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Sample records for clinically n0 neck

  1. Clinical outcome of surgical treatment of T1-2 N0 squamous cell carcinoma of oral tongue with observation for the neck: Analysis of 176 cases

    PubMed Central

    Hakeem, Arsheed Hussain; Pradhan, Sultan Ahmed; Kannan, Rajan; Tubachi, Jagadish

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze various demographic, clinical, and histopathologic factors in T1-2 N0 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral tongue to define a high-risk group for regional recurrence that will benefit from elective neck dissection. Materials and Methods: Retrospective outcome analysis of a patient cohort without palpable or ultrasound (USG) detectable nodal metastases undergoing per oral wide glossectomy for T1-2 N0 SCC of oral tongue. Patients were followed up using palpation and serial USG neck and fine-needle aspiration cytology. Results: Of the 176 patients, 69 (39%) showed recurrence during follow-up. Fifty-eight cases developed regional neck node metastases, i.e., overall regional node recurrence rate of 33%. Fifty-three (91%) with regional neck node metastases were salvaged successfully with further treatment. In 110 cases with tumor thickness more than 5 mm, 39% cases developed regional neck node metastases. This association was significant with P = 0.0402. Among 44 cases with perineural invasion, 54% developed regional neck node metastases. Similarly in 39 cases with lymphovascular invasion, 61% developed regional neck node metastases. Association of both of these parameters with the development of regional neck node metastases was significant. Conclusion: We recommend prophylactic selective neck dissection in early stage SCC of oral tongue, especially with depth of invasion more than 5 mm, perineural and lymphovascular invasion. PMID:28299264

  2. Is Elective Irradiation to the Lower Neck Necessary for N0 Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma?

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yunsheng; Zhu Guopei; Lu Jiade; Ying Hongmei; Kong Ling; Wu Yongru; Hu Chaosu

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize our experience and treatment results in lymph node-negative nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated in a single institution. Methods and Materials: From January 2000 to December 2003, 410 patients with lymph node-negative nasopharyngeal carcinoma were retrospectively analyzed. The T-stage distribution was 18.8% in T1, 54.6% in T2 (T2a, 41 patients; T2b, 183 patients), 13.2% in T3, and 13.4% in T4. All patients received radiotherapy to the nasopharynx, skull base, and upper neck drainage areas, including levels II, III, and VA. The dose was 64-74 Gy, 1. 8-2.0 Gy per fraction over 6.5-7.5 weeks to the primary tumor with {sup 60}Co or 6-MV X-rays, and 50-56 Gy to levels II, III, and VA. Residual disease was boosted with either {sup 192}Ir afterloading brachytherapy or small external beam fields. Results: The median follow-up time was 54 months (range, 3-90 months). Four patients developed neck recurrence, and only 1 patient (0.2%) experienced relapse outside the irradiation fields. The 5-year overall survival rate was 84.2%. The 5-year relapse-free survival rate, distant metastasis-free survival rate, and disease-free survival rate were 88.6%, 90.6% and 80.1%, respectively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated that T classification was the only significant prognostic factor for predicting overall survival. The observed serious late toxicities were radiation-induced brain damage (7 cases), cranial nerve palsy (16 cases), and severe trismus (13 cases; the distance between the incisors was {<=}1 cm). Conclusion: Elective levels II, III, and VA irradiation is suitable for nasopharyngeal carcinoma without neck lymph node metastasis.

  3. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by local excision in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Seob; Yoon, Yong sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Chang, Heung Moon; Park, Jin-hong; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-Wook; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) followed by local excision (LE) is feasible approach in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods Patients who received PCRT and LE because of clinical T2 rectal cancer within 7 cm from anal verge between January 2006 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. LE was performed in case of a good clinical response after PCRT. Patients’ characteristics, treatment record, tumor recurrence, and treatment-related complications were reviewed at a median follow-up of 49 months. Results All patients received transanal excision or transanal minimally invasive surgery. Of 34 patients, 19 patients (55.9%) presented pathologic complete response (pCR). The 3-year local recurrence-free survival and disease free-survival were 100.0% and 97.1%, respectively. There was no recurrence among the patients with pCR. Except for 1 case of grade 4 enterovesical fistula, all other late complications were mild and self-limiting. Conclusion PCRT followed by an LE might be feasible as an alternative to total mesorectal excision in good responders with clinical T2N0 distal rectal cancer. PMID:27730804

  4. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy Is Beneficial for Clinical Stage T2 N0 Esophageal Cancer Patients Due to Inaccurate Preoperative Staging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jennifer Q.; Hooker, Craig M.; Brock, Malcolm V.; Shin, James; Lee, Sue; How, Remealle; Franco, Noreli; Prevas, Helen; Hulbert, Alicia; Yang, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Background It remains unclear if patients with clinical stage T2 N0 (cT2 N0) esophageal cancer should be offered induction therapy vs surgical intervention alone. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of cT2 N0 patients undergoing induction therapy, followed by surgical resection, or resection alone, at the Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1989 to 2009. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to compare all-cause mortality in cT2 N0 patients who had resection alone vs those who had induction chemoradiation therapy, followed by resection. Results A study cohort of 69 patients was identified and divided into two groups: 55 patients (79.7%) received induction therapy and 14 (20.3%) did not. No statistically significant difference in 5-year survival rate was observed for the two groups: 49.5% for the resection-only group and 53.8% for the induction group. More than 50% of cT2 N0 patients were understaged. Conclusions For cT2 N0 esophageal cancer patients, the benefit of neoadjuvant therapy is still unclear. Induction therapy for cT2 N0 did not translate into a statistically significant improvement in survival. However, due to the significant understaging of T2 N0 patients, we recommend neoadjuvant therapy to all cT2N0 patients before operation. PMID:22269708

  5. Head and neck paragangliomas: clinical and molecular genetic classification

    PubMed Central

    Offergeld, Christian; Brase, Christoph; Yaremchuk, Svetlana; Mader, Irina; Rischke, Hans Christian; Gläsker, Sven; Schmid, Kurt W; Wiech, Thorsten; Preuss, Simon F; Suárez, Carlos; Kopeć, Tomasz; Patocs, Attila; Wohllk, Nelson; Malekpour, Mahdi; Boedeker, Carsten C; Neumann, Hartmut PH

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck paragangliomas are tumors arising from specialized neural crest cells. Prominent locations are the carotid body along with the vagal, jugular, and tympanic glomus. Head and neck paragangliomas are slowly growing tumors, with some carotid body tumors being reported to exist for many years as a painless lateral mass on the neck. Symptoms depend on the specific locations. In contrast to paraganglial tumors of the adrenals, abdomen and thorax, head and neck paragangliomas seldom release catecholamines and are hence rarely vasoactive. Petrous bone, jugular, and tympanic head and neck paragangliomas may cause hearing loss. The internationally accepted clinical classifications for carotid body tumors are based on the Shamblin Class I–III stages, which correspond to postoperative permanent side effects. For petrous-bone paragangliomas in the head and neck, the Fisch classification is used. Regarding the molecular genetics, head and neck paragangliomas have been associated with nine susceptibility genes: NF1, RET, VHL, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2 (SDH5), and TMEM127. Hereditary HNPs are mostly caused by mutations of the SDHD gene, but SDHB and SDHC mutations are not uncommon in such patients. Head and neck paragangliomas are rarely associated with mutations of VHL, RET, or NF1. The research on SDHA, SDHAF2 and TMEM127 is ongoing. Multiple head and neck paragangliomas are common in patients with SDHD mutations, while malignant head and neck paraganglioma is mostly seen in patients with SDHB mutations. The treatment of choice is surgical resection. Good postoperative results can be expected in carotid body tumors of Shamblin Class I and II, whereas operations on other carotid body tumors and other head and neck paragangliomas frequently result in deficits of the cranial nerves adjacent to the tumors. Slow growth and the tendency of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas to be multifocal may justify less aggressive treatment strategies. PMID:22584701

  6. Review of sentinel node procedure in cN0 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Guidelines from the French evaluation cooperative subgroup of GETTEC.

    PubMed

    Garrel, R; Poissonnet, G; Temam, S; Dolivet, G; Fakhry, N; de Raucourt, D

    2017-04-01

    The reliability of the sentinel lymph node (SN) technique has been established for more than ten years in T1-T2 oral cavity and oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma. Although most authors stress the necessity of rigorous implementation, there are no agreed guidelines. Moreover, other indications have been described, in other anatomical areas of the upper aerodigestive tract and in case of previous surgery or radiotherapy. SN expert teams, under the GETTEC head and neck tumor study group, conducted a review of the key points for implementation in head and neck cancers through guidelines and a review of classical and extended indications. Reliability depends on respecting key points of preoperative landmarking by lymphoscintigraphy, and intraoperative SN sampling and histological analysis. The SN technique is the best means of diagnosing occult lymph node involvement, whatever the primary tumor location, T stage or patient history.

  7. Current clinical immunotherapeutic approaches for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Soto Chervin, Carolina; Brockstein, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    It was estimated that 59,340 new cases of head and neck cancer would be diagnosed in the US alone in 2015 and that 12,290 deaths would be attributed to the disease. Local and regional recurrences may be treated with chemotherapy and radiation; however, metastatic head and neck cancer is fatal and is treated with chemotherapy for palliation. Recent successful treatment of a variety of solid and hematological malignancies by immunotherapeutic approaches (i.e. harnessing the body’s own immune system to combat disease) has added a fourth therapeutic option for the treatment of cancer. This commentary will review the status of immunotherapies in clinical development for the specific treatment of head and neck cancer. PMID:27239282

  8. Diagnostic yield of a one-stop neck lump clinic.

    PubMed

    Al Hamarneh, Osama; Liew, Lenny; Shortridge, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Diagnostic clinics for patients with neck lumps were established across the UK in response to NICE guidance on cancer services. The guidance stated that a surgeon and a cytopathologist among its other key recommendations should staff each clinic. The aim of this study was to establish the diagnostic yield of this clinic at Wolverhampton. A prospective cohort study was conducted of patients attending a one-stop neck lump clinic over a period of 30 months. Patients' characteristics, diagnostic tests and outcomes were recorded and the data analysed. Of 333 patients, n = 65 (20 %) had no lump, n = 214 (64 %) had a benign lump and n = 54 (16 %) had a malignant lump. Older age of patients and a history of smoking were found to be significantly higher when a malignant lump was diagnosed when compared with a benign lump. In the benign lump group, freehand FNAC had an accuracy of 87 % (n = 48/55), while USS-guided FNAC had an accuracy of 74 % (n = 32/43). Diagnosis was confirmed on the same day for the majority of patients (n = 178, 84 %). In the malignant lump group, freehand FNAC had an accuracy of 82 % (n = 28/34), while USS-guided FNAC had an accuracy of 81 % (n = 17/21). Diagnosis on the same day was confirmed for 74 % of the patients (n = 40). The clinic in our unit achieved an overall diagnostic yield of 84 %. Outcomes regarding age, sex, smoking, size and site of neck lumps and accuracy of FNAC were in line with published data. The study showed that this one-stop neck lump clinic was better at excluding malignancy than diagnosing it.

