Science.gov

Sample records for clinically n0 neck

  1. Effect of clinical symptoms on the indication for selective neck dissection for N0 carcinomas of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Maruo, Takashi; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Yoshida, Kenji; Hiramatsu, Mariko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Nishio, Naoki; Shimono, Mariko; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2014-07-01

    Lymph node metastasis is a major prognostic factor in parotid carcinoma, however, the pre-operative diagnosis of occult nodal metastasis is difficult in clinical N0 (cN0) parotid cancer patients. In addition, the indication of neck dissection in T1-3 cN0 patients is controversial. The current study investigated 17 patients with clinical T1-3 cN0 parotid cancer, and analyzed the correlation between patient symptoms/findings and pathological N status/tumor histological grade. In the statistical analysis, pain was found to significantly correlate with neck metastasis. Furthermore, cN0-staged patients without pain exhibited no neck metastasis. However, no significant correlation was identified between patient symptoms or findings and histological grade. These results indicate the possibility that selective neck dissection can be omitted for T1-3 cN0-staged patients without pain.

  2. Is Elective Irradiation to the Lower Neck Necessary for N0 Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma?

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yunsheng; Zhu Guopei; Lu Jiade; Ying Hongmei; Kong Ling; Wu Yongru; Hu Chaosu

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize our experience and treatment results in lymph node-negative nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated in a single institution. Methods and Materials: From January 2000 to December 2003, 410 patients with lymph node-negative nasopharyngeal carcinoma were retrospectively analyzed. The T-stage distribution was 18.8% in T1, 54.6% in T2 (T2a, 41 patients; T2b, 183 patients), 13.2% in T3, and 13.4% in T4. All patients received radiotherapy to the nasopharynx, skull base, and upper neck drainage areas, including levels II, III, and VA. The dose was 64-74 Gy, 1. 8-2.0 Gy per fraction over 6.5-7.5 weeks to the primary tumor with {sup 60}Co or 6-MV X-rays, and 50-56 Gy to levels II, III, and VA. Residual disease was boosted with either {sup 192}Ir afterloading brachytherapy or small external beam fields. Results: The median follow-up time was 54 months (range, 3-90 months). Four patients developed neck recurrence, and only 1 patient (0.2%) experienced relapse outside the irradiation fields. The 5-year overall survival rate was 84.2%. The 5-year relapse-free survival rate, distant metastasis-free survival rate, and disease-free survival rate were 88.6%, 90.6% and 80.1%, respectively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated that T classification was the only significant prognostic factor for predicting overall survival. The observed serious late toxicities were radiation-induced brain damage (7 cases), cranial nerve palsy (16 cases), and severe trismus (13 cases; the distance between the incisors was {<=}1 cm). Conclusion: Elective levels II, III, and VA irradiation is suitable for nasopharyngeal carcinoma without neck lymph node metastasis.

  3. Is an Elective Neck Dissection Necessary for All Cases of N0 Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma? -Elective Neck Dissection may be Performed for Tongue Cancer with Tumor Thickness More than 4 mm.

    PubMed

    Otsuru, Mitsunobu; Aoki, Takayuki; Ota, Yoshihide; Denda, Yuya; Akiba, Takeshi; Sekine, Riyo; Yoshida, Yoshifumi; Osaka, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether neck dissection should be performed to prevent T1-2N0M0 tongue cancer by using the Weiss and colleague's decision tree method. The results showed that preventive neck dissection should not be recommended for T1-2N0M0 tongue cancer. However, preventive neck dissection is a suitable approach when treating tongue cancer tumors with a thickness of ≥ 4 mm. PMID:27628601

  4. The value of PET/CT to assess clinically negative necks.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Enver; Naiboğlu, Barış; Meacham, Ryan; Ryoo, Cherie; Agrawal, Amit; Schuller, David E

    2012-11-01

    The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of [(18)F]-2-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in evaluating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) to the cervical lymph nodes, with specific attention to the efficacy in regard to clinically negative necks. This was a retrospective review of 243 patients with HNSCC between years 2005 and 2007 treated at a comprehensive cancer care institution who underwent pre-operative PET/CT and neck dissection with either an N0 (112 patients) or N+ (131 patients) clinical nodal status. PET/CT findings were correlated with histopathological results of surgical specimens. A majority of the primary sites were oral cavity and oropharynx (70%), followed by larynx, unknown primary and hypopharynx. In the group of 112 patients who underwent 144 neck dissections with N0 nodal status, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive (NPV) and accuracy were 57, 82, 59, 80 and 74%, respectively. In the group of 131 patients who underwent 169 neck dissections with N+ nodal status, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 93, 70, 96, 58 and 91%, respectively. PET/CT has a much reduced rate of efficacy for the clinically negative neck compared to the clinically positive neck. PET/CT in its current stage does not appear to offer an advantage in staging the clinically N0 neck due to high rates of false positives and negatives.

  5. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by local excision in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Seob; Yoon, Yong sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Chang, Heung Moon; Park, Jin-hong; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-Wook; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) followed by local excision (LE) is feasible approach in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods Patients who received PCRT and LE because of clinical T2 rectal cancer within 7 cm from anal verge between January 2006 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. LE was performed in case of a good clinical response after PCRT. Patients’ characteristics, treatment record, tumor recurrence, and treatment-related complications were reviewed at a median follow-up of 49 months. Results All patients received transanal excision or transanal minimally invasive surgery. Of 34 patients, 19 patients (55.9%) presented pathologic complete response (pCR). The 3-year local recurrence-free survival and disease free-survival were 100.0% and 97.1%, respectively. There was no recurrence among the patients with pCR. Except for 1 case of grade 4 enterovesical fistula, all other late complications were mild and self-limiting. Conclusion PCRT followed by an LE might be feasible as an alternative to total mesorectal excision in good responders with clinical T2N0 distal rectal cancer. PMID:27730804

  6. Evaluation of the Reliability of Clinical Staging of T2N0 Esophageal Cancer: A Review of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Traves D.; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; Puri, Varun; Burfeind, William; Bharat, Ankit; Patterson, G Alexander; Hofstetter, Wayne; Meyers, Bryan F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical staging of esophageal cancer has improved with PET/CT and endoscopic ultrasound. Despite such progress, small single center studies have questioned the reliability of clinical staging of T2N0 esophageal cancer. This study broadly examines the adequacy of clinical staging of T2N0 disease using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons database. Methods We retrospectively studied 810 clinical stage T2N0 patients from 2002-2011. There were 58 excluded because of incomplete pathologic staging data. Clinical stage, pathologic stage, and preoperative characteristics were recorded. Logistic regression analysis was utilized to identify factors associated with upstaging at the time of surgery. Results Among 752 clinical stage T2N0 patients, 35.9 %(270) received induction therapy prior to surgery. Of 482 patients that went directly to surgery, 27.4%(132) were confirmed as pathologic T2N0, 25.9%(125) were downstaged(i.e. T0-1N0), while 46.7%(225) were upstaged at surgery (T3-4N0 or TanyN1-3). Exclusive tumor upstaging(i.e. pathological T3-4N0) accounted for 18.2%(41), while exclusive nodal upstaging(i.e. pathological T1-2N1-3) accounted for 44.5%(100). Combined tumor and nodal upstaging(i.e. pathological T3-4N1-3) accounted for 37.3%(84). Among patients who received induction therapy, 38.1%(103) were upstaged vs. 46.7%(225) without induction therapy(p=0.026). Comparing the induction therapy group and the primary surgical group, postoperative 30-day mortality(3.7% vs. 3.7%, p=1.0) and morbidity(46.3% vs. 45%, p=0.76) were similar. Conclusion Despite advances in staging techniques clinical staging of T2N0 esophageal cancer remains unreliable. Recognizing T2N0 as a threshold for induction therapy in esophageal cancer, many surgeons have opted to treat T2N0 disease with induction therapy, despite the fact that one quarter of these patients will be pathological T1N0. While this study demonstrated similar perioperative morbidity and mortality with and without induction

  7. Clinical aspects of IMRT for head-and-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, Avraham

    2002-01-01

    The tightly conformal doses produced by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the existence of many critical structures in close proximity to the target, and the lack of internal organ motion in the head and neck, provide the potential for organ sparing and improved tumor irradiation. Many studies of treatment planning for head-and-neck cancer have demonstrated the dosimetric superiority of IMRT over conventional techniques in these respects. The initial results of clinical studies demonstrate reduced xerostomia. They suggest an improvement in tumor control, which needs to be verified in larger studies and longer follow-up. PMID:12074474

  8. Current clinical immunotherapeutic approaches for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Soto Chervin, Carolina; Brockstein, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    It was estimated that 59,340 new cases of head and neck cancer would be diagnosed in the US alone in 2015 and that 12,290 deaths would be attributed to the disease. Local and regional recurrences may be treated with chemotherapy and radiation; however, metastatic head and neck cancer is fatal and is treated with chemotherapy for palliation. Recent successful treatment of a variety of solid and hematological malignancies by immunotherapeutic approaches (i.e. harnessing the body’s own immune system to combat disease) has added a fourth therapeutic option for the treatment of cancer. This commentary will review the status of immunotherapies in clinical development for the specific treatment of head and neck cancer. PMID:27239282

  9. A Lean Neck Mass Clinic Model: Adding Value to Care

    PubMed Central

    Tillman, Brittny N.; Glazer, Tiffany A.; Ray, Amrita; Brenner, J. Chad; Spector, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate that ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (USFNA) with on-site cytopathologic analysis eliminates unnecessary diagnostic testing, return visits, repeat procedures and optimizes quality of care. Study Design Retrospective Cohort Methods 61 new patients (28 female; 33 male; age range 19-85) were seen in our dedicated neck mass clinic over a one-year period. All patients underwent USFNA of masses located in neck levels I-VI (40), parotid gland (20), or parapharyngeal space (1). Each patient underwent two USFNA passes followed by on-site cytopathologic analysis with additional passes if required for diagnosis. Results Diagnosis was made in 93.4% (57) of patients allowing for counseling and treatment planning at the first visit. In order to obtain a diagnosis, more than half (57.4%, 35) of our patients required additional passes which implies that they would have required an additional visit without on-site cytopathologic analysis. Treatment included: Observation in 42.6% (26) of patients, surgery in 32.8 % (20) of patients and nonsurgical treatment (chemotherapy, radiation, other) in 24.6% (15) of patients. The average time from check-in to checkout including the clinic visit, biopsy and treatment counseling was 103 minutes, and the average round trip mileage traveled per patient was 127.6 miles. Conclusion The adult neck mass is a commonly encountered scenario in otolaryngology. For the patient this can be a stressful situation in which timely and accurate diagnosis is critical. A dedicated lean neck mass clinic model with USFNA and on-site cytopathologic analysis can be both an efficient part of one's practice and a valuable addition to patient care. PMID:26256915

  10. Post Burn Contracture Neck: Clinical Profile and Management

    PubMed Central

    Bankar, Sanket S.; Patil, Avinash

    2014-01-01

    Background: Morbidity related to hypertrophic scars and contractures which are well known sequel after burns remains high and in fact has increased as more severely burned patients are surviving. This study was undertaken in order to assess the varied clinical presentation, precipitating factors, preventive measures, treatment modalities of neck contractures and evaluate the results after surgical procedures. Materials and Methods: This hospital based study was conducted on patients admitted in our institution with proven cases of Post burn neck contracture from 1st August 2009 to 31st July 2011. Twenty two patients of post burn neck contracture who underwent operative treatment were included. Observation: 10 of 22 cases were in the middle age group i.e. between 21-30 years. There were 5 males and 17 females. Accidental flame burn was the commonest aetiology. Fourteen patients were treated within 1 year of burns for functional disability. Excisional release was performed in 13 and incisional release in 9 of our patients. Resurfacing with STSG (split thickness skin graft) was carried out in 19 cases and a local or regional flap with or without a graft in 3 patients. Hypertrophy and recontracture were the commonest late complications and occurred in 3 cases. Good to fair results were obtained in 19 patients Conclusion: Local flaps have many advantages and are to be used whenever possible. It is preferable to place the grafts if used in the area surrounding the neck (donor site of flap) or at least in the non-visible area of the neck (submental area). When a combination of flap & graft is used, it’s preferable to place the flap in a horizontal intersecting fashion in between the two patches of the graft. A follow up program for reasonable period is highly desired. PMID:25478392

  11. Local-Regional Recurrence With and Without Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy for Clinically Staged T3N0 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Himanshu; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, Tse-Kuan

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine local-regional recurrence (LRR) risk according to whether postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) was used to treat breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy. Methodsand Materials: Clinicopathology data from 162 patients with clinical T3N0 breast cancer who received NAC and underwent mastectomy were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 119 patients received PMRT, and 43 patients did not. The median number of axillary lymph nodes (LNs) dissected was 15. Actuarial rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up of 75 months, 15 of 162 patients developed LRR. For all patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-14%). The 5-year LRR rate for those who received PMRT was 4% (95% CI, 1%-9%) vs. 24% (95% CI, 10%-39%) for those who did not receive PMRT (p <0.001). A significantly higher proportion of irradiated patients had pathology involved LNs and were {<=}40 years old. Among patients who had pathology involved LNs, the LRR rate was lower in those who received PMRT (p <0.001). A similar trend was observed for those who did not have pathology involved LN disease. Among nonirradiated patients, the appearance of pathologic LN disease after NAC was the only clinicopathologic factor examined that significantly correlated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease treated with NAC and mastectomy but without PMRT had a significant risk of LRR, even when there was no pathologic evidence of LN involvement present after NAC. PMRT was effective in reducing the LRR rate. We suggest PMRT should be considered for patients with clinical T3N0 disease.

  12. Treatment of head and neck cancers: issues for clinical pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Scarpace, Sarah L; Brodzik, Frank A; Mehdi, Syed; Belgam, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Head and neck cancers are a heterogeneous group of diseases involving the oral cavity, pharyngeal tube, and larynx. Given the drug therapy options available, clinical pharmacists can play an important role in the care of this patient population. They can recommend a regimen based on efficacy, toxicity, and patient-specific factors; ensure that the prescribed regimen has been studied and reported in the literature; verify dosages; and monitor and counsel patients about adverse effects. Chemotherapy plus radiation (chemoradiation) is often the standard treatment for patients with stage III or nonmetastatic stage IV head and neck cancer. Cisplatin-based regimens are preferred, although carboplatin may be appropriate in some circumstances. Induction therapy with a docetaxel-based regimen is recommended for some patients; however, this therapy has been associated with a high frequency of grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia. Cetuximab, an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, is the newest agent approved for treatment of head and neck cancer. Although evidence supports cetuximab combined with cisplatin versus cisplatin alone for patients with metastatic disease, the role of combination therapy is less clear in patients undergoing chemoradiation. Patients with head and neck cancer may experience swallowing difficulties or mouth pain, possibly interfering with drug administration and adherence; thus, pharmacists in all practice settings should be knowledgeable about different regimens and alternative routes of administration. Xerostomia and mucositis are common adverse effects of radiation therapy, and it is critical that good oral hygiene practices are maintained. Patients may achieve symptomatic relief from xerostomia with saliva substitutes, and clinical experience suggests that use of pilocarpine is worthwhile. Until more evidence becomes available, prevention of xerostomia and mucositis with amifostine is still controversial. Salt-water rinses

  13. Clinical effects of deep cervical flexor muscle activation in patients with chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Kwag, Kwang Il

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscles exercise on pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and neck and shoulder postures in patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight patients with chronic neck pain were randomly assigned into either the general strengthening exercise (GSE) group or the DCF activation group as control and experimental groups, respectively. All exercises were performed three times per week over 4 weeks. NDI and numeric rating scale (NRS) score for pain were determined and radiological assessment of neck-shoulder postures (head tilt angle [HTA], neck flexion angle [NFA], and forward shoulder angle [FSA]) was performed before (baseline), 4 weeks after, and 8 weeks after exercise in order to directly compare the exercise effects between the groups. [Results] In the DCF group, the NDI, NRS score, and neck-shoulder postures (analyzed by uisng HTA, NFA, and FSA) were significantly improved. [Conclusion] DCF activation exercise was effective to alleviate pain, recover functions, and correct forward head posture in the patients with neck pain. Hence, it might be recommended in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic neck pain. PMID:26957772

  14. Clinical Results of Internal Fixation of Subcapital Femoral Neck Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Ho; Shin, Joong Sup; Shin, Eun Ho; Ahn, Chi Hoon; Choi, Geon Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Subcapital femoral neck is known to cause many complications, such as avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head or nonunion, compared with other femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence of AVN and fixation failures in patients treated with internal fixation using cannulated screws for the subcapital femoral neck fractures. Methods This study targeted a total of 84 cases of subcapital femoral neck fractures that underwent internal fixation using cannulated screws. The average follow-up time after surgery was 36.8 months (range, 24 to 148 months). Results Nine hips (10.7%) showing AVN of the femoral head and 6 hips (7.1%) showing fixation failures were observed. The factors affecting the incidence of AVN of the femoral head after sustaining fractures correlated well with fracture types in the Garden classification (p = 0.030). The factors affecting fixation failure were the degree of reduction (p = 0.001) measured by the Garden alignment index and firm fixation (p = 0.009) assessed using the technique of 3-point fixation through the inferomedial cortical bone of the femoral neck. Conclusions The complication rates for subcapital femoral neck fractures were lower than those previously reported; hence, internal fixation could be a primary treatment option for these fractures. PMID:27247738

  15. The Tip of the Iceberg: Clinical Implications of Genomic Sequencing Projects in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Andrew C.; Ludwig, Megan L.; Meraj, Taha S.; Brenner, J. Chad; Prince, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genomic sequencing studies have provided valuable insight into genetic aberrations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite these great advances, certain hurdles exist in translating genomic findings to clinical care. Further correlation of genetic findings to clinical outcomes, additional analyses of subgroups of head and neck cancers and follow-up investigation into genetic heterogeneity are needed. While the development of targeted therapy trials is of key importance, numerous challenges exist in establishing and optimizing such programs. This review discusses potential upcoming steps for further genetic evaluation of head and neck cancers and implementation of genetic findings into precision medicine trials. PMID:26506389

  16. Effectiveness of dry needling for chronic nonspecific neck pain: a randomized, single-blinded, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cerezo-Téllez, Ester; Torres-Lacomba, María; Fuentes-Gallardo, Isabel; Perez-Muñoz, Milagros; Mayoral-Del-Moral, Orlando; Lluch-Girbés, Enrique; Prieto-Valiente, Luis; Falla, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    Chronic neck pain attributed to a myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of muscle contractures referred to as myofascial trigger points. In this randomized, parallel-group, blinded, controlled clinical trial, we examined the effectiveness of deep dry needling (DDN) of myofascial trigger points in people with chronic nonspecific neck pain. The study was conducted at a public Primary Health Care Centre in Madrid, Spain, from January 2010 to December 2014. A total of 130 participants with nonspecific neck pain presenting with active myofascial trigger points in their cervical muscles were included. These participants were randomly allocated to receive: DDN plus stretching (n = 65) or stretching only (control group [n = 65]). Four sessions of treatment were applied over 2 weeks with a 6-month follow-up after treatment. Pain intensity, mechanical hyperalgesia, neck active range of motion, neck muscle strength, and perceived neck disability were measured at baseline, after 2 sessions of intervention, after the intervention period, and 15, 30, 90, and 180 days after the intervention. Significant and clinically relevant differences were found in favour of dry needling in all the outcomes (all P < 0.001) at both short and long follow-ups. Deep dry needling and passive stretching is more effective than passive stretching alone in people with nonspecific neck pain. The results support the use of DDN in the management of myofascial pain syndrome in people with chronic nonspecific neck pain. PMID:27537209

  17. Effectiveness of dry needling for chronic nonspecific neck pain: a randomized, single-blinded, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cerezo-Téllez, Ester; Torres-Lacomba, María; Fuentes-Gallardo, Isabel; Perez-Muñoz, Milagros; Mayoral-Del-Moral, Orlando; Lluch-Girbés, Enrique; Prieto-Valiente, Luis; Falla, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    Chronic neck pain attributed to a myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of muscle contractures referred to as myofascial trigger points. In this randomized, parallel-group, blinded, controlled clinical trial, we examined the effectiveness of deep dry needling (DDN) of myofascial trigger points in people with chronic nonspecific neck pain. The study was conducted at a public Primary Health Care Centre in Madrid, Spain, from January 2010 to December 2014. A total of 130 participants with nonspecific neck pain presenting with active myofascial trigger points in their cervical muscles were included. These participants were randomly allocated to receive: DDN plus stretching (n = 65) or stretching only (control group [n = 65]). Four sessions of treatment were applied over 2 weeks with a 6-month follow-up after treatment. Pain intensity, mechanical hyperalgesia, neck active range of motion, neck muscle strength, and perceived neck disability were measured at baseline, after 2 sessions of intervention, after the intervention period, and 15, 30, 90, and 180 days after the intervention. Significant and clinically relevant differences were found in favour of dry needling in all the outcomes (all P < 0.001) at both short and long follow-ups. Deep dry needling and passive stretching is more effective than passive stretching alone in people with nonspecific neck pain. The results support the use of DDN in the management of myofascial pain syndrome in people with chronic nonspecific neck pain.

  18. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David L.; Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy; Chen Yipei; Zhang Yongbin; Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S.; Dong, Lei

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. Results: With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Conclusion: This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond.

  19. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes from a Prospective Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David L.; Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy; Chen, Yipei; Zhang, Yongbin; Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S.; Dong, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods Twenty-four patients enrolled onto an IRB-approved clinical trial. Twenty-two patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of CTVs and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1. Twenty (91%) patients had AJCC stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4 and N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Twenty-one (95%) patients received systemic therapy. Results With 31 month median follow up (range: 13-45), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to conventional IMRT results. Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Discussion This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only 1 or 2 mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at one-year follow-up and beyond. PMID:22138459

  20. Severe neck infections that require wide external drainage: clinical analysis of 17 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Tamás; Horváth, Barnabás; Varga, Zsuzsa; Liktor, Bálint; Szabadka, Hajnalka; Csákó, László; Liktor, Bálint

    2015-11-01

    Infections in the neck layers and spaces are potentially life-threatening diseases causing further complications, like mediastinitis, airway obstruction, or sepsis. Despite of the need for a conservative approach, they still regularly require surgical intervention. Records of 17 patients with severe neck infections that were treated by wide external incision and open wound management were retrospectively analyzed. The aim of the study was to clinically characterize these most serious neck infections. The most common presenting symptoms were neck pain and tense neck mass (94-94%) regularly with fever (65%), always accompanied by a marked elevation of C reactive protein level (average 192 uG/l). These findings were constant and very similar among both the deep neck infection and necrotizing fasciitis cases. More than half of the patients (53%) had at least one systemic co-morbidity. The parapharyngeal space was most commonly affected (83%), but extended disease involving more than two major neck regions was found in 13 cases (76%). Dental (29%) was the most common primary infection, followed by peritonsillar abscess (23%), Microbiological results showed a wide variety of corresponding bacteria. Mediastinitis was developed in three cases (18%), and airway obstruction requiring tracheostomy in two cases (12%). All the patients survived. Severe neck infections are a heterogenous group of diseases regarding to the primary site of infection, microbiology, localisation and host reaction. However, rapidly developed, painful, tense neck mass with a highly elevated CRP level should always alert for an extended or phlegmonous process in the layers or spaces of the neck. PMID:25359195

  1. The clinical significance of radionuclide bone and gallium scanning in osteomyelitis of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Noyek, A.M.; Kirsh, J.C.; Greyson, N.D.; Wortzman, G.; Jazrawy, H.; Freeman, J.L.; Blair, R.L.; Chapnik, J.S.

    1984-05-01

    Osteomyelitis of the head and neck remains a difficult clinical problem both in diagnosis and treatment evaluation. The purpose of this manuscript is to review our clinical experience with 25 cases of osteomyelitis distributed evenly among the temporal bone and skull base, the paranasal sinuses, and the mandible. Radionuclide bone and gallium scan images accurately depicted the biologic activity of the disease process and permitted accurate treatment evaluation and patient monitoring. This work demonstrates the potentials and limitations of radionuclide imaging with bone and gallium scan agents and attempts to define a role for their contemporary use in the management of osteomyelitis of the head and neck.

  2. Percutaneous Lung Thermal Ablation of Non-surgical Clinical N0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of Eight Years’ Experience in 87 Patients from Two Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Palussiere, Jean; Lagarde, Philippe; Aupérin, Anne; Deschamps, Frédéric; Chomy, François; Baere, Thierry de

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the survival outcomes of percutaneous thermal ablation (RFA + microwaves) for patients presenting N0 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) ineligible for surgery.Materials and MethodsEighty-seven patients from two comprehensive cancer centers were included. Eighty-two patients were treated with RFA electrodes and five with microwave antenna. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated and predictive factors of local tumor progression, OS and DFS identified and compared by univariate and multivariate analysesResultsMedian follow-up was 30.5 months (interquartile range 16.7–51) and tumor size was 21 mm (range 10–54 mm). Treatment was incomplete for 14 patients with a local tumor progression of 11.5, 18.3, and 21.1 % at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Two patients presented with neurological (grade III or IV) complications, and one died of respiratory and multivisceral failure as a result of the procedure at 29 days. In univariate analysis, increasing tumor size (P = 0.003) was the only predictive factor related to risk of local tumor progression. 5-year OS and DFS were 58.1 and 27.9 %, respectively. Sex (P = 0.044), pathology (P = 0.032), and tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.046) were prognostic factors for DFS. In multivariate analysis, pathology (P = 0.033) and tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.032) were independent prognostic factors for DFS.ConclusionsOversized and overlapping ablation of N0 NSCLC was well tolerated, effective, with few local tumor progressions, even over long-term follow-up. Increasing tumor size was the main prognostic factor linked to OS, DFS, and local tumor progression.

  3. Dorsal midbrain syndrome associated with persistent neck extension: Clinical and diagnostic imaging findings in 2 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Sara; Baroni, Massimo; Falzone, Cristian; De Benedictis, Giulia M.; Bernardini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Two young dogs were evaluated for an acute onset of abnormal head posture and eye movement. Neurological examination was characterized mostly by permanent neck extension, abnormalities of pupils, and eye movement. A mesencephalic mass lesion was detected on magnetic resonance imaging in both cases. Neurophysiological pathways likely responsible for this peculiar clinical presentation are discussed. PMID:26663922

  4. Dorsal midbrain syndrome associated with persistent neck extension: Clinical and diagnostic imaging findings in 2 dogs.

    PubMed

    Canal, Sara; Baroni, Massimo; Falzone, Cristian; De Benedictis, Giulia M; Bernardini, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Two young dogs were evaluated for an acute onset of abnormal head posture and eye movement. Neurological examination was characterized mostly by permanent neck extension, abnormalities of pupils, and eye movement. A mesencephalic mass lesion was detected on magnetic resonance imaging in both cases. Neurophysiological pathways likely responsible for this peculiar clinical presentation are discussed.

  5. Nontraumatic head and neck emergencies: a clinical approach. Part 1: cervicofacial swelling, dysphagia, and dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Brea Álvarez, B; Tuñón Gómez, M; Esteban García, L; García Hidalgo, C Y; Ruiz Peralbo, R M

    2016-01-01

    Nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck represent a challenge in the field of neuroradiology for two reasons: first, they affect an area where the thorax joins the cranial cavity and can thus compromise both structures; second, they are uncommon, so they are not well known. Various publications focus on nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck from the viewpoints of anatomic location or of particular diseases. However, these are not the most helpful viewpoints for dealing with patients in the emergency department, who present with particular signs and symptoms. We propose an analysis starting from the four most common clinical presentations of patients who come to the emergency department for nontraumatic head and neck emergencies: cervical swelling, dysphagia, dyspnea, and loss of vision. Starting from these entities, we develop an approach to the radiologic management and diagnosis of these patients.

  6. Chondroid syringoma of the head and neck: clinical management and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, A H; Moreano, E H; Houston, B; Funk, G F

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the case of a chondroid syringoma occurring in the nasofacial groove of a 60-year-old woman. This benign, mixed epithelial tumor is infrequently seen by the otolaryngologist-head and neck surgeon, and therefore may not be included in the differential diagnosis of a nodular lesion on the skin of the head and neck. However, the most frequent site of occurrence for these relatively rare cutaneous lesions is the head and neck region. Histologically, these tumors are quite similar to pleomorphic adenomas of salivary gland origin, and optimal surgical management similarly requires removal of a cuff of normal tissue, rather than a simple shelling out of the lesion. The clinical presentation, pathology and recommended management of this rare tumor are discussed.

  7. Guidelines for delineation of lymphatic clinical target volumes for high conformal radiotherapy: head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The success of radiotherapy depends on the accurate delineation of the clinical target volume. The delineation of the lymph node regions has most impact, especially for tumors in the head and neck region. The purpose of this article was the development an atlas for the delineation of the clinical target volume for patients, who should receive radiotherapy for a tumor of the head and neck region. Literature was reviewed for localisations of the adjacent lymph node regions and their lymph drain in dependence of the tumor entity. On this basis the lymph node regions were contoured on transversal CT slices. The probability for involvement was reviewed and a recommendation for the delineation of the CTV was generated. PMID:21854585

  8. Role of prophylactic central compartment lymph node dissection in clinically N0 differentiated thyroid cancer patients: analysis of risk factors and review of modern trends.

    PubMed

    Conzo, Giovanni; Tartaglia, Ernesto; Avenia, Nicola; Calò, Pier Giorgio; de Bellis, Annamaria; Esposito, Katherine; Gambardella, Claudio; Iorio, Sergio; Pasquali, Daniela; Santini, Luigi; Sinisi, Maria Antonia; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino; Testini, Mario; Polistena, Andrea; Bellastella, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, especially thanks to a large diffusion of ultrasound-guided FNBs, a surprising increased incidence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), "small" tumors and microcarcinomas have been reported in the international series. This led endocrinologists and surgeons to search for "tailored" and "less aggressive" therapeutic protocols avoiding risky morbidity and useless "overtreatment". Considering the most recent guidelines of referral endocrine societies, we analyzed the role of routine or so-called prophylactic central compartment lymph node dissection (RCLD), also considering its benefits and risks. Literature data showed that the debate is still open and the surgeons are divided between proponents and opponents of its use. Even if lymph node metastases are commonly observed, and in up to 90% of DTC cases micrometastases are reported, the impact of lymphatic involvement on long-term survival is subject to intensive research and the best indications of lymph node dissection are still controversial. Identification of prognostic factors for central compartment metastases could assist surgeons in determining whether to perform RLCD. Considering available evidence, a general agreement to definitely reserve RCLD to "high-risk" cases was observed. More clinical researches, in order to identify risk factors of meaningful predictive power and prospective long-term randomized trials, should be useful to validate this selective approach. PMID:27185169

  9. Heterogeneity in head and neck IMRT target design and clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Theodore S.; Tomé, Wolfgang A.; Harari, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess patterns of H&N IMRT practice with particular emphasis on elective target delineation. Materials and methods Twenty institutions with established H&N IMRT expertise were solicited to design clinical target volumes for the identical H&N cancer case. To limit contouring variability, a primary tonsil GTV and ipsilateral level II node were pre-contoured. Participants were asked to accept this GTV, and contour their recommended CTV and PTV. Dose prescriptions, contouring time, and recommendations regarding chemotherapy were solicited. Results All 20 institutions responded. Remarkable heterogeneity in H&N IMRT design and practice was identified. Seventeen of 20 centers recommended treatment of bilateral necks whereas 3/20 recommended treatment of the ipsilateral neck only. The average CTV volume was 250 cm3 (range 37–676 cm3). Although there was high concordance in coverage of ipsilateral neck levels II and III, substantial variation was identified for levels I, V, and the contralateral neck. Average CTV expansion was 4.1 mm (range 0–15 mm). Eight of 20 centers recommended chemotherapy (cisplatin), whereas 12/20 recommended radiation alone. Responders prescribed on average 69 and 68 Gy to the tumor and metastatic node GTV, respectively. Average H&N target volume contouring time was 102.5 min (range 60–210 min). Conclusion This study identifies substantial heterogeneity in H&N IMRT target definition, prescription, neck treatment, and use of chemotherapy among practitioners with established H&N IMRT expertise. These data suggest that continued efforts to standardize and simplify the H&N IMRT process are desirable for the safe and effective global advancement of H&N IMRT practice. PMID:22405806

  10. The Role of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Clinical Stage II-III Breast Cancer Patients With pN0: A Multicenter, Retrospective Study (KROG 12-05)

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Su Jung; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Nam Kwon; Suh, Chang-Ok; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Yong Bae; Ahn, Seung Do; Kim, Su Ssan; Ha, Sung W.; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyubo; Shin, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients with pN0. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 417 clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients who achieved an ypN0 at surgery after receiving NAC between 1998 and 2009. Of these, 151 patients underwent mastectomy after NAC. The effect of PMRT on disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis including known prognostic factors using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log–rank test and Cox proportional regression analysis. Results: Of the 151 patients who underwent mastectomy, 105 (69.5%) received PMRT and 46 patients (30.5%) did not. At a median follow-up of 59 months, 5 patients (3.3%) developed LRR (8 sites of recurrence) and 14 patients (9.3%) developed distant metastasis. The 5-year DFS, LRRFS, and OS rates were 91.2, 98.1, and 93.3% with PMRT and 83.0%, 92.3%, and 89.9% without PMRT, respectively (all P values not significant). By univariate analysis, only age (≤40 vs >40 years) was significantly associated with decreased DFS (P=.027). By multivariate analysis, age (≤40 vs >40 years) and pathologic T stage (0-is vs 1 vs 2-4) were significant prognostic factors affecting DFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.353, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.135-0.928, P=.035; HR 2.223, 95% CI 1.074-4.604, P=.031, respectively). PMRT showed no correlation with a difference in DFS, LRRFS, or OS by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: PMRT might not be necessary for pN0 patients after NAC, regardless of clinical stage. Prospective randomized clinical trial data are needed to assess whether PMRT can be safely omitted in pN0 patients after NAC and mastectomy for clinical stage II-III breast cancer.

  11. Applying the molecular biology and epigenetics of head and neck cancer in everyday clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Glazer, Chad A; Chang, Steven S; Ha, Patrick K; Califano, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    During the past decade, there has been a significant increase in knowledge regarding the molecular biology and epigenetics of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). This has been aided by the steady development of new technology and novel techniques aimed at elucidating additional aberrant molecular alterations characteristic of HNSCC, including the advent of high throughput assays and the development of more sophisticated bioinformatics tools. In addition, advancements in the field of cancer epigenetics and microRNA have increased the complexity of understanding HNSCC tumorigenesis. These advances have lead to an increasing number of translational studies in the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of head and neck cancer. The end result is that molecular biomarkers, gene detection panels and targeted therapeutics are becoming a reality for the care of patients with HNSCC. In this article, we will focus on the many implications of this research as it pertains to clinical practice and the treatment of HNSCC patients.

  12. Proton Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer: A Review of the Clinical Experience to Date

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, Emma B.; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-06-01

    Proton beam radiation has been used for cancer treatment since the 1950s, but recent increasing interest in this form of therapy and the construction of hospital-based and clinic-based facilities for its delivery have greatly increased both the number of patients and the variety of tumors being treated with proton therapy. The mass of proton particles and their unique physical properties (ie, the Bragg peak) allow proton therapy to spare normal tissues distal to the tumor target from incidental irradiation. Initial observations show that proton therapy is particularly useful for treating tumors in challenging locations close to nontarget critical structures. Specifically, improvements in local control outcomes for patients with chordoma, chonodrosarcoma, and tumors in the sinonasal regions have been reported in series using proton. Improved local control and survival outcomes for patients with cancer of the head and neck region have also been seen with the advent of improvements in better imaging and multimodality therapy comprising surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. However, aggressive local therapy in the proximity of critical normal structures to tumors in the head and neck region may produce debilitating early and late toxic effects. Great interest has been expressed in evaluating whether proton therapy can improve outcomes, especially early and late toxicity, when used in the treatment of head and neck malignancies. This review summarizes the progress made to date in addressing this question.

  13. 3D kinematic analysis and clinical evaluation of neck movements in patients with whiplash injury.

    PubMed

    Antonaci, F; Bulgheroni, M; Ghirmai, S; Lanfranchi, S; Dalla Toffola, E; Sandrini, G; Nappi, G

    2002-09-01

    In recent decades whiplash injuries, being a major reason for compensation claims, have become increasingly important in forensic medicine. In view of this, a reliable diagnostic method of assessing cervical range of motion (ROM) is needed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate neck function with a 3D kinematic method compared with clinical evaluation in whiplash injury. Seventy consecutive patients (M/F = 18/52) with a history of whiplash injury (WH) and 46 healthy volunteers (M/F = 24/22), mean age, respectively 33 +/- 9 and 28 +/- 6 years (mean+/-SD) entered the study. Patients suffered from neck pain and/or unilateral headache. A computerized kinematic analysis of the ROM (Elite system) using passive markers and two infrared TV cameras was used. Clinical evaluation of active ROM was also performed both in patients and in 61 controls (M/F = 23/38; mean age 47 +/- 18 years). Thirty out of 70 patients were tested at the time of their first consultation (T0) and 6 months later (T6), and 12 were also followed up after a year (T12). All neck movements, except extension, were significantly reduced in WH subjects compared with controls, in particular lateral bending. Comparing ROM at T0, T6 and T12, no significant differences were found. A global index of motion (GIM), obtained by calculating the sum of ROM in absolute value for all the movements acquired, was significantly reduced in WH compared with control subjects. The interobserver reliability of the clinical evaluation was globally acceptable. On the basis of the clinical evaluation, a significantly reduced ROM was found in all movements in WH subjects compared with an age-matched population. Computing the number of impaired cervical movements (ICMs), a significantly higher number was observed in WH patients than in controls, showing a decreasing trend at T6 and T12, with a significant improvement at T6 vs. T0. The computerized study of neck ROM may constitute a useful tool in the evaluation of WH at

  14. Clinical Validation of Atlas-Based Auto-Segmentation of Multiple Target Volumes and Normal Tissue (Swallowing/Mastication) Structures in the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Teguh, David N.; Levendag, Peter C.; Voet, Peter W.J.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Han Xiao; Wolf, Theresa K.; Hibbard, Lyndon S.; Nowak, Peter; Akhiat, Hafid; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To validate and clinically evaluate autocontouring using atlas-based autosegmentation (ABAS) of computed tomography images. Methods and Materials: The data from 10 head-and-neck patients were selected as input for ABAS, and neck levels I-V and 20 organs at risk were manually contoured according to published guidelines. The total contouring times were recorded. Two different ABAS strategies, multiple and single subject, were evaluated, and the similarity of the autocontours with the atlas contours was assessed using Dice coefficients and the mean distances, using the leave-one-out method. For 12 clinically treated patients, 5 experienced observers edited the autosegmented contours. The editing times were recorded. The Dice coefficients and mean distances were calculated among the clinically used contours, autocontours, and edited autocontours. Finally, an expert panel scored all autocontours and the edited autocontours regarding their adequacy relative to the published atlas. Results: The time to autosegment all the structures using ABAS was 7 min/patient. No significant differences were observed in the autosegmentation accuracy for stage N0 and N+ patients. The multisubject atlas performed best, with a Dice coefficient and mean distance of 0.74 and 2 mm, 0.67 and 3 mm, 0.71 and 2 mm, 0.50 and 2 mm, and 0.78 and 2 mm for the salivary glands, neck levels, chewing muscles, swallowing muscles, and spinal cord-brainstem, respectively. The mean Dice coefficient and mean distance of the autocontours vs. the clinical contours was 0.8 and 2.4 mm for the neck levels and salivary glands, respectively. For the autocontours vs. the edited autocontours, the mean Dice coefficient and mean distance was 0.9 and 1.6 mm, respectively. The expert panel scored 100% of the autocontours as a 'minor deviation, editable' or better. The expert panel scored 88% of the edited contours as good compared with 83% of the clinical contours. The total editing time was 66 min. Conclusion

  15. Clinical implementation of intraoperative cone-beam CT in head and neck surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Barker, E.; Bachar, G.; Dixon, B. J.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    A prototype mobile C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been translated to a prospective clinical trial in head and neck surgery. The flat-panel CBCT C-arm was developed in collaboration with Siemens Healthcare, and demonstrates both sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility at low radiation dose (e.g., <1/5th of a typical diagnostic head CT). CBCT images are available ~15 seconds after scan completion (~1 min acquisition) and reviewed at bedside using custom 3D visualization software based on the open-source Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). The CBCT C-arm has been successfully deployed in 15 head and neck cases and streamlined into the surgical environment using human factors engineering methods and expert feedback from surgeons, nurses, and anesthetists. Intraoperative imaging is implemented in a manner that maintains operating field sterility, reduces image artifacts (e.g., carbon fiber OR table) and minimizes radiation exposure. Image reviews conducted with surgical staff indicate bony detail and soft-tissue visualization sufficient for intraoperative guidance, with additional artifact management (e.g., metal, scatter) promising further improvements. Clinical trial deployment suggests a role for intraoperative CBCT in guiding complex head and neck surgical tasks, including planning mandible and maxilla resection margins, guiding subcranial and endonasal approaches to skull base tumours, and verifying maxillofacial reconstruction alignment. Ongoing translational research into complimentary image-guidance subsystems include novel methods for real-time tool tracking, fusion of endoscopic video and CBCT, and deformable registration of preoperative volumes and planning contours with intraoperative CBCT.

  16. Determining optimal clinical target volume margins in head-and-neck cancer based on microscopic extracapsular extension of metastatic neck nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Elliott, Danielle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Asper, Joshua A. P.A.; Blanco, Angel; Ang, K. Kian; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David; Weber, Randal S.; Chao, K.S. Clifford . E-mail: cchao@mdanderson.org

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimal clinical target volume margins around the gross nodal tumor volume in head-and-neck cancer by assessing microscopic tumor extension beyond cervical lymph node capsules. Methods and Materials: Histologic sections of 96 dissected cervical lymph nodes with extracapsular extension (ECE) from 48 patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma were examined. The maximum linear distance from the external capsule border to the farthest extent of the tumor or tumoral reaction was measured. The trends of ECE as a function of the distance from the capsule and lymph node size were analyzed. Results: The median diameter of all lymph nodes was 11.0 mm (range: 3.0-30.0 mm). The mean and median ECE extent was 2.2 mm and 1.6 mm, respectively (range: 0.4-9.0 mm). The ECE was <5 mm from the capsule in 96% of the nodes. As the distance from the capsule increased, the probability of tumor extension declined. No significant difference between the extent of ECE and lymph node size was observed. Conclusion: For N1 nodes that are at high risk for ECE but not grossly infiltrating musculature, 1 cm clinical target volume margins around the nodal gross tumor volume are recommended to cover microscopic nodal extension in head-and-neck cancer.

  17. Measurement for natural dental neck data of normal adults and its clinical significance on guiding implant restoration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mingxu; Gu, Fang; Wang, Junjun; Zhou, Chengyuan; Xia, Junnan; Qin, Hongwei; Yang, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Provide reference basis for the clinical implant restoration to select implant diameter through measuring each data of 7 teeth in the dental neck of bilateral upper and lower jaws of the young volunteers with normal dentition. Methods: Select 30 healthy young volunteers with complete dentition but no malocclusion, take cone beam CT (CBCT), measure the mesiodistal and buccolingual distance of the tooth root at 1.5 mm from 14 teeth (bilateral upper and lower jaws) to alveolar crest, trace out the outline of each tooth neck in this layer, calculate the cross sectional area and roundness of each tooth neck according to pixel value calibration, and then carry out statistical processing. Results: Complete the data collection and processing of mesiodistal length, buccolingual width, cross sectional area, and cross sectional roundness of the dental neck at 1.5 mm from these seven teeth of the bilateral upper and lower jaws to the alveolar crest of 30 volunteers, and calculate the mean value, variance, and reference value range of medical science of each index. Conclusion: CBCT can effectively obtain the image information of the dental neck. Through mimics 10.0 and Photoshop CS3, it is possible to accurately calculate the dental neck length and width, and cross sectional area of each tooth according to CBCT image information. This result can provide reference basis for the implant restoration of the clinical teeth. PMID:26628955

  18. The clinical impact of HPV tumor status upon head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Eleni; Li, Ryan; Eisele, David; Fakhry, Carole

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Human papillomavirus (HPV) is etiologically responsible for a distinct subset of head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCCs). HPV-positive HNSCCs (HPV-HNSCCs) most commonly arise from the oropharynx and are responsible for the increasing incidence of oropharyngeal SCC (OSCC) in the United States (US) and abroad. HPV-positive OSCC (HPV-OSCC) has a unique demographic and risk factor profile and tumor biology. HPV-OSCC patients tend to be white, younger, and have a higher cumulative exposure to sexual behaviors as compared with HPV-negative OSCC patients. HPV-positive tumor status also significantly improves survival, and is indeed the single strongest prognostic factor for OSCC. The mechanisms that underlie the improved prognosis conferred by HPV-positive disease are unknown. The purpose of this review is to describe the clinical impact of HPV status in HNSCC, particularly in OSCC, both in terms of the unique clinic-demographic profile and prognostic implications. PMID:24134947

  19. Association between injury to the retinacula of Weitbrecht and femoral neck fractures: anatomical and clinical observations

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Jiong; Ni, Ming; Wang, Guoliang; Jia, Guangyao; Liu, Shiwei; Cui, Xueliang; Jiang, Chao; Wang, Hua; Dai, Yahui; Quan, Kun; Chen, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no objective indicator for surgical procedures in elderly patients with femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to determine the severity of damage to the retinacula of Weitbrecht based on the type of femoral neck fracture, anatomical and clinical observations. Data from 44 patients treated with artificial femoral head replacement were analyzed for the association between Garden type fracture and severity of injury to Weitbrecht’s retinacula. Additionally, 18 cases (Pauwels type III fracture) after Watson-Jones surgical approach and internal fixations were used to investigate the bone healing and femoral head necrosis. Among 44 patients (Garden type was III-IV, 79.6%), significant associations were found between Garden type fracture and lateral (P < 0.001), anterior (P = 0.045), and medial (P = 0.004) retinacular injury. Significant positive Spearman correlation coefficients between Garden type and the severity of injury to Weitbrecht’s retinacula were Ρ = 0.561 with P < 0.001 for lateral, Ρ = 0.338 with P = 0.025 for anterior, and Ρ = 0.469 with P = 0.001 for medial retinacula. Additionally, 4 out of 18 Pauwels type III fracture cases were observed severe damages on Weitbrecht’s retinacula and resulting bone necrosis. In conclusion, this study provided the anatomical and histological correlations between fracture displacement and degree of retinacula injury. PMID:26770357

  20. A Clinical Concept for Interfractional Adaptive Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Alexandra D.; Nill, Simeon; Huber, Peter E.; Bendl, Rolf; Debus, Juergen; Muenter, Marc W.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. Methods and Materials: In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006-2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Results: Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. Conclusion: To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online

  1. Clinical experience transitioning from IMRT to VMAT for head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Studenski, Matthew T.; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Siglin, Joshua; Cognetti, David; Curry, Joseph; Tuluc, Madalina; Harrison, Amy S.

    2013-07-01

    To quantify clinical differences for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in terms of dosimetric endpoints and planning and delivery time, twenty head and neck cancer patients have been considered for VMAT using Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan delivered via an Elekta linear accelerator. Differences in planning time between IMRT and VMAT were estimated accounting for both optimization and calculation. The average delivery time per patient was obtained retrospectively using the record and verify software. For the dosimetric comparison, all contoured organs at risk (OARs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were evaluated. Of the 20 cases considered, 14 had VMAT plans approved. Six VMAT plans were rejected due to unacceptable dose to OARs. In terms of optimization time, there was minimal difference between the two modalities. The dose calculation time was significantly longer for VMAT, 4 minutes per 358 degree arc versus 2 minutes for an entire IMRT plan. The overall delivery time was reduced by 9.2 ± 3.9 minutes for VMAT (51.4 ± 15.6%). For the dosimetric comparison of the 14 clinically acceptable plans, there was almost no statistical difference between the VMAT and IMRT. There was also a reduction in monitor units of approximately 32% from IMRT to VMAT with both modalities demonstrating comparable quality assurance results. VMAT provides comparable coverage of target volumes while sparing OARs for the majority of head and neck cases. In cases where high dose modulation was required for OARs, a clinically acceptable plan was only achievable with IMRT. Due to the long calculation times, VMAT plans can cause delays during planning but marked improvements in delivery time reduce patient treatment times and the risk of intra-fraction motion.

  2. Clinical experience transitioning from IMRT to VMAT for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Studenski, Matthew T; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Siglin, Joshua; Cognetti, David; Curry, Joseph; Tuluc, Madalina; Harrison, Amy S

    2013-01-01

    To quantify clinical differences for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in terms of dosimetric endpoints and planning and delivery time, twenty head and neck cancer patients have been considered for VMAT using Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan delivered via an Elekta linear accelerator. Differences in planning time between IMRT and VMAT were estimated accounting for both optimization and calculation. The average delivery time per patient was obtained retrospectively using the record and verify software. For the dosimetric comparison, all contoured organs at risk (OARs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were evaluated. Of the 20 cases considered, 14 had VMAT plans approved. Six VMAT plans were rejected due to unacceptable dose to OARs. In terms of optimization time, there was minimal difference between the two modalities. The dose calculation time was significantly longer for VMAT, 4 minutes per 358 degree arc versus 2 minutes for an entire IMRT plan. The overall delivery time was reduced by 9.2 ± 3.9 minutes for VMAT (51.4 ± 15.6%). For the dosimetric comparison of the 14 clinically acceptable plans, there was almost no statistical difference between the VMAT and IMRT. There was also a reduction in monitor units of approximately 32% from IMRT to VMAT with both modalities demonstrating comparable quality assurance results. VMAT provides comparable coverage of target volumes while sparing OARs for the majority of head and neck cases. In cases where high dose modulation was required for OARs, a clinically acceptable plan was only achievable with IMRT. Due to the long calculation times, VMAT plans can cause delays during planning but marked improvements in delivery time reduce patient treatment times and the risk of intra-fraction motion.

  3. A review of clinical and histological parameters associated with contralateral neck metastases in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Song; Tang, Qiong-lan; Lin, Ying-jin; Chen, Wei-liang; Li, Jin-song; Huang, Zhi-quan; Yang, Zhao-hui; Wang, You-yuan; Zhang, Da-ming; Wang, Hui-jing; Dias-Ribeiro, Eduardo; Cai, Qiang; Wang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has a high incidence of cervical micrometastases and sometimes metastasizes contralaterally because of the rich lymphatic intercommunications relative to submucosal plexus of oral cavity that freely communicate across the midline, and it can facilitate the spread of neoplastic cells to any area of the neck consequently. Clinical and histopathologic factors continue to provide predictive information to contralateral neck metastases (CLNM) in OSCC, which determine prophylactic and adjuvant treatments for an individual patient. This review describes the predictive value of clinical-histopathologic factors, which relate to primary tumor and cervical lymph nodes, and surgical dissection and adjuvant treatments. In addition, the indications for elective contralateral neck dissection and adjuvant radiotherapy (aRT) and strategies for follow-up are offered, which is strongly focused by clinicians to prevent later CLNM and poor prognosis subsequently. PMID:22010576

  4. T1N0 to T2N0 Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Glottic Larynx Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To report the treatment outcomes of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for early-stage squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) of the glottic larynx. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 585 patients with T1N0 to T2N0 invasive SCCA of the glottic larynx treated between 1964 and 2006 with RT alone. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up, had histologic diagnosis of invasive SCCA, and received continuous-course RT. None of these patients received chemotherapy or had elective nodal RT. The probabilities of local control (LC), ultimate LC, ultimate LC with larynx preservation, neck control, cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Results: The median follow-up for survivors was 12 years. Five-year LC rates were as follows: T1A, 94%; T1B, 93%; T2A, 80%; and T2B, 70%. Multivariate analysis revealed that overall treatment time greater than 41 days (p = 0.001) and poorly differentiated histology (p = 0.016) adversely affected LC. Five-year rates of ultimate LC with laryngeal preservation were: T1A, 95%; T1B, 94%, T2A, 81%; and T2B, 74%. Twenty-four (4%) of 585 patients failed in the neck; only 7 neck failures (1%) were isolated. Five-year CSS and OS rates were as follows: T1A, 97% and 82%; T1B, 99% and 83%; T2A, 94% and 76%; and T2B, 90% and 78%, respectively. Ten (1.7%) patients had severe and/or fatal complications. One patient died of a radiation-induced carotid artery angiosarcoma. Conclusion: Based on our study results, RT cures a high proportion of patients with T1N0 to T2N0 glottic SCCAs and has a low rate of severe complications.

  5. Portrait of a process: arts-based research in a head and neck cancer clinic.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Mark A; Lydiatt, William M; Aita, Virginia A; Robbins, Regina E; McNeilly, Dennis P; Desmarais, Michele Marie

    2016-03-01

    The role of art in medicine is complex, varied and uncertain. To examine one aspect of the relationship between art and medicine, investigators analysed the interactions between a professional artist and five adult patients with head and neck cancer as they cocreated portraits in a clinical setting. The artist and four members of an interdisciplinary team analysed the portraits as well as journal entries, transcripts of portrait sessions and semistructured interviews. Over the course of 5 months, 24 artworks evolved from sittings that allowed both the patients and the artist to collaborate around stories of illness, suffering and recovery. Using narrative inquiry and qualitative arts-based research techniques five emergent themes were identified: embracing uncertainties; developing trusting relationships; engaging in reflective practices; creating shared stories; and empowerment. Similar themes are found in successful physician-patient relationships. This paper will discuss these findings and potential implications for healthcare and medical education.

  6. Portrait of a process: arts-based research in a head and neck cancer clinic.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Mark A; Lydiatt, William M; Aita, Virginia A; Robbins, Regina E; McNeilly, Dennis P; Desmarais, Michele Marie

    2016-03-01

    The role of art in medicine is complex, varied and uncertain. To examine one aspect of the relationship between art and medicine, investigators analysed the interactions between a professional artist and five adult patients with head and neck cancer as they cocreated portraits in a clinical setting. The artist and four members of an interdisciplinary team analysed the portraits as well as journal entries, transcripts of portrait sessions and semistructured interviews. Over the course of 5 months, 24 artworks evolved from sittings that allowed both the patients and the artist to collaborate around stories of illness, suffering and recovery. Using narrative inquiry and qualitative arts-based research techniques five emergent themes were identified: embracing uncertainties; developing trusting relationships; engaging in reflective practices; creating shared stories; and empowerment. Similar themes are found in successful physician-patient relationships. This paper will discuss these findings and potential implications for healthcare and medical education. PMID:26744356

  7. Browser Based Platform in Maintaining Clinical Activities - Use of The iPads in Head and Neck Clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. Y.; Moore, J.; Quon, H.; Evans, K.; Sharabi, A.; Herman, J.; Hacker-Prietz, A.; McNutt, T.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Incompatibility between documentation and clinical workflow causes physician resistance in organized data collection, which in turn complicates the use of data in patient care improvement. To resolve the gap, we developed an iPad compatible in situ browser-based platform that integrates clinical activity with data collection and analysis presentation. The ability to perform in-clinic activities and monitor decision making using the iPad was evaluated. Methods: A browser-based platform that can exchange and present analysed data from the MOSAIQ database was developed in situ, the iPads were distributed in head and neck clinics to present the browser for clinical activities, data collection and assessment monitoring. Performance of the iPads for in-clinic activities was observed. Results: All in-clinic documentation activities can be performed without workstation computers. Accessing patient record and previous assessments was significantly faster without having to open the MOSAIQ application. Patient assessments can be completed with the physician facing the patient. Graphical presentation of toxicity progression and patient radiation plans to the patient can be performed in single interface without patient leaving the seating area. Updates in patient treatment status and medical history were presented in real time without having to move paper charts around. Conclusions: The iPad can be used in clinical activities independent of computer workstations. Improvements in clinical workflow can be critical in reducing physician resistance in data maintenance. Using the iPad in providing real-time quality monitoring is intuitive to both providers and patients.

  8. Clinical phase I/II research on ultrasound thermo-chemotherapy in oral and maxillofacial-head and neck carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Guofeng; Ren, Guoxin; Guo, Wei; Chen, Yazhu

    2012-11-01

    The principle of a ultrasound thermo-chemotherapy instrument and the clinical phase I/II research on short-term and long-term therapeutic effect and main side-effect of ultrasound hyperthermia combined with chemotherapy in oral and maxillofacial-head & neck carcinoma by the instrument will be presented in this paper.

  9. A comparison of clinically utilized human papillomavirus detection methods in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlecht, Nicolas F; Brandwein-Gensler, Margaret; Nuovo, Gerard J; Li, Maomi; Dunne, Anne; Kawachi, Nicole; Smith, Richard V; Burk, Robert D; Prystowsky, Michael B

    2011-10-01

    Detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) in head and neck cancer has therapeutic implications. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for p16 are used by surgical pathologists. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of three popular commercial tests for HPV detection in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas with a 'gold standard' HPV PCR assay. A total of 110 prospectively collected, formalin-fixed tumor specimens were compiled onto tissue microarrays and tested for HPV DNA by in situ hybridization with two probe sets, a biotinylated probe for high-risk (HR) HPV types 16/18 (Dako, CA, USA) and a probe cocktail for 16/18, plus 10 additional HR types (Ventana, AZ, USA). The p16(INK4) expression was also assessed using a Pharmingen immunohistochemistry antibody (BD Biosciences, CA, USA). Tissue microarrays were stained and scored at expert laboratories. HPV DNA was detected by MY09/11-PCR, using Gold AmpliTaq and dot-blot hybridization on matched-fresh frozen specimens in a research laboratory. HPV 16 E6 and E7-RNA expression was also measured using RT-PCR. Test performance was assessed by a receiver operating characteristic analysis. HR-HPV DNA types 16, 18 and 35 were detected by MY-PCR in 28% of tumors, with the majority (97%) testing positive for type 16. Compared with MY-PCR, the sensitivity and specificity for HR-HPV DNA detection with Dako in situ hybridization was 21% (95% confidence interval (CI): 7-42) and 100% (95% CI: 93-100), respectively. Corresponding test results by Ventana in situ hybridization were 59% (95% CI: 39-78) and 58% (95% CI: 45-71), respectively. The p16 immunohistochemistry performed better overall than Dako (P=0.042) and Ventana (P=0.055), with a sensitivity of 52% (95% CI: 32-71) and specificity of 93% (95% CI: 84-98). Compared with a gold standard HPV-PCR assay, HPV detection by in situ hybridization was less accurate for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma on tissue microarrays than p16 immunohistochemistry. Further

  10. Rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Clinical results in 178 advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.D.; Demange, L.; Froissart, D.; Panis, X.; Loirette, M.

    1985-07-01

    The authors present a series of 178 patients with Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated by rapid irradiation using multiple and small fractions per day. An initial group of 91 patients (G1) received a total dose of 72 Gy in 80 sessions and 10 days, according to the following split course schedule: J1 to J5, 36 Gy in 40 sessions, eight daily fractions of .9 Gy separated by 2 hours; J6 to J20, rest period; J21 to J25, same as in J1 except that the spinal cord was shielded. This protocol was altered for the following 87 patients (G2) by lessening the total dose to 60 to 66 Gy and the number of fractions to 60. The rest period was lengthened to 4 weeks. All patients but five completed the whole program and the minimal follow-up period was 24 months. At the end of irradiation, 121 patients achieved a total remission, but local recurrences occurred in 56%. Moreover, acute intolerance was considered as severe in 34% of G1 patients, and included extensive mucosal necrosis and bleeding. Although this rate was significantly reduced in G2 patients, late complications were observed in 20 of the 25 survivors, and included trismus, cervical sclerosis, and recurrent laryngeal edema. The crude survival rate is 13% at 2 years. Although this study was not randomized, this particular type of accelerated and hyperfractionated combination of irradiation did not really improve the clinical results in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck. Other schedules and probably other tumors, less extended, should be tested.

  11. Management of the neck in maxillary sinus carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Laura; Shah, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review To discuss and review the role for elective treatment of the neck in maxillary squamous cell carcinoma. Improvements in survival have been seen due to improved local therapies and control, therefore the treatment of the neck has become a topic of debate. Recent findings The risk of occult metastases in neck nodes is higher for T 3-4 tumors. The rate of nodal relapse in the N0 neck without elective treatment is 8-15%. With elective irradiation the nodal relapse rate decreases. However, most nodal relapses are accompanied by local failure or distant disease. Local failure remains the most common site of failure and cause of death in this patient population. Summary Treatment failure occurs overall in 62% of all patients, with local recurrence by far the most common site of treatment failure which is rarely amenable to salvage therapy. Therefore elective neck irradiation is not routinely indicated in the clinically N0 neck; those who recur only in the neck can be surgically salvaged more than 50% of the time. PMID:25692625

  12. Impact of Node Negative Target Volume Delineation on Contralateral Parotid Gland Dose Sparing Using IMRT in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, William J; Urban, Erich; Bayliss, R Adam; Harari, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    There is considerable practice variation in treatment of the node negative (N0) contralateral neck in patients with head and neck cancer. In this study, we examined the impact of N0 neck target delineation volume on radiation dose to the contralateral parotid gland. Following institutional review board approval, 12 patients with head and neck cancer were studied. All had indications for treatment of the N0 neck, such as midline base of tongue or soft palate extension or advanced ipsilateral nodal disease. The N0 neck volumes were created using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group head and neck contouring atlas. The physician-drawn N0 neck clinical target volume (CTV) was expanded by 25% to 200% to generate volume variation, followed by a 3-mm planning target volume (PTV) expansion. Surrounding organs at risk were contoured and complete intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were generated for each N0 volume expansion. The median N0 target volume drawn by the radiation oncologist measured 93 cm(3) (range 71-145). Volumetric expansion of the N0 CTV by 25% to 200% increased the resultant mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland by 1.4 to 8.5 Gray (Gy). For example, a 4.1-mm increase in the N0 neck CTV translated to a 2.0-Gy dose increase to the parotid, 7.4 mm to a 4.5 Gy dose increase, and 12.5 mm to an 8.5 Gy dose increase, respectively. The treatment volume designated for the N0 neck has profound impact on resultant dose to the contralateral parotid gland. Variations of up to 15 mm are routine across physicians in target contouring, reflecting individual preference and training expertise. Depending on the availability of immobilization and image guidance techniques, experts commonly recommend 3 to 10 mm margin expansions to generate the PTV. Careful attention to the original volume of the N0 neck CTV, as well as expansion margins, is important in achieving effective contralateral gland sparing to reduce the resultant xerostomia and dysguesia that may ensue

  13. Mayo Clinic Experience with Unfavorable Results After Free Tissue Transfer to Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Thomas H; Hayden, Richard E

    2016-10-01

    Free tissue transfer to the head and neck in the modern era has a high success rate. To maximize success with reconstructive surgery in the head and neck region, it helps to understand those factors that present unique challenges. These factors include contamination by the upper aerodigestive tract, tissue mobility, and a high percentage of patients receiving radiotherapy for oncologic treatment. This article reviews the authors' experience in the head and neck, specifically how addressing these factors can best lead to successful functional and aesthetic outcomes. The authors share surgical techniques and lessons learned from their successes and failures. PMID:27601391

  14. Balloon-assisted coil placement in wide-necked cerebral aneurysms: preliminary clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Irie, K; Kawanishi, M; Nagao, S

    2000-12-01

    Endovascular treatment of wide-necked cerebral aneurysms with Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs) has been limited due to coil protrusion into the artery. Seven patients with wide-necked cerebral aneurysms were treated with GDCs with temporary balloon inflation for mechanical protection during coil placement. Transarterial embolization of the aneurysm with GDCs had failed due to coil protrusion into the parent artery. The use of simultaneous temporary balloon protection achieved more dense intra-aneurysmal coil packing, especially in the neck, without compromising the parent artery.

  15. Mayo Clinic Experience with Unfavorable Results After Free Tissue Transfer to Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Thomas H; Hayden, Richard E

    2016-10-01

    Free tissue transfer to the head and neck in the modern era has a high success rate. To maximize success with reconstructive surgery in the head and neck region, it helps to understand those factors that present unique challenges. These factors include contamination by the upper aerodigestive tract, tissue mobility, and a high percentage of patients receiving radiotherapy for oncologic treatment. This article reviews the authors' experience in the head and neck, specifically how addressing these factors can best lead to successful functional and aesthetic outcomes. The authors share surgical techniques and lessons learned from their successes and failures.

  16. Clinical Outcomes of Patients Receiving Integrated PET/CT-Guided Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, Matthew R.; Maheshwari, Mohit; Schultz, Christopher J.; Michel, Michelle A.; Wong, Stuart J.; Campbell, Bruce H.; Massey, Becky L.; Wilson, J. Frank; Wang Dian

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: We previously reported the advantages of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) fused with CT for radiotherapy planning over CT alone in head and neck carcinoma (HNC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes and the predictive value of PET for patients receiving PET/CT-guided definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: From December 2002 to August 2006, 42 patients received PET/CT imaging as part of staging and radiotherapy planning. Clinical outcomes including locoregional recurrence, distant metastasis, death, and treatment-related toxicities were collected retrospectively and analyzed for disease-free and overall survival and cumulative incidence of recurrence. Results: Median follow-up from initiation of treatment was 32 months. Overall survival and disease-free survival were 82.8% and 71.0%, respectively, at 2 years, and 74.1% and 66.9% at 3 years. Of the 42 patients, seven recurrences were identified (three LR, one DM, three both LR and DM). Mean time to recurrence was 9.4 months. Cumulative risk of recurrence was 18.7%. The maximum standard uptake volume (SUV) of primary tumor, adenopathy, or both on PET did not correlate with recurrence, with mean values of 12.0 for treatment failures vs. 11.7 for all patients. Toxicities identified in those patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy were also evaluated. Conclusions: A high level of disease control combined with favorable toxicity profiles was achieved in a cohort of HNC patients receiving PET/CT fusion guided radiotherapy plus/minus chemotherapy. Maximum SUV of primary tumor and/or adenopathy was not predictive of risk of disease recurrence.

  17. Enhanced patient reported outcome measurement suitable for head and neck cancer follow-up clinics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The ‘Worse-Stable-Better’ (W-S-B) question was introduced to capture patient-perceived change in University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QOL) domains. Methods 202 head and neck cancer patients in remission prospectively completed UW-QOL and Patients Concerns Inventory (PCI). For each UW-QOL domain, patients indicated whether over the last month things had worsened (W), remained stable (S) or were better (B). Results 202 patients at 448 attendances selected 1752 PCI items they wanted to discuss in consultation, and 58% (1024/1752) of these were not covered by the UW-QOL. UW-QOL algorithms highlighted another 440 significant problems that the patient did not want to discuss (i.e. the corresponding items on the PCI were not selected). After making allowance for UW-QOL algorithms to identify 'significant problems' and PCI selection of corresponding issues for discussion there remained clear residual and notable variation in W-S-B responses, in particular to identify patients with significant problems that were getting worse, and patients without significant problems that wanted to discuss issues that were getting worse. Changes in mean UW-QOL scores were notably lower for those getting worse on the W-S-B question, typically by 10 or more units a magnitude that suggests clinically important changes in score. Conclusions The W-S-B question adds little questionnaire burden and could help to better identify patients who might benefit from intervention. The results of this study suggest that the UW-QOL with the W-S-B modification should be used together with the PCI to allow optimal identification of issues for patient-clinician discussion during routine outpatient clinics. PMID:22695251

  18. Clinical evaluation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bhide, S A; Newbold, K L; Harrington, K J; Nutting, C M

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy and surgery are the principal curative modalities in treatment of head and neck cancer. Conventional two-dimensional and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy result in significant side effects and altered quality of life. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can spare the normal tissues, while delivering a curative dose to the tumour-bearing tissues. This article reviews the current role of IMRT in head and neck cancer from the point of view of normal tissue sparing, and also reviews the current published literature by individual head and neck cancer subsites. In addition, we briefly discuss the role of image guidance in head and neck IMRT, and future directions in this area. PMID:22556403

  19. Innovative perspectives of immunotherapy in head and neck cancer. From relevant scientific rationale to effective clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lalami, Y; Awada, A

    2016-02-01

    It is now well established that head and neck cancer carcinogenesis is characterized by genetic instability and several immune defects, leading to unique host-tumor interactions. In such condition, recent improved comprehension and relevant findings could lead to identification of innovative molecular therapeutic targets, achieving considerable clinical and translational research. This review aims to summarize and to highlight most recent and relevant scientific rationale in this era of immunotherapy revival, and to correlate it to the near future clinical practice for the management of this challenging disease.

