1 of this paper gives an overview of applied academics by examining what…

  20. Clinical biochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, W. C.; Leach, C. S.; Fischer, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    The objectives of the biochemical studies conducted for the Apollo program were (1) to provide routine laboratory data for assessment of preflight crew physical status and for postflight comparisons; (2) to detect clinical or pathological abnormalities which might have required remedial action preflight; (3) to discover as early as possible any infectious disease process during the postflight quarantine periods following certain missions; and (4) to obtain fundamental medical knowledge relative to man's adjustment to and return from the space flight environment. The accumulated data presented suggest that these requirements were met by the program described. All changes ascribed to the space flight environment were subtle, whereas clinically significant changes were consistent with infrequent illnesses unrelated to the space flight exposure.

  1. Morphometrics applied to medical entomology.

    PubMed

    Dujardin, Jean-Pierre

    2008-12-01

    Morphometrics underwent a revolution more than one decade ago. In the modern morphometrics, the estimate of size is now contained in a single variable reflecting variation in many directions, as many as there are landmarks under study, and shape is defined as their relative positions after correcting for size, position and orientation. With these informative data, and the corresponding software freely available to conduct complex analyses, significant biological and epidemiological features can be quantified more accurately. We discuss the evolutionary significance of the environmental impact on metric variability, mentioning the importance of concepts like genetic assimilation, genetic accommodation, and epigenetics. We provide examples of measuring the effect of selection on metric variation by comparing (unpublished) Qst values with corresponding (published) Fst. The primary needs of medical entomologists are to distinguish species, especially cryptic species, and to detect them where they are not expected. We explain how geometric morphometrics could apply to these questions, and where there are deficiencies preventing the approach from being utilized at its maximum potential. Medical entomologists in connection with control programs aim to identify isolated populations where the risk of reinfestation after treatment would be low ("biogeographical islands"). Identifying them can be obtained from estimating the number of migrants per generation. Direct assessment of movement remains the most valid approach, but it scores active movement only. Genetic methods estimating gene flow levels among interbreeding populations are commonly used, but gene flow does not necessarily mean the current flow of migrants. Methods using the morphometric variation are neither suited to evaluate gene flow, nor are they adapted to estimate the flow of migrants. They may provide, however, the information needed to create a preliminary map pointing to relevant areas where one could

  2. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine in applied research: a year in review of 2014.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xunxun; Huang, Jia; Shi, Yuan; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) remains to be one of the fastest growing fields, which covers a wide scope of topics of both basic and applied biological researches. This overview article summarized the advancements in applied researches of TERM area, including stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration, material science, and TERM clinical trial. These achievements demonstrated the great potential of clinical regenerative therapy of tissue/organ disease or defect through stem cells and tissue engineering approaches.

  3. Data Assimilation for Applied Meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Although atmospheric models provide a best estimate of the future state of the atmosphere, due to sensitivity to initial condition, it is difficult to predict the precise future state. For applied problems, however, users often depend on having accurate knowledge of that future state. To improve prediction of a particular realization of an evolving flow field requires knowledge of the current state of that field and assimilation of local observations into the model. This talk will consider how dynamic assimilation can help address the concerns of users of atmospheric forecasts. First, we will look at the value of assimilation for the renewable energy industry. If the industry decision makers can have confidence in the wind and solar power forecasts, they can build their power allocations around the expected renewable resource, saving money for the ratepayers as well as reducing carbon emissions. We will assess the value to that industry of assimilating local real-time observations into the model forecasts and the value that is provided. The value of the forecasts with assimilation is important on both short (several hour) to medium range (within two days). A second application will be atmospheric transport and dispersion problems. In particular, we will look at assimilation of concentration data into a prediction model. An interesting aspect of this problem is that the dynamics are a one-way coupled system, with the fluid dynamic equations affecting the concentration equation, but not vice versa. So when the observations are of the concentration, one must infer the fluid dynamics. This one-way coupled system presents a challenge: one must first infer the changes in the flow field from observations of the contaminant, then assimilate that to recover both the advecting flow and information on the subgrid processes that provide the mixing. To accomplish such assimilation requires a robust method to match the observed contaminant field to that modeled. One approach is

  4. Clinical arthrography

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt, R.; Horns, J.W.; Gold, R.H.; Blaschke, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This book deals with the method and interpretation of arthrography of the shoulder, knee, ankle, elbow, hip, wrist, and metacarpophalangeal, interphalangeal, and temporomandibular joints. The emphasis is on orthopaedic disorders, usually of traumatic origin, which is in keeping with the application of arthrography in clinical practice. Other conditions, such as inflammatory and degenerative diseases, congenital disorders and, in the case of the hip, arthrography of reconstructive joint surgery, are included. Each chapter is devoted to one joint and provides a comprehensive discussion on the method of arthrography, including single and double contrast techniques where applicable, normal radiographic anatomy, and finally, the interpretation of the normal and the abnormal arthrogram.

  5. Teacher-induced countertransference in clinical teaching.

    PubMed

    Paterson, B; Groening, M

    1996-06-01

    Although it is acknowledged that clinical teaching is an interpersonal process that is relational in nature, little has been written regarding the conflicts and feelings that can exist within the student-teacher relationship. The article is a discussion of the concept of countertransference in psychotherapy, specifically as to how it may be applied to understanding clinical teachers' subjective responses to students. The authors present arguments to support the fit between the concept of countertransference and clinical teaching, focusing on the negative effects of a teacher's countertransference in clinical teaching. The implications of the concept of countertransference in clinical nursing education is explored.

  6. Developing Cross Cultural Competence: Applying Development and Prevention Ideals to Counseling Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfgang, Jeff; Frazier, Kimberly; West-Olatunji, Cirecie; Barrett, Joe

    2011-01-01

    As counselors turn their attention to child-based counseling, there is a need to apply the core tenets of the discipline of counseling to young children and incorporate cross-cultural issues into clinical competence. Using Multicultural Counseling Theory (MCT), the authors discuss conventional approaches to providing clinical interventions for…

  7. Clinical neuropsychology: a discipline in evolution.

    PubMed

    Costa, L

    1983-02-01

    The future of neuropsychology is considered first in terms of the potential impact of events occurring in clinical medicine, neuroscience research, basic behavioral science and applied psychology, and related disciplines. The focus is then turned inward on clinical neuropsychology itself and a series of suggestions are made concerning how this specialty can evolve to best meet the challenges it will face.

  8. Applied Psycholinguistics--Amphibian or Phantom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titone, Renzo

    1975-01-01

    A tentative classification of internal departments of psycholinguistics is suggested and a list of applied fields is presented. Applied psycholinguistics is not seen here to have a right to scientific independence. (SCC)

  9. Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research: Luciano L'Abate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Luciano L'Abate, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research, contributed to applied research through the introduction of the laboratory method in clinical psychology assessment and intervention, leading to the development of the first automated playroom, linking play therapy with research in child…

  10. Automating clinical dietetics documentation.

    PubMed

    Grace-Farfaglia, P; Rosow, P

    1995-06-01

    A review of commonly used charting formats discussed in the dietetics literature revealed that the subjective, objective assessment and planning (SOAP) approach is most frequently used by dietitians. Formats reported in the nursing literature were charting by exception (CBE); problem, intervention, evaluation (PIE); and focus/data, action, response (Focus/DAR). The strengths and weaknesses of the charting styles as they apply to the needs of clinical dietetic specialists were reviewed. We then decided to test in house the Focus/DAR format by assessing chart entries for adherence to style, brevity, and physician response. Dietitians pilot tested all the methods, but found them time consuming to use. The consensus was that SOAP could be adapted to the documentation needs of the individual situation and required little additional staff training. Often because of time limitations, a narrative summary was most appropriate. Chart entry length was reduced as much as 200% when staff were given brief clinical communication as a goal, and a further reduction when line limits were imposed. The physician response was positive, with recommendations followed in 50% of charts, compared with 34% in a previous audit. A nutrition documentation system was developed by the researchers by reviewing medical chart structure, documentation standards, methods of risk identification, and terminology for clinical documentation style. The resulting system affected the decision making of physicians, who could now scan notes more quickly and implement nutrition recommendations in a more timely fashion.

  11. Western Perspectives in Applied Linguistics in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makoni, Sinfree; Meinhof, Ulrike H.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the nature of the historical and contemporary social contexts within which applied linguistics in Africa emerged, and is currently practiced. The article examines the challenges "local" applied Linguistics in Africa is confronted with as it tries to amplify applied linguistic programs emanating from…

  12. Critical and Alternative Directions in Applied Linguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennycook, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    Critical directions in applied linguistics can be understood in various ways. The term "critical" as it has been used in "critical applied linguistics," "critical discourse analysis," "critical literacy" and so forth, is now embedded as part of applied linguistic work, adding an overt focus on questions of power and inequality to discourse…

  13. Suicide warning signs in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rudd, M David

    2008-02-01

    This review discusses suicide warning signs in clinical practice and has three simple goals: 1) to help practitioners differentiate in a clinically meaningful fashion between warning signs and risk factors for suicide; 2) to articulate the link among warning signs for suicide, hopelessness, and intent to die; and 3) to assist practitioners in applying warning signs in day-to-day clinical practice, doing so in a concrete and effective manner.

  14. Criteria for critiquing clinical nursing research reports.

    PubMed

    Grant, J S; Davis, L L; Kinney, M R

    1993-06-01

    The primary goal of nursing research is to develop a scientific knowledge base for practice. Postanesthesia nurses are expected to critique nursing research before applying findings to clinical practice. As consumers of research, postanesthesia nurses must be able to employ critical evaluation skills to judge the merit and relevance of research to their clinical practice. This article presents criteria for critiquing clinical nursing research reports to determine their relevance to practice.

  15. Talk in Interaction in the Speech-Language Pathology Clinic: Bringing Theory to Practice through Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaby, Margaret M.; Walsh, Irene P.

    2008-01-01

    The importance of learning about and applying clinical discourse analysis to enhance the talk in interaction in the speech-language pathology clinic is discussed. The benefits of analyzing clinical discourse to explicate therapy dynamics are described.

  16. Enhancing clinical evidence by proactively building quality into clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Meeker-O’Connell, Ann; Glessner, Coleen; Behm, Mark; Mulinde, Jean; Roach, Nancy; Sweeney, Fergus; Tenaerts, Pamela; Landray, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stakeholders across the clinical trial enterprise have expressed concern that the current clinical trial enterprise is unsustainable. The cost and complexity of trials have continued to increase, threatening our ability to generate reliable evidence essential for making appropriate decisions concerning the benefits and harms associated with clinical interventions. Overcoming this inefficiency rests on improving protocol design, trial planning, and quality oversight. Methods: The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative convened a project to evaluate methods to prospectively build quality into the scientific and operational design of clinical trials (“quality-by-design”), such that trials are feasible to conduct and important errors are prevented rather than remediated. A working group evaluated aspects of trial design and oversight and developed the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative quality-by-design principles document, outlining a series of factors generally relevant to the reliability of trial conclusions and to patient safety. These principles were then applied and further refined during a series of hands-on workshops to evaluate their utility in facilitating proactive, cross-functional dialogue, and decision-making about trial design and planning. Following these workshops, independent qualitative interviews were conducted with 19 workshop attendees to explore the potential challenges for implementing a quality-by-design approach to clinical trials. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative project team subsequently developed recommendations and an online resource guide to support implementation of this approach. Conclusion: The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative quality-by-design principles provide a framework for assuring that clinical trials adequately safeguard participants and provide reliable information on which to make decisions on the effects of treatments. The quality-by-design workshops highlighted the value of

  17. Recognizing Disjoint Clinical Concepts in Clinical Text Using Machine Learning-based Methods.

    PubMed

    Tang, Buzhou; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong; Wu, Yonghui; Zhang, Yaoyun; Jiang, Min; Wang, Jingqi; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Clinical concept recognition (CCR) is a fundamental task in clinical natural language processing (NLP) field. Almost all current machine learning-based CCR systems can only recognize clinical concepts of consecutive words (called consecutive clinical concepts, CCCs), but can do nothing about clinical concepts of disjoint words (called disjoint clinical concepts, DCCs), which widely exist in clinical text. In this paper, we proposed two novel types of representations for disjoint clinical concepts, and applied two state-of-the-art machine learning methods to recognizing consecutive and disjoint concepts. Experiments conducted on the 2013 ShARe/CLEF challenge corpus showed that our best system achieved a "strict" F-measure of 0.803 for CCCs, a "strict" F-measure of 0.477 for DCCs, and a "strict" F-measure of 0.783 for all clinical concepts, significantly higher than the baseline systems by 4.2% and 4.1% respectively.

  18. Evaluating Language. Papers from the Annual Meeting of the British Association for Applied Linguistics (Essex, England, United Kingdom, September 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graddol, David, Ed.; Swann, Joan, Ed.

    Papers from a British conference on applied linguistics address various aspects of evaluation and language. Articles include: "Grammar and Language Impairment: Clinical Linguistics as Applied Linguistics" (Paul Fletcher); "Putting Our Practice Into Theory" (Deborah Cameron); "Applied Linguistics as Evaluation of Theory and…

  19. Electrochemical Sensors for Clinic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, You; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Jianming; Li, Guang

    2008-01-01

    Demanded by modern medical diagnosis, advances in microfabrication technology have led to the development of fast, sensitive and selective electrochemical sensors for clinic analysis. This review addresses the principles behind electrochemical sensor design and fabrication, and introduces recent progress in the application of electrochemical sensors to analysis of clinical chemicals such as blood gases, electrolytes, metabolites, DNA and antibodies, including basic and applied research. Miniaturized commercial electrochemical biosensors will form the basis of inexpensive and easy to use devices for acquiring chemical information to bring sophisticated analytical capabilities to the non-specialist and general public alike in the future. PMID:27879810

  20. [The first ambulatory clinic for the prevention of women's cancer: the Strang clinic of New York].

    PubMed

    Alonso de Ruiz, Patricia; Ruiz Moreno, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The first ambulatory clinic for the prevention of women's cancers was the Strang clinic of New York City, founded by L'Esperance in 1932. Careful and complete clinical examination and some additional tests were the basis for the initial diagnosis of early cancers. In 1945, the Papanicolaou test was added as a new examination tool. Some years later, the Strang clinic proved that detection and treatment of cervical cancers in their preinvasive phase were an important factor for the control of this frequent and mortal neoplasia. The Strang clinic demonstrated that the preventive medicine principles can be applied on the discovery and diagnosis of initial cancer cases and that the treatment applied in such cases offers the best results. Additionally, according with these results, the early diagnosis and treatment of cancers should be the work's philosophy applied in all the health systems.