  9. Local-Regional Recurrence With and Without Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy for Clinically Staged T3N0 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Himanshu; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, Tse-Kuan

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine local-regional recurrence (LRR) risk according to whether postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) was used to treat breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy. Methodsand Materials: Clinicopathology data from 162 patients with clinical T3N0 breast cancer who received NAC and underwent mastectomy were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 119 patients received PMRT, and 43 patients did not. The median number of axillary lymph nodes (LNs) dissected was 15. Actuarial rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up of 75 months, 15 of 162 patients developed LRR. For all patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-14%). The 5-year LRR rate for those who received PMRT was 4% (95% CI, 1%-9%) vs. 24% (95% CI, 10%-39%) for those who did not receive PMRT (p <0.001). A significantly higher proportion of irradiated patients had pathology involved LNs and were {<=}40 years old. Among patients who had pathology involved LNs, the LRR rate was lower in those who received PMRT (p <0.001). A similar trend was observed for those who did not have pathology involved LN disease. Among nonirradiated patients, the appearance of pathologic LN disease after NAC was the only clinicopathologic factor examined that significantly correlated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease treated with NAC and mastectomy but without PMRT had a significant risk of LRR, even when there was no pathologic evidence of LN involvement present after NAC. PMRT was effective in reducing the LRR rate. We suggest PMRT should be considered for patients with clinical T3N0 disease.

  10. Impaired neck motor function and pronounced pain-related fear in helicopter pilots with neck pain - a clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Ang, Björn Olov

    2008-08-01

    There is recognition that neck pain is a significant clinical problem in military aviation. In the present trial, the objectives were to explore neck motor function and pain-related fear in pilots with differing progression of neck pain. Seventy-two military helicopter pilots were enrolled: 20 had acute ongoing neck pain, 27 had subacute pain, and 25 were pain-free controls. Neck-flexor electromyography activity (root-mean-square) during staged active craniocervical flexion, median power frequency during sustained neck-flexor contraction, cervical range of motion, rating of perceived exertion after sustained flexor contraction, and rated fear-avoidance beliefs about physical activity were estimated. Main effects emerged for flexor activity, fear-avoidance and range of motion, but not for median frequency variables or perceived exertion. Post hoc testing showed that, compared to controls, both pain groups had greater flexor activity at higher stages of craniocervical flexion while the acute group had higher fear-avoidance and less range of motion in axial rotation and flexion-extension, all P<0.01. Discriminant regression revealed a sensitivity/specificity of 87%/71% (neck-pain/controls), with the flexor activity superior. The results indicate that altered neuromotor synergies are present at different progressions of pain. The tracing of such aberrant activity and fear-avoidance beliefs is suggested in future screening and neck intervention research.

  11. Acquired Bilateral Dyspigmentation on Face and Neck: Clinically Appropriate Approaches

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Facial dyspigmentation in Asian women often poses diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Recently, a distinctive bilateral hyperpigmentation of face and neck has occasionally been observed. This study was performed to investigate the clinico-pathological features of this dyspigmentation as well as proper treatment approaches. We retrospectively investigated the medical records including photographs, routine laboratory tests, histopathologic studies of both lesional and peri-lesional normal skin and patch test of thirty-one patients presented acquired bizarre hyperpigmentation on face and neck. The mean age of patients was 52.3 years and the mean duration of dyspigmentation was 24.2 months. In histologic evaluations of lesional skin, a significantly increased liquefactive degeneration of basal layer, pigmentary incontinence and lymphocytic infiltration were noted, whereas epidermal melanin or solar elastosis showed no statistical differences. Among 19 patients managed with a step-by-step approach, seven improved with using only topical anti-inflammatory agents and moisturizer, and 12 patients gained clinical benefit after laser therapy without clinical aggravation. Both clinical and histopathologic findings of the cases suggest a distinctive acquired hyperpigmentary disorder related with subclinical inflammation. Proper step-by-step evaluation and management of underlying subclinical inflammation would provide clinical benefit. PMID:27822947

  12. A Model Predicting Lymph Node Status for Patients with Clinical Stage T1aN0-2M0 Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Ruo-Chuan; Qiu, Bin; Gao, Shu-Geng; He, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lymph node status of patients with early-stage nonsmall cell lung cancer has an influence on the choice of surgery. To assess the lymph node status more correspondingly and accurately, we evaluated the relationship between the preoperative clinical variables and lymph node status and developed one model for predicting lymph node involvement. Methods: We collected clinical and dissected lymph node information of 474 patients with clinical stage T1aN0-2M0 nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Logistic regression analysis of clinical characteristics was used to estimate independent predictors of lymph node metastasis. The prediction model was validated by another group. Results: Eighty-two patients were diagnosed with positive lymph nodes (17.3%), and four independent predictors of lymph node disease were identified: larger consolidation size (odds ratio [OR] = 2.356, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.517–3.658, P < 0.001,), central tumor location (OR = 2.810, 95% CI: 1.545–5.109, P = 0.001), abnormal status of tumor marker (OR = 3.190, 95% CI: 1.797–5.661, P < 0.001), and clinical N1–N2 stage (OR = 6.518, 95% CI: 3.242–11.697, P < 0.001). The model showed good calibration (Hosmer–Lemeshow goodness-of-fit, P < 0.766) with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) of 0.842 (95% [CI]: 0.797–0.886). For the validation group, the AUC was 0.810 (95% CI: 0.731–0.889). Conclusions: The model can assess the lymph node status of patients with clinical stage T1aN0-2M0 NSCLC, enable surgeons perform an individualized prediction preoperatively, and assist the clinical decision-making procedure. PMID:28218211

  13. Clinical utility of head and neck aspiration cytology.

    PubMed

    Karayianis, S L; Francisco, G J; Schumann, G B

    1988-01-01

    Over the past 3.5 yr, we have examined 195 head and neck fine-needle aspiration (FNA) specimens from three diverse medical settings. Specimens were collected in saline solution or Saccomanno fixative and processed using cytocentrifugation or membrane filtration. This allowed us simultaneously to perform cytologic evaluations, special stains, and immunologic marker studies from a single specimen. Good correlation between clinical experience with FNA and obtaining satisfactory specimens was demonstrated. Our sensitivity (89%) and specificity (94%) reflect problems associated with specimen collection in a training environment where clinician experience with the procedure is low. A definitive diagnosis was possible in most cases, and the treatment plan was often based on the FNA results. In patients without a history of a primary malignancy, a FNA done early in the clinical course helped direct the initial workup of the patient, saving time and expense.

  14. Hematoporphyrin-mediated photodynamic therapy for treatment of head and neck cancer: clinical update 1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Vanessa G.

    1996-04-01

    From 1983 to 1996 Phase II and III clinical studies at Henry Ford Hospital demonstrated complete or partial responses in 55 of 56 patients treated with hematoporphyrin-derivative or PHOTOFRIN-mediated photodynamic therapy (HPD-PDT) for a variety of benign and malignant upper aerodigestive tract disease: (1) superficial 'condemned mucosa' or 'field cancerization' of the oral cavity and larynx (7 cases); (2) Stage III/IV head and neck cancer (25 cases); (3) mucocutaneous AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma of the upper aerodigestive tract and non AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma of the lower extremity (15 cases); (4) recurrent laryngotracheal papillomatosis (3 cases); (5) severe dysplasia/adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma in situ in Barrett's esophagus (4 cases); (6) partial or completely obstructing terminal esophageal cancer (9 cases). At the time of this report, HPD-PDT produced complete responses in 24 patients (follow up 6 months to 9 years) with 'field cancerization' (CIS, T1N0M0) of the oral cavity and larynx (6 cases), adenocarcinoma in situ in Barrett's esophagus (3 cases), mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma (12 cases), obstructing esophageal carcinoma (1 case), and stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx (1 case), and radiation therapy or solar-induced basal cell/squamous cell carcinomas (2 cases). PDT treatment protocols, results, complications, and application as adjunct or primary oncologic therapy for head and neck cancer are reviewed in this article.

  15. Implementing the National Institute of Clinical Excellence improving outcome guidelines for head and neck cancer: developing a business plan with reorganisation of head and neck cancer services.

    PubMed

    Jeannon, J-P; Abbs, I; Calman, F; Gleeson, M; Lyons, A; Hussain, K; McGurk, M; O'Connell, M; Probert, D; Ng, R; Simo, R

    2008-04-01

    The implementation of the National Institute of Clinical Excellence improving outcome guidelines (NICE-IOG) manual for head and neck cancer may have a huge potential cost implication. Head and neck cancer is a rare disease which utilises large quantities of resources which can only be provided in a tertiary centre. Head and neck cancer services should be centralised into a single site for each cancer network. A new higher tariff rate for complex head and neck cancer cases is needed which recognises the true cost of this work. Each network should set its own tariff to make head and neck cancer care financially viable.

  16. Clinical effects of deep cervical flexor muscle activation in patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Kwag, Kwang Il

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscles exercise on pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and neck and shoulder postures in patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight patients with chronic neck pain were randomly assigned into either the general strengthening exercise (GSE) group or the DCF activation group as control and experimental groups, respectively. All exercises were performed three times per week over 4 weeks. NDI and numeric rating scale (NRS) score for pain were determined and radiological assessment of neck-shoulder postures (head tilt angle [HTA], neck flexion angle [NFA], and forward shoulder angle [FSA]) was performed before (baseline), 4 weeks after, and 8 weeks after exercise in order to directly compare the exercise effects between the groups. [Results] In the DCF group, the NDI, NRS score, and neck-shoulder postures (analyzed by uisng HTA, NFA, and FSA) were significantly improved. [Conclusion] DCF activation exercise was effective to alleviate pain, recover functions, and correct forward head posture in the patients with neck pain. Hence, it might be recommended in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic neck pain.