  20. Methods of Investigating Metastatic Lymph Nodes in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    POPESCU, Bogdan; ENE, Patricia; BERTESTEANU, Serban Vifor Gabriel; ENE, Razvan; CIRSTOIU, Catalin; POPESCU, Cristian Radu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT When dealing with patients who have head and neck cancer - squamous cell carcinoma and have clinically N0 neck disease it is very difficult to assess the real extension of the malignant proccess. This is why several techniques are curently in use to determine the actual TNM clasiffication for each patient in order to apply best suited therapy management. Up until today the staging of the neck has been done by using a combination of the physical exam and conventional imaging studies. Recent studies and research have tried to determine weather the use of sentinel lymph node biopsy is a more reliable tool in predicting occult metastasis in cancer patients with clinically N0 neck disease. There are no guidelines in this matter and as such the use of the sentinel lymph node detection technique is yet to be used on a routine basis. The authors are trying to assess the benefits of different paraclinical investigation regarding the improvement of overall survival rates in patients with T1/T2 squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and N0 neck disease. PMID:24790674

  1. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy

  2. Chiropractic clinical practice guideline: evidence-based treatment of adult neck pain not due to whiplash

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Peacock, Elizabeth; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Bryans, Roland; Danis, Normand; Furlan, Andrea; Marcoux, Henri; Potter, Brock; Ruegg, Rick; Gross Stein, Janice; White, Eleanor

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the chiropractic cervical treatment of adults with acute or chronic neck pain not due to whiplash. This is a considerable health concern considered to be a priority by stakeholders, and about which the scientific information was poorly organized. OPTIONS Cervical treatments: manipulation, mobilization, ischemic pressure, clinic- and home-based exercise, traction, education, low-power laser, massage, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, pillows, pulsed electromagnetic therapy, and ultrasound. OUTCOMES The primary outcomes considered were improved (reduced and less intrusive) pain and improved (increased and easier) ranges of motion (ROM) of the adult cervical spine. EVIDENCE An “extraction” team recorded evidence from articles found by literature search teams using 4 separate literature searches, and rated it using a Table adapted from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. The searches were 1) Treatment; August, 2003, using MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, MANTIS, ICL, The Cochrane Library (includes CENTRAL), and EBSCO, identified 182 articles. 2) Risk management (adverse events); October, 2004, identified 230 articles and 2 texts. 3) Risk management (dissection); September, 2003, identified 79 articles. 4) Treatment update; a repeat of the treatment search for articles published between September, 2003 and November, 2004 inclusive identified 121 articles. VALUES To enable the search of the literature, the authors (Guidelines Development Committee [GDC]) regarded chiropractic treatment as including elements of “conservative” care in the search strategies, but not in the consideration of the range of chiropractic practice. Also, knowledge based only on clinical experience was considered less valid and reliable than good-caliber evidence, but where the caliber of the relevant evidence was low or it was non-existent, unpublished clinical experience was considered to be equivalent to

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a postoperative clinical care pathway in head and neck surgery with microvascular reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a postoperative clinical care pathway for patients undergoing major head and neck oncologic surgery with microvascular reconstruction. Methods This is a comparative trial of a prospective treatment group managed on a postoperative clinical care pathway and a historical group managed prior to pathway implementation. Effectiveness outcomes evaluated were total hospital days, return to OR, readmission to ICU and rate of pulmonary complications. Costing perspective was from the government payer. Results 118 patients were included in the study. All outcomes demonstrated that the postoperative pathway group was both more effective and less costly, and is therefore a dominant clinical intervention. The overall mean pre- and post-pathway costs are $22,733 and $16,564 per patient, respectively. The incremental cost reduction associated with the postoperative pathway was $6,169 per patient. Conclusion Implementing the postoperative clinical care pathway in patients undergoing head and neck oncologic surgery with reconstruction resulted in improved clinical outcomes and reduced costs. PMID:24351020

  4. Chiropractic clinical practice guideline: evidence-based treatment of adult neck pain not due to whiplash

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Peacock, Elizabeth; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Bryans, Roland; Danis, Normand; Furlan, Andrea; Marcoux, Henri; Potter, Brock; Ruegg, Rick; Gross Stein, Janice; White, Eleanor

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the chiropractic cervical treatment of adults with acute or chronic neck pain not due to whiplash. This is a considerable health concern considered to be a priority by stakeholders, and about which the scientific information was poorly organized. OPTIONS Cervical treatments: manipulation, mobilization, ischemic pressure, clinic- and home-based exercise, traction, education, low-power laser, massage, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, pillows, pulsed electromagnetic therapy, and ultrasound. OUTCOMES The primary outcomes considered were improved (reduced and less intrusive) pain and improved (increased and easier) ranges of motion (ROM) of the adult cervical spine. EVIDENCE An “extraction” team recorded evidence from articles found by literature search teams using 4 separate literature searches, and rated it using a Table adapted from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. The searches were 1) Treatment; August, 2003, using MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, MANTIS, ICL, The Cochrane Library (includes CENTRAL), and EBSCO, identified 182 articles. 2) Risk management (adverse events); October, 2004, identified 230 articles and 2 texts. 3) Risk management (dissection); September, 2003, identified 79 articles. 4) Treatment update; a repeat of the treatment search for articles published between September, 2003 and November, 2004 inclusive identified 121 articles. VALUES To enable the search of the literature, the authors (Guidelines Development Committee [GDC]) regarded chiropractic treatment as including elements of “conservative” care in the search strategies, but not in the consideration of the range of chiropractic practice. Also, knowledge based only on clinical experience was considered less valid and reliable than good-caliber evidence, but where the caliber of the relevant evidence was low or it was non-existent, unpublished clinical experience was considered to be equivalent to

  5. Microbotox of the Lower Face and Neck: Evolution of a Personal Technique and Its Clinical Effects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Woffles T L

    2015-11-01

    Microbotox is the injection of multiple microdroplets of diluted onabotulinumtoxinA into the dermis or the interface between the dermis and the superficial layer of facial muscles. The intention is to decrease sweat and sebaceous gland activity to improve skin texture and sheen and to target the superficial layer of muscles that find attachment to the undersurface of the dermis causing visible rhytides. For treatment of the lower face and neck, hundreds of microdroplets of diluted Botox are injected into the dermis or immediate subdermal plane to improve skin texture, smoothen horizontal creases, and decrease vertical banding of the neck, as well as to achieve better apposition of the platysma to the jawline and neck, improving contouring of the cervicomental angle. The Microbotox solution is mixed in the syringe by adding a small volume of lidocaine to the calculated dose of onabotulinumtoxinA drawn from a standard bottle of Botox prepared with 2.5 mL saline. Each 1 mL syringe of Microbotox solution contains 20-28 units of onabotulinumtoxinA per mL of solution and is used to deliver 100-120 injections. The lower face and neck will usually require 1 mL per side. The injections are delivered intradermally using a 30- or 32-G needle raising a tiny blanched weal at each point. The author has over 1867 documented cases of Microbotox in various parts of the face (forehead, glabellar, crow's-feet, infraorbital, and cheeks) and neck, the majority of these patients being treated in forehead or the lower face and neck as described in this article. PMID:26441119

  6. Adaptive Planning in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancers: Single-Institution Experience and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Peter H.; Chen, Chin-Cheng; Ahn, Andrew I.; Hong, Linda; Scripes, Paola G.; Shen Jin; Lee, Chen-Chiao; Miller, Ekeni; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Anatomic changes and positional variability during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer can lead to clinically significant dosimetric changes. We report our single-institution experience using an adaptive protocol and correlate these changes with anatomic and positional changes during treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three sequential head and neck IMRT patients underwent serial computed tomography (CT) scans during their radiation course. After undergoing the planning CT scan, patients underwent planned rescans at 11, 22, and 33 fractions; a total of 89 scans with 129 unique CT plan combinations were thus analyzed. Positional variability and anatomic changes during treatment were correlated with changes in dosimetric parameters to target and avoidance structures between planning CT and subsequent scans. Results: A total of 15/23 patients (65%) benefited from adaptive planning, either due to inadequate dose to gross disease or to increased dose to organs at risk. Significant differences in primary and nodal targets (planning target volume, gross tumor volume, and clinical tumor volume), parotid, and spinal cord dosimetric parameters were noted throughout the treatment. Correlations were established between these dosimetric changes and weight loss, fraction number, multiple skin separations, and change in position of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine. Conclusions: Variations in patient positioning and anatomy changes during IMRT for head and neck cancer can affect dosimetric parameters and have wide-ranging clinical implications. The interplay between random positional variability and gradual anatomic changes requires careful clinical monitoring and frequent use of CT- based image-guided radiation therapy, which should determine variations necessitating new plans.

  7. Effects of nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy: A prospective randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wen-Xing; Li, Wentao; Huang, Shi-Gao; Dang, Yazhang; Gao, Hongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck malignant tumors have numerous locations of the disease. After patients receive radiotherapy, their nutritional status is very poor, thus the curative effect is unsatisfactory. The aims of the present study were to investigate and analyze the nutritional status of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy (RT) in order to provide positive nutrition intervention for assisting the radiotherapy effect. A total of 40 patients with head and neck cancer were selected using a method of subjective global assessment (SGA) to assess nutritional status, including calorie intake and energy expenditure. In a randomized, controlled study, 20 patients received intensive dietary counseling and nutritional therapy (G1) and 20 received regular dietary as controls (G0) preradiotherapy and postradiotherapy. The primary endpoint was calorie intake and energy expenditure. The secondary endpoint was SGA rating with nutritional therapy. At the end of RT, energy intake showed a net increase in G1 (1,691±301 kcal) compared with that in G0 (1,066±312 kcal) (P<0.05); energy expenditure increased in G1 (1,673±279 kcal) compared with G0 (1,490±298 kcal) (P<0.05). The prevalence of severe malnutrition following radiotherapy was significantly different between the two study groups (10 patients in G0 and 4 patients in G1; P<0.05). The number of the normal malnutrition patients postRT in G0 decreased from 4 to 2 and conversely, in G1 it increased from 3 to 6 (P<0.05). In conclusion, patients with head and neck cancer were most malnutritioned, which impacted on clinical outcome. Timely nutritional intervention can effectively prevent weight loss and muscle wasting. Additionally, it may improve quality of life by decreasing the frequency of severe malnutrition. PMID:27588193

  8. Randomized clinical trial assessing whether additional massage treatments for chronic neck pain improve 12- and 26-week outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Andrea J.; Wellman, Robert D.; Cherkin, Daniel C.; Kahn, Janet R.; Sherman, Karen J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Context This is the first study to systematically evaluate the value of a longer treatment period for massage. We provide a framework of how to conceptualize an optimal dose in this challenging setting of non-pharmacological treatments. Purpose To determine the optimal dose of massage for neck pain. Study Design/Setting Two-phase randomized trial for persons with chronic non-specific neck pain. Primary randomization to one of 5 groups receiving 4 weeks of massage (30 minutes 2×/ or 3×/week or 60 minutes 1×, 2×, or 3×/week). Booster randomization of participants to receive an additional 6 massages, 60 minute 1×/week, or no additional massage. Patient Sample 179 participants from Group Health and the general population of Seattle, WA USA recruited between June 2010 and August 2011. Outcome Measures Primary outcomes self-reported neck-related dysfunction (Neck Disability Index) and pain (0–10 scale) were assessed at baseline, 12, and 26 weeks. Clinically meaningful improvement was defined as >5 point decrease in dysfunction and > 30% decrease in pain from baseline. Methods Clinically meaningful improvement for each primary outcome with both follow-up times was analyzed using adjusted modified Poisson generalized estimating equations. Secondary analyses for the continuous outcomes used linear generalized estimating equations. This study was funded the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, NIH, USA (R01 AT004411). The funders had no role in the interpretation or reporting of results. Results There were no observed differences by primary treatment group at 12 or 26 weeks. Those receiving booster dose had improvements in both dysfunction and pain at 12 weeks (dysfunction: RR=1.56(1.08–2.25), P=0.018; pain: RR=1.25(0.98–1.61); P=0.077), but those were non-significant at 26 weeks (dysfunction: RR=1.22(0.85–1.74); pain: RR=1.09(0.82–1.43)). Subgroup analysis by primary and booster treatments found the booster dose only

  9. Clinical Management of Salivary Gland Hypofunction and Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients: Successes and Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Vissink, Arjan; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.; Limesand, Kirsten H.; Jensen, Siri Beier; Fox, Philip C.; Elting, Linda S.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Coppes, Robert P.; Reyland, Mary E.

    2010-11-15

    The most significant long-term complication of radiotherapy in the head-and-neck region is hyposalivation and its related complaints, particularily xerostomia. This review addresses the pathophysiology underlying irradiation damage to salivary gland tissue, the consequences of radiation injury, and issues contributing to the clinical management of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia. These include ways to (1) prevent or minimize radiation injury of salivary gland tissue, (2) manage radiation-induced hyposalivation and xerostomia, and (3) restore the function of salivary gland tissue damaged by radiotherapy.

  10. Epigenetic alterations in head and neck cancer: prevalence, clinical significance, and implications.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chun-Yang

    2004-03-01

    Head and neck cancers are a group of malignancies with diverse biologic behaviors and a strong, well-established association with tobacco and alcohol use. Although the hunt for genetic alterations in head and neck cancer has continued in the past two decades, with unequivocal proof of a genetic role in multistage head and neck carcinogenesis, epigenetic alteration in association with promoter CpG island hypermethylation has emerged in the past few years as one of the most active areas of cancer research. It is now firmly believed that, in cancer cells, promoter CpG island hypermethylation (epigenetic alteration) represents a bona fide alternative mechanism, as opposed to genetic factors, such as gene mutations and deletion, in the inactivation of many tumor-suppressor genes. It is also realized that epigenetic and genetic factors often work together, affecting multiple cellular pathways, such as cell-cycle regulation, DNA repair, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and cell-to-cell adhesion, during the process of tumor growth and progression.

  11. Level IIB Neck Dissection in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Science or Myth?

    PubMed

    Ghantous, Yasmine; Akrish, Sharon; Abd-Elraziq, Morad; El-Naaj, Imad Abu

    2016-06-01

    Selective neck dissection enables us to reduce the morbidity of neck dissection while maintaining the same oncological results, mainly in clinically negative neck N0. The most common morbidity associated with selective neck dissection is spinal accessory nerve dysfunction and related shoulder disability, which are encountered during dissection of level IIB.The aim of authors' study is to evaluate the incidence of sublevel IIB lymphatic metastasis in clinically N0 oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients.The study group comprised 48 men (68%) and 22 women (32%). The median number of the lymph nodes removed from level IIB was 6.5. All the investigated necks were clinically classified as N0, of which 14 (20%) turned out to have an occult nodal metastasis, including only 1 patient (1.42%) of level IIB occult metastasis, which originated from the primary tumor located in the tongue and also metastasized to level IIA. The most associated morbidity was shoulder pain and dysfunction, which presented in 60% of the patients.Also, an electronic search was conducted to find relevant studies investigating the prevalence of level IIB metastasis in OSCC. Ten studies were included for full text review, including the current study. The overall incidence of level IIB metastasis is 4% (17 patients); of these 17 patients, only 4 patients had isolated level IIB nodal metastases (2%).To conclude, neck dissecting, including dissecting level IIB, remains the keystone of treating OSCC. Its prognostic and therapeutic value exceeds its associated morbidity; therefore, dissecting level IIB is recommended in treating OSCC in clinically N0 patients. PMID:27171965

  12. Neuro Emotional Technique for the treatment of trigger point sensitivity in chronic neck pain sufferers: A controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Bablis, Peter; Pollard, Henry; Bonello, Rod

    2008-01-01

    Background Trigger points have been shown to be active in many myofascial pain syndromes. Treatment of trigger point pain and dysfunction may be explained through the mechanisms of central and peripheral paradigms. This study aimed to investigate whether the mind/body treatment of Neuro Emotional Technique (NET) could significantly relieve pain sensitivity of trigger points presenting in a cohort of chronic neck pain sufferers. Methods Sixty participants presenting to a private chiropractic clinic with chronic cervical pain as their primary complaint were sequentially allocated into treatment and control groups. Participants in the treatment group received a short course of Neuro Emotional Technique that consists of muscle testing, general semantics and Traditional Chinese Medicine. The control group received a sham NET protocol. Outcome measurements included pain assessment utilizing a visual analog scale and a pressure gauge algometer. Pain sensitivity was measured at four trigger point locations: suboccipital region (S); levator scapulae region (LS); sternocleidomastoid region (SCM) and temporomandibular region (TMJ). For each outcome measurement and each trigger point, we calculated the change in measurement between pre- and post- treatment. We then examined the relationships between these measurement changes and six independent variables (i.e. treatment group and the above five additional participant variables) using forward stepwise General Linear Model. Results The visual analog scale (0 to 10) had an improvement of 7.6 at S, 7.2 at LS, 7.5 at SCM and 7.1 at the TMJ in the treatment group compared with no improvement of at S, and an improvement of 0.04 at LS, 0.1 at SCM and 0.1 at the TMJ point in the control group, (P < 0.001). Conclusion After a short course of NET treatment, measurements of visual analog scale and pressure algometer recordings of four trigger point locations in a cohort of chronic neck pain sufferers were significantly improved when

  13. Prospective Evaluation to Establish a Dose Response for Clinical Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Head-and-Neck Conformal Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Samir Lehmann, Joerg; Coleman, Matthew A.; Vaughan, Andrew; Yang, Claus Chunli; Enepekides, Danny; Farwell, Gregory; Purdy, James A.; Laredo, Grace; Nolan, Kerry A.S.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: We conducted a clinical study to correlate oral cavity dose with clinical mucositis, perform in vivo dosimetry, and determine the feasibility of obtaining buccal mucosal cell samples in patients undergoing head-and-neck radiation therapy. The main objective is to establish a quantitative dose response for clinical oral mucositis. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively studied. Four points were chosen in separate quadrants of the oral cavity. Calculated dose distributions were generated by using AcQPlan and Eclipse treatment planning systems. MOSFET dosimeters were used to measure dose at each sampled point. Each patient underwent buccal sampling for future RNA analysis before and after the first radiation treatment at the four selected points. Clinical and functional mucositis were assessed weekly according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3. Results: Maximum and average doses for sampled sites ranged from 7.4-62.3 and 3.0-54.3 Gy, respectively. A cumulative point dose of 39.1 Gy resulted in mucositis for 3 weeks or longer. Mild severity (Grade {<=} 1) and short duration ({<=}1 week) of mucositis were found at cumulative point doses less than 32 Gy. Polymerase chain reaction consistently was able to detect basal levels of two known radiation responsive genes. Conclusions: In our sample, cumulative doses to the oral cavity of less than 32 Gy were associated with minimal acute mucositis. A dose greater than 39 Gy was associated with longer duration of mucositis. Our technique for sampling buccal mucosa yielded sufficient cells for RNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction.

  14. Improved Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Farwell, D. Gregory; Marsano, Joseph; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To compare differences in dosimetric, clinical, and quality-of-life endpoints among a cohort of patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 51 patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Twenty-four patients (47%) were treated using CRT, and 27 (53%) were treated using IMRT. The proportions of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy were 54% and 63%, respectively. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and disease-specific survival for the entire patient population were 86%, 89%, and84%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to radiation therapy technique (p > 0.05 for all). Dosimetric analysis revealed that the use of IMRT resulted in significant improvements with respect to mean dose and V30 to the contralateral (spared) parotid gland. In addition, mean doses to the ipsilateral inner and middle ear structures were significantly reduced with IMRT (p < 0.05 for all). The incidence of severe xerostomia in the late setting was 58% and 11% among patients treated by CRT and IMRT, respectively (p < 0.001). The percentages of patients who were G-tube dependent at 6 months after treatment were 42% and 11%, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT results in significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio among patients treated by radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin.

  15. Identification of a High-Risk Group Among Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and pT1-2N0 Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Chen, I-How; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan; and others

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010 classification system, pT1-2N0 oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is considered an early-stage cancer treatable with surgery alone (National Comprehensive Cancer Network 2010 guidelines). Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of surgery alone for pT1-2N0 OSCC patients. Methods and Materials: Among 1279 previously untreated OSCC patients referred to our hospital between January 1996 and May 2008, we identified 457 consecutive patients with pT1-2N0 disease. All had radical tumor excision with neck dissection. A total of 387 patients showing pathologic margins greater than 4 mm and treated by surgery alone were included in the final analysis. All were followed up for at least 24 months after surgery or until death. The 5-year rates of control, distant metastasis, and survival were the main outcome measures. Results: The 5-year rates in the entire group of pT1-2N0 patients were as follows: local control, 91%; neck control, 92%; distant metastases, 1%; disease-free survival, 85%; disease-specific survival, 93%; and overall survival, 84%. Multivariate analysis identified poor differentiation and pathologic tumor depth of 4 mm or greater as independent risk factors for neck control, disease-free survival, and disease-specific survival. A scoring system using poor differentiation and tumor depth was formulated to define distinct prognostic groups. The presence of both poorly differentiated tumors and a tumor depth of 4 mm or greater resulted in significantly poorer 5-year neck control (p < 0.0001), disease-free (p < 0.0001), disease-specific (p < 0.0001), and overall survival (p = 0.0046) rates. Conclusion: The combination of poor differentiation and pathologic tumor depth of 4 mm or greater identified a subset of pT1-2N0 OSCC patients with poor outcome, who may have clinical benefit from postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy.

  16. Extraction of 3D Femur Neck Trabecular Bone Architecture from Clinical CT Images in Osteoporotic Evaluation: a Novel Framework.

    PubMed

    Sapthagirivasan, V; Anburajan, M; Janarthanam, S

    2015-08-01

    The early detection of osteoporosis risk enhances the lifespan and quality of life of an individual. A reasonable in-vivo assessment of trabecular bone strength at the proximal femur helps to evaluate the fracture risk and henceforth, to understand the associated structural dynamics on occurrence of osteoporosis. The main aim of our study was to develop a framework to automatically determine the trabecular bone strength from clinical femur CT images and thereby to estimate its correlation with BMD. All the 50 studied south Indian female subjects aged 30 to 80 years underwent CT and DXA measurements at right femur region. Initially, the original CT slices were intensified and active contour model was utilised for the extraction of the neck region. After processing through a novel process called trabecular enrichment approach (TEA), the three dimensional (3D) trabecular features were extracted. The extracted 3D trabecular features, such as volume fraction (VF), solidity of delta points (SDP) and boundness, demonstrated a significant correlation with femoral neck bone mineral density (r = 0.551, r = 0.432, r = 0.552 respectively) at p < 0.001. The higher area under the curve values of the extracted features (VF: 85.3 %; 95CI: 68.2-100 %, SDP: 82.1 %; 95CI: 65.1-98.9 % and boundness: 90.4 %; 95CI: 78.7-100 %) were observed. The findings suggest that the proposed framework with TEA method would be useful for spotting women vulnerable to osteoporotic risk.

  17. The utility of neck/thyromental ratio in defining low-risk patients with obstructive sleep apnea in sleep clinics.

    PubMed

    Yuceege, Melike; Firat, Hikmet; Altintas, Nejat; Mutlu, Murad; Ardic, Sadik

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to evaluate the importance of neck/thyromental distance in the diagnosis of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in sleep clinics. 185 patients (122 males, 63 females) referred to our sleep clinic with OSA symptoms were enrolled to the study. The patients had level-1 polysomnography (PSG). The neck circumference (N), thyromental distance (T), and STOP test were recorded in all patients. Using an obstructive AHI > 15 event/h on PSG as the cut-off, the best N/T ratio to find patients with OSA was calculated with the receiver operator curve analyses. The best cut-off for N/T was chosen as 4.6. We used Modified STOP test: STO-NT test in which P (for hypertension item) was replaced with N/T ratio. N/T ratio >4.6 was scored as "positive". Two positives out of four questions in STO-NT were scored as high risk for OSA. The OSA prevalence was 60 % for AHI > 15. The mean ratio of N/T was significantly different between groups with AHI > 15 and AHI ≤ 15. N and N/T ratio were moderately correlated with AHI. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and negative likelihood ratio of STOP test for AHI > 15 were 88.5, 28.4, 61.8, 65.4 % and 0.40, whereas 97.3, 23, 85, 65.9 % and 0.12 for STO-NT test, respectively. STO-NT test seems better than STOP test in determining patients who do not likely to have moderate to severe OSA in sleep clinics so can be preferred to decide on therapies other than CPAP in a short time.

  18. TCGA head Neck

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  19. The emerging role of immunotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC): anti-tumor immunity and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Economopoulou, Panagiota; Perisanidis, Christos; Giotakis, Evaggelos I.

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) carries a poor prognosis, with low survival rates for advanced stage tumors and minimal improvement in survival trends through the past decades. It is becoming increasingly clear that HNSCC oncogenesis and evolution is characterized by profound immune defects, as cancer cells evade immunosurveillance due to accumulation of genetic mutations and tumor heterogeneity. Improved understanding of the role of the immune system in cancer has led to the identification of novel therapeutic targets, which are being investigated for their potential to provide durable responses. In this review, we will summarize the role of the immune system in HNSCC, the rationale behind immunotherapy strategies and their clinical applications. PMID:27275486

  20. Review of the Clinical and Biologic Aspects of Human Papillomavirus-Positive Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Blitzer, Grace C.; Smith, Molly A.; Harris, Stephen L.; Kimple, Randall J.

    2014-03-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), a known etiology of a subset of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNCs), causes numerous alterations in normal cellular functions. This article reviews the biology, detection, and treatment of HPV-positive HNC. The role of HPV oncoproteins in tumor development, the natural history of HPV infection, and risk factors for and prevention of transmission of oral HPV are considered. Commonly used methods for detecting HPV infection, including limitations of these methods, are discussed to aid the practicing clinician in using these tests in their clinical practice. Clinical characteristics of HPV-positive HNC, including potential explanations for the improved outcomes seen in patients with HPV-positive HNC, are assessed. Ongoing clinical trials specific for patients with HPV-positive HNC are described, and areas in need of additional research are summarized. Until the results of ongoing trials are known, treatment of HPV-positive HNC should not differ in clinical practice from treatment of similar non-HPV related cancers.

  1. Evaluation of ultrasonography as a diagnostic tool in the management of head and neck facial space infections: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ajaz; Ahmed, Irshad; Hassan, Shahid; Samoon, Amina; Ali, Babar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Superficial facial space infections represent a significant amount of the dental problems that present to hospital. Determining whether an odontogenic swelling is a cellulitis or abscess is difficult, but important as both may require different treatments. The use of an ultrasound may aid in differentiating cellulitis and abscess. This study was done to compare the accuracy of clinical examination alone versus ultrasonography (USG) in the diagnosis of cellulitis and abscess in symptomatic patients with a diagnosis of superficial facial space infection. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients (1870 years) diagnosed as superficial facial space infections by clinical and radiographic examinations were included in the study and patients with significant medical conditions were excluded. The provisional clinical diagnosis was made after a thorough history was taken and clinical examination was performed to determine if the swelling was a cellulitis or abscess. Swelling was then evaluated using the ultrasonic transducer which was placed over the swelling to aid the diagnosis which was again recorded. An incision and drainage procedure was performed after the administration of local anesthesia. The success of the ultrasound intervention versus clinical examination was based on whether frank exudation was detected during incision and drainage of such swellings. Results: The statistical analysis found that USG is a valuable diagnostic aid for detection of abscess or cellulitis in head and neck facial space infections. Interpretation and Conclusion: The findings of this prospective analysis indicate that there was statistical difference between clinical examination alone and USG in making the correct diagnosis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive, negative predictive, and accuracy were not similar for all methods tested. From the results of this study, ultrasound is recommended as an adjunct to clinical examination in differentiating between

  2. Use of a Conventional Low Neck Field (LNF) and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT): No Clinical Detriment of IMRT to an Anterior LNF During the Treatment of Head-and Neck-Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Turaka, Aruna; Li Tianyu; Nicolaou, Nicos; Lango, Miriam N.; Burtness, Barbara; Horwitz, Eric M.; Ridge, John A.; Feigenberg, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine differences in clinical outcomes using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or a standard low neck field (LNF) to treat low neck. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective, single-institution study. Ninety-one patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with curative intent. According to physician preference, some patients were treated with LNF (Planning Target Volume 3) field using a single anterior photon field matched to the IMRT field. Field junctions were not feathered. The endpoints were time to failure and use of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube (as a surrogate of laryngeal edema causing aspiration), and analysis was done with {chi}{sup 2} and log-rank tests. Results: Median follow-up was 21 months (range, 2-89 months). Median age was 60 years. Thirty-seven patients (41%) were treated with LNF, 84% were Stage III or IV. A PEG tube was required in 30%, as opposed to 33% without the use of LNF. Node 2 or 3 neck disease was treated more commonly without LNF (38% vs. 24%, p = 0.009). Failures occurred in 12 patients (13%). Only 1 patient treated with LNF failed regionally, 4.5 cm above the match line. The 3-year disease-free survival rate was 87% and 79% with LNF and without LNF, respectively (p = 0.2), and the 3-year LR failure rate was 4% and 21%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Using LNF to treat the low neck did not increase the risk of regional failure 'in early T and early N diseases' or decrease PEG tube requirements.

  3. A pilot study evaluating real-time shear wave ultrasound elastography of miscellaneous non-nodal neck masses in a routine head and neck ultrasound clinic.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Kunwar S S; Yuen, Edmund H Y; Cho, Carmen C M; Tong, Cina S L; Lee, Yolanda Y P; Ahuja, Anil T

    2012-06-01

    A pilot study was performed to evaluate shear wave ultrasound elastography (SWE) for miscellaneous non-nodal/salivary/thyroid neck lesions. Forty-six lesions undergoing conventional sonography also underwent SWE. Elastic moduli from the stiffest areas in lesions were correlated with diagnosis. Forty lesions were benign (9 lipomas, 8 lymphatic/venous vascular malformations, 7 thyroglossal duct cysts, 4 branchial cleft cysts, 4 abscesses/phlegmons, 3 neurogenic tumors and 1 each of paraganglioma, sebaceous cyst, pseudotumor, hypertrophic scar, ranula) and 6 were malignant (1 malignant fibrous histiocytoma, 2 primary squamous cell carcinomas and 3 intramuscular metastases [2 squamous cell carcinomas, 1 malignant melanoma]).Median stiffness of malignant lesions (226.4 kPa, range 55.6 to 300.0) was higher than benign lesions (28.3 kPa, range 4.0 to 300.0) (p < 0.001). SWE cut-off with highest accuracy (174.4 kPa) achieved 83.3% sensitivity and 97.5% specificity, and the cut-off with 100% sensitivity (55.6 kPa) achieved 75% specificity. All malignant lesions were suspected on conventional sonography. The preliminary data indicate that SWE is feasible for miscellaneous neck lesions. SWE would not have altered management in terms of detecting undisclosed malignancies, although as a quantitative technique, it may increase the diagnostic confidence of less experienced operators performing head and neck ultrasound.

  4. The clinical feasibility of deep hyperthermia treatment in the head and neck: new challenges for positioning and temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Paulides, M M; Bakker, J F; Linthorst, M; van der Zee, J; Rijnen, Z; Neufeld, E; Pattynama, P M T; Jansen, P P; Levendag, P C; van Rhoon, G C

    2010-05-01

    To apply high-quality hyperthermia treatment to tumours at deep locations in the head and neck (H&N), we have designed and built a site-specific phased-array applicator. Earlier, we demonstrated its features in parameter studies, validated those by phantom measurements and clinically introduced the system. In this paper we will critically review our first clinical experiences and demonstrate the pivotal role of hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP). Three representative patient cases (thyroid, oropharynx and nasal cavity) are selected and discussed. Treatment planning, the treatment, interstitially measured temperatures and their interrelation are analysed from a physics point of view. Treatments lasting 1 h were feasible and well tolerated and no acute treatment-related toxicity has been observed. Maximum temperatures measured are in the range of those obtained during deep hyperthermia treatments in the pelvic region but mean temperatures are still to be improved. Further, we found that simulated power absorption correlated well with measured temperatures illustrating the validity of our treatment approach of using energy profile optimizations to arrive at higher temperatures. This is the first data proving that focussed heating of tumours in the H&N is feasible. Further, HTP proved a valuable tool in treatment optimization. Items to improve are (1) the transfer of HTP settings into the clinic and (2) the registration of the thermal dose, i.e. dosimetry.

  5. The clinical feasibility of deep hyperthermia treatment in the head and neck: new challenges for positioning and temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulides, M. M.; Bakker, J. F.; Linthorst, M.; van der Zee, J.; Rijnen, Z.; Neufeld, E.; Pattynama, P. M. T.; Jansen, P. P.; Levendag, P. C.; van Rhoon, G. C.

    2010-05-01

    To apply high-quality hyperthermia treatment to tumours at deep locations in the head and neck (H&N), we have designed and built a site-specific phased-array applicator. Earlier, we demonstrated its features in parameter studies, validated those by phantom measurements and clinically introduced the system. In this paper we will critically review our first clinical experiences and demonstrate the pivotal role of hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP). Three representative patient cases (thyroid, oropharynx and nasal cavity) are selected and discussed. Treatment planning, the treatment, interstitially measured temperatures and their interrelation are analysed from a physics point of view. Treatments lasting 1 h were feasible and well tolerated and no acute treatment-related toxicity has been observed. Maximum temperatures measured are in the range of those obtained during deep hyperthermia treatments in the pelvic region but mean temperatures are still to be improved. Further, we found that simulated power absorption correlated well with measured temperatures illustrating the validity of our treatment approach of using energy profile optimizations to arrive at higher temperatures. This is the first data proving that focussed heating of tumours in the H&N is feasible. Further, HTP proved a valuable tool in treatment optimization. Items to improve are (1) the transfer of HTP settings into the clinic and (2) the registration of the thermal dose, i.e. dosimetry.

  6. [Sequential Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: A Clinical Study with 33 Cases].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Katsumasa; Nakajima, Kyoko; Murata, Takaaki; Shino, Masato; Nikkuni, Osamu; Toyoda, Minoru; Takayasu, Yukihiro; Chikamatsu, Kazuaki

    2016-05-01

    A total of 33 patients with advanced head and neck cancer (AHNC) treated with sequential chemoradiotherapy (SCRT) were retrospectively evaluated at Gunma University Hospital between 2009 and 2011. The regimen of SCRT was docetaxel, cisplatin, and fluorouracil (TPF)-based induction chemotherapy (ICT), accompanied by docetaxel and cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), and oral administration of TS-1 after that. The response rate was 61%, the 3-year overall survival rate was 42%, the non-tumor-bearing survival rate was 27%, and the tumor-bearing survival rate was 15%. Fourteen of 33 patients were tumor-free, and their 3-year overall survival rate was surprisingly 86%. On the other hand, 3-year overall survival rate in the remaining 19 patients was significantly low. To select good response cases for ICT was important. In such cases, TPF should be applied repeatedly, which achieved a 61% response rate even in AHNC. A long-term TS-1 oral medication suppressed cancer regrowth and contributed to long-term survival. PMID:27459819

  7. Primary extranodal head and neck classical Hodgkin lymphoma: A rare clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yongzhi; Sun, Xuemei; Wei, Daolin; Yu, Ziwei

    2016-01-01

    The subcutaneous soft tissue of the forehead is a rare anatomic site for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), and no such case has previously been reported in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. HLs commonly present in the nodal regions in the majority of patients, rarely occurring in extranodal sites, whereas primary extranodal lymphoma is less common and is more typical in cases of non-HL. The present study reports a novel case of extranodal head and neck classical HL (cHL), initially diagnosed as frontal fibroma. The present study describes an unusual case of subcutaneous soft tissue involvement of HL, aiming to enhance current levels of awareness for patients with extranodal symptoms. A 25-year-old male, who inadvertently detected a hard painless mass above the right superciliary arch 2 months prior to admission in April 2013 was eventually diagnosed with mixed cellularity cHL. Subsequent to six cycles of doxorubicin (Adriamycin), bleomycin, vindesine and dacarbazine chemotherapy, followed by four cycles of ifosfamide, gemcitabine, vinorelbine and prednisone chemotherapy, a satisfactory curative effect was obtained. In conclusion, it is proposed that lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a mass involving the subcutaneous soft tissue. PMID:27446312

  8. Prevalence and clinical features of human papillomavirus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in Okinawa, southern Japan.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zeyi; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Matayoshi, Sen; Kiyuna, Asanori; Yamashita, Yukashi; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Mikio

    2011-11-01

    Previous studies from Okinawa, a subtropical island in southern Japan, demonstrated a higher prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral carcinoma and a higher incidence of oral and pharyngeal carcinoma than those for mainland Japan. The present study aims to investigate epidemiologic and clinical features of HPV in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in Okinawa. A total of 150 DNA samples from 150 Okinawan patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) were screened for HPV sequences by PCR using three consensus primer sets, and HPV types were determined by direct sequencing. The samples were consisted of 46 cases from the hypopharynx, 44 from the oropharynx, 16 from the larynx, 25 from the oral cavity, 10 from the maxillary sinus, and 9 from the nasopharynx. HPV DNA was detected in 45 (30.0%) HNSCCs, and HPV-16 was identified in 86.7% of positive specimens. The highest prevalence of the HPV sequence was found in oropharyngeal carcinomas (50.0%), especially in tonsillar cancer (63.6%). Multivariate analysis showed that oropharyngeal carcinoma (P = 0.002; OR = 5.34; 95% CI = 1.83-15.58), oral cavity carcinoma (P = 0.012; OR = 4.94; 95% CI = 1.43-17.10), and histological poor differentiation (P = 0.011; OR = 4.25; 95% CI = 1.39-13.04) each independently increased the prevalence of HPV infection. The present study reveals that patients with HNSCC, e.g., oropharyngeal and oral cavity carcinomas, in Okinawa have relatively high HPV-16 positive rates and low HPV-18 positive rates comparing with mainland Japan.

  9. [Implantation of bipolar prosthesis for treatment of medial femoral neck fractures in the elderly--clinical and radiographic outcome].

    PubMed

    Müller, C A; Bayer, J; Szarzynski, E; Südkamp, N P

    2008-12-01

    In our study, we retrospectively evaluated 203 patients with medial or lateral femoral neck fractures who received 210 bipolar prosthesis (7 bilateral implantations) at our institution. 204 patients underwent cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty. These included 149 females and 54 males with a median age of 82 (46-97) years. At the time of surgery 144 patients (71%) suffered from more than 3 medical conditions. We conducted our follow-up examination at a median of 27.9 months after the operation, at which time 97 patients (48%) had already died. On examination, 17% of our 76 patients had a Harris hip score between 90 and 100 and 20% between 80 and 89 or 70 and 79, respectively. 43% had a score of less than 70. In 20 patients (57%) we found radiographic evidence of periarticular ossification. Signs of loosening according to Gruen were found in 7 out of 35 patients, with no apparent clinical correlation. Surgery-related complications were noted in 15% of our 203 patients--mostly, with 10 cases each, wound infections and postoperative haematomas. In 3 cases of deep wound infection, a removal of the prosthesis was necessary, leading to a Girdlestone hip in one case. Postoperative hip dislocations occurred in 3.4% and intraoperative femur fissures were encountered in 1% of our patients. There were no cases of nerve damage or protrusion of the acetabulum reported. 43% of our patients developed a general complication--mainly cardiological or vascular problems, nephrological or urinary tract diseases, pulmonary or neurological complications. Hip arthroplasty is predominantly applied in older patients, most of them suffering from at least one medical condition at the time of surgery that influences their hospital course. This is why especially the overall physical condition of elderly patients has to be taken seriously into account when planning surgical treatment of femoral neck fractures. In our retrospective study, we have shown that implantation of a bipolar hip prosthesis

  10. Economic Analyses in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: A Review of the Literature From a Clinical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Jonas A. de; Santana, Iuri A.; Castro, Gilberto de; Lima Lopes, Gilberto de; Tina Shih, Ya-Chen

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this review was to describe cost-effectiveness and cost analysis studies across treatment modalities for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), while placing their results in context of the current clinical practice. We performed a literature search in PubMed for English-language studies addressing economic analyses of treatment modalities for SCCHN published from January 2000 to March 2013. We also performed an additional search for related studies published by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the United Kingdom. Identified articles were classified into 3 clinical approaches (organ preservation, radiation therapy modalities, and chemotherapy regimens) and into 2 types of economic studies (cost analysis and cost-effectiveness/cost-utility studies). All cost estimates were normalized to US dollars, year 2013 values. Our search yielded 23 articles: 13 related to organ preservation approaches, 5 to radiation therapy modalities, and 5 to chemotherapy regimens. In general, studies analyzed different questions and modalities, making it difficult to reach a conclusion. Even when restricted to comparisons of modalities within the same clinical approach, studies often yielded conflicting findings. The heterogeneity across economic studies of SCCHN should be carefully understood in light of the modeling assumptions and limitations of each study and placed in context with relevant settings of clinical practices and study perspectives. Furthermore, the scarcity of comparative effectiveness and quality-of-life data poses unique challenges for conducting economic analyses for a resource-intensive disease, such as SCCHN, that requires a multimodal care. Future research is needed to better understand how to compare the costs and cost-effectiveness of different modalities for SCCHN.

  11. YAG laser in experimental and clinical surgery of the head and neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulibacki, Marek P.; Kukwa, Andrzej; Zajac, Andrzej; Zendzian, Waldemar

    1996-03-01

    The authors present their basic and clinical experience aiming at the evaluation of the possibilities of different types of YAG-laser. The aim of the present study was the assessment of the degree of tissue destruction for the most adequate clinical application of laser; the work was carried out using experimental animals and cadavers.

  12. Clinical Evaluation of Direct Aperture Optimization When Applied to Head-And-Neck IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Stephen Williams, Matthew

    2008-04-01

    Direct Machine Parameter Optimization (DMPO) is a leaf segmentation program released as an optional item of the Pinnacle planning system (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Milpitas, CA); it is based on the principles of direct aperture optimization where the size, shape, and weight of individual segments are optimized to produce an intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) plan. In this study, we compare DMPO to the traditional method of IMRT planning, in which intensity maps are optimized prior to conversion into deliverable multileaf collimator (MLC) apertures, and we determine if there was any dosimetric improvement, treatment efficiency gain, or planning advantage provided by the use of DMPO. Eleven head-and-neck patients treated with IMRT had treatment plans generated using each optimization method. For each patient, the same planning parameters were used for each optimization method. All calculations were performed using Pinnacle version 7.6c software and treatments were delivered using a step-and-shoot IMRT method on a Varian 2100EX linear accelerator equipped with a 120-leaf Millennium MLC (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Each plan was assessed based on the calculation time, a conformity index, the composite objective value used in the optimization, the number of segments, monitor units (MUs), and treatment time. The results showed DMPO to be superior to the traditional optimization method in all areas. Considerable advantages were observed in the dosimetric quality of DMPO plans, which also required 32% less time to calculate, 42% fewer MUs, and 35% fewer segments than the conventional optimization method. These reductions translated directly into a 29% decrease in treatment times. While considerable gains were observed in planning and treatment efficiency, they were specific to our institution, and the impact of direct aperture optimization on plan quality and workflow will be dependent on the planning parameters, planning system, and

  13. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of myofascial pain syndromes involving the neck and back: a review from a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Climent, José M; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Fenollosa, Pedro; Martin-Del-Rosario, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Botulinum toxin inhibits acetylcholine (ACh) release and probably blocks some nociceptive neurotransmitters. It has been suggested that the development of myofascial trigger points (MTrP) is related to an excess release of ACh to increase the number of sensitized nociceptors. Although the use of botulinum toxin to treat myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) has been investigated in many clinical trials, the results are contradictory. The objective of this paper is to identify sources of variability that could explain these differences in the results. Material and Methods. We performed a content analysis of the clinical trials and systematic reviews of MPS. Results and Discussion. Sources of differences in studies were found in the diagnostic and selection criteria, the muscles injected, the injection technique, the number of trigger points injected, the dosage of botulinum toxin used, treatments for control group, outcome measures, and duration of followup. The contradictory results regarding the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in MPS associated with neck and back pain do not allow this treatment to be recommended or rejected. There is evidence that botulinum toxin could be useful in specific myofascial regions such as piriformis syndrome. It could also be useful in patients with refractory MPS that has not responded to other myofascial injection therapies.

  14. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of myofascial pain syndromes involving the neck and back: a review from a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Climent, José M; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Fenollosa, Pedro; Martin-Del-Rosario, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Botulinum toxin inhibits acetylcholine (ACh) release and probably blocks some nociceptive neurotransmitters. It has been suggested that the development of myofascial trigger points (MTrP) is related to an excess release of ACh to increase the number of sensitized nociceptors. Although the use of botulinum toxin to treat myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) has been investigated in many clinical trials, the results are contradictory. The objective of this paper is to identify sources of variability that could explain these differences in the results. Material and Methods. We performed a content analysis of the clinical trials and systematic reviews of MPS. Results and Discussion. Sources of differences in studies were found in the diagnostic and selection criteria, the muscles injected, the injection technique, the number of trigger points injected, the dosage of botulinum toxin used, treatments for control group, outcome measures, and duration of followup. The contradictory results regarding the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in MPS associated with neck and back pain do not allow this treatment to be recommended or rejected. There is evidence that botulinum toxin could be useful in specific myofascial regions such as piriformis syndrome. It could also be useful in patients with refractory MPS that has not responded to other myofascial injection therapies. PMID:23533477

  15. Significant differences in demographic, clinical, and pathological features in relation to smoking and alcohol consumption among 1,633 head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Moyses, Raquel Ajub; López, Rossana Verónica Mendoza; Cury, Patrícia Maluf; Siqueira, Sheila Aparecida Coelho; Curioni, Otávio Alberto; de Gois Filho, José Francisco; Figueiredo, David Livingstone Alves; Head; GENCAPO, Neck Genome Project; Tajara, Eloiza Helena; Michaluart, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: As a lifestyle-related disease, social and cultural disparities may influence the features of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in different geographic regions. We describe demographic, clinical, and pathological aspects of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck according to the smoking and alcohol consumption habits of patients in a Brazilian cohort. METHODS: We prospectively analyzed the smoking and alcohol consumption habits of 1,633 patients enrolled in five São Paulo hospitals that participated in the Brazilian Head and Neck Genome Project – Gencapo. RESULTS: The patients who smoked and drank were younger, and those who smoked were leaner than the other patients, regardless of alcohol consumption. The non-smokers/non-drinkers were typically elderly white females who had more differentiated oral cavity cancers and fewer first-degree relatives who smoked. The patients who drank presented significantly more frequent nodal metastasis, and those who smoked presented less-differentiated tumors. CONCLUSIONS: The patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck demonstrated demographic, clinical, and pathological features that were markedly different according to their smoking and drinking habits. A subset of elderly females who had oral cavity cancer and had never smoked or consumed alcohol was notable. Alcohol consumption seemed to be related to nodal metastasis, whereas smoking correlated with the degree of differentiation. PMID:23778492

  16. ICF Core Set for Head and Neck Cancer: Do the Categories Discriminate Among Clinically Relevant Subgroups of Patients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschiesner, Uta; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Cieza, Alarcos

    2011-01-01

    The multidisciplinary assessment of functioning in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) according to the "ICF Core Set for Head and Neck Cancer" (ICF-HNC) was developed in an international and multi-disciplinary approach. The ICF-HNC is an application of the ICF that was adopted by the World Health Organization. The objective of this study was…

  17. Deep neck space infections.

    PubMed

    Beasley, D J; Amedee, R G

    1995-05-01

    The incidence of deep neck space infections has dramatically decreased since the advent of antibiotics, but with delayed treatment they carry the potential for significant morbidity and mortality. Odontogenic infections with involvement of the submandibular space are the most common source of deep neck space infections in adults, whereas in the pediatric population the most common cause is acute tonsillitis with involvement of the peritonsillar space. The newest group of patients at risk for deep neck space infections are intravenous drug abusers who inject the major vessels of the neck. Knowledge of neck spaces and fascial relationships is important in understanding the presentation, treatment, and complications of deep neck space infections. The spaces, which are created by various fasciae of the head and neck, are only potential spaces in that under normal conditions they cannot be examined clinically or radiographically. As the spaces are invaded by bacteria, a cellulitis or abscess occurs, and this infection may travel through paths of least resistance from one space to another.

  18. Transoral Endoscopic Head and Neck Surgery and Its Role Within the Multidisciplinary Treatment Paradigm of Oropharynx Cancer: Robotics, Lasers, and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Holsinger, F. Christopher; Ferris, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Transoral endoscopic head and neck surgery is a new approach for the treatment of oropharyngeal tumors. Using either a robotic system and/or laser, surgeons gain access through the mouth via minimally invasive technique and thus have improved visualization of the tumors of the oropharynx, without disfiguring incisions. This transoral route of access minimizes long-term speech and swallowing dysfunction. Surgeons view this approach as a considerable technologic advance, analogous to the evolution in radiation therapy from conventional two- and three-dimensional conformal techniques to intensity-modulated techniques. Although the use of radiation with or without chemotherapy to treat oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is supported by evidence from prospective clinical trials, there are no prospective data supporting the use of this new surgical approach for OPC. Here, we review the fundamentals of transoral endoscopic head and neck surgery, with robotics and laser technology, and discuss ongoing clinical trials for patients with OPC. PMID:26351337

  19. Transoral Endoscopic Head and Neck Surgery and Its Role Within the Multidisciplinary Treatment Paradigm of Oropharynx Cancer: Robotics, Lasers, and Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Holsinger, F Christopher; Ferris, Robert L

    2015-10-10

    Transoral endoscopic head and neck surgery is a new approach for the treatment of oropharyngeal tumors. Using either a robotic system and/or laser, surgeons gain access through the mouth via minimally invasive technique and thus have improved visualization of the tumors of the oropharynx, without disfiguring incisions. This transoral route of access minimizes long-term speech and swallowing dysfunction. Surgeons view this approach as a considerable technologic advance, analogous to the evolution in radiation therapy from conventional two- and three-dimensional conformal techniques to intensity-modulated techniques. Although the use of radiation with or without chemotherapy to treat oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is supported by evidence from prospective clinical trials, there are no prospective data supporting the use of this new surgical approach for OPC. Here, we review the fundamentals of transoral endoscopic head and neck surgery, with robotics and laser technology, and discuss ongoing clinical trials for patients with OPC.

  20. Ultrasound of the neck.

    PubMed

    Koischwitz, D; Gritzmann, N

    2000-09-01

    Sonography, when performed by an experienced examiner, can be used for evaluation of many pathologies in the head and neck area. Some benign neck lesions, such as cysts, lipomas, carotid body tumors, and hyperplastic lymph nodes, have typical sonomorphology. Sonography has an accuracy rate of about 90% in cervical lymph node staging and can delineate subclinical lymph node recurrences. It is the method of choice for evaluation of tumor infiltrations of the wall of the great vessels. Salivary gland tumors in the superficial lobe can be delineated completely by sonography. Salivary stones can be detected and localized. Carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth with T1 and T2 staging can be assessed by US. The use and contribution of color Doppler sonography for the assessment of pathologic entities in the neck is a method under clinical investigation. US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of lymph nodes and tumors of the salivary glands is easy to perform and is characterized by high sensitivity and specificity. To perform US examinations of the head and neck area of the highest quality the examiner should be familiar with the anatomy of the head and neck, be informed about the clinical problem, and have experience in the interpretation of abnormal US findings. US of the head and neck area is one of the most difficult sonographic examinations and should be performed by an experienced physician.

  1. Talar neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Berlet, G C; Lee, T H; Massa, E G

    2001-01-01

    Clinical management of talar neck fractures is complex and fraught with complications. As Gaius Julius Caesar stated: "The die is cast"; often the outcome of a talar neck fracture is determined at the time of injury. The authors believe, however, that better results can be achieved by following some simple guidelines. The authors advocate prompt and precise anatomic surgical reduction, preferring the medial approach with secondary anterolateral approach. Preservation of blood supply can be achieved by a thorough understanding of vascular pathways and efforts to stay within appropriate surgical intervals. The authors advocate bone grafting of medial neck comminution (if present) to prevent varus malalignment and rigid internal fixation to allow for joint mobilization postoperatively. These guidelines may seem simple, but when dealing with the complexity of talar neck fractures, the foot and ankle surgeon needs to focus and rely on easily grasped concepts to reduce poor outcomes. PMID:11465133

  2. SERIAL NECK ULTRASOUND IS MORE LIKELY TO IDENTIFY FALSE-POSITIVE ABNORMALITIES THAN CLINICALLY SIGNIFICANT DISEASE IN LOW-RISK PAPILLARY THYROID CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Samantha Peiling; Bach, Ariadne M.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Fish, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective American Thyroid Association (ATA) low-risk papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) patients without structural evidence of disease on initial posttreatment evaluation have a low risk of recurrence. Despite this, most patients undergo frequent surveillance neck ultrasound (US). The objective of the study was to evaluate the clinical utility of routine neck US in ATA low-risk PTC patients with no structural evidence of disease after their initial thyroid surgery. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 171 ATA low-risk PTC patients after total thyroidectomy, with or without radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation, who had a neck US without suspicious findings after therapy. The main outcome measure was a comparison of the frequency of finding false-positive US abnormalities and the frequency of identifying structural disease recurrence. Results Over a median follow-up of 8 years, 171 patients underwent a median of 5 neck US (range 2–17). Structural recurrence with low-volume disease (≤1 cm) was identified in 1.2% (2/171) of patients at a median of 2.8 years (range 1.6–4.1 years) after their initial diagnosis. Recurrence was associated with rising serum thyroglobulin (Tg) level in 1 of the 2 patients and was detected without signs of biochemical recurrence in the other patient. Conversely, false-positive US abnormalities were identified in 67% (114/171) of patients after therapy, leading to additional testing without identifying clinically significant disease. Conclusion In ATA low-risk patients without structural evidence of disease on initial surveillance evaluation, routine screening US is substantially more likely to identify false-positive results than clinically significant structural disease recurrence. PMID:26372300

  3. A computer-aided system for automatic extraction of femur neck trabecular bone architecture using isotropic volume construction from clinical hip computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Vivekanandhan, Sapthagirivasan; Subramaniam, Janarthanam; Mariamichael, Anburajan

    2016-10-01

    Hip fractures due to osteoporosis are increasing progressively across the globe. It is also difficult for those fractured patients to undergo dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans due to its complicated protocol and its associated cost. The utilisation of computed tomography for the fracture treatment has become common in the clinical practice. It would be helpful for orthopaedic clinicians, if they could get some additional information related to bone strength for better treatment planning. The aim of our study was to develop an automated system to segment the femoral neck region, extract the cortical and trabecular bone parameters, and assess the bone strength using an isotropic volume construction from clinical computed tomography images. The right hip computed tomography and right femur dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements were taken from 50 south-Indian females aged 30-80 years. Each computed tomography image volume was re-constructed to form isotropic volumes. An automated system by incorporating active contour models was used to segment the neck region. A minimum distance boundary method was applied to isolate the cortical and trabecular bone components. The trabecular bone was enhanced and segmented using trabecular enrichment approach. The cortical and trabecular bone features were extracted and statistically compared with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measured femur neck bone mineral density. The extracted bone measures demonstrated a significant correlation with neck bone mineral density (r > 0.7, p < 0.001). The inclusion of cortical measures, along with the trabecular measures extracted after isotropic volume construction and trabecular enrichment approach procedures, resulted in better estimation of bone strength. The findings suggest that the proposed system using the clinical computed tomography images scanned with low dose could eventually be helpful in osteoporosis diagnosis and its treatment planning.

  4. The development of a Patients Concerns Inventory (PCI) to help reveal patients concerns in the head and neck clinic.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S N; El-Sheikha, J; Lowe, D

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of the Patients Concerns Inventory (PCI) is to identify the concerns that patients would like to discuss during their consultation. The PCI covers a range of issues including hearing, intimacy, fatigue, financial/benefits, PEG tube, relationships, regret, support for family, and wound healing. It also lists MDT members that patients would like to see or be referred on to. The PCI is completed using a touch-screen computer (TST) immediately before consultation. Responses are networked into the consultation room. A 28 weeks pilot for one consultant ran from August 2007 with 123 (of maximum 150) patients. The median time to complete the TST was 8min. Patients most frequently selected fear of recurrence (37%), dental health/teeth (27%), chewing (24%), pain in head/neck (20%), fatigue/tiredness (19%), saliva (18%) and swallowing (18%). The two MDT members they wished to see were dentist (19%) and speech/language therapist (10%). The vast majority felt the PCI made a difference (quite a bit/very much) to their consultation as it made it 'a bit more personal', 'reminds them of the points they want discussed', 'allows the consultation to get straight to the point'. Although the PCI can raise many issues it did not noticeably prolong the consultation (median 8min with PCI, 7min without PCI). The Patients Concerns Inventory (PCI) helps focus the consultation onto patient needs and promotes multidisciplinary care. Following this very successful pilot the PCI is being rolled out to other consultants in the H & N clinic.

  5. Impact of HPV infection on the clinical outcome of p-CAIR trial in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Snietura, Miroslaw; Piglowski, Wojciech; Jaworska, Magdalena; Mucha-Malecka, Anna; Wozniak, Grzegorz; Lange, Dariusz; Suwinski, Rafal

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the influence of HPV infection on the outcome of a randomized clinical trial of conventional (CF) versus 7-days-a-week postoperative radiotherapy (p-CAIR) for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN). Between 2001 and 2004, 279 patients with high-risk SCC of the larynx or cancer of the oral cavity/oropharynx were randomized to receive 63 Gy in fractions of 1.8 Gy given 5 days a week or 7 days a week (Radiother Oncol 87:155-163, 2008). The presence of HPV DNA in 131 archival paraffin blocks was assessed with multiplex quantitative real-time PCR using five consensus primers for the conservative L1 region and molecular beacon probes targeting 14 high-risk HPV subtypes. Following the RT-PCR procedure, we could determine the presence and type of HPV16, HPV18 and the other 12 less frequent oncogenic subtypes. Out of 131 samples, 9 were positive for HPV infection (6.9%), all of them with HPV16 subtype. None of the 65 laryngeal tumours was HPV positive. The 5-year LRC in HPV-positive patients was 100%, compared to 58% in the HPV-negative group (p = 0.02, log-rank test). Amongst 122 patients with HPV-negative tumours, 5-year LRC was 50.3% in p-CF versus 65.2 in p-CAIR (p = 0.37). HPV infection was associated with low expression of EGFR and cyclin D. This study demonstrates a favourable outcome for HPV-positive patients with SCCHN treated with postoperative radiotherapy. While considering the small number of HPV+ tumours, the data set can be considered as hypothesis generating only, the outcome raises new questions on the necessity of aggressive postoperative treatment in HPV+ patients.

  6. Controlling distant metastasis and surgical treatment are crucial for improving clinical outcome in uncommon head and neck malignancies, such as non-squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    SHIIBA, MASASHI; UNOZAWA, MOTOHARU; HIGO, MORIHIRO; KOUZU, YUKINAO; KASAMATSU, ATSUSHI; SAKAMOTO, YOSUKE; OGAWARA, KATSUNORI; UZAWA, KATSUHIRO; TAKIGUCHI, YUICHI; TANZAWA, HIDEKI

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics of uncommon head and neck malignancies, such as non-squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), in order to improve patient outcomes. A total of 463 head and neck malignancies were retrospectively analyzed, with 43 cases (9.3%) diagnosed as non-SCC. The overall survival rate of patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma was significantly worse compared to that of patients with SCC. The 5-year survival rates were <50% for patients with malignant melanoma, adenocarcinoma, small-cell carcinoma and sarcomas. Distant metastasis to the lung was frequently observed in cases with a poor outcome. Non-SCC malignancies treated without surgery were associated with a worse outcome. Some non-SCC patients had a poor prognosis and distant metastasis was associated with an unsatisfactory outcome. Timely treatment and control of distant metastasis are essential and surgical treatment should be prioritized in non-SCC cases to improve patient outcomes. PMID:24940505

  7. Phototheranostic Porphyrin Nanoparticles Enable Visualization and Targeted Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in Clinically Relevant Models

    PubMed Central

    Muhanna, Nidal; Jin, Cheng S; Huynh, Elizabeth; Chan, Harley; Qiu, Yi; Jiang, Wenlei; Cui, Liyang; Burgess, Laura; Akens, Margarete K; Chen, Juan; Irish, Jonathan C; Zheng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is the fifth most common type of cancer worldwide and remains challenging for effective treatment due to the proximity to critical anatomical structures in the head and neck region, which increases the probability of toxicity from surgery and radiotherapy, and therefore emphasizes the importance of maximizing the targeted ablation. We have assessed the effectiveness of porphysome nanoparticles to enhance fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging of head and neck tumors in rabbit and hamster models. In addition, we evaluated the effectiveness of this agent for localized photothermal ablative therapy of head and neck tumors. We have demonstrated that porphysomes not only enabled fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging of buccal and tongue carcinomas, but also allowed for complete targeted ablation of these tumors. The supremacy of porphysome-enabled photothermal therapy over surgery to completely eradicate primary tumors and metastatic regional lymph node while sparing the adjacent critical structures' function has been demonstrated for the first time. This study represents a novel breakthrough that has the potential to revolutionize our approach to tumor diagnosis and treatment in head and neck cancer and beyond. PMID:26681987

  8. [Fiddler's neck].

    PubMed

    Knierim, C; Goertz, W; Reifenberger, J; Homey, B; Meller, S

    2013-10-01

    The fiddler's neck is an uncommon variant of acne mechanica in violinists and violists. It is a single firm red-brown dermal nodule usually on the left side of neck. This special form of acne mechanica represents a therapeutic challenge since the triggering mechanical factors persist, unless they can be corrected by changes in positioning or modifications of the chin pad. A 72-year-old woman who had played the violin since childhood presented with a red-brown nodule on her neck for 18 months. Cushioning provided no relief. Excision of the affected area with primary closure represented one therapeutic option. Further supportive measures include improved posture to reduce the pressure between skin and instrument and interposing a neck cloth. PMID:23989244

  9. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    A common cause of neck pain is muscle strain or tension. Most often, everyday activities are to blame. Such activities include: Bending over a desk for hours Having poor posture while watching TV or ...

  10. De-escalation of radiation dose for human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A case report and preclinical and clinical literature review

    PubMed Central

    WU, CHENG-CHIA; HOROWITZ, DAVID P.; DEUTSCH, ISRAEL; RAHMATI, RAHMATULLAH; SCHECTER, JORDAN M.; SAQI, ANJALI; WANG, TONY J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has been considered to be a relatively homogeneous disease. However, recent data have demonstrated that human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative disease are two different clinical entities associated with different outcomes. Preclinical and clinical studies have reported a divergence in treatment strategies as well as prognostic outcomes for HNSCCs that are HPV-positive versus HPV-negative. The present study describes the case of a 52-year-old man who presented with stage IVB cT2N3M0 right tonsillar HPV-positive squamous cell carcinoma. Induction chemotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (TPF), followed by chemoradiation therapy with carboplatin and 70 Gray (Gy) radiation in daily fractions was recommended. The patient completed the TPF and carboplatin treatment; however, he was unable to tolerate the radiation course, receiving a final dose of 46 Gy. A 60-day follow-up right neck salvage dissection was subsequently performed. Despite having received a partial radiation treatment of 46 Gy, the patient had no pathological evidence of disease at 60 days post radiation treatment. Repeat positron emission tomography-computed tomography at 32 months after the right neck dissection revealed no evidence of disease. The present study also discusses the current preclinical in vitro and in vivo targets for HPV-positive HNSCC and the obstacles presented in advancing clinical treatment modalities. Previous preclinical models investigating radiation sensitivity have yielded mixed results. Thus, it is important to understand and establish representative preclinical models for studying HPV and HNSCC to improve clinical research and therapeutic development. This review may guide future understanding of the role of HPV in HNSCC. PMID:26870181

  11. Sprain of the neck in clinically treated patients in The Netherlands: an inventory of different categories of car accidents.

    PubMed

    Versteegen, G J; Kingma, J; ten Duis, H J

    2001-06-01

    Different categories of car accidents of victims with sprain of the neck were investigated for both drivers and passengers. The predominant category of the car crash was a collision with another car for drivers as well as for passengers. The second cause was unknown. The distribution of the accidents was statistically significantly different for drivers and passengers.

  12. Survivors' Experiences of Dysphagia-Related Services Following Head and Neck Cancer: Implications for Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nund, Rebecca L.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Scarinci, Nerina A.; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is known that people with dysphagia experience a number of negative consequences as a result of their swallowing difficulties following head and neck cancer management (HNC). However their perceptions and experiences of adjusting to dysphagia in the post-treatment phase, and the services received to assist this process, has not been…

  13. Aspiration in head and neck cancer patients: a single centre experience of clinical profile, bacterial isolates and antibiotic sensitivity pattern.

    PubMed

    Lakshmaiah, K C; Sirsath, Nagesh T; Subramanyam, Jayshree R; Govind, Babu K; Lokanatha, D; Shenoy, Ashok M

    2013-07-01

    Most patients with head and neck cancer have dysphagia and are at increased risk of having aspiration and subsequent pneumonia. It can cause prolonged hospitalization, treatment delay and/or interruption and mortality in cancer patients. The treatment of these infections often relies on empirical antibiotics based on local microbiology and antibiotic sensitivity patterns. The aim of present study is to analyse respiratory tract pathogens isolated by sputum culture in head and neck cancer patients undergoing treatment at a tertiary cancer centre in South India who presented with features of aspiration. The study is carried out to establish empirical antibiotic policy for head and neck cancer patients who present with features of aspiration. This was a retrospective study. The study included sputum samples sent for culture and sensitivity from January 2011 to December 2012. Analysis of microbiologic species isolated in sputum specimen and the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of the bacterial isolates was performed. A detailed study of case files of all patients was done to find out which is the most common site prone for producing aspiration. There were 47 (31.54 %) gram positive isolates and 102 (68.45 %) gram negative isolates. The most common bacterial isolates were Klebsiella pneumoniae (25.50 %), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16.77 %) and Haemophilus influenzae (15.43 %). Levofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic with excellent activity against both gram positive and gram negative isolates. Most patients with aspiration had laryngeal cancer (34.89 %). Aspiration pneumonia was present in 14 (9.39 %) patients. Gram negative bacteria are common etiologic agents in head and neck cancer patients presenting with features of aspiration. Levofloxacin should be started as empirical antibiotic in these patients while awaiting sputum culture sensitivity report. As aspiration in head and neck cancer is an underreported event such institutional antibiotic sensitivity

  14. Preliminary results, methodological considerations and recruitment difficulties of a randomised clinical trial comparing two treatment regimens for patients with headache and neck pain

    PubMed Central

    De Hertogh, Willem; Vaes, Peter; Devroey, Dirk; Louis, Paul; Carpay, Hans; Truijen, Steven; Duquet, William; Oostendorp, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Background Headache is a highly prevalent disorder. Irrespective of the headache diagnosis it is often accompanied with neck pain and -stiffness. Due to this common combination of headache and neck pain, physical treatments of the cervical spine are often considered. The additional value of these treatments to standard medical care or usual care (UC) is insufficiently documented. We therefore wanted to compare the treatment effects of UC alone and in combination with manual therapy (MT) in patients with a combination of headache and neck pain. UC consisted of a stepped treatment approach according to the Dutch General Practitioners Guideline for headache, the additional MT consisted of articular mobilisations and low load exercises. Due to insufficient enrolment the study was terminated prematurely. We aim to report not only our preliminary clinical findings but also to discuss the encountered difficulties and to formulate recommendations for future research. Methods A randomised clinical trial was conducted. Thirty-seven patients were included and randomly allocated to one of both treatment groups. The treatment period was 6 weeks, with follow-up measurements at weeks 7, 12 and 26. Primary outcome measures were global perceived effect (GPE) and the impact of the headache using the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6). Reduction in headache frequency, pain intensity, medication intake, absenteeism and the use of additional professional help were secondary outcome measures Results Significant improvements on primary and secondary outcome measures were recorded in both treatment groups. No significant differences between both treatment groups were found. The number of recruited patients remained low despite various strategies. Conclusion It appears that both treatment strategies can have equivalent positive influences on headache complaints. Additional studies with larger study populations are needed to draw firm conclusions. Recommendations to increase patient inflow in

  15. Fully Automated Simultaneous Integrated Boosted-Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning Is Feasible for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Binbin; McNutt, Todd; Zahurak, Marianna; Simari, Patricio; Pang, Dalong; Taylor, Russell; Sanguineti, Giuseppe

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively determine whether overlap volume histogram (OVH)-driven, automated simultaneous integrated boosted (SIB)-intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning for head-and-neck cancer can be implemented in clinics. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was designed to compare fully automated plans (APs) created by an OVH-driven, automated planning application with clinical plans (CPs) created by dosimetrists in a 3-dose-level (70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy), head-and-neck SIB-IMRT planning. Because primary organ sparing (cord, brain, brainstem, mandible, and optic nerve/chiasm) always received the highest priority in clinical planning, the study aimed to show the noninferiority of APs with respect to PTV coverage and secondary organ sparing (parotid, brachial plexus, esophagus, larynx, inner ear, and oral mucosa). The sample size was determined a priori by a superiority hypothesis test that had 85% power to detect a 4% dose decrease in secondary organ sparing with a 2-sided alpha level of 0.05. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression model was used for statistical comparison. Results: Forty consecutive patients were accrued from July to December 2010. GEE analysis indicated that in APs, overall average dose to the secondary organs was reduced by 1.16 (95% CI = 0.09-2.33) with P=.04, overall average PTV coverage was increased by 0.26% (95% CI = 0.06-0.47) with P=.02 and overall average dose to the primary organs was reduced by 1.14 Gy (95% CI = 0.45-1.8) with P=.004. A physician determined that all APs could be delivered to patients, and APs were clinically superior in 27 of 40 cases. Conclusions: The application can be implemented in clinics as a fast, reliable, and consistent way of generating plans that need only minor adjustments to meet specific clinical needs.