  1. International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemle, Ludovic Dan; Jiang, Yiwen

    2014-03-01

    The International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2013) took place in Wuhan, P R China from 26-27 October 2013 at the Military Economics Academy. The conference is regularly organized, alternately in Romania and in P R China, by ''Politehnica'' University of Timişoara, Romania, and Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, P R China, with the aim to serve as a platform for the exchange of information between various areas of applied sciences, and to promote the communication between the scientists of different nations, countries and continents. The conference has been organized for the first time in 15-16 June 2012 at the Engineering Faculty of Hunedoara, Romania. The topics of the conference covered a comprehensive spectrum of issues: Economical sciences Engineering sciences Fundamental sciences Medical sciences The conference gathered qualified researchers whose expertise can be used to develop new engineering knowledge that has applicability potential in economics, defense, medicine, etc. The number of registered participants was nearly 90 from 5 countries. During the two days of the conference 4 invited and 36 oral talks were delivered. A few of the speakers deserve a special mention: Mircea Octavian Popoviciu, Academy of Romanian Scientist — Timişoara Branch, Correlations between mechanical properties and cavitation erosion resistance for stainless steels with 12% chromium and variable contents of nickel; Carmen Eleonora Hărău, ''Politehnica'' University of Timişoara, SWOT analysis of Romania's integration in EU; Ding Hui, Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, Design and engineering analysis of material procurement mobile operation platform; Serban Rosu, University of Medicine and Pharmacy ''Victor Babeş'' Timişoara, Cervical and facial infections — a real life threat, among others. Based on the work presented at the conference, 14 selected papers are included in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. These papers

  2. Neural Networks Applied to Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    DTIC FILE COpy NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL . Monterey, California Lf 0 (0 V’ STATES 4 THESIS NEURAL NETWORKS APPLIED TO SIGNAL PROCESSING by Mark D...FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) NEURAL NETWORKS APPLIED TO...for public release; distribution is unlimited Neural Networks Applied to Signal Processing by Mark D. Baehre Captain, United States Army B.S., United

  3. Clinically Isolated Syndromes: Clinical Characteristics, Differential Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    EFENDİ, Hüsnü

    2015-01-01

    Clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) is a term that describes the first clinical onset of potential multiple sclerosis (MS). The term CIS is typically applied to young adults with episodes of acute or subacute onset, which reaches a peak quite rapidly within 2–3 weeks. In 85% of young adults who develop MS, onset occurs with an acute, CIS of the optic nerves, brainstem, or spinal cord. When clinically silent brain lesions are seen on MRI, the likelihood of developing MS is high. Because no single clinical feature or diagnostic test is sufficient for the diagnosis of CIS, diagnostic criteria have included a combination of both clinical and paraclinical studies. Diagnostic criteria from the International Panel of McDonald and colleagues incorporate MRI evidence of dissemination in time and space to allow a diagnosis of definite MS in patients with CIS. As CIS is typically the earliest clinical expression of MS, research on patients with CIS may provide new insights into early pathological changes and pathogenetic mechanisms that might affect the course of the disorder. With recent improvements in diagnosis and the advent of disease-modifying treatments for MS, there has been growing interest and research in patients with CIS.

  4. Heavy-Ion Imaging <span class="hlt">Applied</span> To Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J. I.; Tobias, C. A.; Capp, M. P.; Benton, E. V.; Holley, W. R.; Gray, Joel E.; Hendee, William R.; Haus, Andrew G.; Properzio, William S.

    1980-08-18

    Heavy particle radiography is a newly developed noninvasive low dose imaging procedure with increased resolution of minute density differences in soft tissues of the body. The method utilizes accelerated high energy ions, primarily carbon and neon, at the BEVALAC accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The research program applied to medicine utilizes heavy-ion radiography for low dose mammography, for treatment planning for cancer patients, and for imaging and accurate densitometry of skeletal structures and brain and spinal neoplasms. The presentation will be illustrated with clinical cases under study. Discussion will include the potential of heavy-ion imaging, and particularly reconstruction tomography, as an adjunct to existing diagnostic imaging procedures in medicine, both for the applications to the diagnosis, management and treatment of clinical cancer in man, but also for the early detection of small soft tissue tumors at low radiation dose.

  5. Biosensors in clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Paul

    2003-08-01

    Biosensors are analytical devices composed of a recognition element of biological origin and a physico-chemical transducer. The biological element is capable of sensing the presence, activity or concentration of a chemical analyte in solution. The sensing takes place either as a binding event or a biocatalytical event. These interactions produce a measurable change in a solution property, which the transducer converts into a quantifiable electrical signal. Present-day applications of biosensors to clinical chemistry are reviewed, including basic and applied research, commercial applications and fabrication techniques. Recognition elements include enzymes as biocatalytic recognition elements and immunoagents and DNA segments as affinity ligand recognition elements, coupled to electrochemical and optical modes of transduction. The future will include biosensors based on synthetic recognition elements to allow broad applicability to different classes of analytes and modes of transduction extending lower limits of sensitivity. Microfabrication will permit biosensors to be constructed as arrays and incorporated into lab-on-a-chip devices.

  6. Clinical risk modification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J

    Claims for compensation in cases of clinical negligence have risen dramatically in recent years. The implementation of the NHS reforms, with greater clarity of roles and responsibilities and the emphasis on devolving decision-making as close to the patient as possible, is meant to affect the entire performance of healthcare delivery. For most senior managers and clinicians, the environment in which they operate has grown increasingly turbulent and complex. Both purchasers and providers of health care want the best and most effective and efficient care. The cost and quality of care are components in determining the value of health care delivered, and both are elements of healthcare risk. To begin to manage these elements of risk, the process of healthcare risk modification can be applied. Healthcare risk modification provides the best service for patients through obtaining a synergy between risk management, quality and the law.

  7. Applying XDS for sharing CDA-based medical records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joong Il; Jang, Bong Mun; Han, Dong Hoon; Yang, Keon Ho; Kang, Won-Suk; Jung, Haijo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2006-03-01

    Many countries have set long-term objectives for establishing an Electronic Healthcare Records system(EHRs). Various IT Strategies note that integration of EHR systems has a high priority. Because the EHR systems are based on different information models and different technology platforms, one of the key integration problems in the realization of the EHRs for the continuity of patient care, is the inability to share patient records between various institutions. Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) committee has defined the detailed implementations of existing standards such as DICOM, HL7, in a publicly available document called the IHE technical framework (IHE-TF). Cross-enterprise document sharing (XDS), one of IHE technical frameworks, is describing how to apply the standards into the information systems for the sharing of medical documents among hospitals. This study aims to design Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) schema based on HL7, and to apply implementation strategies of XDS using this CDA schema.

  8. Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference.

    PubMed

    Lee, Violet; Liu, Ang; Groeber, Elizabeth; Moghaddam, Mehran; Schiller, James; Tweed, Joseph A; Walker, Gregory S

    2016-02-01

    Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference, Hyatt Regency Hotel, Cambridge, MA, USA, 14-16 September 2015 The Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis (APA) conference took place at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Cambridge, MA, on 14-16 September 2015. The 3-day conference affords pharmaceutical professionals, academic researchers and industry regulators the opportunity to collectively participate in meaningful and relevant discussions impacting the areas of pharmaceutical drug development. The APA conference was organized in three workshops encompassing the disciplines of regulated bioanalysis, discovery bioanalysis (encompassing new and emerging technologies) and biotransformation. The conference included a short course titled 'Bioanalytical considerations for the clinical development of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs)', an engaging poster session, several panel and round table discussions and over 50 diverse talks from leading industry and academic scientists.

  9. Applying professional values: the perspective of nurses of Isfahan hospitals.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Mohsen; Baloochestani, Elahe

    2014-01-01

    Applying professional values is an important issue in nursing practice. It is also crucial to find out nurses' perspectives toward ethical and professional values in the clinical environment. For this purpose, we aimed to utilize a standard tool to survey perspectives on applying these values in nursing care in hospitals of Isfahan, Iran. This is a descriptive-analytical study in which 150 nurses working in hospitals of Isfahan, Iran in 2010 were recruited by quota convenience sampling, and their perspectives on professional values were assessed. Data were collected by the Nurses Professional Values Scale (NPVS) and analyzed using SPSS Software version 16 applying descriptive and interpretive statistics. In the present study, 84% of the participants were female and 88% had bachelor's degree in nursing. The average age was 34.2 (SD=7.3), and the average years of working in a hospital were 11 (SD=7.3). No significant association was present between demographic characteristics such as age, sex, educational level or work records and applying professional and ethical values. Results also demonstrated that respect for professional values is similar among nurses of different employment types. In this study, we addressed the most and the less important professional values specified by nurses with different types of employment and also different experiences. Iranian nurses believe in respecting the legal and ethical rights of patients as the most prominent value in the nursing profession. We suggest that these professional values be specified and assessed based on Iranian culture.

  10. [Clinical activity in nursing education].

    PubMed

    Brignon, Béatrice

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to enlight the actual nursing act of the student in order to search for what makes sense in his (her) self nursing becoming and to reinterpret what is said regarding what is done. Up till, researchs were focused on declarative intentions; instead here, we go beyond using an innovative approach based on the clinical activity research method applied to the nursing education field.

  11. [Clinical research VI. Clinical relevance].

    PubMed

    Talavera, Juan O; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Usually, in clinical practice the maneuver selected is the one that achieves a favorable outcome with a direct percentage of superiority of at least 10 %, or when the number needed to treat is approximately equal to 10. While this percentage difference is practical for estimating the magnitude of an association, we need to differentiate the impact measures (attributable risk, preventable fraction), measures of association (RR, OR, HR), and frequency measures (incidence and prevalence) applicable when the outcome is nominal. And we must identify ways to measure the strength of association and the magnitude of the association when the outcome variable is quantitative. It is not uncommon to interpret the measures of association as if they were impact measures. For example, for a RR of 0.68, it is common to assume a 32 % reduction of the outcome, but we must consider that this is a relative reduction, which comes from relations of 0.4/0.6, 0.04/0.06, or 0.00004/0.00006. However the direct reduction is 20 % (60 % - 40 %), 2 %, and 2 per 100,000, respectively. Therefore, to estimate the impact of a maneuver it is important to have the direct difference and/or NNT.

  12. Framework for a clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Van De Velde, R; Lansiers, R; Antonissen, G

    2002-01-01

    The design and implementation of Clinical Information System architecture is presented. This architecture has been developed and implemented based on components following a strong underlying conceptual and technological model. Common Object Request Broker and n-tier technology featuring centralised and departmental clinical information systems as the back-end store for all clinical data are used. Servers located in the "middle" tier apply the clinical (business) model and application rules. The main characteristics are the focus on modelling and reuse of both data and business logic. Scalability as well as adaptability to constantly changing requirements via component driven computing are the main reasons for that approach.

  13. Ubiquitous Multicriteria Clinic Recommendation System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Toly

    2016-05-01

    Advancements in information, communication, and sensor technologies have led to new opportunities in medical care and education. Patients in general prefer visiting the nearest clinic, attempt to avoid waiting for treatment, and have unequal preferences for different clinics and doctors. Therefore, to enable patients to compare multiple clinics, this study proposes a ubiquitous multicriteria clinic recommendation system. In this system, patients can send requests through their cell phones to the system server to obtain a clinic recommendation. Once the patient sends this information to the system, the system server first estimates the patient's speed according to the detection results of a global positioning system. It then applies a fuzzy integer nonlinear programming-ordered weighted average approach to assess four criteria and finally recommends a clinic with maximal utility to the patient. The proposed methodology was tested in a field experiment, and the experimental results showed that it is advantageous over two existing methods in elevating the utilities of recommendations. In addition, such an advantage was shown to be statistically significant.

  14. The Contextual Interference Effect in Applied Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreiros, Joao; Figueiredo, Teresa; Godinho, Mario

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the research literature that approaches the contextual interference effect in applied settings. In contrast to the laboratory settings, in which high interference conditions depress acquisition and promote learning evaluated in retention and transfer tests, in applied settings most of the studies (60%) fail to observe positive…

  15. Applied Linguistics in Its Disciplinary Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddicoat, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    Australia's current attempt to develop a process to evaluate the quality of research (Excellence in Research for Australia--ERA) places a central emphasis on the disciplinary organisation of academic work. This disciplinary focus poses particular problems for Applied Linguistics in Australia. This paper will examine Applied Linguistics in relation…

  16. Autobiographic Narratives as Data in Applied Linguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlenko, Aneta

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, language memoirs, linguistic autobiographies, and learners' journals and diaries have become a popular means of data collection in applied linguistics. It is not always clear however how one should go about analyzing these data. The aim of this paper is to offer a critical review of analytical frameworks applied to second…

  17. Applied Behavior Analysis and Statistical Process Control?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, B. L.

    1995-01-01

    Incorporating statistical process control (SPC) methods into applied behavior analysis is discussed. It is claimed that SPC methods would likely reduce applied behavior analysts' intimate contacts with problems and would likely yield poor treatment and research decisions. Cases and data presented by Pfadt and Wheeler (1995) are cited as examples.…

  18. Why They Didn't Apply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael E.; Meganathan, Ami

    Prospective students who received application materials for Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU), Pennsylvania, in 1976 and 1978 but did not apply for admission were surveyed to determine student background factors or attitudes that may have influenced their choice of colleges to which they applied. Findings include the following: nonapplicants…

  19. Applied Implications of Reinforcement History Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipkin, Claire St. Peter; Vollmer, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    Although the influence of reinforcement history is a theoretical focus of behavior analysis, the specific behavioral effects of reinforcement history have received relatively little attention in applied research and practice. We examined the potential effects of reinforcement history by reviewing nonhuman, human operant, and applied research and…

  20. 32 CFR 37.1220 - Applied research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1220 Applied research... technology such as new materials, devices, methods and processes. It typically is funded in Research... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applied research. 37.1220 Section...

  1. 32 CFR 37.1220 - Applied research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1220 Applied research... technology such as new materials, devices, methods and processes. It typically is funded in Research... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applied research. 37.1220 Section...

  2. 32 CFR 37.1220 - Applied research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1220 Applied research... technology such as new materials, devices, methods and processes. It typically is funded in Research... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applied research. 37.1220 Section...

  3. Nuclear Facilities and Applied Technologies at Sandia

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Dave; Kaiser, Krista; Martin, Lonnie; Hanson, Don; Harms, Gary; Quirk, Tom

    2014-11-28

    The Nuclear Facilities and Applied Technologies organization at Sandia National Laboratories’ Technical Area Five (TA-V) is the leader in advancing nuclear technologies through applied radiation science and unique nuclear environments. This video describes the organization’s capabilities, facilities, and culture.