  17. Clinical effects of deep cervical flexor muscle activation in patients with chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Kwag, Kwang Il

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscles exercise on pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and neck and shoulder postures in patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight patients with chronic neck pain were randomly assigned into either the general strengthening exercise (GSE) group or the DCF activation group as control and experimental groups, respectively. All exercises were performed three times per week over 4 weeks. NDI and numeric rating scale (NRS) score for pain were determined and radiological assessment of neck-shoulder postures (head tilt angle [HTA], neck flexion angle [NFA], and forward shoulder angle [FSA]) was performed before (baseline), 4 weeks after, and 8 weeks after exercise in order to directly compare the exercise effects between the groups. [Results] In the DCF group, the NDI, NRS score, and neck-shoulder postures (analyzed by uisng HTA, NFA, and FSA) were significantly improved. [Conclusion] DCF activation exercise was effective to alleviate pain, recover functions, and correct forward head posture in the patients with neck pain. Hence, it might be recommended in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic neck pain. PMID:26957772

  18. Effectiveness of dry needling for chronic nonspecific neck pain: a randomized, single-blinded, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cerezo-Téllez, Ester; Torres-Lacomba, María; Fuentes-Gallardo, Isabel; Perez-Muñoz, Milagros; Mayoral-Del-Moral, Orlando; Lluch-Girbés, Enrique; Prieto-Valiente, Luis; Falla, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    Chronic neck pain attributed to a myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of muscle contractures referred to as myofascial trigger points. In this randomized, parallel-group, blinded, controlled clinical trial, we examined the effectiveness of deep dry needling (DDN) of myofascial trigger points in people with chronic nonspecific neck pain. The study was conducted at a public Primary Health Care Centre in Madrid, Spain, from January 2010 to December 2014. A total of 130 participants with nonspecific neck pain presenting with active myofascial trigger points in their cervical muscles were included. These participants were randomly allocated to receive: DDN plus stretching (n = 65) or stretching only (control group [n = 65]). Four sessions of treatment were applied over 2 weeks with a 6-month follow-up after treatment. Pain intensity, mechanical hyperalgesia, neck active range of motion, neck muscle strength, and perceived neck disability were measured at baseline, after 2 sessions of intervention, after the intervention period, and 15, 30, 90, and 180 days after the intervention. Significant and clinically relevant differences were found in favour of dry needling in all the outcomes (all P < 0.001) at both short and long follow-ups. Deep dry needling and passive stretching is more effective than passive stretching alone in people with nonspecific neck pain. The results support the use of DDN in the management of myofascial pain syndrome in people with chronic nonspecific neck pain.

  19. The Tip of the Iceberg: Clinical Implications of Genomic Sequencing Projects in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Andrew C.; Ludwig, Megan L.; Meraj, Taha S.; Brenner, J. Chad; Prince, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genomic sequencing studies have provided valuable insight into genetic aberrations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite these great advances, certain hurdles exist in translating genomic findings to clinical care. Further correlation of genetic findings to clinical outcomes, additional analyses of subgroups of head and neck cancers and follow-up investigation into genetic heterogeneity are needed. While the development of targeted therapy trials is of key importance, numerous challenges exist in establishing and optimizing such programs. This review discusses potential upcoming steps for further genetic evaluation of head and neck cancers and implementation of genetic findings into precision medicine trials. PMID:26506389

  20. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David L.; Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy; Chen Yipei; Zhang Yongbin; Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S.; Dong, Lei

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. Results: With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Conclusion: This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond.

  1. Percutaneous Lung Thermal Ablation of Non-surgical Clinical N0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of Eight Years’ Experience in 87 Patients from Two Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Palussiere, Jean; Lagarde, Philippe; Aupérin, Anne; Deschamps, Frédéric; Chomy, François; Baere, Thierry de

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the survival outcomes of percutaneous thermal ablation (RFA + microwaves) for patients presenting N0 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) ineligible for surgery.Materials and MethodsEighty-seven patients from two comprehensive cancer centers were included. Eighty-two patients were treated with RFA electrodes and five with microwave antenna. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated and predictive factors of local tumor progression, OS and DFS identified and compared by univariate and multivariate analysesResultsMedian follow-up was 30.5 months (interquartile range 16.7–51) and tumor size was 21 mm (range 10–54 mm). Treatment was incomplete for 14 patients with a local tumor progression of 11.5, 18.3, and 21.1 % at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Two patients presented with neurological (grade III or IV) complications, and one died of respiratory and multivisceral failure as a result of the procedure at 29 days. In univariate analysis, increasing tumor size (P = 0.003) was the only predictive factor related to risk of local tumor progression. 5-year OS and DFS were 58.1 and 27.9 %, respectively. Sex (P = 0.044), pathology (P = 0.032), and tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.046) were prognostic factors for DFS. In multivariate analysis, pathology (P = 0.033) and tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.032) were independent prognostic factors for DFS.ConclusionsOversized and overlapping ablation of N0 NSCLC was well tolerated, effective, with few local tumor progressions, even over long-term follow-up. Increasing tumor size was the main prognostic factor linked to OS, DFS, and local tumor progression.

  2. Dorsal midbrain syndrome associated with persistent neck extension: Clinical and diagnostic imaging findings in 2 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Sara; Baroni, Massimo; Falzone, Cristian; De Benedictis, Giulia M.; Bernardini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Two young dogs were evaluated for an acute onset of abnormal head posture and eye movement. Neurological examination was characterized mostly by permanent neck extension, abnormalities of pupils, and eye movement. A mesencephalic mass lesion was detected on magnetic resonance imaging in both cases. Neurophysiological pathways likely responsible for this peculiar clinical presentation are discussed. PMID:26663922

  3. Clinical applications of dual-energy CT in head and neck imaging.

    PubMed

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Mayich, Michael; Daftari-Besheli, Laleh; Gupta, Rajiv

    2016-03-01

    Dual-energy CT provides insights into the material properties of the tissues and can differentiate between tissues that have similar attenuation on conventional, single energy CT imaging. It has several useful and promising applications in head and neck imaging that an otolaryngologist could use to deliver improved clinical care. These applications include metal artifact reduction, atherosclerotic plaque and tumor characterization, detection of parathyroid lesions, and delineation of paranasal sinus ventilation. Dual-energy CT can potentially improve image quality, reduce radiation dose, and provide specific diagnostic information for certain head and neck lesions. This article reviews some current and potential otolaryngology applications of dual-energy CT.

  4. Congenital midline cervical cleft: clinical approach to a congenital anterior neck defect.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Bedeschi, Maria Francesca; Cantarella, Giovanna; Colombo, Lorenzo; Agosti, Viola; Amodeo, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Monica; Mazzola, Isabella; Mosca, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    Numerous malformations can affect the anterior part of the neck presenting at birth as a real diagnostic challenge for the pediatrician or the primary care physician who initially evaluate the baby. Congenital midline cervical cleft represents a rare defect of the midline neck, which is sometimes wrongly diagnosed as a thyroglossal duct anomaly, dermoid cyst, branchial cleft anomaly or "birthmark". A prompt clinical diagnosis and surgical treatment during early infancy are essential to ensure both functional and aesthetic outcome. We report a case of a female neonate with a midline cervical cleft diagnosed immediately after birth. The main features of other congenital anomalies of the anterior neck are also discussed referring to their embryologic origin.

  5. Nontraumatic head and neck emergencies: a clinical approach. Part 1: cervicofacial swelling, dysphagia, and dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Brea Álvarez, B; Tuñón Gómez, M; Esteban García, L; García Hidalgo, C Y; Ruiz Peralbo, R M

    2016-01-01

    Nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck represent a challenge in the field of neuroradiology for two reasons: first, they affect an area where the thorax joins the cranial cavity and can thus compromise both structures; second, they are uncommon, so they are not well known. Various publications focus on nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck from the viewpoints of anatomic location or of particular diseases. However, these are not the most helpful viewpoints for dealing with patients in the emergency department, who present with particular signs and symptoms. We propose an analysis starting from the four most common clinical presentations of patients who come to the emergency department for nontraumatic head and neck emergencies: cervical swelling, dysphagia, dyspnea, and loss of vision. Starting from these entities, we develop an approach to the radiologic management and diagnosis of these patients.

  6. Minimum detectable and minimal clinically important changes for pain in patients with nonspecific neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Francisco M; Abraira, Víctor; Royuela, Ana; Corcoll, Josep; Alegre, Luis; Tomás, Miquel; Mir, María Antonia; Cano, Alejandra; Muriel, Alfonso; Zamora, Javier; del Real, María Teresa Gil; Gestoso, Mario; Mufraggi, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Background The minimal detectable change (MDC) and the minimal clinically important changes (MCIC) have been explored for nonspecific low back pain patients and are similar across different cultural settings. No data on MDC and MCIC for pain severity are available for neck pain patients. The objectives of this study were to estimate MDC and MCIC for pain severity in subacute and chronic neck pain (NP) patients, to assess if MDC and MCIC values are influenced by baseline values and to explore if they are different in the subset of patients reporting referred pain, and in subacute versus chronic patients. Methods Subacute and chronic patients treated in routine clinical practice of the Spanish National Health Service for neck pain, with or without pain referred to the arm, and a pain severity ≥ 3 points on a pain intensity number rating scale (PI-NRS), were included in this study. Patients' own "global perceived effect" over a 3 month period was used as the external criterion. The minimal detectable change (MDC) was estimated by means of the standard error of measurement in patients who self-assess as unchanged. MCIC were estimated by the mean value of change score in patients who self-assess as improved (mean change score, MCS), and by the optimal cutoff point in receiver operating characteristics curves (ROC). The effect on MDC and MCIC of initial scores, duration of pain, and existence of referred pain were assessed. Results 658 patients were included, 487 of them with referred pain. MDC was 4.0 PI-NRS points for neck pain in the entire sample, 4.2 for neck pain in patients who also had referred pain, and 6.2 for referred pain. MCS was 4.1 and ROC was 1.5 for referred and for neck pain, both in the entire sample and in patients who also complained of referred pain. ROC was lower (0.5 PI-NRS points) for subacute than for chronic patients (1.5 points). MCS was higher for patients with more intense baseline pain, ranging from 2.4 to 4.9 PI-NRS for neck pain and

  7. Guidelines for delineation of lymphatic clinical target volumes for high conformal radiotherapy: head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The success of radiotherapy depends on the accurate delineation of the clinical target volume. The delineation of the lymph node regions has most impact, especially for tumors in the head and neck region. The purpose of this article was the development an atlas for the delineation of the clinical target volume for patients, who should receive radiotherapy for a tumor of the head and neck region. Literature was reviewed for localisations of the adjacent lymph node regions and their lymph drain in dependence of the tumor entity. On this basis the lymph node regions were contoured on transversal CT slices. The probability for involvement was reviewed and a recommendation for the delineation of the CTV was generated. PMID:21854585

  8. Tuberculosis of the head and neck – epidemiological and clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bruzgielewicz, Antoni; Osuch-Wójcikewicz, Ewa; Niemczyk, Kazimierz; Chmielewski, Rafał

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of our retrospective study was to review the clinical and epidemiological presentation of head and neck tuberculosis. Material and methods We analyzed the history of 73 patients with head and neck tuberculosis hospitalized in the Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Warsaw, between 1983 and 2009. Results We found that 26 (35.6%) patients presented with lymph node tuberculosis, 20 (27.4%) with laryngeal tuberculosis, 10 (13.7%) with oropharyngeal tuberculosis, 9 (12.3%) with salivary gland tuberculosis, 3 (4.1%) with tuberculosis of paranasal sinuses, 3 (4.1%) with aural tuberculosis, and 2 (2.7%) with skin tuberculosis in the head and neck region. Within the group of patients with lymph node tuberculosis in 15 cases there were infected lymph nodes of the 2nd and 3rd cervical region and in 11 infected lymph nodes of the 1st cervical region. In 5 cases of laryngeal tuberculosis there was detected coexistence of cancer. Oropharyngeal tuberculosis in 7 cases was localized in tonsils, where in 1 case coexisting cancer was diagnosed. Chest X-ray was performed in all cases and pulmonary tuberculosis was identified in 26 (35.6%) cases. Conclusions We conclude that tuberculosis still remains a problem and must be taken into consideration in the diagnostic process. The coincidence of tuberculosis and cancer is remarkable in the head and neck region. PMID:25624854

  9. Analysis of time-dose factors in clinically positive neck nodes treated with irradiation alone in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, W.M.; Million, R.R.; Bova, F.J.