  16. Evaluation of pain and function after two home exercise programs in a clinical trial on women with chronic neck pain - with special emphasises on completers and responders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Different types of exercises can help manage chronic neck pain. Supervised exercise interventions are widely used, but these protocols require substantial resources. The aim of this trial, which focused on adherence, was to evaluate two home exercise interventions. Methods This parallel group randomized controlled trial included 57 women randomly allocated into two groups – a strength training group (STRENGTH, 34 subjects) and a stretching group (STRETCH, 23 subjects). The interventions focused on the neck and shoulder muscles and lasted for 12 months. The STRENGTH group performed weight training and ended each session with stretching exercises. These stretching exercises constituted the entirety of the STRETCH group’s training session. Both groups were instructed to exercise three times per week. All the participants kept an exercise diary. In addition, all participants were offered support via phone and e-mail. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and function. The trial included a four- to six-month and a twelve-month follow-up. A completer in this study exercised at least 1,5 times per week during eight unbroken weeks. A responder in this study reported clinically significant improvements on pain and function. The statistical analyses used the Mann Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and X 2 test. Results At four- to six-months, the numbers of completers were 19 in the STRENGTH group and 17 in the STRETCH group. At twelve months, the corresponding numbers were 11 (STRENGTH) and 10 (STRETCH). At four- to six-months, the proportions of subjects reporting clinically important changes (STRENGTH and STRETCH) were for neck pain: 47% and 41%, shoulder pain: 47% and 47%, function: 37% and 29%. At twelve months, the corresponding numbers were for neck pain: 45% and 40%, shoulder pain: 55% and 50%, function: 55% and 20%. Conclusions No differences in the two primary outcomes between the two interventions were found, a finding that may be due to

  17. The Prognostic Value of Age, Sex, and Subsite in Cutaneous Head and Neck Melanoma: A Clinical Review of Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kadakia, Sameep; Chan, David; Mourad, Moustafa; Ducic, Yadranko

    2016-01-01

    Context Cutaneous head and neck melanoma is a challenging disease owing to its aggressive nature and often times advanced stage at presentation. Age, sex, and subsite are three prognostic indicators which can be determined prior to treatment or testing, and can allow the practitioner to counsel the patient before initiating therapy. Evidence Acquisition A PubMed search was conducted utilizing various terms relating to the subject matter. Articles over the past 25 years were analyzed and appropriately selected for review. Results It appears that patients older than 65 have a decreased overall 5 year survival compared to their younger counterparts. Male patients have poorer prognosis compared to female patients as noted by the decreased overall survival, decreased disease specific survival, and shorter time to distant metastasis. Scalp subsite was most uniformly accepted as having the worst prognosis in the head and neck, and may even serve as an independent prognostic indicator. Conclusions Advanced age, male sex, and scalp subsite all portend poor prognosis in patients with cutaneous head and neck melanoma. PMID:27703647

  18. Radiotherapeutic management and results of T1N0, T2N0 carcinoma of the oral tongue: Evaluation of boost techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.C. )

    1989-08-01

    This paper presents the total experience of radiation therapy of early carcinoma of the oral tongue at the Massachusetts General Hospital over a span of 25 years. External beam radiotherapy with various boost techniques were used including interstitial implant, and intra-oral cone (IOC) using kilovoltage (250 kV HVL 1.53 mm Cu) radiations or low megavoltage electron beam. We evaluated our results of boost techniques for treatment of patients with T1N0 and T2N0 lesions and determined the 5-year actuarial local control rates of these treatment methods. From 1960-1978, 49 patients were treated by implant and 20 by intra-oral cone kilovoltage radiation. From 1979-1985, 73 patients were treated by intra-oral cone electron beam with minimal follow-up of 2 years. The 5-year actuarial local control rates for T1N0 and T2N0 lesions showed 54% after implant, 50% after intra-oral cone kilovoltage, and 86% after intra-oral cone electron beam boost with a p value of 0.0001. For the T1N0 lesions, the corresponding rates were 77%, 62%, and 90%, and for T2N0 lesions the rates were 54%, 43%, and 85%, respectively. In the absence of a prospective randomized trial, direct comparison of various boost techniques is not possible due to selection factor for therapy, increased clinical and technical expertise, and improvement in equipment. Therefore, no definitive conclusions can be made regarding optimum boost therapy. The data presented herein suggest that intra-oral cone electron beam boost technique is superior to interstitial implant for boosting early carcinoma of the tongue.

  19. Experimental Verification of n=0 Structures for Visible Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesseur, Ernst Jan R.; Coenen, Toon; Caglayan, Humeyra; Engheta, Nader; Polman, Albert

    2013-01-01

    We fabricate and characterize a metal-dielectric nanostructure with an effective refractive index n=0 in the visible spectral range. Light is excited in the material at deep subwavelength resolution by a 30-keV electron beam. From the measured spatially and angle-resolved emission patterns, a vanishing phase advance, corresponding to an effective ɛ=0 and n=0, is directly observed at the cutoff frequency. The wavelength at which this condition is observed can be tuned over the entire visible or near-infrared spectral range by varying the waveguide width. This n=0 plasmonic nanostructure may serve as a new building block in nanoscale optical integrated circuits and to control spontaneous emission as experimentally demonstrated by the strongly enhanced radiative optical density of states over the entire n=0 structure.

  20. Clinical evaluation of BIOXTRA in relieving signs and symptoms of dry mouth after head and neck radiotherapy of cancer patients at Seyed-al-Shohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gookizadeh, Abbas; Emami, Hamid; Najafizadeh, Nadia; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy of head and neck cancers causes acute and chronic xerostomia and acute mucositis. Xerostomia increases risk of radiation caries and affects on oral comfort, fit of prostheses, speech, swallowing, and the growth of caries-producing organisms. Salivary flow rate can be measured by asking patients some questions. There are different types of commercial synthetic saliva such as BIOXTRA, but until now, no one can effectively relieve xerostomia. We tried to design a clinical research on BIOXTRA efficacy for treating xerostomia. Materials and Methods: In this research, 58 patients with head and neck cancer (except salivary gland cancers) treated in Seyed-al-Shohada Hospital. The patients received at least 40-50 GY; and after 2 months of compilation treatment, they were evaluated by asking about having xerostomia. Before and after treatment with the BIOXTRA, the PH of the oral cavity, candida albicans, and lactobacillus counts measured and documented in laboratory. We used BIOXTRA for 2 weeks, 3 times daily, and then re-evaluated patients with some questions. Results: The counts of candida albicans and lactobacilli statistically significant decreased. Conclusion: Xerostomia for most patients improved clinically during the day and night while PH of the oral cavity increased. PMID:23326802

  1. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better. No 7. Did you have a whiplash-type injury in the past, or do you have pain and/or stiffness every day in your neck, hands, knees, hips or other joints? Yes Your pain may be from DEGENERATIVE CERVICAL ARTHRITIS, a disorder that affects the bones and ...

  2. Effect of thoracic manipulation and deep craniocervical flexor training on pain, mobility, strength, and disability of the neck of patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwan-Woo; Kim, Won-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of thoracic manipulation and deep craniocervical flexor training on the muscle strength and endurance, range of motion, and the disability index of the neck of patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-six patients with chronic neck pain participated. They received an intervention for 35 minutes a day, three times a week for 10 weeks. Subjects were randomly assigned to one control and two experimental groups: group A (thoracic manipulation combined with deep craniocervical flexor training, n=16), group B (deep craniocervical flexor training, n=15), and group C (active self-exercise as a control group, n=15). Muscle strength and endurance, pain, neck disability index, and range of motion of the cervical and thoracic spine were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] Group A showed significant increases in muscle strength, endurance, and cervical and thoracic range of motion, and significant decreases in the pain and neck disability index, compared with groups B and C. [Conclusion] Although deep craniocervical flexor training is effective at improving neck function, thoracic manipulation combined with deep craniocervical flexor training was a more effective intervention for pain relief and improving the range of motion, muscle function, and neck disability of patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain. PMID:26957752

  3. Laser Doppler flowmetry: an early diagnosis instrument in detecting the soft tissue changes that occur during radiotherapy to the head and neck area, clinical case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, L. C.; Miron, M. I.; Ianes, E.

    2016-03-01

    Aim of the study: Our goal was to monitor soft tissue changes occurring during radiotherapy - both through clinical examination and using LDF - in order to establish Laser Doppler as an early diagnosis instrument in this situation, and also to assess what kind of dental procedures could be provided during radiotherapy, in order to increase patients' quality of life. Material and Method: Our study included two male patients, who received head and neck radiotherapy. Patient A, 68 years old, underwent 31 radiotherapy exposures. Patient B, 52 years old, underwent 24 exposures. They received a thorough clinical examination, and a LDF evaluation of gingival blood flow in areas close to the irradiated site, after the first, the 18th, and the last radiotherapy exposure. Results: Patient A presented radiotherapy induced mucositis, after the 18th radiotherapy exposure. After the last exposure the mucositis worsened, additionally, radiodermitis appeared on the neck. LDF showed an increase in blood flow of the irradiated area, even after the first exposure, and it persisted throughout treatment. Patient B showed no clinical changes, besides a hyperkeratinisation of the gingiva in the irradiated area, after the last exposure. LDF showed an overall increase in vascularity of the area throughout treatment. Discussion: Even after the first radiotherapy exposure, and also when clinical changes were not apparent, LDF measurements revealed an increase in blood flow in the gingiva of irradiated patients. LDF might allow us to establish the most appropriate moment in time for each dental treatment, in order to increase the quality of life.

  4. Clinical Practice Guidance for Radiotherapy Planning After Induction Chemotherapy in Locoregionally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Joseph K.; Haddad, Robert I.; Kies, Merril S.; Busse, Paul M.; Dong Lei; Brizel, David M.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Tishler, Roy B.; Trotti, Andy M.; Garden, Adam S.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: The use of induction chemotherapy (IC) for locoregionally advanced head-and-neck cancer is increasing. The response to IC often causes significant alterations in tumor volume and location and shifts in normal anatomy. Proper determination of the radiotherapy (RT) targets after IC becomes challenging, especially with the use of conformal and precision RT techniques. Therefore, a consensus conference was convened to discuss issues related to RT planning and coordination of care for patients receiving IC. Methods and Materials: Ten participants with special expertise in the various aspects of integration of IC and RT for the treatment of locoregionally advanced head-and-neck cancer, including radiation oncologists, medical oncologists, and a medical physicist, participated. The individual members were assigned topics for focused, didactic presentations. Discussion was encouraged after each presentation, and recommendations were formulated. Results: Recommendations and guidelines emerged that emphasize up-front evaluation by all members of the head-and-neck management team, high-quality baseline and postinduction planning scans with the patient in the treatment position, the use of preinduction target volumes, and the use of full-dose RT, even in the face of a complete response. Conclusion: A multidisciplinary approach is strongly encouraged. Although these recommendations were provided primarily for patients treated with IC, many of these same principles apply to concurrent chemoradiotherapy without IC. A rapid response during RT is quite common, requiring the development of two or more plans in a sizeable fraction of patients, and suggesting the need for similar guidance in the rapidly evolving area of adaptive RT.

  5. Clinical Experience With n-Butyl-2-Cyanoacrylate in Performing Lateral Neck Dissection for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeung Kyoo; Kim, Seok-Mo; Chang, Hojin; Kim, Bup Woo; Lee, Yong Sang; Lim, Chi Young; Chang, Hang-Seok; Park, Cheong Soo

    2016-10-01

    Background Chyle leakage following lateral neck dissection (LND) is rare, but can induce metabolic disturbances, delay wound healing, and prolong hospitalization. n-Butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) has been used to achieve hemostasis and seal tissues in several surgical settings. We here assessed whether application of NBCA to the thoracic duct area is effective in sealing chyle leakage. Methods The medical records of 163 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy with unilateral LND between March 2011 and September 2012 were reviewed. NBCA was applied to 84 patients and not applied to 79. Drainage volume, duration of hospital stay, and incidence of complications were compared between the 2 groups. Results The 2 groups were not different with regard to age, body weight, gender, primary tumor histology, and number of lateral neck nodes harvested. Mean hospital stay was significantly shorter (4.3 ± 1.8 vs 5.7 ± 3.0 days, P < .001), median total drainage volume was significantly smaller (270 mL; range: 97-931 mL vs 328 mL; range: 113-2636 mL; P < .001), and rate of chyle leakage was significantly lower (0% vs 6.3%, P = .025) in the NBCA than in the non-NBCA group. Conclusion NBCA application to the dissected area of the thoracic duct posterior to its angle of junction with the internal jugular and subclavian veins could be safe and effective in reducing surgical complications related to chyle leakage after LND.

  6. Is one better than another?: A randomized clinical trial of manual therapy for patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo Pérez, Honorio; Alonso Perez, Jose Luis; Gil Martinez, Alfonso; La Touche, Roy; Lerma-Lara, Sergio; Commeaux Gonzalez, Noelia; Arribas Perez, Hector; Bishop, Mark D; Fernández-Carnero, Josue

    2014-06-01

    Our purpose was to compare the effectiveness of three manual therapy techniques: high velocity, low amplitude (HVLA), mobilization (Mob) and sustained natural apophyseal glide (SNAG) in patients with chronic neck pain (CNP). The randomized controlled trial included patients with mechanically reproducible CNP, who were randomized to the treatment group. Outcome measures were the Visual Analogue scale (VAS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), Global Rating of Change (GROC) and Cervical Range of Motion (CROM). Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance compared outcomes at baseline, at the end of treatment and 1, 2 and 3 months after treatment. A total of 51 subjects completed the trial. No significant differences were found between HVLA, Mob and SNAG at the end of treatment and during the follow-up in any of the analysed outcomes. There were no differences in satisfaction for all techniques. The results lead to the conclusion that there is no long-term difference between the application of HVLA, Mob and SNAG in pain, disability and cervical range of motion for patients with CNP.

  7. Assessment of cobalt 57 tagged bleomycin as a clinical aid in staging of head and neck carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, C.W.; Larson, S.M.; Dobie, R.A.; Weymuller, E.A. Jr.; Rudd, T.G.; Merello, A.

    1981-04-01

    Critical assessment of head and neck cancer with respect to staging has, on occasion, been disappointingly ineffective. The incidence of measurable uptake of cobalt 57 tagged bleomycin by primary squamous cell carcinoma and metastatic cervical lymph nodes has been correlated. Forty-six cases have been evaluated with respect to histopathological confirmation of the suspected metastatic disease. We have found that this diagnostic measure increases our acumen in staging of head and neck cancer. The relevance of the Co-Bleo scans as a diagnostic aid is reported in 46 cases. Malignant tumors greater than 2 cm in size appear to demonstrate active uptake of the imaging agent. Small tumor size and excess background radioactivity contribute to the false-negatives (17%). Inflammatory conditions or benign tumors of the salivary apparatus may result in minimal uptake, thus, a false-positive result (10%). An increase in the radioactivity of the Co-Bleo may enhance the benefits of this procedure in the search for an undiagnosed primary, as well as undiagnosed local or distant metastases.

  8. Assessment of cobalt 57 tagged bleomycin as a clinical aid in staging of head and neck carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, C.W.; Larson, S.M.; Dobie, R.A.; Weymuller, E.A. Jr.; Rudd, T.G.; Merello, A.

    1981-04-01

    Critical assessment of head and neck cancer with respect to staging has, on occasion, been disappointingly ineffective. We have attempted to correlate the incidence of measureable uptake of cobalt 57 tagged bleomycin by primary squamous cell carcinoma and metastatic cervical lymph nodes. Forty-six cases have been evaluated with respect to histopathological confirmation of the suspected metastatic disease. We have found that this diagnostic measure increases our acumen in staging of head and neck cancer. The relevance of the Co-Bleo scans as a diagnostic aid is reported in 46 cases. Malignant tumors greater than 2 cm in size appear to demonstrate active uptake of the imaging agent. Small tumor size and excess background radioactivity contribute to the false-negatives (17%). Inflammatory conditions or benign tumors of the salivary apparatus may result in minimal uptake, thus, a false-positive result (10%). An increase in the radioactivity of the Co-Bleo may enhance the benefits of this procedure in the search for an undiagnosed primary, as well as undiagnosed local or distant metastases.

  9. Assessment of cobalt 57 tagged bleomycin as a clinical aid in staging of head and neck carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cummings, C W; Larson, S M; Dobie, R A; Weymuller, E A; Rudd, T G; Merello, A

    1981-04-01

    Critical assessment of head and neck cancer with respect to staging has, on occasion, been disappointingly ineffective. We have attempted to correlate the incidence of measureable uptake of cobalt 57 tagged bleomycin by primary squamous cell carcinoma and metastatic cervical lymph nodes. Forty-six cases have been evaluated with respect to histopathological confirmation of the suspected metastatic disease. We have found that this diagnostic measure increases our acumen in staging of head and neck cancer. The relevance of the Co-Bleo scans as a diagnostic aid is reported in 46 cases. Malignant tumors greater than 2 cm in size appear to demonstrate active uptake of the imaging agent. Small tumor size and excess background radioactivity contribute to the false-negatives (17%). Inflammatory conditions or benign tumors of the salivary apparatus may result in minimal uptake, thus, a false-positive result (10%). An increase in the radioactivity of the Co-Bleo may enhance the benefits of this procedure in the search for an undiagnosed primary, as well as undiagnosed local or distant metastases.

  10. Prediction of clinical toxicity in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients by radio-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is treated mainly by surgery and radiotherapy. Normal tissue toxicity due to x-ray exposure is a limiting factor for treatment success. Many efforts have been employed to develop predictive tests applied to clinical practice. Determination of lymphocyte radio-sensitivity by radio-induced apoptosis arises as a possible method to predict tissue toxicity due to radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to analyze radio-induced apoptosis of peripheral blood lymphocytes in head and neck cancer patients and to explore their role in predicting radiation induced toxicity. Seventy nine consecutive patients suffering from head and neck cancer, diagnosed and treated in our institution, were included in the study. Toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated and irradiated at 0, 1, 2 and 8 Gy during 24 hours. Apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide. Lymphocytes were marked with CD45 APC-conjugated monoclonal antibody. Radiation-induced apoptosis increased in order to radiation dose and fitted to a semi logarithmic model defined by two constants: α and β. α, as the origin of the curve in the Y axis determining the percentage of spontaneous cell death, and β, as the slope of the curve determining the percentage of cell death induced at a determined radiation dose, were obtained. β value was statistically associated to normal tissue toxicity in terms of severe xerostomia, as higher levels of apoptosis were observed in patients with low toxicity (p = 0.035; Exp(B) 0.224, I.C.95% (0.060-0.904)). These data agree with our previous results and suggest that it is possible to estimate the radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients determining the radiation induced apoptosis with annexin V/propidium iodide staining. β values observed define an individual radiosensitivity profile that could predict late toxicity due to radiotherapy

  11. Expression of TP53 mutation-associated microRNAs predicts clinical outcome in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Ganci, F.; Sacconi, A.; Bossel Ben-Moshe, N.; Manciocco, V.; Sperduti, I.; Strigari, L.; Covello, R.; Benevolo, M.; Pescarmona, E.; Domany, E.; Muti, P.; Strano, S.; Spriano, G.; Fontemaggi, G.; Blandino, G.

    2013-01-01

    Background TP53 mutation is associated with decreased survival rate in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. We set out to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) whose expression associates with TP53 mutation and survival in HNSCC. Patients and methods We analyzed TP53 status by direct sequencing of exons 2 through 11 of a prospective series of 121 HNSCC samples and assessed its association with outcome in 109 followed-up patients. We carried out miRNA expression profiling on 121 HNSCC samples and 66 normal counterparts. miRNA associations with TP53 mutations and outcome were evaluated. Results A TP53 mutation was present in 58% of the tumors and TP53 mutations were significantly associated with a shorter recurrence-free survival. This association was stronger in the clinical subgroup of patients subjected to adjuvant therapy after surgery. The expression of 49 miRNAs was significantly associated with TP53 status. Among these 49, we identified a group of 12 miRNAs whose expression correlates with recurrence-free survival and a group of 4 miRNAs that correlates with cancer-specific survival. The two groups share three miRNAs. Importantly, miRNAs that correlate with survival are independent prognostic factors either when considered individually or as signatures. Conclusions miRNAs expression associates with TP53 status and with reduced survival after surgical treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. PMID:24107801

  12. Prospective randomized clinical trial comparing hemiarthroplasty to total hip arthroplasty in the treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures: winner of the Dorr Award.

    PubMed

    Macaulay, William; Nellans, Kate W; Garvin, Kevin L; Iorio, Richard; Healy, William L; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2008-09-01

    The Displaced Femoral (neck fracture) Arthroplasty Consortium for Treatment and Outcomes study is a prospective, multicenter randomized clinical trial comparing hemiarthroplasty to total hip arthroplasty (THA) in the treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures in previously independent patients. Primary outcomes were measured at 6, 12, and 24 months with the Short Form-36 (SF-36), Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and the Harris Hip Score and the Timed "Up & Go" Test. Forty subjects were enrolled. At 24 months, THA patients had significantly less pain on the SF-36 subscale than hemiarthroplasty patients (54.8 +/- 7.9 vs 44.7 +/- 10.5, P = .04) and scored significantly better on the SF-36 mental health subscale (54.9 +/- 9.4 vs 40.9 +/- 10.3, P = .006). Total hip arthroplasty patients also had superior WOMAC function scores (81.8 +/- 10.2 vs 65.1 +/- 18.1, P = .03). Significant differences in outcomes, without a significantly greater incidence of complications, suggest THA is a valuable treatment option for the active elderly hip fracture population.

  13. Detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) in clinical samples: Evolving methods and strategies for the accurate determination of HPV status of head and neck carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Westra, William H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Much recent attention has highlighted a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) related to human papillomavirus (HPV) that has an epidemiologic, demographic, molecular and clinical profile which is distinct from non-HPV-related HNSCC. The clinical significance of detecting HPV in a HNSCC has resulted in a growing expectation for HPV testing of HNSCCs. Although the growing demand for routine testing is understandable and appropriate, it has impelled an undisciplined approach that has been largely unsystematic. The current state of the art has now arrived at a point where a better understanding of HPV-related tumorigenesis and a growing experience with HPV testing can now move wide scale, indiscriminant and non-standardized testing towards a more directed, clinically relevant and standardized approach. This review will address the current state of HPV detection; and will focus on why HPV testing is important, when HPV testing is appropriate, and how to test for the presence of HPV in various clinical samples. As no single test has been universally accepted as a best method, this review will consider the strengths and weaknesses of some of the more commonly used assays, and will emphasize some emerging techniques that may improve the efficiency of HPV testing of clinical samples including cytologic specimens. PMID:24932529

  14. SU-E-T-593: Clinical Evaluation of Direct Aperture Optimization in Head/Neck and Prostate IMRT Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hosini, M; GALAL, M; Emam, I; Kamal, G; Algohary, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the planning and dosimetric advantages of direct aperture optimization (DAO) over beam-let optimization in IMRT treatment of head and neck (H/N) and prostate cancers. Methods: Five Head and Neck as well as five prostate patients were planned using the beamlet optimizer in Elekta-Xio ver 4.6 IMRT treatment planning system. Based on our experience in beamlet IMRT optimization, PTVs in H/N plans were prescribed to 70 Gy delivered by 7 fields. While prostate PTVs were prescribed to 76 Gy with 9 fields. In all plans, fields were set to be equally spaced. All cases were re-planed using Direct Aperture optimizer in Prowess Panther ver 5.01 IMRT planning system at same configurations and dose constraints. Plans were evaluated according to ICRU criteria, number of segments, number of monitor units and planning time. Results: For H/N plans, the near maximum dose (D2) and the dose that covers 95% D95 of PTV has improved by 4% in DAO. For organs at risk (OAR), DAO reduced the volume covered by 30% (V30) in spinal cord, right parotid, and left parotid by 60%, 54%, and 53% respectively. This considerable dosimetric quality improvement achieved using 25% less planning time and lower number of segments and monitor units by 46% and 51% respectively. In DAO prostate plans, Both D2 and D95 for the PTV were improved by only 2%. The V30 of the right femur, left femur and bladder were improved by 35%, 15% and 3% respectively. On the contrary, the rectum V30 got even worse by 9%. However, number of monitor units, and number of segments decreased by 20% and 25% respectively. Moreover the planning time reduced significantly too. Conclusion: DAO introduces considerable advantages over the beamlet optimization in regards to organs at risk sparing. However, no significant improvement occurred in most studied PTVs.

  15. Paragangliomas of the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Woolen, Sean; Gemmete, Joseph J

    2016-05-01

    Paragangliomas of the head and neck are rare vascular skull-base tumors derived from the paraganglionic system with an estimated incidence of 1:30,000 accounting for 3% of all paragangliomas. The most common paraganglioma locations of the head and neck in descending order are the carotid body, jugular, tympanic, and vagal paragangliomas. This article discusses the clinical characterics, normal anatamy, imaging findings and protocols, pathology, staging, and differential diagnosis for paragangliomas of the head and neck. PMID:27154608

  16. Investigating Clinical Failure of Bone Grafting through a Window at the Femoral Head Neck Junction Surgery for the Treatment of Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Zhao, Dingyan; Gao, Fuqiang; Su, Yangming; Li, Zirong

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to analyze the clinical factors related to the failure of bone grafting through a window at the femoral head-neck junction. Methods In total, 119 patients (158 hips) underwent bone grafting for treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The patients were classified by their ARCO staging and CJFH classification. All patients were clinically and radiographically followed up every three months during the first year and every six months in the following year. The clinical follow-up comprised determination of pre- and postoperative Harris hip scores, while serial AP, frog lateral radiographs, and CT scan were used for the radiographic follow-up. Results The clinical failure of bone grafting was observed in 40 patients. The clinical failure rates in patients belonging to ARCO stage II period, IIIa, and III (b + c) were 25.9%, 16.2%, and 61.5%, respectively, while those in patients belonging to (C + M + L1) type and L2, L3 type disease groups were 1.7%, 38.9%, and 39%, respectively. The clinical failure rates in patients aged below 40 and those aged 40 and over were 20.5% and 39.0%, respectively (all P < 0.05). Conclusion Disease type, disease stage, and patient age are risk factors for failure of bone graft surgery. Patients belonging to ARCO stage II and IIIa showed a good overall response rate, while patients belonging to ARCO stage IIIb and IIIc and those with necrotic lesions involving the lateral pillar (L2 and L3 type) showed high surgical failure rates. PMID:27285821

  17. (18)F-FDG PET/CT quantification in head and neck squamous cell cancer: principles, technical issues and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Manca, Gianpiero; Vanzi, Eleonora; Rubello, Domenico; Giammarile, Francesco; Grassetto, Gaia; Wong, Ka Kit; Perkins, Alan C; Colletti, Patrick M; Volterrani, Duccio

    2016-07-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). The major clinical applications of this method include diagnosing an unknown primary tumour, identifying regional lymph node involvement and distant metastases, and providing prognostic information. (18)F-FDG PET/CT is also used for precise delineation of the tumour volume for radiation therapy planning and dose painting, and for treatment response monitoring, by detecting residual or recurrent disease. Most of these applications would benefit from a quantitative approach to the disease, but the quantitative capability of (18)F-FDG PET/CT is still underused in HNSCC. Innovations in PET/CT technology promise to overcome the issues that until now have hindered the employment of dynamic procedures in clinical practice and have limited "quantification" to the evaluation of standardized uptake values (SUV), de facto a semiquantitative parameter, the limits of which are well known to the nuclear medicine community. In this paper the principles of quantitative imaging and the related technical issues are reviewed so that professionals involved in HNSCC management can reflect on the advantages of "true" quantification. A discussion is then presented on how semiquantitative information is currently used in clinical (18)F-FDG PET/CT applications in HNSCC, by discussing the improvements that could be obtained with more advanced and "personalized" quantification techniques.

  18. Standardized manual palpation of myofascial trigger points in relation to neck/shoulder pain; the influence of clinical experience on inter-examiner reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, Corrie; Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Larsen, Anders H; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2011-04-01

    A diagnosis of Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) requires palpation for the identification of at least one clinically relevant trigger point (TP). However, few comparable, high quality studies currently exist from which to draw firm conclusions regarding the robustness of TP examination. An inter-observer agreement study was conducted using two experienced and two inexperienced clinicians. All performed standardized palpation of the upper Trapezius musculature, judging the clinical relevance of TP(s) using clinician global assessment (GA). A random case mix of 81 female participants was examined, 14 asymptomatic and the remainder suffering from neck/shoulder pain. Examiners received psychomotor skills training and video feedback analysis to improve protocol standardization. Kappa co-efficient calculations indicated good agreement between the experienced pairing (κ = 0.63), moderate agreement between the mixed pairings (κ = 0.35 and 0.47) and poor agreement between the inexperienced pairing (κ = 0.22). Inter-observer agreement was not stable with the experienced pairing exhibiting a sharp decline in agreement during the latter portion of the study. Identification of clinically relevant TPs of the upper Trapezius musculature is reproducible when performed by two experienced clinicians, however, a mixed observer pairing can yield acceptable agreement. A protracted period of data collection may be detrimental to inter-observer agreement; more investigation is needed in this regard.

  19. Skin Cancer of the Head and Neck with Perineural Invasion: Defining the Clinical Target Volumes Based on the Pattern of Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gluck, Iris; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Popovtzer, Aron; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Chepeha, Douglas B; Prince, Mark E; Moyer, Jeffrey S; Bradford, Carol R; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To analyze patterns of failure in patients with head and neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (HNCSCC) and clinical/radiological evidence of perineural invasion (CPNI), in order to define neural clinical target volume (CTV) for treatment planning. Methods Patients treated with 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for HNCSCC with CPNI were included in the study. A retrospective review of the clinical charts, radiotherapy (RT) plans and radiological studies has been conducted. Results Eleven consecutive patients with HNCSCCs with CPNI were treated from 2000 through 2007. Most patients received multiple surgical procedures and RT courses. The most prevalent failure pattern was along cranial nerves (CNs), and multiple CNs were ultimately involved in the majority of cases. In all cases the involved CNs at recurrence were the main nerves innervating the primary tumor sites, as well as their major communicating nerves. We have found several distinct patterns of disease spread along specific CNs depending on the skin regions harboring the primary tumors, including multiple branches of CN V and VII. These patterns and the pertinent anatomy are detailed in the paper. Conclusions Predictable disease spread patterns along cranial nerves supplying the primary tumor sites were found in this study. Awareness of these patterns, as well as knowledge of the relevant cranial nerve anatomy, should be the basis for CTV definition and delineation for RT treatment planning. PMID:18938044

  20. Skin Cancer of the Head and Neck With Perineural Invasion: Defining the Clinical Target Volumes Based on the Pattern of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Gluck, Iris; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Popovtzer, Aron; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Prince, Mark E.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Bradford, Carol R.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To analyze patterns of failure in patients with head-and-neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (HNCSCC) and clinical/radiologic evidence of perineural invasion (CPNI), in order to define neural clinical target volume (CTV) for treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for HNCSCC with CPNI were included in the study. A retrospective review of the clinical charts, radiotherapy (RT) plans and radiologic studies has been conducted. Results: Eleven consecutive patients with HNCSCCs with CPNI were treated from 2000 through 2007. Most patients underwent multiple surgical procedures and RT courses. The most prevalent failure pattern was along cranial nerves (CNs), and multiple CNs were ultimately involved in the majority of cases. In all cases the involved CNs at recurrence were the main nerves innervating the primary tumor sites, as well as their major communicating nerves. We have found several distinct patterns of disease spread along specific CNs depending on the skin regions harboring the primary tumors, including multiple branches of CN V and VII. These patterns and the pertinent anatomy are detailed in the this article. Conclusions: Predictable disease spread patterns along cranial nerves supplying the primary tumor sites were found in this study. Awareness of these patterns, as well as knowledge of the relevant cranial nerve anatomy, should be the basis for CTV definition and delineation for RT treatment planning.

  1. Antioxidant capacity of calendula officinalis flowers extract and prevention of radiation induced oropharyngeal mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers: a randomized controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Babaee, Neda; Moslemi, Dariush; Khalilpour, Mohammad; Vejdani, Fatemeh; Moghadamnia, Yasaman; Bijani, Ali; Baradaran, Mahmoud; Kazemi, Mohammad Taghi; Khalilpour, Asieh; Pouramir, Mahdi; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM) in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group). Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (200 cGy/fraction, five fractions weekly, 30-35 fractions within 4-7 weeks). The oropharyngeal mucositis was evaluated by two clinical investigators (a radiation oncologist and a dentist), using the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS). Trying to find out the possible mechanism of action of the treatment, total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents, and quercetin concentration of the mouth wash were measured. Calendula mouthwash significantly decreased the intensity of OM compared to placebo at week 2 (score: 5.5 vs. 6.8, p = 0.019), week 3 (score: 8.25 vs. 10.95, p < 0.0001) and week 6 (score: 11.4 vs. 13.35, p = 0.031). Total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents and quercetin concentration of the 2% extract were 2353.4 ± 56.5 μM, 313.40 ± 6.52 mg/g, 76.66 ± 23.24 mg/g, and 19.41 ± 4.34 mg/l, respectively. Calendula extract gel could be effective on decreasing the intensity of radiotherapy- induced OM during the treatment and antioxidant capacity may be partly responsible for the effect. PMID:23497687

  2. Antioxidant capacity of calendula officinalis flowers extract and prevention of radiation induced oropharyngeal mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers: a randomized controlled clinical study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM) in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group). Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (200 cGy/fraction, five fractions weekly, 30–35 fractions within 4–7 weeks). The oropharyngeal mucositis was evaluated by two clinical investigators (a radiation oncologist and a dentist), using the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS). Trying to find out the possible mechanism of action of the treatment, total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents, and quercetin concentration of the mouth wash were measured. Calendula mouthwash significantly decreased the intensity of OM compared to placebo at week 2 (score: 5.5 vs. 6.8, p = 0.019), week 3 (score: 8.25 vs. 10.95, p < 0.0001) and week 6 (score: 11.4 vs. 13.35, p = 0.031). Total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents and quercetin concentration of the 2% extract were 2353.4 ± 56.5 μM, 313.40 ± 6.52 mg/g, 76.66 ± 23.24 mg/g, and 19.41 ± 4.34 mg/l, respectively. Calendula extract gel could be effective on decreasing the intensity of radiotherapy- induced OM during the treatment and antioxidant capacity may be partly responsible for the effect. PMID:23497687

  3. Treatment of Femoral Neck Fracture with a Minimal Invasive Surgical Approach for Hemiarthroplasty – Clinical and Radiological Results in 180 Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Unger, A.C; Dirksen, B; Renken, F. G; Wilde, E; Willkomm, M; Schulz, A.P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : The Direct Anterior Approach (DAA) is well established as a minimal access approach in elective orthopaedic hip surgery. For the growing number of elderly patients with femoral neck fractures treated with Bipolar Hip Hemiarthroplasty (BHH), only a few results do exist. The study shows the clinical and radiological outcome for 180 patients treated by a modified DAA with BHH. Materials and Methods : The data of 180 geriatric patients with medial femoral neck fractures were evaluated retrospectively. The general and surgical complications, mobilisation using the Timed Up and Go test (TUG), the social environment pre- and postoperative and the radiological results have been compared with established approaches for geriatric hip surgery. Results : After joint replacement, 18 (10%) patients were developed pneumonia, of which 3 (1.7%) died during hospitalisation. In 7 cases (4%), surgical revision had to be carried out: three times (1.7%) because of a seroma, three times (1.7%) because of subcutaneous infection, and one time (0.6%) because the BHH was removed, owing to deep wound infection. One dislocation (0.6%) occurred, as well as one femoral nerve lesion (0.6%) occured. 88.3% of patients were mobilised on walkers or crutches; the Timed Up and Go Test showed a significant improvement during inpatient rehabilitation. 83% were discharged to their usual social environment, 10% were transferred to a short-term care facility and 7% were relocated permanently to a nursing home. 3/4 of patients had a cemented stem alignment in the range between -5° and 5°, while 2/3 of patients had a maximum difference of 1 cm in leg length. Conclusion : Using the modified DAA, a high patient satisfaction is achieved after implantation of a BHH. The rate of major complications is just as low as in conventional approaches, and rapid mobilisation is possible. PMID:25136389

  4. Antioxidant capacity of calendula officinalis flowers extract and prevention of radiation induced oropharyngeal mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers: a randomized controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Babaee, Neda; Moslemi, Dariush; Khalilpour, Mohammad; Vejdani, Fatemeh; Moghadamnia, Yasaman; Bijani, Ali; Baradaran, Mahmoud; Kazemi, Mohammad Taghi; Khalilpour, Asieh; Pouramir, Mahdi; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM) in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group). Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (200 cGy/fraction, five fractions weekly, 30-35 fractions within 4-7 weeks). The oropharyngeal mucositis was evaluated by two clinical investigators (a radiation oncologist and a dentist), using the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS). Trying to find out the possible mechanism of action of the treatment, total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents, and quercetin concentration of the mouth wash were measured. Calendula mouthwash significantly decreased the intensity of OM compared to placebo at week 2 (score: 5.5 vs. 6.8, p = 0.019), week 3 (score: 8.25 vs. 10.95, p < 0.0001) and week 6 (score: 11.4 vs. 13.35, p = 0.031). Total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents and quercetin concentration of the 2% extract were 2353.4 ± 56.5 μM, 313.40 ± 6.52 mg/g, 76.66 ± 23.24 mg/g, and 19.41 ± 4.34 mg/l, respectively. Calendula extract gel could be effective on decreasing the intensity of radiotherapy- induced OM during the treatment and antioxidant capacity may be partly responsible for the effect.

  5. Suitability of the Patient Concerns Inventory as a holistic screening tool in routine head and neck cancer follow-up clinics.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S N; Lowe, D; Kanatas, A

    2016-05-01

    In patients with cancer of the head and neck, efficient screening for problems can improve care and the management of resources. We explored use of the Patient Concerns Inventory (PCI-HN) as a holistic screening tool in the follow up of these patients. Between August 2007 and January 2013, 464 patients completed the PCI-HN and the University of Washington Quality of Life questionnaire version 4 (UWQoL) immediately before their routine follow-up consultations. The median (IQR) number of items selected on the inventory was 3 (1-6). This was associated (p<0.001) with the number of serious problems (dysfunction) in the 12 UWQoL domains (Spearman's correlation, rs=0.51), overall QoL (rs=-0.41), and the 2 UWQoL subscale scores of physical (rs=-0.46) and social-emotional (rs=-0.53) function. Binary regression to predict an overall outcome of "less than good" indicated that use of the PCI could be better than just recording clinical characteristics. Some patients however, chose few PCI items and had numerous problems. The inventory may have a role in the screening of patients with cancer of the head and neck, particularly in relation to social-emotional function and overall QoL, and may have added value when used with the UWQoL-v4. The total number of PCI items selected is a useful predictor of QoL. Further research is required to confirm suitable limits, and to find out whether additional support and repeated use of the inventory over time improve QoL.

  6. Clinical Usefulness of [(18)F]Fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Uptake in 178 Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients With Nodal Metastasis Treated With Definitive Chemoradiotherapy: Consideration of Its Prognostic Value and Ability to Provide Guidance for Optimal Selection of Patients for Planned Neck Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuchi, Haruo; Kodaira, Takeshi; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Tomita, Natsuo; Nakahara, Rie; Takada, Akinori; Mizoguchi, Nobutaka; Tamaki, Tsuneo; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of pretreatment [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma patients with nodal metastasis treated with chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2002 and December 2006, 178 patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma and nodal metastasis underwent fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography before chemoradiotherapy. Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake by both the primary lesion and the neck node was measured using the standard uptake value (SUV). The overall survival, disease-free survival, local control, nodal progression-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were calculated, and several prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: The patients with a nodal SUV {>=}6.00 had a significantly lower 3-year disease-free survival rate than those with a lower SUV (44% vs. 69%, p = .004). On multivariate analysis, a high SUV of nodal disease also proved to be a significantly unfavorable factor for disease-free survival (p = .04, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-3.23), nodal progression-free survival (p = .05; 95% CI, 1.00-4.15), and distant metastasis-free survival (p = .016; 95% CI, 1.25-8.92). Among the patients with a greater nodal SUV ({>=}6.00), those treated with planned neck dissection had better nodal progression-free survival than those in the observation group (p = .04, hazard ratio, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.00-5.85). Conclusion: Among head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with chemoradiotherapy, the pretreatment SUV of nodal disease was one of the strongest prognostic factors and also provided important information for the selection of patients suitable for planned neck dissection.

  7. Clinical significance of Anoctamin-1 gene at 11q13 in the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Juan P.; Menéndez, Sofía Tirados; Hermida-Prado, Francisco; Álvarez-Teijeiro, Saúl; Villaronga, M. Ángeles; Alonso-Durán, Laura; Vallina, Aitana; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Astudillo, Aurora; Suárez, Carlos; María García-Pedrero, Juana

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the clinical significance of Anoctamin-1 gene mapping at 11q13 amplicon in both the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). ANO1 protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 372 surgically treated HNSCC patients and also in 35 laryngeal precancerous lesions. ANO1 gene amplification was determined by real-time PCR in all the laryngeal premalignancies and 60 of the HNSCCs, and molecular data correlated with clinical outcome. ANO1 gene amplification was frequently detected in both premalignant lesions (63%) and HNSCC tumours (58%), whereas concomitant ANO1 expression occurred at a much lower frequency (20 and 22%). Interestingly, laryngeal dysplasias harbouring ANO1 gene amplification showed a higher risk of malignant transformation (HR = 3.62; 95% CI 0.79–16.57; P = 0.097; Cox regression). ANO1 expression and gene amplification showed no significant associations with clinicopathological parameters in HNSCC. However, remarkably ANO1 expression differentially influenced patient survival depending on the tumour site. Collectively, this study provides original evidence demonstrating the distinctive impact of ANO1 expression on HNSCC prognosis depending on the tumour site. PMID:26498851

  8. Integrating Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Assay With Clinical Parameters Improves Risk Classification for Relapse and Survival in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Christine H.; Hammond, Elizabeth M.; Trotti, Andy M.; Wang Huijun; Spencer, Sharon; Zhang Huazhong; Cooper, Jay; Jordan, Richard; Rotman, Marvin H.; Ang, K. Kian

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression has been consistently found to be an independent predictor of local-regional relapse (LRR) after radiotherapy. We assessed the extent by which it can refine risk classification for overall survival (OS) and LRR in patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: EGFR expression in locally advanced HNSCC was measured by immunohistochemistry in a series of patients randomized to receive accelerated or conventional radiation regimens in a Phase III trial. Subsequently, data of the two series were pooled (N = 533) for conducting a recursive partitioning analysis that incorporated clinical parameters (e.g., performance status, primary site, T and N categories) and four molecular markers (EGFR, p53, Ki-67, and microvessel density). Results: This study confirmed that patients with higher than median levels of tumor EGFR expression had a lower OS (relative risk [RR]: 1.90, p = 0.0010) and a higher LRR (RR: 1.91, p = 0.0163). Of the four markers analyzed, only EGFR was found to contribute to refining classification of patients into three risk classes with distinct OS and LRR outcomes. The addition of EGFR to three clinical parameters could identify patients having up to a fivefold difference in the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Adding pretreatment EGFR expression data to known robust clinical prognostic variables improved the estimation of the probability for OS and LRR after radiotherapy. Its use for stratifying or selecting patients with defined tumor feature and pattern of relapse for enrollment into clinical trials testing specific therapeutic strategy warrants further investigation.

  9. Japanese Board Certification System for head and neck surgeons.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Seiichi; Nakashima, Torahiko; Fujii, Takashi; Matsuura, Kazuto; Otsuki, Naoki; Asakage, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Hanai, Nobuhiro; Homma, Akihiro; Monden, Nobuya; Okami, Kenji; Sugasawa, Masashi; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Nibu, Ken-ichi; Kamata, Shin-etsu; Kishimoto, Seiji; Kohno, Naoyuki; Fukuda, Satoshi; Hisa, Yasuo

    2014-08-01

    The Japan Society for Head and Neck Surgery (JSHNS) started a board certification system for head and neck surgeons in 2010. To become certified, the following qualification and experiences are required: (1) board certification as otorhinolaryngologist, (2) 2 years of clinical experience in a board-certified training facility, (3) clinical care of 100 patients with head and neck cancer under the supervision of board-certified faculty and (4) surgical experience in 50 major head and neck surgical procedures, including 20 neck dissections, under the supervision of board-certified faculty. The following scientific activities are also required during the preceding 5 years: (1) two clinical papers on head and neck cancers presented at major scientific meetings, (2) one clinical paper on head and neck cancer published in a major journal, (3) attendance at two annual meetings of JSHNS and (4) enrolment in three educational programs approved by JSHNS. The qualifying examination consists of multiple choice tests and oral examinations. A total of 151 head and neck surgeons were certified in 2010 followed by 43 in 2011 and 34 in 2012, while the membership of JSHNS dramatically increased from 1201 in 2007 to 1748 in 2013. Although the board certification system for head and neck surgeons was started only recently, it has encouraged many residents and fellows as well as established head and neck surgeons. We believe that this system will contribute to further advancement in the clinical practice for head and neck cancers in Japan.

  10. Exclusive low-dose-rate brachytherapy in 279 patients with T2N0 mobile tongue carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgier, Celine; Coche-Dequeant, Bernard; Fournier, Charles; Castelain, Bernard; Prevost, Bernard; Lefebvre, Jean-Louis; Lartigau, Eric . E-mail: e-lartigau@o-lambret.fr

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic results obtained with {sup 192}Ir low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in T2N0 mobile tongue carcinoma. Patients and Methods: Between December 1979 and January 1998, 279 patients with T2N0 mobile tongue carcinoma were treated by exclusive low-dose-rate brachytherapy, with or without neck dissection. {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy was performed according to the 'Paris system' with a median total dose of 60 Gy (median dose rate, 0.5 Gy/h). Results: Overall survival was 74.3% and 46.6% at 2 and 5 years. Local control was 79.1% at 2 years and regional control, respectively, 75.9% and 69.5% at 2 and 5 years (Kaplan-Meier method). Systematic dissection revealed 44.6% occult node metastases, and histologic lymph node involvement was identified as the main significant factor for survival. Complication rate was 16.5% (Grade 3, 2.9%). Half of the patients presented previous and/or successive malignant tumor (ear-nose-throat, esophagus, or bronchus). Conclusion: Exclusive low-dose-rate brachytherapy is an effective treatment for T2 tongue carcinoma. Regional control and survival are excellent in patients undergoing systematic neck dissection, which is mandatory in our experience because of a high rate of occult lymph node metastases.

  11. DICOM for quantitative imaging biomarker development: a standards based approach to sharing clinical data and structured PET/CT analysis results in head and neck cancer research.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Andriy; Clunie, David; Ulrich, Ethan; Bauer, Christian; Wahle, Andreas; Brown, Bartley; Onken, Michael; Riesmeier, Jörg; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron; Buatti, John; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Imaging biomarkers hold tremendous promise for precision medicine clinical applications. Development of such biomarkers relies heavily on image post-processing tools for automated image quantitation. Their deployment in the context of clinical research necessitates interoperability with the clinical systems. Comparison with the established outcomes and evaluation tasks motivate integration of the clinical and imaging data, and the use of standardized approaches to support annotation and sharing of the analysis results and semantics. We developed the methodology and tools to support these tasks in Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography (PET/CT) quantitative imaging (QI) biomarker development applied to head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment response assessment, using the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM(®)) international standard and free open-source software. Methods. Quantitative analysis of PET/CT imaging data collected on patients undergoing treatment for HNC was conducted. Processing steps included Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) normalization of the images, segmentation of the tumor using manual and semi-automatic approaches, automatic segmentation of the reference regions, and extraction of the volumetric segmentation-based measurements. Suitable components of the DICOM standard were identified to model the various types of data produced by the analysis. A developer toolkit of conversion routines and an Application Programming Interface (API) were contributed and applied to create a standards-based representation of the data. Results. DICOM Real World Value Mapping, Segmentation and Structured Reporting objects were utilized for standards-compliant representation of the PET/CT QI analysis results and relevant clinical data. A number of correction proposals to the standard were developed. The open-source DICOM toolkit (DCMTK) was improved to simplify the task of DICOM encoding by introducing new API abstractions

  12. DICOM for quantitative imaging biomarker development: a standards based approach to sharing clinical data and structured PET/CT analysis results in head and neck cancer research.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Andriy; Clunie, David; Ulrich, Ethan; Bauer, Christian; Wahle, Andreas; Brown, Bartley; Onken, Michael; Riesmeier, Jörg; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron; Buatti, John; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Imaging biomarkers hold tremendous promise for precision medicine clinical applications. Development of such biomarkers relies heavily on image post-processing tools for automated image quantitation. Their deployment in the context of clinical research necessitates interoperability with the clinical systems. Comparison with the established outcomes and evaluation tasks motivate integration of the clinical and imaging data, and the use of standardized approaches to support annotation and sharing of the analysis results and semantics. We developed the methodology and tools to support these tasks in Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography (PET/CT) quantitative imaging (QI) biomarker development applied to head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment response assessment, using the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM(®)) international standard and free open-source software. Methods. Quantitative analysis of PET/CT imaging data collected on patients undergoing treatment for HNC was conducted. Processing steps included Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) normalization of the images, segmentation of the tumor using manual and semi-automatic approaches, automatic segmentation of the reference regions, and extraction of the volumetric segmentation-based measurements. Suitable components of the DICOM standard were identified to model the various types of data produced by the analysis. A developer toolkit of conversion routines and an Application Programming Interface (API) were contributed and applied to create a standards-based representation of the data. Results. DICOM Real World Value Mapping, Segmentation and Structured Reporting objects were utilized for standards-compliant representation of the PET/CT QI analysis results and relevant clinical data. A number of correction proposals to the standard were developed. The open-source DICOM toolkit (DCMTK) was improved to simplify the task of DICOM encoding by introducing new API abstractions

  13. DICOM for quantitative imaging biomarker development: a standards based approach to sharing clinical data and structured PET/CT analysis results in head and neck cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Clunie, David; Ulrich, Ethan; Bauer, Christian; Wahle, Andreas; Brown, Bartley; Onken, Michael; Riesmeier, Jörg; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron; Buatti, John; Beichel, Reinhard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Imaging biomarkers hold tremendous promise for precision medicine clinical applications. Development of such biomarkers relies heavily on image post-processing tools for automated image quantitation. Their deployment in the context of clinical research necessitates interoperability with the clinical systems. Comparison with the established outcomes and evaluation tasks motivate integration of the clinical and imaging data, and the use of standardized approaches to support annotation and sharing of the analysis results and semantics. We developed the methodology and tools to support these tasks in Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography (PET/CT) quantitative imaging (QI) biomarker development applied to head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment response assessment, using the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM®) international standard and free open-source software. Methods. Quantitative analysis of PET/CT imaging data collected on patients undergoing treatment for HNC was conducted. Processing steps included Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) normalization of the images, segmentation of the tumor using manual and semi-automatic approaches, automatic segmentation of the reference regions, and extraction of the volumetric segmentation-based measurements. Suitable components of the DICOM standard were identified to model the various types of data produced by the analysis. A developer toolkit of conversion routines and an Application Programming Interface (API) were contributed and applied to create a standards-based representation of the data. Results. DICOM Real World Value Mapping, Segmentation and Structured Reporting objects were utilized for standards-compliant representation of the PET/CT QI analysis results and relevant clinical data. A number of correction proposals to the standard were developed. The open-source DICOM toolkit (DCMTK) was improved to simplify the task of DICOM encoding by introducing new API abstractions

  14. Clinical and radiological results after implantation of the femoral neck preserving Delfi M hip prosthesis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Budde, Stefan; Windhagen, Henning; Lerch, Matthias; Broese, Maximilian; Götze, Patricc; Thorey, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Various types of bone preserving total hip prostheses with a proximal force transmission concept have been developed for younger adults, one of these being the implant "Delfi M®", produced by ESKA until 2009. Since the demand could not meet the expectations, the production was stopped due to economic reasons so that only 31 implants of this type were sold and even less actually implanted. This study followed up 15 Delfi M® prostheses in 12 patients for 3.1 years and represents the only existing valid data about this implant.Demographical, preoperative and postoperative data including clinical scores (HOOS and mHHS) were collected retrospectively. Postoperative X-rays were analyzed by an independent radiologist. One implant had to be exchanged due to an infection and another one due to excessive implant migration. The mHHS and the HOOS scores showed a significant improvement after surgery. In the radiological analysis, there were no signs of radiolucent lines or osteolyses.This trial demonstrates good clinical and radiological midterm results for the Delfi M prosthesis. Limitations of this study are a small sample size and a follow-up time of 3 years at only one timepoint.

  15. High RAB25 expression is associated with good clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Gabriel, Marta; Arroyo-Solera, Irene; León, Xavier; Gallardo, Alberto; López, Montserrat; Céspedes, Maria V; Casanova, Isolda; López-Pousa, Antonio; Quer, Miquel; Mangues, Maria A; Barnadas, Agustí; Mangues, Ramón; Pavón, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Currently there are no molecular markers able to predict clinical outcome in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In a previous microarray study, RAB25 was identified as a potential prognostic marker. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between RAB25 expression and clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced HNSCC treated with standard therapy. In a retrospective immunohistochemical study (n = 97), we observed that RAB25-negative tumors had lower survival (log-rank, P = 0.01) than patients bearing positive tumors. In an independent prospective mRNA study (n = 117), low RAB25 mRNA expression was associated with poor prognosis. Using classification and regression tree analysis (CART) we established two groups of patients according to their RAB25 mRNA level and their risk of death. Low mRNA level was associated with poor local recurrence-free (log-rank, P = 0.005), progression-free (log-rank, P = 0.002) and cancer-specific (log-rank, P < 0.001) survival. Multivariate Cox model analysis showed that low expression of RAB25 was an independent poor prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio: 3.84, 95% confidence interval: 1.93–7.62, P < 0.001). Patients whose tumors showed high RAB25 expression had a low probability of death after treatment. We also found lower RAB25 expression in tumors than in normal tissue (Mann–Whitney U, P < 0.001). Moreover, overexpression of RAB25 in the UM-SCC-74B HNSCC cell line increased cisplatin sensitivity, and reduced cell migration and invasion. Our findings support a tumor suppressor role for RAB25 in HNSCC and its potential use to identify locally advanced patients with a high probability of survival after genotoxic treatment. PMID:24403269

  16. High RAB25 expression is associated with good clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Téllez-Gabriel, Marta; Arroyo-Solera, Irene; León, Xavier; Gallardo, Alberto; López, Montserrat; Céspedes, Maria V; Casanova, Isolda; López-Pousa, Antonio; Quer, Miquel; Mangues, Maria A; Barnadas, Agustí; Mangues, Ramón; Pavón, Miguel A

    2013-12-01

    Currently there are no molecular markers able to predict clinical outcome in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In a previous microarray study, RAB25 was identified as a potential prognostic marker. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between RAB25 expression and clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced HNSCC treated with standard therapy. In a retrospective immunohistochemical study (n = 97), we observed that RAB25-negative tumors had lower survival (log-rank, P = 0.01) than patients bearing positive tumors. In an independent prospective mRNA study (n = 117), low RAB25 mRNA expression was associated with poor prognosis. Using classification and regression tree analysis (CART) we established two groups of patients according to their RAB25 mRNA level and their risk of death. Low mRNA level was associated with poor local recurrence-free (log-rank, P = 0.005), progression-free (log-rank, P = 0.002) and cancer-specific (log-rank, P < 0.001) survival. Multivariate Cox model analysis showed that low expression of RAB25 was an independent poor prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio: 3.84, 95% confidence interval: 1.93-7.62, P < 0.001). Patients whose tumors showed high RAB25 expression had a low probability of death after treatment. We also found lower RAB25 expression in tumors than in normal tissue (Mann-Whitney U, P < 0.001). Moreover, overexpression of RAB25 in the UM-SCC-74B HNSCC cell line increased cisplatin sensitivity, and reduced cell migration and invasion. Our findings support a tumor suppressor role for RAB25 in HNSCC and its potential use to identify locally advanced patients with a high probability of survival after genotoxic treatment. PMID:24403269

  17. Alternative treatments for neck sprain.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Kerstin; Morton, Rosemary

    2003-01-01

    A short cut review was carried out to establish whether osteopathy or chiropractic treatments improve outcome in patients with neck sprain. Altogether 206 papers were found using the reported search, of which nine presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these best papers are tabulated. A clinical bottom line is stated

  18. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting

    SciTech Connect

    Kumarasiri, Akila Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Kim, Jinkoo

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm{sup 3}. Organs with volumes <3 cm{sup 3} and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm{sup 3}), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours

  19. Hereditary and environmental risk factors; clinical and laboratory risk matters for head and neck, especially oral, cancer and precancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, N W; Warnakulasuriy, S; Tavassoli, M

    1996-02-01

    The continuing high incidence and mortality of squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract in South Asia, parts of France and central Europe, together with a rising incidence and mortality from a lower base elsewhere in the Western world, stimulates continuing research on risk factors and risk markers. Tobaccos (smoked and smokeless), heavy alcohol consumption, and areca nut remain the dominant risk factors, with confirmation of the protective effects of diets rich in antioxidants. There is emerging evidence of a small, but real, risk associated with occupational and other air pollution, and with family, part of which may be hereditary. Markers in peripheral blood and saliva are underexploited. Clinical staging and histological grading methods continue to be refined, with improved prognostic value, much aided by newer and simpler methods for estimating cell proliferation and apoptosis. Data on the significance of viral genes are still inadequate, but there is good progress describing the epidemiology of chromosomal abnormalities and abberations of a growing list of oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. Unfortunately, as yet, these have only limited longitudinal or prognostic data.

  20. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  1. Fenestrated internal jugular vein: a rare finding in neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Sánchez, M; Hernández Vila, C; González-García, R; Monje, F

    2015-09-01

    Fenestration of the internal jugular vein (IJV) is an extremely rare phenomenon. An 85-year-old woman was referred to our department with T2N0M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the right floor of the mouth. The patient underwent local resection, an ipsilateral modified type 3 radical neck dissection, and microsurgical reconstruction. During neck dissection, a fenestration was observed in the middle of the IJV. No structure passed through the fenestration. Such anatomical variations are rare, but clinicians and surgeons should be aware of them in order to avoid damage to the important vascular structures, especially if a neck dissection is performed.

  2. Neck Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... too long. Sometimes you can strain your neck muscles from sleeping in an awkward position or overdoing it during exercise. Falls or accidents, including car accidents, are another common cause of neck pain. ...

  3. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  4. Effects of tailored neck-shoulder pain treatment based on a decision model guided by clinical assessments and standardized functional tests. A study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A major problem with rehabilitation interventions for neck pain is that the condition may have multiple causes, thus a single treatment approach is seldom efficient. The present study protocol outlines a single blinded randomised controlled trial evaluating the effect of tailored treatment for neck-shoulder pain. The treatment is based on a decision model guided by standardized clinical assessment and functional tests with cut-off values. Our main hypothesis is that the tailored treatment has better short, intermediate and long-term effects than either non-tailored treatment or treatment-as-usual (TAU) on pain and function. We sub-sequentially hypothesize that tailored and non-tailored treatment both have better effect than TAU. Methods/Design 120 working women with minimum six weeks of nonspecific neck-shoulder pain aged 20–65, are allocated by minimisation with the factors age, duration of pain, pain intensity and disability in to the groups tailored treatment (T), non-tailored treatment (NT) or treatment-as-usual (TAU). Treatment is given to the groups T and NT for 11 weeks (27 sessions evenly distributed). An extensive presentation of the tests and treatment decision model is provided. The main treatment components are manual therapy, cranio-cervical flexion exercise and strength training, EMG-biofeedback training, treatment for cervicogenic headache, neck motor control training. A decision algorithm based on the baseline assessment determines the treatment components given to each participant of T- and NT-groups. Primary outcome measures are physical functioning (Neck Disability Index) and average pain intensity last week (Numeric Rating Scale). Secondary outcomes are general improvement (Patient Global Impression of Change scale), symptoms (Profile Fitness Mapping neck questionnaire), capacity to work in the last 6 weeks (quality and quantity) and pressure pain threshold of m. trapezius. Primary and secondary outcomes will be reported for

  5. Incidence of Small Lymph Node Metastases With Evidence of Extracapsular Extension: Clinical Implications in Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Simcock, Mathew; Schreiber-Facklam, Heide; Zimmer, Yitzhak; Graeter, Ruth; Evers, Christina; Arnold, Andreas; Wilkens, Ludwig; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Small lymph nodes (LN) show evidence of extracapsular extension (ECE) in a significant number of patients. This study was performed to determine the impact of ECE in LN {<=}7 mm as compared with ECE in larger LN. Methods and Materials: All tumor-positive LN of 74 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients with at least one ECE positive LN were analyzed retrospectively for the LN diameter and the extent of ECE. Clinical endpoints were regional relapse-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 2.1 years (range, 0.3-9.2 years). Results: Forty-four of 74 patients (60%) had at least one ECE positive LN {<=}10 mm. These small ECE positive LN had a median diameter of 7 mm, which was used as a cutoff. Thirty patients (41%) had at least one ECE positive LN {<=}7 mm. In both univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses, the incidence of at least one ECE positive LN {<=}7 mm was a statistically significant prognostic factor for decreased regional relapse-free survival (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 2.7, p = 0.03, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-6.4), distant metastasis-free survival (HR: 2.6, p = 0.04, 95% CI: 1.0-6.6), and overall survival (HR: 2.5, p = 0.03, 95% CI: 1.1-5.8). Conclusions: The incidence of small ECE positive LN metastases is a significant prognostic factor in HNSCC patients. Small ECE positive LN may represent more invasive tumor biology and could be used as prognostic markers.

  6. Predicting the Effect of Accelerated Fractionation in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Based on Molecular Marker Profiles: Data From a Randomized Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Suwinski, Rafal; Jaworska, Magdalena; Nikiel, Barbara; Grzegorz, Wozniak; Bankowska-Wozniak, Magdalena; Wojciech, Majewski; Krzysztof, Skladowski; Dariusz, Lange

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic and predictive values of molecular marker expression profiles based on data from a randomized clinical trial of postoperative conventional fractionation (p-CF) therapy versus 7-day-per-week postoperative continuous accelerated irradiation (p-CAIR) therapy for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Tumor samples from 148 patients (72 p-CF and 76 p-CAIR patients) were available for molecular studies. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess levels of EGFR, nm23, Ki-67, p-53, and cyclin D1 expression. To evaluate the effect of fractionation relative to the expression profiles, data for locoregional tumor control (LRC) were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Survival curves were compared using the Cox f test. Results: Patients who had tumors with low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression levels and oral cavity/oropharyngeal primary cancer sites tended to benefit from p-CAIR. A joint score for the gain in LRC from p-CAIR based of these features was used to separate the patients into two groups: those who benefited significantly from p-CAIR with respect to LRC (n = 49 patients; 5-year LRC of 28% vs. 68%; p = 0.01) and those who did not benefit from p-CAIR (n = 99 patients; 5-year LRC of 72% vs. 66%; p = 0.38). The nm23 expression level appeared useful as a prognostic factor but not as a predictor of fractionation effect. Conclusions: These results support the studies that demonstrate the potential of molecular profiles to predict the benefit from accelerated radiotherapy. The molecular profile that favored accelerated treatment (low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression) was in a good accordance with results provided by other investigators. Combining individual predictors in a joint score may improve their predictive potential.

  7. Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck: emphasizing the risk of undertreatment.

    PubMed

    Timmer, Ferdinand C A; Klop, W M C; Relyveld, Germaine N; Crijns, Marianne B; Balm, A J M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Lohuis, Peter J F M

    2016-05-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare primary cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma. It occurs predominantly in the head and neck area and often behaves aggressively. In this single-institution retrospective observational cohort study, we describe the results of a treatment strategy that we developed over the past decades. Endpoints of this study were local, regional and distant control, disease-specific survival and overall survival. In total 47 patients with head and neck MCC, diagnosed in the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (NKI-AvL) between 1984 and 2012, were included in this study. Local tumor control was 82 % (95 % CI 71-95 %) at 5 years. Regional lymph node metastases were found at the moment of diagnosis in 13 cases (28 %). In the group of patients who were initially cN0, the 5-year regional control was 80 % (68-95 %). The 5-year metastasis-free interval probability was 80 % (68-94 %). The disease-specific survival (DSS) at 5 years was 70 % (56-86 %). An overall survival of 54 % (40-72 %) was found at 5-year follow-up and of 37 % (23-59 %) at 10-year follow-up. Univariable Cox regression analysis of many clinical and pathological variables did not identify any predictors for DSS. The MCC has a high propensity for locoregional and distant spread in the head and neck region. Undertreatment, especially of the lymph nodes in the neck, is a serious problem as regional (micro)metastasis are common even in T1 tumors. Future research will have to elucidate the role of the sentinel lymph node procedure versus the elective selective node dissection and standardized elective local and regional radiotherapy in the head and neck area.

  8. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  9. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible.