  4. Applying Information Competency to Digital Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Lisa; Francoeur, Stephen

    This paper presents a case for applying information competency (IC) standards to digital reference services at academic libraries. Practical reasons for applying standards or guidelines to e-mail and online chat reference services are given with some insight to the nature of digital reference interactions. The standards that arose from the…

  5. Applying Psychological Theories to Educational Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Two approaches to the application of psychological theories to education might be referred to as domain-general and domain-specific. The domain-general approach seeks a general theory of cognitive and other skills that apply across subject-matter areas. The domain-specific approach seeks to apply specific theories within given domains, such as…

  6. Applied Linguistics: The Challenge of Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Language has featured prominently in contemporary social theory, but the relevance of this fact to the concerns of Applied Linguistics, with its necessary orientation to practical issues of language in context, represents an ongoing challenge. This article supports the need for a greater engagement with theory in Applied Linguistics. It considers…

  7. Applied Mathematics Should Be Taught Mixed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gary I.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the differences between applied and pure mathematics and provides extensive history of mixed mathematics. Argues that applied mathematics should be taught allowing for speculative mathematics, which involves breaking down a given problem into simpler parts until one arrives at first principles. (ASK)

  8. 32 CFR 37.1220 - Applied research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applied research. 37.1220 Section 37.1220... REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1220 Applied research... technology such as new materials, devices, methods and processes. It typically is funded in...

  9. 32 CFR 37.1220 - Applied research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applied research. 37.1220 Section 37.1220... REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1220 Applied research... technology such as new materials, devices, methods and processes. It typically is funded in...

  10. Child Participant Roles in Applied Linguistics Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinter, Annamaria

    2014-01-01

    Children's status as research participants in applied linguistics has been largely overlooked even though unique methodological and ethical concerns arise in projects where children, rather than adults, are involved. This article examines the role of children as research participants in applied linguistics and discusses the limitations of…

  11. Clinical Physiology: A Successful Academic and Clinical Discipline is Threatened in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arheden, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    Clinical physiologists in Sweden are physicians (the majority with a PhD degree) with thorough training in system physiology and pathophysiology. They investigate patients in a functional approach and are engaged in basic and applied physiology teaching and research. In 1954, clinical physiology was founded as an independent academic and clinical…

  12. The basic importance of applied behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Epling, W. Frank; Pierce, W. David

    1986-01-01

    We argue that applied behavior analysis is relevant to basic research. Modification studies, and a broad range of investigations that focus on the precipitating and maintaining conditions of socially significant human behavior, have basic importance. Applied behavior analysis may aid basic researchers in the design of externally valid experiments and thereby enhance the theoretical significance of basic research for understanding human behavior. Applied research with humans, directed at culturally-important problems, will help to propagate the science of human behavior. Such a science will also be furthered by analogue experiments that model socially important behavior. Analytical-applied studies and analogue experiments are forms of applied behavior analysis that could suggest new environment-behavior relationships. These relationships could lead to basic research and principles that further the prediction, control, and understanding of behavior. PMID:22478650

  13. History and theory in "applied ethics".

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Tom L

    2007-03-01

    Robert Baker and Laurence McCullough argue that the "applied ethics model" is deficient and in need of a replacement model. However, they supply no clear meaning to "applied ethics" and miss most of what is important in the literature on methodology that treats this question. The Baker-McCullough account of medical and applied ethics is a straw man that has had no influence in these fields or in philosophical ethics. The authors are also on shaky historical grounds in dealing with two problems: (1) the historical source of the notion of "practical ethics" and (2) the historical source of and the assimilation of the term "autonomy" into applied philosophy and professional ethics. They mistakenly hold (1) that the expression "practical ethics" was first used in a publication by Thomas Percival and (2) that Kant is the primary historical source of the notion of autonomy as that notion is used in contemporary applied ethics.

  14. Accreditation Stimuli and Evaluation Responses in a Clinical Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, David; And Others

    Assessment and evaluation skills are significant goals of clinical training, yet many clinical and counseling students lack personal experiences with applied program evaluation. Clinical psychology graduate students responded to successive impending accreditation visits by conducting in-house evaluations. Students in 1977 (N=38) and 1980 (N=35)…

  15. Writing clinical scenarios for clinical science questions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Phil Em; Mucklow, John C

    2016-04-01

    Written knowledge assessments for physicians in training typically involve multiple-choice questions that use a clinical scenario in a single-best-answer format. The Royal College of Physicians Part 1 MRCP(UK) examination includes basic sciences themes that are challenging to assess through a clinical scenario. A realistic clinical setting based on everyday clinical practice and integral to the question is the clearest demonstration that the knowledge being assessed is clinically relevant. However, without special attention to detail, the scenario in a clinical science question can appear redundant or artificial. Reading unnecessary material frustrates candidates and threatens the reputation of the assessment. In this paper we discuss why a clinical scenario is important for basic science questions and offer advice on setting realistic and plausible clinical scenarios for such questions.

  16. Applied Aeroscience and CFD Branch Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBeau, Gerald J.; Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2014-01-01

    The principal mission of NASA Johnson Space Center is Human Spaceflight. In support of the mission the Applied Aeroscience and CFD Branch has several technical competencies that include aerodynamic characterization, aerothermodynamic heating, rarefied gas dynamics, and decelerator (parachute) systems.

  17. How to Apply for Protection Time Graphic

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    We will review insect repellent products that voluntarily apply to use the repellency awareness graphic to ensure that their scientific data meet current testing protocols and standard evaluation processes.

  18. Regulation of Skin-Applied Repellents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Before they can be marketed, most insect repellents must be registered by EPA, which indicates they have been evaluated and approved for human safety and effectiveness when applied according to label instructions.

  19. Applying the National Aquatic Resource Survey Data

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The NARS generate nationally-consistent water quality data across a variety of indicators. States have applied the NARS data to help address local policy questions and to implement changes regarding aquatic resource management.

  20. Applied Physics at Heriot-Watt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colles, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a course in applied physics with solid state electronics, aimed at providing a continuing broad background in general physics while allowing for the gradual development of an emphasis on applications, engineering expertise, and relevant industrial experience. (Author/GA)

  1. [Method and apparatus for applying metal cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Bosna, A.A.

    1989-09-27

    This progress report contains information related to the development of durable corrosion resistant coating materials for the hulls of ships and offshore platforms. Also contained are the details of an apparatus used to apply this material. (JEF)

  2. A Teaching Game for Applied Hydrobiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dussart, G. B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Provided are details for a game designed to help secondary school or college students understand the types of problems encountered in applied hydrobiology and the financial and time constraints involved in their solution. (PB)

  3. Applying or Implementing Nitrogen Dioxide Standards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Along with developing the NO2 standards themselves (part of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, or NAAQS), EPA also develops requirements for how to apply or implement them, and work toward about attaining and maintaining those standards.

  4. Applied andrology in chickens and turkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The theories and practices of applied andrology in commercial poultry species (turkey, layer chicken and broiler chicken) are reviewed. Poultry male reproductive biology, including reproductive anatomy and spermatogenesis, is compared with mammalian livestock species. A detailed description of pou...

  5. Applied-field MPD thruster geometry effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1991-01-01

    Eight MPD thruster configurations were used to study the effects of applied field strength, propellant, and facility pressure on thruster performance. Vacuum facility background pressures higher than approx. 0.12 Pa were found to greatly influence thruster performance and electrode power deposition. Thrust efficiency and specific impulse increased monotonically with increasing applied field strength. Both cathode and anode radii fundamentally influenced the efficiency specific impulse relationship, while their lengths influence only the magnitude of the applied magnetic field required to reach a given performance level. At a given specific impulse, large electrode radii result in lower efficiencies for the operating conditions studied. For all test conditions, anode power deposition was the largest efficiency loss, and represented between 50 and 80 pct. of the input power. The fraction of the input power deposited into the anode decreased with increasing applied field and anode radii. The highest performance measured, 20 pct. efficiency at 3700 seconds specific impulse, was obtained using hydrogen propellant.

  6. Security Science as an Applied Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clifton

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of a security science degree as the emerging applied science of the protection of individuals and assets. Proposes the themes of physical, electronic, information security and facility management as scientific applications for the course. (Author/MM)

  7. Applying or Implementing Sulfur Dioxide Standards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Along with developing the SO2 standards themselves (part of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, or NAAQS), EPA also develops requirements for how to apply or implement them, and work toward about attaining and maintaining those standards.

  8. Orienting and Applying Flux to Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feder, H.; Frasch, W.

    1982-01-01

    Solar cells are oriented and fluxed automatically at first work station along solar-array assembly line. In under 2 seconds rotary drive rotates cell into proper position for applying solder flux to bus pad on collector side. When contact bus pad is in correct position, capstan drive is disengaged, and vacuum holddown beneath cell is turned on. Flux system lowers and applies preset amount of solder flux to bus pad. Two interconnect tabs are soldered to fluxed areas.

  9. Applied Behavior Analysis in Flying Training Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    often referred to as behavior modification ) which promotes improvements in human learning through an analysis of the contingencies surrounding a...Company, in press. Bandura, A. Principles of behavior modification . New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1969. Bostow, D.E., & Bailey, J.S. Modification of...tutors for kindergarten children. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 1974, 7, 223-232. Kazdin, A.E. Behavior modification in applied settings

  10. Applied Psychology in Europe: An ONR Perspective.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-27

    RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS- I963-A ONR LONOON REPORT R-7-83 ~, 0 04N9 OFFICEI F NAVAL ..of M IAPPLIED PSYCHOLOGY IN EUROPE...and Subtitle) S TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Applied Psychology in Europe: An ONR Assessment ’"PerspectivePrpci6v PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7...neceeeary end Identify by block nmber) Applied psychology Digital simulators Man-machine interfaces Performance models Combat reactions Memory enhancement 20

  11. A value analysis model applied to the management of amblyopia.

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, G R; Bane, M C; Stager, D R; Berry, P M; Wright, W W

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the value of amblyopia-related services by utilizing a health value model (HVM). Cost and quality criteria are evaluated in accordance with the interests of patients, physicians, and purchasers. METHODS: We applied an HVM to a hypothetical statistical ("median") child with amblyopia whose visual acuity is 20/80 and to a group of children with amblyopia who are managed by our practice. We applied the model to calculate the value of these services by evaluating the responses of patients and physicians and relating these responses to clinical outcomes. RESULTS: The consensus value of care for the hypothetical median child was calculated to be 0.406 (of 1.000). For those children managed in our practice, the calculated value is 0.682. Clinically, 79% achieved 20/40 or better visual acuity, and the mean final visual acuity was 0.2 logMAR (20/32). Value appraisals revealed significant concerns about the financial aspects of amblyopia-related services, particularly among physicians. Patients rated services more positively than did physicians. CONCLUSIONS: Amblyopia care is difficult, sustained, and important work that requires substantial sensitivity to and support of children and families. Compliance and early detection are essential to success. The value of amblyopia services is rated significantly higher by patients than by physicians. Relative to the measured value, amblyopia care is undercompensated. The HVM is useful to appraise clinical service delivery and its variation. The costs of failure and the benefits of success are high; high-value amblyopia care yields substantial dividends and should be commensurately compensated in the marketplace. PMID:10703133

  12. Clinical applications in molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Heneweer, Carola; Grimm, Jan

    2011-02-01

    Molecular imaging is aimed at the noninvasive in vivo characterization and measurement of processes at a cellular and molecular level with clinical imaging methods. Contrast agents are constructed to target markers that are specific either for certain diseases or for functional states of specialized tissues. Efforts are currently focused mainly on processes involved in angiogenesis, inflammation, and apoptosis. Cell tracking is performed for diagnostic purposes as well as for monitoring of novel cell therapies. Visualization of these processes would provide more precise information about disease expansion as well as treatment response, and could lead to a more individualized therapy for patients. Many attempts have shown promising results in preclinical studies; however, translation into the clinic remains a challenge. This applies especially to paediatrics because of more stringent safety concerns and the low prevalence of individual diseases. The most promising modalities for clinical translation are nuclear medicine methods (positron emission tomography [PET] and single photon emission CT [SPECT]) due to their high sensitivity, which allows concentrations below biological activity. However, special dose consideration is required for any application of ionizing radiation especially in children. While very little has been published on molecular imaging in a paediatric patient population beyond fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) tracers, this review will attempt to discuss approaches that we believe have promise for paediatric imaging. These will include agents that already reached clinical trials as well as preclinical developments with high potential for clinical application.

  13. Clinical Utility of Quantitative Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Ganeshan, Dhakshinamoorthy; Abramson, Richard G.; Burton, Kirsteen R.; Yu, John-Paul J.; Scalzetti, Ernest M.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Subramaniam, Rathan M.; Lenchik, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative imaging (QI) is increasingly applied in modern radiology practice, assisting in the clinical assessment of many patients and providing a source of biomarkers for a spectrum of diseases. QI is commonly used to inform patient diagnosis or prognosis, determine the choice of therapy, or monitor therapy response. Because most radiologists will likely implement some QI tools to meet the patient care needs of their referring clinicians, it is important for all radiologists to become familiar with the strengths and limitations of QI. The Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Quantitative Imaging Task Force has explored the clinical application of QI and summarizes its work in this review. We provide an overview of the clinical use of QI by discussing QI tools that are currently employed in clinical practice, clinical applications of these tools, approaches to reporting of QI, and challenges to implementing QI. It is hoped that these insights will help radiologists recognize the tangible benefits of QI to their patients, their referring clinicians, and their own radiology practice. PMID:25442800

  14. Applied Physics. Course Materials: Physics 111, 112, 113. Seattle Tech Prep Applied Academics Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Seattle Community Coll., Washington.

    This publication contains materials for three courses in Applied Physics in the Applied Academics program at South Seattle Community College. It begins with the article, "Community College Applied Academics: The State of the Art?" (George B. Neff), which describes the characteristics, model, courses, and coordination activity that make…

  15. 34 CFR 400.4 - What definitions apply to the Vocational and Applied Technology Education Programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Technology Education Programs? 400.4 Section 400.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PROGRAMS-GENERAL PROVISIONS § 400.4 What definitions apply to the Vocational and Applied Technology Education Programs? (a) Definitions in EDGAR. The following terms used...

  16. Applied Math. Course Materials: Math 111, 112, 113. Seattle Tech Prep Applied Academics Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Seattle Community Coll., Washington.