    1984-05-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of time-dose factors in 139 patients with 238 evaluable clinically positive lymph nodes treated with external beam radiation therapy alone to the primary lesion and neck for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck at the University of Florida from October 1964 through April 1980. Lymph node control was also influenced by dose, overall treament time, and fractionation schedule; these factors were interrelated and appeared to increase in importance as the size of the lymph node increased.

  10. Clinical impact of cervical lymph node involvement and central neck dissection in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma: a retrospective analysis of 368 cases.

    PubMed

    Bozec, Alexandre; Dassonville, Olivier; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Poissonnet, Gilles; Sudaka, Anne; Peyrottes, Isabelle; Ettore, Francette; Haudebourg, Juliette; Bussière, Françoise; Benisvy, Danielle; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Sadoul, Jean Louis; Hofman, Paul; Lassale, Sandra; Vallicioni, Jacques; Demard, François; Santini, José

    2011-08-01

    The impact of cervical lymph node metastases and the optimal surgical management of the neck in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) remain controversial. The objectives of this retrospective study were to determine, in patients with PTC, the predictive factors and the impact on tumor recurrence rate of cervical lymph node involvement, and to evaluate the oncologic results and the morbidity of central neck dissection (CND). We reviewed the records of patients who had undergone surgical treatment for PTC at our institution between 1990 and 2000. A total of 368 patients (86 men and 282 women) were included in this study. Young age (p = 0.02), tumor size (p = 0.001) and extrathyroidal tumor extension (p = 0.003) were significant predictive factors of cervical lymph node metastatic involvement (multivariate analysis). Initial metastatic cervical lymph node involvement was identified as an independent risk factor of tumor recurrence (multivariate analysis, p = 0.01). Metastatic lymph node(s) were found in prophylactic CND specimens in 31% of the patients. CND increased the risk of postoperative hypocalcemia (p = 0.008) and of permanent hypoparathyroidism (p = 0.002). In conclusion, cervical lymph node metastatic involvement at the time of initial surgery is an independent risk factor of tumor recurrence. CND provided an up-staging of more than 30% of patients with a clinically N0 neck, but was associated with significant morbidity regarding parathyroid function.

  11. Head and neck neurovascular trauma: Clinical and angiographic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Ssenyonga, Peter Kato; Le Feuvre, David

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective review of all angiograms done for craniocervical trauma, over an eight-year period at Groote Schuur Hospital identified 61 patients out of 823 angiographically studied who had extradural vascular injury and required endovascular treatment. Multiple lesions were identified in nine (14,8%) patients and associated injuries were found in 23 patients (37%). The mechanism of injury was blunt in nine (14.8%) patients and penetrating in 52 (85.2%). There was a statistically significant correlation between the presenting clinical feature and the underlying angiographic lesion. Patients with active bleeding were more likely to have a vessel laceration, an expanding hematoma was associated with false aneurysm and a pulsatile mass with arteriovenous fistula. Endovascular treatment with emphasis on vessel occlusion rather than preservation was successful in all cases except one which required surgical vessel ligation. PMID:25934784

  12. The Role of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Clinical Stage II-III Breast Cancer Patients With pN0: A Multicenter, Retrospective Study (KROG 12-05)

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Su Jung; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Nam Kwon; Suh, Chang-Ok; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Yong Bae; Ahn, Seung Do; Kim, Su Ssan; Ha, Sung W.; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyubo; Shin, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients with pN0. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 417 clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients who achieved an ypN0 at surgery after receiving NAC between 1998 and 2009. Of these, 151 patients underwent mastectomy after NAC. The effect of PMRT on disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis including known prognostic factors using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log–rank test and Cox proportional regression analysis. Results: Of the 151 patients who underwent mastectomy, 105 (69.5%) received PMRT and 46 patients (30.5%) did not. At a median follow-up of 59 months, 5 patients (3.3%) developed LRR (8 sites of recurrence) and 14 patients (9.3%) developed distant metastasis. The 5-year DFS, LRRFS, and OS rates were 91.2, 98.1, and 93.3% with PMRT and 83.0%, 92.3%, and 89.9% without PMRT, respectively (all P values not significant). By univariate analysis, only age (≤40 vs >40 years) was significantly associated with decreased DFS (P=.027). By multivariate analysis, age (≤40 vs >40 years) and pathologic T stage (0-is vs 1 vs 2-4) were significant prognostic factors affecting DFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.353, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.135-0.928, P=.035; HR 2.223, 95% CI 1.074-4.604, P=.031, respectively). PMRT showed no correlation with a difference in DFS, LRRFS, or OS by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: PMRT might not be necessary for pN0 patients after NAC, regardless of clinical stage. Prospective randomized clinical trial data are needed to assess whether PMRT can be safely omitted in pN0 patients after NAC and mastectomy for clinical stage II-III breast cancer.

  13. HPV-Associated Head and Neck Cancer: Unique Features of Epidemiology and Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jessica H.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Ferris, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a recently identified causative agent for a subset of head and neck cancers, primarily in the oropharynx, and is largely responsible for the rising worldwide incidence of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Patients with HPV-positive OPC have distinct risk factor profiles and generally have a better prognosis than patients with traditional, HPV-negative, head and neck cancer. Concurrent chemotherapy and radiation is a widely accepted primary treatment modality for many patients with HPV-positive OPC. However, recent advances in surgical modalities, including transoral laser and robotic surgery, have led to the reemergence of primary surgical treatment for HPV-positive patients. Clinical trials are under way to determine optimal treatment strategies for the growing subset of patients with HPV-positive OPC. Similarly, identifying those patients with HPV-positive cancer who are at risk for recurrence and poor survival is critical in order to tailor individual treatment regimens and avoid potential undertreatment. PMID:26332002

  14. HPV-Associated Head and Neck Cancer: Unique Features of Epidemiology and Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Jessica H; Grandis, Jennifer R; Ferris, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a recently identified causative agent for a subset of head and neck cancers, primarily in the oropharynx, and is largely responsible for the rising worldwide incidence of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Patients with HPV-positive OPC have distinct risk factor profiles and generally have a better prognosis than patients with traditional, HPV-negative, head and neck cancer. Concurrent chemotherapy and radiation is a widely accepted primary treatment modality for many patients with HPV-positive OPC. However, recent advances in surgical modalities, including transoral laser and robotic surgery, have led to the reemergence of primary surgical treatment for HPV-positive patients. Clinical trials are under way to determine optimal treatment strategies for the growing subset of patients with HPV-positive OPC. Similarly, identifying those patients with HPV-positive cancer who are at risk for recurrence and poor survival is critical in order to tailor individual treatment regimens and avoid potential undertreatment.

  15. The role of neuroplasticity in experimental neck pain: a study of potential mechanisms impeding clinical outcomes of training.

    PubMed

    Rittig-Rasmussen, Bjarne; Kasch, Helge; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2014-08-01

    Training is a mainstay in the clinical management of neck pain, yet, effects of various training protocols are only small to moderate and improvements are required. Previous investigations of the nervous system indicate a correlation between neuroplastic adaptation to training and functional recovery. The interaction between neck pain and training thus needs further exploration. This was a randomized experimental study of the effects of experimental neck pain and training on corticomotor excitability. Healthy volunteers were randomized to training and experimental neck pain, training and no pain, and pain and no training. Primary endpoints were corticomotor excitability assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography measured as changes in amplitudes and latencies of motor evoked potentials (MEPs), recorded at baseline and after 30 min, 1 h, and 1 week. Additionally, correlations between changes in MEPs and motor learning, effects of pain and concomitant neck training on pain, muscle strength, and fatigue were investigated. Data were analyzed by repeated measurement ANOVA, paired t tests, Grubbs' outlier test and correlation coefficients. Results indicated that neck pain and training significantly enhanced the inhibition of the amplitudes of the MEPs for 1 week. The results indicate that moderate neck pain and training induce long-lasting inhibition of the corticomotor pathways. This inhibition may limit the outcome of neck training in painful conditions in contrast to pain-free training conditions.

  16. Proton Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer: A Review of the Clinical Experience to Date

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, Emma B.; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-06-01

    Proton beam radiation has been used for cancer treatment since the 1950s, but recent increasing interest in this form of therapy and the construction of hospital-based and clinic-based facilities for its delivery have greatly increased both the number of patients and the variety of tumors being treated with proton therapy. The mass of proton particles and their unique physical properties (ie, the Bragg peak) allow proton therapy to spare normal tissues distal to the tumor target from incidental irradiation. Initial observations show that proton therapy is particularly useful for treating tumors in challenging locations close to nontarget critical structures. Specifically, improvements in local control outcomes for patients with chordoma, chonodrosarcoma, and tumors in the sinonasal regions have been reported in series using proton. Improved local control and survival outcomes for patients with cancer of the head and neck region have also been seen with the advent of improvements in better imaging and multimodality therapy comprising surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. However, aggressive local therapy in the proximity of critical normal structures to tumors in the head and neck region may produce debilitating early and late toxic effects. Great interest has been expressed in evaluating whether proton therapy can improve outcomes, especially early and late toxicity, when used in the treatment of head and neck malignancies. This review summarizes the progress made to date in addressing this question.

  17. Spine and Pain Clinics Serving North Carolina Patients With Back and Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Castel, Liana D.; Freburger, Janet K.; Holmes, George M.; Scheinman, Rachael P.; Jackman, Anne M.; Carey, Timothy S.