  10. Exploring patient satisfaction: a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial of spinal manipulation, home exercise, and medication for acute and subacute neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Leininger, Brent D; Evans, Roni; Bronfort, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess satisfaction with specific aspects of care for acute neck pain and explore the relationship between satisfaction with care, neck pain and global satisfaction. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of patient satisfaction from a randomized trial of spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) delivered by doctors of chiropractic, home exercise and advice (HEA) delivered by exercise therapists, and medication (MED) prescribed by a medical physician for acute/subacute neck pain. Differences in satisfaction with specific aspects of care were analyzed using a linear mixed model. The relationship between specific aspects of care and 1) change in neck pain (primary outcome of the randomized trial) and 2) global satisfaction were assessed using Pearson’s correlation and multiple linear regression. Results Individuals receiving SMT or HEA were more satisfied with the information and general care received than MED group participants. SMT and HEA groups reported similar satisfaction with information provided during treatment; however, the SMT group was more satisfied with general care. Satisfaction with general care (r=−0.75 to −0.77, R2= 0.55 to 0.56) had a stronger relationship with global satisfaction compared to satisfaction with information provided (r=−0.65 to 0.67, R2=0.39 to 0.46). The relationship between satisfaction with care and neck pain was weak (r=0.17 to 0.38, R2=0.08 to 0.21). Conclusions Individuals with acute/subacute neck pain were more satisfied with specific aspects of care from SMT delivered by doctors of chiropractic or HEA interventions compared to MED prescribed by a medical physician. PMID:25199824

  11. Inclusion of thoracic spine thrust manipulation into an electro-therapy/thermal program for the management of patients with acute mechanical neck pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    González-Iglesias, Javier; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, Cesar; Cleland, Joshua A; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Palomeque-del-Cerro, Luis; Méndez-Sánchez, Roberto

    2009-06-01

    Our aim was to examine the effects of a seated thoracic spine distraction thrust manipulation included in an electrotherapy/thermal program on pain, disability, and cervical range of motion in patients with acute neck pain. This randomized controlled trial included 45 patients (20 males, 25 females) between 23 and 44 years of age presenting with acute neck pain. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: an experimental group which received a thoracic manipulation, and a control group which did not receive the manipulative procedure. Both groups received an electrotherapy program consisting of 6 sessions of TENS (frequency 100Hz; 20min), superficial thermo-therapy (15min) and soft tissue massage. The experimental group also received a thoracic manipulation once a week for 3 consecutive weeks. Outcome measures included neck pain (numerical pain rate scale; NPRS), level of disability (Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire; NPQ) and neck mobility. These outcomes were assessed at baseline and 1 week after discharge. A 2-way repeated-measures ANOVA with group as between-subject variable and time as within-subject variable was used. Patients receiving thoracic manipulation experienced greater reductions in both neck pain, with between-group difference of 2.3 (95% CI 2-2.7) points on a 11-NPRS, and perceived disability with between-group differences 8.5 (95% CI 7.2-9.8) points. Further, patients receiving thoracic manipulation experienced greater increases in all cervical motions with between-group differences of 10.6 degrees (95% CI 8.8-12.5 degrees) for flexion; 9.9 degrees (95% CI 8.1-11.7 degrees) for extension; 9.5 degrees (95% CI 7.6-11.4 degrees) for right lateral-flexion; 8 degrees (95% CI 6.2-9.8 degrees) for left lateral-flexion; 9.6 degrees (95% CI 7.7-11.6 degrees) for right rotation; and 8.4 degrees (95% CI 6.5-10.3 degrees) for left rotation. We found that the inclusion of a thoracic manipulation into an electrotherapy/thermal program was effective in

  12. Short term treatment versus long term management of neck and back disability in older adults utilizing spinal manipulative therapy and supervised exercise: a parallel-group randomized clinical trial evaluating relative effectiveness and harms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Back and neck disability are frequent in older adults resulting in loss of function and independence. Exercise therapy and manual therapy, like spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), have evidence of short and intermediate term effectiveness for spinal disability in the general population and growing evidence in older adults. For older populations experiencing chronic spinal conditions, long term management may be more appropriate to maintain improvement and minimize the impact of future exacerbations. Research is limited comparing short courses of treatment to long term management of spinal disability. The primary aim is to compare the relative effectiveness of 12 weeks versus 36 weeks of SMT and supervised rehabilitative exercise (SRE) in older adults with back and neck disability. Methods/Design Randomized, mixed-methods, comparative effectiveness trial conducted at a university-affiliated research clinic in the Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota metropolitan area. Participants Independently ambulatory community dwelling adults ≥ 65 years of age with back and neck disability of minimum 12 weeks duration (n = 200). Interventions 12 weeks SMT + SRE or 36 weeks SMT + SRE. Randomization Blocked 1:1 allocation; computer generated scheme, concealed in sequentially numbered, opaque, sealed envelopes. Blinding Functional outcome examiners are blinded to treatment allocation; physical nature of the treatments prevents blinding of participants and providers to treatment assignment. Primary endpoint 36 weeks post-randomization. Data collection Self-report questionnaires administered at 2 baseline visits and 4, 12, 24, 36, 52, and 78 weeks post-randomization. Primary outcomes include back and neck disability, measured by the Oswestry Disability Index and Neck Disability Index. Secondary outcomes include pain, general health status, improvement, self-efficacy, kinesiophobia, satisfaction, and medication use. Functional outcome assessment occurs

  13. The evolution of surgery in the management of neck metastases

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, S; Chiesa, F; Lyubaev, V; Aidarbekova, A; Brzhezovskiy, V

    2006-01-01

    Summary In spite of advancement in science, molecular medicine and target therapies, surgical treatment of metastases using different techniques, from selective neck dissection to extended radical neck dissections, form a major part in the management of neck metastases. This is due to the fact that, so far, there is no treatment more effective for resectable neck metastases, than surgery. Since most head and neck cancer patients die due to loco-regional progression of disease, and a very large majority of them do not live long enough to develop distant metastases, the status of neck lymph nodes remains the single most important prognostic factor, in these cases. In the 100 years since George Washington Crile described Radical Neck Dissection, we now have a much better understanding of the biological and clinical behaviour of neck metastases. This has ultimately led to the conservative approaches of selective neck dissections depending on the primary site of the tumour, type of tumour and the characteristic features of the metastases themselves. A search of the literature on neck lymph nodes and neck dissections, on the internet and in old publications, not available in the electronic media, has been carried out. Using this as the basis, we arranged, in sequence, the dates of various landmarks in the treatment of head and neck cancer related to neck dissections to emphasize the overall process of evolution of neck dissection thereby showing how the field of head and neck surgery has travelled a long way from radical neck dissection to its modifications and further to selective neck dissections and sentinel node biopsies. The present understanding of the patterns of neck metastases enables us not only to adequately treat the neck metastases, but also to diagnose metastases from unknown primaries. Therefore, depending on the site of the primary tumour, it is now easy to predict the most probable route of metastatic spread and vice versa. This has enabled us to adopt

  14. Clinical Efficacy and Safety of a Monopolar Radiofrequency Device With Comfort Pulse Technology for the Treatment of Facial and Neck Laxity in Men.

    PubMed

    Fabi, Sabrina Guillen; Niwa Massaki, Ane B M; Goldman, Mitchel P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of a monopolar radiofrequency treatment for facial and neck laxity in men. Twelve men received one treatment of the face and upper portion of the neck using an RF system with comfort pulsed technology. Standardized photographs were taken at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months of follow-up. Study investigators evaluated facial and neck laxity at baseline and all follow-up visits using the Fasil Laxity Scale. Patents and investigators assessed skin texture and overall appearance using the Quartile Improvement Scale. Average improvement in treated areas was statistically significant at 1-month (P<.01), 3-month (P=.02), and 6-month (P=.05) follow-up visits compared with baseline. Investigators rated greatest improvement in skin texture and overall appearance (mild to moderate) at the 3-month follow-up. Patient assessments demonstrated moderate improvement in skin laxity, skin texture, and overall appearance maintained out to 6 months after treatment. A total of 64% of patients were satisfied to very satisfied with treatment at the 6-month follow-up. One RF treatment of the face and neck yielded 20% reduction in facial laxity 1 month after treatment, with maintained improvement out to 6 months (15% reduction). PMID:27502254

  15. Forgotten triangles of neck.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet; Vashistha, Arpit; Chaudhary, Manoj; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to add some more information in the present scientific literature on these nearly forgotten triangles of surgical importance. The neck is an area that lends itself to anatomical geometry, such as triangles. Many triangles of the neck have been described, and some are well-known, yet, some have been nearly forgotten, i.e., Lesser's triangle, Farabeuf triangle, Pirogoff's triangle, and Beclard's triangle. From the anatomic and surgical point of view, the neck is an amazingly interesting place. It is like a connection where crucial functional units meet and pass. Added surgical landmarks are always helpful to the surgeon while dealing with the neck. Described triangles of neck in this article are always reliable and constant landmarks for head and neck surgeons. PMID:27563614

  16. A new mechanism of regulation of p21 by the mTORC1/4E-BP1 pathway predicts clinical outcome of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Llanos, Susana; García-Pedrero, Juana M

    2016-07-01

    We have identified a novel mechanism of regulation of the protein CDKN1A (also known as p21) by the serine/threonine kinase complex mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Our results demonstrate that the mTORC1 substrate EIF4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) in its non-phosphorylated state interacts with p21 and promotes p21 degradation. In addition, we demonstrate the prevalence of this mechanism in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and show that it strongly and significantly associates with improved disease-specific survival, providing evidence for its clinical relevance. PMID:27652314

  17. General Information about Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Occult Primary Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  18. Osteoid Osteoma of the Talar Neck With Subacute Presentation.

    PubMed

    Assafiri, Ibrahim; Sraj, Shafic

    2015-10-01

    Osteoid osteoma of the talar neck is a rare clinical entity that is frequently missed on initial assessment in patients with ankle pain. We present a case report of an adolescent with talar neck osteoid osteoma who presented with persistent pain after an injury. We review the differential diagnosis of persistent anterior ankle pain and review the treatment options for osteoid osteoma of the talar neck.

  19. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced (Stage II and worse) head-and-neck cancer: Dosimetric and clinical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Portaluri, Maurizio . E-mail: portaluri@hotmail.com; Fucilli, Fulvio I.M.; Castagna, Roberta; Bambace, Santa; Pili, Giorgio; Tramacere, Francesco; Russo, Donatella; Francavilla, Maria Carmen

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric parameters of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in locally advanced head-and-neck tumors (Stage II and above) and the effects on xerostomia. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients with histologically proven squamous cell cancer of the head and neck were consecutively treated with 3D-CRT using a one-point setup technique; 17 had larynx cancer, 12 oropharynx, 12 oral cavity, and 6 nasopharynx cancer; 2 had other sites of cancer. Of the 49 patients, 41 received postoperative RT and 8 definitive treatment. Also, 13 were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy before and during RT; in 6 cases, 5-fluorouracil was added. The follow-up time was 484-567 days (median, 530 days). Results: One-point setup can deliver 96% of the prescribed dose to the isocenter, to the whole planning target volume, including all node levels of the neck and without overdosages. The mean dose to the primary planning target volume was 49.54 {+-} 4.82 Gy (51.53 {+-} 5.47 Gy for larynx cases). The average dose to the contralateral parotid gland was approximately 38 Gy (30 Gy for larynx cases). The maximal dose to the spinal cord was 46 Gy. A Grade 0 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer xerostomia score corresponded to a mean dose of 30 Gy to one parotid gland. A lower xerostomia score with a lower mean parotid dose and longer follow-up seemed to give rise to a sort of functional recovery phenomenon. Conclusion: Three dimensional-CRT in head-and-neck cancers permits good coverage of the planning target volume with about 10-11 segments and one isocenter. With a mean dose of approximately 30 Gy to the contralateral parotid, we observed no or mild xerostomia.

  20. Continuous accelerated 7-days-a-week radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: Long-term results of Phase III clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Skladowski, Krzysztof . E-mail: skladowski@io.gliwice.pl; Maciejewski, Boguslaw; Golen, Maria; Tarnawski, Rafal; Slosarek, Krzysztof; Suwinski, Rafal; Sygula, Mariusz; Wygoda, Andrzej

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: To update 5-year results of a previously published study on special 7-days-a-week fractionation continuous accelerated irradiation (CAIR) for head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: One hundred patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck in Stage T{sub 2-4}N{sub 0-1}M were randomized between two definitive radiation treatments: accelerated fractionation 7 days a week including weekends (CAIR) and conventional 5 days a week (control). Hence the overall treatment time was 2 weeks shorter in CAIR. Results: Five-year local tumor control was 75% in the CAIR group and 33% in the control arm (p < 0.00004). Tumor-cure benefit corresponded with significant improvement in disease-free survival and overall survival rates. Confluent mucositis was the main acute toxicity, with the incidence significantly higher in CAIR patients than in control (respectively, 94% vs. 53%). When 2.0-Gy fractions were used, radiation necrosis developed in 5 patients (22%) in the CAIR group as a consequential late effect (CLE), but when fraction size was reduced to 1.8 Gy no more CLE occurred. Actuarial 5-year morbidity-free survival rate was similar for both treatments. Conclusions: Selected head-and-neck cancer patients could be treated very effectively with 7-days-a-week radiation schedule with no compromise of total dose and with slight 10% reduction of fraction dose (2 Gy-1.8 Gy), which article gives 1 week reduction of overall treatment time compared with standard 70 Gy in 35 fractions over 47-49 days. Although this report is based on the relatively small group of patients, its results have encouraged us to use CAIR fractionation in a standard radiation treatment for moderately advanced head-and-neck cancer patients.

  1. American Head and Neck Society

    MedlinePlus

    American Head & Neck Society Mission Statement: Advance Education, Research, and Quality of Care for the head and neck oncology patient. American Head & Neck Society | AHNS The mission of the AHNS is ...

  2. The use of the anatomic 'zones' of the neck in the assessment of penetrating neck injury.

    PubMed

    Low, Garren M I; Inaba, Kenji; Chouliaras, Konstantinos; Branco, Bernardino; Lam, Lydia; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Menaker, Jay; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2014-10-01

    The traditional classification of neck injuries uses an anatomic description of Zones I through III. The objective of this article was to characterize the association between external wounds and the corresponding internal injuries after penetrating neck trauma to identify the clinical use of the anatomic zones of the neck. Patients who sustained penetrating neck trauma from December 2008 to March 2011 were analyzed. All patients underwent structured clinical examination documenting the external zone where the wound(s) were located. All internal injuries were then correlated with the external wounds. An internal injury was defined as "unexpected" if it was located outside the borders of the neck zone corresponding to the external wound. In total, 146 patients sustaining a penetrating neck injury were analyzed; 126 (86%) male. The mechanism of injury was stab wounds in 74 (51%) and gunshot wounds in 69 (47%). Mean age was 31 years (range, nine to 62 years). Thirty-seven (25%) patients sustained had a total of 50 internal injuries. There was a high incidence of noncorrelation between the location of the external injury and the internal structures that were damaged in patients with hard signs of vascular or aerodigestive injury. The use of the anatomic zones and their role in the workup of penetrating neck injury are questionable.

  3. Chainsaw penetrating neck injury.

    PubMed

    Brown, A F

    1995-06-01

    A case of chainsaw injury to the neck is described. Previous reports in the English language are exceedingly rare. A brief discussion of safety features on chain saws is followed by a review of selective vs. mandatory surgical exploration in penetrating neck trauma, including the role of ancillary diagnostic tests.

  4. The ratio of change in muscle thickness between superficial and deep cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test and a suggestion regarding clinical treatment of patients with musculoskeletal neck pain.

    PubMed

    Goo, Miran; Kim, Seong-Gil; Jun, Deokhoon

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the imbalance of muscle recruitment in cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test by using ultrasonography and to propose the optimal level of pressure in clinical craniocervical flexion exercise for people with neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 18 students (9 males and 9 females) with neck pain at D University in Gyeongsangbuk-do, South Korea, participated in this study. The change in muscle thickness in superficial and deep cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test was measured using ultrasonography. The ratio of muscle thickness changes between superficial and deep muscles during the test were obtained to interpret the imbalance of muscle recruitment in cervical flexor muscles. [Results] The muscle thickness ratio of the sternocleidomastoid muscle/deep cervical flexor muscles according to the incremental pressure showed significant differences between 22 mmHg and 24 mmHg, between 24 mmHg and 28 mmHg, between 24 mmHg and 30 mmHg, and between 26 mmHg and 28 mmHg. [Conclusion] Ultrasonography can be applied for examination of cervical flexor muscles in clinical environment, and practical suggestion for intervention exercise of craniocervical flexors can be expected on the pressure level between 24 mmHg and 26 mmHg enabling the smallest activation of the sternocleidomastoid muscle.

  5. pN0(i+) Breast Cancer: Treatment Patterns, Locoregional Recurrence, and Survival Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Karam, Irene; Lesperance, Maria F.; Berrang, Tanya; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott; Truong, Pauline T.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To examine treatment patterns, recurrence, and survival outcomes in patients with pN0(i+) breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5999 women with AJCC (6th edition) pT1-3, pN0-N1a, M0 breast cancer diagnosed between 2003 and 2006. Of these, 4342 (72%) had pN0, 96 (2%) had pN0(i+), 349 (6%) had pNmic (micrometastases >0.2 mm to ≤2 mm), and 1212 (20%) had pN1a (1-3 positive macroscopic nodes) disease. Treatment characteristics and 5-year Kaplan-Meier local recurrence, regional recurrence (RR), locoregional recurrence (LRR), and overall survival were compared between nodal subgroups. Multivariable analysis was performed using Cox regression modeling. A 1:3 case-match analysis examined outcomes in pN0(i+) cases compared with pN0 controls matched for similar tumor and treatment characteristics. Results: Median follow-up was 4.8 years. Adjuvant systemic therapy use increased with nodal stage: 81%, 92%, 95%, and 94% in pN0, pN0(i+), pNmic, and pN1a disease, respectively (P<.001). Nodal radiation therapy (RT) use also increased with nodal stage: 1.7% in pN0, 27% in pN0(i+), 33% in pNmic, and 63% in pN1a cohorts (P<.001). Five-year Kaplan-Meier outcomes in pN0 versus pN0(i+) cases were as follows: local recurrence 1.7% versus 3.7% (P=.20), RR 0.5% versus 2.2% (P=.02), and LRR 2.1% versus 5.8% (P=.02). There were no RR events in 26 patients with pN0(i+) disease who received nodal RT and 2 RR events in 70 patients who did not receive nodal RT. On multivariable analysis, pN0(i+) was not associated with worse locoregional control or survival. On case-match analysis, LRR and overall survival were similar between pN0(i+) and matched pN0 counterparts. Conclusions: Nodal involvement with isolated tumor cells is not a significant prognostic factor for LRR or survival in this study's multivariable and case-match analyses. These data do not support the routine use of nodal RT in the setting of pN0(i+) disease. Prospective studies are needed to define optimal

  6. Contemporary use of imaging modalities in neck mass evaluation.

    PubMed

    St J Blythe, John N; Pearce, Oliver J; Tilley, Elizabeth A; Brennan, Peter A

    2015-03-01

    The effective and efficient management of a patient with a neck mass in a 1-stop clinic requires a collaborative and harmonious partnership among surgeon, radiologist, and pathologist. In this article, theoretic and practical issues are addressed to optimize patient care when prescribing, planning, performing, and interpreting imaging for neck disease.

  7. A Modified Dissection Method to Preserve Neck Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankin, Mark H.; Stoller, Jeremy L.

    2009-01-01

    The neck is not only one of the more challenging anatomical regions to dissect but also has important application to clinical conditions, diseases, and procedures. In this study, we describe two simple modifications for dissection of the neck that (1) aid in the identification and preservation of the cutaneous branches of the cervical plexus and…

  8. Toxicity profile and clinical outcomes in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with induction chemotherapy prior to concurrent chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eric C; Genden, Eric M; Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof; Som, Peter M; Kostakoglu, Lale; Chen, Chien-Ting; Packer, Stuart; Kao, Johnny

    2012-02-01

    The use of induction chemotherapy prior to chemoradiation for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (LA-HNSCC) remains controversial. We explored whether toxicity from induction chemotherapy influenced the delivery of concurrent chemoradiation. Among 171 consecutive previously unirradiated patients with HNSCC treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation, we identified 66 patients with stage III-IVB head and neck carcinoma who were treated with induction chemotherapy prior to planned chemoradiation. The most common induction regimen was docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-FU (TPF; 80%) for 2 to 3 cycles. Mean radiation dose was 72 Gy (range, 36-75 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy regimens included cisplatin (26%), cetuximab (5%) and 5-fluorouracil/hydroxyurea (65%)-based regimens. At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 9-56 months), the 2-year locoregional control and distant control rates were 85 and 86%, respectively. The 2-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 74 and 80%, respectively. Although there were no grade 5 toxicities during induction chemotherapy, 26% of patients required hospitalization for adverse events, including 5% needing intensive care. The most common high grade adverse events were grade 4 neutropenia (21%) and neutropenic fever (17%). Six percent of patients were unable to tolerate concurrent chemotherapy. The 2-year disease-free survival was significantly higher in patients able to complete induction and concurrent chemoradiation as planned (83 vs. 27%, p<0.001). Induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation results in promising survival rates in our cohort of advanced head and neck carcinoma patients. Due to severe toxicities in a subset of patients, this strategy is only recommended in selected high-risk patients who are carefully followed by an experienced multidisciplinary team. PMID:22020564

  9. Effect of Global Posture Reeducation and of Static Stretching on Pain, Range of Motion, and Quality of Life in Women with Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Ana Cláudia Violino; Burke, Thomaz Nogueira; França, Fábio Jorge Renovato; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE Compare the effect of conventional static stretching and muscle chain stretching, as proposed by the global posture reeducation method, in the manual therapy of patients with chronic neck pain. METHODS Thirty-three female patients aged 35 to 60 years old, 31 of whom completed the program, were randomly divided into two groups: The global posture reeducation group (n=15) performed muscle chain stretching, while the conventional stretching group (n=16) performed conventional static muscle stretching. Both groups also underwent manual therapy. Patients were evaluated before and after treatment and at a six-week follow-up appointment and tested for pain intensity (by means of visual analog scale), range of motion (by goniometry), and health-related quality of life (by the SF-36 questionnaire). The treatment program consisted of two 1-hour individual sessions per week for six weeks. Data were statistically analyzed at a significance level of p<0.05. RESULTS Significant pain relief and range of motion improvement were observed after treatment in both groups, with a slight reduction at follow-up time. Quality of life also improved after treatment, except for the global posture reeducation group in one domain; at follow-up, there was improvement in all domains, except that both groups reported increased pain. There were no significant differences between groups CONCLUSION Conventional stretching and muscle chain stretching in association with manual therapy were equally effective in reducing pain and improving the range of motion and quality of life of female patients with chronic neck pain, both immediately after treatment and at a six-week follow-up, suggesting that stretching exercises should be prescribed to chronic neck pain patients. PMID:19060998

  10. Quantification of Trade-Off Between Parotid Gland Sparing and Planning Target Volume Underdosages in Clinically Node-Negative Head-and-Neck Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kruijf, Wilhelmus de . E-mail: kruijf.de.w@bvi.nl; Heijmen, Ben; Levendag, Peter C.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To quantify the trade-off between parotid gland sparing and planning target volume (PTV) underdosages for head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A planning study was performed for 4 patients with either soft palate or tonsil tumors treated with external radiotherapy up to 46 Gy. The trade-off between underdosages in the PTV and sparing of the parotid glands was investigated by systematically varying the optimization objectives for the inverse planning. A new way of presenting dose-volume information allows easy detection of small PTV subvolumes with underdosages that cannot be assessed in conventional cumulative dose-volume histograms. A simple radiobiological model to estimate the control probability for an electively irradiated neck level was developed. Results: The average dose to the parotid glands can decrease by >10 Gy by allowing the PTV to be underdosed in such a way that the radiobiological model predicts a decrease in subclinical disease control probability of (typically) 1% to a few percent. Conclusion: The trade-off between parotid gland sparing and underdosages in the PTV has been quantified by the use of an alternative method to present dose-volume information and by the use of a radiobiological model to predict subclinical disease control probability.

  11. Syndecan-1 expression has prognostic significance in head and neck carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Anttonen, A; Kajanti, M; Heikkilä, P; Jalkanen, M; Joensuu, H

    1999-01-01

    The syndecans are a family of cell-surface heparan sulphate proteoglycans that regulate cell behaviour by binding extracellular matrix molecules such as growth factors. The syndecan family has four members, of which syndecan-1 is the most studied and best characterized. We have studied the prognostic significance of syndecan-1 expression in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck treated with surgery and post-operative radiotherapy. Paraffin-embedded tissue samples taken from 175 patients with primary SCC, followed up from 2 to 15 years after surgery, were studied for expression of syndecan-1 by immunohistochemistry. A low number (≤50%, the median value) of syndecan-1-positive tumour cells was associated with low histological grade of differentiation (P < 0.0001), a large primary tumour size (T1–2 vs T3–4, P = 0.02), positive nodal status (N0 vs N1–3, P = 0.0006), and high clinical stage (stage I or II vs III or IV, P < 0.0001). Low syndecan-1 expression was also associated with unfavourable overall survival in a univariate analysis (P = 0.001). In a multivariate survival analysis, the clinical stage and syndecan-1 expression were the only independent prognostic factors. We conclude that syndecan-1 is a novel prognostic factor in SCC of the head and neck treated with surgery and post-operative radiotherapy. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10027330

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A PRELIMINARY CLINICAL PREDICTION RULE TO IDENTIFY PATIENTS WITH NECK PAIN THAT MAY BENEFIT FROM A STANDARDIZED PROGRAM OF STRETCHING AND MUSCLE PERFORMANCE EXERCISE: A PROSPECTIVE COHORT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Kolber, Morey J.; George, Steven Z.; Young, Ian; Patel, Chetan K.; Cleland, Joshua A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Neck pain is a significant problem and many treatment options exist. While some studies suggest exercise is beneficial for individuals with non‐specific neck pain clinicians have few tools to assist in the decision making process. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to derive a preliminary clinical prediction rule (CPR) for identifying patients with neck pain (NP) who may respond to an exercise‐based treatment program. Exercise‐based interventions have demonstrated positive outcomes in patients with NP, however it is unclear which patients are more likely to respond to this treatment approach. Methods: Consecutive patients with a primary report of nonspecific NP with or without arm pain were recruited. All patients participated in a standardized exercise program and then were classified as having a successful or non‐successful outcome at 6 weeks. Potential predictor variables were entered into a stepwise regression analysis. Variables retained in the regression model were used to develop a multivariate CPR that can be used to classify patients with NP that may benefit from exercise‐based treatment. A 6‐month follow up of the patients was used to evaluate the long‐term effects. Results: Ninety‐one patients were enrolled in the study of which 50 had a successful outcome. A CPR with 5 variables was identified (Neck Disability Index score < 18/50, presence of shoulder protraction during static postural assessment, patient does not bicycle for exercise, cervical side bending < 32°, and Fear Avoidance Belief Questionnaire–Physical Activity Score < 15). If 4 of the 5 variables were present, the probability of a successful outcome shifted from 56% to 78% (+LR 2.97). At 6 months no significant difference existed in self‐reported outcomes between those considered positive on the rule for a successful outcome and those negative on the rule for a successful outcome. Conclusions: The proposed CPR may identify patients with NP

  13. Survival benefit of surgery with radiotherapy vs surgery alone to patients with T2-3N0M0 stage esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Guangzhou; Wang, Wanwei; Sun, Xinchen

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims This study is designed to analyze survival benefit of (neo-) adjuvant radiotherapy to patients with T2-3N0M0 stage esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Methods T2-3N0M0 stage EAC patients from 2004 to 2012 were searched from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data. Clinical factors including age, sex, race were summarized. Univariate, multivariate analysis, and stratified cox analysis based on different T stages were performed to explore the survival effect of (neo-)adjuvant radiotherapy to T2-3N0M0 stage EAC. Results T2-3N0M0 stage EAC patients with surgery were more likely to be white race, T3 stage. Univariate analysis showed sex, age, and T stage were the prognostic factors of survival (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis proved (neo-)adjuvant radiotherapy can prolong survival time of T2-3N0M0 stage EAC (P<0.05). Further analysis based on different T stages showed that both neoadjuvant radiotherapy (HR 0.615; 95% CI 0.475-0.797) and adjuvant radiotherapy (HR 0.597; 95% 0.387-0.921) significantly reduced the risk of death of T3N0M0 stage EAC, but neither of which significantly reduced death risk of T2N0M0 stage EAC (P>0.05). Conclusions sex, age are the independent prognostic factors of T2-3N0M0 EAC. Significant survival benefit of (neo-)adjuvant radiotherapy is only observed in patients with T3N0M0 stage EAC, but not in those with T2N0M0 stage. PMID:26870996

  14. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... head and neck cancer. Poor oral and dental hygiene . Poor care of the mouth and teeth has ... sore throat Foul mouth odor not explained by hygiene Hoarseness or change in voice Nasal obstruction or ...

  15. Torticollis (wry neck) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Torticollis is a form of dystonia (prolonged muscle contractions) in which the neck muscles, particularly the sternocleidomastoid muscle, contract involuntarily causing the head to turn. Torticollis may occur without known cause (idiopathic), be genetic ( ...

  16. Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Thariat, Juliette; Ahamad, Anesa; Williams, Michelle D.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Rosenthal, David I.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2012-03-01

    Background: This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. Methods: Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log-rank test and prognostic factors by Cox's proportional hazard model. Results: Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients, of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p < 0.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. Conclusions: With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge.

  17. Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Thariat, Juliette; Ang, K. Kian; Allen, Pamela K.; Ahamad, Anesa; Williams, Michelle D.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Rosenthal, David I.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Morrison, William H.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation, and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. METHODS Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log-rank test and prognostic factors by Cox analyses. RESULTS Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p <.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. CONCLUSIONS With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge. PMID:22284033

  18. Comparison between stainless steel staples and silk sutures for primary closure of skin in patients undergoing neck dissection: A comparative clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Abhishek; Nanjappa, Madan; Nagaraj, Vaibhav; Rajkumar, G. C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Comparison between stainless steel staples and silk sutures for primary closure of skin in patients undergoing neck dissection, in context of rapid application, approximation of the skin edges, economy and aesthetics of the resultant scar. Aim: (1) To compare surgical stainless steel staples and silk sutures for primary wound closure, with respect to presence/absence of wound infection and dehiscence (2) To compare the resultant scar following the two different methods of the closure at 3rd month postoperatively with the help of visual analog scale and analyze the result statistically Design: This study was designed to compare skin closure using staples and silk sutures in patients undergoing neck dissection, using both methods in one-half of the same wound; thus each wound affording its own control. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on patients requiring collar line incision (high submandibular incision) with or without a cephalad extension of midline lower lip split incision for surgical access, who presented to the Department of Oral and Maxillo-Facial Surgery. (1) Sample size: 10 (2) Study design: Prospective Comparative study (3) Study duration: One and half years (4) Surgical stainless steel staples: Proximate Plus MD 35 W, Ethicon Endo Surgery (5) Sutures: 3–0 Ethiprime NW 5003, Non-Absorbable Surgical Suture, Mersilk-90 cm, Ethicon, (16 mm 3/8 circle cutting needle). Conclusion: It was concluded that there is no significant difference between the scars observed in the regions of incision which underwent primary closure by two different methods, that is surgical stainless steel staples and 3–0 Mersilk Sutures. PMID:25821376

  19. SU-F-19A-10: Recalculation and Reporting Clinical HDR 192-Ir Head and Neck Dose Distributions Using Model Based Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson Tedgren, A; Persson, M; Nilsson, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively re-calculate dose distributions for selected head and neck cancer patients, earlier treated with HDR 192Ir brachytherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and compare results to distributions from the planning system derived using TG43 formalism. To study differences between dose to medium (as obtained with the MC code) and dose to water in medium as obtained through (1) ratios of stopping powers and (2) ratios of mass energy absorption coefficients between water and medium. Methods: The MC code Algebra was used to calculate dose distributions according to earlier actual treatment plans using anonymized plan data and CT images in DICOM format. Ratios of stopping power and mass energy absorption coefficients for water with various media obtained from 192-Ir spectra were used in toggling between dose to water and dose to media. Results: Differences between initial planned TG43 dose distributions and the doses to media calculated by MC are insignificant in the target volume. Differences are moderate (within 4–5 % at distances of 3–4 cm) but increase with distance and are most notable in bone and at the patient surface. Differences between dose to water and dose to medium are within 1-2% when using mass energy absorption coefficients to toggle between the two quantities but increase to above 10% for bone using stopping power ratios. Conclusion: MC predicts target doses for head and neck cancer patients in close agreement with TG43. MC yields improved dose estimations outside the target where a larger fraction of dose is from scattered photons. It is important with awareness and a clear reporting of absorbed dose values in using model based algorithms. Differences in bone media can exceed 10% depending on how dose to water in medium is defined.

  20. Malignant lymphoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Zapater, E; Bagán, J V; Carbonell, F; Basterra, J

    2010-03-01

    Malignant lymphomas represent approximately 5% of all malignant neoplasms of the head and neck area. They are classically divided into two subgroups, Hodgkin's lymphomas (HLs) and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs). We describe the clinical characteristics of head and neck lymphomas and the methods to establish the diagnosis. The World Health Organization classification of lymphoid tissues describes more than 50 different histological types, and we analyse the most common staging system for lymphomas, the Ann Arbor staging system. Finally, the different therapeutic approaches are discussed. PMID:20374502

  1. Structures and stabilities of (OsnN)0,±(n = 7 - 11) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W. L.; Zhang, L. L.; Luo, M.; Zhang, X. R.

    2015-08-01

    Structures and stabilities of (OsnN)0,± clusters have been systematically studied via using density functional theory (DFT) with generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The calculations show that the stable configurations of (OsnN)0,± are such structures with one N atom bonded to the external of the basic constructions consisting of Os atoms. Meanwhile, (OsnN)0,± clusters (n = 7 - 9) represent “magic number” effect, and 8 is the magic number. Additionally, the ground-state structures of (Os8N)0,± clusters have the best stability, while that of Os7N cluster possesses the worst stability. The result of the study on the ionization potential (IP) and the electron affinity (EA) shows that there are not topological differences among the configurations of (OsnN)0,±(n = 7 - 11) clusters.

  2. YpT1-2N0 rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation has lower survival compared with pT1-2N0 rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jue-feng; Zhu, Ji; Li, Gui-chao; Sun, Wen-jie; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Pathologic T1-2N0 rectal cancer shows an excellent prognosis without preoperative or postoperative chemoradiation. However, oncologic outcome of ypT1-2N0 remains unclear and undetermined. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare the survival of ypT1-2 and pT1-2 rectal cancer patients after radical resection and identify risk factors of ypT1-2 rectal cancer in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER)-registered rectal cancer patients. The results showed that ypT1-2N0 rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation has lower survival compared with pT1-2N0 rectal cancer and mucinous/signet-ring cancer and less than 12 lymph nodes retrieval were two risk factors in ypT1-2 patients. These results suggest that ypT1-2 patients with one or two risk factors may benefit from postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26517674

  3. Safety and Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin to Preserve Gland Function after Radiotherapy in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blinded Phase I Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Teymoortash, Afshin; Pfestroff, Andreas; Wittig, Andrea; Franke, Nora; Hoch, Stephan; Harnisch, Susanne; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Hoeffken, Helmut; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Brugger, Markus; Strauch, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded phase I clinical trial investigates safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin (BoNT) to preserve gland function after radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Twelve patients with advanced head and neck cancer were injected with BoNT into the submandibular glands prior to primary radiochemotherapy. Six patients received BoNT/A and 6 patients BoNT/A and B, half of each subgroup into their left and the other half into their right gland. As an internal control, sodium chloride was injected into the respective contralateral gland (placebo). For the evaluation of the salivary gland function, technetium pertechnetate salivary gland scintigraphy was performed before and after the end of radiotherapy. BoNT/A and B were well tolerated. Analysis of the scintigraphic data revealed no statistically significant difference between BoNT and placebo regarding the scintigraphic uptake difference (pBoNT/A = 0.84 and pBoNT/A-B = 0.56 for BoNT/A vs. placebo and BoNT/A-B vs. placebo, respectively). We also found no significant difference in treatment between BoNT and placebo in terms of salivary excretion fraction (pBoNT/A = 0.44; pBoNT/A-B = 0.44). This study demonstrates that BoNT can be safely combined with radiochemotherapy. Dosing and timing of BoNT injection should be further investigated for efficacy analysis. Trial Registration German Registry for Clinical Trails DRKS00004595.

  4. Safety and Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin to Preserve Gland Function after Radiotherapy in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blinded Phase I Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Teymoortash, Afshin; Pfestroff, Andreas; Wittig, Andrea; Franke, Nora; Hoch, Stephan; Harnisch, Susanne; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Hoeffken, Helmut; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Brugger, Markus; Strauch, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded phase I clinical trial investigates safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin (BoNT) to preserve gland function after radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Twelve patients with advanced head and neck cancer were injected with BoNT into the submandibular glands prior to primary radiochemotherapy. Six patients received BoNT/A and 6 patients BoNT/A and B, half of each subgroup into their left and the other half into their right gland. As an internal control, sodium chloride was injected into the respective contralateral gland (placebo). For the evaluation of the salivary gland function, technetium pertechnetate salivary gland scintigraphy was performed before and after the end of radiotherapy. BoNT/A and B were well tolerated. Analysis of the scintigraphic data revealed no statistically significant difference between BoNT and placebo regarding the scintigraphic uptake difference (pBoNT/A = 0.84 and pBoNT/A-B = 0.56 for BoNT/A vs. placebo and BoNT/A-B vs. placebo, respectively). We also found no significant difference in treatment between BoNT and placebo in terms of salivary excretion fraction (pBoNT/A = 0.44; pBoNT/A-B = 0.44). This study demonstrates that BoNT can be safely combined with radiochemotherapy. Dosing and timing of BoNT injection should be further investigated for efficacy analysis. Trial Registration German Registry for Clinical Trails DRKS00004595 PMID:26991494

  5. Loss of Mitochondrial Tumor Suppressor Genes Expression Is Associated with Unfavorable Clinical Outcome in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Data from Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Mahjabeen, Ishrat; Kayani, Mahmood Akhtar

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial genes play important roles in cellular energy metabolism, free radical generation, and apoptosis. Dysregulation of these genes have long been suspected to contribute to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased proliferation and progression of cancer. A family of orthologues of yeast silent information regulator 3 (SIRT3), 4 (SIRT4) and mitochondrial tumor suppressor 1 (MTUS1) are important mitochondrial tumor suppressor genes which play an important role in the progression of multiple cancers. However, their role in the development of oxidative stress, enhanced proliferation and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has not yet been studied. In this study we aimed to test the association between reduced mitochondrial tumor suppressor genes' activities and enhancement in tissue oxidative stress and cell proliferation in HNSCC cases. The expression of mitochondrial tumor suppressor genes (SIRT3, SIRT4 and MTUS1), mitochondrial DNA repair gene (OGG1-2a) and a proliferation marker (Ki-67) was studied in a study cohort of 120 HNSCC patients and controls with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR (qPCR) in order to determine the potential prognostic significance of these genes. A statistically significant downregulation of SIRT3 (p<0.001), SIRT4 (p<0.0001), MTUS1 (p<0.002) and OGG1 (p<0.0001) was observed in HNSCC compared to control samples. Ki-67 was also overexpressed (p<0.0001) in HNSCC versus control samples. Additionally, to explore gene-gene relationship, we observed a positive spearmen correlation between SIRT3 versus SIRT4 (r = 0.523***, p<0.0001), SIRT3 versus MTUS1 (r = 0.273***, p<0.001), SIRT3 versus OGG1-2a (r = 0.213*, p<0.03), SIRT4 versus OGG1 (r = 0.338***, p<0.0001) and MTUS1 versus OGG1-2a (r = 0.215*, p<0.03) in HNSCC cases. A negative spearman correlation was observed between OGG1 versus Ki-67 (r = -0.224**, p<0.01) and OGG1-2a versus Ki-67 (r = -0.224**, p<0

  6. Primary Tumor Volume Is an Important Predictor of Clinical Outcomes Among Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Treated With Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Strongin, Anna; Yovino, Susannah; Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey; Cullen, Kevin; Zimrin, Ann; Strome, Scott; Regine, William; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The tumor volume has been established as a significant predictor of outcomes among patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy alone. The present study attempted to add to the existing data on tumor volume as a prognostic factor among patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients who had undergone definitive chemoradiotherapy for Stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the hypopharynx, oropharynx, and larynx were identified. The primary tumor volumes were calculated from the treatment planning computed tomography scans, and these were correlated to the survival and tumor control data obtained from the retrospective analysis. Results: The interval to progression correlated with the primary tumor volume (p = .007). The critical cutoff point for the tumor volume was identified as 35 cm{sup 3}, and patients with a tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a significantly better prognosis than those with a tumor volume >35 cm{sup 3} at 5 years (43% vs. 71%, p = .010). Longer survival was also correlated with smaller primary tumor volumes (p = .022). Similarly, patients with a primary tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a better prognosis in terms of both progression-free survival (61% vs. 33%, p = .004) and overall survival (84% vs. 41%, p = < .001). On multivariate analysis, the primary tumor volume was the best predictor of recurrence (hazard ratio 4.7, 95% confidence interval 1.9-11.6; p = .001) and survival (hazard ratio 10.0, 95% confidence interval 2.9-35.1; p = < .001). In contrast, the T stage and N stage were not significant factors. Analysis of variance revealed that tumors with locoregional failure were on average 21.6 cm{sup 3} larger than tumors without locoregional failure (p = .028) and 27.1-cm{sup 3} larger than tumors that recurred as distant metastases (p = .020). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the primary tumor volume is a significant prognostic factor in patients with advanced cancer

  7. Is Planned Neck Dissection Necessary for Head and Neck Cancer After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Min |. E-mail: min-yao@uiowa.edu; Hoffman, Henry T.; Funk, Gerry F. |; Chang, Kristi; Smith, Russell B. |; Tan Huaming; Clamon, Gerald H.; Dornfeld, Ken |; Buatti, John M. |

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine regional control of local regional advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), along with the role and selection criteria for neck dissection after IMRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 90 patients with stage N2A or greater HNSCC were treated with definitive IMRT from December 1999 to July 2005. Three clinical target volumes were defined and were treated to 70 to 74 Gy, 60 Gy, and 54 Gy, respectively. Neck dissection was performed for selected patients after IMRT. Selection criteria evolved during this period with emphasis on post-IMRT [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in recent years. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 29 months (range, 0.2-74 months). All living patients were followed at least 9 months after completing treatment. Thirteen patients underwent neck dissection after IMRT because of residual lymphadenopathy. Of these, 6 contained residual viable tumor. Three patients with persistent adenopathy did not undergo neck dissection: 2 refused and 1 had lung metastasis. Among the remaining 74 patients who were observed without neck dissection, there was only 1 case of regional failure. Among all 90 patients in this study, the 3-year local and regional control was 96.3% and 95.4%, respectively. Conclusions: Appropriately delivered IMRT has excellent dose coverage for cervical lymph nodes. A high radiation dose can be safely delivered to the abnormal lymph nodes. There is a high complete response rate. Routine planned neck dissection for patients with N2A and higher stage after IMRT is not necessary. Post-IMRT [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is a useful tool in selecting patients appropriate for neck dissection.

  8. Effects of Zinc Supplementation on Clinical Outcomes in Patients Receiving Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancers: A Double-Blinded Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.-C. Que, Jenny; Lin, Ki-L.; Leung, Henry Wing-Cheung; Lu, C.-L.; Chang, C.-H.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of zinc supplementation on the survival of patients after receiving radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Patients were randomly divided into two groups; experimental and control. Patients in the experimental group received a predetermined dose of a zinc supplement, and the control group, a placebo. The 50 patients in each group could be considered homogenous with respect to medical histories, tumor characteristics, and therapeutic details. Results: Patients in both groups appeared to have similar results for 3-year overall, disease-free, and metastases-free survival rates (p = 0.19, p = 0.54, and p = 0.35, respectively). However, patients in the experimental group had better 3-year local-free survival (LFS), although the difference was only marginal (p = 0.092). Another difference was that patients in the experimental group with Stages III-IV disease had a much better 3-year LFS rate when they received concurrent chemoradiotherapy (p = 0.003). Conclusions: One impact seen was that zinc supplementation improved LFS at 3 years after beginning treatment for patients with Stages III-IV disease. It is imperative that these patients be followed up for a longer period to draw a definite conclusion.

  9. Uncertainties and CTV to PTV margins quantitative assessment using cone-beam CT technique in clinical application for prostate, and head and neck irradiation tumours.

    PubMed

    Juan-Senabre, X J; López-Tarjuelo, J; Conde-Moreno, A; Santos-Serra, A; Sánchez-Iglesias, A L; Quirós-Higueras, J D; de Marco Blancas, N; Calzada-Feliu, S; Ferrer-Albiach, C

    2011-11-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the magnitude of systematic and random errors from a subset of 100 prostate and 26 head and neck (H&N) cancer patients treated with conventional conformal radiotherapy and using image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). After treatment, the uncertainties involved and the CTV to PTV margin were evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS An Elekta Synergy® linear accelerator was used, taking advantage of 3D on-board computed tomography. IGRT with no-action level (NAL) protocol was applied, reporting the 3D translation and rotation corrections. A statistical study was performed to analyse systematic, random and interobserver uncertainties, and, finally, to obtain the CTV to PTV margins. RESULTS The H&N patients' uncertainties found were smaller than those of prostate patients. The CTV to PTV margins assessed, following the guidelines found in the literature, in the three dimensions of space (right-left, superior-inferior, anterior-posterior) were (5.3, 3.5, 3.2) mm for H&N and (7.3, 7.0, 9.0) mm for prostate cancer treatments. CONCLUSIONS It was found that assessing all the involved uncertainties within radiation treatments was very revealing; their quality improves using IGRT techniques and performing extensive data analysis. PMID:22082648

  10. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    SciTech Connect

    Ruetten, Heidi; Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J.; Takes, Robert P.; Knuijt, Simone; Berg, Manon van den; Merkx, Matthias A.; Herpen, Carla M.L. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  11. CT angiography - head and neck

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - brain; CTA - skull; CTA - cranial; TIA-CTA head; Stroke-CTA head; Computed tomography angiography - neck; CTA - neck; Vertebral artery - CTA; Carotid artery stenosis - CTA; ...

  12. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of atlantoaxial joint in a middle-aged man presenting with deafness as first symptom and soft-tissue mass at neck showing excellent response to radiotherapy alone: Report of an extremely rare and unusual clinical condition and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Dodul; Julka, P. K.; Jana, Manisha; Walia, Ritika; Chaudhuri, Tamojit

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disorder of clonal proliferation of dendritic cell mainly occurring in children. Spine involvement is rare. This usually presents with pain and torticollis when neck is involved. Histopathology with immunohistochemistry is confirmatory. Local curative therapy with excision or curettage is used for localized disease. Radiotherapy is usually reserved for selected cases. Systemic chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for widespread systemic disease. In this article, we present an unusual presentation of atlantoaxial LCH with mastoid involvement resulting in hearing loss as the first symptom and quadruparesis in a middle aged male patient, which was also associated with soft-tissue mass at the nape of the neck and deafness. The patient was treated with radical radiotherapy, which provided excellent response to the disease. Involvement of atlantoaxial joint and temporal bone associated with soft-tissue mass neck and deafness in a middle-aged man is an extremely rare clinical situation. PMID:25506166

  13. Low-level laser therapy for the prevention of low salivary flow rate after radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Gonnelli, Fernanda Aurora Stabile; Palma, Luiz Felipe; Giordani, Adelmo José; Deboni, Aline Lima Silva; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether low-level laser therapy can prevent salivary hypofunction after radiotherapy and chemotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Materials and Methods We evaluated 23 head and neck cancer patients, of whom 13 received laser therapy and 10 received clinical care only. An InGaAlP laser was used intra-orally (at 660 nm and 40 mW) at a mean dose of 10.0 J/cm2 and extra-orally (at 780 nm and 15 mW) at a mean dose of 3.7 J/cm2, three times per week, on alternate days. Stimulated and unstimulated sialometry tests were performed before the first radiotherapy and chemotherapy sessions (N0) and at 30 days after the end of treatment (N30). Results At N30, the mean salivary flow rates were significantly higher among the laser therapy patients than among the patients who received clinical care only, in the stimulated and unstimulated sialometry tests (p = 0.0131 and p = 0.0143, respectively). Conclusion Low-level laser therapy, administered concomitantly with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, appears to mitigate treatment-induced salivary hypofunction in patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:27141130

  14. Patterns of nodal relapse after surgery and postoperative radiation therapy for carcinomas of the major and minor salivary glands: What is the role of elective neck irradiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. . E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com; Garcia, Joaquin; Lee, Nancy Y.; Bucci, M. Kara; Eisele, David W.

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of nodal relapses from carcinomas of the salivary glands among patients with clinically negative necks in an attempt to determine the potential utility of elective neck irradiation (ENI). Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 251 patients with clinically N0 carcinomas of the salivary glands were treated with surgery and postoperative radiation therapy. None of the patients had undergone previous neck dissection. Histology was: adenoid cystic (84 patients), mucoepidermoid (60 patients), adenocarcinoma (58 patients), acinic cell (21 patients), undifferentiated (11 patients), carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (7 patients), squamous cell (7 patients), and salivary duct carcinoma (3 patients); 131 patients (52%) had ENI. Median follow-up was 62 months (range, 3-267 months). Results: The 5- and 10-year actuarial estimates of nodal relapse were 11% and 13%, respectively. The 10-year actuarial rates of nodal failure were 7%, 5%, 12%, and 16%, for patients with T1, T2, T3, and T4 disease, respectively (p = 0.11). The use of ENI reduced the 10-year nodal failure rate from 26% to 0% (p = 0.0001). The highest crude rates of nodal relapse among those treated without ENI were found in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (67%), undifferentiated carcinoma (50%), adenocarcinoma (34%), and mucoepidermoid carcinoma (29%). There were no nodal failures observed among patients with adenoid cystic or acinic cell histology. Conclusion: ENI effectively prevents nodal relapses and should be used for select patients at high risk for regional failure.

  15. Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy With Mitomycin C and Cisplatin in Advanced Unresectable Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Phase I-II Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Strojan, Primoz Karner, Katarina; Smid, Lojze; Soba, Erika; Fajdiga, Igor; Jancar, Boris; Anicin, Aleksandar; Budihna, Marjan; Zakotnik, Branko

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of concomitant chemoradiotherapy with mitomycin C and cisplatin in the treatment of advanced unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: Treatment consisted of conventional radiotherapy (70 Gy in 35 fractions), mitomycin C 15 mg/m{sup 2} IV, applied after the delivery of 10 Gy, and cisplatin at an initial dose of 10 mg/m{sup 2}/d IV, applied during the last 10 fractions of irradiation ('chemoboost'). The cisplatin dose was escalated with respect to the toxic side effects by 2 mg/m{sup 2}/d up to the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or at the most 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d (Phase I study), which was tested in the subsequent Phase II study. Results: All 36 patients had Stage T4 and/or N3 disease, and the majority had oropharyngeal (50%) or hypopharyngeal (39%) primary tumors. Six patients were treated at each of the three cisplatin dose levels tested (Phase I study). Dose-limiting toxicity was not reached even at 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d of cisplatin, which was determined as the MTD and tested in an additional 18 patients (Phase II study). After a median follow-up time of 48 months, 4-year locoregional control, failure-free, and overall survival rates were 30%, 14%, and 20%, respectively. In 24 patients treated at the cisplatin dose level of 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d, the corresponding rates were 40%, 20%, and 22%, respectively. Conclusion: Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with mitomycin C and cisplatin 'chemoboost' at 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d is feasible, with encouraging survival results if the extremely poor disease profile of the treated patients is considered.

  16. Cisplatin/Tegafur/Uracil/Irinotecan Triple Combination Therapy for Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Phase I/II Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, San-Chi; Chang, Peter Mu-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Lessons Learned Cisplatin/tegafur/uracil/irinotecan triple combination therapy shows moderate response, especially in patients without previous chemoradiotherapy within the 6 months before this combination therapy. Toxicity is tolerable, and quality of life is improved in responders. Background. The prognosis is poor in recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (R/M HNSCC). Triple combination therapy may increase tumor response. Methods. This phase I/II prospective trial first determined the dose-limiting toxicity and recommended dose of irinotecan with cisplatin and tegafur/uracil (UFUR) in phase I. Irinotecan was supplied at doses of 40, 50, 60, and 70 mg/m2 by using a standard 3+3 design. Doses of cisplatin and UFUR were held stable. In phase II, the recommended dose of irinotecan was administered intravenously (i.v.) over 90 min on day 1, with cisplatin 50 mg/m2 i.v. over 60 min also on day 1, and oral UFUR 200 mg twice a day for 5 days every 2 weeks a cycle. Results. In the phase I portion, 14 patients were enrolled, and the dose level of irinotecan at 60 mg/m2 was defined as the recommended dose for the phase II portion of the study. Among 43 patients enrolled in the phase II portion, complete response was seen in 2 patients (4.7%) and partial response in 10 patients (23.3%), and the disease control rate was 39.5%. In a subgroup analysis of patients whose prior chemoradiotherapy was more than 6 months earlier, a response rate of 40.7% and disease control rate of 59.3% were observed. Conclusion. Cisplatin/UFUR/irinotecan triple combination therapy is tolerated and effective for selected patients. Individualized choice of treatment will influence prognosis and quality of life in R/M HNSCC patients. PMID:27091418

  17. Prospective clinical study on long-term swallowing function and voice quality in advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy and preventive swallowing exercises.

    PubMed

    Kraaijenga, Sophie A C; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Hilgers, Frans J M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2015-11-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for advanced head and neck cancer (HNC) is associated with substantial early and late side effects, most notably regarding swallowing function, but also regarding voice quality and quality of life (QoL). Despite increased awareness/knowledge on acute dysphagia in HNC survivors, long-term (i.e., beyond 5 years) prospectively collected data on objective and subjective treatment-induced functional outcomes (and their impact on QoL) still are scarce. The objective of this study was the assessment of long-term CCRT-induced results on swallowing function and voice quality in advanced HNC patients. The study was conducted as a randomized controlled trial on preventive swallowing rehabilitation (2006-2008) in a tertiary comprehensive HNC center with twenty-two disease-free and evaluable HNC patients as participants. Multidimensional assessment of functional sequels was performed with videofluoroscopy, mouth opening measurements, Functional Oral Intake Scale, acoustic voice parameters, and (study specific, SWAL-QoL, and VHI) questionnaires. Outcome measures at 6 years post-treatment were compared with results at baseline and at 2 years post-treatment. At a mean follow-up of 6.1 years most initial tumor-, and treatment-related problems remained similarly low to those observed after 2 years follow-up, except increased xerostomia (68%) and increased (mild) pain (32%). Acoustic voice analysis showed less voicedness, increased fundamental frequency, and more vocal effort for the tumors located below the hyoid bone (n = 12), without recovery to baseline values. Patients' subjective vocal function (VHI score) was good. Functional swallowing and voice problems at 6 years post-treatment are minimal in this patient cohort, originating from preventive and continued post-treatment rehabilitation programs.

  18. Molecular and Clinical Responses in a Pilot Study of Gefitinib with Paclitaxel and Radiation in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Van Waes, Carter; Allen, Clint T.; Citrin, Deborah; Gius, David; Colevas, A. Dimetrios; Harold, Nancy A.; Rudy, Susan; Nottingham, Liesl; Muir, Christine; Chen, Zhong; Singh, Anurag K.; Dancey, Janet; Morris, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) stimulates tumor cell proliferation, inhibits apoptosis, and increases chemotherapy and radiation resistance. We examined the toxicity, safety and the effects on EGFR signaling in tumor biopsies from patients with locally advanced HNSCC treated with the EGFR signaling inhibitor gefitinib (GEF) combined with weekly intravenous paclitaxel (PAC) and radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials A pilot phase I dose-escalation study. Eligibility included stage III-IVB HNSCC, age ≥18 years, no prior RT or chemotherapy, adequate organ function and informed consent. Endpoints included determination of maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and analysis of treatment effect on EGFR signaling, tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis in biopsies. Results Ten patients were treated. The MTD of this combination was GEF 250 mg/d with PAC 36 mg/m2 I.V. weekly × 6 with concurrent RT. Grade 3/4 toxicities included prolonged (>8 weeks) stomatitis (7 patients), infection (1), and interstitial pneumonitis (1). There were five complete responses (CR) and two partial responses (PR). Of 7 patients undergoing serial biopsies, only one demonstrated a reduction in phosphorylated-EGFR, decreased downstream signaling and reduced cellular proliferation after initiating GEF. Conclusions GEF inhibition of EGFR was observed in only one of seven tumors studied. The addition of GEF to PAC and RT did not appear to improve the response of locally advanced HNSCC compared to our prior experience with PAC and RT alone. This treatment appeared to delay recovery from stomatitis. PMID:19879702

  19. Molecular and Clinical Responses in a Pilot Study of Gefitinib With Paclitaxel and Radiation in Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Van Waes, Carter; Allen, Clint T.; Citrin, Deborah; Gius, David; Colevas, A. Dimetrios; Harold, Nancy A.; Rudy, Susan; Nottingham, Liesl; Muir, Christine; Chen, Zhong; Singh, Anurag K.; Dancey, Janet; Morris, John C.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) stimulates tumor cell proliferation, inhibits apoptosis, and increases chemotherapy and radiation resistance. We examined the toxicity, safety and the effects on EGFR signaling in tumor biopsy samples from patients with locally advanced HNSCC treated with the EGFR signaling inhibitor gefitinib (GEF) combined with weekly intravenous paclitaxel (PAC) and radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: This was a pilot Phase I dose-escalation study. Eligibility included Stage III to IVB HNSCC, age >=18 years, no prior RT or chemotherapy, adequate organ function, and informed consent. Endpoints included determination of maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and analysis of treatment effect on EGFR signaling, tumor cell proliferation, and apoptosis in biopsy samples. Results: Ten patients were treated. The MTD of this combination was GEF 250 mg/d with PAC 36 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously weekly x 6 with concurrent RT. Grade 3/4 toxicities included prolonged (>8 weeks) stomatitis (7 patients), infection (2 patients), and interstitial pneumonitis (1 patient). There were five complete responses (CR) and two partial responses (PR). Of 7 patients undergoing serial biopsies, only 1 patient demonstrated a reduction in phosphorylated EGFR, decreased downstream signaling, and reduced cellular proliferation after initiating GEF. Conclusions: Inhibition of EGFR by GEF was observed in only one of seven tumors studied. The addition of GEF to PAC and RT did not appear to improve the response of locally advanced HNSCC compared with our prior experience with PAC and RT alone. This treatment appeared to delay recovery from stomatitis.

  20. Sarcoidosis of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Badhey, Arvind K; Kadakia, Sameep; Carrau, Ricardo L; Iacob, Codrin; Khorsandi, Azita

    2015-06-01

    Sarcoidosis is a complex disorder that often times involves the head and neck. Despite the presence of strong clinical evidence, tissue diagnosis and imaging is needed for confirmation of the disease. Although typically managed medically, when found in the sinonasal tract or intracranially, it may necessitate the intervention of a rhinologist-skull base surgeon. This article seeks to provide a comprehensive review of head and neck sarcoidosis, as this fascinating disorder often poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. A brief discussion of surgical treatment for pituitary lesions is also provided. Articles from 1997 to 2013 were selected and reviewed by three researchers utilizing the most recent literature regarding sarcoidosis in the head and neck. PubMed searches were conducted using search terms such as "sarcoidosis", "neurosarcoid", and "extra-pulmonary sarcoid", among many others. A large collection of articles was generated and reviewed by the team of authors, and appropriate information was extracted to compose a thorough and expansive review of the subject. 10-15 % of patients with sarcoidosis have head and neck manifestations. Sinonasal and pituitary sarcoidosis presents a diagnostic challenge owing to its non-specific symptoms. Although systemic steroid therapy is often the first time treatment, endoscopic surgery is commonly used to treat advanced pituitary sarcoidosis refractory to medical management. As tissue diagnosis and imaging is key, a multi-disciplinary team approach is advantageous. Our study collates the available literature on head and neck sarcoidosis to provide a comprehensive review of the subject. This provides helpful information to guide all practitioners involved in the care of these challenging patients, namely pathologists, radiologists, otolaryngologists, and skull base surgeons, in the workup and management of head and neck sarcoidosis.

  1. Effectiveness of a tailored neck training program on neck strength, movement, and fatigue in under-19 male rugby players: a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Matthew D; McLoughlin, Terence F; Gallagher, Kieran R; Gatherer, Don; Parratt, Michael TR; Perera, Jonathan R; Briggs, Tim WR

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of a tailored neck muscle conditioning program on neck muscle strength, neck muscle fatigue, and range of neck movement in 16–18-year-old male rugby players. Materials and methods Thirty-four male rugby players were divided into forward and back playing positions and randomized within these groups. Seventeen players were randomly assigned to each group. The test group was given a tailored 6-week exercise regime based on their baseline measurements to be performed three times a week in addition to their normal training and playing. The control group trained and played as normal. The outcome measures used were cervical spine range of movement, neck strength, and neck muscle fatigability. Results There were no clinically relevant statistically significant differences between the two groups. Trends identified between the two groups suggest that a tailored neck exercise program increases neck strength, particularly neck extension, and increases resistance to fatigue, as well as influencing right- and left-sided neck muscle balance. A reduction in range of movement was also demonstrated in the test group. There was a great deal of variability in range of movement and strength within this age group. No previously undiagnosed neck conditions were detected, and there were no adverse events reported. Conclusion This study has shown that neck strength, range of movement, and susceptibility of the neck muscles to fatigue can be influenced using a focused neck training regime. It forms an important basis for a larger, multicenter study to ensure the neck is given due attention in rugby training and receives the same focus of conditioning as other parts of the body. PMID:25999771

  2. Neck motion in the high school football player. Observations and suggestions for diminishing stresses on the neck.

    PubMed

    Pearl, A J; Mayer, P W

    1979-01-01

    In a group of 40 high school athletes (height: 166.37 to 189.57 cm, average, 174.40 cm; neck circumference: 35.56 to 41.91 cm, average, 39.12 cm), the neck motions were studied in flexion and extension, clinically, radiographically, and cineoradiographically. Flexion ranged from 34 to 84 degrees (average 72 degrees) and extension from 21 to 64 degrees (average 45 degrees) without helmet and shoulder pads. In well-fitting equipment flexion ranged from 36 to 86 degrees (average 73 degrees) and extension from 12 to 56 degrees(average 34 degrees). No correlation was determined between the size of the athlete's neck and the range of motion. The size of the athlete's neck was important in the determination of maximum stresses in the neck. The helmets impinged on the shoulder pads or interscapular region; this impingement diminished tension on the anterior portion of the cervical spine in extension. The face masks impinged on the shoulder pads in flexion of the neck; this impingement diminished stress on the posterior musculature. Proper fitting equipment, conditioning neck exercises, and changes in the rules of the game so that abuse of the head and neck is not encouraged are some of the aspects that may reduce the risk of injury to the cervical region in football players.

  3. Comparative aspects of chronic pain in the head and neck versus trunk and appendages: experiences of the Multidisciplinary University of North Carolina Pain Clinic.

    PubMed

    Gregg, J M; Ghia, J N

    1981-05-01

    The interdisciplinary University of North Carolina Pain Clinic, in existence since 1973, is a coordination center for research, pre and postdoctoral and resident training, and clinical services. It functions primarily as a tertiary care center for outpatients as a component of the North Carolina Memorial Hospital. Inpatient consultations and therapy direction are carried out on request. Approximately 400 new patient visits and 1,200 consults and return visits are made yearly. The clinic is administered by codirectors from the Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Anesthesiology. Consultants to the clinic include the disciplines of psychiatry, neurosurgery, family medicine, pathology-oral pathology, dentistry, physical therapy, social work and nursing. Support staff includes a head nurse, half-time transcription and half-time general secretary and a financial technician. Facilities consist of an 8-room clinic dual equipped for patient care and clinical research. An adjacent conference room is used for research and patient presentation conferences. In addition to routine examining and interview rooms, a minor procedure operating room is equipped with resuscitation equipment, suction, oxygen, anesthesia machine, a physiologic monitoring system with polygraph, a cryosurgical unit and a radiofrequency lesion generator. A second room is equipped for neurosensory studies of peripheral nerve functions including a battery of tactile-mechanical and thermal threshold stimuli tests, as well as nerve conduction and EMG. A system for psychophysical testing is available through tie-in with a computer, which is located in an adjacent laboratory used for data analysis and also subhuman primate experiments. Another room is equipped with psychophysiologic training equipment, particularly EMG biofeedback. A computer terminal on line to the University IBM 360 is located in the Pain Clinic for use in entering patient-research data. A library with dictating space is available

  4. [Head and neck adaptive radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Graff, P; Huger, S; Kirby, N; Pouliot, J

    2013-10-01

    Onboard volumetric imaging systems can provide accurate data of the patient's anatomy during a course of head and neck radiotherapy making it possible to assess the actual delivered dose and to evaluate the dosimetric impact of complex daily positioning variations and gradual anatomic changes such as geometric variations of tumors and normal tissues or shrinkage of external contours. Adaptive radiotherapy is defined as the correction of a patient's treatment planning to adapt for individual variations observed during treatment. Strategies are developed to selectively identify patients that require replanning because of an intolerable dosimetric drift. Automated tools are designed to limit time consumption. Deformable image registration algorithms are the cornerstones of these strategies, but a better understanding of their limits of validity is required before adaptive radiotherapy can be safely introduced to daily practice. Moreover, strict evaluation of the clinical benefits is yet to be proven.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Cancer; Head and Neck Sarcoma; Paraganglioma of Head and Neck; Chordoma of Head and Neck; Chondrosarcoma of Head and Neck; Angiofibroma of Head and Neck

  6. Neck swelling after thyroidectomy: not always a haematoma.

    PubMed

    Zou, Maggie; Reid, Diane; Ravichandran, Duraisamy

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a patient who returned with a neck swelling 6 days following thyroidectomy and central neck compartment lymphadenectomy for suspected thyroid carcinoma. The initial clinical suspicion pointed to a haematoma, but a needle aspiration showed chyle. Chyle leak is a rare complication of thyroid surgery. In the described case, this was successfully managed conservatively with repeated aspirations and a low-fat diet. We discuss the aetiology, presentation and management of this complication. PMID:26564112

  7. Penetrating nontorso trauma: the head and the neck

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Chad G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Acute penetrating injuries to the head and neck cause considerable anxiety for most clinicians owing to concern for airway control and neurologic injury and to limited clinician experience in most centres. This article discusses an organized approach to the evaluation and initial treatment of penetrating injuries to the head and neck based on regional anatomy and clinical examination. The approach is particularly helpful in the context of ongoing hemorrhage and/or airway compromise. PMID:26022154

  8. Penetrating nontorso trauma: the head and the neck.

    PubMed

    Ball, Chad G

    2015-08-01

    Acute penetrating injuries to the head and neck cause considerable anxiety for most clinicians owing to concern for airway control and neurologic injury and to limited clinician experience in most centres. This article discusses an organized approach to the evaluation and initial treatment of penetrating injuries to the head and neck based on regional anatomy and clinical examination. The approach is particularly helpful in the context of ongoing hemorrhage and/or airway compromise.

  9. Multi-institutional Quantitative Evaluation and Clinical Validation of Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE) Autosegmentation of Target Structures and Normal Tissues on Computer Tomography Images in the Head and Neck, Thorax, Liver, and Male Pelvis Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bzdusek, Karl; Brink, Carsten; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Hansen, Olfred; Jensen, Helle Anita; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Widder, Joachim; Brouwer, Charlotte L.; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Vanhauten, Hubertus A.M.; Cao, Jeffrey Q.; McBrayne, Gail; Patel, Salil H.; Cannon, Donald M.; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Tomé, Wolfgang A.; Guckenberg, Matthias; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Clinical validation and quantitative evaluation of computed tomography (CT) image autosegmentation using Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE). Methods and Materials: CT images of 125 treated patients (32 head and neck [HN], 40 thorax, 23 liver, and 30 prostate) in 7 independent institutions were autosegmented using SPICE and computational times were recorded. The number of structures autocontoured were 25 for the HN, 7 for the thorax, 3 for the liver, and 6 for the male pelvis regions. Using the clinical contours as reference, autocontours of 22 selected structures were quantitatively evaluated using Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and Mean Slice-wise Hausdorff Distance (MSHD). All 40 autocontours were evaluated by a radiation oncologist from the institution that treated the patients. Results: The mean computational times to autosegment all the structures using SPICE were 3.1 to 11.1 minutes per patient. For the HN region, the mean DSC was >0.70 for all evaluated structures, and the MSHD ranged from 3.2 to 10.0 mm. For the thorax region, the mean DSC was 0.95 for the lungs and 0.90 for the heart, and the MSHD ranged from 2.8 to 12.8 mm. For the liver region, the mean DSC was >0.92 for all structures, and the MSHD ranged from 5.2 to 15.9 mm. For the male pelvis region, the mean DSC was >0.76 for all structures, and the MSHD ranged from 4.8 to 10.5 mm. Out of the 40 autocontoured structures reviews by experts, 25 were scored useful as autocontoured or with minor edits for at least 90% of the patients and 33 were scored useful autocontoured or with minor edits for at least 80% of the patients. Conclusions: Compared with manual contouring, autosegmentation using SPICE for the HN, thorax, liver, and male pelvis regions is efficient and shows significant promise for clinical utility.