    This publication contains materials for three courses in Applied Math in the Applied Academics program at South Seattle Community College. It begins with the article, "Community College Applied Academics: The State of the Art?" (George B. Neff), which describes the characteristics, model, courses, and coordination activity that make up…

  17. Efficiency Improvement of Dentistry Clinics: Introducing an Intervening Package for Dentistry Clinics, Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Alaghemandan, Hamed; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Khorasani, Elahe; Rezaee, Sobhan

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Isfahan, the second metropolitan in Iran, there are 1448 dentistry treatment centers that most of them are inefficient. Today, efficiency is the most important issue in health care centers as well as dentistry clinics. The goal of this research is to investigate the affordability and efficiency of dentistry clinics in Isfahan province, Iran. Methods: The current work is a quantitative research, designed in three methodological steps, including two surveys and experimental studies, for understanding current deficiencies of Iranian dentistry clinics. First, we ran a survey. Then, we analyzed the results of the questionnaires which guided us to find a particular intervening package to improve the efficiency of the clinics. At the second step, we chose an inefficient clinic named Mohtasham (Iran, Isfahan) to evaluate our intervening package. Results: Based on what the interviewees answered, we mention the most important issues to be considered for improving the efficiency of dental clinics in Isfahan. By considering mentioned problematic issues, an intervening package was designed. This intervening package was applied in Mohtasham clinic, since June 2010. It improved the clinic's income from 16328 US$ with 4125 clients in 2010, to 420,000 US$ with 14784 patients in 2012. Conclusions: The proposed intervening package changed this clinic to an efficient and economic one. Its income increased 5.08 times and its patient's numbers grew 4.01 times simultaneously. In other words, Mohtasham's experience demonstrates the reliability of the package and its potentiality to be applied in macro level to improve other dentistry clinics. PMID:24627744

  18. Advances in clinical study of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunfen; Su, Xun; Liu, Anchang; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Aihua; Xi, Yanwei; Zhai, Guangxi

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin has been estimated as a potential agent for many diseases and attracted great attention owing to its various pharmacological activities, including anti-cancer, and anti-inflammatory. Now curcumin is being applied to a number of patients with breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, colorectal cancer, psoriatic, etc. Several clinical trials have stated that curcumin is safe enough and effective. The objective of this article was to summarize the clinical studies of curcumin, and give a reference for future studies.

  19. The clinical decision analysis using decision tree.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jong-Myon

    2014-01-01

    The clinical decision analysis (CDA) has used to overcome complexity and uncertainty in medical problems. The CDA is a tool allowing decision-makers to apply evidence-based medicine to make objective clinical decisions when faced with complex situations. The usefulness and limitation including six steps in conducting CDA were reviewed. The application of CDA results should be done under shared decision with patients' value.

  20. The clinical decision analysis using decision tree

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jong-Myon

    2014-01-01

    The clinical decision analysis (CDA) has used to overcome complexity and uncertainty in medical problems. The CDA is a tool allowing decision-makers to apply evidence-based medicine to make objective clinical decisions when faced with complex situations. The usefulness and limitation including six steps in conducting CDA were reviewed. The application of CDA results should be done under shared decision with patients’ value. PMID:25358466

  1. Applied Mathematical Sciences research at Argonne, October 1, 1978-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    This report reviews the research activities of the Applied Mathematical Sciences Section for the period October 1, 1978, through March 31, 1980. The body of the report discusses various projects carried out in four major areas of research: applied analysis, computational mathematics, software engineering, and software clinics. Information on section staff, visitors, workshops, and seminars is found in the appendices. Descriptions of individual research topics are very brief.

  2. Applied kinesiology unreliable for assessing nutrient status.

    PubMed

    Kenney, J J; Clemens, R; Forsythe, K D

    1988-06-01

    Applied kinesiology is a technique used to assess nutritional status on the basis of the response of muscles to mechanical stress. In this study, 11 subjects were evaluated independently by three experienced applied kinesiologists for four nutrients (thiamin, zinc, vitamin A, and ascorbic acid). The results obtained by those applied kinesiologists were compared with (a) one another, (b) standard laboratory tests for nutrient status, and (c) computerized isometric muscle testing. Statistical analysis yielded no significant interjudge reliability, no significant correlation between the testers and standard biochemical tests for nutrient status, and no significant correlation between mechanical and manual determinations of relative muscle strength. In addition, the subjects were exposed in a double-blind fashion to supplements of thiamin, zinc, vitamin A, and ascorbic acid and two placebos (pectin and sucrose) and then re-tested. According to applied kinesiology theory, "weak" (indicating deficiency) muscles are strengthened when the subject is exposed to an appropriate nutritional supplement. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences in the response to placebo, nutrients previously determined (by muscle testing) to be deficient, and nutrients previously determined (by muscle testing) to be adequate. Even though the number of subjects (11) and nutrients (4) tested was limited, the results of this study indicated that the use of applied kinesiology to evaluate nutrient status is no more useful than random guessing.

  3. Evidence and Clinical Trials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Steven N.

    1989-11-01

    This dissertation explores the use of a mathematical measure of statistical evidence, the log likelihood ratio, in clinical trials. The methods and thinking behind the use of an evidential measure are contrasted with traditional methods of analyzing data, which depend primarily on a p-value as an estimate of the statistical strength of an observed data pattern. It is contended that neither the behavioral dictates of Neyman-Pearson hypothesis testing methods, nor the coherency dictates of Bayesian methods are realistic models on which to base inference. The use of the likelihood alone is applied to four aspects of trial design or conduct: the calculation of sample size, the monitoring of data, testing for the equivalence of two treatments, and meta-analysis--the combining of results from different trials. Finally, a more general model of statistical inference, using belief functions, is used to see if it is possible to separate the assessment of evidence from our background knowledge. It is shown that traditional and Bayesian methods can be modeled as two ends of a continuum of structured background knowledge, methods which summarize evidence at the point of maximum likelihood assuming no structure, and Bayesian methods assuming complete knowledge. Both schools are seen to be missing a concept of ignorance- -uncommitted belief. This concept provides the key to understanding the problem of sampling to a foregone conclusion and the role of frequency properties in statistical inference. The conclusion is that statistical evidence cannot be defined independently of background knowledge, and that frequency properties of an estimator are an indirect measure of uncommitted belief. Several likelihood summaries need to be used in clinical trials, with the quantitative disparity between summaries being an indirect measure of our ignorance. This conclusion is linked with parallel ideas in the philosophy of science and cognitive psychology.

  4. [How to share results of clinical trials with study participants?].

    PubMed

    Sarradon-Eck, Aline; Mancini, Julien; Genre, Dominique; Sakoyan, Juliette; Desclaux, Alice; Julian-Reynier, Claire

    2012-03-01

    Informing research participants of the results of clinical trials in which they were enrolled is in agreement with patients' rights and human dignity; such feedback is considered an ethical standard applied to clinical research. Cancer patients who participate in a clinical trial usually want to know the results. Here we analysed the literature about the different ways of disclosure of clinical trial results to participants, questioning their expectations and the meanings they give to the results. We describe some of the dilemma and intertwining between clinical care and clinical research. We highlight how the standardisation of sharing such results to participants could raise difficulties particularly for the relationship between doctor and patients.

  5. Clinical toxicology: clinical science to public health.

    PubMed

    Bateman, D N

    2005-11-01

    1. The aims of the present paper are to: (i) review progress in clinical toxicology over the past 40 years and to place it in the context of modern health care by describing its development; and (ii) illustrate the use of clinical toxicology data from Scotland, in particular, as a tool for informing clinical care and public health policy with respect to drugs. 2. A historical literature review was conducted with amalgamation and comparison of a series of published and unpublished clinical toxicology datasets from NPIS Edinburgh and other sources. 3. Clinical databases within poisons treatment centres offer an important method of collecting data on the clinical effects of drugs in overdose. These data can be used to increase knowledge on drug toxicity mechanisms that inform licensing decisions, contribute to evidence-based care and clinical management. Combination of this material with national morbidity datasets provides another valuable approach that can inform public health prevention strategies. 4. In conclusion, clinical toxicology datasets offer clinical pharmacologists a new study area. Clinical toxicology treatment units and poisons information services offer an important health resource.

  6. Uses of clinical algorithms.

    PubMed

    Margolis, C Z

    1983-02-04

    The clinical algorithm (flow chart) is a text format that is specially suited for representing a sequence of clinical decisions, for teaching clinical decision making, and for guiding patient care. A representative clinical algorithm is described in detail; five steps for writing an algorithm and seven steps for writing a set of algorithms are outlined. Five clinical education and patient care uses of algorithms are then discussed, including a map for teaching clinical decision making and protocol charts for guiding step-by-step care of specific problems. Clinical algorithms are compared as to their clinical usefulness with decision analysis. Three objections to clinical algorithms are answered, including the one that they restrict thinking. It is concluded that methods should be sought for writing clinical algorithms that represent expert consensus. A clinical algorithm could then be written for any area of medical decision making that can be standardized. Medical practice could then be taught more effectively, monitored accurately, and understood better.

  7. [A critical review of applied criminology].

    PubMed

    Vollbach, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    By reporting on a recent decision of the Regional Court (LG) of Marburg (Germany) calling attention to applied criminology, a concept still insufficiently considered in the administration of criminal justice, the paper argues that professional action in the execution of the sentence represents nothing else but applied criminology. Based on this assumption, the paper discusses practical diagnosis and correctional planning. Beyond that, the paper deals with the future of criminology. In the opinion of the author an important aspect for the future of criminology will be if it will be able to remain in touch with the world in which we live, as an independent empirical science. Applied criminology and its methodology constitute the link between science and practice.

  8. Symbolic Interaction and Applied Social Research

    PubMed Central

    Kotarba, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    In symbolic interaction, a traditional yet unfortunate and unnecessary distinction has been made between basic and applied research. The argument has been made that basic research is intended to generate new knowledge, whereas applied research is intended to apply knowledge to the solution of practical (social and organizational) problems. I will argue that the distinction between basic and applied research in symbolic interaction is outdated and dysfunctional. The masters of symbolic interactionist thought have left us a proud legacy of shaping their scholarly thinking and inquiry in response to and in light of practical issues of the day (e.g., Znaniecki, and Blumer). Current interactionist work continues this tradition in topical areas such as social justice studies. Applied research, especially in term of evaluation and needs assessment studies, can be designed to serve both basic and applied goals. Symbolic interaction provides three great resources to do this. The first is its orientation to dynamic sensitizing concepts that direct research and ask questions instead of supplying a priori and often impractical answers. The second is its orientation to qualitative methods, and appreciation for the logic of grounded theory. The third is interactionism’s overall holistic approach to interfacing with the everyday life world. The primary illustrative case here is the qualitative component of the evaluation of an NIH-funded, translational medical research program. The qualitative component has provided interactionist-inspired insights into translational research, such as examining cultural change in medical research in terms of changes in the form and content of formal and informal discourse among scientists; delineating the impact of significant symbols such as "my lab" on the social organization of science; and appreciating the essence of the self-concept "scientist" on the increasingly bureaucratic and administrative identities of medical researchers. This

  9. Caldwell University's Department of Applied Behavior Analysis.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Kenneth F; Reeve, Sharon A

    2016-05-01

    Since 2004, faculty members at Caldwell University have developed three successful graduate programs in Applied Behavior Analysis (i.e., PhD, MA, non-degree programs), increased program faculty from two to six members, developed and operated an on-campus autism center, and begun a stand-alone Applied Behavior Analysis Department. This paper outlines a number of strategies used to advance these initiatives, including those associated with an extensive public relations campaign. We also outline challenges that have limited our programs' growth. These strategies, along with a consideration of potential challenges, might prove useful in guiding academicians who are interested in starting their own programs in behavior analysis.

  10. Velocity filtering applied to optical flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1990-01-01

    Optical flow is a method by which a stream of two-dimensional images obtained from a forward-looking passive sensor is used to map the three-dimensional volume in front of a moving vehicle. Passive ranging via optical flow is applied here to the helicopter obstacle-avoidance problem. Velocity filtering is used as a field-based method to determine range to all pixels in the initial image. The theoretical understanding and performance analysis of velocity filtering as applied to optical flow is expanded and experimental results are presented.

  11. Method of applying coatings to substrates

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1991-01-01

    A method for applying novel coatings to substrates is provided. The ends of multiplicity of rods of different materials are melted by focused beams of laser light. Individual electric fields are applied to each of the molten rod ends, thereby ejecting charged particles that include droplets, atomic clusters, molecules, and atoms. The charged particles are separately transported, by the accelerations provided by electric potentials produced by an electrode structure, to substrates where they combine and form the coatings. Layered and thickness graded coatings comprised of hithereto unavailable compositions, are provided.

  12. System Applies Polymer Powder To Filament Tow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Snoha, John J.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1993-01-01

    Polymer powder applied uniformly and in continuous manner. Powder-coating system applies dry polymer powder to continuous fiber tow. Unique filament-spreading technique, combined with precise control of tension on fibers in system, ensures uniform application of polymer powder to web of spread filaments. Fiber tows impregnated with dry polymer powders ("towpregs") produced for preform-weaving and composite-material-molding applications. System and process valuable to prepreg industry, for production of flexible filament-windable tows and high-temperature polymer prepregs.

  13. Applying a Genetic Algorithm to Reconfigurable Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, B. Earl; Weir, John; Trevino, Luis; Patrick, Clint; Steincamp, Jim

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of applying genetic algorithms to solve optimization problems that are implemented entirely in reconfgurable hardware. The paper highlights the pe$ormance/design space trade-offs that must be understood to effectively implement a standard genetic algorithm within a modem Field Programmable Gate Array, FPGA, reconfgurable hardware environment and presents a case-study where this stochastic search technique is applied to standard test-case problems taken from the technical literature. In this research, the targeted FPGA-based platform and high-level design environment was the Starbridge Hypercomputing platform, which incorporates multiple Xilinx Virtex II FPGAs, and the Viva TM graphical hardware description language.

  14. Defining applied behavior analysis: An historical analogy

    PubMed Central

    Deitz, Samuel M.

    1982-01-01

    This article examines two criteria for a definition of applied behavior analysis. The criteria are derived from a 19th century attempt to establish medicine as a scientific field. The first criterion, experimental determinism, specifies the methodological boundaries of an experimental science. The second criterion, philosophic doubt, clarifies the tentative nature of facts and theories derived from those facts. Practices which will advance the science of behavior are commented upon within each criteria. To conclude, the problems of a 19th century form of empiricism in medicine are related to current practices in applied behavior analysis. PMID:22478557

  15. Determination of clinical efficacy: nuclear medicine as applied to lung scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Saenger, E.L.; Buncher, C.R.; Specker, B.L.; McDevitt, R.A.

    1985-07-01

    This paper describes a Society of Nuclear Medicine sponsored study of 2023 patients which compares two methods, logistic regression (LR) and entropy minimax pattern detection (EMPD), to evaluate efficacy. Lung scans, used in determining or excluding a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE), were utilized to create the data set. The LR analysis, presented here, shows that lung scan findings have significant influence on the referring physician's diagnostic thinking. Models were developed for the probability of a signout diagnosis of PE, and equal patient groups tested the validity of these regression equations. A comparison of the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of EMPD and LR was done. EMPD predicts a signout diagnosis on only 41% of cases before lung scan and 71% after lung scan; LR provides a prediction of the signout diagnosis on 100% of cases. An advantage of EMPD is that it does not require poor probability estimates.

  16. Semantic Web Technology for Mapping and Applying Clinical Functional Assessment Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    and developed a framework for structuring and using functional assessment information. Within this framework, we modeled as OWL ontologies...coding scheme will be described in a document and also modeled as an OWL ontology using the Protégé tool. In our original proposal, we hypothesized

  17. Reliability Realized! Year Two of Clinical Practice Candidates Applying Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, David W.; Zhou, Yunfang; Reid, Barbara K.