    2009-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional survey. Objective Our primary objective was to describe spine and pain clinics serving North Carolina residents with respect to organizational characteristics. Our secondary objective was to assess the multidisciplinary nature of the clinics surveyed. Summary of Background Data Pain clinics have become common in the United States, and patients with chronic back pain have increasingly been seeking services at these clinics. Little is known about the organizational characteristics of spine and pain clinics. Methods We identified and surveyed spine and pain clinics serving North Carolina residents with chronic back and neck pain. Practice managers at 46 clinics completed a 20-minute questionnaire about the characteristics of their clinic, including providers on staff and services offered. Descriptive and exploratory analyses were conducted to summarize the data. Several variables were constructed to assess the multidisciplinary nature of the clinics. Results The response rate was 75%. There was marked heterogeneity among the clinics surveyed. Fifty-nine percent of practices were free-standing (n = 27) and 61% were physician-owned (n = 28). Twenty-five clinics (54%) had an anesthesiologist. Other common physician providers were physiatrists and surgeons. Less than one third of sites had mental health providers (n = 12; 26%); only 26% employed physical therapists. Seventy-six percent of sites offered epidural injections, 74% long-term narcotic prescriptions, and 67% antidepressants. The majority of clinics (30 of 33) prescribing narcotics provided monitoring of therapy using periodic urine toxicology testing. Forty-eight percent of sites (n = 22) offered exercise instruction. Few clinics were multidisciplinary in nature. Only 3 (7%) met the criteria of having a medical physician, registered nurse, physical therapist, and mental health specialist. Conclusion Clinics varied widely in their organizational characteristics, including providers

  18. Clinical implementation of intraoperative cone-beam CT in head and neck surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Barker, E.; Bachar, G.; Dixon, B. J.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    A prototype mobile C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been translated to a prospective clinical trial in head and neck surgery. The flat-panel CBCT C-arm was developed in collaboration with Siemens Healthcare, and demonstrates both sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility at low radiation dose (e.g., <1/5th of a typical diagnostic head CT). CBCT images are available ~15 seconds after scan completion (~1 min acquisition) and reviewed at bedside using custom 3D visualization software based on the open-source Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). The CBCT C-arm has been successfully deployed in 15 head and neck cases and streamlined into the surgical environment using human factors engineering methods and expert feedback from surgeons, nurses, and anesthetists. Intraoperative imaging is implemented in a manner that maintains operating field sterility, reduces image artifacts (e.g., carbon fiber OR table) and minimizes radiation exposure. Image reviews conducted with surgical staff indicate bony detail and soft-tissue visualization sufficient for intraoperative guidance, with additional artifact management (e.g., metal, scatter) promising further improvements. Clinical trial deployment suggests a role for intraoperative CBCT in guiding complex head and neck surgical tasks, including planning mandible and maxilla resection margins, guiding subcranial and endonasal approaches to skull base tumours, and verifying maxillofacial reconstruction alignment. Ongoing translational research into complimentary image-guidance subsystems include novel methods for real-time tool tracking, fusion of endoscopic video and CBCT, and deformable registration of preoperative volumes and planning contours with intraoperative CBCT.

  19. Determining optimal clinical target volume margins in head-and-neck cancer based on microscopic extracapsular extension of metastatic neck nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Elliott, Danielle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Asper, Joshua A. P.A.; Blanco, Angel; Ang, K. Kian; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David; Weber, Randal S.; Chao, K.S. Clifford . E-mail: cchao@mdanderson.org

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimal clinical target volume margins around the gross nodal tumor volume in head-and-neck cancer by assessing microscopic tumor extension beyond cervical lymph node capsules. Methods and Materials: Histologic sections of 96 dissected cervical lymph nodes with extracapsular extension (ECE) from 48 patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma were examined. The maximum linear distance from the external capsule border to the farthest extent of the tumor or tumoral reaction was measured. The trends of ECE as a function of the distance from the capsule and lymph node size were analyzed. Results: The median diameter of all lymph nodes was 11.0 mm (range: 3.0-30.0 mm). The mean and median ECE extent was 2.2 mm and 1.6 mm, respectively (range: 0.4-9.0 mm). The ECE was <5 mm from the capsule in 96% of the nodes. As the distance from the capsule increased, the probability of tumor extension declined. No significant difference between the extent of ECE and lymph node size was observed. Conclusion: For N1 nodes that are at high risk for ECE but not grossly infiltrating musculature, 1 cm clinical target volume margins around the nodal gross tumor volume are recommended to cover microscopic nodal extension in head-and-neck cancer.

  20. ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME AND COMPLICATIONS OF TALAR NECK FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Leonardo Ribeiro; Ferreira, Ricardo Cardenuto; Mercadante, Marcelo Tomanik

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical, functional and radiographic results from talar neck fractures in patients treated at the Foot and Ankle Surgery Group of Santa Casa de Sao Paulo. Method: We evaluated 20 patients. The mean follow-up time was 71 months. One fracture was classified as Hawkins Type I, 12 as Hawkins type II, five as Hawkins type III, two as Hawkins type IV and four fractures were open. Results: One patient was treated conservatively, 16 were treated with open reduction and internal fixation (three with primary subtalar arthrodesis), one was treated with talectomy and two with tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis. The reduction obtained was anatomical in seven feet, acceptable in six feet and poor in four. Seven patients had early complications. There was one case of delayed consolidation and four of talar body osteonecrosis. Four patients required secondary reconstruction procedures. No significant radiographic impairment of the ankle joint was found in 62% of the patients and of the subtalar joint in 25%. Of the patients who did not undergo secondary procedures, 81% complained about the treated foot, 37.5% showed some deformity, 44% presented diminished sensitivity and 50% had to retire from work. The mean loss of motion in the ankle was 49%, and in the subtalar joint, 80%. The average AOFAS score was 73 points. Conclusion: Talar neck fractures are associated with high rates of clinical, functional and radiographic complications. PMID:27022565

  1. The intra- and inter-rater reliability of five clinical muscle performance tests in patients with and without neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigates the reliability of muscle performance tests using cost- and time-effective methods similar to those used in clinical practice. When conducting reliability studies, great effort goes into standardising test procedures to facilitate a stable outcome. Therefore, several test trials are often performed. However, when muscle performance tests are applied in the clinical setting, clinicians often only conduct a muscle performance test once as repeated testing may produce fatigue and pain, thus variation in test results. We aimed to investigate whether cervical muscle performance tests, which have shown promising psychometric properties, would remain reliable when examined under conditions similar to those of daily clinical practice. Methods The intra-rater (between-day) and inter-rater (within-day) reliability was assessed for five cervical muscle performance tests in patients with (n = 33) and without neck pain (n = 30). The five tests were joint position error, the cranio-cervical flexion test, the neck flexor muscle endurance test performed in supine and in a 45°-upright position and a new neck extensor test. Results Intra-rater reliability ranged from moderate to almost perfect agreement for joint position error (ICC ≥ 0.48-0.82), the cranio-cervical flexion test (ICC ≥ 0.69), the neck flexor muscle endurance test performed in supine (ICC ≥ 0.68) and in a 45°-upright position (ICC ≥ 0.41) with the exception of a new test (neck extensor test), which ranged from slight to moderate agreement (ICC = 0.14-0.41). Likewise, inter-rater reliability ranged from moderate to almost perfect agreement for joint position error (ICC ≥ 0.51-0.75), the cranio-cervical flexion test (ICC ≥ 0.85), the neck flexor muscle endurance test performed in supine (ICC ≥ 0.70) and in a 45°-upright position (ICC ≥ 0.56). However, only slight to fair agreement was found for the neck extensor test (ICC

  2. Surgical anatomy of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve and its clinical significance in head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Kochilas, Xenophon; Bibas, Athanasios; Xenellis, John; Anagnostopoulou, Sofia

    2008-03-01

    Injury of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) increases the morbidity following a variety of neck procedures and can have catastrophic consequences in people who use their voice professionally. Identification and preservation of the EBSLN are thus important in thyroidectomy, parathyroidectomy, carotid endarterectomy, and anterior cervical spine procedures, where the nerve is at risk. There are large variations in the anatomical course of the EBSLN, which makes the intraoperative identification of the nerve challenging. The topographic relationship of the EBSLN to the superior thyroid artery and the upper pole of the thyroid gland are considered by many authors to be the key point for identifying the nerve during surgery of the neck. The classifications by Cernea et al. ([1992a] Head Neck 14:380-383; [1992b] Am. J. Surg. 164:634-639) and by Kierner et al. ([1998] Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg. 124:301-303), as well as clinically important connections are discussed in detail. Along with sound anatomical knowledge, neuromonitoring is helpful in identifying the EBSLN during neck procedures. The clinical signs of EBSLN injury include hoarseness, decreased voice projection, decreased pitch range, and fatigue after extensive voice use. Videostroboscopy, electromyography, voice analysis, and electroglottography can provide crucial information on the function of the EBSLN following neck surgery.

  3. Exploring integrative medicine for back and neck pain - a pragmatic randomised clinical pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, Tobias; Petzold, Max; Wändell, Per; Rydén, Anna; Falkenberg, Torkel

    2009-01-01

    Background A model for integrative medicine (IM) adapted to Swedish primary care was previously developed. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of a pragmatic randomised clinical trial to investigate the effectiveness of the IM model versus conventional primary care in the management of patients with non-specific back/neck pain. Specific objectives included the exploration of recruitment and retention rates, patient and care characteristics, clinical differences and effect sizes between groups, selected outcome measures and power calculations to inform the basis of a full-scale trial. Methods Eighty patients with back/neck pain of at least two weeks duration were randomised to the two types of care. Outcome measures were standardised health related quality of life (the eight domains of SF-36) complemented by a set of exploratory "IM tailored" outcomes targeting self-rated disability, stress and well-being (0-10 scales); days in pain (0-14); and the use of analgesics and health care over the last two weeks (yes/no). Data on clinical management were derived from medical records. Outcome changes from baseline to follow-up after 16 weeks were used to explore the differences between the groups. Results Seventy-five percent (80/107) of screened patients in general practice were eligible and feasible to enrol into the trial. Eighty-two percent (36/44) of the integrative and 75% (27/36) of the conventional care group completed follow-up after 16 weeks. Most patients had back/neck pain of at least three months duration. Conventional care typically comprised advice and prescription of analgesics, occasionally complemented with sick leave or a written referral to physiotherapy. IM care generally integrated seven treatment sessions from two different types of complementary therapies with conventional care over ten weeks. The study was underpowered to detect any statistically significant differences between the groups. One SF-36 domain showed a clinically

  4. Association between injury to the retinacula of Weitbrecht and femoral neck fractures: anatomical and clinical observations

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Jiong; Ni, Ming; Wang, Guoliang; Jia, Guangyao; Liu, Shiwei; Cui, Xueliang; Jiang, Chao; Wang, Hua; Dai, Yahui; Quan, Kun; Chen, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no objective indicator for surgical procedures in elderly patients with femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to determine the severity of damage to the retinacula of Weitbrecht based on the type of femoral neck fracture, anatomical and clinical observations. Data from 44 patients treated with artificial femoral head replacement were analyzed for the association between Garden type fracture and severity of injury to Weitbrecht’s retinacula. Additionally, 18 cases (Pauwels type III fracture) after Watson-Jones surgical approach and internal fixations were used to investigate the bone healing and femoral head necrosis. Among 44 patients (Garden type was III-IV, 79.6%), significant associations were found between Garden type fracture and lateral (P < 0.001), anterior (P = 0.045), and medial (P = 0.004) retinacular injury. Significant positive Spearman correlation coefficients between Garden type and the severity of injury to Weitbrecht’s retinacula were Ρ = 0.561 with P < 0.001 for lateral, Ρ = 0.338 with P = 0.025 for anterior, and Ρ = 0.469 with P = 0.001 for medial retinacula. Additionally, 4 out of 18 Pauwels type III fracture cases were observed severe damages on Weitbrecht’s retinacula and resulting bone necrosis. In conclusion, this study provided the anatomical and histological correlations between fracture displacement and degree of retinacula injury. PMID:26770357

  5. Clinical experience transitioning from IMRT to VMAT for head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Studenski, Matthew T.; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Siglin, Joshua; Cognetti, David; Curry, Joseph; Tuluc, Madalina; Harrison, Amy S.