  10. Osteoma with cholesteatoma of the external auditory canal: neck manifestation of this rare association†

    PubMed Central

    Khoyratty, Fadil; Sweed, Ahmed; Douglas, Susan; Magdy, Tawfik

    2013-01-01

    Osteoma and cholesteatoma of the external auditory canal is a rare clinical finding, presenting specific challenges in patients suffering from this dual pathology of the ear. We report on a unique complication of this association in a patient suffering with recurrent neck abscesses. Neck disease secondary to cholesteatoma has become nearly extinct with better clinical imaging and sensible antibiotic usage. PMID:24964451

  11. Induction cytotoxic chemotherapy: the significance of apparent complete clinical regression after using the Price Hill Schedule A protocol for squamous carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Shaw, H J

    1988-12-01

    A small group of 46 previously untreated patients out of about 260 in all who have received Price Hill Schedule A cytotoxic chemotherapy, achieved apparent complete clinical regression (ACCR) of their disease before local treatment. Forty patients were classified T3 or T4, over half having clinically positive nodes at the start of treatment. A determinate survival rate of 70 per cent disease free at three years was obtained and 74 per cent achieved quality relief of all symptoms. Two patients declined local treatment and survived three years disease free after chemotherapy alone. No recurrence has occurred to date in seven patients achieving apparent complete histological regression (ACHR) in their surgical specimens. Although ACCR does not automatically improve prognosis it is likely that it does enhance the complete remission rate, especially for those also achieving ACHR. Benefits to patients obtaining ACCR with this minimally toxic chemotherapy schedule are listed. PMID:2465362

  12. A prospective picture collection study for a grading atlas of radiation dermatitis for clinical trials in head-and-neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Ota, Yosuke; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Ishii, Shinobu; Hashiguchi, Chikako; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Radiation dermatitis is one of the most common acute toxicities of both radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Many clinical trials have evaluated the level of toxicity using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events ver. 4.03. This criterion accounts for severity in a single sentence only, and no visual classification guide has been available. Thus, there is a risk of subjective interpretation by the individual investigator. This contrasts with the situation with hematologic toxicities, which can be interpreted objectively. The aim of this prospective picture collection study was to develop a grading tool for use in establishing the severity of radiation dermatitis in clinical trials. A total of 118 patients who were scheduled to receive definitive or postoperative radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy were enrolled from the four participating cancer centers. All researchers in our group used the same model of camera under the same shooting conditions to maintain consistent photographic quality. In all, 1600 photographs were collected. Of these, 100 photographs qualified for the first round of selection and were then graded by six experts, basically in accordance with the CTCAE ver. 4.03 (JCOG ver. in Japanese). After further study, 38 photographs were selected as representing typical models for Grade 1–4 radiation dermatitis; the radiation dermatitis grading atlas was produced from these photographs. The atlas will play a major role in ensuring that the dermatitis rating system is consistent between the institutions participating in trials. We hope that this will contribute to improving the quality of clinical trials, and also to improving the level of routine clinical practice. PMID:26850926

  13. A prospective picture collection study for a grading atlas of radiation dermatitis for clinical trials in head-and-neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Ota, Yosuke; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Ishii, Shinobu; Hashiguchi, Chikako; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2016-06-01

    Radiation dermatitis is one of the most common acute toxicities of both radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Many clinical trials have evaluated the level of toxicity using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events ver. 4.03. This criterion accounts for severity in a single sentence only, and no visual classification guide has been available. Thus, there is a risk of subjective interpretation by the individual investigator. This contrasts with the situation with hematologic toxicities, which can be interpreted objectively. The aim of this prospective picture collection study was to develop a grading tool for use in establishing the severity of radiation dermatitis in clinical trials. A total of 118 patients who were scheduled to receive definitive or postoperative radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy were enrolled from the four participating cancer centers. All researchers in our group used the same model of camera under the same shooting conditions to maintain consistent photographic quality. In all, 1600 photographs were collected. Of these, 100 photographs qualified for the first round of selection and were then graded by six experts, basically in accordance with the CTCAE ver. 4.03 (JCOG ver. in Japanese). After further study, 38 photographs were selected as representing typical models for Grade 1-4 radiation dermatitis; the radiation dermatitis grading atlas was produced from these photographs. The atlas will play a major role in ensuring that the dermatitis rating system is consistent between the institutions participating in trials. We hope that this will contribute to improving the quality of clinical trials, and also to improving the level of routine clinical practice. PMID:26850926

  14. Myofascial trigger point-focused head and neck massage for recurrent tension-type headache: A randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Moraska, Albert F.; Stenerson, Lea; Butryn, Nathan; Krutsch, Jason P.; Schmiege, Sarah J.; Mann, J. Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Objective Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are focal disruptions in skeletal muscle that can refer pain to the head and reproduce the pain patterns of tension-type headache (TTH). The present study applied massage focused on MTrPs of subjects with TTH in a placebo-controlled, clinical trial to assess efficacy on reducing headache pain. Methods Fifty-six subjects with TTH were randomized to receive 12 massage or placebo (detuned ultrasound) sessions over six weeks, or to wait-list. Trigger point release (TPR) massage focused on MTrPs in cervical musculature. Headache pain (frequency, intensity and duration) was recorded in a daily headache diary. Additional outcome measures included self-report of perceived clinical change in headache pain and pressure-pain threshold (PPT) at MTrPs in the upper trapezius and sub-occipital muscles. Results From diary recordings, group differences across time were detected in headache frequency (p=0.026), but not for intensity or duration. Post hoc analysis indicated headache frequency decreased from baseline for both massage (p<0.0003) and placebo (p=0.013), but no difference was detected between massage and placebo. Subject report of perceived clinical change was a greater reduction in headache pain for massage than placebo or wait-list groups (p=0.002). PPT improved in all muscles tested for massage only (all p's<0.002). Discussion Two findings from this study are apparent: 1) MTrPs are important components in the treatment of TTH, and 2) TTH, like other chronic conditions, is responsive to placebo. Clinical trials on headache that do not include a placebo group are at risk for overestimating the specific contribution from the active intervention. PMID:25329141

  15. Hyperparathyroidism after neck irradiation.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Chapple, C R; Noble, J G; Milroy, E J; Cowie, A G

    1988-09-01

    A retrospective review of 1550 cases of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) treated surgically over a 30-year period reveals a past history of exposure to neck irradiation in 10 cases (0.7 per cent). The indication for radiotherapy was benign disease in nine and papillary thyroid carcinoma in one case. The mean interval between radiation exposure and the detection of HPT was 32 years (range 3-63 years). Patients treated with radioactive iodine alone developed HPT after a mean of 5 years while the interval for those treated with external beam therapy alone was a mean of 44 years. The parathyroid histology was adenoma in six cases, carcinoma in three cases and nodular hyperplasia in one case. All patients had coincident benign thyroid disease apart from one that had previously had papillary carcinoma and another with follicular carcinoma. Neck irradiation has been shown to confer an increased risk of HPT due to parathyroid adenoma and carcinoma. Radiotherapy for benign disease has generally been abandoned and these cases demonstrate a further contra-indication for the use of neck irradiation.

  16. Elective neck irradiation in the treatment of cancer of the oral tongue

    SciTech Connect

    Leborgne, F.; Leborgne, J.H.; Barlocci, L.A.; Ortega, B.

    1987-08-01

    A total of 69 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue Stages T1-2-3 N0 were treated between 1952 and 1982 at one cancer center in Montevideo, Uruguay. Of 52 patients with the primary disease controlled, 2 had elective cervical lymph node dissection, and were therefore excluded from the study, 25 were treated with elective neck irradiation, and 25 were followed without irradiation to the neck. In the untreated group, 40% developed neck node metastases, while this was observed only in 20% of the group receiving elective neck irradiation, but only 4% recurred in the elective irradiated areas of the neck (p: 0.0028). The survival was the same for each group (5-year absolute survival with NED 67% for the neck irradiation group and 64% for the unirradiated group). From this retrospective study, we conclude that elective neck irradiation in carcinoma of the oral tongue decreases the incidence of neck metastases but an improvement in survival of these patients was not demonstrated.

  17. Integration of Fluorescence Differential Path-Length Spectroscopy to Photodynamic Therapy of the Head and Neck Tumors is Useful in Monitoring Clinical Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakullukcu, Baris; Kanick, Stephen; Aans, Jan Bonne; Sterenborg, Henricus; Tan, Bing; Amelink, Arjen; Robinson, Dominic

    2015-04-01

    The use of fluorescence differential pathlength spectroscopy (FDPS) has the potential to provide real-time information on photosensitiser pharmacokinetics, vascular physiology and photosensitizer photobleaching based dosimetry of tumors in the oral cavity receiving m-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC) photodynamic therapy (PDT). Reflectance spectra can be used provide quantitative values of oxygen saturation, blood volume fraction, blood vessel diameter, and to determine the local optical properties that can be used to correct raw fluorescence for tissue absorption. Patients and methods: Twenty-seven lesions in the oral cavity, either dysplasias or cancer were interrogated using FDPS, before and immediately after the therapeutic illumination. The average tumor center to normal mucosa ratio of fluorescence was 1.50 ± 0.66. mTHPC photobleaching was observed in 24 of the lesions treated. The average extent of photobleaching was 81% ± 17%. Information from FDPS spectroscopy coupled with the clinical results of the treatment identified 3 types of correctable errors in the application of mTHPC-PDT: Two patients exhibited very low concentrations of photosensitizer in tumour center, indicating an ineffective i.v. injection of photosensitiser or an erroneous systemic distribution of mTHPC. In one in tumor we observed no photobleaching accompanied by a high blood volume fraction in the illuminated tissue, suggesting that the presence of blood prevented therapeutic light reaching the target tissue. All 3 of the these lesions had no clinical response to PDT. In four patients we observed less than 50% photobleaching at the tumor margins , suggesting a possible geographic miss. One patient in this group had a recurrence within 2 months after PDT even though the initial response was good. The integration of FDPS to clinical PDT yields data on tissue physiology, photosensitiser content and photobleaching that can help identify treatment errors that can potentially be corrected.

  18. Transoral resection of pharyngeal cancer: summary of a National Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Steering Committee Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, November 6-7, 2011, Arlington, Virginia.

    PubMed

    Adelstein, David J; Ridge, John A; Brizel, David M; Holsinger, F Christopher; Haughey, Bruce H; O'Sullivan, Brian; Genden, Eric M; Beitler, Jonathan J; Weinstein, Gregory S; Quon, Harry; Chepeha, Douglas B; Ferris, Robert L; Weber, Randal S; Movsas, Benjamin; Waldron, John; Lowe, Val; Ramsey, Scott; Manola, Judith; Yueh, Bevan; Carey, Thomas E; Bekelman, Justin E; Konski, Andre A; Moore, Eric; Forastiere, Arlene; Schuller, David E; Lynn, Jean; Ullmann, Claudio Dansky

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances now permit resection of many pharyngeal tumors through the open mouth, an approach that can greatly reduce the morbidity of surgical exposure. These transoral techniques are being rapidly adopted by the surgical community and hold considerable promise. On November 6-7, 2011, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting to address how to further investigate the use of transoral surgery, both in the good prognosis human papillomavirus (HPV)-initiated oropharyngeal cancers, and in those with HPV-unrelated disease. The proceedings of this meeting are summarized. PMID:23015475

  19. Patterns of Care in Elderly Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiation Oncology Patients: A Single-Center Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shaohui; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John; Lockwood, Gina; Bayley, Andrew; Kim, John; Cummings, Bernard; Dawson, Laura A.; Hope, Andrew; Cho, John; Witterick, Ian; Chen, Eric X.; Ringash, Jolie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the patterns of care for elderly head-and-neck cancer patients with those of younger patients. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of all new mucosal head-and-neck cancer referrals to radiation oncology between July 1, 2003 and December 31, 2007 at our institution. The clinical characteristics, treatment pattern, tolerance, and outcomes were compared between the elderly (aged {>=}75 years) and younger (aged <75 years) cohorts. Results: A total of 2,312 patients, including 452 (20%) elderly and 1,860 (80%) younger patients, were studied. The elderly patients were more likely to be women (36% vs. 27%, p <.01) and to have other malignancies (23% vs. 13%, p <.01), Stage I or II disease (38% vs. 32%, p <.01), and N0 status (56% vs. 42%, p <.01). Treatment was less often curative in intent (79% vs. 93%, p <.01). For the 1,487 patients who received definitive radiotherapy (RT), no differences were found between the elderly (n = 238) and younger (n = 1,249) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. Within the subset of 760 patients who received intensified treatment (concurrent chemoradiotherapy or hyperfractionated accelerated RT), no difference was seen between the elderly (n = 46) and younger (n = 714) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. After a median follow-up of 2.5 years, the 2-year cause-specific survival rate after definitive RT was 72% (range, 65-78%) for the elderly vs. 86% (range, 84-88%) for the younger patients (p <.01). Conclusion: Elderly head-and-neck cancer patients exhibited different clinical characteristics and experienced different patterns of care from younger patients. Although age itself was an adverse predictor of cause-specific survival, its effect was modest. Elderly patients selected for definitive RT or intensified RT showed no evidence of impaired treatment tolerance.

  20. [Grading of head and neck neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Agaimy, A; Weichert, W

    2016-07-01

    Tumors of the head and neck form a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms with significant differences in biological behavior and therapeutic strategies. Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity represent the most frequent and, thus, clinically most important malignant neoplasms in this anatomical region. Similar to other neoplasms, grading of head and neck malignancies is based on evaluation of the tumor histology usually including both architectural and cytological features; however, the current consensus grading for head and neck SCC is of limited prognostic and therapeutic value and the reproducibility is low. Therefore, novel grading criteria have been proposed that are based on additional parameters, such as the type of tumor growth pattern at the invasive front (so-called tumor budding). These novel algorithms, however, have not yet been officially endorsed into guidelines. Salivary gland (SG) neoplasms, although less frequent, constitute a second important pathologically and clinically complex group of tumors at this location. In contrast to SCC, grading of these tumors is of high clinical importance. Based on the large variety of carcinoma entities of the SG, both entity-specific (e. g. mucoepidermoid carcinoma) algorithms but also algorithms, which are solely based on the recognition of a specific carcinoma variant with subsequent automatic assignment of the tumor grade (e. g. acinic cell carcinoma and salivary duct carcinoma) are in use. In the sinonasal tract, grading is important for non-intestinal type adenocarcinoma and esthesioneuroblastoma. In this article the most important grading schemes and criteria for head and neck malignancies are presented and their prognostic and therapeutic implications are discussed. PMID:27342593

  1. Unicentric Castleman Disease: An Unusual Cause of An Isolated Neck Mass.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anjay; Aggarwal, Krittika; Agrawal, Himanshu; Sharma, Sonal; Garg, Pankaj Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown aetiology. It manifests in two distinct clinical presentations: unicentric and multicentric. Unicentric CD is rare and may present as an isolated neck mass. A 22-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of right neck swelling that occupied the posterior triangle of the right neck region. After surgical exploration, a solitary, well defined, and hyper vascular mass was excise. A histopathological examination confirmed the lesion as CD, hyaline-vascular variant. CD of the neck is a diagnosis that is usually not taken into consideration while evaluating neck masses due to its rarity and unassuming presentation. It should be keep in the differential diagnosis of neck masses as the clinical and radiological features evade a firm diagnosis. The treatment of unicentric CD is complete surgical excision, which cures the patient. PMID:27660550

  2. Unicentric Castleman Disease: An Unusual Cause of An Isolated Neck Mass

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anjay; Aggarwal, Krittika; Agrawal, Himanshu; Sharma, Sonal; Garg, Pankaj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown aetiology. It manifests in two distinct clinical presentations: unicentric and multicentric. Unicentric CD is rare and may present as an isolated neck mass. A 22-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of right neck swelling that occupied the posterior triangle of the right neck region. After surgical exploration, a solitary, well defined, and hyper vascular mass was excise. A histopathological examination confirmed the lesion as CD, hyaline-vascular variant. CD of the neck is a diagnosis that is usually not taken into consideration while evaluating neck masses due to its rarity and unassuming presentation. It should be keep in the differential diagnosis of neck masses as the clinical and radiological features evade a firm diagnosis. The treatment of unicentric CD is complete surgical excision, which cures the patient. PMID:27660550

  3. Neck pain in children: a retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jocelyn; Davidian, Christine; Mior, Silvano

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Spinal pain in the paediatric population is a significant health issue, with an increasing prevalence as they age. Paediatric patients attend for chiropractor care for spinal pain, yet, there is a paucity of quality evidence to guide the practitioner with respect to appropriate care planning. Methods: A retrospective chart review was used to describe chiropractic management of paediatric neck pain. Two researchers abstracted data from 50 clinical files that met inclusion criteria from a general practice chiropractic office in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. Data were entered into SPSS 15 and descriptively analyzed. Results: Fifty paediatric neck pain patient files were analysed. Patients’ age ranged between 6 and 18 years (mean 13 years). Most (98%) were diagnosed with Grade I–II mechanical neck pain. Treatment frequency averaged 5 visits over 19 days; with spinal manipulative therapy used in 96% of patients. Significant improvement was recorded in 96% of the files. No adverse events were documented. Conclusion: Paediatric mechanical neck pain appears to be successfully managed by chiropractic care. Spinal manipulative therapy appears to benefit paediatric mechanical neck pain resulting from day-today activities with no reported serious adverse events. Results can be used to inform clinical trials assessing effectiveness of manual therapy in managing paediatric mechanical neck pain. PMID:27713576

  4. Abductor pollicis longus tendon division with swan neck thumb deformity.

    PubMed

    Zacharia, Balaji; Puthezhath, Kishore

    2012-08-01

    Swan neck thumb deformity can be caused by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, tendon transfers and paralytic diseases. Abductor pollicis longus is one of the major stabilizing tendon of the carpometacarpal joint of thumb. To the best of our knowledge, swan neck thumb deformity owing to division of abductor pollicis longus tendon is rare. In this article, we describe a case of isolated division of abductor pollicis longus tendon presenting with swan-neck deformity of thumb and discuss the mechanism, management and outcome. The patient was treated by repair of the divided tendon using palmaris longus tendon graft. At approximately 107 weeks following treatment, the patient was having full range of thumb movement and the deformity completely disappeared. We also describe the unusual mechanism whereby an isolated division of abductor pollicis longus tendon results in swan neck thumb deformity. Level of clinical evidence IV. PMID:22825877

  5. Interventional radiology neck procedures.

    PubMed

    Zabala Landa, R M; Korta Gómez, I; Del Cura Rodríguez, J L

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonography has become extremely useful in the evaluation of masses in the head and neck. It enables us to determine the anatomic location of the masses as well as the characteristics of the tissues that compose them, thus making it possible to orient the differential diagnosis toward inflammatory, neoplastic, congenital, traumatic, or vascular lesions, although it is necessary to use computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging to determine the complete extension of certain lesions. The growing range of interventional procedures, mostly guided by ultrasonography, now includes biopsies, drainages, infiltrations, sclerosing treatments, and tumor ablation. PMID:27138033

  6. Interventional radiology neck procedures.

    PubMed

    Zabala Landa, R M; Korta Gómez, I; Del Cura Rodríguez, J L

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonography has become extremely useful in the evaluation of masses in the head and neck. It enables us to determine the anatomic location of the masses as well as the characteristics of the tissues that compose them, thus making it possible to orient the differential diagnosis toward inflammatory, neoplastic, congenital, traumatic, or vascular lesions, although it is necessary to use computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging to determine the complete extension of certain lesions. The growing range of interventional procedures, mostly guided by ultrasonography, now includes biopsies, drainages, infiltrations, sclerosing treatments, and tumor ablation.

  7. Level IIb Neck Dissection in Oral Cavity Cancers- When Should One Address it..?

    PubMed

    Dabholkar, Jyoti Pralhad; Kapre, Neeti Madan

    2016-09-01

    Nodal metastases is the most important prognostic marker for oral cavity cancers. Nodal dissection at level IIb risks damage to the spinal accessory nerve. We aim to study positivity of level IIb lymph nodes in oral cancers. In this non-randomized prospective observational study, 65 patients of oral cavity cancers were evaluated. Appropriate surgery for primary tumour and neck dissection were undertaken. All patients underwent level II b dissection. Out of 67 neck dissections (27 elective and 40 therapeutic), 7 patients had level IIb positive for metastases (10.44 %) with no isolated or contralateral metastases at level IIb and direct correlation with level IIa nodes. There was no statistical association of level IIb positivity with stage or site of primary. Level IIb dissection can be avoided in N0 necks. For therapeutic neck dissections, Level IIb should be cleared if there are positive nodes at level IIa. PMID:27651689

  8. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer This page ... and neck cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer Abitrexate (Methotrexate) ...

  9. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Print to PDF Head and Neck Cancer - Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  10. More on two-dimensional O (N ) models with N =(0 ,1 ) supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Adam J.; Kurianovych, Evgeniy; Shifman, Mikhail

    2016-03-01

    We study the behavior of two-dimensional supersymmetric connections of n copies of O (N ) models with an N =(0 ,1 ) heterotic deformation generated by a right-moving fermion. We develop the model in analogy with the connected N =(0 ,2 ) C P (N -1 ) models for the case of a single connecting fermionic superfield. We calculate the effective potential in the large-N limit and determine the vacuum field configurations. Similarly to other supersymmetry (SUSY) connected models we find that SUSY is unbroken under certain conditions despite the vanishing of the Witten index. Specifically, this preservation of SUSY occurs when we have an even number n of O (N ) families. As in previous cases we show that this result follows from a Zn symmetry under a particular exchange of the O (N ) families. This leads to a definition of a modified Witten index, which guarantees the preservation of SUSY in this case.

  11. Associations among temporomandibular disorders, chronic neck pain and neck pain disability in computer office workers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bragatto, M M; Bevilaqua-Grossi, D; Regalo, S C H; Sousa, J D; Chaves, T C

    2016-05-01

    Neck pain is the most common musculoskeletal complaint among computer office workers. There are several reports about the coexistence of neck pain and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). However, there are no studies investigating this association in the context of work involving computers. The purpose of this study was to verify the association between TMD and neck pain in computer office workers. Fifty-two female computer workers who were divided into two groups: (i) those with self-reported chronic neck pain and disability (WNP) (n = 26) and (ii) those without self-reported neck pain (WONP) (n = 26), and a control group (CG) consisting of 26 women who did not work with computers participated in this study. Clinical assessments were performed to establish a diagnosis of TMD, and craniocervical mechanical pain was assessed using manual palpation and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The results of this study showed that the WNP group had a higher percentage of participants with TMD than the WONP group (42·30% vs. 23·07%, χ(2) = 5·70, P = 0·02). PPTs in all cervical sites were significantly lower in the groups WNP and WONP compared to the CG. Regression analysis revealed TMD, neck pain and work-related factors to be good predictors of disability (R(2) = 0·93, P < 0·001). These results highlighted the importance of considering the work conditions of patients with TMD, as neck disability in computer workers is explained by the association among neck pain, TMD and unfavourable workplace conditions. Consequently, this study attempted to emphasise the importance of considering work activity for minimising neck pain-related disability. PMID:26732204

  12. Post-mastectomy Radiation Therapy for T3N0: A SEER Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew E.; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Martin, Jeffrey M.; Hayes, Shelly B.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is conflicting evidence regarding the benefit of post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) for pathologic stage T3N0M0 breast cancers. We analyzed data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database to investigate the benefit of PMRT in these patients. Methods We queried the SEER database for T3N0M0 breast cancer patients diagnosed from 2000–2010 who underwent modified radical mastectomy. We excluded males, patients with unknown radiation timing/type, other primary tumors, or survival <6 months. 2525 patients were included in this analysis. We performed univariate and multivariate statistical analysis using Chi-squared tests, log rank test, and Cox proportional hazards regression. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and breast cancer-specific survival (CSS). Results Of the 2525 patients identified, 1063 received PMRT. The median follow-up was 56 months (range: 6–131). On univariate analysis, PMRT improved OS (76.5% vs. 61.8%, p<0.01) and CSS (85.0% vs. 82.4%, p<0.01) at 8 years. The use of PMRT remained significant on multivariate analysis: PMRT improved OS (HR 0.63, p<0.001) and CSS (HR 0.77, p=0.045). Low tumor grade (p<0.01) and marital status "married" (p=0.01) also predicted for improved CSS on multivariate analysis. Conclusion(s) PMRT was associated with significant improvements in both CSS and OS in patients with T3N0M0 breast cancers treated with modified radical mastectomy from 2000 to 2010. PMRT should be strongly considered in T3N0M0 patients. PMID:24985911

  13. [Femoral neck fracture].

    PubMed

    Gierer, P; Mittlmeier, T

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of femoral neck fractures increases exponentially with rising age. Young patients are rarely affected but when they are it is mostly due to high energy accidents, whereas older patients suffer from femoral neck fractures by low energy trauma due to osteoporotic changes of the bone mineral density. Treatment options have not essentially changed over the last few years. Non-operative treatment may be a choice in non-dislocated and impacted fractures. Due to the high risk of secondary fracture displacement prophylactic screw osteosynthesis is recommended even in Garden type I fractures. Osteosynthetic fracture stabilization with cannulated screws or angle stable sliding screws, is usually applied in non-displaced fractures and fractures in younger patients. Older patients need rapid mobilization after surgery; therefore, total hip arthroplasty and hemiarthroplasty are commonly used with a low incidence of secondary complications. In addition to sufficient operative treatment a guideline conform osteoprosis therapy should be initiated for the prophylaxis of further fractures and patients should undertake a suitable rehabilitation.

  14. Knowledge and Screening of Head and Neck Cancer Among American Indians in South Dakota

    PubMed Central

    Deschler, Daniel; Sargent, Michele; Emerick, Kevin; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh; Petereit, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We established the level of awareness of risk factors and early symptoms of head and neck cancer among American Indians in South Dakota and determined whether head and neck cancer screening detected clinical findings in this population. Methods. We used the European About Face survey. We added questions about human papillomavirus, a risk factor for head and neck cancer, and demographics. Surveys were administered at 2 public events in 2011. Participants could partake in a head and neck cancer screening at the time of survey administration. Results. Of the 205 American Indians who completed the survey, 114 participated in the screening. Mean head and neck cancer knowledge scores were 26 out of 44. Level of education was the only factor that predicted higher head and neck cancer knowledge (b = 0.90; P = .01). Nine (8%) people had positive head and neck cancer screening examination results. All abnormal clinical findings were in current or past smokers (P = .06). Conclusions. There are gaps in American Indian knowledge of head and neck cancer risk factors and symptoms. Community-based head and neck cancer screening in this population is feasible and may be a way to identify early abnormal clinical findings in smokers. PMID:25320895

  15. Initial Experience of Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated in an Oncologist Led Palliative Cancer Care Clinic at a Tertiary Cancer Care Center in Uttar Pradesh: Is the Initiative of a Full-fledged Palliative Care for Cancer Patients Justified

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Punita; Verma, Mranalini; Kumar, Gaurav; Shrivastava, Resham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Poor socioeconomic status and illiteracy attribute to the advanced presentation of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients in India and are candidates for palliation in our setup. We set up a palliative cancer care clinic (PCCC), and an audit of initial 153 HNC patients is presented. Aims and Objectives: To assess the impact of palliative cancer care services. Methodology: Data of advanced HNC patients suited for palliation were collected to document demography, symptomatology, cancer treatment, and supportive care. Results: One hundred and fifty-three patients were seen during January 2013 to March 2015 in the PCCC. Seventy-two (47%) referral cases were due to disease progression and 81 (53%) due to de novo advanced cases. Median follow-up for this group was 5.3 months. Ninety (59%) cases needed some degree of assistance for their normal activities. Sixty-seven (44%) patients belonged to poor socioeconomic status and 65 (43%) were educated up to equivalent of high school. One hundred and thirty-five (88%) patients had an adequate family support. Pain was the most common presenting symptom in 134 (87%) cases with adequate relief in 112 (84%) patients with another 13 (09%) could not be assessed. Overall median duration of symptoms was 6 months. Cancer-directed therapy was used in 143 (93%) patients. Near the end of life in 47 (73%) out of 63 documented cases, caregivers were psychologically prepared for the inevitable. Conclusion: The role of palliative care team in alleviating physical, psychosocial, and emotional issues of patient and family members was significant. PCCC seems to be a feasible working model in our setup. PMID:27803571

  16. Planned neck dissection for patients with complete response to chemoradiotherapy: a concept approaching obsolescence.

    PubMed

    Ferlito, Alfio; Corry, June; Silver, Carl E; Shaha, Ashok R; Thomas Robbins, K; Rinaldo, Alessandra

    2010-02-01

    The question of efficacy of "planned" neck dissection following complete response to chemoradiation of head and neck cancer is discussed. There is general agreement that preemptive neck dissection in patients who present initially with low volume (N1) neck disease is not necessary. However, routine performance of planned neck dissection for patients who present initially with high volume (> or =N2) disease remains controversial. The authors reviewed a large number of studies reported in the recent literature and discuss how they affect this debate.Twenty-four of the reviewed studies indicate a benefit in regional control obtained by "planned" neck dissection among patients who had bulky neck disease pretreatment. All these studies are retrospective, they do not assess treatment response prior to surgery, although they do show very good regional control rates. Twenty-six studies demonstrate no benefit from "planned" neck dissection after complete clinical response. The reasons for these different conclusions include the development of more effective chemoradiation regimens which have improved the initial locoregional control rates of patients undergoing primary chemoradiation treatment, and improvements in diagnostic technology which have increased ability to detect low volume persistent tumor in the post treatment period. When neck dissection is necessary for persistent or recurrent disease, recent studies have shown that selective or superselective neck dissection may produce results therapeutically equivalent to those obtained with more extensive procedures, with less morbidity.There is now a large body of evidence, based on long-term clinical outcomes, that patients who have achieved a complete clinical (including radiologic) response to chemoradiation have a low rate of isolated neck failure, and the continued use of planned neck dissection for these patients cannot be justified. PMID:19572281

  17. A Planned Neck Dissection Is Not Necessary in All Patients With N2-3 Head-and-Neck Cancer After Sequential Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Soltys, Scott G.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Fee, Willard E.; Pinto, Harlan A.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of a planned neck dissection (PND) after sequential chemoradiotherapy for patients with head-and-neck cancer with N2-N3 nodal disease. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 90 patients with N2-N3 head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated between 1991 and 2001 on two sequential chemoradiotherapy protocols. All patients received induction and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorocuracil, with or without tirapazamine. Patients with less than a clinical complete response (cCR) in the neck proceeded to a PND after chemoradiation. The primary endpoint was nodal response. Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up durations for living and all patients were 8.3 years (range, 1.5-16.3 year) and 5.4 years (range, 0.6-16.3 years), respectively. Of the 48 patients with nodal cCR whose necks were observed, 5 patients had neck failures as a component of their recurrence [neck and primary (n = 2); neck, primary, and distant (n = 1); neck only (n = 1); neck and distant (n = 1)]. Therefore, PND may have benefited only 2 patients (4%) [neck only failure (n = 1); neck and distant failure (n = 1)]. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for those with a clinical partial response (cPR) undergoing PND (n = 30) was 53%. The 5-year neck control rates after cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR were 90%, 93%, and 78%, respectively (p = 0.36). The 5-year disease-free survival rates for the cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR groups were 53%, 75%, and 42%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusion: In our series, patients with N2-N3 neck disease achieving a cCR in the neck, PND would have benefited only 4% and, therefore, is not recommended. Patients with a cPR should be treated with PND. Residual tumor in the PND specimens was associated with poor outcomes; therefore, aggressive therapy is recommended. Studies using novel imaging modalities are needed to better assess treatment response.

  18. Talar Neck Fracture after United Tibiotalar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Platt, W.; Welck, M.; Rudge, B.

    2015-01-01

    Tibiotalar arthrodesis is a well-established treatment for tibiotalar arthritis, for example, in younger high demand patients. Talar neck fractures are less common though well-recognised sequelae of foot ankle trauma. Here we present the clinical case of a 69-year-old male who presented to our institution with a nonunion of a talar neck fracture, having undergone a left tibiotalar fusion 24 years previously. To the authors' knowledge, this injury has only been described once previously in the literature. However, the original case described a fracture sustained in the very early postoperative period following tibiotalar fusion, postulated to be secondary to postimmobilisation osteopaenia or stress risers from metalwork. The aetiology in this case is likely due to axial compression transmitted to the talar neck via the calcaneus. The predisposing factors for nonunion are discussed, highlighting the importance of vigilance for this injury in any patient with concomitant tibiotalar fusion and foot trauma. The management of this patient is discussed. PMID:26491589

  19. Is lymphovascular invasion a powerful predictor for biochemical recurrence in pT3 N0 prostate cancer? Results from the K-CaP database.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, Yejin; Yu, Hwanjo; Choi, In Young; Byun, Seok-Soo; Kwak, Cheol; Chung, Byung Ha; Lee, Hyun Moo; Kim, Choung Soo; Lee, Ji Youl

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) on the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) in pT3 N0 prostate cancer, clinical data were extracted from 1,622 patients with pT3 N0 prostate cancer from the K-CaP database. Patients with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (n = 325) or insufficient pathologic or follow-up data (n = 87) were excluded. The primary endpoint was the oncologic importance of LVI, and the secondary endpoint was the hierarchical relationships for estimating BCR between the evaluated variables. LVI was noted in 260 patients (21.5%) and was significantly associated with other adverse clinicopathologic features. In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, LVI was significantly associated with an increased risk of BCR after adjusting for known prognostic factors. In the Bayesian belief network analysis, LVI and pathologic Gleason score were found to be first-degree associates of BCR, whereas prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, seminal vesicle invasion, perineural invasion, and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia were considered second-degree associates. In the random survival forest, pathologic Gleason score, LVI, and PSA level were three most important variables in determining BCR of patients with pT3 N0 prostate cancer. In conclusion, LVI is one of the most powerful adverse prognostic factors for BCR in patients with pT3 N0 prostate cancer. PMID:27146602

  20. Is lymphovascular invasion a powerful predictor for biochemical recurrence in pT3 N0 prostate cancer? Results from the K-CaP database

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, Yejin; Yu, Hwanjo; Choi, In Young; Byun, Seok-Soo; Kwak, Cheol; Chung, Byung Ha; Lee, Hyun Moo; Kim, Choung Soo; Lee, Ji Youl

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) on the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) in pT3 N0 prostate cancer, clinical data were extracted from 1,622 patients with pT3 N0 prostate cancer from the K-CaP database. Patients with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (n = 325) or insufficient pathologic or follow-up data (n = 87) were excluded. The primary endpoint was the oncologic importance of LVI, and the secondary endpoint was the hierarchical relationships for estimating BCR between the evaluated variables. LVI was noted in 260 patients (21.5%) and was significantly associated with other adverse clinicopathologic features. In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, LVI was significantly associated with an increased risk of BCR after adjusting for known prognostic factors. In the Bayesian belief network analysis, LVI and pathologic Gleason score were found to be first-degree associates of BCR, whereas prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, seminal vesicle invasion, perineural invasion, and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia were considered second-degree associates. In the random survival forest, pathologic Gleason score, LVI, and PSA level were three most important variables in determining BCR of patients with pT3 N0 prostate cancer. In conclusion, LVI is one of the most powerful adverse prognostic factors for BCR in patients with pT3 N0 prostate cancer. PMID:27146602

  1. Neck incision planning for total laryngectomy: A finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Allen L; Clark, James H; Agrawal, Nishant; Moussa, Walied; Richmon, Jeremy D

    2015-11-26

    Post-operative complications can be attributed to technical aspects of surgery, yet no studies have investigated the mechanics behind commonly used incisions for total laryngopharyngectomies (TLP). This procedure, seen in head and neck cancer patients, necessitates free tissue transfer to construct a neo-pharynx, creating an inherently greater risk of complications. We sought to investigate the impact of neck incision location on these post-operative complications for TLP using finite element analysis (FEA). A nonlinear hyperelastic 2-D finite element model was used to evaluate the stress and strain along the incision line of two separate neck incision models commonly used for TLP: low-neck apron (LNA) incisions that incorporate the patient׳s tracheostoma and mid-neck apron (MNA) incisions that do not communicate with the tracheostoma. A constant displacement was applied to the incision to simulate normal neck extension experienced during the post-operative phase. Each neck incision was also modeled at varying strain energy densities to simulate various stages of wound healing. For a constant displacement of 40mm, the principal von Mises stress of the LNA incision varied between 5.87 and 6.41MPa, depending on the hyperelastic properties of the healing incision. This stress was concentrated at the junction of the incision and the fixed tracheostomal edge. The MNA model demonstrated a principal von Mises stress that varied between 0.558 and 0.711MPa and was concentrated along the midline of the neck incision. MNA incisions for TL patients result in principal von Mises stresses which are up to 11 times lower than those seen in LNA incisions. These results coincided with clinical observations from a concurrent study that showed a decrease in rate of wound dehiscence for patients undergoing TLP with an MNA incision.

  2. [Robot-assisted surgery in the head and neck region].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, T K; Friedrich, D T; Schuler, P J

    2016-09-01

    Robot-assisted surgery (RAS) in the head and neck region is believed to have a large potential for the improvement of patient care. Several systems with a master-slave setup are already in routine clinical use, particularly for oncologic surgery. Although specific patient groups may benefit from RAS, there is a lack of randomized clinical studies validating the advantages of these new technological systems in comparison to the existing standard procedures. On the other hand, RAS in the head and neck region is being constantly developed. Currently, the main limitations are the technical miniaturization of the tools and the loss of haptic feedback, as well as the high costs for acquisition and maintenance without financial reimbursement. In any case, the current generation of head and neck surgeons will face the technical, scientific, and ethical challenges of RAS. PMID:27510228

  3. [Robot-assisted surgery in the head and neck region].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, T K; Friedrich, D T; Schuler, P J

    2016-09-01

    Robot-assisted surgery (RAS) in the head and neck region is believed to have a large potential for the improvement of patient care. Several systems with a master-slave setup are already in routine clinical use, particularly for oncologic surgery. Although specific patient groups may benefit from RAS, there is a lack of randomized clinical studies validating the advantages of these new technological systems in comparison to the existing standard procedures. On the other hand, RAS in the head and neck region is being constantly developed. Currently, the main limitations are the technical miniaturization of the tools and the loss of haptic feedback, as well as the high costs for acquisition and maintenance without financial reimbursement. In any case, the current generation of head and neck surgeons will face the technical, scientific, and ethical challenges of RAS.

  4. Outcomes of Induction Chemotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Wu, Li-Li; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Chang, Chia-Lun; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Ding, Yi-Fang; Lin, Ming-Chin; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of induction chemotherapy (CT) is controversial. We compared the survival of head and neck cancer patients receiving docetaxel- or platinum-based induction CT before concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) with the survival of those receiving upfront CCRT alone. Data from the National Health Insurance and cancer registry databases in Taiwan were linked and analyzed. We enrolled patients who had head and neck cancer between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2011. Follow-up was from the index date to December 31, 2013. We included head and neck patients diagnosed according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes 140.0–148.9 who were aged >20 years, at American Joint Committee on Cancer clinical cancer stage III or IV, and receiving induction CT or platinum-based CCRT. The exclusion criteria were a cancer history before head and neck cancer diagnosis, distant metastasis, AJCC clinical cancer stage I or II, receipt of platinum and docetaxel before radiotherapy, an age <20 years, missing sex data, docetaxel use during or after RT, induction CT for >8 weeks before RT, induction CT alone before RT, cetuximab use, adjuvant CT within 90 days after RT completion, an RT dose <7000 cGy, curative head and neck cancer surgery before RT, nasopharyngeal cancer, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, and head and neck cancer recurrence. We enrolled 10,721 stage III–IV head and neck cancer patients, with a median follow-up of 4.18 years (interquartile range, 3.25 years). The CCRT (arm 1), docetaxel-based induction CT (arm 2), and platinum-based CCRT (arm 3; control arm) groups comprised 7968, 503, and 2232 patients, respectively. Arm 3 was used to investigate mortality risk after induction CT. After adjustment for age, sex, clinical stage, and comorbidities, the adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) (95% confidence interval [CI]) for overall death were 1.37 (1.22–1.53) and 1.44 (1.36–1.52) in arms 2 and 3, respectively. In a

  5. Head-Neck Biomechanics in Simulated Rear Impact

    PubMed Central

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A.; Cusick, Joseph F.; Kleinberger, Michael

    1998-01-01

    human head-neck anatomy at the upper cervical spine region and the associated facet joint characteristics, and clinical studies.

  6. A dodecameric ring-like structure of the N0 domain of the type II secretin from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Konstantin V; Delarosa, Jaclyn R; Hol, Wim G J

    2013-09-01

    In many bacteria, secretins from the type II secretion system (T2SS) function as outer membrane gated channels that enable passage of folded proteins from the periplasm into the extracellular milieu. Cryo-electron microscopy of the T2SS secretin GspD revealed previously the dodecameric cylindrical architecture of secretins, and crystal structures of periplasmic secretin domains showed a modular domain organization. However, no high-resolution experimental data has as yet been provided about how the entire T2SS secretin or its domains are organized in a cylindrical fashion. Here we present a crystal structure of the N0 domain of the T2SS secretin GspD from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli containing a helix with 12 subunits per turn. The helix has an outer diameter of ∼125Å and a pitch of only 24Å which suggests a model of a cylindrical dodecameric N0 ring whose dimensions correspond with the cryo-electron microscopy map of Vibrio cholerae GspD. The N0 domain is known to interact with the HR domain of the inner membrane T2SS protein GspC. When the new N0 ring model is combined with the known N0·HR crystal structure, a dodecameric double-ring of twelve N0-HR heterodimers is obtained. In contrast, the previously observed compact N0-N1 GspD module is not compatible with the N0 ring. Interestingly, a N0-N1 T3SS homolog is compatible with forming a N0-N1 dodecameric ring, due to a different N0-vs-N1 orientation. This suggests that the dodecameric N0 ring is an important feature of T2SS secretins with periplasmic domains undergoing considerable motions during exoprotein translocation.

  7. Outcome With Neck Dissection After Chemoradiation for N3 Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Igidbashian, Levon; Fortin, Bernard; Guertin, Louis; Soulieres, Denis; Coulombe, Genevieve; Belair, Manon; Charpentier, Danielle; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of neck dissection (ND) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with N3 disease. Methods and Materials: From March 1998 to September 2006, 70 patients with HNSCC and N3 neck disease were treated with concomitant CRT as primary therapy. Response to treatment was assessed using clinical examination and computed tomography 6 to 8 weeks posttreatment. Neck dissection was not routinely performed and considered for those with less than complete response. Of the patients, 26 (37.1%) achieved clinical complete response (cCR) after CRT. A total of 31 (44.3%) underwent ND after partial response (cPR-ND). Thirteen patients (29.5%) did not achieve cCR and did not undergo ND for the following reasons: incomplete response/progression at primary site, refusal/contraindication to surgery, metastatic progression, or death. These patients were excluded from the analysis. Outcomes were computed using Kaplan-Meier curves and were compared with log rank tests. Results: Comparing the cCR and cPR-ND groups at 2 years, the disease-free survival was respectively 62.7% and 84.9% (p = 0.048); overall survival was 63.0% and 79.4% (p = 0.26), regional relapse-free survival was 87.8% and 96.0% (p = 0.21); and distant disease-free survival was 67.1% and 92.6% (p = 0.059). In the cPR-ND group, 71.0% had no pathologic evidence of disease (PPV of 29.0%). Conclusions: Patients with N3 disease achieving regional cPR and primary cCR who underwent ND seemed to have better outcomes than patients achieving global cCR without ND. Clinical assessment with computed tomography is not adequate for evaluating response to treatment. Because of the inherent limitations of our study, further confirmatory studies are warranted.

  8. The vibration properties of the (n,0) boron nitride nanotubes from ab initio quantum chemical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erba, A.; Ferrabone, M.; Baima, J.; Orlando, R.; Rérat, M.; Dovesi, R.

    2013-02-01

    The vibration spectrum of single-walled zigzag boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is simulated with an ab initio periodic quantum chemical method. The trend towards the hexagonal monolayer (h-BN) in the limit of large tube radius R is explored for a variety of properties related to the vibrational spectrum: vibration frequencies, infrared intensities, oscillator strengths, and vibration contributions to the polarizability tensor. The (n,0) family is investigated in the range from n = 6 (24 atoms in the unit cell and tube radius R = 2.5 Å) to n = 60 (240 atoms in the cell and R = 24.0 Å). Simulations are performed using the CRYSTAL program which fully exploits the rich symmetry of this class of one-dimensional periodic systems: 4n symmetry operators for the general (n,0) tube. Three sets of infrared active phonon bands are found in the spectrum. The first one lies in the 0-600 cm-1 range and goes regularly to zero when R increases; the connection between these normal modes and the elastic and piezoelectric constants of h-BN is discussed. The second (600-800 cm-1) and third (1300-1600 cm-1) sets tend regularly, but with quite different speed, to the optical modes of the h-BN layer. The vibrational contribution of these modes to the two components (parallel and perpendicular) of the polarizability tensor is also discussed.

  9. Anatomic Eponyms in Neuroradiology: Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    In medicine, an eponym is a word-typically referring to an anatomic structure, disease, or syndrome-that is derived from a person's name. Medical eponyms are ubiquitous and numerous. They are also at times controversial. Eponyms reflect medicine's rich and colorful history and can be useful for concisely conveying complex concepts. Familiarity with eponyms facilitates correct usage and accurate communication. In this article, 22 eponyms used to describe anatomic structures of the head and neck are discussed. For each structure, the author first provides a biographical account of the individual for whom the structure is named. An anatomic description and brief discussion of the structure's clinical relevance follow. PMID:27283070

  10. Anatomic Eponyms in Neuroradiology: Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    In medicine, an eponym is a word-typically referring to an anatomic structure, disease, or syndrome-that is derived from a person's name. Medical eponyms are ubiquitous and numerous. They are also at times controversial. Eponyms reflect medicine's rich and colorful history and can be useful for concisely conveying complex concepts. Familiarity with eponyms facilitates correct usage and accurate communication. In this article, 22 eponyms used to describe anatomic structures of the head and neck are discussed. For each structure, the author first provides a biographical account of the individual for whom the structure is named. An anatomic description and brief discussion of the structure's clinical relevance follow.

  11. Acute disposition of neck injuries.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Leslie

    2005-02-01

    Neck injuries can be some of the most serious and anxiety-producing injuries that occur during sporting events. It is important for the team physician to be prepared for the care of these injuries and be able to identify some of the more serious injuries. Proper care of these injuries can be life saving and prevent further injury and permanent disability. This article reviews the principles of management and latest evidence for acute neck injuries.

  12. Immunotherapy of HPV-associated head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nizard, Mevyn; Sandoval, Federico; Badoual, Cecile; Pere, Helene; Terme, Magali; Hans, Stephane; Benhamouda, Nadine; Granier, Clemence; Brasnu, Daniel; Tartour, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Various arguments support the development of a vaccine targeting human papillomavirus (HPV) for the treatment of HPV-associated head and neck cancer. However, the mucosal localization of this tumor, the HPV-driven downregulation of MHC Class I molecules and various other immunosuppressive mechanisms must be carefully considered to improve the clinical efficacy of such an immunotherapeutic strategy. PMID:23894716

  13. Integrated media presentation in multidisciplinary head and neck oncology meetings.

    PubMed

    Simo, Ricard; Morgan, Peter; Jeannon, Jean-Pierre; Odell, Edward; Harrison, John; Almeida, Bernice; McGurk, Mark; Lyons, Andrew; Hussain, Karim; Gleeson, Michael; O'Connell, Mary; Calman, Frances; Ng, Roy; Roblin, Paul; Connor, Steve; Fenlon, Michael; Burke, Mary; Chandra, Ashish; Herbert, Amanda; Patt, Sarah; Steward-Bagley, Lizzie; Donnelly, Rachael; Freeman, Lesley; Twinn, Claire; Mason, Carolyn

    2009-02-01

    Multidisciplinary meetings (MDMs) are an essential part of the management of head and neck cancer. Practice care guidance set up by the British Association of Head and Neck Oncologists has recommended that MDMs should have appropriate projection equipment for computer-generated images so that all members of group have access to the same information. The aim of this paper is to review our experience with the integrated visual presentation of head and neck oncology patients and to demonstrate its advantages over conventional approaches. Digital photographs are taken of patients and of their index tumour at presentation or at the time of diagnostic endoscopy. All relevant pre-treatment digitised images from tumour sites and radiological images and histological slides are incorporated into a single presentation using Microsoft PowerPoint software. During the past 2 years, on-line radiological scans have also become accessible for the meeting to aid treatment planning. Subsequently, all peri-operative pictures and post-surgical macroscopic and microscopic histopathological images are added to each patient's presentation, which is then hyperlinked into the agenda. The Guy's and St Thomas' Head and Neck Cancer Centre treats over 400 patients a year, and since 2002, all new cancer diagnoses have been discussed in the weekly MDM as described above. A total of 1,638 presentations have been incorporated in a centralized database that is updated in the event of recurrence, further primary tumours or other clinical developments. Satisfactory documentation and staging of head and neck tumours must include a verbal description, accurate measurement, diagrammatic representation, photographic recording and appropriate radiological imaging. Integrated presentation at MDM collates all relevant findings for clinical management decisions on patients with head and neck cancer. This approach is also an extremely valuable adjunct to long-term clinical monitoring.

  14. Radiation-Free Weekend Rescued! Continuous Accelerated Irradiation of 7-Days per Week Is Equal to Accelerated Fractionation With Concomitant Boost of 7 Fractions in 5-Days per Week: Report on Phase 3 Clinical Trial in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Skladowski, Krzysztof; Hutnik, Marcin; Wygoda, Andrzej; Golen, Maria; Pilecki, Boleslaw; Przeorek, Wieslawa; Rutkowski, Tomasz; Lukaszczyk-Widel, Beata; Heyda, Alicja; Suwinski, Rafal; Tarnawski, Rafal; Maciejewski, Boguslaw

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of randomized trial comparing 2 accelerated fractionations of definitive radiation therapy assessing the need to irradiate during weekend in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 345 patients with SCC of the oral cavity, larynx, and oro- or hypo-pharynx, stage T2-4N0-1M0, were randomized to receive continuous accelerated irradiation (CAIR: once per day, 7 days per week) or concomitant accelerated boost (CB: once per day, 3 days per week, and twice per day, 2 days per week). Total dose ranged from 66.6-72 Gy, dose per fraction was 1.8 Gy, number of fractions ranged from 37-40 fractions, and overall treatment time ranged from 37-40 days. Results: No differences for all trial end-points were noted. At 5 and 10 years, the actuarial rates of local-regional control were 63% and 60% for CAIR vs 65% and 60% for CB, and the corresponding overall survival were 40% and 25% vs 44% and 25%, respectively. Confluent mucositis was the main acute toxicity, with an incidence of 89% in CAIR and 86% in CB patients. The 5-year rate of grade 3-4 late radiation morbidity was 6% for both regimens. Conclusions: Results of this trial indicate that the effects of accelerated fractionation can be achieve by delivering twice-per-day irradiation on weekday(s). This trial has also confirmed that an accelerated, 6-weeks schedule is a reasonable option for patients with intermediate-stage head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma because of the associated high cure rate and minimal severe late toxicity.

  15. Treatment Outcome of Combined Modalities for Buccal Cancers: Unilateral or Bilateral Neck Radiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.-Y.; Lee, L.-Y.; Huang, S.-F.; Kang, C.-J.; Fan, K.-H.; Wang, H.-M.; Chen, I.-H.; Liao, C.-T.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of treatment for buccal cancers and assess the impact of unilateral vs. bilateral adjuvant neck radiation. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the course of 145 patients newly diagnosed with buccal squamous cell carcinoma without distant metastases who completed definitive treatment between January 1994 and December 2000. Of 145 patients, 112 (77%) had Stage III or IV disease. All underwent radical surgery with postoperative radiotherapy (median dose, 64 Gy), including unilateral neck treatment in most (n = 120, 82.8%). After 1997, cisplatin-based concomitant chemoradiotherapy was given for high-risk patients with more than two involved lymph nodes, extracapsular spread, and/or positive margins. Results: The 5-year disease-specific survival rate for Stages I-IV was 87%, 83%, 61%, and 60%, respectively (p = 0.01). The most significant prognostic factor was N stage, with the 5-year disease-specific survival rate for N0, N1, and N2 being 79%, 65%, and 54%, respectively (p 0.001). For patients with more than two lymph nodes or positive extracapsular spread, cisplatin-based concomitant chemoradiotherapy improved locoregional control (p = 0.02). Locoregional control did not differ between patients undergoing unilateral or bilateral neck treatments (p = 0.95). Contralateral neck failure occurred in only 2.1%. Conclusions: In patients with buccal carcinoma after radical resection, ipsilateral neck radiation is adequate. Bilateral prophylactic neck treatment does not confer an added benefit.

  16. [Van Neck-Odelberg disease. Report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Örs; Zuh, Sándor-György; Kovács, Attila; Sólyom, Árpád; Sólyom, Réka; Gergely, István

    2016-05-22

    Osteochondritis ischiopubica or van Neck-Odelberg disease is characterized by atypical ossification of the ischiopubic synchondrosis. Clinical symptoms are usually pain, limping and limited range of motion of the hip joint. Radiologic images may be confused with the possibility of fracture, tumor or inflammation. In some cases it may be difficult to set up the accurate diagnosis, and during the diagnostic process it is essential that van Neck-Odelberg disease should be considered. In this paper the authors draw attention to this rare disorder and they present the history of two patients who posed diagnostic difficulties.

  17. Displaced femoral neck fractures: is there a standard of care?

    PubMed

    Macaulay, William; Yoon, Richard S; Parsley, Brian; Nellans, Kate W; Teeny, Steven M

    2007-09-01

    Many factors must be considered in treating displaced femoral neck fractures. For younger patients, ORIF is preferred, whereas arthroplasty is the better option for elderly patients. For institutionalized elderly patients with a low activity level or impaired mental status, the choice should be hemiarthroplasty (either unipolar or bipolar). For high-demand, active patients, evidence continues to mount toward THA as the favored treatment option. However, there is a need for larger clinical trials to demonstrate the most cost-effective way to treat sub-populations of an ever-growing number of patients with displaced femoral neck fractures.

  18. Tracheoinnominate fistula: a rare acute complication of penetrating neck injury.

    PubMed

    Kulyapina, Alena; Díaz, Dolores Pérez; Rodríguez, Teresa Sanchez; Fuentes, Fernando Turegano

    2015-05-01

    Penetrating injuries in the base of the neck are considered to be the most dangerous due to the potential combination of vascular and intrathoracic lesions. We describe an extremely rare case of combined injury of the trachea and innominate artery, which resulted in formation of a traumatic acute tracheoinnominate fistula. Previously, these fistulas have been described as an iatrogenic complication of tracheostomy, presenting with massive peristomal bleed or hemoptysis. This case demonstrates that a combination of lesions to vital anatomical structures in the neck can change their clinical presentation, making them extremely difficult to diagnose.

  19. Effects of spiral taping applied to the neck and ankle on the body balance index

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Hoon; Lee, Hye Rim; Kim, Kyeong Mi; Lee, Jeong Hun; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to investigate the changes in the body balance index when spiral taping is applied to the neck and ankle. The findings are expected to serve as evidence of the usefulness of taping the neck instead of the ankle when ankle taping is not feasible in clinical practice. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy male students at A university were enrolled in this study. Balance measurements were made under three conditions: no intervention, ankle intervention and neck intervention. Static balance was measured with subjects’ eyes open and closed, and dynamic balance was measured with subjects’ eyes closed. [Results] There were significant differences in dynamic balance assessed by the Overall Balance Index (OBI), and the Anteroposterior Balance Index (ABI) with subjects’ eyes open when ankle or neck taping was applied compared to no intervention. The static balance (OBI) of subjects with eyes open showed significant differences from the no intervention condition in both the ankle and neck intervention. The static balance (OBI) with subjects’ eyes closed also showed significant differences in both the ankle and neck interventions compared to the no intervention condition. [Conclusion] Our results indicate that neck taping stimulates the somatic senses around the neck and increase proprioception, resulting in balance improvement similar to that elicited by ankle taping. Further studies with larger sample sizes various experimental conditions should be performed to more systematically and objectively elucidate the effects of neck taping. PMID:25642043

  20. Head and neck pain review: traditional and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M H; Nelson, A J

    1996-10-01

    A variety of conditions are frequently associated with the occurrence of head and neck pain. The purposes of this review are: to describe the characteristics of several musculoskeletal, neurological, and systemic conditions frequently cited as possible causes of head and neck pain and to suggest a new technique for treating head and neck pain. The characteristics of musculoskeletal conditions, such as muscle spasm, tendinitis, trigger points, and joint inflammation, and their relationship to head and neck pain are considered. The features and clinical implications of neurologic conditions, such as atypical facial pain, trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, and neurogenic inflammation, are also described. The distinguishing characteristics of headaches, including cluster, tension, chronic daily, rebound, posttraumatic, and postlumbar puncture, are detailed. This review also addresses the contributions of systemic disorders, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and the variants, and rheumatoid-related conditions, like dermatomyositis, temporal arteritis, Lyme's disease, and fibromyalgia, to head and neck pain. The results of a recent pilot study of the effectiveness of intraoral circulating ice water for resolving symptoms related to head and neck pain secondary to neurogenic inflammation are presented in this work. Ice water circulating through hollow metal tubes was placed intraorally for 15 minutes in the posterior maxillary area on 12 individuals with cervical pain and muscle spasm. In nine of these individuals, reduced cervical pain perception, upper trapezius electromyography signal reduction, and increased cervical range of motion was produced. Six out of 12 individuals had accompanying headache, which was reduced or eliminated in four cases. These findings suggest a strong trigemino-cervical relationship to neck pain and headache.

  1. Analysis of deep tissue hypersensitivity to pressure pain in professional pianists with insidious mechanical neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether pressure pain hyperalgesia is a feature of professional pianists suffering from neck pain as their main playing-related musculoskeletal disorder. Methods Twenty-three active expert pianists, 6 males and 17 females (age: 36 ± 12 years) with insidious neck pain and 23 pianists, 9 males and 14 females (age: 38 ± 10 years) without neck pain the previous year were recruited. A numerical pain rate scale, Neck Disability Index, hand size and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed bilaterally over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, deltoid muscle, the second metacarpal and the tibialis anterior muscle in a blinded design. Results The results showed that PPT levels were significantly decreased bilaterally over the second metacarpal and tibialis anterior muscles (P < 0.05), but not over C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint and deltoid muscle (P > 0.10), in pianists with neck pain as compared to healthy pianists. Pianists with neck pain had a smaller (P < 0.05) hand size (mean: 181.8 ± 11.8) as compared to pianists without neck pain (mean: 188. 6 ± 13.1). PPT over the tibialis anterior muscles was negatively correlated with the intensity of neck pain. Conclusions Our findings revealed pressure pain hypersensitivity over distant non-symptomatic distant points but not over the symptomatic areas in pianists suffering from neck pain. In addition, pianists with neck pain also had smaller hand size than those without neck pain. Future studies are needed to further determine the relevance of these findings in the clinical course of neck pain as playing-related musculoskeletal disorder in professional pianists. PMID:22111912

  2. Comparison of external beam treatment techniques for T1-2, N0, M0 glottic cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Camingue, Pamela; Christian, Rochelle; Ng, Davin; Williams, Preston; Amin, Mayankkumar; Roniger, Dominique L.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 4 different external beam radiation therapy treatment techniques for the treatment of T1-2, N0, M0 glottic cancers: traditional lateral beams with wedges (3D), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and proton therapy. Treatment plans in each technique were created for 10 patients using consistent planning parameters. The photon treatment plans were optimized using Philips Pinnacle{sub 3} v.9 and the IMRT and VMAT plans used the Direct Machine Parameter Optimization algorithm. The proton treatment plans were optimized using Varian Eclipse Proton v.8.9. The prescription used for each plan was 63 Gy in 28 fractions. The contours for spinal cord, right carotid artery, left carotid artery, and normal tissue were created with respect to the patient's bony anatomy so that proper comparisons of doses could be made with respect to volume. An example of the different isodose distributions will be shown. The data collection for comparison purposes includes: clinical treatment volume coverage, dose to spinal cord, dose to carotid arteries, and dose to normal tissue. Data comparisons will be displayed graphically showing the maximum, mean, median, and ranges of doses.

  3. Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Gurudutt, Vivek V.; Genden, Eric M.

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is an epidemic that reaches all parts of the world. Making the diagnosis relies on the acumen of the clinician and pathologist. Various pathologic subtypes exist and differ in histology and prognosis. High-risk tumors need aggressive treatment and vigilant surveillance to monitor for recurrence. Large tumors, deep tissue invasion, perineural involvement, recurrence, location in high-risk areas, and immunosuppression are implicated in worsening prognosis. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment with adjuvant radiation therapy as needed for aggressive tumors; however, other modalities are potentially useful for low-risk lesions. The use of Mohs surgery has become increasingly useful and has shown high success rates. Involvement of parotid and neck lymph nodes significantly affects outcomes and the physician should be comfortable with management of this complex disease. This paper examines the diagnosis, pathology, clinical course, and treatment options for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. PMID:21461387

  4. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Gurudutt, Vivek V; Genden, Eric M

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is an epidemic that reaches all parts of the world. Making the diagnosis relies on the acumen of the clinician and pathologist. Various pathologic subtypes exist and differ in histology and prognosis. High-risk tumors need aggressive treatment and vigilant surveillance to monitor for recurrence. Large tumors, deep tissue invasion, perineural involvement, recurrence, location in high-risk areas, and immunosuppression are implicated in worsening prognosis. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment with adjuvant radiation therapy as needed for aggressive tumors; however, other modalities are potentially useful for low-risk lesions. The use of Mohs surgery has become increasingly useful and has shown high success rates. Involvement of parotid and neck lymph nodes significantly affects outcomes and the physician should be comfortable with management of this complex disease. This paper examines the diagnosis, pathology, clinical course, and treatment options for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. PMID:21461387

  5. [Circulating tumor cells in head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Guntinas-Lichius, O; Pachmann, K

    2015-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells are defined as tumor cells which are circulating in the peripheral blood of the cancer patient. While several large studies have investigated the role of circulating tumor cells in other solid tumors, the importance of these tumor cells in patients with head and neck cancer was turned into the focus not until the recent years. In other solid tumor the presence of circulating tumor cells often seems to be a negative prognostic marker and seems to be a marker for therapy response. The present article wants to give an overview about the knowledge on circulating tumor cells and their clinical relevance in head and neck cancer. The methodology to detect circulating tumor cells will be critically reflected. The future potential of the detection of circulating tumor cells in head and neck cancer patients will be discussed.

  6. Contact dermatitis in Nigeria. (III). Dermatitis of the neck.

    PubMed

    Olumide, Y

    1987-09-01

    Out of 545 consecutive contact dermatitis clinic patients, 73 (13%) had dermatitis of the neck of whom 18 (25%) were nickel positive. 7 had clothing dermatitis and 3 of them reacted to chromate in military uniforms. 5 patients were sensitised to perfume and 4 to medicaments used to treat existing dermatitis. 3 patients were sensitised to hair dyes. Nickel dermatitis, was clinically overdiagnosed, mainly due (for various reasons) to inability to make a firm diagnosis of atopy.

  7. Current status of experimental therapeutics for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juna; Moon, Chulso

    2011-04-01

    As with many cancers, early detection of head and neck cancer increases a patient's survival rate. If diagnosed early, its five-year survival nears 90% with standard therapy alone. Unfortunately, the average survival rate for head and neck cancer is low due to the difficulty in early detection and achieving a sustainable response. Conventional treatments are not adequate for the majority of advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer patients because of the remarkable resistance of tumors to chemotherapy and radiation, and the situation is especially devastating for the first time treatment failure. The major limitations of these treatments are the lack of specificity for the tumor cell and unacceptable toxicity to the patient. As a result, current research in therapeutics for advanced, chemotherapy-resistant or recurrent head and neck cancer patients has focused on new treatment modalities that exploit biological differences between tumor and normal cells. These therapies include monoclonal antibodies, molecular inhibitors, gene therapy and photodynamic therapy. This article reviews the current preclinical and clinical evidence of these experimental therapeutics as they relate to head and neck cancer.

  8. Proton Beam Therapy as a Nonsurgical Approach to Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Nishio, Teiji; Kohno, Ryosuke; Nihei, Keiji; Onozawa, Masakatsu; Arahira, Satoko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this pilot study was to assess the clinical benefit of proton beam therapy for mucosal melanoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Patients with mucosal melanoma of the head and neck with histologically confirmed malignant melanoma and N0 and M0 disease were enrolled. Proton therapy was delivered three times per week with a planned total dose of 60 Gy equivalents (GyE) in 15 fractions. Results: Fourteen consecutive patients were enrolled from January 2004 through February 2008. Patient characteristics were as follows: median age 73 years old (range, 56 to 79 years); male/female ratio, 7/7; and T stage 1/2/3/4, 3/2/0/9. All patients were able to receive the full dose of proton therapy. The most common acute toxicities were mucositis (grade 3, 21%) and mild dermatitis (grade 3, 0%). As for late toxicity, 2 patients had a unilateral decrease in visual acuity, although blindness did not occur. No treatment-related deaths occurred throughout the study. Initial local control rate was 85.7%, and, with a median follow-up period of 36.7 months, median progression-free survival was 25.1 months, and 3-year overall survival rates were 58.0%. The most frequent site of first failure was cervical lymph nodes (6 patients), followed by local failure in 1 patient and lung metastases in 1 patient. On follow-up, 5 patients died of disease, 4 died due to cachexia caused by distant metastases, and 1 patient by carotid artery perforation cause by lymph nodes metastases. Conclusions: Proton beam radiotherapy showed promising local control benefits and would benefit from ongoing clinical study.

  9. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, B.A.

    1982-04-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is an uncommon neoplasm that is seen in the head and neck area. Since the symptoms of rhabdomyosarcoma, such as aural discharge and nasal obstruction, mimic common disease states, the clinical diagnosis is often delayed. Case reports and a literature review are presented to emphasize the clinical and roentgenological findings in rhabdomyosarcoma. Misinterpretation of microscopic findings can delay the histological diagnosis. Cross-striations, the hallmark of rhabdomyosarcoma, are not always found, while racquet and spindle cells may be seen. Special stains and electron microscopy can assist the pathologist. The pathological findings of the different variants of rhabdomyosarcoma and a review of cases accessioned by the A.F.I.P. Otolaryngic Registry are presented. Early diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma is important because the disease, once inevitably fatal, can now be controlled and apparently cured in most cases by a combination of surgery, radiation, and multidrug chemotherapy. This therapeutic approach, its results, complications, and support measures are considered.

  10. Olefin metathesis reaction on GaN (0 0 0 1) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Matthew S.; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2011-03-01

    Proof-of-concept reactions were performed on GaN (0 0 0 1) surfaces to demonstrate surface termination with desired chemical groups using an olefin cross-metathesis reaction. To prepare the GaN surfaces for olefin metathesis, the surfaces were hydrogen terminated with hydrogen plasma, chlorine terminated with phosphorous pentachloride, and then terminated with an alkene group via a Grignard reaction. The olefin metathesis reaction then bound 7-bromo-1-heptene. The modified surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, and water contact angle measurements following each step in the reaction scheme. The XPS data was used to qualitatively identify surface chemical species and to quantitatively determine molecular surface coverage. The bromine atom in 7-bromo-1-heptene served as a heteroatom for identification with XPS. The reaction scheme resulted in GaN substrates with a surface coverage of 0.10 monolayers and excellent stability towards oxidation when exposed to oxygen plasma.

  11. Isotropic thin PTCDA films on GaN(0 0 0 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Ch; Flege, J. I.; Jaye, C.; Fischer, D. A.; Schmidt, Th; Falta, J.

    2016-11-01

    The growth of 3, 4, 9, 10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) on the Ga-polar GaN(0 0 0 1) surface has been studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), spot profile analysis low-energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED), near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The stoichiometric ratios derived from XPS indicate that the molecules remain intact upon adsorption on the surface. Furthermore, no chemical shifts can be observed in the C 1s and O 1s core levels with progressing deposition of PTCDA, suggesting none or only weak interactions between the molecules and the substrate. NEXAFS data indicate the PTCDA molecules being oriented with their molecular plane parallel to the surface. High-resolution STM shows PTCDA islands of irregular shape on the sub-micron scale, and together with corresponding SPA-LEED data reveals a lateral ordering of the molecules that is compatible with the presence of (1 0 2) oriented PTCDA nano-crystals. SPA-LEED moreover clearly shows the presence of homogeneously distributed rotational domains of two-dimensionally isotropic PTCDA.