    2009-01-01

    The Investigators studied effects of Candidates' 10 day unit plans of instruction through prescribed action research projects, across academic years 2007-2008 and 2008-2009. Results of the spring term '07-'08 Action Research projects informed the Unit in such a way that modifications were possible and made across programs. This resulted in…

  18. Information systems in clinical pharmacy applied to parenteral nutrition management and traceability: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Martínez Gabarrón, Josefa; Sanz-Valero, Javier; Wanden-Berghe, Carmina

    2017-01-01

    Objetivo: Revisar la literatura científica sobre los sistemas de información en farmacia clínica aplicados a la gestión y trazabilidad de la nutrición parenteral (NP). Método: Revisión sistemática de los documentos recuperados en las bases de datos MEDLINE (PubMed), Web of Science, Scopus, Cochrane Library, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA) y Google Académico hasta mayo de 2016. Los términos utilizados, como descriptores y texto libre, fueron: “Parenteral Nutrition” y “Drug Information Services”. La calidad de los artículos se evaluó mediante el cuestionario STROBE. Se completó la búsqueda con la consulta a expertos y la revisión de la bibliografía de los artículos seleccionados. Resultado: De las 153 referencias recuperadas, tras aplicar los criterios de inclusión y exclusión, se seleccionaron para la revisión seis artículos. Tres trabajos diseñaban diagramas de flujo, o algún tipo de notación gráfica, para desarrollar sistemas normalizados de gestión, y tres se basaban en programas informáticos. Dos de los trabajos seleccionados diseñaban un sistema de gestión integral de control y trazabilidad para la NP. Conclusiones: La NP debe integrarse en un sistema estandarizado con el fin de asegurar la calidad y la minimización de los riesgos asociados a esta terapia. Disponer de tecnologías aplicadas a la NP permitiría configurar sistemas de gestión más completos y fáciles de aplicar en un contexto real. Por ende, se cree necesario la generación de nuevos trabajos y desarrollos específicos en relación a la gestión y trazabilidad de la NP que permitan su control y evaluación constante.

  19. Applying behavior analysis to clinical problems: review and analysis of habit reversal.

    PubMed Central

    Miltenberger, R G; Fuqua, R W; Woods, D W

    1998-01-01

    This article provides a review and analysis of habit reversal, a multicomponent procedure developed by Azrin and Nunn (1973, 1974) for the treatment of nervous habits, tics, and stuttering. The article starts with a discussion of the behaviors treated with habit reversal, behavioral covariation among habits, and functional analysis and assessment of habits. Research on habit reversal and simplified versions of the procedure is then described. Next the article discusses the limitations of habit reversal and the evidence for its generality. The article concludes with an analysis of the behavioral processes involved in habit reversal and suggestions for future research. PMID:9757583

  20. Structure and Measurement of Depression in Youths: Applying Item Response Theory to Clinical Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, David A.; Cai, Li; Martin, Nina C.; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Garber, Judy; Curry, John F.; Hyde, Janet S.; Essex, Marilyn J.; Compas, Bruce E.; Goodyer, Ian M.; Rohde, Paul; Stark, Kevin D.; Slattery, Marcia J.; Forehand, Rex

    2011-01-01

    Our goals in this article were to use item response theory (IRT) to assess the relation of depressive symptoms to the underlying dimension of depression and to demonstrate how IRT-based measurement strategies can yield more reliable data about depression severity than conventional symptom counts. Participants were 3,403 children and adolescents…

  1. Helping patients make better decisions: how to apply behavioral economics in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Maureen Reni; Spivey, Christy; Daniel, Kathy M

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians are committed to effectively educating patients and helping them to make sound decisions concerning their own health care. However, how do clinicians determine what is effective education? How do they present information clearly and in a manner that patients understand and can use to make informed decisions? Behavioral economics (BE) is a subfield of economics that can assist clinicians to better understand how individuals actually make decisions. BE research can help guide interactions with patients so that information is presented and discussed in a more deliberate and impactful way. We can be more effective providers of care when we understand the factors that influence how our patients make decisions, factors of which we may have been largely unaware. BE research that focuses on health care and medical decision making is becoming more widely known, and what has been reported suggests that BE interventions can be effective in the medical realm. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with an overview of BE decision science and derived practice strategies to promote more effective behavior change in patients. PMID:25378915

  2. Applying the Concept of Trustworthiness to the Evaluation of a Clinical Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barzansky, Barbara; And Others

    An attending tutor program designed to increase faculty-student contact within an Obstetrics and Gynecology clerkship was evaluated. Sessions were observed, written documents were reviewed, and faculty and students were interviewed in order to determine if the program was meeting its goals. Based on the evaluation data, the program was…

  3. APPLIED AUDIOLOGY FOR CHILDREN. SECOND EDITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DALE, D.M.C.

    THE PURPOSE OF THE BOOK IS TO HELP TEACHERS, PARENTS, DOCTORS, AND WORKERS IN AUDIOLOGY CLINICS MAKE THE MOST OF SOUND IN THE EDUCATIONAL AND SOCIAL TREATMENT OF DEAFNESS. ASPECTS OF SOUND AMPLIFICATION CONSIDERED ARE THE NATURE OF SOUND, ELECTRICAL AMPLIFICATION, AND VARIOUS TYPES OF HEARING AIDS (INDIVIDUAL, GROUP, INDUCTION LOOP, SPEECH…

  4. The Master's Thesis in Applied Psychology Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Kenneth S.; Kottke, Janet L.

    1996-01-01

    Recommends the inclusion of a master's thesis in industrial and organizational psychology programs. Argues that the thesis serves several critical educational purposes and is relevant to applied psychology. Offers suggestions for increasing the relationship between the educational requirement and the professional tasks. (MJP)

  5. Learning for Life: Applying the AASL Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Pat; Stephens, Claire Gatrell

    2010-01-01

    When the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) first released the new Standards for the 21st-Century Learner, controversy arose because many school librarians thought that they were vague and de-emphasized information skill instruction. Many school librarians had trouble visualizing how the program would be applied in their school and…

  6. Applied programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This document overviews the areas of current research at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Technology transfer and the user facilities are discussed. Current topics are presented in the areas of applied physics, chemical science, material science, energy efficiency and conservation, environmental health and mathematics, biosystems and process science, oceanography, and nuclear energy. (GHH)

  7. Applying Automated Theorem Proving to Computer Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Based Access Control. International Journal of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, 12(2), 2002. LM82. A. Lockman and N. Minsky . Unidirectional...Min78. N. Minsky . An Operation-Control Scheme for Authorization in Com- puter Systems. International Journal of Computing and Information Sciences, June

  8. Applied fluvial geomorphology. Report No. 31

    SciTech Connect

    MacBroom, J.G.

    1981-03-01

    The first portion of this report discusse the geologic properties and characteristics of natural rivers and floodplains. The second part outlines the influence of man on fluvial geomorphology, ecological considerations, and the natural characteristics of rivers that should be applied in the design of river and bridge projects.

  9. Applied fluvial geomorphology. Report No. 31

    SciTech Connect

    MacBroom, J.G.

    1981-03-01

    The first portion of this report discusses the geologic properties and characteristics of natural rivers and floodplains. The second part outlines the influence of man on fluvial geomorphology, ecological considerations, and the natural characteristics of rivers that should be applied in the design of river and bridge projects.

  10. Educating and Training Undergraduate Applied Statisticians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peres, Clovis A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A course on Applied Statistics, offered since 1978 at the Instituto de Matematica e Estatistica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brasil, is designed to educate statisticians at the bachelor's level for jobs in government statistical offices, industry, and business. (Author/LMO)

  11. Second Language Acquisition: Research and Applied Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of second language acquisition (SLA) research over the past several decades and highlights the ways in which it has retained its original applied and linguistic interests and enhanced them by addressing questions about acquisition processes. After discussing disciplinary contexts (SLA research and applied…

  12. Applied Biomechanics in an Instructional Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Jackie L.

    2006-01-01

    Biomechanics is the science of how people move better, meaning more skillfully and more safely. This article places more emphasis on skill rather than safety, though there are many parallels between them. It shares a few features of the author's paradigm of applied biomechanics and discusses an integrated approach toward a middle school football…

  13. Applying Cryopreservation Techniques to Diverse Biological Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developing new cryopreservation protocols for each new plant or tissue is time consuming and often unnecessary. Existing standard protocols can be applied to many plants resulting in moderate to excellent results or protocols may require only a few changes for optimum recovery of plants. Protocols ...

  14. Newspaper Twitter: Applied Drama and Microblogging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wotzko, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of applied drama within the microblogging platform "Twitter" as a method to increase students' social media and news literacy. Online news sites are increasingly using "Twitter" as a source for eyewitness accounts of events or public opinion. "Twitter" offers users a simple way to publicly…

  15. Plenary Speeches: Applied Linguists without Borders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarone, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Until 1989, the American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL) could have been viewed as an interest group of the Linguistics Society of America (LSA); AAAL met in two designated meeting rooms as a subsection of the LSA conference. In 1991, I was asked to organize the first independent meeting of AAAL in New York City, with the help of…

  16. Ideology in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Alan

    2009-01-01

    It is contended that much of present-day applied linguistics for language teaching (ALLT) fails to mediate effectively, primarily because an ideological construction, emanating from a critical theory perspective, is too often imposed on everyday pedagogical practices. This has resulted in an exaggerated level of concern about the power imbalances…

  17. Applying Brain-Friendly Instructional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlauer-Myrah, Laura

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author offers advice for principals on working with teachers to change the instructional climate and on how to apply brain-friendly instructions to improve the effectiveness of one's teaching. To lead an entire district toward the use of brain-compatible instruction, the author suggests to start with a group of motivated…

  18. Second Language Acquisition and Applied Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the second language acquisition (SLA) process and the differential success of second language learners. Examines the fundamental challenges that this characterization faces, and highlights the contributions SLA is capable of in the coming decade. Offers topics for a training and development of curriculum for future applied linguists from…

  19. An Innovative Baccalaureate Degree: Applied versus Traditional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arney, Janna B.; Hardebeck, Suzanne; Estrada, Joselito; Permenter, Vivian

    2006-01-01

    The bachelor of applied arts and sciences (BAAS) degree is a baccalaureate program designed to meet the needs of nontraditional students by allowing technical hours to be transferred for credit to a baccalaureate degree. To determine if the university was positively serving the needs of its constituents, salaries of BAAS graduates were compared to…

  20. Applied Behavior Analysis: Beyond Discrete Trial Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steege, Mark W.; Mace, F. Charles; Perry, Lora; Longenecker, Harold

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the problem of autism-specific special education programs representing themselves as Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) programs when the only ABA intervention employed is Discrete Trial Teaching (DTT), and often for limited portions of the school day. Although DTT has many advantages to recommend its use, it is not well suited to teach…

  1. Positive Behavior Support and Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, J. M.; Foxx, R. M.; Jacobson, J. W.; Green, G.; Mulick, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the origins and characteristics of the positive behavior support (PBS) movement and examines those features in the context of the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA). We raise a number of concerns about PBS as an approach to delivery of behavioral services and its impact on how ABA is viewed by those in human services. We…

  2. Applied Behavior Analysis as Technological Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwata, Brian A.

    1991-01-01

    To the extent that applied behavior analysis represents a scientific and practical approach to the study of behavior, its technological character is essential. The most serious problem evident in the field is not that the research being done is too technical but that more good research of all types is needed. (JDD)

  3. Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode

    DOEpatents

    Seidel, David B.; Slutz, Stephen A.

    1988-01-01

    An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

  4. Applied Art in Trade and Industrial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Annie; Zirkle, Chris

    Ohio Hi-Point Joint Vocational School (JVS) has developed a comprehensive art program within the vocational setting. Selected trade and industrial programs at the school, as well as programs in agriculture and home economics, incorporate art instruction. The goals of the applied art program are as follows: to give students the opportunity to…

  5. Engineering and Applied Science, Recent Research Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate of Engineering and Applied Science.

    This collection contains abstracts of technical reports and journal articles resulting from research funded by the National Science Foundation. Included in the collection are abstracts arranged in several categories: (1) electrical, computer, and systems engineering; (2) civil and mechanical engineering; (3) applied research; (4) problem-focused…

  6. Applied groundwater modeling, 2nd Edition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Mary P.; Woessner, William W.; Hunt, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    This second edition is extensively revised throughout with expanded discussion of modeling fundamentals and coverage of advances in model calibration and uncertainty analysis that are revolutionizing the science of groundwater modeling. The text is intended for undergraduate and graduate level courses in applied groundwater modeling and as a comprehensive reference for environmental consultants and scientists/engineers in industry and governmental agencies.

  7. Thermodynamic Laws Applied to Economic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González, José Villacís

    2009-01-01

    Economic activity in its different manifestations--production, exchange, consumption and, particularly, information on quantities and prices--generates and transfers energy. As a result, we can apply to it the basic laws of thermodynamics. These laws are applicable within a system, i.e., in a country or between systems and countries. To these…

  8. Applying College Credit to a Noncollegiate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarraghy, John J.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the evaluation process as it was applied at the Life Office Management Association (LOMA)-the first organization to have a nationally conducted adult education program evaluated. Information about other noncollegiate sponsored programs for college credit is also provided. (ABM)

  9. Applied Creativity: The Creative Marketing Breakthrough Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of personal creativity in today's business environment, few conceptual creativity frameworks have been presented in the marketing education literature. The purpose of this article is to advance the integration of creativity instruction into marketing classrooms by presenting an applied creative marketing…

  10. Research Design and Statistics for Applied Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Evelyn; Farhady, Hossein

    An introduction to the conventions of research design and statistical analysis is presented for graduate students of applied linguistics. The chapters cover such concepts as the definition of research, variables, research designs, research report formats, sorting and displaying data, probability and hypothesis testing, comparing means,…

  11. Political Economy in Applied Linguistics Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, David

    2017-01-01

    This state-of-the-art review is based on the fundamental idea that political economy should be adopted as a frame for research and discussion in applied linguistics as part of a general social turn which has taken hold in the field over the past three decades. It starts with Susan Gal's (1989) early call for such a move in sociolinguistics and…

  12. Applying Servant Leadership in Today's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culver, Mary K.

    2009-01-01

    This book illustrates how the ideal of servant leadership can be applied in your school today. With real-life scenarios, discussions, and self assessments, this book gives practical suggestions to help you develop into a caring and effective servant leader. There are 52 scenarios in this book, focusing on situations as varied as: (1) Dealing with…

  13. Applied Mathematics in the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics, Berkeley, CA.

    After considering the growth in the use of mathematics in the past 25 years, this report makes four major recommendations regarding the undergraduate curriculum: (1) The mathematics department should offer a course or two in applied mathematics which treat some realistic situations completely, including the steps of problem formulation, model…

  14. Applying Mechanics to Swimming Performance Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barthels, Katharine

    1989-01-01

    Swimming teachers and coaches can improve their feedback to swimmers, when correcting or refining swim movements, by applying some basic biomechanical concepts relevant to swimming. This article focuses on the biomechanical considerations used in analyzing swimming performance. Techniques for spotting and correcting problems that impede…

  15. Applying Social Psychological Concepts Outside the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Jessica L.; Wichman, Aaron L.