    2013-07-01

    To quantify clinical differences for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in terms of dosimetric endpoints and planning and delivery time, twenty head and neck cancer patients have been considered for VMAT using Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan delivered via an Elekta linear accelerator. Differences in planning time between IMRT and VMAT were estimated accounting for both optimization and calculation. The average delivery time per patient was obtained retrospectively using the record and verify software. For the dosimetric comparison, all contoured organs at risk (OARs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were evaluated. Of the 20 cases considered, 14 had VMAT plans approved. Six VMAT plans were rejected due to unacceptable dose to OARs. In terms of optimization time, there was minimal difference between the two modalities. The dose calculation time was significantly longer for VMAT, 4 minutes per 358 degree arc versus 2 minutes for an entire IMRT plan. The overall delivery time was reduced by 9.2 ± 3.9 minutes for VMAT (51.4 ± 15.6%). For the dosimetric comparison of the 14 clinically acceptable plans, there was almost no statistical difference between the VMAT and IMRT. There was also a reduction in monitor units of approximately 32% from IMRT to VMAT with both modalities demonstrating comparable quality assurance results. VMAT provides comparable coverage of target volumes while sparing OARs for the majority of head and neck cases. In cases where high dose modulation was required for OARs, a clinically acceptable plan was only achievable with IMRT. Due to the long calculation times, VMAT plans can cause delays during planning but marked improvements in delivery time reduce patient treatment times and the risk of intra-fraction motion.

  6. A Clinical Concept for Interfractional Adaptive Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Alexandra D.; Nill, Simeon; Huber, Peter E.; Bendl, Rolf; Debus, Juergen; Muenter, Marc W.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. Methods and Materials: In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006-2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Results: Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. Conclusion: To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online

  7. T1N0 to T2N0 Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Glottic Larynx Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To report the treatment outcomes of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for early-stage squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) of the glottic larynx. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 585 patients with T1N0 to T2N0 invasive SCCA of the glottic larynx treated between 1964 and 2006 with RT alone. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up, had histologic diagnosis of invasive SCCA, and received continuous-course RT. None of these patients received chemotherapy or had elective nodal RT. The probabilities of local control (LC), ultimate LC, ultimate LC with larynx preservation, neck control, cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Results: The median follow-up for survivors was 12 years. Five-year LC rates were as follows: T1A, 94%; T1B, 93%; T2A, 80%; and T2B, 70%. Multivariate analysis revealed that overall treatment time greater than 41 days (p = 0.001) and poorly differentiated histology (p = 0.016) adversely affected LC. Five-year rates of ultimate LC with laryngeal preservation were: T1A, 95%; T1B, 94%, T2A, 81%; and T2B, 74%. Twenty-four (4%) of 585 patients failed in the neck; only 7 neck failures (1%) were isolated. Five-year CSS and OS rates were as follows: T1A, 97% and 82%; T1B, 99% and 83%; T2A, 94% and 76%; and T2B, 90% and 78%, respectively. Ten (1.7%) patients had severe and/or fatal complications. One patient died of a radiation-induced carotid artery angiosarcoma. Conclusion: Based on our study results, RT cures a high proportion of patients with T1N0 to T2N0 glottic SCCAs and has a low rate of severe complications.

  8. Midterm results of a femoral stem with a modular neck design: clinical outcomes and metal ion analysis.

    PubMed

    Silverton, Craig D; Jacobs, Joshua J; Devitt, Jeffrey W; Cooper, H John

    2014-09-01

    Modular neck femoral stems have a higher-than-anticipated rate of failure in registry results, but large single-center cohort studies are lacking. This is a retrospective cohort of 152 hips implanted with a single titanium stem with a modular titanium neck, presenting clinical, radiographic, and metal ion results at a mean 4.5-year follow-up. Five hips were revised during the study period, for an overall Kaplan-Meier survival of 0.894 at 8 years. There was one modular neck fracture (0.66%), but others demonstrated corrosion or adverse tissue reaction. Serum metal levels demonstrated wide variability. Despite good clinical results in the majority of patients, we confirmed an increased rate of femoral revision at mid-term follow-up, and therefore urge caution in the use of this particular stem design.

  9. Interactive cervical motion kinematics: sensitivity, specificity and clinically significant values for identifying kinematic impairments in patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Sarig Bahat, Hilla; Chen, Xiaoqi; Reznik, David; Kodesh, Einat; Treleaven, Julia

    2015-04-01

    Chronic neck pain has been consistently shown to be associated with impaired kinematic control including reduced range, velocity and smoothness of cervical motion, that seem relevant to daily function as in quick neck motion in response to surrounding stimuli. The objectives of this study were: to compare interactive cervical kinematics in patients with neck pain and controls; to explore the new measures of cervical motion accuracy; and to find the sensitivity, specificity, and optimal cutoff values for defining impaired kinematics in those with neck pain. In this cross-section study, 33 patients with chronic neck pain and 22 asymptomatic controls were assessed for their cervical kinematic control using interactive virtual reality hardware and customized software utilizing a head mounted display with built-in head tracking. Outcome measures included peak and mean velocity, smoothness (represented by number of velocity peaks (NVP)), symmetry (represented by time to peak velocity percentage (TTPP)), and accuracy of cervical motion. Results demonstrated significant and strong effect-size differences in peak and mean velocities, NVP and TTPP in all directions excluding TTPP in left rotation, and good effect-size group differences in 5/8 accuracy measures. Regression results emphasized the high clinical value of neck motion velocity, with very high sensitivity and specificity (85%-100%), followed by motion smoothness, symmetry and accuracy. These finding suggest cervical kinematics should be evaluated clinically, and screened by the provided cut off values for identification of relevant impairments in those with neck pain. Such identification of presence or absence of kinematic impairments may direct treatment strategies and additional evaluation when needed.

  10. Portrait of a process: arts-based research in a head and neck cancer clinic.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Mark A; Lydiatt, William M; Aita, Virginia A; Robbins, Regina E; McNeilly, Dennis P; Desmarais, Michele Marie

    2016-03-01

    The role of art in medicine is complex, varied and uncertain. To examine one aspect of the relationship between art and medicine, investigators analysed the interactions between a professional artist and five adult patients with head and neck cancer as they cocreated portraits in a clinical setting. The artist and four members of an interdisciplinary team analysed the portraits as well as journal entries, transcripts of portrait sessions and semistructured interviews. Over the course of 5 months, 24 artworks evolved from sittings that allowed both the patients and the artist to collaborate around stories of illness, suffering and recovery. Using narrative inquiry and qualitative arts-based research techniques five emergent themes were identified: embracing uncertainties; developing trusting relationships; engaging in reflective practices; creating shared stories; and empowerment. Similar themes are found in successful physician-patient relationships. This paper will discuss these findings and potential implications for healthcare and medical education.

  11. Phase I clinical study of vascular targeting fluorescent cationic liposomes in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Strieth, Sebastian; Dunau, Christoph; Kolbow, Kristina; Knuechel, Ruth; Michaelis, Uwe; Ledderose, Hannelore; Eichhorn, Martin E; Strelczyk, Donata; Tschiesner, Uta; Wollenberg, Barbara; Dellian, Marc

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this first-time-in-human non-randomized dose-escalating prospective phase I clinical trial was to analyze safety of two doses of fluorescent rhodamine-labeled cationic liposomes (LDF01) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients had resectable UICC stadium I-IV A HNSCCs. LDF01 was administered before tumor resection under general anesthesia as an intravenous infusion with effective lipid doses of 0.5 or 2 mg/kg b.w., respectively. In addition to clinical monitoring for safety assessment, tumor biopsies were taken during the surgical procedure for fluorescence histological analysis. Eight patients were assigned to the two dose groups. During safety follow-up no clinically relevant adverse events occurred. Fluorescence histology revealed some evidence of favorable selectivity of LDF01 for tumor microvessels in the high-dose group. LDF01 is safe applied as infusion at both tested dose levels. Furthermore, LDF01 can be detected in the vicinity of tumor cells and could be assigned to the microvessel target in individual HNSSC cases. Detailed analysis of targeting properties of LDF01 has to be performed in upcoming clinical phase II trials.

  12. Browser Based Platform in Maintaining Clinical Activities - Use of The iPads in Head and Neck Clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. Y.; Moore, J.; Quon, H.; Evans, K.; Sharabi, A.; Herman, J.; Hacker-Prietz, A.; McNutt, T.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Incompatibility between documentation and clinical workflow causes physician resistance in organized data collection, which in turn complicates the use of data in patient care improvement. To resolve the gap, we developed an iPad compatible in situ browser-based platform that integrates clinical activity with data collection and analysis presentation. The ability to perform in-clinic activities and monitor decision making using the iPad was evaluated. Methods: A browser-based platform that can exchange and present analysed data from the MOSAIQ database was developed in situ, the iPads were distributed in head and neck clinics to present the browser for clinical activities, data collection and assessment monitoring. Performance of the iPads for in-clinic activities was observed. Results: All in-clinic documentation activities can be performed without workstation computers. Accessing patient record and previous assessments was significantly faster without having to open the MOSAIQ application. Patient assessments can be completed with the physician facing the patient. Graphical presentation of toxicity progression and patient radiation plans to the patient can be performed in single interface without patient leaving the seating area. Updates in patient treatment status and medical history were presented in real time without having to move paper charts around. Conclusions: The iPad can be used in clinical activities independent of computer workstations. Improvements in clinical workflow can be critical in reducing physician resistance in data maintenance. Using the iPad in providing real-time quality monitoring is intuitive to both providers and patients.

  13. Immunotherapy of head and neck cancer: Emerging clinical trials from a National Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Steering Committee Planning Meeting.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Julie E; Cohen, Ezra; Ferris, Robert L; Adelstein, David J; Brizel, David M; Ridge, John A; O'Sullivan, Brian; Burtness, Barbara A; Butterfield, Lisa H; Carson, William E; Disis, Mary L; Fox, Bernard A; Gajewski, Thomas F; Gillison, Maura L; Hodge, James W; Le, Quynh-Thu; Raben, David; Strome, Scott E; Lynn, Jean; Malik, Shakun

    2017-04-01

    Recent advances have permitted successful therapeutic targeting of the immune system in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). These new immunotherapeutic targets and agents are being rapidly adopted by the oncologic community and hold considerable promise. The National Cancer Institute sponsored a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting to address the issue of how to further investigate the use of immunotherapy in patients with HNSCC. The goals of the meeting were to consider phase 2 or 3 trial designs primarily in 3 different patient populations: those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-initiated oropharyngeal cancers; those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-negative HNSCC; and those with recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. In addition, a separate committee was formed to develop integrative biomarkers for the clinical trials. The meeting started with an overview of key immune components and principles related to HNSCC, including immunosurveillance and immune escape. Four clinical trial concepts were developed at the meeting integrating different immunotherapies with existing standards of care. These designs were presented for implementation by the head and neck committees of the National Cancer Institute-funded National Clinical Trials Network. This article summarizes the proceedings of this Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, the purpose of which was to facilitate the rigorous development and design of randomized phase 2 and 3 immunotherapeutic trials in patients with HNSCC. Although reviews usually are published immediately after the meeting is held, this report is unique because there are now tangible clinical trial designs that have been funded and put into practice and the studies are being activated to accrual. Cancer 2017;123:1259-1271. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  14. Clinical signs and physical function in neck and upper extremities among elderly female computer users: the NEW study.