  12. Bilateral deep neck space infection in the paediatric age group: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Songu, M; Demiray, U; Adibelli, Z H; Adibelli, H

    2011-06-01

    Deep neck space infections can occur at any age but require more intimate management in the paediatric age group because of their rapidly progressive nature. Concurrent abscess in distinct neck spaces has rarely been reported in healthy children. Herewith, a rare case of bilateral neck abscess is reported in a 16-month-old female and the clinical presentation and management are discussed with a review of the literature.

  13. Deep space infections of neck.

    PubMed

    Kaluskar, S; Bajaj, P; Bane, P

    2007-03-01

    A retrospective study was performed on fourteen cases of deep cervical space infections in the neck admitted for diagnosis and treatment to the ENT Department, during a period of seven years from 1989-1997. Of the fourteen, four patients had Ludwig's angina and of the fourteen, one had a very serious complication resulting in death. Early diagnosis and adequate treatment were of paramount importance. The role of tracheostomy and management of airway in deep cervical space infections of the neck is discussed to gether with bacteriology, antibiotic treatment and surgical management.

  14. Is there a role for neck manipulation in elderly falls prevention? – An overview

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Julie C.; Hartvigsen, Jan; French, Simon D.; Azari, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Many risk factors exist for falls in the elderly. Dizziness is an important risk factor for such falls. Spinal pain has also been identified as a risk factor for these falls. In this overview of the literature, we examine studies, including trials, of neck manipulation for neck pain, unsteadiness and falls risk relevant to the elderly. We also examine two related, but not mutually exclusive, mechanisms through which a putative beneficial effect may be mediated. These are the effects of neck manipulation on neck pain and on non-specific dizziness. We focus on the available evidence primarily in terms of clinical data rather than laboratory-based measures of balance. We conclude that chiropractors may have a role in falls prevention strategies in the subpopulation of the elderly that suffer from mechanical neck pain or dysfunction and non-specific dizziness. However, this role remains to be rigorously studied and properly defined. PMID:25729086

  15. Is there a role for neck manipulation in elderly falls prevention? - An overview.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Julie C; Hartvigsen, Jan; French, Simon D; Azari, Michael F

    2015-03-01

    Many risk factors exist for falls in the elderly. Dizziness is an important risk factor for such falls. Spinal pain has also been identified as a risk factor for these falls. In this overview of the literature, we examine studies, including trials, of neck manipulation for neck pain, unsteadiness and falls risk relevant to the elderly. We also examine two related, but not mutually exclusive, mechanisms through which a putative beneficial effect may be mediated. These are the effects of neck manipulation on neck pain and on non-specific dizziness. We focus on the available evidence primarily in terms of clinical data rather than laboratory-based measures of balance. We conclude that chiropractors may have a role in falls prevention strategies in the subpopulation of the elderly that suffer from mechanical neck pain or dysfunction and non-specific dizziness. However, this role remains to be rigorously studied and properly defined.

  16. Acupuncture at Houxi (SI 3) acupoint for acute neck pain caused by stiff neck: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhong-ren; Yue, Jin-huan; Tian, Hong-zhao; Zhang, Qin-hong

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The use of acupuncture has been suggested for the treatment of acute neck pain caused by stiff neck in China. However, current evidence is insufficient to draw any conclusions about its efficacy. Therefore this pilot study was designed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of acupuncture at the Houxi (SI3) acupoint for treatment of acute neck pain. Methods/analysis This pilot study will be a two-parallel-group, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial. Thirty-six stiff neck participants with acute neck pain will be recruited and randomly divided into two groups in a 1:1 ratio. Participants in the control group will receive massage on the local neck region (5 min each session, three times a day for 3 days). In addition to massage, patients in the treatment group will receive acupuncture (one session a day for 3 days). Measures will be taken at 0, 3 and 15 days. The primary outcome is the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). The secondary outcome is the Short Form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ). Ethics/dissemination The protocol for this pilot randomised clinical trial has undergone ethics scrutiny and been approved by the ethics review boards of the First Affiliated Hospital of Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Permission number: HZYLL201303502). The findings of this study will provide important clinical evidence on the feasibility and efficacy of acupuncture treatment for stiff neck patients with acute neck pain. In addition, it will explore the feasibility of further acupuncture research. Trial registration number ChiCTR-TRC-13003911. PMID:25537784

  17. Neck pain or spasms - self care

    MedlinePlus

    ... chronic pain . Some with ongoing neck pain take narcotics to control the pain . It is best if only one health care provider is prescribing your narcotic pain medicines. If you have chronic neck pain, ...

  18. Pseudopathologic fracture of the femoral neck

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, T.L. Jr.; Keats, T.E.; Goldner, R.; Stelling, C.B.; Logan, M.

    1981-11-01

    We have seen two cases of traumatic subcapital fractures of the femoral neck which resembled pathologic fractures on plain radiography. We have named this entity pseudopathologic fracture of the femoral neck and offer suggestions for why it occurs.

  19. Anthropomorphic dummy neck modeling and injury considerations.

    PubMed

    Deng, Y C

    1989-02-01

    This study investigates the modeling of the Hybrid III dummy head and neck system and its response under impulsive loading. Two neck models were proposed, one rigid, one flexible; both give satisfactory head kinematics upon comparing to minisled test results. The flexible neck model provides a more detailed understanding of the Hybrid III neck structure behavior. It indicates that the Hybrid III neck has a torque response similar to a human neck but has higher shear response. During flexion whiplash, the torque at the occipital condyle reverses its direction at about 25 ms after impact. Since concussion may be related to the head angular acceleration, which reaches its peak value in the first 25 ms, it might be necessary to extend the existing human torque-rotation corridor to include the neck response in this region. For flexion whiplash impact, simulation results indicated that the neck injury threshold is reached before exceeding the head injury threshold as the impact velocity is increased.

  20. Prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many adults experience bothersome neck/shoulder pain. While research and treatment strategies often focus on the upper trapezius, other neck/shoulder muscles may be affected as well. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Methods Clinical neck/shoulder examination at two large office workplaces in Copenhagen, Denmark. 174 women and 24 men (aged 25-65 years) with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain for a duration of at least 30 days during the previous year and a pain intensity of at least 2 on a modified VAS-scale of 0-10 participated. Exclusion criteria were traumatic injuries or other serious chronic disease. Using a standardized finger pressure of 2 kg, palpable tenderness were performed of eight anatomical neck/shoulder locations in the left and right side on a scale of 'no tenderness', 'some tenderness' and 'severe tenderness'. Results In women, the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus showed the highest prevalence of severe tenderness (18-30%). In comparison, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the upper trapezius, occipital border and supraspinatus was 13-19%. Severe tenderness of the medial deltoid was least prevalent (0-1%). In men, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the levator scapulae was 13-21%, and ranged between 0-8% in the remainder of the examined anatomical locations. Conclusions A high prevalence of tenderness exists in several anatomical locations of the neck/shoulder complex among adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Future research should focus on several neck/shoulder muscles, including the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus, and not only the upper trapezius. Trial Registration ISRCTN60264809 PMID:21777478

  1. Management of penetrating neck injuries at a London trauma centre.

    PubMed

    Siau, Richard T K; Moore, Andrew; Ahmed, Timothy; Lee, Michael S W; Tostevin, Philippa

    2013-07-01

    Penetrating neck injuries (PNIs) are uncommon in the UK. The majority of guidelines are from the USA or South Africa. No UK national guidelines exist. Increasing urban violence in the UK has lead to an increase in PNIs. There is a need to develop a PNI guideline that reflects the pathology and experience in the UK. A retrospective review of all PNIs managed at St George's Hospital over an 18 month period was undertaken. Data collected included patient demographics, mechanism of injury, investigations, multidisciplinary team involvement and management. Clinical activity data was correlated to current worldwide literature and a flow-chart style clinical guideline was produced. 25 neck wounds were managed over an 18 month period. 68 % were male, 32 % female with a mean age of 36 years. The mechanism of injury included deliberate self-harm (48 %), stab wounds (32 %), gunshot wounds (4 %), shotgun wounds (4 %) and other accidental causes (12 %). 52 % of wounds were superficial to platysma. 58 % of deep wounds had CT. 42 % of patients with deep wounds also had panendoscopy. Interventional radiology was used in one case (8 %) and a single case was managed jointly with the vascular team (8 %). UK ENT surgeons have limited exposure to neck trauma and dedicated head and neck out-of-hours cover is uncommon. There is a need for UK PNI guidelines that reflect local pathology and experience. The St George's PNI guideline can be used to facilitate assessment, documentation and management of a relatively infrequent emergency presentation.

  2. Femoral Neck Version Affects Medial Femorotibial Loading

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, T. A.; Digas, Georgios; Bikos, Ch.; Karamoulas, V.; Magnissalis, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a preliminary evaluation of the possible effect that femoral version may have on the bearing equilibrium conditions developed on the medial tibiofemoral compartment. A digital 3D solid model of the left physiological adult femur was used to create morphological variations of different neck-shaft angles (varus 115, normal 125, and valgus 135 degrees) and version angles (−10, 0, and +10 degrees). By means of finite element modeling and analysis techniques (FEM-FEA), a virtual experiment was executed with the femoral models aligned in a neutral upright position, distally supported on a fully congruent tibial tray and proximally loaded with a vertical only hip joint load of 2800 N. Equivalent stresses and their distribution on the medial compartment were computed and comparatively evaluated. Within our context, the neck-shaft angle proved to be of rather indifferent influence. Reduction of femoral version, however, appeared as the most influencing parameter regarding the tendency of the medial compartment to establish its bearing equilibrium towards posteromedial directions, as a consequence of the corresponding anteroposterior changes of the hip centre over the horizontal tibiofemoral plane. We found a correlation between femoral anteversion and medial tibiofemoral compartment contact pressure. Our findings will be further elucidated by more sophisticated FEM-FEA and by clinical studies that are currently planned. PMID:24959355

  3. Extracranial Head and Neck Schwannomas: Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Shrikrishna, B H; Jyothi, A C; Kulkarni, N H; Mazhar, Md Shafiuddin

    2016-06-01

    Schwannomas are benign neoplasms of the peripheral nerves originating in the Schwann cells. They are rare and usually solitary, with clearly delimited capsules. They occur in the head and neck region in only 25 % of the cases, and may be associated with Von Recklinghausen's disease. Schwannomas are always a diagnostic dilemma as they are asymptomatic for long time and histopathology is the gold standard for diagnosis. The present study retrospectively analysed data of 4 patients with schwannomas and reviewed the literature on the subject. Retrospective study at ENT & Head and Neck Surgery Department of Navodaya Medical College, Raichur. Data of 4 patients between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed. The sites of cervical schwannomas and the intraoperative, histopathological and postoperative clinical status of these cases were studied. Diagnostic methods, type of surgery and associated nerve of origin (NOO) were evaluated. The patients' age ranged from 18 to 50 years. None of them had type I neurofibromatosis or Von Recklinghausen's disease. The nerves affected included the brachial plexus, vagus nerve, sympathetic chain and lingual nerve. The nerve of origin was identified based on intra-operative findings and post-operative neurological deficits. Tumour was removed by debulk operation with the preservation of NOO method. Schwannomas are generally benign, and rarely recur. An accurate preoperative workup with the identification of NOO is very important not only for a correct diagnosis, but also for surgical planning and informing the patient about the possible complications. PMID:27340644

  4. Giant Arteriovenous Malformation of the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Dieng, P. A.; Ba, P. S.; Gaye, M.; Diatta, S.; Diop, M. S.; Sene, E.; Ciss, A. G.; Ndiaye, A.; Ndiaye, M.

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) have a wide range of clinical presentations. Operative bleeding is one of the most hazardous complications in the surgical management of high-flow vascular malformations. In the cervical region, the presence of vital vascular structures, such as the carotid artery and jugular vein, may increase this risk. This is a case of massive arteriovenous malformation deforming the neck and the face aspect of this aged lady and growing for several years. A giant mass of the left neck occupied the carotid region and the subclavian region. The AVM was developed between the carotid arteries, jugular veins, and vertebral and subclavian vessels, with arterial and venous flux. The patient underwent surgery twice for the cure of that AVM. The first step was the ligation of the external carotid. Seven days later, the excision of the mass was done. In postoperative period the patient presented a peripheral facial paralysis which completely decreased within 10 days. The first ligation of the external carotid reduces significantly the blood flow into the AVM. It permitted secondarily the complete ablation of the AVM without major bleeding even though multiple ligations were done. PMID:26347847

  5. HPV Associated Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Spence, Tara; Bruce, Jeff; Yip, Kenneth W; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNCs) are a highly heterogeneous group of tumours that are associated with diverse clinical outcomes. Recent evidence has demonstrated that human papillomavirus (HPV) is involved in up to 25% of HNCs; particularly in the oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) subtype where it can account for up to 60% of such cases. HPVs are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial cells; numerous HPV subtypes, including 16, 18, 31, 33, and 35, drive epithelial cell transformation and tumourigenesis. HPV positive (HPV+) HNC represents a distinct molecular and clinical entity from HPV negative (HPV-) disease; the biological basis for which remains to be fully elucidated. HPV positivity is strongly correlated with a significantly superior outcome; indicating that such tumours should have a distinct management approach. This review focuses on the recent scientific and clinical investigation of HPV+ HNC. In particular, we discuss the importance of molecular and clinical evidence for defining the role of HPV in HNC, and the clinical impact of HPV status as a biomarker for HNC. PMID:27527216

  6. HPV Associated Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Spence, Tara; Bruce, Jeff; Yip, Kenneth W; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-08-05

    Head and neck cancers (HNCs) are a highly heterogeneous group of tumours that are associated with diverse clinical outcomes. Recent evidence has demonstrated that human papillomavirus (HPV) is involved in up to 25% of HNCs; particularly in the oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) subtype where it can account for up to 60% of such cases. HPVs are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial cells; numerous HPV subtypes, including 16, 18, 31, 33, and 35, drive epithelial cell transformation and tumourigenesis. HPV positive (HPV+) HNC represents a distinct molecular and clinical entity from HPV negative (HPV-) disease; the biological basis for which remains to be fully elucidated. HPV positivity is strongly correlated with a significantly superior outcome; indicating that such tumours should have a distinct management approach. This review focuses on the recent scientific and clinical investigation of HPV+ HNC. In particular, we discuss the importance of molecular and clinical evidence for defining the role of HPV in HNC, and the clinical impact of HPV status as a biomarker for HNC.

  7. HPV Associated Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Tara; Bruce, Jeff; Yip, Kenneth W.; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNCs) are a highly heterogeneous group of tumours that are associated with diverse clinical outcomes. Recent evidence has demonstrated that human papillomavirus (HPV) is involved in up to 25% of HNCs; particularly in the oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) subtype where it can account for up to 60% of such cases. HPVs are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial cells; numerous HPV subtypes, including 16, 18, 31, 33, and 35, drive epithelial cell transformation and tumourigenesis. HPV positive (HPV+) HNC represents a distinct molecular and clinical entity from HPV negative (HPV−) disease; the biological basis for which remains to be fully elucidated. HPV positivity is strongly correlated with a significantly superior outcome; indicating that such tumours should have a distinct management approach. This review focuses on the recent scientific and clinical investigation of HPV+ HNC. In particular, we discuss the importance of molecular and clinical evidence for defining the role of HPV in HNC, and the clinical impact of HPV status as a biomarker for HNC. PMID:27527216

  8. Trial of Postoperative Radiation, Cisplatin, and Panitumumab in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Cancer of Head; Cancer of Head and Neck; Cancer of Neck; Cancer of the Head; Cancer of the Head and Neck; Cancer of the Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Head Cancer; Head Neoplasms; Head, Neck Neoplasms; Neck Cancer; Neck Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Head; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Neoplasms, Neck; Neoplasms, Upper Aerodigestive Tract; UADT Neoplasms; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Neoplasms

  9. Neck pain after minor neck trauma--is it always neck sprain?

    PubMed

    Chong, C L; Ooi, S B

    2000-06-01

    We report a patient who had headache and neck pain after whiplash injury and subsequently developed cerebellar infarction due to vertebral artery dissection. This patient's pain was out of proportion to his apparent injury and it was a clue to the final diagnosis. Gross motor examination for cord injury may not be adequate for patients with minor neck trauma. Detailed cranial nerve and cerebellar examination should be performed for detection of circulatory insufficiency. Discharge advice for patients should also include that of stroke or transient ischaemic attack.

  10. Influence of Head and Neck Position on Oropharyngeal Leak Pressure and Cuff Position with the ProSeal Laryngeal Mask Airway and the I-Gel: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Satyapraksh, M. V. S.; Bidkar, Prasanna Udupi; Hemavathy, Balachander

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study was designed to assess and compare the effect of head and neck position on the oropharyngeal leak pressures and cuff position (employing fibreoptic view of the glottis) and ventilation scores between ProSeal LMA and the I-gel. Material and Methods. After induction of anesthesia, the supraglottic device was inserted and ventilation confirmed. The position of the head was randomly changed from neutral to flexion, extension, and lateral rotation (left). The oropharyngeal leak pressures, fibreoptic view of glottis, ventilation scores, and delivered tidal volumes and end tidal CO2 were noted in all positions. Results. In both groups compared with neutral position, oropharyngeal leak pressures were significantly higher with flexion and lower with extension but similar with rotation of head and neck. However the oropharyngeal leak pressure was significantly higher for ProSeal LMA compared with the I-gel in all positions. Peak airway pressures were significantly higher with flexion in both groups (however this did not affect ventilation), lower with extension in ProSeal group, and comparable in I-gel group but did not change significantly with rotation of head and neck in both groups. Conclusion. Effective ventilation can be done with both ProSeal LMA and I-gel with head in all the above positions. ProSeal LMA has a better margin of safety than I-gel due to better sealing pressures except in flexion where the increase in airway pressure is more with the former. Extreme precaution should be taken in flexion position in ProSeal LMA. PMID:25648620

  11. Influence of Head and Neck Position on Oropharyngeal Leak Pressure and Cuff Position with the ProSeal Laryngeal Mask Airway and the I-Gel: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Nawaz, Mohammad; Satyapraksh, M V S; Parida, Satyen; Bidkar, Prasanna Udupi; Hemavathy, Balachander; Kundra, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study was designed to assess and compare the effect of head and neck position on the oropharyngeal leak pressures and cuff position (employing fibreoptic view of the glottis) and ventilation scores between ProSeal LMA and the I-gel. Material and Methods. After induction of anesthesia, the supraglottic device was inserted and ventilation confirmed. The position of the head was randomly changed from neutral to flexion, extension, and lateral rotation (left). The oropharyngeal leak pressures, fibreoptic view of glottis, ventilation scores, and delivered tidal volumes and end tidal CO2 were noted in all positions. Results. In both groups compared with neutral position, oropharyngeal leak pressures were significantly higher with flexion and lower with extension but similar with rotation of head and neck. However the oropharyngeal leak pressure was significantly higher for ProSeal LMA compared with the I-gel in all positions. Peak airway pressures were significantly higher with flexion in both groups (however this did not affect ventilation), lower with extension in ProSeal group, and comparable in I-gel group but did not change significantly with rotation of head and neck in both groups. Conclusion. Effective ventilation can be done with both ProSeal LMA and I-gel with head in all the above positions. ProSeal LMA has a better margin of safety than I-gel due to better sealing pressures except in flexion where the increase in airway pressure is more with the former. Extreme precaution should be taken in flexion position in ProSeal LMA.

  12. Head and neck cancer: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Chin, David; Boyle, Glen M; Porceddu, Sandro; Theile, David R; Parsons, Peter G; Coman, William B

    2006-07-01

    Head and neck cancer consists of a diverse group of cancers that ranges from cutaneous, lip, salivary glands, sinuses, oral cavity, pharynx and larynx. Each group dictates different management. In this review, the primary focus is on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) arising from the mucosal lining of the oral cavity and pharynx, excluding nasopharyngeal cancer. Presently, HNSCC is the sixth most prevalent neoplasm in the world, with approximately 900,000 cases diagnosed worldwide. Prognosis has improved little in the past 30 years. In those who have survived, pain, disfigurement and physical disability from treatment have had an enormous psychosocial impact on their lives. Management of these patients remains a challenge, especially in developing countries where this disease is most common. Of all human cancers, HNSCC is the most distressing since the head and neck is the site of the most complex functional anatomy in the human body. Its areas of responsibility include breathing, the CNS, vision, hearing, balance, olfaction, taste, swallowing, voice, endocrine and cosmesis. Cancers that occur in this area impact on these important human functions. Consequently, in treating cancers of the head and neck, the effects of the treatment on the functional outcome of the patient need the most serious consideration. In assessing the success of HNSCC treatment, consideration of both the survival and functional deficits that the patient may suffer as a consequence of their treatment are of paramount importance. For this reason, the modern-day management of head and neck patients should be carried out in a multidisciplinary head and neck clinic.

  13. A Novel Digital Patient-Reported Outcome Platform for Head and Neck Oncology Patients—A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Maria K.; Lehikoinen, Joel S.; Sippola, Lauri T.; Saarilahti, Kauko; Mäkitie, Antti A.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The patient’s role in toxicity reporting is increasingly acknowledged. There is also a need for developing modern communication methods between the patient and the medical personnel. Furthermore, the increasing number of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients is reflected in the volume of treatment follow-up visits, which remains a challenge for the health care. Electronic patient-reported outcome (ePRO) measures may provide a cost-efficient way to organize follow-up for cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS We tested a novel ePRO application called Kaiku®, which enables real-time, online collection of patient-reported outcomes, such as side effects caused by treatment and quality of life. We conducted a pilot study to assess the suitability of Kaiku® for HNC patients at the Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. Patients used Kaiku® during and one month after radiotherapy to report treatment-related side effects and quality of life. Two physicians and a nurse performed the practical electronic communication part of the study. RESULTS Five of the nine patients agreed to participate in the study: three of them had local early-stage larynx cancer (T2N0, T1aN0, and T2N0) and the remaining two patients had early-stage base of tongue cancer (T2N0 and T1N2b). The degree of side effects reported by the patients via Kaiku® ranged from mild to life threatening. The number of outcome data points on patients’ progress was significantly increased, which resulted in a better follow-up and improved communication between the patient and the care team. CONCLUSIONS Kaiku® seems to be a suitable tool to monitor side effects and quality of life during and after radiotherapy among HNC patients. Kaiku® and similar tools could be useful in organizing a cost-effective follow-up process for HNC patients. We recommend conducting a larger study to further assess the impact of an ePRO solution in routine clinical practice. ePRO solutions

  14. Neck control after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck control outcomes after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed medical records of fifty patients with node-positive head and neck cancer who received definitive radiochemotherapy. Twelve patients subsequently underwent neck dissection for suspicious recurrent or persistent disease. A median dose of 70 Gy (range 60-70.6) was delivered to involved nodes. Response evaluation was performed at a median of 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Results Neck failure was observed in 11 patients and the 3-year regional control (RC) rate was 77.1%. Neck dissection was performed in 10 of the 11 patients; seven of these cases were successfully salvaged, and the ultimate rate of neck control was 92%. The remaining two patients who received neck dissection had negative pathologic results. On univariate analysis, initial nodal size > 2 cm, a less-than-complete response at the primary site, post-radiotherapy nodal size > 1.5 cm, and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were associated with RC. On multivariate analysis, less-than-complete primary site response and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were identified as independent prognostic factors for RC. Conclusions The neck failure rate after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection was 22%. Two-thirds of these were successfully salvaged with neck dissection and the ultimate neck control rate was 92%. Our results suggest that planned neck dissection might not be necessary in patients with complete response of primary site, no evidence of residual lesion > 1.5 cm, or no necrotic lymph nodes at the 1-2 months follow-up evaluation after radiotherapy. PMID:22313843

  15. HPV and head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Dufour, X; Beby-Defaux, A; Agius, G; Lacau St Guily, J

    2012-02-01

    Head and neck cancer is frequent worldwide and oropharyngeal locations are presently sharply on the increase, in relation with an increasing incidence of oropharyngeal infection by oncogenic type-16 human papillomavirus (HPV). The clinical and biologic profile of these patients is distinct from that of other oropharyngeal carcinoma patients, with earlier onset, cystic cervical nodes and basaloid carcinoma histopathology. Detection of intratumoral viral DNA is essential to confirm the role of HPV, and E6/E7 mRNA expression is the most relevant indicator for stratification. Several methods can reveal intratumoral oncogenic HPV DNA, but PCR with hybridization is the most sensitive and most widely used. According to several reports, prognosis in terms of survival and locoregional control is better in HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma than in oropharyngeal carcinoma associated with smoking and alcohol consumption. The future lies in vaccination, but further studies will determine whether the rate of oropharyngeal carcinoma falls in women vaccinated against cervical cancer.

  16. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    SciTech Connect

    Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

    1985-02-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  17. Unusual cause of neck pain: septic arthritis of a cervical facet.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jaime L; Ernst, Amy A

    2012-11-01

    Neck pain is a common cause for presentation to an emergency department. Most causes are benign and often secondary to arthritis or injuries. We present a case of septic cervical facet arthritis, a very rare cause of neck pain. The clinical presentation of septic cervical facet arthritis includes fever, neck pain that is often unilateral that is worse with movement, nerve root symptoms, and radiation of pain to the shoulder. Consequences may be severe and include joint destruction and infection progression. Symptoms may be indolent, and a high index of suspicion is necessary to make this diagnosis.

  18. Airway management in laryngotracheal injuries from blunt neck trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debnath; Agarwal, Rita; Bajaj, Lalit; Teng, Sarena N; Prager, Jeremy D

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric laryngotracheal injuries from blunt neck trauma are extremely rare, but can be potentially catastrophic. Early diagnosis and skillful airway management is critical in avoiding significant morbidity and mortality associated with these cases. We present a case of a patient who suffered a complete tracheal transection and cervical spine fracture following a clothesline injury to the anterior neck. A review of the mechanisms of injury, clinical presentation, initial airway management, and anesthetic considerations in laryngotracheal injuries from blunt neck trauma in children are presented.

  19. A randomised controlled trial comparing graded exercise treatment and usual physiotherapy for patients with non-specific neck pain (the GET UP neck pain trial).

    PubMed

    McLean, Sionnadh M; Klaber Moffett, Jennifer A; Sharp, Donald M; Gardiner, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Evidence supports exercise-based interventions for the management of neck pain, however there is little evidence of its superiority over usual physiotherapy. This study investigated the effectiveness of a group neck and upper limb exercise programme (GET) compared with usual physiotherapy (UP) for patients with non-specific neck pain. A total of 151 adult patients were randomised to either GET or UP. The primary measure was the Northwick Park Neck pain Questionnaire (NPQ) score at six weeks, six months and 12 months. Mixed modelling identified no difference in neck pain and function between patients receiving GET and those receiving UP at any follow-up time point. Both interventions resulted in modest significant and clinically important improvements on the NPQ score with a change score of around 9% between baseline and 12 months. Both GET and UP are appropriate clinical interventions for patients with non-specific neck pain, however preferences for treatment and targeted strategies to address barriers to adherence may need to be considered in order to maximise the effectiveness of these approaches.

  20. Influence of the linac design on intensity-modulated radiotherapy of head-and-neck plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolnjak, R.; van der Heide, U. A.; Meijer, G. J.; van Asselen, B.; Raaijmakers, C. P. J.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we quantify the impact of linac/MLC design parameters on IMRT treatment plans. The investigated parameters were leaf width in the MLC, leaf transmission, related to the thickness of the leaves, and penumbra related primarily to the source size. Seven head-and-neck patients with stage T1-T3N0-N2cM0 oropharyngeal cancer were studied. For each patient nine plans were made with a different set of linac/MLC parameters. The plans were optimized in Pinnacle3 v7.6c and PLATO RTS v2.6.4, ITP v1.1.8. A hypothetical ideal linac/MLC was introduced to investigate the influence of one parameter at a time without interaction of other parameters. When any of the three parameters was increased from the ideal set-up values (leaf width 2.5 mm, transmission 0%, penumbra 3 mm), the mean dose to the parotid glands increased, given the same tumour coverage. The largest increase was found for increasing leaf transmission. The investigation showed that by changing more than one parameter of the ideal linac/MLC set-up, the increase in the mean dose was smaller than the sum of dose increments for each parameter separately. As a reference to clinical practice, we also optimized the plans of the seven patients with the clinically used Elekta SLi 15, equipped with a standard MLC with a leaf width of 10 mm. As compared to the ideal linac, this resulted in an increase of the average dose to the parotid glands of 5.8 Gy.

  1. Factors Associated With Neck Hematoma After Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sayaka; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Saito, Yuki; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To identify risk factors for post-thyroidectomy hematoma requiring airway intervention or surgery (“wound hematoma”) and determine post-thyroidectomy time to intervention. Post-thyroidectomy hematoma is rare but potentially lethal. Information on wound hematoma in a nationwide clinical setting is scarce. Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we extracted data from records of patients undergoing thyroidectomy from July 2010 to March 2014. Patients with clinical stage IV cancer or those with bilateral neck dissection were excluded because they could have undergone planned tracheotomy on the day of thyroidectomy. We assessed the association between background characteristics and wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy, using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Among 51,968 patients from 880 hospitals, wound hematoma occurred in 920 (1.8%) ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy and in 203 (0.4%) ≥3 days post-thyroidectomy (in-hospital mortality = 0.05%). Factors significantly associated with wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy were male sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30–1.77); higher age (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.02); overweight or obese (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04–1.44); type of surgery (partial thyroidectomy for benign tumor compared with: total thyroidectomy, benign tumor [OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.45–2.63]; partial thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.00–1.46]; total thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.82–3.49]; and thyroidectomy for Graves disease [OR 3.88, 95% CI 2.59–5.82]); neck dissection (OR, 1.53, 95% CI 1.05–2.23); antithrombotic agents (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.15–2.17); and blood transfusion (OR 5.33, 95% CI 2.39–11.91). Closer monitoring of airway and neck is recommended for patients with risk factors, and further cautious monitoring beyond 3 days post-thyroidectomy. PMID:26886632

  2. Posttraumatic Boutonnière and Swan Neck Deformities.

    PubMed

    McKeon, Kathleen E; Lee, Donald H

    2015-10-01

    Boutonnière and swan neck deformities of the finger can be the result of trauma. The complex anatomy of the extensor mechanism of the finger makes understanding the pathomechanics of these deformities challenging. These posttraumatic deformities should not be confused with those associated with inflammatory arthritis because the treatment options are often very different. An accurate clinical assessment is essential for selecting the appropriate treatment method. Physical examination, including Elson and intrinsic-plus tests, and plain radiography are important tools for diagnosis. A variety of nonsurgical and surgical treatment modalities can be used to restore the motion of the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints and rebalance the forces across these joints. An understanding of the anatomy, clinical presentation, treatment options, and expected outcomes is crucial for optimal treatment of posttraumatic boutonnière and swan neck deformities. PMID:26320165

  3. Immunotherapy With MK-3475 in Surgically Resectable Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Cancer of Head and Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Head and Neck

  4. Pain and Disability in the Jaw and Neck Region following Whiplash Trauma.

    PubMed

    Häggman-Henrikson, B; Lampa, E; Marklund, S; Wänman, A

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between whiplash trauma and chronic orofacial pain is unclear, especially with regard to the time elapsed from trauma to development of orofacial pain. The aim was to analyze prevalence of jaw pain and disability, as well as the relationship between pain and disability in the jaw and neck regions in the early nonchronic stage after whiplash trauma. In this case-control study, 70 individuals (40 women, 30 men, mean age 35.5 y) who visited an emergency department with neck pain following a car accident were examined within 3 wk of trauma (group 1) and compared with 70 individuals (42 women, 28 men, mean age 33.8 y), who declined to attend a clinical examination but agreed to fill in questionnaires (group 2). The 2 case groups were compared with a matched control group of 70 individuals (42 women, 28 men, mean age 37.6 y) without a history of neck trauma. All participants completed questionnaires regarding jaw pain and dysfunction, rating pain intensity in jaw and neck regions on the Numerical Rating Scale, the Neck Disability Index, and Jaw Disability Checklist. Compared with controls, individuals with a recent whiplash trauma reported more jaw pain and dysfunction. Furthermore, there was a moderate positive correlation between jaw and neck pain ratings for group 1 (r = 0.61, P < 0.0001) and group 2 (r = 0.59, P < 0.0001). In the logistic regression analysis, cases showed higher odds ratios (range, 6.1 to 40.8) for jaw and neck pain and disability compared with controls. Taken together, the results show that individuals with a recent whiplash trauma report more jaw pain and disability compared with controls without a history of neck trauma. Furthermore, the correlation between jaw and neck pain intensity implies that intensity of neck pain in the acute stage after whiplash trauma might be a possible risk factor also for development of chronic orofacial pain. PMID:27307051

  5. Assessment and measurement of head and neck lymphedema: state-of-the-science and future directions.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jie; Ridner, Sheila H; Aulino, Joseph M; Murphy, Barbara A

    2015-05-01

    Currently, assessment and measurement of lymphedema in head and neck cancer patients is difficult. The aims of this report are to examine the current state of science regarding available measurement of head and neck lymphedema, to identify gaps in clinical evaluation of head and neck lymphedema, and to propose future research directions for advancing the assessment of head and neck lymphedema. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature review based on PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane database, EMBASE, and PsycINFO from 1989 to 2014. Primary search terms included head and/or neck cancer, head and/or neck and/or face, lymphedema, edema, swelling, fibrosis, measurement, assessment, and evaluation. The authors also reviewed information from the Oncology Nursing Society, National Lymphedema Network, National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, and other related healthcare professional association web sites. Based on the nature/characteristics of measurement reported in the literature, methods for assessment of head and neck lymphedema can be categorized into: (1) patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures (e.g., symptom tool), (2) clinician-reported outcome (CRO) measures based on clinical grading criteria via a clinical exam (external lymphedema evaluation by physical examination and internal edema examination via endoscopy), and (3) technical capacity/measurement techniques (e.g., imaging techniques). Although a number of measures have been reported in the literature, clinically useful PRO and CRO measures, and reliable and sensitive measurement techniques need to be validated to address gaps in assessment of head and neck lymphedema, and to be easily used in early identification of lymphedema and assessment of treatment/interventional effects. PMID:25703799

  6. Liverpool Opinion on Unfavorable Results in Microsurgical Head and Neck Reconstruction: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Brown, James; Schache, Andrew; Butterworth, Chris

    2016-10-01

    This article annotates a philosophy toward achieving best results for the patient with head and neck cancer, in particular relating to oral, mandibular, and maxillary resection. At the same time are highlighted the pitfalls that, if not avoided, are likely to result in a poor outcome even with a successful flap transfer. There is a paucity of evidence to support clinical practice in head and neck reconstruction such that much of the discussion presented is opinion-based rather than evidence-based.

  7. Laryngeal Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting with Neck Mass in an Adult Woman

    PubMed Central

    Jahandideh, Hesam; Nasoori, Yasser; Rostami, Sara; Safdarian, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a very rare condition that commonly affects the head and neck region. There are very few cases of isolated laryngeal involvement by LCH, mostly reported in pediatric patients. Here, we report a case of laryngeal LCH in a 62-year-old woman presenting with a neck mass several weeks ago. The clinical and histopathological findings are reported with a brief discussion about the disease. PMID:27127670

  8. Pictorial essay: Vascular interventions in extra cranial head and neck.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Suyash S; Shetty, Nitin S; Dharia, Tejas P; Polnaya, Ashwin M

    2012-10-01

    Medicine is an ever changing field and interventional radiology (IR) procedures are becoming increasingly popular because of high efficacy and its minimally invasive nature of the procedure. Management of disease processes in the extra cranial head and neck (ECHN) has always been a challenge due to the complex anatomy of the region. Cross sectional imaging of the ECHN has grown and evolved tremendously and occupies a pivotal and integral position in the clinical management of variety of head and neck pathologies. Advances in angiographic technologies including flat panel detector systems, biplane, and 3-dimensional rotational angiography have consolidated and expanded the role of IR in the management of various ECHN pathologies. The ECHN is at cross roads between the origins of great vessels and the cerebral vasculature. Thorough knowledge of functional and technical aspects of neuroangiography is essential before embarking on head and neck vascular interventions. The vessels of the head and neck can be involved by infectious and inflammatory conditions, get irradiated during radiotherapy and injured due to trauma or iatrogenic cause. The ECHN is also a common site for various hypervascular neoplasms and vascular malformations, which can be treated with endovascular and percutaneous embolization. This pictorial essay provides a review of variety of ECHN pathologies which were managed by various IR procedures using different approaches. PMID:23833428

  9. Access to dental services for head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Mark; Aleid, Wesam; McKechnie, Alasdair

    2013-07-01

    Dental assessment is important for patients with cancer of the head and neck who are to have radiotherapy, as many of these patients have poor dental health before they start treatment. This, compounded by the fact that radiotherapy to the head and neck has a detrimental effect on oral health, has led the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) to issue guidance that the dental health of these patients should be assessed before treatment. Unfortunately some multidisciplinary teams, such as the one at United Lincolnshire Hospitals, do not have access to a restorative dentist or a dental hygienist. In a retrospective survey we investigated access to general dental services by patients with head and neck cancer who were to have radiotherapy at our hospital and found that 37/71 (52%) had not been reviewed by a dentist within the past 12 months. A secondary national survey that investigated the availability of restorative dental and dental hygienic services showed that of the 56 multidisciplinary teams that deal with head and neck cancer in England, 19 (34%) do not have access to a restorative dentist and 23 (41%) do not have access to a dental hygienist, suggesting that this problem may be countrywide.

  10. The effectiveness of balneotherapy in chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Koyuncu, Engin; Ökmen, Burcu Metin; Özkuk, Kağan; Taşoğlu, Özlem; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of balneotherapy (BT), which is applied in addition to physical therapy (PT), in the treatment of chronic neck pain. Sixty patients with chronic neck pain were divided into study (n = 30) and control (n = 30) groups. All of the patients in both groups were treated with a 15-session standard PT program consisting of hot pack, ultrasound, and transcutaneous electrical stimulation. Patients in the study group were also treated with a 15-session BT program lasting 20 min/day in addition to the standard PT program. Visual analogue scale (VAS), modified neck disability index (mNDI), and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) scores of all patients were evaluated at three different times as pretreatment, posttreatment, and posttreatment third week. There was no statistically significant difference between the clinical and demographic characteristics of the patients in different groups before treatment. Intragroup analysis revealed significant improvement in all parameters for both of the groups at all time intervals. Intergroup analysis uncovered the superiority of the study group. According to the results of this study, BT in combination with PT is superior to PT alone in reducing pain and disability and improving quality of life in patients with chronic neck pain.

  11. Emerging applications for OCT in the head and neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Marc; Kim, Jason H.; Armstrong, William B.; Djalilian, Hamid R.; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2010-02-01

    Objectives: To describe the current and promising new applications of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) as a helpful tool when imaging the different sites in the head and neck. We used the OCT Niris system, which is the first commercially available OCT device for applications outside the field of ophthalmology. Methods: OCT images were obtained of normal, benign, premalignant and malignant lesions in different areas of the head and neck. The OCT imaging system has a tissue penetration depth of approximately 1-2mm, a scanning range of 2mm and a spatial depth resolution of approximately 10-20μm. Imaging was performed using a flexible probe in two different settings, the outpatient clinic and the operating room. Results: High-resolution cross-sectional images from the larynx were obtained with the patient awake, without the need for general anesthesia, under direct visualization with a flexible fiberoptic endoscope. The OCT probe was inserted through the nasal cavity and placed in slight contact with the laryngeal tissue. In the ears, cholesteatoma was differentiated from inflamed middle ear mucosa by the different hyperintensity. In the neck, normal as well as different pathologies of the thyroid were identified. Conclusions: This system is non invasive and easy to incorporate into the operating room setting as well as the outpatient clinic. It requires minimal set-up and only one person is required to operate the system. OCT has the distinctive capability to obtain highresolution images, and the microanatomy of different sites can be observed. OCT technology has the potential to offer a quick, efficient and reliable imaging method to help the surgeon not only in the operating room but also in the clinical setting to guide surgical biopsies and aid in clinical decision making of different head and neck pathologies, especially those arising form the larynx.

  12. Solitaire AB Stent-Assisted Coiling of Wide-Neck Micro Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-dong; Qin, Jun; Xiao, Zhen-yong; Feng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Solitaire AB stent-assisted coiling facilitates the endovascular treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. We present our experience of coiling the micro-aneurysms of wide-neck with Solitaire AB stent assisting in a single center. Methods Thirty-one Solitaire AB stents were used to treat via endovascular approach patients with 31 wide-neck micro aneurysms in a single center in China. Technical and clinical complications were recorded. Modified Rankin Scale was used to evaluate the patients' conditions via clinic and telephone follow-up. Results The mean width of aneurysm sac was 2.30±0.42 mm, and the mean diameter of aneurysm neck was 2.83±0.48 mm. Complete occlusion was achieved in 28 aneurysms (90.32%); neck remnant was seen in 3 aneurysms (9.68%). Technical and clinical complications related to the procedure were encountered in four patients (12.5%). Two patients died (6.25%). No patient had a permanent deficit. Conclusion Solitaire AB stent was a safe and efficiency tool in assisting coiling of micro aneurysms with wide neck, but may be not suitable for a blaster-like one. Mid- and long-term follow-up will be required to elucidate the impact of the Solitaire AB stent on recanalization rate. PMID:27446513

  13. MATRIX METALLOPROTEASES IN HEAD AND NECK CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Eben L.; Matrisian, Lynn M.

    2010-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a collection of enzymes capable of cleaving extracellular matrix components, growth factors, and cell-surface receptors. MMPs modulate most aspects of tumorigenesis and are highly expressed in cancer compared with normal tissues. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) express high levels of MMPs in vivo and that inhibition of these enzymes in vitro and in mouse models decreases invasion and metastasis. However, the clinical trials for MMP inhibitors have failed to demonstrate a significant survival advantage in most cancers. The disparity between preclinical and clinical studies has led to the reevaluation of how MMP functions in cancer and the design of clinical trials for molecularly targeted agents. Mouse model data and analysis of HNSCC tumor specimens suggests that membrane type-1 MMP (MT1-MMP) may be a critical enzyme in tumor cell invasion and survival in vivo. This accumulated data provide evidence for development of selective MT1-MMP inhibitors as therapy in HNSCC. PMID:16470875

  14. Impact of targeting insulin-like growth factor signaling in head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Limesand, Kirsten H; Chibly, Alejandro Martinez; Fribley, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    The IGF system has been shown to have either negative or negligible impact on clinical outcomes of tumor development depending on specific tumor sites or stages. This review focuses on the clinical impact of IGF signaling in head and neck cancer, the effects of IGF targeted therapies, and the multi-dimensional role of IRS 1/2 signaling as a potential mechanism in resistance to targeted therapies. Similar to other tumor sites, both negative and positive correlations between levels of IGF-1/IGF-1-R and clinical outcomes in head and neck cancer have been reported. In addition, utilization of IGF targeted therapies has not demonstrated significant clinical benefit; therefore the prognostic impact of the IGF system on head and neck cancer remains uncertain.

  15. Age Moderates the Relationships between Family Functioning and Neck Pain/Disability

    PubMed Central

    Guzy, Grażyna; Polczyk, Romuald; Szpitalak, Malwina; Vernon, Howard

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional clinical study was designed to explore the relationships between family functioning, coping styles, and neck pain and neck disability. It was hypothesized that better family functioning and more effective coping styles would be associated with less pain and pain-related disability. It also was hypothesized that these relationships would be stronger in older people because they have fewer resources, more limited coping styles, and may depend more on their family for support. In this study, 88 women with chronic non-traumatic neck pain completed the Family Assessment Measure (FAM), Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and a Visual-Analogue Scale (VAS) measuring the subjective intensity of neck pain. Zero-order and partial correlations and hierarchical stepwise regression were performed. CISS was not correlated with the NDI orVAS. Good family functioning was correlated with lower NDI and VAS scores. Age was found to moderate the relationship between the FAM and both NDI and VAS. This relationship was significant and positive in older patients, but non-significant in younger patients. It was concluded that better family functioning is associated with lower neck disability and pain intensity, especially in the case of older women suffering from non-traumatic neck pain. PMID:27078854

  16. The role of radiology in head and neck tumours in children

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Head and neck malignancy is rare in children. However, distinguishing malignant tumours from the more common and numerous benign causes of neck masses in childhood is crucial as many malignant conditions have an excellent prognosis with appropriate oncological management. Ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging all have crucial roles in the diagnosis of head and neck malignancy in children and there is an emerging role for positron emission tomography, particularly in the management and follow-up of lymphoma. We describe the imaging appearances of the common malignant tumours arising in the extracranial head and neck in children, focusing on lymphoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The clinical presentation and radiological appearances of benign tumours in the head and neck in children may overlap with those seen in malignant disease. We describe the imaging appearances of juvenile angiofibroma, vascular abnormalities involving the extracranial head and neck and cervical teratomas. Advances in both imaging techniques and cancer staging systems, many of the latter aimed at avoiding over-treatment and treatment-related complications, will lead to an increasingly central role for imaging in childhood head and neck cancer. PMID:20199940

  17. Age Moderates the Relationships between Family Functioning and Neck Pain/Disability.

    PubMed

    Guzy, Grażyna; Polczyk, Romuald; Szpitalak, Malwina; Vernon, Howard

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional clinical study was designed to explore the relationships between family functioning, coping styles, and neck pain and neck disability. It was hypothesized that better family functioning and more effective coping styles would be associated with less pain and pain-related disability. It also was hypothesized that these relationships would be stronger in older people because they have fewer resources, more limited coping styles, and may depend more on their family for support. In this study, 88 women with chronic non-traumatic neck pain completed the Family Assessment Measure (FAM), Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and a Visual-Analogue Scale (VAS) measuring the subjective intensity of neck pain. Zero-order and partial correlations and hierarchical stepwise regression were performed. CISS was not correlated with the NDI orVAS. Good family functioning was correlated with lower NDI and VAS scores. Age was found to moderate the relationship between the FAM and both NDI and VAS. This relationship was significant and positive in older patients, but non-significant in younger patients. It was concluded that better family functioning is associated with lower neck disability and pain intensity, especially in the case of older women suffering from non-traumatic neck pain. PMID:27078854

  18. Neck pain: manipulating the upper back helps lessen pain and improve neck motion.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    Neck pain is very common. In the United States, between 30% and 50% of people suffer from an aching neck each year. Although neck pain can be caused by injury, most of this pain results from more gradual stresses, such as particular sitting, standing, or work postures, lifting patterns, or sleeping positions. Typical neck pain can also cause headaches, pain between your shoulders, or a feeling of knots in your neck and upper back muscles. Although manual therapy, sometimes called "manipulation," is a common treatment for many types of spine pain, some people are uncomfortable having their necks manipulated. Recently, though, researchers have tested the benefits of a thrust manipulation of the upper back to treat neck pain. A study published in the September 2011 issue of JOSPT provides new insight and an evidence-based summary of the benefits of manipulating the upper back to ease and eliminate neck pain.

  19. A NEW DIAGNOSTIC SIGN IN NECK INJURIES.

    PubMed

    CROWE, H

    1964-01-01

    The aggravation of neck pain and headache as a result of the use of diathermy or other forms of energy in the treatment of neck sprain may represent a diagnostic sign by which to distinguish severe injury of the neck from simple sprain. In the case of simple neck sprain, the patient's complaints may be inadvertently continued more or less indefinitely by the use of high frequency energy or even locally applied heat. That recovery sometimes follows settlement of litigation in such cases may be due not to the award of money but to discontinuance of an aggravating medical treatment.

  20. Infections of the deep neck spaces.

    PubMed

    Hedge, Amogh; Mohan, Suyash; Lim, Winston Eng Hoe

    2012-05-01

    Deep neck infections (DNI) have a propensity to spread rapidly along the interconnected deep neck spaces and compromise the airway, cervical vessels and spinal canal. The value of imaging lies in delineating the anatomical extent of the disease process, identifying the source of infection and detecting complications. Its role in the identification and drainage of abscesses is well known. This paper pictorially illustrates infections of important deep neck spaces. The merits and drawbacks of imaging modalities used for assessment of DNI, the relevant anatomy and the possible sources of infection of each deep neck space are discussed. Certain imaging features that alter the management of DNI have been highlighted. PMID:22584969

  1. Crohn's disease manifesting in the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Patrick J; Ferlito, Alfio; Devaney, Kenneth O; Rinaldo, Alessandra

    2004-04-01

    Crohn's disease may present to the head and neck surgeon with symptoms and signs attributed to the disease. Many clinical presentations, both specific and non-specific, have been recorded in the oral cavity, nose and larynx. Some of these clinical manifestations have been found to be consistent with Crohn's disease, but most have been attributed to Crohn's disease without histologic confirmation of the presence of non-caseating granulomas, which is pathognomonic of Crohn's disease. Lesions, when present without an associated diagnosis of Crohn's disease, should be ascribed the diagnosis of orofacial granulomatosis, until a diagnosis of intestinal Crohn's disease has been confirmed.

  2. Getting Personal: Head and Neck Cancer Management in the Era of Genomic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Andrew C.; Uhlmann, Wendy R.; Brenner, J. Chad; Shuman, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic testing is rapidly becoming an important tool in the management of patients with head and neck cancer. As we enter the era of genomics and personalized medicine, providers should be aware of testing options, counseling resources, and the benefits, limitations and future of personalized therapy. Methods This manuscript offers a primer to assist clinicians treating patients in anticipating and managing the inherent practical and ethical challenges of cancer care in the genomic era. Results Clinical applications of genomics for head and neck cancer are emerging. We discuss the indications for genetic testing, types of testing available, implications for care, privacy/disclosure concerns and ethical considerations. Hereditary genetic syndromes associated with head and neck neoplasms are reviewed, and online genetics resources are provided. Conclusions This article summarizes and contextualizes the evolving diagnostic and therapeutic options that impact the care of patients with head and neck cancer in the genomic era. PMID:25995036

  3. [The role definition of lateral arm free flap in reconstruction after head and neck cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Li, C; Cai, Y C; Wang, W; He, Y X; Lan, X J; Li, Q L; Zhou, Y Q; Liu, J F; Zhu, G Q; Liu, K; Wang, S X; Wang, K; Fan, J C; Sun, R H

    2016-02-01

    Application of free flap is one of the important repair means in head and neck surgery. A variety of free flaps, such as anterolateral thigh flap, have showed unique advantages in repair for tissue defects after resection of head and neck tumor, and have became increasing popularity. Lateral arm flee flap is an important repair means in plastic surgery, which has developed more than 30 years, but the application of this flap for reconstruction in head and neck surgery is relatively backward, with few reports. This review focuses on the creativity and innovation, the relationship between anatomy and clinical application, and the application status and prospects for lateral arm flee flap in individual head and neck reconstruction surgery.

  4. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head after internal fixation for femoral neck fracture: histopathological investigation.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Kido, Hidehiko; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-08-01

    Late segmental collapse after internal fixation for femoral neck fracture is the phenomenon observed in post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ON), which has generally been reported to occur over a year or more after internal fixation. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head (SIF) has also been recognized to cause femoral head collapse, however, only two cases of SIF after internal fixation for femoral neck fracture have been reported. We report a case with femoral head collapse observed 5 months after internal fixation for femoral neck fracture, which was histopathologically diagnosed as SIF. Clinically, differentiating SIF from ON is important because some cases of SIF have been reported to heal without surgical treatments. The timing of femoral head collapse after femoral neck fracture may be different between SIF and post-traumatic ON.

  5. [Necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck].

    PubMed

    Gajda, Mieczysław; Holzhausen, Hans-Jürgen; Gudziol, Silke; Hauptmann, Steffen; Bloching, Marc

    2005-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a potentially lethal soft tissue infection characterized by cutaneous necrosis, suppurative fasciitis, vascular thrombosis and extreme systemic toxicity. It is a rare entity in the head and neck region, but occur most frequently in patients with diabetes and chronic alcoholism. Mostly involved are immunodeficient patients with banal infections of the upper aerodigestive tract, small traumas, but also after surgical procedures. Necrotizing fasciitis is an infection caused by aerobic or anaerobic microorganisms. A strong complication is a streptococcus-associated-toxic shock-syndrome which should be prevented because it is often associated with letal outcome. Septicemia and systemic toxic effects may lead to death within as short a time as 2 to 4 days. Necrotizing fasciitis is often misdiagnosed or the diagnosis is delayed with a mortality rate of approximately 30-70%. Once identified, treatment consists of antimicrobial therapy and surgical debridement followed at a later date with reconstructive surgery. We present a fatal case of craniofacial necrotizing fasciitis (NF) in a 63-year-old diabetic and chronic alcoholic man and discuss it's pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and the best therapeutic choice for this disease. A review of the literature with the clinical presentations, bacteriology diagnosis and treatment was presented.

  6. [Necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck].

    PubMed

    Gajda, Mieczysław; Holzhausen, Hans-Jürgen; Gudziol, Silke; Hauptmann, Steffen; Bloching, Marc

    2005-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a potentially lethal soft tissue infection characterized by cutaneous necrosis, suppurative fasciitis, vascular thrombosis and extreme systemic toxicity. It is a rare entity in the head and neck region, but occur most frequently in patients with diabetes and chronic alcoholism. Mostly involved are immunodeficient patients with banal infections of the upper aerodigestive tract, small traumas, but also after surgical procedures. Necrotizing fasciitis is an infection caused by aerobic or anaerobic microorganisms. A strong complication is a streptococcus-associated-toxic shock-syndrome which should be prevented because it is often associated with letal outcome. Septicemia and systemic toxic effects may lead to death within as short a time as 2 to 4 days. Necrotizing fasciitis is often misdiagnosed or the diagnosis is delayed with a mortality rate of approximately 30-70%. Once identified, treatment consists of antimicrobial therapy and surgical debridement followed at a later date with reconstructive surgery. We present a fatal case of craniofacial necrotizing fasciitis (NF) in a 63-year-old diabetic and chronic alcoholic man and discuss it's pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and the best therapeutic choice for this disease. A review of the literature with the clinical presentations, bacteriology diagnosis and treatment was presented. PMID:16521446

  7. [Mycoses of the head and neck].

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Audrey; Cornet, Muriel; Carnot, Françoise; Brasnu, Daniel; Bruneval, Patrick; Badoual, Cécile

    2005-04-01

    In recent years, mycoses have emerged as important infections in clinical practice. This phenomenon is explained by the ever growing number of immunocompromised patients and the increasing number of people travelling in areas where fungal diseases are endemic. Head and neck infections are common in disseminated mycoses and may simulate carcinoma or cause upper airway obstruction. The most frequent causative yeasts or yeast-like organisms include Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum var capsulatum, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Coccidioides immitis. Other causative fungal pathogens include Aspergillus fumigatus and less frequently, Rhizopus oryzae and Rhinosporidium seeberi. Since in most cases their pathophysiology is similar, those microorganisms share a common clinical pathological presentation. Symptoms such as dysphonia or dysphagia associated with hyperplastic and ulcerative lesions on endoscopic examination should prompt biopsies. A purulent or granulomatous inflammatory tissue reaction with pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia warrants caution since it may lead to a mistaken diagnosis of carcinoma. The pathologist must look carefully for microorganisms with Grocott and PAS stains. The causative agent can be identified if the pathologist is aware of the risk. Positive culture is needed to institute adequate treatment. PMID:16142162

  8. [Neck chylous fistula: conservative treatment].

    PubMed

    López Otero, Maria J; Fernández López, Maria T; Outeiriño Blanco, E; Álvarez Vázquez, P; Pinal Osorio, I; Iglesias Diz, D

    2010-01-01

    Injury to the thoracic duct, leading to chyle leak, occurs in 1-2,5% of patients who undergo neck dissection. Associated complications include malnutrition, immune compromise, fistula formation and carotid blowout. No definitive treatment algorithm can be deduced from the current literature, but on last reviews, there is an agreement on the conservative management. Medical management is based on that decreasing chyle flow will allow for spontaneous closure of the chyle leak. Conservative treatment includes: closed vacuum drainage, bed-rest, nutrition modification and synthetic somatostatin analog. Nutrition modification involves a low-fat diet supplemented with medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), enteral nutrition with high percentage of MCT or parenteral nutrition.

  9. A Rare Differential Diagnosis of a Solitary Anterior Neck Mass.

    PubMed

    Saniasiaya, Jeyasakthy; Mohamad, Irfan

    2016-09-01

    Patients with anterior neck masses commonly present to otorhinolaryngology clinics, but there are limited differential diagnoses for such lesions. Common ones include thyroid nodule and thyroglossal duct cyst. In an elderly patient, a differentiated thyroid carcinoma should be suspected especially if it moves with swallowing. We encountered a typical presentation of a solitary thyroid nodule-like mass with the exception of pulsation in a 65-year-old female. Further investigation, using neck ultrasonography, revealed that it was a variant of right common carotid artery arising from the left common carotid artery. Knowledge of such variants is of great importance as ignorance of such a variation may lead to inadvertent surgical complications during procedures. PMID:27602195

  10. Head-neck taper corrosion in hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hussenbocus, S; Kosuge, D; Solomon, L B; Howie, D W; Oskouei, R H

    2015-01-01

    Modularity at the head-neck junction of the femoral component in THA became popular as a design feature with advantages of decreasing implant inventory and allowing adjustment of leg length, offset, and soft tissue balancing through different head options. The introduction of a new modular interface to femoral stems that were previously monoblock, or nonmodular, comes with the potential for corrosion at the taper junction through mechanically assisted crevice corrosion. The incidence of revision hip arthroplasty is on the rise and along with improved wear properties of polyethylene and ceramic, use of larger femoral head sizes is becoming increasingly popular. Taper corrosion appears to be related to all of its geometric parameters, material combinations, and femoral head size. This review article discusses the pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical assessment, and management of taper corrosion at the head-neck junction.

  11. Immunology and Immunotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a key role in the development, establishment, and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). A greater understanding of the dysregulation and evasion of the immune system in the evolution and progression of HNSCC provides the basis for improved therapies and outcomes for patients. HNSCC cells evade the host immune system through manipulation of their own immunogenicity, production of immunosuppressive mediators, and promotion of immunomodulatory cell types. Through the tumor's influence on the microenvironment, the immune system can be exploited to promote metastasis, angiogenesis, and growth. This article provides a brief overview of key components of the immune infiltrating cells in the tumor microenvironment, reviewing immunological principles related to head and neck cancer, including the concept of cancer immunosurveillance and immune escape. Current immunotherapeutic strategies and emerging results from ongoing clinical trials are presented. PMID:26351330

  12. A Rare Differential Diagnosis of a Solitary Anterior Neck Mass

    PubMed Central

    Saniasiaya, Jeyasakthy; Mohamad, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Patients with anterior neck masses commonly present to otorhinolaryngology clinics, but there are limited differential diagnoses for such lesions. Common ones include thyroid nodule and thyroglossal duct cyst. In an elderly patient, a differentiated thyroid carcinoma should be suspected especially if it moves with swallowing. We encountered a typical presentation of a solitary thyroid nodule-like mass with the exception of pulsation in a 65-year-old female. Further investigation, using neck ultrasonography, revealed that it was a variant of right common carotid artery arising from the left common carotid artery. Knowledge of such variants is of great importance as ignorance of such a variation may lead to inadvertent surgical complications during procedures. Keywords Carotid Arteries. PMID:27602195

  13. Head-Neck Taper Corrosion in Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hussenbocus, S.; Kosuge, D.; Solomon, L. B.; Howie, D. W.; Oskouei, R. H.

    2015-01-01

    Modularity at the head-neck junction of the femoral component in THA became popular as a design feature with advantages of decreasing implant inventory and allowing adjustment of leg length, offset, and soft tissue balancing through different head options. The introduction of a new modular interface to femoral stems that were previously monoblock, or nonmodular, comes with the potential for corrosion at the taper junction through mechanically assisted crevice corrosion. The incidence of revision hip arthroplasty is on the rise and along with improved wear properties of polyethylene and ceramic, use of larger femoral head sizes is becoming increasingly popular. Taper corrosion appears to be related to all of its geometric parameters, material combinations, and femoral head size. This review article discusses the pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical assessment, and management of taper corrosion at the head-neck junction. PMID:25954757

  14. Moving Toward Bioadjuvant Approaches to Head and Neck Cancer Prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Saba, Nabil F.; Hammond, Anthea; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.

    2007-10-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma affects >45,000 Americans annually. Patients who are successfully treated for their primary tumor are at high risk of developing a second primary tumor, making effective preventive strategies highly desirable for this disease. Although a landmark study in 1990 suggested some benefit of high-dose retinoids in head and neck cancer prevention, subsequent trials using more tolerable doses have shown limited clinical success. Newer preventive strategies have included bioadjuvant therapy combining retinoids with interferon and {alpha}-tocopherol, combinations of molecularly targeted agents, and oncolytic viruses. Furthermore, considerable evidence has supported a cancer protective role for several nutrients, including green tea and curcumin analogs. Natural compounds such as these with favorable long-term safety profiles might be particularly suited to the cancer prevention setting, in which patients will usually tolerate only moderate risk and toxicity.

  15. Hip Arthroscopy for Excision of Osteoid Osteoma of Femoral Neck

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hatem Galal; Abdulla Babaqi, AbdulRahman; AbdelSalam El-Assal, Maher

    2014-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is the most commonly seen benign bone-forming lesion. It can occur anywhere, including the metaphyseal regions of small and large bones. We present 2 cases that underwent an arthroscopic technique for removal of OO of the femoral neck. The diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography in addition to magnetic resonance imaging. The lesions were accessed arthroscopically and excised by unroofing and curettage. The clinical and radiographic findings are presented, along with the surgical management. The patients improved dramatically postoperatively. OO of the femoral neck should be included in the differential diagnosis of hip pain in young patients. Arthroscopic excision and curettage provide a good choice for management, with low morbidity and rapid recovery. PMID:24749036

  16. Photodynamic therapy of head and neck cancer with different sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoulovskaya, Elena G.; Shental, Victor V.; Abdoullin, N. A.; Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Tabolinovskaia, T. D.; Edinak, N. J.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Kondratjeva, T. T.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Agafonov, Valery V.

    1997-12-01

    This paper deals with the results of clinical trials for sulfated aluminum phthalocyanine (PHS) (Photosens, Russia; Photogeme (PG) in Russia. The results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of head and neck tumors (HNT), side effects and ways of their correction and prevention, as well as possibility to work out less toxic regimes of PDT with photosense, choice of laser and type of irradiation are discussed. PDT have been provided in 79 patients with different head and neck tumors. Efficacy of PDT depended on tumor size and its histological type. Undesirable changes in plasma content of antioxidants by means of high pressure liquid chromatography (HLPC) have been found in patients after PHS injection. Influence of short-term and long-term supplementation with beta-carotene and vitamin E on this parameters are discussed.

  17. A Rare Differential Diagnosis of a Solitary Anterior Neck Mass

    PubMed Central

    Saniasiaya, Jeyasakthy; Mohamad, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Patients with anterior neck masses commonly present to otorhinolaryngology clinics, but there are limited differential diagnoses for such lesions. Common ones include thyroid nodule and thyroglossal duct cyst. In an elderly patient, a differentiated thyroid carcinoma should be suspected especially if it moves with swallowing. We encountered a typical presentation of a solitary thyroid nodule-like mass with the exception of pulsation in a 65-year-old female. Further investigation, using neck ultrasonography, revealed that it was a variant of right common carotid artery arising from the left common carotid artery. Knowledge of such variants is of great importance as ignorance of such a variation may lead to inadvertent surgical complications during procedures. Keywords Carotid Arteries.

  18. Position paper of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and the German Society of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology – Current state of clinical and endoscopic diagnostics, evaluation, and therapy of swallowing disorders in children

    PubMed Central

    Arens, Christoph; Herrmann, Ingo F.; Rohrbach, Saskia; Schwemmle, Cornelia; Nawka, Tadeus

    2015-01-01

    Swallowing disorders are frequent. The main concern is mortality due to aspiration-induced pneumonia and malnutrition. In addition, quality of life is severely affected. The demographic trend indicates an increase of dysphagia in the future. Neurodegenerative diseases, tumors of the digestive tract, and sequelae of tumor treatment in the head and neck region are the main pathologic entities. Predominantly ENT physicians and phoniatricians are asked for diagnostics and therapy, and will coordinate the interdisciplinary treatment according to the endoscopic findings. A differentiated approach in history, diagnostics, and symptom-oriented treatment is necessary for these mostly complex disorders. Integration of non-medical staff such as speech therapists, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists in planning and executing an effective therapy expands and completes the patient-oriented care. Conservative treatment by these therapists is an important pillar in the treatment. Parts of the specific diagnostics can be taken over in close cooperation. In particular, an interdisciplinary cooperation with the staff of intensive care medicine is essential. The diagnostic procedures of specific endoscopy as described in this position paper are part of the primary and fundamental tasks of ENT specialists and phoniatrists. Endoscopy is a medical service that is basically not delegable. Consequently, substitution of the physician is excluded. PMID:26770277

  19. Position paper of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and the German Society of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology - Current state of clinical and endoscopic diagnostics, evaluation, and therapy of swallowing disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Arens, Christoph; Herrmann, Ingo F; Rohrbach, Saskia; Schwemmle, Cornelia; Nawka, Tadeus

    2015-01-01

    Swallowing disorders are frequent. The main concern is mortality due to aspiration-induced pneumonia and malnutrition. In addition, quality of life is severely affected. The demographic trend indicates an increase of dysphagia in the future. Neurodegenerative diseases, tumors of the digestive tract, and sequelae of tumor treatment in the head and neck region are the main pathologic entities. Predominantly ENT physicians and phoniatricians are asked for diagnostics and therapy, and will coordinate the interdisciplinary treatment according to the endoscopic findings. A differentiated approach in history, diagnostics, and symptom-oriented treatment is necessary for these mostly complex disorders. Integration of non-medical staff such as speech therapists, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists in planning and executing an effective therapy expands and completes the patient-oriented care. Conservative treatment by these therapists is an important pillar in the treatment. Parts of the specific diagnostics can be taken over in close cooperation. In particular, an interdisciplinary cooperation with the staff of intensive care medicine is essential. The diagnostic procedures of specific endoscopy as described in this position paper are part of the primary and fundamental tasks of ENT specialists and phoniatrists. Endoscopy is a medical service that is basically not delegable. Consequently, substitution of the physician is excluded.

  20. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for T3 and T4N0M0 non–small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eriguchi, Takahisa; Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Nishimura, Shuichi; Takagawa, Yoshiaki; Enomoto, Tatsuji; Saeki, Noriyuki; Yashiro, Kae; Mizuno, Tomikazu; Aoki, Yousuke; Oku, Yohei; Yokosuka, Tetsuya; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the outcomes and feasibility of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for cT3 and cT4N0M0 non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 25 patients with localized primary NSCLC diagnosed as cT3 or cT4N0M0, given SBRT between May 2005 and July 2013, were analyzed. All patients had inoperable tumors. The major reasons for tumors being unresectable were insufficient respiratory function for curative resection, advanced age (>80 years old) or technically inoperable due to invasion into critical organs. The median patient age was 79 years (range; 60–86). The median follow-up duration was 25 months (range: 5–100 months). The 2-year overall survival rates for T3 and T4 were 57% and 69%, respectively. The 2-year local control rates for T3 and T4 were 91% and 68%, respectively. As for toxicities, Grade 0–1, Grade 2 and Grade 3 radiation pneumonitis occurred in 23, 1 and 1 patient, respectively. No other acute or symptomatic late toxicities were reported. Thirteen patients who had no local, mediastinal or intrapulmonary progression at one year after SBRT underwent pulmonary function testing. The median variation in pre-SBRT and post-SBRT forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) values was –0.1 (–0.8–0.8). This variation was not statistically significant (P = 0.56). Forced vital capacity (FVC), vital capacity (VC), %VC and %FEV1 also showed no significant differences. SBRT for cT3 and cT4N0M0 NSCLC was both effective and feasible. Considering the favorable survival and low morbidity rate, SBRT is a potential treatment option for cT3 and cT4N0M0 NSCLC. PMID:26983978

  1. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for T3 and T4N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eriguchi, Takahisa; Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Nishimura, Shuichi; Takagawa, Yoshiaki; Enomoto, Tatsuji; Saeki, Noriyuki; Yashiro, Kae; Mizuno, Tomikazu; Aoki, Yousuke; Oku, Yohei; Yokosuka, Tetsuya; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the outcomes and feasibility of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for cT3 and cT4N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 25 patients with localized primary NSCLC diagnosed as cT3 or cT4N0M0, given SBRT between May 2005 and July 2013, were analyzed. All patients had inoperable tumors. The major reasons for tumors being unresectable were insufficient respiratory function for curative resection, advanced age (>80 years old) or technically inoperable due to invasion into critical organs. The median patient age was 79 years (range; 60-86). The median follow-up duration was 25 months (range: 5-100 months). The 2-year overall survival rates for T3 and T4 were 57% and 69%, respectively. The 2-year local control rates for T3 and T4 were 91% and 68%, respectively. As for toxicities, Grade 0-1, Grade 2 and Grade 3 radiation pneumonitis occurred in 23, 1 and 1 patient, respectively. No other acute or symptomatic late toxicities were reported. Thirteen patients who had no local, mediastinal or intrapulmonary progression at one year after SBRT underwent pulmonary function testing. The median variation in pre-SBRT and post-SBRT forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) values was -0.1 (-0.8-0.8). This variation was not statistically significant (P = 0.56). Forced vital capacity (FVC), vital capacity (VC), %VC and %FEV1 also showed no significant differences. SBRT for cT3 and cT4N0M0 NSCLC was both effective and feasible. Considering the favorable survival and low morbidity rate, SBRT is a potential treatment option for cT3 and cT4N0M0 NSCLC. PMID:26983978

  2. [Mucosal melanomas of the head and neck: State of the art and current controversies].