    2005-01-01

    This article evaluates a writing assignment in which social psychology students gathered examples from outside the classroom (e.g., cartoons, movies) and analyzed them with course material. Compared to a control group, students who completed the assignment learned that it was easier to apply social psychology to the real world. A follow-up survey…

  16. Visualisation in Applied Learning Contexts: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twissell, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    This literature review explores visualisation within the context of learning in design, engineering and technology education. The investigation first defines visualisation, providing examples of activities that utilise visualisation skills within an applied field. Then exploration of the mental mechanisms of visualisation used to engage with those…

  17. Applying Technology in the Work Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Reed, Ed.

    A series of papers is presented from two symposia sponsored by the Work Environment and Technology Committee and offered at annual conferences of the President's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities. The 1988 symposium was called "Applying Technology in the Work Environment" and the 1989 symposium was called "Reasonable…

  18. Introduction: Conversation Analysis in Applied Linguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sert, Olcay; Seedhouse, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This short, introductory paper presents an up-to-date account of works within the field of Applied Linguistics which have been influenced by a Conversation Analytic paradigm. The article reviews recent studies in classroom interaction, materials development, proficiency assessment and language teacher education. We believe that the publication of…

  19. Applied Welding Technology. Technical Committee Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Technical Committee Report prepared by industry representatives in Idaho lists the skills currently necessary for an employee in that state to obtain a job in applied welding technology, retain a job once hired, and advance in that occupational field. (Task lists are grouped according to duty areas generally used in industry settings, and are…

  20. Edinburgh Working Papers in Applied Linguistics, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Keith, Ed.; Parkinson, Brian, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    Papers on applied linguistics and language pedagogy include: "A Genre Analysis Study of 80 Medical Abstracts" (Kenneth Anderson, Joan Maclean); "Oral Classroom Testing in an Adult French Community Class" (Sheena Davies, Aileen Irvine, Jacqueline Larrieu); "Whose Relevance? Interpretation of Hybrid Texts by a Multiple…

  1. A Primer on Disseminating Applied Quantitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Bethany A.; DiStefano, Christine; Morgan, Grant B.

    2010-01-01

    Transparency and replication are essential features of scientific inquiry, yet scientific communications of applied quantitative research are often lacking in much-needed procedural information. In an effort to promote researchers dissemination of their quantitative studies in a cohesive, detailed, and informative manner, the authors delineate…

  2. Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington DC, USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugarman, Julie; Fee, Molly; Donovan, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The Center for Applied Linguistics (CAL) is a private, nonprofit organization with over 50 years' experience in the application of research on language and culture to educational and societal concerns. CAL carries out its mission to improve communication through better understanding of language and culture by engaging in a variety of projects in…

  3. How To Apply For a Broadcast Station.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    Procedures for receiving permission from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for authority to construct a radio or television broadcast station are outlined. Instructions for selecting a facility, applying for a construction permit, and giving local notice of intentions are included, along with sections on the hearing procedure,…

  4. Applied Literature and Composition Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    Redesigned to reflect a more standards-driven as opposed to course-driven approach, the Applied Literature and Composition courses (I and II) described in this paper not only prepare the two-year college/technical school students for entering the real world of work, but also for post-secondary and college level work. It notes that the course is…

  5. Applied Linguistics and Primary School Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Sue, Ed.; McCartney, Elspeth, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Modern primary teachers must adapt literacy programmes and ensure efficient learning for all. They must also support children with language and literacy difficulties, children learning English as an additional language and possibly teach a modern foreign language. To do this effectively, they need to understand the applied linguistics research…

  6. The Moral Self: Applying Identity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stets, Jan E.; Carter, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    This research applies identity theory to understand the moral self. In identity theory, individuals act on the basis of their identity meanings, and they regulate the meanings of their behavior so that those meanings are consistent with their identity meanings. An inconsistency produces negative emotions and motivates individuals to behave…

  7. Problems Portraying Migrants in Applied Linguistics Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a very personal attempt to explore the problematics of portraying migrants in Applied Linguistics research. I begin with a discussion of identity, in particular what we might mean when we use the term, and from there I go on to explore its fundamental imprecision through an analysis of a census question about ethnicity. I then…

  8. Populations, Natural Selection, and Applied Organizational Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelvey, Bill; Aldrich, Howard

    1983-01-01

    Deficiencies in existing models in organizational science may be remedied by applying the population approach, with its concepts of taxonomy, classification, evolution, and population ecology; and natural selection theory, with its principles of variation, natural selection, heredity, and struggle for existence, to the idea of organizational forms…

  9. Psycholinguistics in Applied Linguistics: Trends and Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bot, Kees

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between the terms psycholinguistics and applied linguistics, and in the process explores key issues in multilingual processing, such as the structure of the bilingual lexicon, language choice in production and perception, and the language mode. (Author/VWL)

  10. Development of clinical scientists.

    PubMed

    Smith, R V

    1987-01-01

    The education and training of clinical scientists has served society in several ways. For academic pharmacy, the emergence of clinical science has provided research and scholarship opportunities for clinical faculty development. Clinical scientists have also begun to play important roles in industrial drug research and development. For all faculty and students, clinical science research reinforces a "research mindset" that will become increasingly important as our society moves from a production/extraction to an information-based economy. Pharmacy will best evolve by increasing its commitment to clinical science research. In the process, academic pharmacy must continue to improve and support excellent education and training programs for clinical scientists.

  11. Gatekeepers for pragmatic clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Whicher, Danielle M; Miller, Jennifer E; Dunham, Kelly M; Joffe, Steven

    2015-10-01

    To successfully implement a pragmatic clinical trial, investigators need access to numerous resources, including financial support, institutional infrastructure (e.g. clinics, facilities, staff), eligible patients, and patient data. Gatekeepers are people or entities who have the ability to allow or deny access to the resources required to support the conduct of clinical research. Based on this definition, gatekeepers relevant to the US clinical research enterprise include research sponsors, regulatory agencies, payers, health system and other organizational leadership, research team leadership, human research protections programs, advocacy and community groups, and clinicians. This article provides a framework to help guide gatekeepers' decision-making related to the use of resources for pragmatic clinical trials. Relevant ethical considerations for gatekeepers include (1) concern for the interests of individuals, groups, and communities affected by the gatekeepers' decisions, including protection from harm and maximization of benefits; (2) advancement of organizational mission and values; and (3) stewardship of financial, human, and other organizational resources. Separate from these ethical considerations, gatekeepers' actions will be guided by relevant federal, state, and local regulations. This framework also suggests that to further enhance the legitimacy of their decision-making, gatekeepers should adopt transparent processes that engage relevant stakeholders when feasible and appropriate. We apply this framework to the set of gatekeepers responsible for making decisions about resources necessary for pragmatic clinical trials in the United States, describing the relevance of the criteria in different situations and pointing out where conflicts among the criteria and relevant regulations may affect decision-making. Recognition of the complex set of considerations that should inform decision-making will guide gatekeepers in making justifiable choices regarding

  12. Genes, Race, and Culture in Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Linda M.; Truesdell, Nicole D.; Kreiner, Meta J.

    2015-01-01

    Race, although an unscientific concept, remains prominent in health research and clinical guidelines, and is routinely invoked in clinical practice. In interviews with 58 primary care clinicians we explored how they understand and apply concepts of racial difference. We found wide agreement that race is important to consider in clinical care. They explained the effect of race on health, drawing on common assumptions about the biological, class, and cultural characteristics of racial minorities. They identified specific race-based clinical strategies for only a handful of conditions and were inconsistent in the details of what they said should be done for minority patients. We conclude that using race in clinical medicine promotes and maintains the illusion of inherent racial differences and may result in minority patients receiving care aimed at presumed racial group characteristics, rather than care selected as specifically appropriate for them as individuals. [race and genetics, primary care, health disparities, racial profiling] PMID:23804331

  13. The Ising Model Applied on Chronification of Pain.

    PubMed

    Granan, Lars-Petter

    2016-01-01

    This is a hypothesis-article suggesting an entirely new framework for understanding and treating longstanding pain. Most medical and psychological models are described with boxes and arrows. Such models are of little clinical and explanatory use when describing the phenomenon of chronification of pain due to unknown causes. To date no models that have been provided - and tested in a scientific satisfactory way - lays out a plan for specific assessment due to a specific causal explanation, and in the end serves the clinicians, patients and researcher with tools on how to address the specific pain condition to every individual pain patient's condition. By applying the Ising model (from physics) on the phenomenon of chronification of pain, one is able to detangle all these factors, and thus have a model that both suggests an explanation of the condition and outlines how one might target the treatment of chronic pain patients with the use of network science.

  14. The Ising Model Applied on Chronification of Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a hypothesis-article suggesting an entirely new framework for understanding and treating longstanding pain. Most medical and psychological models are described with boxes and arrows. Such models are of little clinical and explanatory use when describing the phenomenon of chronification of pain due to unknown causes. To date no models that have been provided - and tested in a scientific satisfactory way - lays out a plan for specific assessment due to a specific causal explanation, and in the end serves the clinicians, patients and researcher with tools on how to address the specific pain condition to every individual pain patient's condition. By applying the Ising model (from physics) on the phenomenon of chronification of pain, one is able to detangle all these factors, and thus have a model that both suggests an explanation of the condition and outlines how one might target the treatment of chronic pain patients with the use of network science. PMID:26398917

  15. Clinical Hypnosis — A Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kushnir, S.; Banack, A. D.; Marks, C. P.

    1974-01-01

    Hypnosis and trance states are as old as man himself. Over the years, many misconceptions concerning this phenomenon have arisen from lack of knowledge and misrepresentations in the literature and on the stage; however, these are being dispelled as more scientific research into the nature of hypnosis is undertaken. When applied in accordance with ethical principles, hypnotherapy has a very wide range of clinical applications, only one of which is psychotherapy. This overview of the current status of medical hypnosis includes a discussion of misconceptions, myths, and dangers, as well as an outline of common uses. PMID:20469081

  16. The Evidence-Based Practice of Applied Behavior Analysis.

    PubMed

    Slocum, Timothy A; Detrich, Ronnie; Wilczynski, Susan M; Spencer, Trina D; Lewis, Teri; Wolfe, Katie

    2014-05-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a model of professional decision-making in which practitioners integrate the best available evidence with client values/context and clinical expertise in order to provide services for their clients. This framework provides behavior analysts with a structure for pervasive use of the best available evidence in the complex settings in which they work. This structure recognizes the need for clear and explicit understanding of the strength of evidence supporting intervention options, the important contextual factors including client values that contribute to decision making, and the key role of clinical expertise in the conceptualization, intervention, and evaluation of cases. Opening the discussion of EBP in this journal, Smith (The Behavior Analyst, 36, 7-33, 2013) raised several key issues related to EBP and applied behavior analysis (ABA). The purpose of this paper is to respond to Smith's arguments and extend the discussion of the relevant issues. Although we support many of Smith's (The Behavior Analyst, 36, 7-33, 2013) points, we contend that Smith's definition of EBP is significantly narrower than definitions that are used in professions with long histories of EBP and that this narrowness conflicts with the principles that drive applied behavior analytic practice. We offer a definition and framework for EBP that aligns with the foundations of ABA and is consistent with well-established definitions of EBP in medicine, psychology, and other professions. In addition to supporting the systematic use of research evidence in behavior analytic decision making, this definition can promote clear communication about treatment decisions across disciplines and with important outside institutions such as insurance companies and granting agencies.

  17. Applying Convergent Immunity to Innovative Vaccines Targeting Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Yeaman, Michael R.; Filler, Scott G.; Schmidt, Clint S.; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Edwards, John E.; Hennessey, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent perspectives forecast a new paradigm for future “third generation” vaccines based on commonalities found in diverse pathogens or convergent immune defenses to such pathogens. For Staphylococcus aureus, recurring infections and a limited success of vaccines containing S. aureus antigens imply that native antigens induce immune responses insufficient for optimal efficacy. These perspectives exemplify the need to apply novel vaccine strategies to high-priority pathogens. One such approach can be termed convergent immunity, where antigens from non-target organisms that contain epitope homologs found in the target organism are applied in vaccines. This approach aims to evoke atypical immune defenses via synergistic processes that (1) afford protective efficacy; (2) target an epitope from one organism that contributes to protective immunity against another; (3) cross-protect against multiple pathogens occupying a common anatomic or immunological niche; and/or (4) overcome immune subversion or avoidance strategies of target pathogens. Thus, convergent immunity has a potential to promote protective efficacy not usually elicited by native antigens from a target pathogen. Variations of this concept have been mainstays in the history of viral and bacterial vaccine development. A more far-reaching example is the pre-clinical evidence that specific fungal antigens can induce cross-kingdom protection against bacterial pathogens. This trans-kingdom protection has been demonstrated in pre-clinical studies of the recombinant Candida albicans agglutinin-like sequence 3 protein (rAls3) where it was shown that a vaccine containing rAls3 provides homologous protection against C. albicans, heterologous protection against several other Candida species, and convergent protection against several strains of S. aureus. Convergent immunity reflects an intriguing new approach to designing and developing vaccine antigens and is considered here in the context of vaccines to target S

  18. Strategies to Encourage Adoption in Multi-Site Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Guydish, Joseph; Tajima, Barbara; Manser, Sarah; Jessup, Martha

    2012-01-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) is intended to test promising drug abuse treatment models in multi-site clinical trials, and to support adoption of new interventions into clinical practice. Using qualitative research methods we studied adoption in the context of two multi-site clinical trials, one outside the CTN and one within the CTN. A total of 71 participants, representing 8 organizational levels ranging from clinic staff to clinical trial leaders, were interviewed about their role in the clinical trial, its interactions with clinics, and intervention adoption. Drawing on conceptual themes identified in these interviews, we report strategies that could be applied in planning, development and implementation of multi-site studies to better support adoption of tested interventions in study clinics after the trial has ended. Planning for adoption in the early stages of protocol development will enhance integration of new interventions into practice. PMID:17306726

  19. 42 CFR 68a.16 - What other regulations and statutes apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What other regulations and statutes apply? 68a.16 Section 68a.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM...

  20. 42 CFR 68a.16 - What other regulations and statutes apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What other regulations and statutes apply? 68a.16 Section 68a.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM...

  1. 42 CFR 68a.16 - What other regulations and statutes apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What other regulations and statutes apply? 68a.16 Section 68a.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM...