    PubMed

    Juul-Kristensen, B; Kadefors, R; Hansen, K; Byström, P; Sandsjö, L; Sjøgaard, G

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to present the prevalence of clinical signs and symptoms among female computer users above 45 years, both in a group with self-reported neck/shoulder trouble (NS cases) and in a group without such trouble (NS controls). The hypothesis was that computer users with self-reported neck/shoulder trouble have more clinical findings than those not reporting trouble, and that a corresponding pattern holds true for physical function. In total 42 and 61 questionnaire-defined NS cases and NS controls participated and went through a clinical examination of the neck and upper extremities and five physical function tests: maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of shoulder elevation, abduction, and handgrip, as well as endurance at 30% MVC shoulder elevation and a physical performance test. Based on clinical signs and symptoms, trapezius myalgia (38%), tension neck syndrome (17%) and cervicalgia (17%) were the most frequent diagnoses among NS cases, and were significantly more frequent among NS cases than NS controls. A total of 60% of the subjects with reported trouble had one or several of the diagnoses located in the neck/shoulder. Physical function of the shoulder was lower in subjects with self-reported trouble as well as in the subgroup of NS cases with clinical diagnoses. In conclusion, the present clinical diagnoses and physical function tests differed between NS cases and NS controls, and are therefore recommended to be included as quantitative objective measures in assessing musculoskeletal health. Physical function tests should be further developed in order to be able to detect pre-stages of work-related disorders for preventive strategies.

  15. A comparison of the clinical usefulness of neck circumference and waist circumference in individuals with severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Assyov, Yavor; Gateva, Antoaneta; Tsakova, Adelina; Kamenov, Zdravko

    2017-02-01

    Purpose/Aim: Neck circumference (NC) is an emerging anthropometric parameter that has been proposed to reflect metabolic health. The aim of the current study was to compare its clinical usefulness to waist circumference (WC) in the assessment of individuals with severe obesity.

  16. Clinical phase I/II research on ultrasound thermo-chemotherapy in oral and maxillofacial-head and neck carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Guofeng; Ren, Guoxin; Guo, Wei; Chen, Yazhu

    2012-11-01

    The principle of a ultrasound thermo-chemotherapy instrument and the clinical phase I/II research on short-term and long-term therapeutic effect and main side-effect of ultrasound hyperthermia combined with chemotherapy in oral and maxillofacial-head & neck carcinoma by the instrument will be presented in this paper.

  17. Validity and test re-test reliability of the neck disability index in the Nigerian clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Odole, A C; Adegoke, B O A; Akomas, N C

    2011-06-01

    The neck disability index (NDI) is a valid and widely used clinical instrument, which enjoys the recommendation of the World Health Organization for outcome assessment in neck pain. Its psychometric properties have not been investigated in the Nigerian clinical setting. This study investigated the content validity and test-retest reliability of the NDI in order to encourage its integration in the Nigerian clinical setting. Content validity of NDI was assessed through an expert panel review for content relevance/coverage and pretesting. Thirty two subjects with neck pain, recruited through a purposive sampling technique participated in the study. The NDI was administered twice within 48 hours interval. Data were summarized in percentages. Intra class correlation coefficient was used to analyze data for test-retest reliability with alpha set at 0.05. Participants were 1 males, 21 females with a majority within age group 38-57. Twenty four (75%) participants had mild to moderate disability, 7 (21.9%) had severe to complete disability and one individual had no disability. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.969, P=0.01) between the scores obtained from the first administration of the NDI and the second administration. The NDI is a valid and reliable outcome measure and it is recommended for integration into the assessment of neck pain in the Nigerian clinical setting.

  18. Site-Dependent Reference Point Microindentation Complements Clinical Measures for Improved Fracture Risk Assessment at the Human Femoral Neck.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Thomas; Coutts, Louise V; D'Angelo, Stefania; Dunlop, Douglas G; Oreffo, Richard O C; Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas C; Thurner, Phillipp J

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to traditional approaches to fracture risk assessment using clinical risk factors and bone mineral density (BMD), a new technique, reference point microindentation (RPI), permits direct assessment of bone quality; in vivo tibial RPI measurements appear to discriminate patients with a fragility fracture from controls. However, it is unclear how this relates to the site of the most clinically devastating fracture, the femoral neck, and whether RPI provides information complementary to that from existing assessments. Femoral neck samples were collected at surgery after low-trauma hip fracture (n = 46; 17 male; aged 83 [interquartile range 77-87] years) and compared, using RPI (Biodent Hfc), with 16 cadaveric control samples, free from bone disease (7 male; aged 65 [IQR 61-74] years). A subset of fracture patients returned for dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) assessment (Hologic Discovery) and, for the controls, a micro-computed tomography setup (HMX, Nikon) was used to replicate DXA scans. The indentation depth was greater in femoral neck samples from osteoporotic fracture patients than controls (p < 0.001), which persisted with adjustment for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and height (p < 0.001) but was site-dependent, being less pronounced in the inferomedial region. RPI demonstrated good discrimination between fracture and controls using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.79 to 0.89), and a model combining RPI to clinical risk factors or BMD performed better than the individual components (AUC = 0.88 to 0.99). In conclusion, RPI at the femoral neck discriminated fracture cases from controls independent of BMD and traditional risk factors but dependent on location. The clinical RPI device may, therefore, supplement risk assessment and requires testing in prospective cohorts and comparison between the clinically accessible tibia and the femoral neck. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral

  19. A comparison of clinically utilized human papillomavirus detection methods in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Brandwein-Gensler, Margaret; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Li, Maomi; Dunne, Anne; Kawachi, Nicole; Smith, Richard V.; Burk, Robert D.; Prystowsky, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    less accurate for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma on tissue microarrays than p16 immuno-histochemistry. Further testing is warranted before these assays should be recommended for clinical human papillomavirus detection. PMID:21572401

  20. Rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Clinical results in 178 advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.D.; Demange, L.; Froissart, D.; Panis, X.; Loirette, M.

    1985-07-01

    The authors present a series of 178 patients with Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated by rapid irradiation using multiple and small fractions per day. An initial group of 91 patients (G1) received a total dose of 72 Gy in 80 sessions and 10 days, according to the following split course schedule: J1 to J5, 36 Gy in 40 sessions, eight daily fractions of .9 Gy separated by 2 hours; J6 to J20, rest period; J21 to J25, same as in J1 except that the spinal cord was shielded. This protocol was altered for the following 87 patients (G2) by lessening the total dose to 60 to 66 Gy and the number of fractions to 60. The rest period was lengthened to 4 weeks. All patients but five completed the whole program and the minimal follow-up period was 24 months. At the end of irradiation, 121 patients achieved a total remission, but local recurrences occurred in 56%. Moreover, acute intolerance was considered as severe in 34% of G1 patients, and included extensive mucosal necrosis and bleeding. Although this rate was significantly reduced in G2 patients, late complications were observed in 20 of the 25 survivors, and included trismus, cervical sclerosis, and recurrent laryngeal edema. The crude survival rate is 13% at 2 years. Although this study was not randomized, this particular type of accelerated and hyperfractionated combination of irradiation did not really improve the clinical results in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck. Other schedules and probably other tumors, less extended, should be tested.

  1. Clinical impact of surveillance for head and neck cancer in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Yano, Tomonori; Yoda, Yusuke; Oono, Yasuhiro; Ikematsu, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the clinical impact of surveillance for head and neck (HN) region with narrow band imaging (NBI) in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS Since 2006, we introduced the surveillance for HN region using NBI for all patients with ESCC before treatment, and each follow-up. The patients with newly diagnosed stage I to III ESCC were enrolled and classified into two groups as follows: Group A (no surveillance for HN region); between 1992 and 2000), and Group B (surveillance for HN region with NBI; between 2006 and 2008). We comparatively evaluated the detection rate of superficial head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and the serious events due to metachronous advanced HNSCC during the follow-up. RESULTS A total 561 patients (group A: 254, group B: 307) were enrolled. Synchronous superficial HNSCC was detected in 1 patient (0.3%) in group A, and in 12 (3.9%) in group B (P = 0.008). During the follow up period, metachronous HNSCC were detected in 10 patients (3.9%) in group A and in 30 patients (9.8%) in group B (P = 0.008). All metachronous lesions in group B were early stage, and 26 patients underwent local resection, however, 6 of 10 patients (60%) in group A lost their laryngeal function and died with metachronous HNSCC. CONCLUSION Surveillance for the HN region by using NBI endoscopy increase the detection rate of early HNSCC in patients with ESCC, and led to decrease serious events related to advanced metachronous HNSCC. PMID:28246479

  2. Management of the neck in maxillary sinus carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Laura; Shah, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review To discuss and review the role for elective treatment of the neck in maxillary squamous cell carcinoma. Improvements in survival have been seen due to improved local therapies and control, therefore the treatment of the neck has become a topic of debate. Recent findings The risk of occult metastases in neck nodes is higher for T 3-4 tumors. The rate of nodal relapse in the N0 neck without elective treatment is 8-15%. With elective irradiation the nodal relapse rate decreases. However, most nodal relapses are accompanied by local failure or distant disease. Local failure remains the most common site of failure and cause of death in this patient population. Summary Treatment failure occurs overall in 62% of all patients, with local recurrence by far the most common site of treatment failure which is rarely amenable to salvage therapy. Therefore elective neck irradiation is not routinely indicated in the clinically N0 neck; those who recur only in the neck can be surgically salvaged more than 50% of the time. PMID:25692625