    PubMed

    Troussier, Idriss; Baglin, Anne-Catherine; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Even, Caroline; Moya-Plana, Antoine; Krengli, Marco; Thariat, Juliette

    2015-06-01

    Mucosal melanomas of the head and neck (sinonasal and oral cavity) account for 1% of neoplasms, 4% of all melanomas and over 50% of all mucosal melanomas. They have a high metastatic potential. Five-year overall survival does not exceed 30%. Diagnosis may be difficult and includes adequate immunohistochemical staining. Risk factors, presentation and molecular biology are different from those of cutaneous melanomas. The mainstay of treatment is surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. Endoscopic surgery should be evaluated prospectively. Neck dissection is recommended for N0 oral cavity melanomas, while it can generally be omitted for sinonasal melanomas. Inoperable tumors can be treated with exclusive radiotherapy. Molecular guidance for metastatic cases is a relevant option despite low level of evidence, based on the rarity of disease and low response rates to chemotherapy. c-KIT inhibitors and immunotherapy appear promising.

  3. [Position paper of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and the German Society of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology - current state of clinical and endoscopic diagnostics, evaluation, and therapy of swallowing disorders in children and adults].

    PubMed

    Arens, C; Herrmann, I F; Rohrbach, S; Schwemmle, C; Nawka, T

    2015-03-01

    Position Paper of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and the German Society of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology - Current State of Clinical and Endoscopic Diagnostics, Evaluation, and Therapy of Swallowing Disorders in Children and AdultsSwallowing disorders are frequent. The main concern is mortality due to aspiration induced pneumonia and malnutrition. On the other hand quality of life is severely affected. The demographic trend indicates an increase of dysphagia in the future. Neurodegenerative diseases, tumors of the digestive tract and sequelae of tumor treatment in the head and neck region are the main pathologic entities.Predominantly ENT physicians and phoniatrists, are asked for diagnostics and therapy who will coordinate the interdisciplinary treatment according to the endoscopic findings.A differentiated approach in history, diagnostics, and symptom oriented treatment is necessary for the mostly complex disorders. The integration of non-medical personnel such as logopeds (speech language pathologists), physiotherapists, and occupational therapists in planning and executing an effective therapy expands and completes the patient-oriented care. Conservative treatment by these therapists is an important pillar in the treatment. Parts of the specific diagnostics can be taken over by them in close cooperation.In particular an interdisciplinary cooperation with the staff from intensive care medicine is indispensable.The diagnostic procedures of specific endoscopy as described in this position paper are part of the primary and fundamental tasks of ENT specialists and phoniatrists.Endoscopy is a medical service that is basically not delegable. Consequently substitution of the physician is precluded.

  4. Current philosophy in the surgical management of neck metastases for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, H. Hakan; Medina, Jesus E.; Robbins, K. Thomas; Silver, Carl E.; Strojan, Primož; Teymoortash, Afshin; Pellitteri, Phillip K.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Stoeckli, Sandro J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Suçrez, Carlos; Hartl, Dana M.; de Bree, Remco; Takes, Robert P.; Hamoir, Marc; Pitman, Karen T.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2016-01-01

    Neck dissection is an important treatment for metastases from upper aerodigestive carcinoma; an event that markedly reduces survival. Since its inception, the philosophy of the procedure has undergone significant change from one of radicalism to the current conservative approach. Furthermore, nonsurgical modalities have been introduced, and, in many situations, have supplanted neck surgery. The refinements of imaging the neck based on the concept of neck level involvement has encouraged new philosophies to evolve that seem to benefit patient outcomes particularly as this relates to diminished morbidity. The purpose of this review was to highlight the new paradigms for surgical removal of neck metastases using an evidence-based approach. PMID:24623715

  5. SU-E-T-63: Carotid Sparing Tomohelical Three Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for T1N0 Glottic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, C; Ju, S; Ahn, Y; Oh, D; Noh, J; Chung, K; Kim, J; Han, Y; Choi, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We investigated the dosimetric benefit and treatment efficiency of carotid-sparing TomoHelical (TH) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for early glottic cancer. Methods: Computed tomography (CT) simulation was performed for 10 patients with early-stage (T1N0M0) glottic squamous cell carcinoma. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), carotid artery (CA), and spinal cord (SP) were delineated for each CT data set. Two-field 3DCRT (2F-3DCRT), three-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (3F-IMRT), TomoHelical-IMRT (TH-IMRT), and TH-3DCRT plans were generated, with a total prescribed dose of 67.5 Gy in 30 fractions to the PTV for each patient. In order to evaluate plan quality, dosimetric characteristics were compared in terms of the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for the PTV, V35, V50, and V63 for the CAs and in terms of the maximum dose for the SP. Additionally, treatment planning and delivery times were compared to evaluate treatment efficiency. Results: The CIs for 3F-IMRT (0.650±0.05), TH-IMRT (0.643±0.03), and TH-3DCRT (0.631±0.03) were much better than that for 2F-3DCRT (0.318±0.03). The HIs for TH-IMRT (1.053±0.01) and TH-3DCRT (1.055±0.01) were slightly better than those for 2F-3DCRT (1.062±0.01) and 3F-IMRT (1.091±0.007). 2F-3DCRT showed poor CA sparing in terms of the V35, V50, and V63 compared to 3F-IMRT, TH-IMRT, and TH-3DCRT (p<0.05), whereas there was no significant dose difference between 3F-IMRT, TH-IMRT, and TH-3DCRT (p>0.05). The maximum dose to the SP with all plans was below 45 Gy. The treatment planning times for 2F-3DCRT (5.9±0.66 min) and TH-3DCRT (7.32±0.94 min) were much lower than those for 3F-IMRT (45.51±2.76 min) and TH-IMRT (35.58±4.41 min), whereas the delivery times with all plans was below 3 minutes. Conclusion: TH-3DCRT showed excellent carotid sparing capability, comparable to that with TH-IMRT, with high treatment efficiency and short planning and

  6. Neck pain brought into focus.

    PubMed

    Richter, Hans O

    2014-01-01

    A time honored dictum states that the eyes "lead the body", i.e., that the body typically adjusts its position to compensate for an impoverished retinal image (e.g., as due to optical blur, and/or inappropriately sized visual target). But only moderate or low level of evidence exists in support of this view. Inconclusive evidence does not, however, equal negative evidence. The accommodation/vergence system does exhibit signs of overload in contemporary working life, including eye discomfort, transient myopia, altered pattern of eye-lens oscillations, and associated phoria. Accommodation/vergence overload, caused by non-ergonomic near work, may also emerge as quickly as within one regular workday. Long-term musculoskeletal consequences of high accommodation/vergence demands have nevertheless not yet been studied in any detail. A research agenda which aims to provide multi-scientific evidence for eye-neck/shoulder interactions with public health implications and which also, in addition, study the eye-neck/shoulder mechanisms and elucidates the operating characteristics, should consequently be highly warranted. This new knowledge would be useful for physiotherapists, ergonomists and opticians, who in their profession treat patients experiencing vision- and musculoskeletal disorders. If both visual and the musculoskeletal aspects are given full and equal weight in the design and evaluation of work places, it is predicted to lead to an improved quality of life for the individual worker, and an enhanced productivity for the employer.

  7. Preventing head and neck injury.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, A S; McCrory, P

    2005-06-01

    A wide range of head and neck injury risks are present in sport, including catastrophic injury. The literature since 1980 on prevention of head and neck injury in sport was reviewed, focusing on catastrophic and brain injury and identifying the range of injury prevention methods in use. There have been few formal evaluations of injury prevention methods. Approaches that are considered, or have been proven, to be successful in preventing injury include: modification of the baseball; implementation of helmet standards in ice hockey and American football and increased wearing rates; use of full faceguards in ice hockey; changes in rules associated with body contact; implementation of rules to reduce the impact forces in rugby scrums. Helmets and other devices have been shown to reduce the risk of severe head and facial injury, but current designs appear to make little difference to rates of concussion. Research methods involving epidemiological, medical, and human factors are required in combination with biomechanical and technological approaches to reduce further injury risks in sport.

  8. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: emphasis on the selection and delineation of the targets.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Foote, Robert L; O'Sullivan, Brian; Beitler, Jonathan J; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2002-07-01

    The head and neck contain many critical, noninvolved structures in close vicinity to the targets. The tightly conformal doses produced by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and the lack of internal organ motion in the head and neck, provide the potential for organ sparing and improved tumor irradiation. Many studies of treatment planning for head and neck cancer have demonstrated the dosimetric superiority of IMRT over conventional techniques in these respects. The initial results of clinical studies demonstrate reduced xerostomia. They suggest an improvement in tumor control, which needs to be verified in larger studies and longer follow-up. Critical issues for successful outcome of head and neck IMRT are accurate selection of the neck lymph nodes that require adjuvant treatment, and accurate delineation on the planning computed tomography (CT) of the lymph-node bearing areas and subclinical disease adjoining the gross tumor. This review emphasizes these topics and provides some guidelines. PMID:12118389

  9. [Neck appendages--branchiogenic surplus malformations (choristoma)].

    PubMed

    Stieler, W; Senff, H; Mensing, H

    1988-09-01

    Congenital cartilaginous rests of the neck are branchiogenic surplus malformations that are very rare. They arise from epithelial growth in a false place and frequently contain elastic cartilage. Congenital cartilaginous rests of the neck are only rarely associated with other congenital malformations.

  10. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  11. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  12. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  13. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  14. Biomechanics of Sports-Induced Axial-Compression Injuries of the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Ivancic, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    will increase clinical awareness and immediate care and ultimately lead to improved protective equipment, reducing the frequency and severity of neck injuries and their associated societal costs. PMID:23068585

  15. Chronic Neck Pain: Making the Connection Between Capsular Ligament Laxity and Cervical Instability

    PubMed Central

    Steilen, Danielle; Hauser, Ross; Woldin, Barbara; Sawyer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    excessive motion between two adjacent cervical vertebrae and these associated symptoms is described as cervical instability. Therefore, we propose that in many cases of chronic neck pain, the cause may be underlying joint instability due to capsular ligament laxity. Currently, curative treatment options for this type of cervical instability are inconclusive and inadequate. Based on clinical studies and experience with patients who have visited our chronic pain clinic with complaints of chronic neck pain, we contend that prolotherapy offers a potentially curative treatment option for chronic neck pain related to capsular ligament laxity and underlying cervical instability. PMID:25328557

  16. Human papillomavirus status in head and neck cancer: the ethics of disclosure.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Andrew G; Wolf, Gregory T

    2010-09-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an emerging causative factor for squamous carcinoma of the oropharynx and perhaps other head and neck cancers. There is a great deal of uncertainty regarding the clinical significance and implications of HPV status in this patient population. As a result, there is no established protocol for informing patients of the potential link between viral infection and their cancer. This paper discusses some of the ethical issues involved with informing head and neck cancer patients of their HPV status, recognizing the dilemma posed by unresolved clinical questions and the need to respect the autonomy of patients by disclosing relevant information.

  17. Assessment of nutritional status and quality of life in patients treated for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Prevost, V; Joubert, C; Heutte, N; Babin, E

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify tools for the assessment of nutritional status in head and neck cancer patients, to evaluate the impact of malnutrition on therapeutic management and quality of life and to propose a simple screening approach adapted to routine clinical practice. The authors conducted a review of the literature to identify tools for the assessment of nutritional status in head and neck cancer patients published in French and English. Articles were obtained from the PubMed database and from the references of these articles and selected journals, using the keywords: "nutritional assessment", and "head and neck" and "cancer". Anthropometric indices, laboratory parameters, dietary intake assessment, clinical scores and nutritional risk scores used in patients with head and neck cancers are presented. The relevance of these tools in clinical practice and in research is discussed, together with the links between nutritional status and quality of life. This article is designed to help teams involved in the management of patients with head and neck cancer to choose the most appropriate tools for assessment of nutritional status according to their resources and their objectives.

  18. Adverse tissue reaction to corrosion at the neck-stem junction after modular primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gkagkalis, G; Mettraux, P; Omoumi, P; Mischler, S; Rüdiger, H A

    2015-02-01

    Complications related to the neck-stem junction of modular stems used for total hip arthroplasty (THA) are generating increasing concern. A 74-year-old male had increasing pain and a cutaneous reaction around the scar 1 year after THA with a modular neck-stem. Imaging revealed osteolysis of the calcar and a pseudo-tumour adjacent to the neck-stem junction. Serum cobalt levels were elevated. Revision surgery to exchange the stem and liner and to resect the pseudo-tumour was performed. Analysis of the stem by scanning electron microscopy and by energy dispersive X-ray and white light interferometry showed fretting corrosion at the neck-stem junction contrasting with minimal changes at the head-neck junction. Thus, despite dry assembly of the neck and stem on the back table at primary THA, full neck-stem contact was not achieved, and the resulting micromotion at the interface led to fretting corrosion. This case highlights the mechanism of fretting corrosion at the neck-stem interface responsible for adverse local tissue reactions. Clinical and radiological follow-up is mandatory in patients with dual-modular stems.

  19. Position of document holder and work related risk factors for neck pain among computer users: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Ambusam, S; Baharudin, O; Roslizawati, N; Leonard, J

    2015-01-01

    Document holder is used as a remedy to address occupational neck pain among computer users. An understanding on the effects of the document holder along with other work related risk factors while working in computer workstation requires attention. A comprehensive knowledge on the optimal location of the document holder in computer use and associated work related factors that may contribute to neck pain reviewed in this article. A literature search has been conducted over the past 14 years based on the published articles from January 1990 to January 2014 in both Science Direct and PubMed databases. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) keywords for search were neck muscle OR head posture OR muscle tension' OR muscle activity OR work related disorders OR neck pain AND/OR document location OR document holder OR source document OR copy screen holder.Document holder placed lateral to the screen was most preferred to reduce neck discomfort among occupational typists. Document without a holder was placed flat on the surface is least preferred. The head posture and muscle activity increases when the document is placed flat on the surface compared to when placed on the document holder. Work related factors such as static posture, repetitive movement, prolong sitting and awkward positions were the risk factors for chronic neck pain. This review highlights the optimal location for document holder for computer users to reduce neck pain. Together, the importance of work related risk factors for to neck pain on occupational typist is emphasized for the clinical management.

  20. New equations for matching a low neck field to oblique upper neck fields with collimator rotation in a 3-field monoisocentric setup for head-and-neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Manske, Maria A; Barker, Jerry L; Wong, Pei-Fong; Westlake, Wallace; Garden, Adam S; Ang, K Kian; Rosenthal, David I

    2004-01-01

    With a monoisocentric 3-field technique for treating head-and-neck cancer, collimator rotation may be needed for the upper lateral fields to avoid cephalad-positioned shoulders or to avoid unnecessary arytenoid irradiation while maintaining more anterior coverage. For patients with unilateral lymphadenopathy, lateral oblique-opposed boost fields can be used to encompass the primary tumor and ipsilateral lymph nodes without junctioning through gross disease. When initial collimated lateral fields are also rotated with a gantry angle to produce oblique boost fields, however, the resulting matchline with a low anterior neck (LAN) boost field is no longer nondivergent. This can be corrected by manual adjustment of collimator and gantry angles for the LAN field using 3D treatment planning software. The goal of this study was to derive mathematical formulas to simplify this process. We used a transformation matrix to define formulas that could predict the appropriate modifications to the LAN boost field. Output from the formulas was (1) visually tested within 3D treatment planning software and (2) verified using a solid water head-and-neck phantom and radiographic film dosimetry to confirm that a nondivergent matchline was obtained in several clinical scenarios. When evaluated with 3D treatment planning software, the formulas accurately predicted the appropriate gantry and collimator angles of the LAN boost field for a variety of possible beam combinations. When evaluated with film dosimetry, the formulas were shown to accurately predict the appropriate gantry and collimator angles of the LAN boost field to within the +/- 2 mm/1 degrees tolerance specifications of the linear accelerator and acceptable for routine clinical use. The presented formulas are simple and geometrically precise. They predict the necessary manipulations of the LAN boost field to maintain a geometrically precise matchline, as verified by 3D treatment planning software, phantom dosimetry, and actual

  1. Amide proton transfer-weighted imaging of the head and neck at 3 T: a feasibility study on healthy human subjects and patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Chen, Shuzhong; King, Ann D; Zhou, Jinyuan; Bhatia, Kunwar S; Zhang, Qinwei; Yeung, David Ka Wei; Wei, Juan; Mok, Greta Seng Peng; Wang, Yi-Xiang

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility and repeatability of amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) MRI for the head and neck on clinical MRI scanners. Six healthy volunteers and four patients with head and neck tumors underwent APTw MRI scanning at 3 T. The APTw signal was quantified by the asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) at 3.5 ppm. Z spectra of normal tissues in the head and neck (masseter muscle, parotid glands, submandibular glands and thyroid glands) were analyzed in healthy volunteers. Inter-scan repeatability of APTw MRI was evaluated in six healthy volunteers. Z spectra of patients with head and neck tumors were produced and APTw signals in these tumors were analyzed. APTw MRI scanning was successful for all 10 subjects. The parotid glands showed the highest APTw signal (~7.6% average), whereas the APTw signals in other tissues were relatively moderate. The repeatability of APTw signals from the masseter muscle, parotid gland, submandibular gland and thyroid gland of healthy volunteers was established. Four head and neck tumors showed positive mean APTw ranging from 1.2% to 3.2%, distinguishable from surrounding normal tissues. APTw MRI was feasible for use in the head and neck regions at 3 T. The preliminary results on patients with head and neck tumors indicated the potential of APTw MRI for clinical applications.

  2. Amide proton transfer-weighted imaging of the head and neck at 3 T: a feasibility study on healthy human subjects and patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Chen, Shuzhong; King, Ann D; Zhou, Jinyuan; Bhatia, Kunwar S; Zhang, Qinwei; Yeung, David Ka Wei; Wei, Juan; Mok, Greta Seng Peng; Wang, Yi-Xiang

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility and repeatability of amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) MRI for the head and neck on clinical MRI scanners. Six healthy volunteers and four patients with head and neck tumors underwent APTw MRI scanning at 3 T. The APTw signal was quantified by the asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) at 3.5 ppm. Z spectra of normal tissues in the head and neck (masseter muscle, parotid glands, submandibular glands and thyroid glands) were analyzed in healthy volunteers. Inter-scan repeatability of APTw MRI was evaluated in six healthy volunteers. Z spectra of patients with head and neck tumors were produced and APTw signals in these tumors were analyzed. APTw MRI scanning was successful for all 10 subjects. The parotid glands showed the highest APTw signal (~7.6% average), whereas the APTw signals in other tissues were relatively moderate. The repeatability of APTw signals from the masseter muscle, parotid gland, submandibular gland and thyroid gland of healthy volunteers was established. Four head and neck tumors showed positive mean APTw ranging from 1.2% to 3.2%, distinguishable from surrounding normal tissues. APTw MRI was feasible for use in the head and neck regions at 3 T. The preliminary results on patients with head and neck tumors indicated the potential of APTw MRI for clinical applications. PMID:25137521

  3. [Estimation of twenty days treatment of neck pain by McKenzie method].

    PubMed

    Lisiński, Przemysław; Wielogórka, Ewa

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study was to define the most common reasons for chronic neck pain and to state a connection between correction of posture by McKenzie and the character of pain. We investigated 30 people with chronic neck pain. They were patients of Out-Patients Unit of Rehabilitation. The average age was 43 +/- 6. Our group consisted of 21 women and 9 men. We used McKenzie protocol as a basis on the beginning and the end of treatment. The most important reason of neck pain in this study was frequent flexion of the neck and long-lasting flexion position. Pain often was activated by flexion and rotation of the neck. Above 70% of our patients stated that a character of pain changed towards better profile. Method of McKenzie is looked a quite successful in a correction of a posture of the body itself. Probably this method is capable to resolve a large portion of neck-pain problems. It should be used more frequently in clinical practice. PMID:16294698

  4. A correlation study of diagnostic fine-needle aspiration with histologic diagnosis in cystic neck lesions.

    PubMed

    Moatamed, Neda A; Naini, Bita V; Fathizadeh, Payman; Estrella, Julie; Apple, Sophia K

    2009-10-01

    The clinical diagnosis of a mass in the neck region encompasses a wide spectrum of differential diagnosis. Fine-needle aspiration is a quick and safe technique, which can provide useful information for initial assessment and further therapeutic measures. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the performance characteristics of the fine-needle aspiration (FNA) in cystic neck lesions. Of 142 patients with FNA for cystic neck masses during 2002-2007, 92 cases were selected with a follow-up histologic diagnosis, excluding the cystic colloid nodule of the thyroid. The cases were divided into salivary gland cystic neck (37 patients) and non-salivary cystic neck (55 patients) mass groups. False-positive and false-negative diagnoses were applied only to the malignant lesions after confirmation by histopathology. In the first group, nine malignant and 28 benign diagnoses were made by FNA; of which three were false-negative. In the second group, there were nine malignant and 46 benign diagnoses with three false negatives. The overall performance of the FNA showed 76% sensitivity and 100% specificity. In conclusion, FNA of the cystic neck lesions offers an invaluable and highly specific initial diagnostic approach for the management of the patients.

  5. Ruxolitinib Associated Tuberculosis Presenting as a Neck Lump.

    PubMed

    Shamil, Eamon; Cunningham, David; Wong, Billy L K; Jani, Piyush

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is an opportunistic infection with protean clinical manifestations. We describe a case of Ruxolitinib induced miliary tuberculosis presenting as a neck lump. A 78-year-old female presented with a two-month history of right-sided neck lump associated with fever, night sweats, and significant weight loss. She had a past medical history that included myelofibrosis, being treated with Ruxolitinib. Examination demonstrated 4 × 4 cm right-sided cervical lymphadenopathy. A chest radiograph showed extensive shadowing in both lungs. CT scan demonstrated perilymphatic nodes in addition to the cervical mass. An ultrasound-guided biopsy of a cervical lymph node demonstrated confirmed Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. It was hypothesized that use of Ruxolitinib through its selective inhibition of Janus-activated kinases 1 and 2 resulted in immunosuppression and miliary tuberculosis in this patient. The medication was stopped and a 12-month regime of antituberculosis therapy commenced. She remained well at one-year follow-up with resolution of lung involvement. Clinicians should consider tuberculosis as a differential diagnosis for patients presenting with a neck lump, particularly in those taking immunosuppressant medication such as Ruxolitinib. A multidisciplinary approach is needed to promptly treat the tuberculosis and consider discontinuation of Ruxolitinib. PMID:26788384

  6. LONG-TERM RESULTS OF BODY AND NECK TALUS FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Gomes de Sousa, Ricardo Jorge; Teixeira de Oliveira Massada, Marta Maria; Gonçalves Pereira, Manuel Alexandre Negrais Pinho; Gonçalves Costa, Isabel Maria; da Costa e Castro, José Fernando Souzellas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Talar neck and body fractures are unusual fractures. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of long term results. Material and Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out including 11 patients that underwent surgical treatment for body or neck talus fractures between January 1997 and December 2005. Final follow-up examination included a clinical evaluation (AOFAS score) and standard radiographs. Results: The mean follow-up time was 58.5 months. The prevalence of associated fractures was 60% (6/10). Overall AOFAS score averaged 72 [19-100]. Avascular necrosis and post-traumatic arthritis were present in half of the patients. Quality of surgical reduction, body fractures and absence of degenerative changes were correlated with better functional results. Neck fractures, osteonecrosis and posttraumatic arthritis led to inferior results. Conclusion: There is a great potential for long term functional impairment due to posttraumatic arthritis and chronic pain in this kind of fracture. Anatomic surgical reduction is the best chance to avoid them but it is not infallible. The avascular necrosis rate correlates with initial fracture displacement, but its occurrence in each specific case is unpredictable. PMID:27004192

  7. Bone impregnated hip screw in femoral neck fracture: Clinicoradiological results

    PubMed Central

    Sundar Raj, PK; Nuuman, Jiju A; Pattathil, Amish Sunder

    2015-01-01

    Background: Femoral neck fractures are treated either by internal fixation or arthroplasty. Usually, cannulated cancellous screws are used for osteosynthesis of fracture neck of femur. The bone impregnated hip screw (BIHS) is an alternative implant, where osteosyntehsis is required in femoral neck fracture. Materials and Methods: The BIHS is a hollow screw with thread diameter 8.3 mm, shank diameter 6.5 mm and wall thickness 2.2 mm and holes in the shaft of the screw with diameter 2 mm, placed in a staggered fashion. Biomechanical and animal experimental studies were done. Clinical study was done in two phases: Phase 1 in a group of volunteers, only with BIHS was used in a pilot study and phase 2 comparative study was done in a group with AO cannulated screws and the other group treated with BIHS. Results: In the phase 1 study, out of 15 patients, only one patient had delayed union. In phase 2, there were 78 patients, 44 patients in BIHS showed early union, compared to the rest 34 cases of AO cannulated screws Out of 44 patients with BIHS, 41 patients had an excellent outcome, 2 had nonunions and one implant breakage was noted. Conclusions: Bone impregnated hip screw has shown to provide early solid union since it incorporates the biomechanical principles and also increases the osteogenic potential and hence, found superior to conventional cannulated cancellous screw. PMID:26015608

  8. American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ezra E W; LaMonte, Samuel J; Erb, Nicole L; Beckman, Kerry L; Sadeghi, Nader; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Abbott, Dennis M; Fisher, Penelope S; Stein, Kevin D; Lyman, Gary H; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L

    2016-05-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:27002678

  9. American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ezra E W; LaMonte, Samuel J; Erb, Nicole L; Beckman, Kerry L; Sadeghi, Nader; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Abbott, Dennis M; Fisher, Penelope S; Stein, Kevin D; Lyman, Gary H; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L

    2016-05-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  10. Head and neck cancer: from research to therapy and cure.

    PubMed

    Varelas, Xaralabos; Kukuruzinska, Maria A

    2014-12-01

    Cumulative findings from many research groups have identified new signaling mechanisms associated with head and neck cancers. We summarize these findings, including discussion of aberrant NOTCH, PI3K, STAT3, immune recognition, oxidative pathway, and regulation of cell cycle and cell death. The genomic landscape of head and neck cancers has been shown to differ depending on human papillomavirus (HPV) status. We discuss studies examining the integration of HPV into genomic regions, as well as the epigenetic alterations that occur in response to HPV infection, and how these may help reveal new biomarker and treatment predictors. The characterization of premalignant lesions is also highlighted, as is evidence indicating that the surgical removal of these lesions is associated with better clinical outcomes. Current surgical methods are also discussed, including several less aggressive approaches such as minimal invasive robotic surgery. While much remains to be done in the fight against head and neck cancer, continued integration of basic research with new treatment options will likely lead to more effective therapeutic strategies directed against this disease.

  11. Head and neck cancer: from research to therapy and cure.

    PubMed

    Varelas, Xaralabos; Kukuruzinska, Maria A

    2014-12-01

    Cumulative findings from many research groups have identified new signaling mechanisms associated with head and neck cancers. We summarize these findings, including discussion of aberrant NOTCH, PI3K, STAT3, immune recognition, oxidative pathway, and regulation of cell cycle and cell death. The genomic landscape of head and neck cancers has been shown to differ depending on human papillomavirus (HPV) status. We discuss studies examining the integration of HPV into genomic regions, as well as the epigenetic alterations that occur in response to HPV infection, and how these may help reveal new biomarker and treatment predictors. The characterization of premalignant lesions is also highlighted, as is evidence indicating that the surgical removal of these lesions is associated with better clinical outcomes. Current surgical methods are also discussed, including several less aggressive approaches such as minimal invasive robotic surgery. While much remains to be done in the fight against head and neck cancer, continued integration of basic research with new treatment options will likely lead to more effective therapeutic strategies directed against this disease. PMID:25532687

  12. Structures and Electronic Properties of (KI)n(-/0) (n = 1-4) and K(KI)n(-/0) (n = 1-3) Clusters: Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Isomer-Depletion, and ab Initio Calculations.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gao-Lei; Feng, Gang; Zhao, Li-Juan; Xu, Hong-Guang; Zheng, Wei-Jun

    2015-11-12

    The (KI)n(-) (n = 1-4) and K(KI)n(-) (n = 1-3) clusters were studied by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. Comparison between the theoretical vertical detachment energies and the experimental values revealed that multiple isomers may coexist in the experiments. The existence of two isomers for K(KI)(-) and K(KI)2(-) were confirmed directly by isomer-depletion experiments, in which the low adiabatic detachment energy isomers were depleted by a 1064 nm laser beam before the anions were photodetached by a 532 nm laser beam. Our results show that the most stable structures of the K(KI)(-), (KI)2(-), and K(KI)2(-) anions are chain structures, while those of their neutral counterparts are planar. Three-dimensional structures start to appear at n = 3 for (KI)n(-/0) and K(KI)n(-/0). In the K(KI)n(-) cluster anions, the excess electron is localized on the extra K atom and forms an electron pair with the existing s electron of the K atom; the resulting negatively charged K prefers to interact with the other positively charged K atoms rather than with the I atoms. Both the anionic and neutral (KI)4 clusters have cuboid structures, which may be regarded as the smallest structural motif of KI crystal. PMID:26473992

  13. Estrogen/Progesterone Receptor Negativity and HER2 Positivity Predict Locoregional Recurrence in Patients With T1a,bN0 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Guray, Merih; Sahin, Aysegul

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Data have suggested that the molecular features of breast cancer are important determinants of outcome; however, few studies have correlated these features with locoregional recurrence (LRR). In the present study, we evaluated estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) as predictors of LRR in patients with lymph node-negative disease and tumors {<=}1 cm, because these patients often do not receive adjuvant chemotherapy or trastuzumab. Methods and Materials: The data from 911 patients with stage T1a,bN0 breast cancer who had received definitive treatment at our institution between 1997 and 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. We prospectively analyzed ER/PR/HER2 expression from the archival tissue blocks of 756 patients. These 756 patients represented the cohort for the present study. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.0 years, the 5- and 8-year Kaplan-Meier LRR rate was 1.6% and 5.9%, respectively, with no difference noted in those who underwent breast conservation therapy vs. mastectomy (p = .347). The 8-year LRR rates were greater in the patients with ER-negative (10.6% vs. 4.2%, p = .016), PR-negative (9.0% vs. 4.2%, p = .009), or HER2-positive (17.5% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.009) tumors. On multivariate analysis, ER-negative and PR-negative disease (hazard ratio, 2.37; p = .046) and HER2-positive disease (hazard ratio, 3.13, p = .016) independently predicted for LRR. Conclusion: Patients with ER/PR-negative or HER2-positive T1a,bN0 breast cancer had a greater risk of LRR. Therapeutic strategies, such as the use of chemotherapy and/or anti-HER2 therapies, should be considered for future clinical trials for these patients.

  14. Dementia Risk in Irradiated Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Chang, Chia-Lun; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with head and neck cancer are treated through surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy (CT). Carotid artery damage and neurotoxicity were previously observed in these patients. This study estimated the dementia risk associated with different treatment modalities in a head and neck cancer population with long-term follow-up. Taiwan's National Health Insurance claims database and a cancer registry database from the Collaboration Center of Health Information Application were linked for the present analysis. Patients with head and neck cancer, treated from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2010, were included in the study. The follow-up duration was the period from the index date to December 31, 2012. Inclusion criteria were head and neck cancer; an age >20 years; and having undergone surgery, CT, concurrent CT, or surgery with adjuvant treatment. Exclusion criteria were another cancer diagnosed before the head and neck cancer, death or being diagnosed with dementia within 2 years after the treatment of the head and neck cancer, stroke before the index date, distant metastasis, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, head and neck cancer recurrence, an unknown sex, and an age <20 years. In total, 20,135 patients were included. In patient groups that underwent surgery alone, surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, and chemoradiotherapy alone, the dementia incidence per 1000 person-years was 1.44, 1.04, and 1.98, respectively. The crude hazard ratio (HR) of dementia was 1.84 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21–2.81) in the RT with or without CT group. After adjustment for age, sex, clinical stage, and comorbidity, the HR was 1.92 (95% CI 1.14–3.24). Examining the dementia risk in patients who received different treatment modalities according to the Cox proportional-hazard model revealed that an age >65 years and having undergone RT with or without CT were risk factors (P < 0.001 and P = 0.015; and HRs of 16.5 and 1.92, respectively). The dementia risk

  15. Cross section measurements of the B10(d,n0)C11 reaction below 160 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stave, S.; Ahmed, M. W.; Antolak, A. J.; Blackston, M. A.; Crowell, A. S.; Doyle, B. L.; Henshaw, S. S.; Howell, C. R.; Kingsberry, P.; Perdue, B. A.; Rossi, P.; Prior, R. M.; Spraker, M. C.; Weller, H. R.

    2008-05-01

    New data were taken at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory to investigate the plausibility of using low energy deuterons and the B10(d,n)C11 reaction as a portable source of 6.3 MeV neutrons. Analysis of the data at and below incident deuteron energies of 160 keV indicates an n0 neutron cross section that is lower than previous estimates by at least three orders of magnitude. In separate runs, deuterons with two different energies (160 and 140 keV) were stopped in a B10 target. The resulting n0 neutrons of approximately 6.3 MeV were detected at angles between 0° and 150°. The angle integrated yields were used to determine the astrophysical S factor for this reaction assuming a constant value for the S factor below 160 keV. The cross sections reported between 130 and 160 keV were calculated using the extracted value of the S factor. The measured n0 cross section is several orders of magnitude smaller than previous results, thus eliminating B10(d,n)C11 as a portable source of intense neutrons with low energy deuteron beams on the order of tens of microamps. In order to gain insight into the reaction dynamics at these low energies the cross section results have been compared with results from calculations using the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) and a detailed Hauser-Feshbach calculation performed by the authors. The angular distribution is consistent with the Hauser-Feshbach calculation suggesting a statistical compound nucleus reaction rather than a direct reaction.

  16. Raman spectroscopy in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In recent years there has been much interest in the use of optical diagnostics in cancer detection. Early diagnosis of cancer affords early intervention and greatest chance of cure. Raman spectroscopy is based on the interaction of photons with the target material producing a highly detailed biochemical 'fingerprint' of the sample. It can be appreciated that such a sensitive biochemical detection system could confer diagnostic benefit in a clinical setting. Raman has been used successfully in key health areas such as cardiovascular diseases, and dental care but there is a paucity of literature on Raman spectroscopy in Head and Neck cancer. Following the introduction of health care targets for cancer, and with an ever-aging population the need for rapid cancer detection has never been greater. Raman spectroscopy could confer great patient benefit with early, rapid and accurate diagnosis. This technique is almost labour free without the need for sample preparation. It could reduce the need for whole pathological specimen examination, in theatre it could help to determine margin status, and finally peripheral blood diagnosis may be an achievable target. PMID:20923567

  17. A three-dimensional axis for the study of femoral neck orientation

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Noémie; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Simonis, Caroline; Puymerail, Laurent; Baylac, Michel; Tardieu, Christine; Gagey, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    A common problem in the quantification of the orientation of the femoral neck is the difficulty to determine its true axis; however, this axis is typically estimated visually only. Moreover, the orientation of the femoral neck is commonly analysed using angles that are dependent on anatomical planes of reference and only quantify the orientation in two dimensions. The purpose of this study is to establish a method to determine the three-dimensional orientation of the femoral neck using a three-dimensional model. An accurate determination of the femoral neck axis requires a reconsideration of the complex architecture of the proximal femur. The morphology of the femoral neck results from both the medial and arcuate trabecular systems, and the asymmetry of the cortical bone. Given these considerations, two alternative models, in addition to the cylindrical one frequently assumed, were tested. The surface geometry of the femoral neck was subsequently used to fit one cylinder, two cylinders and successive cross-sectional ellipses. The model based on successive ellipses provided a significantly smaller average deviation than the two other models (P < 0.001) and reduced the observer-induced measurement error. Comparisons with traditional measurements and analyses on a sample of 91 femora were also performed to assess the validity of the model based on successive ellipses. This study provides a semi-automatic and accurate method for the determination of the functional three-dimensional femoral neck orientation avoiding the use of a reference plane. This innovative method has important implications for future studies that aim to document and understand the change in the orientation of the femoral neck associated with the acquisition of a bipedal gait in humans. Moreover, the precise determination of the three-dimensional orientation has implications in current research involved in developing clinical applications in diagnosis, hip surgery and rehabilitation. PMID:22967192

  18. [Rare tumors of the head and neck; on behalf of the REFCOR, the French Network of rare head and neck tumors].

    PubMed

    Baujat, Bertrand; Thariat, Juliette; Baglin, Anne Catherine; Costes, Valérie; Testelin, Sylvie; Reyt, Emile; Janot, François

    2014-05-01

    Malignant tumors of the upper aerodigestive tract may be rare by their histology (sarcoma, variants of conventional squamous cell carcinomas) and/or location (sinuses, salivary glands, ear, of various histologies themselves). They represent less than 10% of head and neck neoplasms. The confirmation of their diagnosis often requires a medical expertise and sometimes biomolecular techniques complementary to classical histology and immunohistochemistry. Due to their location, their treatment often requires a specific surgical technique. Radiation therapy is indicated based on histoclinical characteristics common to other head and neck neoplasms but also incorporate grade. Further, the technique must often be adapted to take into account the proximity of organs at risk. For most histologies, chemotherapy is relatively inefficient but current molecular advances may allow to consider pharmaceutical developments in the coming years. The REFCOR, the French Network of head and neck cancers aims to organize and promote the optimal management of these rare and heterogeneous diseases, to promote research and clinical trials.

  19. Immunonutrition in head and neck cancer: have a look before surgery!

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Chiara; Ciorba, Andrea; Stomeo, Francesco; Pelucchi, Stefano; Pastore, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possible role of immunonutrition in head and neck cancer patients. Malnutrition frequently occurs in head and neck oncological patients, due to mechanical obstruction, such as tumour induced cachexia, poor dietary habits, as well as excessive alcohol consumption. These defects combined with the immune suppressive effects of surgery have been claimed to contribute in increasing the postoperative complications rate, such as poor wound healing and higher incidence of infections. Immunonutrition has been proposed to provide specific benefits to the immune system; several clinical trials, also in head and neck cancer patients, are already present in the literature, even if methodological differences impede comparisons and firm conclusions so far. Nutritional oncology is a new and interesting field and requires the use of standardised intervention protocols in order to evaluate its clinical efficacy. PMID:21833564

  20. What Does PET Imaging Add to Conventional Staging of Head and Neck Cancer Patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Pohar, Surjeet . E-mail: poharss@evms.edu; Brown, Robert B.S.; Newman, Nancy; Koniarczyk, Michael; Hsu, Jack; Feiglin, David

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of PET scans in the staging of patients with head and neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: The charts of 25 patients who underwent neck dissection, computed tomography (CT) scan, and F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging as part of their initial work-up for a head and neck squamous cell cancer between 2000-2003 were reviewed. All patients underwent clinical examination, triple endoscopy, and chest radiograph as part of their clinical staging, adhering to American Joint Commission for Cancer criteria. In addition to the clinical nodal (N) stage, PET findings were incorporated to determine a second type of N staging: clinical N + PET stage. The number of neck sides and nodal levels involved on CT or PET and on pathologic examination were recorded. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for detection of nodal disease were similar for CT and FDG-PET. Positive and negative likelihood ratios were similar for both diagnostic tests. None of our 25 patients had unsuspected distant disease detected by PET. Conclusion: The addition of PET imaging did not improve diagnostic accuracy in our patients compared with CT. PET scanning did not alter clinical management in any of the patients.

  1. Lessons Learned from Unfavorable Microsurgical Head and Neck Reconstruction: Japan National Cancer Center Hospital and Okayama University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Narusi; Onoda, Satoshi; Sakuraba, Minoru

    2016-10-01

    The risk of surgical site infection (SSI) remains high after major reconstructive surgery of the head and neck. Clinical data regarding SSI in microsurgical tongue reconstruction are described at National Cancer Hospital in Japan, including discussions of unfavorable representative cases, the relationship between SSI and preoperative irradiation at Okayama University Hospital in Japan, and strategies for SSI control in head and neck reconstruction. Local complications are inevitable in patients undergoing reconstruction in the head and neck areas. The frequency of major complications can be decreased, and late postoperative complications can be prevented with the help of appropriate methods. PMID:27601396

  2. Lessons Learned from Unfavorable Microsurgical Head and Neck Reconstruction: Japan National Cancer Center Hospital and Okayama University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Narusi; Onoda, Satoshi; Sakuraba, Minoru

    2016-10-01

    The risk of surgical site infection (SSI) remains high after major reconstructive surgery of the head and neck. Clinical data regarding SSI in microsurgical tongue reconstruction are described at National Cancer Hospital in Japan, including discussions of unfavorable representative cases, the relationship between SSI and preoperative irradiation at Okayama University Hospital in Japan, and strategies for SSI control in head and neck reconstruction. Local complications are inevitable in patients undergoing reconstruction in the head and neck areas. The frequency of major complications can be decreased, and late postoperative complications can be prevented with the help of appropriate methods.

  3. Gynecomastia presenting as a neck mass.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Kyle A; Vemavarapu, Lakshmi K; Sahoo, Sunati

    2013-04-01

    The differential diagnoses of neck mass may include a wide spectrum of lesions ranging from cysts, inflammatory processes, benign and malignant tumors arising from skin, soft tissue, lymph nodes, endocrine glands, salivary glands to metastatic tumors. In adults, malignant non-thyroid neck masses are often metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. Gynecomastia, presenting as a mass or enlargement in its typical subareolar location is usually a straightforward diagnosis. Enlargement due to gynecomastia in locations other than subareola can pose diagnostic challenge. We describe a unique case of gynecomastia presenting as a neck mass in a patient who was diagnosed and treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the floor of the mouth.

  4. Adjuvant chemotherapy for ypT0N0M0 rectal cancer following chemoradiotherapy and total mesorectal excision.

    PubMed

    Kainthla, Radhika; Huerta, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    The management of adenocarcinoma of the rectum is a dynamic field in oncology. The multidisciplinary approach to the management of this disease continues to evolve in each segment of its trimodality treatment. New scheduling regimens and radiosensitizing agents continue to emerge. Although total mesorectal excision continues to be the operation of choice for rectal cancers, what is done before and after surgery continues to evolve to maximize an ideal oncologic outcome with minimal morbidity. The achievement of a pathological complete response [pCR (i.e. ypT0N0)] in a fraction of patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiation poses an interesting management dilemma. The cohort of patients who can achieve a pCR have superior oncologic outcomes compared to nonresponders. The present review addresses the need for adjuvant therapy in patients with a pCR. We discuss the evolution of the role of adjuvant therapy in patients with rectal cancer and the studies addressing the elimination of this strategy in all patients with rectal cancer with a goal of determining the current evidence that might result in the omission of adjuvant therapy for patients with ypT0N0 rectal cancer after chemoradiation and total mesorectal excision. PMID:27387144

  5. Study of Ag transport in Cr2N0.61-7Ag nanocomposite thin film due to thermal exposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bílek, P.; Jurči, P.; Podgornik, B.; Jenko, D.; Hudáková, M.; Kusý, M.

    2015-12-01

    Cr2N0.61-7Ag nanocomposite coatings were deposited on substrates made of Cr-V ledeburitic tool steel Vanadis 6 using reactive magnetron sputtering at a deposition temperature of 500 °C. Investigations of as-deposited films and annealing experiments in closed-air atmosphere at temperatures of 300, 400 and 500 °C and the durations up to 24 h, followed by quantitative scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed that the films were composed of Cr2N0.61 matrix and individual silver agglomerates located along columnar crystals of the matrix. The maximal size of Ag-agglomerates was 80 nm. The surface population density of silver agglomerates increased with prolonging the annealing time up to 2 h and then decreased. The increase was more pronounced at lower annealing temperatures. This behaviour was referred to the competition between three phenomena, namely the transport of detached Ag atoms to the free surface, formation of oxide layer on the surface and sublimation of silver from the surface. At lower temperatures and/or shorter annealing times, the Ag-transport to the free surface was determined to be prevalent, thus, an increase in population density of silver agglomerates was determined. On the other hand, for higher temperatures and/or longer annealing times the population density of Ag-agglomerates rather decreased due to retarding effect of thicker oxide layer and sublimation of silver.

  6. Microsolvation for the Dicyanamide Anion: [N(CN)2-](H2O)n (n=0-12)

    SciTech Connect

    Jagoda-Cwiklik, Barbra; Wang, Xue B.; Woo, Hin-Koon; Yang, Jie; Wang, Guanjun; Zhou, Mingfei; Jungwirth, Pavel; Wang, Lai S.

    2007-08-16

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is combined with ab initio calculations to study the microsolvation of the dicyanamide anion, N(CN)2 -. Photoelectron spectra of [N(CN)2-] (H2O)n (n = 0-12) have been measured at room temperature and also at low temperature for n= 0-4. Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra are obtained for N(CN)2-, allowing the electron affinity of the N(CN)2 radical to be determined accurately as 4.135 ±0.010 eV. The electron binding energies and the spectral width of the hydrated clusters are observed to increase with the number of water molecules. The first five waters are observed to provide significant stabilization to the solute, whereas the stabilization becomes weaker for n > 5. The spectral width, which carries information about the solvent reorganization upon electron detachment in [N(CN)2-](H2O)n, levels off for n > 6. Theoretical calculations reveal several close-lying isomers for n= 1 and 2 due to the fact that the N(CN)2- anion possesses three almost equivalent hydration sites. In all the hydrated clusters, the most stable structures consist of a water cluster solvating one end of the N(CN)2- anion.

  7. Evaluation of document location during computer use in terms of neck muscle activity and neck movement.

    PubMed

    Goostrey, Sonya; Treleaven, Julia; Johnston, Venerina

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the impact on neck movement and muscle activity of placing documents in three commonly used locations: in-line, flat desktop left of the keyboard and laterally placed level with the computer screen. Neck excursion during three standard head movements between the computer monitor and each document location and neck extensor and upper trapezius muscle activity during a 5 min typing task for each of the document locations was measured in 20 healthy participants. Results indicated that muscle activity and neck flexion were least when documents were placed laterally suggesting it may be the optimal location. The desktop option produced both the greatest neck movement and muscle activity in all muscle groups. The in-line document location required significantly more neck flexion but less lateral flexion and rotation than the laterally placed document. Evaluation of other holders is needed to guide decision making for this commonly used office equipment.

  8. Complications of head and neck radiation therapy and their management

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmeier, R.L.; King, G.E.

    1983-04-01

    Patients who receive radiation therapy to the head and neck suffer potential complications and undesirable side-effects of this therapy. The extent of undesirable responses is dependent on the source of irradiation, the fields of irradiation, and the dose. The radiotherapist determines these factors by the extent, location, and radiosensitivity of the tumor. The potential undesirable side-effects are xerostomia, mucositis, fibrosis, trismus, dermatitis, photosensitivity, radiation caries, soft tissue necrosis, and osteoradionecrosis. Each of these clinical entities and their proposed management have been discussed.

  9. [Distant metastases of malignant tumors of head and neck].

    PubMed

    Totan, C; Dincă, O; Negureanu, M; Vlădan, C; Bucur, Al

    2010-01-01

    The charts of 176 previously untreated patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who completed treatment during 2006 in Oro-Maxillo-Facial Clinic, UMF "Carol Davila" Bucharest were reviewed. These patients had no evidence of distant metastases when initially evaluated. The overall incidence of distant metastases was 27.84%, varying from 10.52% for buccal mucosa to 63.63% for tongue and floor of the mouth (p < 0.05). 80% of the metastases were detected within two years after treatment. The rate also increased with the T and N classification; however, the N stage had greater influence on the rate of metastases than the T stage.

  10. Thyroid function following neck irraidation for malignant lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.H.; Fayos, J.V.; Sisson, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Thyroid function tests for T/sub 3/ resin (T/sub 3/-r), serum thyroxine (T/sub 4/), and serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were measured in 70 consecutive patients who had previously undergone lymphangiography and neck irradiation for malignant lymphoma. All were in remission and clinically euthyroid. The abnormalities found were: 23 (33%) patients hypothyroid by TSH, 14 (20%) with subnormal T/sub 4/, and 21 (30%) with subnormal T/sub 3/-r values. None of the patients were biochemically hyperthyroid. The prevalence and magnitude of abnormalities were highest during the third year after irradiation, thereafter decreasing with time.

  11. Correlation among scapular asymmetry, neck pain, and neck disability index (NDI) in young women with slight neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Rim; Kang, Mi-Hee; Bahng, Sun-Young; An, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Ji-Young; Park, Sang-Young; Kim, Seong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the correlations among scapular asymmetry, neck pain, and neck disability index in women in their 20s with slight neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 60 female students at U university in Gyeongsangbuk-do, South Korea, participated in this study. The lateral scapular slide test, which measures the distance between the thorax and scapula, was used to analyze the scapular asymmetry. The lateral scapular slide test was performed in three positions. The visual analogue scale and neck disability index were used to measure neck pain. [Results] In the lateral scapular slide test in position 3 (shoulder abduction at 90 degrees), the scapular left-right asymmetry and VAS showed a moderate positive linear relationship, with r=0.344. The VAS and NDI showed a moderate positive linear relationship, with r = 0.632. [Conclusion] Scapular asymmetry indicates imbalance of surrounding muscles of the scapula and is related to neck pain based on the results of measuring the distance from the thorax to the scapula. PMID:27313361

  12. Vascular anomalies of the head and neck in children

    PubMed Central

    Mahady, Kate; Thust, Stefanie; Berkeley, Rupert; Stuart, Sam; Barnacle, Alex; Robertson, Fergus

    2015-01-01

    Sixty percent of vascular anomalies in children are found in the head and neck. These lesions can present throughout antenatal, perinatal and childhood development. They broadly fall into two categories: vascular tumours and vascular malformations. Their clinical and, often, psychological impact is determined by both pathological type and location: many lesions follow an uncomplicated natural course and other more complex, extensive or progressive lesions can present a threat to life from mass effect, haemorrhage or large volume arteriovenous shunting. Vascular tumours include infantile haemangioma (IH), congenital haemangioma (CH) and kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KH); of which IH is the most common. Management options for vascular tumours include conservative approaches, oral medications and surgical intervention as determined by tumour type, location and associated complications. Vascular malformations can be categorised into low flow and high flow lesions. Low flow lesions include capillary, venous and lymphatic malformations (LMs). High flow lesions describe the arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), a highly heterogeneous group of lesions which can present in a variety of ways—the mainstay of treatment for these dynamic lesions is endovascular or surgical obliteration. We provide a practical framework for clinical classification of vascular anomalies of the head and neck in children. We also explore principles of their clinical and radiological assessment along with management, highlighting the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach. PMID:26807370

  13. Vertebral artery dissection due to indirect neck trauma : an underrecognised entity.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, S; Bhatia, R; Khandelwal, N; Lal, V; Das, C P

    2001-12-01

    Vertebral artery dissection is an important cause of brain stem stroke, especially in the young. Dissections of carotid and vertebral arteries in neck account for about 20% of strokes in young compared with 2.5% in the elderly. Three patients of vertebral artery dissection related to indirect neck trauma are described. The first patient developed the symptoms while dancing, the second after a trivial fall and the third while he was on a dental chair. None of them had a direct severe neck trauma or concomitant risk factor like hypertension, connective tissue disease or migraine. Clinical symptomatology was similar in all the patients and included occipito-nuchal pain, headache and brain stem dysfunction chiefly in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory. One of the patients also had associated ischaemic myelopathy. MRA and DSA confirmed dissection in all with a predominant steno-occlusive picture. Cases of so called trivial neck movement/torsion related dissection have been described previously but have not received any major importance. Usually classified as 'spontaneous' or 'traumatic', there is a possible ambiguity in literature about appropriate terminology. We emphasise that a history of such subtle precipitating events be taken while diagnosing young patients with brain stem strokes, to recognise this clinical entity. Although mechanisms are not absolutely clear, yet there seems to be an important relationship between arterial dissection and neck movements or minor trauma. PMID:11799413

  14. Restriction of neck flexion using soft cervical collars: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Aker, Peter D; Randoll, Martine; Rheault, Chantal; O’Connor, Sandra

    1991-01-01

    This study investigates the use of dropped neck flexion as a manoeuvre to test the restrictive abilities of two different types of soft collars, an Airway soft cervical collar and a handmade cervical rough. The range of neck flexion of 40 asymptomatic subjects aged 20-29 was assessed, both with and without collar wear, using a Spinal Rangiometer. Dropped neck flexion is described as possibly being more representative of the type of movement that a patient with neck pain will undergo, and hence a more useful manoeuvre to employ when testing for the restrictive abilities of soft cervical collars. The mean dropped flexion was 64 degrees without collar wear, 58 degrees with the Airway soft collar, and 34 degrees with the cervical rough. Only the cervical rough provided both statistically (p < 0.001) and clinically (> 15°) significant restriction of dropped neck flexion. The comfort, preparation time, and ease of application of each of these collars is not addressed in this study, and may reflect on use in clinical practice. This preliminary study provides insight and pilot data for future studies in this area. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3

  15. Human papillomavirus induced transformation in cervical and head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Adams, Allie K; Wise-Draper, Trisha M; Wells, Susanne I

    2014-09-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed.

  16. Pathways for cervical metastasis in malignant neoplasms of the head and neck region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Ow, Thomas J; Myers, Jeffrey N

    2012-01-01

    There have been significant changes in the evaluation and management of lymphatic metastases in the neck during the past several decades, and knowledge of the functional anatomy of the cervical lymphatics is fundamental to the clinical management of metastasis in this region. This review provides a comprehensive description of the cervical lymphatics and discusses how this knowledge is used in the modern management of the neck lymphatics in the setting of common cancers of the head and neck. The patterns of tumor spread can be delineated based on the well-studied functional anatomy of the lymphatic networks in the cervical region. The characteristics and patterns of metastatic spread for two common cancers found in this region, squamous cell carcinoma and cutaneous malignant melanoma, are discussed in this review. Significant improvements in clinical care, namely, selective neck dissection and sentinel lymph node biopsy aided by lymphoscintigraphy, have been developed and are based upon detailed studies of the pathways of metastatic spread. These advances have significantly decreased the morbidity associated with the evaluation and treatment of metastatic disease to the neck.

  17. Human Papillomavirus Induced Transformation in Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Allie K.; Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed. PMID:25226287

  18. Neck muscle function in violinists/violists with and without neck pain.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Anke; Claus, Andrew; Hodges, Paul W; Jull, Gwendolen A

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is associated with changes in neuromuscular control of cervical muscles. Violin and viola playing requires good function of the flexor muscles to stabilize the instrument. This study investigated the flexor muscle behaviour in violin/viola players with and without neck pain using the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT). In total, 12 violin/viola players with neck pain, 21 violin/viola players without neck pain in the preceding 12 weeks and 21 pain-free non-musicians were included. Activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) was measured with surface electromyography (EMG) during the CCFT. Violin/viola players with neck pain displayed greater normalised SCM EMG amplitudes during CCFT than the pain-free musicians and non-musicians (P < 0.05). Playing-related neck pain in violinists/violists is associated with altered behaviour of the superficial neck flexor muscles consistent with neck pain, despite the specific use of the deep and superficial neck flexors during violin playing.

  19. Neck muscle function in violinists/violists with and without neck pain.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Anke; Claus, Andrew; Hodges, Paul W; Jull, Gwendolen A

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is associated with changes in neuromuscular control of cervical muscles. Violin and viola playing requires good function of the flexor muscles to stabilize the instrument. This study investigated the flexor muscle behaviour in violin/viola players with and without neck pain using the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT). In total, 12 violin/viola players with neck pain, 21 violin/viola players without neck pain in the preceding 12 weeks and 21 pain-free non-musicians were included. Activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) was measured with surface electromyography (EMG) during the CCFT. Violin/viola players with neck pain displayed greater normalised SCM EMG amplitudes during CCFT than the pain-free musicians and non-musicians (P < 0.05). Playing-related neck pain in violinists/violists is associated with altered behaviour of the superficial neck flexor muscles consistent with neck pain, despite the specific use of the deep and superficial neck flexors during violin playing. PMID:26175099

  20. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Aging small Canada geese by neck plumage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, K.F.; Schoonover, L.J.

    1969-01-01

    The neck plumage method, a new technique for separating immature from adult Canada geese (Branta canadensis) in the hand, was evaluated by comparison with the notched tail feather and cloacal examination methods. Two (1.4 percent) of 141 geese examined were misaged, resulting in a 6 percent error in the immature-adult ratio obtained by the neck plumage method. The neck plumage method is a rapid aging method and reasonable accuracy (94 percent) can be obtained. It can also be used to differentiate immatures from adults on the ground at distances up to 175 yards, but was almost impossible to use when geese were in flight. As yet, the neck plumage method has only been tested on the subspecies (B. c. hutchinsii-parvipes complex) in the Tall-Grass Prairie population of small Canada geese.

  2. Jaw-neck dysfunction in whiplash-associated disorders.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Per-Olof; Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta; Zafar, Hamayun

    2007-04-01

    This paper reports data from recent studies on integrative jaw-neck motor control in healthy subjects and disturbed jaw-neck behaviour in whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). The results show that neck function is an integral part of natural jaw behaviour, and that neck injury can impair jaw function and therefore disturb eating behaviour. We also show preliminary results from implementation of a new approach for rehabilitation of jaw-neck dysfunction and pain in WAD.

  3. Improved Jänecke mass formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z.; Bao, M.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we improve an empirical mass formula constructed by Jänecke and collaborators. This formula is enlightened by the Garvey-Kelson mass relations. The new version of the Jänecke formula reproduces 2275 atomic masses with neutron number N ≥10 and proton number Z ≥6 , at an average accuracy of 128 keV, by employing 576 parameters. The predictive power of our formula is exemplified by comparison with predicted results of other mass models.

  4. Musculocutaneous flaps in head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, A. G.

    1989-01-01

    The introduction of musculocutaneous flaps to head and neck reconstructive surgery is described. The flaps available are listed, and the most important ones described and illustrated. Both the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major flaps are felt to have a role in head and neck reconstruction, though they have largely been superseded by microvascular free flaps such as the radial forearm flap. Images fig. 1 fig. 2 fig. 3 fig. 4 fig. 5 fig. 6 fig. 7 fig. 8 PMID:2686511

  5. Intrathecal bupivacaine for head and neck pain.

    PubMed

    Belverud, Shawn A; Mogilner, Alon Y; Schulder, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Direct central nervous system (CNS) analgesic delivery is a useful option when more traditional means of dealing with chronic pain fail. Solutions containing local anesthetic have been effective in certain disease states, particularly in patients suffering from intractable head and neck pain. This review discusses historical aspects of CNS drug delivery and the role of intrathecal bupivacaine-containing solutions in refractory head and neck pain patients. PMID:22915879

  6. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... sensor of the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by the “X” axis force sensor... My is the moment measured in lbs-ft by the “Y” axis moment sensor of the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by the “X” axis force sensor (Channel Class 600) of the six axis...

  7. Radiation therapy alone or in combination with surgery in head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Marcial, V.A.; Pajak, T.F.

    1985-05-01

    Radiation therapy alone, surgery alone, or the combination of these two modalities, remain the accepted treatments in the management of epidermoid carcinomas of the mucosa of the head and neck. These modalities of therapy produce comparable results; but, radiotherapy alone has the advantage that it can conserve anatomy and function. Irradiation with teletherapy techniques, at times supplemented by interstitial brachytherapy, with doses ranging from 6600 to 8000 cGy, results in satisfactory tumor response (CR). The CR of T1N0 and T2N0 lesions will be 99% and 90% respectively, but only 29% in T4N3 tumors treated with radiation only. To improve on the limited CR rate achieved in the advanced stages, surgery is combined pre or post-irradiation, or reserved for the salvage of failures. In the oral cavity and oropharynx, these possible options give comparable tumor control and survival, but in the supraglottic larynx post-operative irradiation is superior to pre- operative radiotherapy. Tumor recurrence rates in the head and neck range from 15 to 34% depending on initial site, stage and type of therapy. Cancer control activities that emphasize prevention and early diagnosis should present a better future for these patients.

  8. Evaluation of the Painful Dual Taper Modular Neck Stem Total Hip Arthroplasty: Do They All Require Revision?

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Min

    2016-07-01

    Although dual taper modular-neck total hip arthroplasty (THA) design with additional neck-stem modularity has the potential to optimize hip biomechanical parameters by facilitating adjustments of leg length, femoral neck version and offset, there is increasing concern regarding this stem design as a result of the growing numbers of adverse local tissue reactions due to fretting and corrosion at the neck-stem taper junction. Implant factors such as taper cone angle, taper surface roughness, taper contact area, modular neck taper metallurgy, and femoral head size play important roles in influencing extent of taper corrosion. There should be a low threshold to conduct a systematic clinical evaluation of patients with dual-taper modular-neck stem THA using systematic risk stratification algorithms as early recognition and diagnosis will ensure prompt and appropriate treatment. Although specialized tests such as metal ion analysis and cross-sectional imaging modalities such as metal artifact reduction sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MARS MRI) are useful in optimizing clinical decision-making, overreliance on any single investigative tool in the clinical decision-making process for revision surgery should be avoided. PMID:27118353

  9. Automatic planning of head and neck treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Hazell, Irene; Bzdusek, Karl; Kumar, Prashant; Hansen, Christian R; Bertelsen, Anders; Eriksen, Jesper G; Johansen, Jørgen; Brink, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Treatment planning is time-consuming and the outcome depends on the person performing the optimization. A system that automates treatment planning could potentially reduce the manual time required for optimization and could also provide a method to reduce the variation between persons performing radiation dose planning (dosimetrist) and potentially improve the overall plan quality. This study evaluates the performance of the Auto-Planning module that has recently become clinically available in the Pinnacle3 radiation therapy treatment planning system. Twenty-six clinically delivered head and neck treatment plans were reoptimized with the Auto-Planning module. Comparison of the two types of treatment plans were performed using DVH metrics and a blinded clinical evaluation by two senior radiation oncologists using a scale from one to six. Both evaluations investigated dose coverage of target and dose to healthy tissues. Auto-Planning was able to produce clinically acceptable treatment plans in all 26 cases. Target coverages in the two types of plans were similar, but automatically generated plans had less irradiation of healthy tissue. In 94% of the evaluations, the autoplans scored at least as high as the previously delivered clinical plans. For all patients, the Auto-Planning tool produced clinically acceptable head and neck treatment plans without any manual intervention, except for the initial target and OAR delineations. The main benefit of the method is the likely improvement in the overall treatment quality since consistent, high-quality plans are generated which even can be further optimized, if necessary. This makes it possible for the dosimetrist to focus more time on difficult dose planning goals and to spend less time on the more tedious parts of the planning process.

  10. Immunotherapy of HPV-associated head and neck cancer: Critical parameters.

    PubMed

    Nizard, Mevyn; Sandoval, Federico; Badoual, Cecile; Pere, Helene; Terme, Magali; Hans, Stephane; Benhamouda, Nadine; Granier, Clemence; Brasnu, Daniel; Tartour, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Various arguments support the development of a vaccine targeting human papillomavirus (HPV) for the treatment of HPV-associated head and neck cancer. However, the mucosal localization of this tumor, the HPV-driven downregulation of MHC Class I molecules and various other immunosuppressive mechanisms must be carefully considered to improve the clinical efficacy of such an immunotherapeutic strategy.

  11. Robotic Surgery in Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Caio M.; Nguyen, Hiep T.; Ferraz, Alberto R.; Watters, Karen; Rosman, Brian; Rahbar, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Recent advancements in robotics technology have allowed more complex surgical procedures to be performed using minimally invasive approaches. In this article, we reviewed the role of robotic assistance in Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery. We highlight the advantages of robot-assisted surgery and its clinical application in this field. PMID:22567225

  12. Modeling neck mobility in fossil turtles.

    PubMed

    Werneburg, Ingmar; Hinz, Juliane K; Gumpenberger, Michaela; Volpato, Virginie; Natchev, Nikolay; Joyce, Walter G

    2015-05-01

    Turtles have the unparalleled ability to retract their heads and necks within their shell but little is known about the evolution of this trait. Extensive analysis of neck mobility in turtles using radiographs, CT scans, and morphometry reveals that basal turtles possessed less mobility in the neck relative to their extant relatives, although the anatomical prerequisites for modern mobility were already established. Many extant turtles are able to achieve hypermobility by dislocating the central articulations, which raises cautions about reconstructing the mobility of fossil vertebrates. A 3D-model of the Late Triassic turtle Proganochelys quenstedti reveals that this early stem turtle was able to retract its head by tucking it sideways below the shell. The simple ventrolateral bend seen in this stem turtle, however, contrasts with the complex double-bend of extant turtles. The initial evolution of neck retraction therefore occurred in a near-synchrony with the origin of the turtle shell as a place to hide the unprotected neck. In this early, simplified retraction mode, the conical osteoderms on the neck provided further protection.