  2. Applied Behavior Analysis in the Treatment of Severe Psychiatric Disorders: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scotti, Joseph R.; And Others

    Clinical research in the area of severe psychiatric disorders constituted the major focus for the discipline of applied behavior analysis during the early 1960s. Recently, however, there appears to be a notable lack of a behavioral focus within many inpatient psychiatric settings and a relative dearth of published behavioral treatment studies with…

  3. Applying the Codependency Model to a Group for Families of Obsessive-Compulsive People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Marlene

    1995-01-01

    Applies codependency group model to families of obsessive-compulsive people based on view that these families are normal, feeling people who are trying to cope with unremitting stress. Clinical vignettes illustrate how these families are similar to families of alcoholics in their management of emotions and in their dysfunctional behaviors. (JBJ)

  4. Two-, Three-, and Four-Factor PCL-R Models in Applied Sex Offender Risk Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Christopher M.; Meyer, Robert G.; Van Nort, James J.; Tristan, Luciano

    2006-01-01

    The authors compared 2-, 3-, 4-factor, and 2-factor/4-facet Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) models in a previously unpublished sample of 1,566 adult male sex offenders assessed under applied clinical conditions as part of a comprehensive state-mandated community notification risk assessment procedure. "Testlets" significantly…

  5. Exploring Continuous Clinical Placement for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Lisa G.; Wray, Natalie; McCall, Louise

    2009-01-01

    Clinical placements are integral to health professional preparatory courses. These placements allow for the application of classroom-based learning into real patient care situations. In doing so, they provide opportunities for applying theoretical knowledge into practice contexts, skills development and socialisation into the chosen profession.…

  6. Applying Complement Therapeutics to Rare Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Edimara S.; Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; Yancopoulou, Despina; Risitano, Antonio M.; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Around 350 million people worldwide suffer from rare diseases. These may have a genetic, infectious, or autoimmune basis, and several include an inflammatory component. Launching of effective treatments can be very challenging when there is a low disease prevalence and limited scientific insights into the disease mechanisms. As a key trigger of inflammatory processes, complement has been associated with a variety of diseases and has become an attractive therapeutic target for conditions involving inflammation. In view of the clinical experience acquired with drugs licensed for the treatment of rare diseases such as hereditary angioedema and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, growing evidence supports the safety and efficacy of complement therapeutics in restoring immune balance and preventing aggravation of clinical outcomes. This review provides an overview of the candidates currently in the pharmaceutical pipeline with potential to treat orphan diseases and discusses the molecular mechanisms triggered by complement involved with the disease pathogenesis. PMID:26341313

  7. Applying complement therapeutics to rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Reis, Edimara S; Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Yancopoulou, Despina; Risitano, Antonio M; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2015-12-01

    Around 350 million people worldwide suffer from rare diseases. These may have a genetic, infectious, or autoimmune basis, and several include an inflammatory component. Launching of effective treatments can be very challenging when there is a low disease prevalence and limited scientific insights into the disease mechanisms. As a key trigger of inflammatory processes, complement has been associated with a variety of diseases and has become an attractive therapeutic target for conditions involving inflammation. In view of the clinical experience acquired with drugs licensed for the treatment of rare diseases such as hereditary angioedema and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, growing evidence supports the safety and efficacy of complement therapeutics in restoring immune balance and preventing aggravation of clinical outcomes. This review provides an overview of the candidates currently in the pharmaceutical pipeline with potential to treat orphan diseases and discusses the molecular mechanisms triggered by complement involved with the disease pathogenesis.

  8. 76 FR 3912 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ... Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice... Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... how to optimally utilize mechanistic biomarkers and apply clinical pharmacology tools, such...

  9. Optical spectroscopy for clinical detection of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Malavika; Wilson, Robert H.; Scheiman, James; Simeone, Diane; McKenna, Barbara; Purdy, Julianne; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2009-07-01

    A prototype clinical fluorescence and reflectance spectrometer was developed and employed to detect human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. For the first time, quantitative pancreatic tissue models and chemometric algorithms were applied to successfully distinguish among tissue types.

  10. Mentoring in the Clinical Setting to Improve Student Decision-Making Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stick-Mueller, Misty; Boesch, Ron; Silverman, Steven; Carpenter, Scott; Illingworth, Robert; Countryman, James

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The physician-intern relationship can be difficult to develop. A new chiropractic intern in a teaching clinic undergoes a major transition from classroom to clinical practice and must learn to turn classroom knowledge into clinical application. The ability to start formulating clinical techniques and apply them on a patient is…

  11. Innovative technologies applied to sensorimotor rehabilitation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Laffont, I; Bakhti, K; Coroian, F; van Dokkum, L; Mottet, D; Schweighofer, N; Froger, J

    2014-11-01

    Innovative technologies for sensorimotor rehabilitation after stroke have dramatically increased these past 20 years. Based on a review of the literature on "Medline" and "Web of Science" between 1990 and 2013, we offer an overview of available tools and their current level of validation. Neuromuscular electric stimulation and/or functional electric stimulation are widely used and highly suspected of being effective in upper or lower limb stroke rehabilitation. Robotic rehabilitation has yielded various results in the literature. It seems to have some effect on functional capacities when used for the upper limb. Its effectiveness in gait training is more controversial. Virtual reality is widely used in the rehabilitation of cognitive and motor impairments, as well as posture, with admitted benefits. Non-invasive brain stimulation (rTMS and TDCS) are promising in this indication but clinical evidence of their effectiveness is still lacking. In the same manner, these past five years, neurofeedback techniques based on brain signal recordings have emerged with a special focus on their therapeutic relevance in rehabilitation. Technological devices applied to rehabilitation are revolutionizing our clinical practices. Most of them are based on advances in neurosciences allowing us to better understand the phenomenon of brain plasticity, which underlies the effectiveness of rehabilitation. The acceptation and "real use" of those devices is still an issue since most of them are not easily available in current practice.

  12. Applying to subspecialty fellowship: clarifying the confusion and conflicts!

    PubMed

    Frishman, Gary N; Bell, Carrie L; Botros, Sylvia; Brost, Brian C; Robinson, Randal D; Steinauer, Jody; Wright, Jason D; Adams, Karen E

    2016-02-01

    Of graduating obstetrics and gynecology residents, 40% apply for fellowship training and this percentage is likely to increase. The fellowship interview process creates a substantial financial burden on candidates as well as significant challenges in scheduling the multiple interviews for residents, residency programs, and fellowship programs. Coverage with relatively short lead time is needed for some resident rotations, multiple residents may request time off during overlapping time periods, and applicants may not be able to interview based on conflicting interview dates or the inability to find coverage from other residents for their clinical responsibilities. To address these issues, we propose that each subspecialty fellowship within obstetrics and gynecology be allocated a specified and limited time period to schedule their interviews with minimal overlap between subspecialties. Furthermore, programs in close geographic areas should attempt to coordinate their interview dates. This will allow residents to plan their residency rotation schedules far in advance to minimize the impact on rotations that are less amenable to time away from their associated clinical duties, and decrease the numbers of residents needing time off for interviews during any one time period. In addition, a series of formal discussions should take place between subspecialties related to these issues as well as within subspecialties to facilitate coordination.

  13. Data Mining Techniques Applied to Hydrogen Lactose Breath Test

    PubMed Central

    Nepomuceno-Chamorro, Isabel; Pontes-Balanza, Beatriz; Hernández-Mendoza, Yoedusvany; Rodríguez-Herrera, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present the results of applying data mining techniques to hydrogen breath test data. Disposal of H2 gas is of utmost relevance to maintain efficient microbial fermentation processes. Objectives Analyze a set of data of hydrogen breath tests by use of data mining tools. Identify new patterns of H2 production. Methods Hydrogen breath tests data sets as well as k-means clustering as the data mining technique to a dataset of 2571 patients. Results Six different patterns have been extracted upon analysis of the hydrogen breath test data. We have also shown the relevance of each of the samples taken throughout the test. Conclusions Analysis of the hydrogen breath test data sets using data mining techniques has identified new patterns of hydrogen generation upon lactose absorption. We can see the potential of application of data mining techniques to clinical data sets. These results offer promising data for future research on the relations between gut microbiota produced hydrogen and its link to clinical symptoms. PMID:28125620

  14. NASA's Applied Sciences for Water Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doorn, Bradley; Toll, David; Engman, Ted

    2011-01-01

    The Earth Systems Division within NASA has the primary responsibility for the Earth Science Applied Science Program and the objective to accelerate the use of NASA science results in applications to help solve problems important to society and the economy. The primary goal of the Earth Science Applied Science Program is to improve future and current operational systems by infusing them with scientific knowledge of the Earth system gained through space-based observation, assimilation of new observations, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities. This paper discusses one of the major problems facing water resources managers, that of having timely and accurate data to drive their decision support tools. It then describes how NASA?s science and space based satellites may be used to overcome this problem. Opportunities for the water resources community to participate in NASA?s Water Resources Applications Program are described.

  15. [Montessori method applied to dementia - literature review].

    PubMed

    Brandão, Daniela Filipa Soares; Martín, José Ignacio

    2012-06-01

    The Montessori method was initially applied to children, but now it has also been applied to people with dementia. The purpose of this study is to systematically review the research on the effectiveness of this method using Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline) with the keywords dementia and Montessori method. We selected lo studies, in which there were significant improvements in participation and constructive engagement, and reduction of negative affects and passive engagement. Nevertheless, systematic reviews about this non-pharmacological intervention in dementia rate this method as weak in terms of effectiveness. This apparent discrepancy can be explained because the Montessori method may have, in fact, a small influence on dimensions such as behavioral problems, or because there is no research about this method with high levels of control, such as the presence of several control groups or a double-blind study.

  16. APPLIED ORIGAMI. Origami of thick panels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Peng, Rui; You, Zhong

    2015-07-24

    Origami patterns, including the rigid origami patterns in which flat inflexible sheets are joined by creases, are primarily created for zero-thickness sheets. In order to apply them to fold structures such as roofs, solar panels, and space mirrors, for which thickness cannot be disregarded, various methods have been suggested. However, they generally involve adding materials to or offsetting panels away from the idealized sheet without altering the kinematic model used to simulate folding. We develop a comprehensive kinematic synthesis for rigid origami of thick panels that differs from the existing kinematic model but is capable of reproducing motions identical to that of zero-thickness origami. The approach, proven to be effective for typical origami, can be readily applied to fold real engineering structures.

  17. Applied Developmental Science: An Advanced Textbook. The SAGE Program on Applied Developmental Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Richard M., Ed.; Jacobs, Fraincine, Ed.; Wertlieb, Donald, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This course textbook has been adapted from the four-volume "Handbook of Applied Developmental Science" (SAGE 2003), a work that offers a detailed roadmap for action and research in ensuring positive child, youth, and family development. In 20 chapters, "Applied Developmental Science: An Advanced Textbook" brings together theory and application…

  18. 34 CFR 400.4 - What definitions apply to the Vocational and Applied Technology Education Programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What definitions apply to the Vocational and Applied Technology Education Programs? 400.4 Section 400.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION VOCATIONAL...

  19. 34 CFR 400.4 - What definitions apply to the Vocational and Applied Technology Education Programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What definitions apply to the Vocational and Applied Technology Education Programs? 400.4 Section 400.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION VOCATIONAL...

  20. 34 CFR 400.4 - What definitions apply to the Vocational and Applied Technology Education Programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What definitions apply to the Vocational and Applied Technology Education Programs? 400.4 Section 400.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION VOCATIONAL...

  1. Biplot models applied to cancer mortality rates.

    PubMed

    Osmond, C

    1985-01-01

    "A graphical method developed by Gabriel to display the rows and columns of a matrix is applied to tables of age- and period-specific cancer mortality rates. It is particularly useful when the pattern of age-specific rates changes with time. Trends in age-specific rates and changes in the age distribution are identified as projections. Three examples [from England and Wales] are given."

  2. [Applied problems of mathematical biology and bioinformatics].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical biology and bioinformatics represent a new and rapidly progressing line of investigations which emerged in the course of work on the project "Human genome". The main applied problems of these sciences are grug design, patient-specific medicine and nanobioelectronics. It is shown that progress in the technology of mass sequencing of the human genome has set the stage for starting the national program on patient-specific medicine.

  3. Applying Japanese management tips to patient accounts.

    PubMed

    Groenevelt, C J

    1990-04-01

    "Just in time," a Japanese management philosophy that has been applied successfully in manufacturing operations, also can be used to improve management of patient accounts departments. Under its principles, healthcare organizations would develop standardized procedures; involve workers in decision making; set up training and education programs aimed at creating a multi-skilled pool of workers; establish smooth production schedules; and foster cooperation and commitment to the philosophy throughout the organization.

  4. Applying Cost Imposition Strategies against China

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    choice divided by the commensurate cost or hardship disadvantage . Contests where the competitor realizes less capability advantage or suffers more...Co mp eti tiv e Str ate gy Co st Im po sit ion Capability advantage Cost disadvantage Figure 1. Cost -based competitive spectrum Applying Cost ...possi- bility of attaining greater strategic advantage relative to US rivals. This article attempts to clarify cost -imposition methods for defense

  5. Scabies escaping detection until dermoscopy was applied

    PubMed Central

    Lallas, Aimilios; Apalla, Zoe; Lazaridou, Elizabeth; Sotiriou, Elena; Vakirlis, Efstratios; Ioannides, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Dermoscopy is already considered a fairly established method for diagnosing scabies. This is because dermoscopy enables the visualization both of the burrow and the mite itself, forming the so-called “jet with a contrail” structure. In the present report we present an extraordinary case of a patient with scabies lesions on the face and neck, which was misdiagnosed during sequential visits and underwent unnecessary surgical diagnostic procedures. Finally, the diagnostic problem was solved when dermoscopy was applied. PMID:28243495

  6. Wavelet Transform Signal Processing Applied to Ultrasonics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-05-01

    THE WAVELET TRANSFORM IS APPLIED TO THE ANALYSIS OF ULTRASONIC WAVES FOR IMPROVED SIGNAL DETECTION AND ANALYSIS OF THE SIGNALS. In instances where...the mother wavelet is well defined, the wavelet transform has relative insensitivity to noise and does not need windowing. Peak detection of...ultrasonic pulses using the wavelet transform is described and results show good detection even when large white noise was added. The use of the wavelet

  7. Exponential integration algorithms applied to viscoplasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Walker, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    Four, linear, exponential, integration algorithms (two implicit, one explicit, and one predictor/corrector) are applied to a viscoplastic model to assess their capabilities. Viscoplasticity comprises a system of coupled, nonlinear, stiff, first order, ordinary differential equations which are a challenge to integrate by any means. Two of the algorithms (the predictor/corrector and one of the implicits) give outstanding results, even for very large time steps.

  8. Reachability Analysis Applied to Space Situational Awareness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    12:207-242. [15] L. S. Breger, G. Inalhan, M. Tillerson, J. P. How, “Cooperative spacecraft Formation Flying: Model Predictive Control With Open And...applying them to the nonlinear relative orbit equations of motion, which are appropriate both for general SSA and spacecraft proximity operations... Nonlinear System (RNS). This assumption does not restrict the scope of these results in the context of SSA, as in orbital scenarios control and

  9. Selected reaction monitoring applied to quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kiyonami, Reiko; Domon, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics is gradually shifting from pure qualitative studies (protein identification) to large-scale quantitative experiments, prompted by the growing need to analyze consistently and precisely a large set of proteins in biological samples. The selected reaction monitoring (SRM) technique is increasingly applied to quantitative proteomics because of its selectivity (two levels of mass selection), its sensitivity (non-scanning mode), and its wide dynamic range. This account describes the different steps in the design and the experimental setup of SRM experiments.

  10. A RUTCOR Project in Discrete Applied Mathematics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-20

    applied to bilevel linear programming in the paper [34]. Bilevel programs arise in situations where multiple decisionmakers with divergent objectives...strategies of the leader and the follower makes the model more realistic. This leads to bilevel Drogramming, a topic which has attracted much recent...attention, both in the linear case and in the nonlinear one. Applications of bilevel programming have been made in many domains. These include economic

  11. Peptidic tools applied to redirect alternative splicing events.

    PubMed

    Nancy, Martínez-Montiel; Nora, Rosas-Murrieta; Rebeca, Martínez-Contreras

    2015-05-01

    Peptides are versatile and attractive biomolecules that can be applied to modulate genetic mechanisms like alternative splicing. In this process, a single transcript yields different mature RNAs leading to the production of protein isoforms with diverse or even antagonistic functions. During splicing events, errors can be caused either by mutations present in the genome or by defects or imbalances in regulatory protein factors. In any case, defects in alternative splicing have been related to several genetic diseases including muscular dystrophy, Alzheimer's disease and cancer from almost every origin. One of the most effective approaches to redirect alternative splicing events has been to attach cell-penetrating peptides to oligonucleotides that can modulate a single splicing event and restore correct gene expression. Here, we summarize how natural existing and bioengineered peptides have been applied over the last few years to regulate alternative splicing and genetic expression. Under different genetic and cellular backgrounds, peptides have been shown to function as potent vehicles for splice correction, and their therapeutic benefits have reached clinical trials and patenting stages, emphasizing the use of regulatory peptides as an exciting therapeutic tool for the treatment of different genetic diseases.

  12. Caring to Care: Applying Noddings' Philosophy to Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Dorene F; Hirsh, David A; Monie, Daphne; Weil, Henry; Richards, Boyd F

    2016-04-26

    The authors argue that Nel Noddings' philosophy, "an ethic of caring," may illuminate how students learn to be caring physicians from their experience of being in a caring, reciprocal relationship with teaching faculty. In her philosophy, Noddings acknowledges two important contextual continuities: duration and space, which the authors speculate exist within longitudinal integrated clerkships. In this Perspective, the authors highlight core features of Noddings' philosophy and explore its applicability to medical education. They apply Noddings' philosophy to a subset of data from a previously published longitudinal case study to explore its "goodness of fit" with the experience of eight students in the 2012 cohort of the Columbia-Bassett longitudinal integrated clerkship. In line with Noddings' philosophy, the authors' supplementary analysis suggests that students (1) recognized caring when they talked about "being known" by teaching faculty who "cared for" and "trusted" them; (2) responded to caring by demonstrating enthusiasm, action, and responsibility toward patients; and (3) acknowledged that duration and space facilitated caring relations with teaching faculty. The authors discuss how Noddings' philosophy provides a useful conceptual framework to apply to medical education design and to future research on caring-oriented clinical training, such as longitudinal integrated clerkships.

  13. Abductive networks applied to electronic combat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Gerard J.; Hess, Paul; Hwang, Jong S.

    1990-08-01

    A practical approach to dealing with combinatorial decision problems and uncertainties associated with electronic combat through the use of networks of high-level functional elements called abductive networks is presented. It describes the application of the Abductory Induction Mechanism (AIMTM) a supervised inductive learning tool for synthesizing polynomial abductive networks to the electronic combat problem domain. From databases of historical expert-generated or simulated combat engagements AIM can often induce compact and robust network models for making effective real-time electronic combat decisions despite significant uncertainties or a combinatorial explosion of possible situations. The feasibility of applying abductive networks to realize advanced combat decision aiding capabilities was demonstrated by applying AIM to a set of electronic combat simulations. The networks synthesized by AIM generated accurate assessments of the intent lethality and overall risk associated with a variety of simulated threats and produced reasonable estimates of the expected effectiveness of a group of electronic countermeasures for a large number of simulated combat scenarios. This paper presents the application of abductive networks to electronic combat summarizes the results of experiments performed using AIM discusses the benefits and limitations of applying abductive networks to electronic combat and indicates why abductive networks can often result in capabilities not attainable using alternative approaches. 1. ELECTRONIC COMBAT. UNCERTAINTY. AND MACHINE LEARNING Electronic combat has become an essential part of the ability to make war and has become increasingly complex since

  14. Applying WebMining on KM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, Keiko; Ozaki, Tomonobu; Furukawa, Koichi

    KM (Knowledge Management) systems have recently been adopted within the realm of enterprise management. On the other hand, data mining technology is widely acknowledged within Information systems' R&D Divisions. Specially, acquisition of meaningful information from Web usage data has become one of the most exciting eras. In this paper, we employ a Web based KM system and propose a framework for applying Web Usage Mining technology to KM data. As it turns out, task duration varies according to different user operations such as referencing a table-of-contents page, down-loading a target file, and writing to a bulletin board. This in turn makes it possible to easily predict the purpose of the user's task. By taking these observations into account, we segmented access log data manually. These results were compared with results abstained by applying the constant interval method. Next, we obtained a segmentation rule of Web access logs by applying a machine-learning algorithm to manually segmented access logs as training data. Then, the newly obtained segmentation rule was compared with other known methods including the time interval method by evaluating their segmentation results in terms of recall and precision rates and it was shown that our rule attained the best results in both measures. Furthermore, the segmented data were fed to an association rule miner and the obtained association rules were utilized to modify the Web structure.

  15. Cutaneously applied 4-hydroxytamoxifen is not carcinogenic in female rats.

    PubMed

    Sauvez, F; Drouin, D S; Attia, M; Bertheux, H; Forster, R

    1999-05-01

    Tamoxifen is widely used to treat oestrogen-dependent carcinoma of the breast. Previous long-term studies have shown that oral administration of tamoxifen induces hepatoproliferative lesions and hepatocellular tumours in rats. 4-hydroxytamoxifen is an active metabolite of tamoxifen undergoing clinical evaluation for the treatment of various non-malignant breast diseases by topical application. In the present study, 4-hydroxytamoxifen was administered daily by cutaneous application for 101 weeks to groups of 50 female Sprague-Dawley rats at 20, 140 or 1000 microg/kg/day. The product was applied with no occlusive bandage and oral ingestion was avoided by application of an Elizabethan collar for 6 h after administration. Treatment with 4-hydroxytamoxifen was clinically well tolerated and induced changes such as decreased food consumption and body weight gain, uterine and ovarian atrophy, mucification of vaginal epithelium and reduced mammary development, all of which were attributed to its pharmacological action. Mortality was significantly lower in the treated animals. The number of animals with palpable masses was similarly reduced. The incidence of mammary tumours and hypophyseal tumours was markedly lower in 4-hydroxytamoxifen-treated animals. The incidence of chronic tubulo-interstitial nephropathies, a common cause of mortality, was also lowered. There was no evidence of a carcinogenic action of 4-hydroxytamoxifen on the liver, genital organs or skin. Plasma levels of 4-hydroxytamoxifen were stable over the duration of the study and were proportional to the administered dose, exceeding clinical plasma levels by 60-fold at the high dose-level. In conclusion, 4-hydroxytamoxifen is not carcinogenic in the rat and reduces the incidence of spontaneous mammary and hypophyseal tumours.

  16. The possibilities of applying infrared lasers in otolaryngology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwa, Andrzej; Tulibacki, Marek P.; Wojtowicz, Piotr; Oledzka, Iwona; Obarska, Agnieszka

    2003-10-01

    The authors present their many years of experience in the area of laryngological surgery with various types of solid lasers. In our clinical practice we use Nd-YAG, Ho-YAG and Er-YAG surgical lasers. There are many reasons for applying lasers, depending on medical conditions. One of the most frequent cases are the nasal polyps, where surgical treatment is aimed at curing the results. For this type the procedures there was applied Nd-YAG laser, which has shortened the period of treatment and extended the remission. We also use this laser for mucal tissue corrections of the nasal conchs through deep coagulation effect. The above mentioned laser is also useful for the preventative treatment of granulation stenosis by removal of granulation tissue from different sections of the upper way; from the nose to the trachea.Other laser procedures in the nasal area include coagulation of Kisselbach locus, bleeding in Rendu-Osler disease, separating adhesions of the nasal concha from the nasal septum, coagulation of septal bleeding polyps, angiomas of different location, small papillomae of throat and nose, and reduction of hypertrophy nasopharyngeal mucoosa in OSAS patients, and uvolo-palato-pharyngoplasty (UPPP). Neodymium laser is also used for the management of neoplastic diseases in palliative and radical (CA. basocellulare) treatment for the resection of the premalignant changes (papilloma, leukoplakia) and early neoplastic changes of throat and larynx. Keloplasty in the area of larynx and trachea is performed with the use of Ho-YAG laser, with shallow effect, regardless of the density of tissue, enabling coagulation of vascular vessels. It enables non-traumatic resections of bone structures, such as the wall of maxillary sinus, nasal spine, or conchoplasty; the mucal tissue and the frame. Recent clinical tests are examining the possibilities of Er-YAG laser application for crushing calculus in the salivary ducts. Using lasers in laryngology enables their extensive

  17. Need assessment of enhancing the weightage of applied biochemistry in the undergraduate curriculum at MGIMS, sevagram.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satish; Jena, Lingaraja; Vagha, Jayant

    2016-05-06

    In order to review the need assessment of enhancing the weightage of Applied Biochemistry in the undergraduate curriculum at Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences (MGIMS), Sevagram, a validated questionnaire was sent to 453 participants which include 387 undergraduate students, 11 interns, 23 postgraduate students, and 32 faculty members. A web-based data collection and analysis tool was designed for online questionnaire distribution, data collection, and analysis. Response rate was 100%. Most of the respondents agreed that the subject Biochemistry has relevance in clinical practice (81.24%) and applied based learning of Biochemistry by medical undergraduates would help in overall improvement in the health standards/patients care (83.44%). According to 65.12% respondents, most of the medical undergraduates read Biochemistry just for examination purpose only. Nearly half of the respondents agreed that minute details of biochemical reactions were not much useful in clinical practice (53.86%) and the vast majority of diagrammatic cycles memorized by the medical undergraduates had no relevance in clinical practice (51.21%), the decreased interest in learning the Applied Biochemistry was due to more amount of clinically irrelevant information taught to medical undergraduates (73.51%), there was a need to rethink for removing the diagrammatic biochemical cycles from curriculum for medical undergraduates (48.12%), the less learning of Applied Biochemistry or competencies would affect the clinical skills and knowledge of medical undergraduates (70.42%). The result of this study suggests that there is need for restructuring the Biochemistry curriculum with more clinical relevance. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:230-240, 2016.

  18. Quantitative Imaging in Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Mankoff, David A.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Lieberman, Frank S.; Buatti, John M.; Mountz, James M.; Erickson, Bradley J.; Fennessy, Fiona M.M.; Huang, Wei; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Wahl, Richard L.; Linden, Hannah M.; Kinahan, Paul; Zhao, Binsheng; Hylton, Nola M.; Gillies, Robert J.; Clarke, Laurence; Nordstrom, Robert; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    As anti-cancer therapies designed to target specific molecular pathways have been developed, it has become critical to develop methods to assess the response induced by such agents. While traditional, anatomic CT and MRI exams are useful in many settings, there is increasing evidence that these methods cannot answer the fundamental biological and physiological questions essential for assessment and, eventually, prediction of treatment response in the clinical trial setting, especially in the critical period soon after treatment is initiated. To optimally apply advances in quantitative imaging methods to trials of targeted cancer therapy, new infrastructure improvements are needed that incorporate these emerging techniques into the settings where they are most likely to have impact. In this review, we first elucidate the needs for therapeutic response assessment in the era of molecularly targeted therapy and describe how quantitative imaging can most effectively provide scientifically and clinically relevant data. We then describe the tools and methods required to apply quantitative imaging and provide concrete examples of work making these advances practically available for routine application in clinical trials. We conclude by proposing strategies to surmount barriers to wider incorporation of these quantitative imaging methods into clinical trials and, eventually, clinical practice. Our goal is to encourage and guide the oncology community to deploy standardized quantitative imaging techniques in clinical trials to further personalize care for cancer patients, and to provide a more efficient path for the development of improved targeted therapies. PMID:26773162

  19. Quantitative Imaging in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; Mankoff, David A; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Lieberman, Frank S; Buatti, John M; Mountz, James M; Erickson, Bradley J; Fennessy, Fiona M M; Huang, Wei; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Wahl, Richard L; Linden, Hannah M; Kinahan, Paul E; Zhao, Binsheng; Hylton, Nola M; Gillies, Robert J; Clarke, Laurence; Nordstrom, Robert; Rubin, Daniel L

    2016-01-15

    As anticancer therapies designed to target specific molecular pathways have been developed, it has become critical to develop methods to assess the response induced by such agents. Although traditional, anatomic CT, and MRI examinations are useful in many settings, increasing evidence suggests that these methods cannot answer the fundamental biologic and physiologic questions essential for assessment and, eventually, prediction of treatment response in the clinical trial setting, especially in the critical period soon after treatment is initiated. To optimally apply advances in quantitative imaging methods to trials of targeted cancer therapy, new infrastructure improvements are needed that incorporate these emerging techniques into the settings where they are most likely to have impact. In this review, we first elucidate the needs for therapeutic response assessment in the era of molecularly targeted therapy and describe how quantitative imaging can most effectively provide scientifically and clinically relevant data. We then describe the tools and methods required to apply quantitative imaging and provide concrete examples of work making these advances practically available for routine application in clinical trials. We conclude by proposing strategies to surmount barriers to wider incorporation of these quantitative imaging methods into clinical trials and, eventually, clinical practice. Our goal is to encourage and guide the oncology community to deploy standardized quantitative imaging techniques in clinical trials to further personalize care for cancer patients and to provide a more efficient path for the development of improved targeted therapies.

  20. How Do Clinical Trials Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work Who Can Participate What To Expect During Benefits and Risks How They Protect Participants Finding Clinical Trials Links Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites How Do Clinical Trials Work? If you take part in a clinical trial, ...