  13. Emergency imaging assessment of deep neck space infections.

    PubMed

    Maroldi, Roberto; Farina, Davide; Ravanelli, Marco; Lombardi, Davide; Nicolai, Piero

    2012-10-01

    Deep neck space infection may lead to severe and potentially life-threatening complications, such as airway obstruction, mediastinitis, septic embolization, dural sinus thrombosis, and intracranial abscess. The clinical presentation is widely variable, and often early symptoms do not reflect the disease severity. The complication risk depends on the extent and anatomical site: diseases that transgress fascial boundaries and spread along vertically oriented spaces (parapharyngeal, retropharyngeal, and paravertebral space) have a higher risk of complications and require a more aggressive treatment compared with those confined within a nonvertically oriented space (peritonsillar, sublingual, submandibular, parotid, and masticator space). Imaging has 5 crucial roles: (1) confirm the suspected clinical diagnosis, (2) define the precise extent of the disease, (3) identify complications, (4) distinguish between drainable abscesses and cellulitis, and (5) monitor deep neck space infection progression. Ultrasonography is the gold standard to differentiate abscesses from cellulitis, for the diagnosis of lymphadenitis. and to identify internal jugular thrombophlebitis in the infrahyoid neck. However, field-of-view limitation and poor anatomical information confine the use of ultrasonography to the evaluation of superficial lesions and to image-guided aspiration or drainage. Computed tomography (CT) combines fast image acquisition and precise anatomical information without field-of-view limitations. For these reasons, it is the most reliable technique for the evaluation of deep and multicompartment lesions and for the identification of mediastinal and intracranial complications. Contrast agent administration enhances the capability to differentiate fluid collections from cellulitis and allows the detection of vascular complications. Magnetic resonance imaging is more time-consuming than CT, limiting its use to selected indications. It is the technique of choice for assessing

  14. Knowledge of pathologically versus clinically negative lymph nodes is associated with reduced use of radioactive iodine post-thyroidectomy for low-risk papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Ruel, Ewa; Thomas, Samantha; Dinan, Michaela A; Perkins, Jennifer M; Roman, Sanziana A; Sosa, Julie Ann

    2016-06-01

    Cervical lymph node metastases are common in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Clinically negative lymph nodes confer uncertainty about true lymph node status, potentially prompting empiric postoperative radioactive iodine (RAI) administration even in low-risk patients. We examined the association of clinically (cN0) versus pathologically negative (pN0) lymph nodes with utilization of RAI for low-risk PTC. Using the National Cancer Database 1998-2011, adults with PTC who underwent total thyroidectomy for Stage I/II tumors 1-4 cm were evaluated for receipt of RAI based on cN0 versus pN0 status. Cut-point analysis was conducted to determine the number of pN0 nodes associated with the greatest decrease in the odds of receipt of RAI. Survival models and multivariate analyses predicting RAI use were conducted separately for all patients and patients <45 years. 64,980 patients met study criteria; 39,778 (61.2 %) were cN0 versus 25,202 (38.8 %) pN0. Patients with pN0 nodes were more likely to have negative surgical margins and multifocal disease (all p < 0.001). The mean negative nodes reported in surgical pathology specimens was 4; ≥5 pathologically negative lymph nodes provided the best cut-point associated with reduced RAI administration (OR 0.91, CI 0.85-0.97). After multivariable adjustment, pN0 patients with ≥5 nodes examined were less likely to receive RAI compared to cN0 patients across all ages (OR 0.89, p < 0.001) and for patients aged <45 years (0R 0.86, p = 0.001). Patients with <5 pN0 nodes did not differ in RAI use compared to cN0 controls. Unadjusted survival was improved for pN0 versus cN0 patients across all ages (p < 0.001), but not for patients <45 years (p = 0.11); adjusted survival for all ages did not differ (p = 0.13). Pathological confirmation of negative lymph nodes in patients with PTC appears to influence the decision to administer postoperative RAI if ≥5 negative lymph nodes are removed. It is possible that fewer excised

  15. Comparison of electromyographic activity and range of neck motion in violin students with and without neck pain during playing.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyue-nam; Kwon, Oh-yun; Ha, Sung-min; Kim, Su-jung; Choi, Hyun-jung; Weon, Jong-hyuck

    2012-12-01

    Neck pain is common in violin students during a musical performance. The purpose of this study was to compare electromyographic (EMG) activity in superficial neck muscles with neck motion when playing the violin as well as neck range of motion (ROM) at rest, between violin students with and without neck pain. Nine violin students with neck pain and nine age- and gender-matched subjects without neck pain were recruited. Muscle activity of the bilateral upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and superficial cervical extensor muscles was measured using surface EMG. Kinematic data on neck motion while playing and active neck ROM were also measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Independent t-tests were used to compare EMG activity with kinematic data between groups. These analyses revealed that while playing, both the angle of left lateral bending and leftward rotation of the cervical spine were significantly greater in the neck pain group than among those without neck pain. Similarly, EMG activity of the left upper trapezius, both cervical extensors, and both sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly greater in the neck pain group. The active ROM of left axial rotation was significantly lower in the neck pain group. These results suggest that an asymmetric playing posture and the associated increased muscle activity as well as decreased neck axial rotation may contribute to neck pain in violin students. PMID:23247874

  16. Comparison of electromyographic activity and range of neck motion in violin students with and without neck pain during playing.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyue-nam; Kwon, Oh-yun; Ha, Sung-min; Kim, Su-jung; Choi, Hyun-jung; Weon, Jong-hyuck

    2012-12-01

    Neck pain is common in violin students during a musical performance. The purpose of this study was to compare electromyographic (EMG) activity in superficial neck muscles with neck motion when playing the violin as well as neck range of motion (ROM) at rest, between violin students with and without neck pain. Nine violin students with neck pain and nine age- and gender-matched subjects without neck pain were recruited. Muscle activity of the bilateral upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and superficial cervical extensor muscles was measured using surface EMG. Kinematic data on neck motion while playing and active neck ROM were also measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Independent t-tests were used to compare EMG activity with kinematic data between groups. These analyses revealed that while playing, both the angle of left lateral bending and leftward rotation of the cervical spine were significantly greater in the neck pain group than among those without neck pain. Similarly, EMG activity of the left upper trapezius, both cervical extensors, and both sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly greater in the neck pain group. The active ROM of left axial rotation was significantly lower in the neck pain group. These results suggest that an asymmetric playing posture and the associated increased muscle activity as well as decreased neck axial rotation may contribute to neck pain in violin students.

  17. Treatment of ununited femoral neck fractures in young adults using low-intensity pulsed ultrasound: Report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Iwakura, Takashi; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Delayed union and non-union of displaced femoral neck fractures remains a difficult clinical problem for orthopaedic surgeons. In the physiologically young patient, every effort should be made to preserve the native hip joint. We present two cases of ununited femoral neck fractures in young adults who were successfully treated with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and showed satisfactory results. Presentation of case 1 A 41-year-old woman was involved in a motor vehicle crash and was diagnosed with displaced femoral neck fracture. Eleven months after internal fixation, a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed the presence of non-union of the femoral neck. LIPUS treatment was therefore initiated. After eight months, the fracture was completely consolidated. Presentation of case 2 A 39-year-old man was involved in a cycling accident and was diagnosed with displaced femoral neck fracture. Thirteen weeks after internal fixation, a CT scan revealed delayed union of the femoral neck. LIPUS treatment was therefore initiated. After six months, the fracture was completely consolidated. Conclusion We suggest use of LIPUS as a possible treatment approach for delayed union and non-union of displaced femoral neck fractures in young patients before considering further surgical intervention. PMID:26942332

  18. Liverpool Opinion on Unfavorable Results in Microsurgical Head and Neck Reconstruction: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Brown, James; Schache, Andrew; Butterworth, Chris

    2016-10-01

    This article annotates a philosophy toward achieving best results for the patient with head and neck cancer, in particular relating to oral, mandibular, and maxillary resection. At the same time are highlighted the pitfalls that, if not avoided, are likely to result in a poor outcome even with a successful flap transfer. There is a paucity of evidence to support clinical practice in head and neck reconstruction such that much of the discussion presented is opinion-based rather than evidence-based. PMID:27601394

  19. [Avascular osteonecrosis of femoral head and neck in an AIDS patient].

    PubMed

    Villafañe, Maria F; Corti, Marcelo E; Candela, Miguel; Perez Bianco, Raul; Tezanos Pinto, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    Avascular osteonecrosis (AON) has increased in the last few years in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). The most commonly affected bone is the femoral head and neck. Frequently these bilateral and clinical findings include moderate to severe pain and functional impotence of the affected joints. The etiology is multifactorial and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) with protease inhibitors (PI) is probably related to its development. In the evolution, a total hip replacement may be needed. We present an hemophilic patient with AIDS, who developed a bilateral AON of the femoral head and neck during HAART.

  20. [Ultrasonographic findings in a cow with extraskeletal chondroblastic osteosarcoma of the neck region].

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Sydler, T; Irmer, M; Gautschi, A; Kamber, R; Gerspach, C; Puorger, M

    2010-08-01

    This case report describes the clinical, ultrasonographic and pathological findings in a five-year-old Swiss Braunvieh cow with extraskeletal chondroblastic osteosarcoma of the neck region. The cow was referred because of a firm, non-painful swelling, approximately 25 cm in diameter, which was situated mainly on the lower left side of the neck but extended to the right. Ultrasonographic examination of the mass revealed a chambered structure containing echoic material that was separated by hyperechoic septa. Chondroblastic osteosarcoma was diagnosed based on histological evaluation of a biopsy sample, and the diagnosis was confirmed by postmortem examination.

  1. Femoral neck trabecular patterns predict osteoporotic fractures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richard L; Dacre, Jane E; Hart, Deborah J; Spector, Tim D

    2002-07-01

    In this paper we show that texture analysis of femoral neck trabecular patterns can be used to predict osteoporotic fractures. The study is based on a sample of 123 women aged 44-66 years with and without fractures. We analyzed trabecular patterns using the Co-occurrence Matrix texture analysis algorithm and compared the predictive utility of the textural data with densitometry. Logistic regression was used to estimate the predictive utility, exp(B), of clinical and textural data per standard deviation. Reproducibility was also demonstrated using paired films at 1-year intervals (CoV=4.5%). Bone mass estimated by DEXA measurements of the spine and hip were the most predictive of fractures giving a two-fold increase in fractures per s.d. bone mass loss (95% CI: 1.2-3.1, p<0.005). Age was also highly predictive with fracture risk increasing by 1.07-fold per year (95% CI: 1.01-1.14, p<0.02). Trabecular texture was found to give a lower, but significant, prediction of fracture of 1.5-fold per s.d. trabecular pattern loss (95% CI: 0.96-2.31, p<0.05). Combining age, weight, and trabecular texture increased the fracture prediction to 1.78-fold per s.d. (95% CI: 1.19-2.67). Combining trabecular texture with densitometry increased the predictive ability to 2.06-fold per s.d. (95% CI: 1.32-3.22) and combined with age and weight as well increased exp(B) to 2.1-fold per s.d. (95% CI: 1.32-3.35). This shows that osteoporotic trabecular texture changes can be "measured." Moreover, the combination of age, weight, and trabecular texture is more predictive than either alone. We propose therefore that this trabecular texture analysis is both reproducible and clinically meaningful. The application of such methods could be used to improve the estimation of fracture risk in conjunction with other clinical data, or where densitometry data cannot be obtained (e.g., in retrospective studies). PMID:12148717

  2. Physician-Delivered Injection Therapies for Mechanical Neck Disorders: A Systematic Review Update (Non-Oral, Non-Intravenous Pharmacological Interventions for Neck Pain)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Anita R.; Peloso, Paul M.; Galway, Erin; Navasero, Neenah; Essen, Karis Van; Graham, Nadine; Goldsmith, Charlie H; Gzeer, Wisam; Shi, Qiyun; Haines, Ted and COG

    2013-01-01

    Background: Controversy persists regarding medicinal injections for mechanical neck disorders (MNDs). Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of physician-delivered injections on pain, function/disability, quality of life, global perceived effect and patient satisfaction for adults with MNDs. Search Methods: We updated our previous searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE from December 2006 through to March 2012. Selection Criteria: We included randomized controlled trials of adults with neck disorders treated by physician-delivered injection therapies. Data Collection and Analysis: Two authors independently selected articles, abstracted data and assessed methodological quality. When clinical heterogeneity was absent, we combined studies using random-effects models. Results: We included 12 trials (667 participants). No high or moderate quality studies were found with evidence of benefit over control. Moderate quality evidence suggests little or no difference in pain or function/disability between nerve block injection of steroid and bupivacaine vs bupivacaine alone at short, intermediate and long-term for chronic neck pain. We found limited very low quality evidence of an effect on pain with intramuscular lidocaine vs control for chronic myofascial neck pain. Two low quality studies showed an effect on pain with anaesthetic nerve block vs saline immediately post treatment and in the short-term. All other studies were of low or very low quality with no evidence of benefit over controls. Authors' Conclusions: Current evidence does not confirm the effectiveness of IM-lidocaine injection for chronic mechanical neck pain nor anaesthetic nerve block for cervicogenic headache. There is moderate evidence of no benefit for steroid blocks vs controls for mechanical neck pain. PMID:24155806

  3. Prevalence of neck and back pain among dentists and dental auxiliaries in South-western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Abiodun-Solanke, I M F; Agbaje, J O; Ajayi, D M; Arotiba, J T

    2010-06-01

    Dental health workers like other workers have occupation related health problems and hazards which include neck and low back pain. Previous studies have shown that the prevalence and location of pain may be influenced by posture and work habits and as well as demographic factors. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of neck and back problems among dentists and dental auxiliaries in private and government dental hospitals in south western Nigeria. Structured self administered questionnaire was sent to dentist and dental auxiliaries by randomly selecting 3 out of the 6 state capital from the southwestern Nigeria. Participants included those in private clinics, teaching hospitals and general hospitals. The questionnaire was composed of respondents biodata, questions about specific information on neck and back pain and routine practice posture while working at chairside. The total number of properly filled questionnaire was 210 with a male to female ratio of 1.04:1. Respondents included 147 dentists, 37 dental surgeon assistants (DSA), 14 dental therapists and 12 dental technologists. Prevalence of back and neck pain among the respondents was 88.1% and 81.9% respectively. Among the male respondents, the prevalence of back pain was 86.9% and 89.3% in female while for neck pain, the prevalence was 83.2% in male and 80.6% in female. Within the different professional groups, the prevalence of back pain was highest among the DSA (89.2%), closely followed by the dentists (88.4%), then therapists (85.7%) and least among the technologists (83.3%). For neck pain, the prevalence was highest among therapists followed by technologists, dentists and least among the DSA. More females missed work due to back and neck pain than males. There is therefore the need to address ergonomic issues and change the way dentistry is practiced. PMID:21117410

  4. Significance of level v lymph node dissection in clinically node positive oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma and evaluation of potential risk factors for level v lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Devendra G; Chheda, Yogen P; Shah, Shakuntala V; Patel, Ashok M; Sharma, Mohit R

    2013-09-01

    Level V lymph node (LN) dissection has been significantly associated with postoperative shoulder dysfunction as a sequel of spinal accessory nerve (SAN) dysfunction. The aim of study was to determine the role of level V LN dissection in clinically node positive (cN+) oral cavity cancer. We have prospectively evaluated 210 patients of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). During neck dissection, the contents of the level V LN were dissected, labelled, and processed separately from the neck dissection specimen. We studied the prevalence of histopathologic metastasis to level V nodes in clinically node negative (cN0), cN1 and cN2 groups. Potential risk factors for the involvement of level V LN were also analysed. Of 210 cases, 48 were cN0. Out of them 77 % were pN0 and none of cNo (48) patients had level V metastases. Out of 162 cN+ cases, 112 were cN1 and 49 cN2. Amongst cN1 (112) cases, cN1 with palpable level lb LN (99), 60 % had pN0 and none of them had level V LN involvement but cN1 with palpable ll/lll LN (13), 85 % had pN+ and 1 patient had level V LN involvement (8 %). 8 patients from cN2 (49) group had level V LN involvement (16 %). Over all level V LN involvement was 4.3 %. Tongue was the most common site to give rise to level V LN metastases and extra capsular spread (ECS) was present in 100 % patient with level V LN metastases. Thus, we concluded that, apart from cN0, patients with cN1 oral cavity cancer with level lb as only site, carefully selected cases could safely undergo SND. Potential risk factors for level V LN metastases are clinically evident ECS, multiple LN involvement and cN1 with deep jugular chain of LN involvement. PMID:24426737

  5. Femoral neck shortening after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Stephanie M; Keijsers, Noël L; Praet, Stephan F E; Heetveld, Martin J; Bhandari, Mohit; Wilssens, Jean Pierre; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2013-07-01

    This study assesses femoral neck shortening and its effect on gait pattern and muscle strength in patients with femoral neck fractures treated with internal fixation. Seventy-six patients from a multicenter randomized controlled trial participated. Patient characteristics and Short Form 12 and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were collected. Femoral neck shortening, gait parameters, and maximum isometric forces of the hip muscles were measured and differences between the fractured and contralateral leg were calculated. Variables of patients with little or no shortening, moderate shortening, and severe shortening were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. Median femoral neck shortening was 1.1 cm. Subtle changes in gait pattern, reduced gait velocity, and reduced abductor muscle strength were observed. Age, weight, and Pauwels classification were risk factors for femoral neck shortening. Femoral neck shortening decreased gait velocity and seemed to impair gait symmetry and physical functioning. In conclusion, internal fixation of femoral neck fractures results in permanent physical limitations. The relatively young and healthy patients in our study seem capable of compensating. Attention should be paid to femoral neck shortening and proper correction with a heel lift, as inadequate correction may cause physical complaints and influence outcome. PMID:23823040

  6. Increased bone mineral content and bone size in the femoral neck of men with hip osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arokoski, J; Arokoski, M; Jurvelin, J; Helminen, H; Niemitukia, L; Kroger, H

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Even though clinical findings support the idea that hip osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased bone mineral density (BMD), the subject remains controversial. This study was therefore initiated to investigate the relation between the severity of hip OA and femoral and calcaneal BMD. Methods: On the basis of the American College of Rheumatology criteria on classification of OA of the hip, 27 men (aged 47–64 years) with unilateral or bilateral hip OA and 30 age matched randomly selected healthy men were studied. Plain radiographs were graded using Li's scale from 0 (no OA) to 4 (severe OA). According to the side of the highest radiographic score from the patients with clinical hip OA, 29.6% had grade 1, 29.6% grade 2, and 40.8% grade 3 OA. Bone mineral content (BMC), areal BMD (BMDareal), and bone dimensions (area and width) were measured by dual x ray absorptiometry at the proximal femur. BMDareal of the calcaneus was measured from the central area of the bone. Volumetric measurements from magnetic resonance images of the femoral neck were used to create a BMD measure that was corrected for the femoral neck volume (BMDmri). Results: There were no differences in weight, or body mass index between the study groups. There were no significant BMDareal differences in any of the subregions of the proximal femur (femoral neck and trochanter) or calcaneus between the OA and control groups. Neither did the BMDmri of the femoral neck differ between the groups. However, the BMC of the femoral neck was 18% higher (p<0.01) in patients with OA than in controls. Similarly femoral neck bone width and volume were 9% and 18% respectively higher (p<0.001) in patients with OA. Conclusions: The results suggest that men with hip OA have larger femoral neck size and consequently higher BMC than healthy controls matched for age and sex. There is no significant difference in femoral neck BMD (BMDareal or BMDmri) between the groups. Furthermore, increased BMDareal was

  7. An Advanced Quantitative Echosound Methodology for Femoral Neck Densitometry.

    PubMed

    Casciaro, Sergio; Peccarisi, Marco; Pisani, Paola; Franchini, Roberto; Greco, Antonio; De Marco, Tommaso; Grimaldi, Antonella; Quarta, Laura; Quarta, Eugenio; Muratore, Maruizio; Conversano, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the clinical feasibility and the accuracy in femoral neck densitometry of the Osteoporosis Score (O.S.), an ultrasound (US) parameter for osteoporosis diagnosis that has been recently introduced for lumbar spine applications. A total of 377 female patients (aged 61-70 y) underwent both a femoral dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and an echographic scan of the proximal femur. Recruited patients were sub-divided into a reference database used for ultrasound spectral model construction and a study population for repeatability assessments and accuracy evaluations. Echographic images and radiofrequency signals were analyzed through a fully automatic algorithm that performed a series of combined spectral and statistical analyses, providing as a final output the O.S. value of the femoral neck. Assuming DXA as a gold standard reference, the accuracy of O.S.-based diagnoses resulted 94.7%, with k = 0.898 (p < 0.0001). Significant correlations were also found between O.S.-estimated bone mineral density and corresponding DXA values, with r(2) up to 0.79 and root mean square error = 5.9-7.4%. The reported accuracy levels, combined with the proven ease of use and very good measurement repeatability, provide the adopted method with a potential for clinical routine application in osteoporosis diagnosis.

  8. Reirradiation in head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Janot, Francois; Thariat, Juliette; Daly-Schweitzer, Nicolas

    2011-08-01

    Salvage surgery is the mainstay of treatment for recurrences or secondary primary tumors in areas that were irradiated earlier. However, locoregional recurrence remains the main cause of death after surgery. Adjuvant reirradiation dramatically reduces locoregional recurrences but the risk-benefit ratio seems to be advantageous mostly for residual microscopic disease. In contrast, the rate of distant metastasis among reirradiated patients indicates that the local treatment alone is not sufficient. Full-dose exclusive chemo-reirradiation (over 60 Gy) can cure a subset of patients when surgery is not feasible. However, reirradiation is associated with a significant rate of severe toxicity and should, therefore, be compared with chemotherapy in randomized trials. Accrual may be difficult because of selection biases such as tumor volume, small volumes (largest axis less than 3-4 cm) being more likely to be irradiated. In addition, patients in poor general condition with severe comorbidities, organ dysfunction, or incomplete healing after salvage surgery, are unlikely to benefit from reirradiation. Noteworthy volumes to be reirradiated must be established between the head and neck surgeon and the radiation oncologist: the definition of the clinical target volume should be taken into account, the natural history of recurrent tumors, especially with regard to extension modalities, and the absence of strict correlation between imaging and histological real extension. This is even more critical with the advent of new irradiation techniques. Chemotherapy associations and new radiosensitizing agents are also under investigation. Comparison between reirradiation modalities is difficult because most trials are phase 2 mono-institutional trials. As selection of patients is a key issue, only phase 3 multiinstitutional trials can provide definitive results.

  9. Pleomorphic Adenoma in Subcutaneous Plane of the Neck: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Bharat; Bhukebag, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Heterotopic Salivary Gland Tissue (HSGT) is salivary tissue found in locations not normally host to it. Neoplasms occurring in these heterotopic tissues are very rare. Review of literature has revealed the neck to be host to HSGT and rarely, tumourigenic changes in these inclusions have been observed. We present a clinically unsuspected case of an ectopic pleomorphic adenoma of lower neck in which the ectopic salivary tissue was found in subcutaneous plane, which to the best of our knowledge has not been reported and was proved only on cytology and histopathology. There is a probability of this tumour undergoing malignant transformation. Therefore, these tumours need to be promptly diagnosed, adequately treated and should be included in the differential diagnosis of neck masses. PMID:26500955

  10. Osteopathic manipulative treatment to resolve head and neck pain after tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Patricia M; Gustowski, Sharon M

    2012-07-01

    Pain is a common occurrence after tooth extraction and is usually localized to the extraction site. However, clinical experience shows that patients may also have pain in the head or neck in the weeks after this procedure. The authors present a case representative of these findings. In the case, cranial and cervical somatic dysfunction in a patient who had undergone tooth extraction was resolved through the use of osteopathic manipulative treatment. This case emphasizes the need to include a dental history when evaluating head and neck pain as part of comprehensive osteopathic medical care. The case can also serve as a foundation for a detailed discussion regarding how to effectively incorporate osteopathic manipulative treatment into primary care practice for patients who present with head or neck pain after tooth extraction.

  11. Fiddler's Neck Accompanied by Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Nickel in a Viola Player

    PubMed Central

    Jue, Mihn Sook; Kim, Yong Seok

    2010-01-01

    "Fiddler's neck" is an irritant contact dermatitis that frequently affects violin and viola players. The etiology of the skin changes associated with this condition are probably attributable to a combination of factors--including increased pressure, friction, poor hygiene, and excessive perspiration. Clinically, the lesions generally consist of a localized area of lichenification on the left side of the neck just below the angle of the jaw. Herein, we report a case of fiddler's neck in a viola player, attended by allergic contact dermatitis to the nickel in the metal fixtures of a viola. We hope that our case report draws the attention of dermatologists toward this, and many other skin problems that affect musicians. PMID:20548892

  12. Biomarkers of head and neck cancer, tools or a gordian knot?

    PubMed Central

    Lampri, Evangeli S; Chondrogiannis, Georgios; Ioachim, Elli; Varouktsi, Anna; Mitselou, Antigoni; Galani, Aggeliki; Briassoulis, Evangelos; Kanavaros, Panagiotis; Galani, Vasiliki

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck tumors comprise a wide spectrum of heterogeneous neoplasms for which biomarkers are needed to aid in earlier diagnosis, risk assessment and therapy response. Personalized medicine based on predictive markers linked to drug response, it is hoped, will lead to improvements in outcomes and avoidance of unnecessary treatment in carcinoma of the head and neck. Because of the heterogeneity of head and neck tumors, the integration of multiple selected markers in association with the histopathologic features is advocated for risk assessment. Validation of each biomarker in the context of clinical trials will be required before a specific marker can be incorporated into daily practice. Furthermore, we will give evidence that some proteins implicated in cell-cell interaction, such as CD44 may be involved in the multiple mechanism of the development and progression of laryngeal lesions and may help to predict the risk of transformation of the benign or precancerous lesions to cancer. PMID:26379825

  13. Neuroendocrine tumours of the head and neck: anatomical, functional and molecular imaging and contemporary management

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Navaraj; Prestwich, Robin; Chowdhury, Fahmid; Patel, Chirag

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the head and neck are rare neoplasms and can be of epithelial or non-epithelial differentiation. Although the natural history of NETs is variable, it is crucial to establish an early diagnosis of these tumours as they can be potentially curable. Conventional anatomical imaging and functional imaging using radionuclide scintigraphy and positron emission tomography/computed tomography can be complementary for the diagnosis, staging and monitoring of treatment response. This article describes and illustrates the imaging features of head and neck NETs, discusses the potential future role of novel positron-emitting tracers that are emerging into clinical practice and reviews contemporary management of these tumours. Familiarity with the choice of imaging techniques and the variety of imaging patterns and treatment options should help guide radiologists in the management of this rare but important subgroup of head and neck neoplasms. PMID:24240099

  14. Aspiration cytology in the diagnosis of head and neck masses: the early Christchurch experience.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D S; Allison, R S; Robertson, M S; Hamer, J W

    1989-12-13

    Fine needle aspiration cytology has been performed on patients presenting with head and neck masses in Christchurch since mid-1985. The results of an initial 120 aspirations were reviewed. Histology was available to compare with the cytology result in 58% of cases. Clinical review was used to assess the accuracy of the cytology result in the remaining cases. The majority of the masses aspirated were of benign origin (72%). The cytological diagnosis was accurate in 79% of cases. Of the remaining aspirates, 13% were inaccurate and 8% nondiagnostic. The sensitivity for malignant lesions was 100%, with 86% specificity (for benign lesions). Particular diagnostic difficulty was found in the differentiation between some salivary gland tumours, and the assessment of aspirates from neck masses after combined therapy (radiotherapy and surgery). Fine needle aspiration cytology is of considerable value in the management of head and neck masses.

  15. Biphenotypic human papillomavirus-associated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Pitiyage, Gayani; Lei, Mary; Guererro Urbano, Teresa; Odell, Edward; Thavaraj, Selvam

    2015-07-11

    Human papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is now recognised as a subtype of head and neck cancer with distinct clinical, molecular and histological characteristics. The majority of these carcinomas are of non-keratinising squamous type but there is a growing number of histomorphologic variants of this disease. Here we describe the clinical, histomorphologic and immunophenotypic features of two cases of human papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma demonstrating a clearly delineated biphasic differentiated and undifferentiated phenotype.

  16. Future Directions and Treatment Strategies for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Draper, David J.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is a devastating disease that afflicts many individuals worldwide. Conventional therapies are successful in only a limited subgroup and often leave the patient with disfigurement and long lasting adverse effects on normal physiological functions. The field is in dire need of new therapies. Oncolytic viral as well as targeted therapies have shown some success in other malignancies and are attractive for the treatment of head and neck cancer. Recently, it has been shown that a subset of head and neck cancers is human papillomavirus (HPV) positive and that this subset of cancers is biologically distinct and more sensitive to chemoradiation therapies although the underlying mechanism is unclear. However, chemoresistance remains a general problem. One candidate mediator of therapeutic response, which is of interest for the targeting of both HPV-positive and -negative tumors is the human DEK proto-oncogene. DEK is upregulated in numerous tumors including head and neck cancers regardless of their HPV status. Depletion of DEK in tumor cells in culture results in sensitivity to genotoxic agents, particularly in rapidly proliferating cells. This suggests that tumors with high DEK protein expression may be correlated with poor clinical response to clastogenic therapies. Targeting molecules such as DEK in combination with new and/or conventional therapies, holds promise for novel future therapeutics for head and neck cancer. PMID:22683420

  17. Multipaddled Anterolateral Thigh Chimeric Flap for Reconstruction of Complex Defects in Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Liu, Wen; Su, Tong; Chen, Xinqun; Zheng, Lian; Jian, Xinchun

    2014-01-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap has been the workhouse flap for coverage of soft-tissue defects in head and neck for decades. However, the reconstruction of multiple and complex soft-tissue defects in head and neck with multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps is still a challenge for reconstructive surgeries. Here, a clinical series of 12 cases is reported in which multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps were used for complex soft-tissue defects with several separately anatomic locations in head and neck. Of the 12 cases, 7 patients presented with trismus were diagnosed as advanced buccal cancer with oral submucous fibrosis, 2 tongue cancer cases were found accompanied with multiple oral mucosa lesions or buccal cancer, and 3 were hypopharyngeal cancer with anterior neck skin invaded. All soft-tissue defects were reconstructed by multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps, including 9 tripaddled anterolateral thigh flaps and 3 bipaddled flaps. The mean length of skin paddle was 19.2 (range: 14–23) cm and the mean width was 4.9 (range: 2.5–7) cm. All flaps survived and all donor sites were closed primarily. After a mean follow-up time of 9.1 months, there were no problems with the donor or recipient sites. This study supports that the multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flap is a reliable and good alternative for complex and multiple soft-tissue defects of the head and neck. PMID:25180680

  18. Phonoaudiology guidance in the preoperative period in the head and neck tumors

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, Grasiella Aparecida Nau; Fleig, Raquel; do Nascimento, Iramar Baptistella

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The habit of smoking and intake of alcoholic drinks can lead to the incidence of malignant tumors in several areas, including the head or neck. Phonoaudiology is an area of oncology that is always seeking to expand its applications in oncological head and neck cases, with intervention in pre- and post-operative periods and in different clinical fields. Aim: To evaluate and describe the impact of phonoaudiology preoperative guidance in patients, specifically smokers and alcohol drinkers, with head and neck cancer. Methods: Series Study. Interviews were conducted by telephone with 40 individuals diagnosed with malignant head and neck tumors. Questionnaires regarding the use of tobacco and alcohol were administered before and after the phonoaudiology preoperative guidance. Results: Among the 40 individuals who received phonoaudiology preoperative guidance, 26 were smokers before the orientation. Of these 26 individuals, 18 (69.24%) abandoned tobacco dependence, 4 (15.38%) did not quit smoking, and 4 (15.38%) quit smoking for a few months before resuming smoking after receiving phonoaudiology preoperative guidance. Regarding alcohol consumption, 31 individuals ingested alcohol before phonoaudiology preoperative guidance. Of these 31 individuals, 17 (54.84%) abandoned alcohol dependence, 8 (25.81%) did not abstain from alcohol consumption, and 6 (19.35%) resumed alcohol consumption after a period of abstinence after receiving phonoaudiology preoperative guidance. Conclusion: Phonoaudiology preoperative orientations are effective in the treatment of head and neck malignant tumors. PMID:25992003

  19. HPV Infection of the Head and Neck Region and Its Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Pullos, A N; Castilho, R M; Squarize, C H

    2015-11-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is an etiologic agent associated with the development of head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC)-in particular, oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The HPV-positive HNSCC is characterized by genetic alterations, clinical progression, and therapeutic response, which are distinct from HPV-negative head and neck cancers, suggesting that virus-associated tumors constitute a unique entity among head and neck cancers. Malignant stem cells, or cancer stem cells, are a subpopulation of tumor cells that self-renew, initiate new tumors upon transplantation, and are resistant to therapy, and their discovery has revealed novel effects of oncovirus infection in cancer. In this review, we provide a virus-centric view and novel insights into HPV-positive head and neck pathogenesis. We discuss the influence of cancer stem cells, HPV oncoproteins, altered molecular pathways, and mutations in cancer initiation and cancer progression. We compiled a catalogue of the mutations associated with HPV-positive HNSCC, which may be a useful resource for genomic-based studies aiming to develop personalized therapies. We also explain recent changes in mass vaccination campaigns against HPV and the potential long-term impact of vaccinations on the prevention and treatment of HPV-positive head and neck cancers.

  20. Metastases of Melanoma to Head and Neck Mucosa: A Report of Short Series

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Raphaela Silva Leandro; Andrade, Marília Ferreira; Alves, Fábio de Abreu; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Perez, Danyel Elias da Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Metastasis of melanoma to the head and neck mucosa is a very unusual condition. The aim of this study was to report four cases of patients with metastatic melanoma in the head and neck mucosa treated at a single institution. Methods Clinical data were obtained from the medical records. All cases were histologically reviewed to confirm the diagnosis, and immunohistochemical reactions were performed in the cases submitted to biopsy. Results All patients were males and the mean age was 40.5 years old. The sites of the metastatic tumors were gingival mucosa, floor of the mouth, oropharynx, and larynx. Two tumors appeared as submucosal nodules with normal color; one lesion was a blackish nodular lesion, and one was shown to be an ulcerated lesion. The size of tumors ranged from 2.0 to 4.0 cm. All patients had developed systemic disease at time of diagnosis of metastatic tumor in the head and neck mucosa. Survival rates ranged from 2 to 19 months after the diagnosis of the metastatic mucosal melanoma in the head and neck region. Conclusion Although rare, patients with melanoma must be closely and regularly followed up, with careful routine examination of head and neck, because metastatic tumors in this region seem to be part of a lethal widespread metastatic disease. PMID:26976032

  1. Stent-assisted coiling for the treatment of ruptured micro-intracranial wide-necked aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ming; Jiang, Shijie; Nie, Bengang

    2015-01-01

    The stent-assisted coil embolization technique has been increasingly used in the clinic, but its efficacy and safety have yet to be assessed. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stent-assisted coiling in the treatment of micro-intracranial wide-necked aneurysms. Between May 2007 and November 2011, a total of 35 micro-intracranial wide-necked ruptured aneurysms were occluded with Enterprise stent-assisted coils. The patients were followed up for two years. Stent-assisted coiling was performed successfully in all cases, and stent placement was satisfactory without any complications. Of 35 aneurysms, 13 (37.1%) were completely occluded, ten (28.5%) had residual necks, and 12 (34.2%) had residual aneurysms. In the two-year follow-up, no aneurysm rupture occurred and no patients had nerve dysfunction. All patients were reviewed by digital subtraction angiography or computed tomography angiography. One patient had a residual neck (2.8%), and no patients experienced stent restenosis or thromboembolic events. In general, stent-assisted coiling is effective and safe for the treatment of micro-intracranial wide-necked aneurysms. PMID:25934773

  2. Case studies in cervicothoracic spine function evaluation and treatment of two dancers with mechanical neck pain.

    PubMed

    Sandow, Emily

    2011-03-01

    It has been reported that manual therapy directed at the thoracic spine followed by exercise may improve outcomes in patients with mechanical neck pain. At this point, there is little available data on dancers with neck pain, and it is unclear whether this type of treatment is appropriate for restoring the rigorous level of activity required of the dancer. The purpose of this study was to review the evaluation, clinical decision-making process, and treatment of two dancers-one with acute and the other with chronic neck pain-who fell into the classification of patients who might benefit from an intervention to the thoracic spine. The two participants were a musical theater dancer with an acute onset of neck pain and a retired dancer who was an active dance company director with an 11-year history of chronic neck pain. Both participants went through a standard examination and were treated with mobilizations to the upper thoracic spine followed by therapeutic exercises. In both cases, successful outcomes were achieved immediately after treatment and up to six months after discharge from physical therapy.

  3. Minimizing shoulder syndrome with intra-operative spinal accessory nerve monitoring for neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Lee, C-H; Huang, N-C; Chen, H-C; Chen, M-K

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the safety and results of intra-operative SAN (spinal accessary nerve) monitoring during selective neck dissection, with emphasis on shoulder syndrome. Twenty-five consecutive patients with head and neck cancer were studied. Selective neck dissection was performed by a single clinical fellow under the supervision of the department chief using an intra-operative SAN monitor. Electrophysiological data were recorded after initial identification of the SAN and continued until just before closure. Electromyographic evaluation was carried out to assess SAN function one month postoperatively. Shoulder disability was also evaluated at this time using a questionnaire for shoulder syndrome (shrug, flexion, abduction, winging, and pain). No patients had postoperative shoulder syndrome involving shrug, flexion, abduction, or winging. Twenty-two of the 25 (88%) patients had shoulder pain, but the average pain score was low (2.3 ± 1.3). No patients had neck recurrence during at least 1 year of follow up. By using nerve monitoring during selective neck dissection, no patient developed significant "shoulder syndrome", with the exception of slight pain.

  4. Flexibility along the neck of the ostrich (Struthio camelus) and consequences for the reconstruction of dinosaurs with extreme neck length.

    PubMed

    Dzemski, Gordon; Christian, Andreas

    2007-08-01

    The gross morphology and the flexibility along the neck of the ostrich (Struthio camelus) were examined using fresh tissue as well as neck skeletons. The results of the morphologic studies were compared with results from observations of living ostriches. The investigation was focused on differences in the morphology and the function between different sections of the neck. Additionally, the function of major dorsal neck ligaments was examined, including measurements of force-strain-relations. Comparative studies of giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) and camels (Camelus bactrianus) were conducted to find relations between the flexibility along the neck and the general feeding strategy. The examinations revealed that the neck of the ostrich can be divided into four sections with different functions. The first is the atlas-axis-complex which is responsible for torsion. The adjacent cranial section of the neck is flexible in dorsoventral and lateral directions but this part of the neck is usually kept straight at rest and during feeding. Dorsoventral flexibility is highest in the middle section of the neck, whereas the base of the neck is primarily used for lateral excursions of the neck. For giraffes and camels, the posture and utilization of the neck are also reflected in the flexibility of the neck. For all three species, it is possible to reconstruct the pattern of flexibility of the neck by using the neck skeletons alone. Therefore, it appears reasonable to reconstruct the neck utilization and the feeding strategies of dinosaurs with long necks by deriving the flexibility of the neck from preserved vertebrae. For Diplodocus carnegii the neck posture and the feeding strategy were reconstructed. Two neck regions, one around the 9th neck vertebra and the second at the base of the neck, indicate that Diplodocus, like the ostrich, adopted different neck postures. The neck was probably kept very low during feeding. During interruptions of the feeding, e.g., in an alert

  5. Contemporary management of lymph node metastases from an unknown primary to the neck: II. a review of therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Strojan, Primož; Ferlito, Alfio; Langendijk, Johannes A; Corry, June; Woolgar, Julia A; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Silver, Carl E; Paleri, Vinidh; Fagan, Johannes J; Pellitteri, Phillip K; Haigentz, Missak; Suárez, Carlos; Robbins, K Thomas; Rodrigo, Juan P; Olsen, Kerry D; Hinni, Michael L; Werner, Jochen A; Mondin, Vanni; Kowalski, Luiz P; Devaney, Kenneth O; de Bree, Remco; Takes, Robert P; Wolf, Gregory T; Shaha, Ashok R; Genden, Eric M; Barnes, Leon

    2013-02-01

    Although uncommon, cancer of an unknown primary (CUP) metastatic to cervical lymph nodes poses a range of dilemmas relating to optimal treatment. The ideal resolution would be a properly designed prospective randomized trial, but it is unlikely that this will ever be conducted in this group of patients. Accordingly, knowledge gained from retrospective studies and experience from treating patients with known head and neck primary tumors form the basis of therapeutic strategies in CUP. This review provides a critical appraisal of various treatment approaches described in the literature. Emerging treatment options for CUP with metastases to cervical lymph nodes are discussed in view of recent innovations in the field of head and neck oncology and suitable therapeutic strategies for particular clinical scenarios are presented. For pN1 or cN1 disease without extracapsular extension (ECE), selective neck dissection or radiotherapy offer high rates of regional control. For more advanced neck disease, intensive combined treatment is required, either a combination of neck dissection and radiotherapy, or initial (chemo)radiotherapy followed by neck dissection if a complete response is not recorded on imaging. Each of these approaches seems to be equally effective. Use of extensive bilateral neck/mucosal irradiation must be weighed against toxicity, availability of close follow-up with elective neck imaging and guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) when appropriate, the human papillomavirus (HPV) status of the tumor, and particularly against the distribution pattern (oropharynx in the majority of cases) and the emergence rate of hidden primary lesions (<10% after comprehensive workup). The addition of systemic agents is expected to yield similar improvement in outcome as has been observed for known head and neck primary tumors. PMID:22034062

  6. Impact of human papillomavirus on head and neck squamous cell cancers in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Ingrid, Labouba; Chloé, Bertolus; Hervé, Koumakpayi Ismail; Ernest, Belembaogo; Jérôme, Miloundja; Nicolas, Berthet

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancers are among the most aggressive. Their incidence and mortality rates are relatively lower in Middle Africa than worldwide, but in Gabon, these rates tend to be 2-3 fold higher than in neighboring countries. The main risk factors are alcohol and tobacco consumption. However, in the last decades, there was cumulated evidence that human papillomaviruses were a significant risk factor, particularly for oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. In Gabon, as elsewhere in Africa, assessment of these 3 risk factors need to be improved to determine their respective role in the development of head and neck squamous cell cancers. The potential differences in alcohol/tobacco consumption habits as well as in infectious ecology between developing and developed countries can make it difficult to transpose current data on this issue. Determining the respective role of alcohol/tobacco consumption and human papillomaviruses in the development of head and neck squamous cell cancers is crucial for the management of these cancers that could become a serious public health issue in Gabon. Human papillomaviruses are not only a risk factor but also a biomarker with promising clinical potential for the follow-up of head and neck squamous cell cancers potentially able to select an adequate treatment. Then, assessing the epidemiological impact of human papillomaviruses in Gabon and in all of Africa would prove useful for the clinical follow-up of head and neck squamous cell cancers, and would also provide essential data to plan a global prevention strategy against head and neck squamous cell cancers due to human papillomaviruses. PMID:26557156

  7. Preservation of organ function in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tschiesner, Uta

    2012-01-01

    Preservation of function is a crucial aspect for the evaluation of therapies applied in the field of head and neck cancer. However, preservation of anatomic structures cannot automatically be equated with preservation of function. Functional outcome becomes increasingly important particularly for the evaluation of alternative treatment options with equivalent oncological outcomes. As a result, present studies take into account three topic areas with varying emphasis: (1) the effects of cancer therapy on essential physiological functions, (2) additional therapy-induced side-effects and complications, and (3) health-related quality of life. The present article summarizes vital aspects of clinical research from recent years. Functional outcomes after surgical and non-surgical treatment approaches are presented according to tumor localization and staging criteria. Additional methodological aspects relating to data gathering and documentation as well as challenges in implementing the results in clinical practice are also discussed. PMID:23320059

  8. Vestibular disorders following different types of head and neck trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kolev, Ognyan I.; Sergeeva, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Summary This review focuses on the published literature on vestibular disorders following different types of head and neck trauma. Current knowledge of the different causes and underlying mechanisms of vestibular disorders, as well as the sites of organic damage, is presented. Non-organic mechanisms are also surveyed. The frequency of occurrence of vestibular symptoms, and of other accompanying subjective complaints, associated with different types of trauma is presented and related to the specific causes. Hypotheses about the pathogenesis of traumatic vestibular disorders are presented, and the knowledge derived from animal experiments is also discussed. We believe this to be a very important topic, since vestibular complaints in traumatic patients often remain undiagnosed or underestimated in clinical practice. This review article aims to suggest directions for additional research and to provide guidance to both the scientific and clinical practice communities. PMID:27358219

  9. Angiomatosis: A Rare Vascular Proliferation of Head and Neck Region

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sabina; Pujani, Mukta; Jetley, Sujata; Neogi, Sujoy

    2015-01-01

    Angiomatosis is a diffuse vascular lesion which clinically mimics hemangioma or vascular malformation. It usually involves multiple tissues and is histopathologically characterised by proliferation of vessels of varying calibre intimately admixed with large amount of adipose tissue. Its surgical removal is very difficult because of its infiltrative nature. Therefore, a precise histopathological diagnosis is of utmost importance. It is usually seen in females in the first two decades and commonly involves lower extremities. Angiomatosis of head and neck region is very rare. Here we present a rare case of angiomatosis of the lower face involving right cheek and lip in a 4-year-old boy clinically diagnosed as hemangioma. Histopathological differential diagnosis of angiomatosis is also discussed. PMID:26157312

  10. Structures, spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of U₂On (n = 0 ∼ 2, 4) molecules: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Niu, Wen-Xia; Gao, Tao; Wang, Fan; Jia, Ting-Ting; Meng, Da-Qiao; Li, Gan

    2013-12-01

    The equilibrium structures, spectroscopic and thermodynamic parameters [entropy (S), internal energy (E), heat capacity (C p)] of U₂, U₂O, U₂O₂ and U₂O₄ uranium oxide molecules were investigated systematically using density functional theory (DFT). Our computations indicated that the ground electronic state of U₂ is the septet state and the equilibrium bond length is 2.194 Å; the ground electronic state of U₂O and U₂O₂ were found to be X³Φ and X³Σ(g) with stable C(∞v) and D(∞h) linear structures, respectively. The bridge-bonded structure with D(2h) symmetry and X³B₁(g) state is the most stable configuration for the U₂O₄ molecule. Mulliken population analyses show that U atoms always lose electrons to become the donor and O atoms always obtain electrons as the acceptor. Molecular orbital analyses demonstrated that the frontier orbitals of the title molecules were contributed mostly by 5f atomic orbitals of U atoms. Vibrational frequencies analyses indicate that the maximum absorption peaks stem from the stretching mode of U-O bonds in U₂O, U₂O₂ and U₂O₄. In addition, thermodynamic data of U₂O(n) (n = 0 ∼ 4) molecules at elevated temperatures of 293.0 K to 393.0 K was predicted.

  11. The Role of Computed Tomography in the Management of the Neck After Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Clavel, Sebastien; Charron, Marie-Pierre; Belair, Manon; Delouya, Guila; Fortin, Bernard; Despres, Philippe; Soulieres, Denis; Filion, Edith; Guertin, Louis; and others

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe the outcome in patients with head-and neck-squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) followed up without neck dissection (ND) after concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) based on computed tomography (CT) response. The second objective was to establish CT characteristics that can predict which patients can safely avoid ND. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, 369 patients with node-positive HNSCC were treated with primary CRT at our institution. After a clinical and a radiologic evaluation based on CT done 6 to 8 weeks after CRT, patients were labeled with a complete neck response (CR) or with a partial neck response (PR). Results: The median follow-up was 44 months. The number of patients presenting with N3, N2, or N1 disease were 54 (15%), 268 (72%), and 47 (13%), respectively. After CRT, 263 (71%) patients reached a CR, and 253 of them did not undergo ND. Ninety-six patients reached a PR and underwent ND. Of those, 34 (35%) had residual disease on pathologic evaluation. A regression of the diameter of {>=}80% and a residual largest diameter of 15 mm of nodes had negative pathologic predictive values of 100% and 86%, respectively. The 3-year regional control and survival rates were not different between patients with CR who had no ND and patients with PR followed by ND. Conclusion: Node-positive patients presenting a CR as determined by CT evaluation 6 to 8 weeks after CRT had a low rate of regional recurrence without ND. This study also suggests that lymph node residual size and percentage of regression on CT after CRT may be useful criteria to guide clinical decisions regarding neck surgery. Those results can help diminish the number of ND procedures with negative results and their associated surgical complications.

  12. Parotid gland sparing IMRT for head and neck cancer improves xerostomia related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    van Rij, CM; Oughlane-Heemsbergen, WD; Ackerstaff, AH; Lamers, EA; Balm, AJM; Rasch, CRN

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose To assess the impact of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) versus conventional radiation on late xerostomia and Quality of Life aspects in head and neck cancer patients. Patients and nethods Questionnaires on xerostomia in rest and during meals were sent to all patients treated between January 1999 and December 2003 with a T1-4, N0-2 M0 head and neck cancer, with parotid gland sparing IMRT or conventional bilateral neck irradiation to a dose of at least 60 Gy, who were progression free and had no disseminated disease (n = 192). Overall response was 85% (n = 163); 97% in the IMRT group (n = 75) and 77% in the control group (n = 88) the median follow-up was 2.6 years. The prevalence of complaints was compared between the two groups, correcting for all relevant factors at multivariate ordinal regression analysis. Results Patients treated with IMRT reported significantly less difficulty transporting and swallowing their food and needed less water for a dry mouth during day, night and meals. They also experienced fewer problems with speech and eating in public. Laryngeal cancer patients in general had fewer complaints than oropharynx cancer patients but both groups benefited from IMRT. Within the IMRT group the xerostomia scores were better for those patients with a mean parotid dose to the "spared" parotid below 26 Gy. Conclusion Parotid gland sparing IMRT for head and neck cancer patients improves xerostomia related quality of life compared to conventional radiation both in rest and during meals. Laryngeal cancer patients had fewer complaints but benefited equally compared to oropharyngeal cancer patients from IMRT. PMID:19068126

  13. Systemic therapy strategies for head-neck carcinomas: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, most of which are squamous cell tumours, have an unsatisfactory prognosis despite intensive local treatment. This can be attributed, among other factors, to tumour recurrences inside or outside the treated area, and metastases at more distal locations. These tumours therefore require not only the standard surgical and radiation treatments, but also effective systemic modalities. The main option here is antineoplastic chemotherapy, which is firmly established in the palliative treatment of recurrent or metastatic stages of disease, and is used with curative intent in the form of combined simultaneous or adjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with inoperable or advanced tumour stages. Neoadjuvant treatment strategies for tumour reduction before surgery have yet to gain acceptance. Induction chemotherapy protocols before radiotherapy have to date been used in patients at high risk of distant metastases or as an aid for decision-making (“chemoselection”) in those with extensive laryngeal cancers, prior to definitive chemoradiotherapy or laryngectomy. Triple-combination induction therapy (taxanes, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil) shows high remission rates with significant toxicity and, in combination with (chemo-)radiotherapy, is currently being compared with simultaneous chemoradiotherapy; the current gold standard with regards to efficacy and long-term toxicity. A further systemic treatment strategy, called “targeted therapy”, has been developed to help increase specificity and reduce toxicity. An example of targeted therapy, EGFR-specific antibodies, can be used in palliative settings and, in combination with radiotherapy, to treat advanced head and neck cancers. A series of other novel biologicals such as signal cascade inhibitors, genetic agents, or immunotherapies, are currently being evaluated in large-scale clinical studies, and could prove useful in patients with advanced, recurring or metastatic head and neck cancers. When developing

  14. Optimizing Stability in Femoral Neck Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ye; Hao, Jiandong; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing stability of femoral neck fracture fixation is important in obtaining a successful outcome. The mechanical problems and strategies for achieving optimal stability differ depending on patients' age and degree of osteoporosis. Femoral neck fractures in younger adults usually result from high-energy trauma and have a vertical fracture pattern. Strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include placing additional screws at right angles to the fracture plane and medial buttress plate augmentation. In elderly patients, screw position relative to the intact cortical femoral neck bone is of critical importance. Additional strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include the concept of length stable fixation, use of adjunctive calcium phosphate cement, and use of novel fixed angle fixation implants. PMID:26488776

  15. An unusual neck mass: the Warthin tumor.

    PubMed

    Scasso, C A; Papini, M; Eligi, C; Ghelardi, F; Cagno, M C; Bruschini, P

    1998-01-01

    The cystoadenolymphoma or Warthin's tumor is a benign lesion of the salivary glands and principally of the parotid gland. We report a case of a 62 year old white male seen at our Institute for evaluation of an asymptomatic right neck mass located 2 cm below the mandible at the anterior margin of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The echography showed a lymphoid structure simulating a lymphoproliferative process. Histologic examination of the surgical specimen revealed a Warthin's tumor. We discuss the importance of considering Warthin's tumor in the differential diagnosis of an isolated neck mass, and report our experience over a ten year period in the surgical management of neck masses. Additionally, the literature concerning extraparotid Warthin's tumors is reviewed.

  16. Chronic Neck Pain and Cervico-Craniofacial Pain Patients Express Similar Levels of Neck Pain-Related Disability, Pain Catastrophizing, and Cervical Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-García, Daniel; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; López-López, Almudena; Lopez-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; La Touche, Roy; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neck pain (NP) is strongly associated with cervico-craniofacial pain (CCFP). The primary aim of the present study was to compare the neck pain-related disability, pain catastrophizing, and cervical and mandibular ROM between patients with chronic mechanical NP and patients with CCFP, as well as asymptomatic subjects. Methods. A total of 64 participants formed three groups. All participants underwent a clinical examination evaluating the cervical range of motion and maximum mouth opening, neck disability index (NDI), and psychological factor of Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Results. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with NP and CCFP for NDI and PCS (P > 0.05). One- way ANOVA revealed significant differences for all ROM measurements. The post hoc analysis showed no statistically significant differences in cervical extension and rotation between the two patient groups (P > 0.05). The Pearson correlation analysis shows a moderate positive association between NDI and the PCS for the group of patients with NP and CCFP. Conclusion. The CCFP and NP patient groups have similar neck disability levels and limitation in cervical ROM in extension and rotation. Both groups had positively correlated the NDI with the PCS. PMID:27119020

  17. Chronic Neck Pain and Cervico-Craniofacial Pain Patients Express Similar Levels of Neck Pain-Related Disability, Pain Catastrophizing, and Cervical Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-García, Daniel; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; López-López, Almudena; Lopez-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; La Touche, Roy; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neck pain (NP) is strongly associated with cervico-craniofacial pain (CCFP). The primary aim of the present study was to compare the neck pain-related disability, pain catastrophizing, and cervical and mandibular ROM between patients with chronic mechanical NP and patients with CCFP, as well as asymptomatic subjects. Methods. A total of 64 participants formed three groups. All participants underwent a clinical examination evaluating the cervical range of motion and maximum mouth opening, neck disability index (NDI), and psychological factor of Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Results. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with NP and CCFP for NDI and PCS (P > 0.05). One- way ANOVA revealed significant differences for all ROM measurements. The post hoc analysis showed no statistically significant differences in cervical extension and rotation between the two patient groups (P > 0.05). The Pearson correlation analysis shows a moderate positive association between NDI and the PCS for the group of patients with NP and CCFP. Conclusion. The CCFP and NP patient groups have similar neck disability levels and limitation in cervical ROM in extension and rotation. Both groups had positively correlated the NDI with the PCS.

  18. Penetrating wounds of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Jahrsdoerfer, R A; Johns, M E; Cantrell, R W

    1979-12-01

    Wounding capability of bullets is primarily releated to velocity. Bullet mass and shape, and specific gravity of body tissues being struck by the missile, are lesser factors. Seventy cases of penetrating wounds of the head and neck were treated during a six-year period. Vascular injuries were more common with neck wounds, while face and head injuries (extracranial) were similar to maxillofacial trauma. It is recognized that hemorrhage at the base of the skull is difficult to treat, and contemporary training in temporal bone and base of skull surgery is mandatory for the critical management of these wounds.

  19. Neck pain from a rheumatologic perspective.

    PubMed

    Oberstein, Elana M; Carpintero, Maria; Hopkins, Aviva

    2011-08-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of rheumatologic considerations for a clinician when evaluating a patient with neck pain. Clearly, anatomic derangements of the cervical spine should be considered when a patient complains of cervicalgia. However, one must also entertain the possibility of a systemic illness as the cause of the pain. Examples of diseases that may present with a prominent feature of neck pain are discussed, including rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, myositis, and fibromyalgia. Evidence of an underlying rheumatic illness may guide the clinician in a different therapeutic direction. PMID:21824589

  20. Approach to intensely enhancing neck nodes

    PubMed Central

    Karandikar, Amit; Gummalla, Krishna Mohan; Loke, Siu Cheng; Goh, Julian; Tan, Tiong Yong

    2016-01-01

    Cervical node evaluation is one of the most common problems encountered by a radiologist. Here, we present a pictorial review of intensely enhancing neck nodes. While enhancement in a cervical node is a common radiologic finding on contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan, only few conditions cause intense enhancement in cervical nodes. We discuss the common causes of intensely enhancing neck nodes along with pertinent radiologic features and key differentiating points that aid radiologists in reaching a diagnosis. In addition, we discuss certain potential non-nodal mimics, which need to be excluded. PMID:26782154

  1. Hyperparathyroidism following head and neck irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S.D.; Frame, B.; Miller, M.J.; Kleerskoper, M.; Block, M.A.; Parfitt, A.M.

    1980-02-01

    A history of head and neck irradiation in childhood or adolescence was found in 22 of 130 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism compared with only 12 of 400 control patients. Among 200 patients with a known history of childhood irradiation, biochemical or surgical evidence of hyperparathyroidism was found in ten, a prevalence of 5%. This is at least 30 times the prevalence of hyperparathyroidism in the general population. The data indicate that head and neck irradiation should be regarded as an important risk factor in the subsequent development of hyperparathyroidism.

  2. Chemoradiation for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Potential for Improving Results to Match Those of Current Treatment Modalities for Early-Stage Tumors-Long-Term Results of Hyperfractionated Chemoradiation With Carbogen Breathing and Anemia Correction With Erythropoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, Alfonso Martinez, Jose Carlos; Serdio, Jose Luis de

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To attempt to improve results of chemoradiation for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: From March 1996 to April 2007, 98 patients with head and neck cancer (15 Stage III and 83 Stage IV) were treated with a twice-daily hyperfractionated schedule. Eleven patients presented with N0, 11 with N1, 13 with N2A, 17 with N2B, 24 with N2C, and 22 with N3. Each fraction of treatment consisted of 5 mg/m{sup 2} of carboplatin plus 115 cGy with carbogen breathing. Treatment was given 5 days per week up to total doses of 350 mg/m{sup 2} of carboplatin plus 8050 cGy in 7 weeks. Anemia was corrected with erythropoietin. Results: Ninety-six patients tolerated the treatment as scheduled. All patients tolerated the planned radiation dose. Local toxicity remained at the level expected with irradiation alone. Chemotherapy toxicity was moderate. Ninety-seven complete responses were achieved. After 11 years of follow-up (median, 81 months), actuarial locoregional control, cause-specific survival, overall survival, and nodal control rates at 5 and 10 years were, respectively, 83% and 83%, 68% and 68%, 57% and 55%, and 100% and 100%. Median follow-up of disease-free survivors was 80 months. No significant differences in survival were observed between the different subsites or between the pretreatment node status groups (N0 vs. N+, N0 vs. N1, N0 vs. N2A, N0 vs. N2B, N0 vs. N2C, and N0 vs. N3). Conclusions: Improving results of chemoradiation for advanced head and neck cancer up to the level obtained with current treatments for early-stage tumors is a potentially reachable goal.

  3. Elective Inguinal Node Irradiation in Early-Stage T2N0 Anal Cancer: Prognostic Impact on Locoregional Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zilli, Thomas; Betz, Michael; Bieri, Sabine; Ris, Frederic; Roche, Bruno; Roth, Arnaud D.; Allal, Abdelkarim S.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of elective inguinal node radiation therapy (INRT) on locoregional control (LRC) in patients with early-stage T2N0 anal cancer treated conservatively with primary RT. Methods and Materials: Between 1976 and 2008, 116 patients with T2 node-negative anal cancer were treated curatively with RT alone (n=48) or by combined chemoradiation therapy (CRT) (n=68) incorporating mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil. Sixty-four percent of the patients (n=74) received elective INRT. Results: Over a median follow-up of 69 months (range, 4-243 months), 97 (84%) and 95 patients (82%) were locally and locoregionally controlled, respectively. Rates for 5-year actuarial local control, LRC, cancer-specific, and overall survival for the entire population were 81.7% ± 3.8%, 79.2% ± 4.1%, 91.1% ± 3.0%, and 72.1% ± 4.5%, respectively. The overall 5-year inguinal relapse-free survival was 92.3% ± 2.9%. Isolated inguinal recurrence occurred in 2 patients (4.7%) treated without INRT, whereas no groin relapse was observed in those treated with INRT. The 5-year LRC rates for patients treated with and without INRT and with RT alone versus combined CRT were 80.1% ± 5.0% versus 77.8% ± 7.0% (P=.967) and 71.0% ± 7.2% versus 85.4% ± 4.5% (P=.147), respectively. A trend toward a higher rate of grade ≥3 acute toxicity was observed in patients treated with INRT (53% vs 31%, P=.076). Conclusions: In cases of node-negative T2 anal cancer, the inguinal relapse rate remains relatively low with or without INRT. The role of INRT in the treatment of early-stage anal carcinoma needs to be investigated in future prospective trials.

  4. Dermatoses of the neck affecting violin and viola players ("fiddler's neck", and contact dermatitis).

    PubMed

    Tennstedt, D; Cromphaut, P; Dooms-Goossens, A; Lachapelle, J M

    1979-01-01

    Skin lesions occurring on the neck of violin or viola players are described, in the light of two personal observations. The lesions can be divided into two types: 1. Lesions described as "fiddler's neck", i.e. an area of erythematous, sometimes pigmented or scaly lichenification on the left side of the neck, just below the angle of the jaw, where the chin rest of the instrument is in contact with the skin. Histopathologic features of the lesions are described. 2. Allergic contact dermatitis to wooden or metallic parts of the violin. The recent literature is reviewed.

  5. Comfort effects of a new car headrest with neck support.

    PubMed

    Franz, M; Durt, A; Zenk, R; Desmet, P M A

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the design of a neck-/headrest to increase car comfort. Two studies were undertaken to create a new comfortable headrest with neck support. In experiment one, neck- and headrest data were gathered using 35 test subjects. The pressure distribution, stiffness of the foam material and position of the head and neck support were determined. In experiment two a full adjustable final headrest with adjustable neck support was constructed and tested with 12 subjects using a new adjustable headrest under virtual reality driving conditions. Experiment two showed that the headrest with the new/adjustable neck support was favoured by the majority of the subjects. 83% were satisfied with the stiffness of the material. 92% were satisfied with the size of the neck- and headrest. All subjects mentioned that the neck support is a comfort benefit in calm traffic conditions or on the motorway.

  6. PET-CT–Guided Surveillance of Head and Neck Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who underwent PET-CT–guided surveillance had fewer operations but similar overall survival rates to those of patients who underwent planned neck dissection.

  7. Current applications of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue replacement in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery

    PubMed Central

    King, Suzanne N; Hanson, Summer E; Hematti, Peiman; Thibeault, Susan L

    2012-01-01

    Cellular therapy utilizing adult mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) may very well revolutionize the treatment of a variety of head and neck diseases through the restoration of normal structure and function. Transplanting allogeneic or autologous MSCs into damaged tissues can serve multiple regenerative functions through their self-renewal, differentiation capacity, immune modulation and secretion of bioactive molecules. Further, trophic factors expressed by MSCs have been shown to influence their microenvironment through the promotion of extracellular matrix remodeling, angiogenesis and wound healing needed to regenerate or replace injured tissues. Although clinical applications of MSC based therapies in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery are still in their infancy, efforts are being made to understand and exploit MSCs for tissue repair as well as engineering strategies. In this review, we highlight pre clinical and clinical investigations employing MSC based therapies for the reconstruction of bone, cartilage, soft tissue and vocal fold defects. PMID:23671810

  8. Performance and standards for the process of head and neck cancer care: South and West audit of head and neck cancer 1996–1997 (SWAHN I)

    PubMed Central

    Birchall, M A; Bailey, D; Lennon, A

    2000-01-01

    Evidence suggests wide variation in cancer care between different hospitals in the UK. To establish bench-marking data, we designed a prospective, 1 year regional study comparing key performance measures with established standards for the 28 hospital Trusts in the South and West of England involved in head and neck cancer care. 566 sequential patients with a newly-diagnosed head and neck cancer were included. Numbers referred and treated per hospital Trust were 1–58 and 1–65 respectively. 59% of patients received a pretreatment chest X-ray (standard 95%). 45% of patients were seen in a multidisciplinary clinic pretreatment (standard 95%), and this was proportional to the frequency of clinics held (P< 0.0001). Median number of cases treated per surgeon was 4 (1–26), and by radiotherapist was 10 (1–51). Times between parts of the process of oral cancer care were closer to the standards than those for laryngeal cancer. Two patients were entered into a clinical trial. One had a quality-of-life score. Thus, in 1996–1997, in the South and West of England, there were major discrepancies between actual performance and established standards in many fundamental aspects of head and neck cancer care. Re-audit is essential to determine if the implementation of the Calman–Hine report has resulted in improvements. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10945484

  9. Squamous carcinomas of the head and neck: some patterns of spread1

    PubMed Central

    Carter, R L; Pittam, M R

    1980-01-01

    Patterns of tumour spread are examined in 160 patients with squamous carcinomas of the head and neck with reference to perineural infiltration, direct invasion of bone and ossified cartilage, and lymph node metastases in the previously irradiated neck. Perineural spread is comparatively common in large (T3, T4) tumours; it may be apparent early in the disease; it is often detectable clinically; and it is an adverse prognostic feature which may modify clinical management. Direct bone invasion is described with particular reference to tumours of the oral cavity. Most bone destruction is mediated by osteoclasts which appear to be stimulated by materials such as prostaglandins released in the vicinity of the tumour. The numbers of involved lymph nodes in surgical dissections from the irradiated neck are usually few and restricted to the submandibular and jugular groups; nodes in the posterior triangle are infrequently involved by metastatic carcinoma. Transcapsular spread and keratin granulomas are common. The scope of modified neck dissections in this group of patients is discussed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8. PMID:7230216

  10. Squamous cell carcinomas of the lung and of the head and neck: new insights on molecular characterization

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Valentina; Pasello, Giulia; Frega, Stefano; Favaretto, Adolfo; Koussis, Haralabos; Conte, Pierfranco; Bonanno, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the lung and of the head and neck district share strong association with smoking habits and are characterized by smoke-related genetic alterations. Driver mutations have been identified in small percentage of lung squamous cell carcinoma. In parallel, squamous head and neck tumors are classified according to the HPV positivity, thus identifying two different clinical and molecular subgroups of disease. This review depicts different molecular portraits and potential clinical application in the field of targeted therapy, immunotherapy and chemotherapy personalization. PMID:26933818

  11. Vascular Priming Enhances Chemotherapeutic Efficacy against Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Folaron, Margaret; Kalmuk, James; Lockwood, Jaimee; Frangou, Costakis; Vokes, Jordan; Turowski, Steven G.; Merzianu, Mihai; Rigual, Nestor R.; Sullivan-Nasca, Maureen; Kuriakose, Moni A.; Hicks, Wesley L.; Singh, Anurag K.; Seshadri, Mukund

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The need to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy against head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) is well recognized. In this study, we investigated the potential of targeting the established tumor vasculature in combination with chemotherapy in head and neck cancer. Methods Experimental studies were carried out in multiple human HNSCC xenograft models to examine the activity of the vascular disrupting agent (VDA) 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA) in combination with chemotherapy. Multimodality imaging (magnetic resonance imaging, bioluminescence) in conjunction with drug delivery assessment (fluorescence microscopy), histopathology and microarray analysis was performed to characterize tumor response to therapy. Long-term treatment outcome was assessed using clinically-relevant end points of efficacy. Results Pretreatment of tumors with VDA prior to administration of chemotherapy increased intratumoral drug delivery and treatment efficacy. Enhancement of therapeutic efficacy was dependent on the dose and duration of VDA treatment but was independent of the chemotherapeutic agent evaluated. Combination treatment resulted in increased tumor cell kill and improvement in progression-free survival and overall survival in both ectopic and orthotopic HNSCC models. Conclusion Our results show that preconditioning of the tumor microenvironment with an antivascular agent primes the tumor vasculature and results in enhancement of chemotherapeutic delivery and efficacy in vivo. Further investigation into the activity of antivascular agents in combination with chemotherapy against HNSCC is warranted. PMID:23890930

  12. Valgus osteotomy for nonunion and neglected neck of femur fractures

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Viju Daniel; Livingston, Abel; Boopalan, P R; Jepegnanam, Thilak S

    2016-01-01

    Nonunion neck of femur can be a difficult problem to treat, particularly in the young, and is associated with high complication rates of avascular necrosis due to the precarious blood supply and poor biomechanics. The various treatment options that have been described can be broadly divided according to the aim of improving either biology or biomechanics. Surgeries aimed at improving the biology, such as vascularized fibula grafting, have good success rates but require high levels of expertise and substantial resources. A popular surgical treatment aimed at improving the biomechanics-valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy-optimizes conditions for fracture healing by converting shear forces across the fracture site into compressive forces. Numerous variations of this surgical procedure have been developed and successfully applied in clinical practice. As a result, the proximal femoral orientation for obtaining a good functional outcome has evolved over the years, and the present concept of altering the proximal femoral anatomy as little as possible has arisen. This technical objective supports attaining union as well as a good functional outcome, since excessive valgus can lead to increased joint reaction forces. This review summarizes the historical and current literature on valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy treatment of nonunion neck of femur, with a focus on factors predictive of good functional outcome and potential pitfalls to be avoided as well as controversies surrounding this procedure. PMID:27190758