  3. Impact of Node Negative Target Volume Delineation on Contralateral Parotid Gland Dose Sparing Using IMRT in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, William J; Urban, Erich; Bayliss, R Adam; Harari, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    There is considerable practice variation in treatment of the node negative (N0) contralateral neck in patients with head and neck cancer. In this study, we examined the impact of N0 neck target delineation volume on radiation dose to the contralateral parotid gland. Following institutional review board approval, 12 patients with head and neck cancer were studied. All had indications for treatment of the N0 neck, such as midline base of tongue or soft palate extension or advanced ipsilateral nodal disease. The N0 neck volumes were created using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group head and neck contouring atlas. The physician-drawn N0 neck clinical target volume (CTV) was expanded by 25% to 200% to generate volume variation, followed by a 3-mm planning target volume (PTV) expansion. Surrounding organs at risk were contoured and complete intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were generated for each N0 volume expansion. The median N0 target volume drawn by the radiation oncologist measured 93 cm(3) (range 71-145). Volumetric expansion of the N0 CTV by 25% to 200% increased the resultant mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland by 1.4 to 8.5 Gray (Gy). For example, a 4.1-mm increase in the N0 neck CTV translated to a 2.0-Gy dose increase to the parotid, 7.4 mm to a 4.5 Gy dose increase, and 12.5 mm to an 8.5 Gy dose increase, respectively. The treatment volume designated for the N0 neck has profound impact on resultant dose to the contralateral parotid gland. Variations of up to 15 mm are routine across physicians in target contouring, reflecting individual preference and training expertise. Depending on the availability of immobilization and image guidance techniques, experts commonly recommend 3 to 10 mm margin expansions to generate the PTV. Careful attention to the original volume of the N0 neck CTV, as well as expansion margins, is important in achieving effective contralateral gland sparing to reduce the resultant xerostomia and dysguesia that may ensue

  4. Robust Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Increases Estimated Clinical Benefit in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Lisanne V.; Steenbakkers, Roel J. H. M.; ten Haken, Bennie; van der Laan, Hans Paul; van ‘t Veld, Aart A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Korevaar, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the clinical benefit of robust optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (minimax IMPT) with current photon Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and PTV-based IMPT for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. The clinical benefit is quantified in terms of both Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) and target coverage in the case of setup and range errors. Methods and Materials For 10 HNC patients, PTV-based IMRT (7 fields), minimax and PTV-based IMPT (2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 fields) plans were tested on robustness. Robust optimized plans differed from PTV-based plans in that they target the CTV and penalize possible error scenarios, instead of using the static isotropic CTV-PTV margin. Perturbed dose distributions of all plans were acquired by simulating in total 8060 setup (±3.5 mm) and range error (±3%) combinations. NTCP models for xerostomia and dysphagia were used to predict the clinical benefit of IMPT versus IMRT. Results The robustness criterion was met in the IMRT and minimax IMPT plans in all error scenarios, but this was only the case in 1 of 40 PTV-based IMPT plans. Seven (out of 10) patients had relatively large NTCP reductions in minimax IMPT plans compared to IMRT. For these patients, xerostomia and dysphagia NTCP values were reduced by 17.0% (95% CI; 13.0–21.1) and 8.1% (95% CI; 4.9–11.2) on average with minimax IMPT. Increasing the number of fields did not contribute to plan robustness, but improved organ sparing. Conclusions The estimated clinical benefit in terms of NTCP of robust optimized (minimax) IMPT is greater than that of IMRT and PTV-based IMPT in HNC patients. Furthermore, the target coverage of minimax IMPT plans in the presence of errors was comparable to IMRT plans. PMID:27030987

  5. Neck Rhabdoid Tumors: Clinical Features and Consideration of Autologous Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Adam D; Capitini, Christian M; Salamat, Shahriar M; DeSantes, Kenneth; Bradley, Kristin A; Kennedy, Tabassum; Dehner, Louis P; Patel, Neha J

    2017-04-03

    Extrarenal malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRT) have a poor prognosis despite aggressive therapy. Adding high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue (HDC-ASCR) as consolidative therapy for MRT is controversial. We describe 2 patients, age 13 years and 19 months, with unresectable neck MRT. After chemotherapy and radiotherapy, both underwent HDC-ASCR and remain in remission over 4 years later. We reviewed all published cases of neck MRT, and found poorer outcomes and more variable age of presentation and time to progression than MRT at other sites. Neck MRT may represent a higher-risk subset of MRT, and addition of HDC-ASCR merits consideration.

  6. A randomized clinical trial comparing general exercise, McKenzie treatment and a control group in patients with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Kjellman, Görel; Oberg, Birgitta

    2002-07-01

    Seventy-seven patients with neck pain in the primary health care were included in a prospective, randomized clinical trial and randomly assigned to general exercise, McKenzie treatment, or a control group. Seventy patients completed the treatment; response rate 93% at 12-month follow-up. All three groups showed significant improvement regarding the main outcomes, pain intensity and Neck Disability Index, even at 12-month follow-up, but there was no significant difference between the groups. In all, 79% reported that they were better or completely restored after treatment, although 51% reported constant/daily pain. In the McKenzie group compared with the control group, a tendency toward greater improvement was noted for pain intensity at 3 weeks and at 6-month follow-up, and for post-treatment Neck Disability Index. Significant improvement in Distress and Risk Assessment Method scores was shown in the McKenzie group only. The three groups had similar recurrence rates, although after 12 months the McKenzie group showed a tendency toward fewer visits for additional health care. The study did not provide a definite evidence of treatment efficacy in patients with neck pain, however, there was a tendency toward a better outcome with the two active alternatives compared with the control group.

  7. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy

  8. Supraclavicular artery perforator flap in management of post-burn neck reconstruction: clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, H.; Elshobaky, A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Anterior cervical contractures of the neck represent a great challenge for plastic and reconstructive surgeons. Necks can be reconstructed with a wide range of surgical techniques, including chimeric flaps, supercharged flap, pre-expanded flaps, “superthin” flaps and perforator flaps. The supraclavicular flap is easy to harvest without the need for free tissue transfer. It provides a relatively large flap for neck resurfacing with tissue very similar to that of the neck. Between January 2013 and March 2015, 20 patients suffering from postburn neck contracture underwent reconstruction with 20 unilateral supraclavicular artery perforator flaps. Nineteen patients had post-burn neck contractures (9 cases type Іc, 10 cases type Пc) while only one had post-burn granulation tissue in the neck. We harvested fifteen flaps from the right side and five from the left. Size of the reconstructed defect ranged from 23x10 to14x6, and flap size varied from 25/11 to 16/7cm. Period of follow up ranged from 27-2months (average 12.3). Nineteen flaps survived well (95% survival rate): only one was lost due to iatrogenic extensive dissection over the pedicle. Five cases showed distal superficial epidermolysis, and 2 cases showed 2 cm complete distal necrosis. All patients were managed conservatively. Our results coincide with other literature results confirming the efficacy and rich vascularity of this flap. In all cases with distal partial necrosis, flaps were 23 cm or more. We recommend that supraclavicular flaps of more than 22 cm in length are not harvested immediately and that flaps are expanded before harvesting. Expanding the supraclavicular flap increases its surface area and decreases donor site morbidity. PMID:28149252

  9. Supraclavicular artery perforator flap in management of post-burn neck reconstruction: clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Ismail, H; Elshobaky, A

    2016-09-30

    Anterior cervical contractures of the neck represent a great challenge for plastic and reconstructive surgeons. Necks can be reconstructed with a wide range of surgical techniques, including chimeric flaps, supercharged flap, pre-expanded flaps, "superthin" flaps and perforator flaps. The supraclavicular flap is easy to harvest without the need for free tissue transfer. It provides a relatively large flap for neck resurfacing with tissue very similar to that of the neck. Between January 2013 and March 2015, 20 patients suffering from postburn neck contracture underwent reconstruction with 20 unilateral supraclavicular artery perforator flaps. Nineteen patients had post-burn neck contractures (9 cases type Іc, 10 cases type Пc) while only one had post-burn granulation tissue in the neck. We harvested fifteen flaps from the right side and five from the left. Size of the reconstructed defect ranged from 23x10 to14x6, and flap size varied from 25/11 to 16/7cm. Period of follow up ranged from 27-2months (average 12.3). Nineteen flaps survived well (95% survival rate): only one was lost due to iatrogenic extensive dissection over the pedicle. Five cases showed distal superficial epidermolysis, and 2 cases showed 2 cm complete distal necrosis. All patients were managed conservatively. Our results coincide with other literature results confirming the efficacy and rich vascularity of this flap. In all cases with distal partial necrosis, flaps were 23 cm or more. We recommend that supraclavicular flaps of more than 22 cm in length are not harvested immediately and that flaps are expanded before harvesting. Expanding the supraclavicular flap increases its surface area and decreases donor site morbidity.

  10. Clinical features and outcomes of neck lymphatic metastasis in ovarian epithelial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neck lymph node metastasis (NLNM) in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is rare and treated as advanced stage cancer. However, ovarian cancer with lymphatic metastasis may manifest a different clinical course from peritoneal carcinomatosis. Methods The authors retrospectively assessed 20 patients with EOC and pathologically diagnosed as NLNM between January 2001 and December 2010. The patients were divided into two groups according to the time of NLNM identification. Statistical methods included Kaplan-Meier, log-rank, and Cox regression analysis. Results Eleven patients were diagnosed with NLNM at the same time of surgical exploration of EOC (Group A) and nine patients at cancer recurrence 43.3 months after initial surgery (Group B). In Group A, patients with tumors confined to the pelvic cavity had no recurrence or had isolated lymph node recurrence (ILNR), and survived longer than patients with abdominal tumor spreading (P = 0.0007). In Group B, 2 patients showed ILNR. The median survival time after NLNM was 42 months in Group A and 6 months in Group B (P = 0.01). Cox model demonstrated that non-serous histology, brain metastasis, and NLNM identified at cancer recurrence were major predictors for poor overall survival (Hazard ratio [HR] = 18.67, 6.93, and 4.52; P = 0.01, 0.02, and 0.04, respectively). Conclusions A subgroup of EOC patients with NLNM who presented limited pelvic cancer had much better overall survival than patients who had cancer spreading beyond the pelvic cavity or were diagnosed with NLNM at cancer recurrence. PMID:24088247

  11. Patient reported outcomes in head and neck cancer: selecting instruments for quality of life integration in clinical protocols

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Health Related Quality of Life has been used in medical research for more than twenty years, being progressively accepted during the last decade as an important patient reported outcome. Considering the multidimensional approach involved in Health Related Quality of Life assessment, instrument applicability and cultural adaptation must be tested for each population. In order to select the most appropriate instrument for Head and Neck cancer patients, two major Health Related Quality of Life specific questionnaires for Head and Neck cancer patients were compared. Conceptual differences, psychometric characteristics, scores, reliability, construct validity and sensitivity to symptomatology, tumour location, tumour size were analyzed. Methods 102 consecutive Head and Neck cancer patients completed two different Health Related Quality of Life questionnaires: EORTC QLQ-C30 and its specific head and neck module QLQ-H&N35 and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Scales (FACT-H&N). Patients completed the questionnaires, immediately before consultation as a part of the routine evaluation. Results A greater variability was always found in the EORTC QLC-C30 questionnaire's scores for all comparable domains. Both instruments revealed a good internal consistency and demonstrated to be good tools to distinguish symptomatic patients. The EORTC questionnaires still demonstrated sensitivity to distinguish T3 and T4 staging. Conceptual differences and the psychometric characteristics are discussed. Our results suggest that these two instruments assess different aspects of Health Related Quality of Life - the questionnaires should be used separately and chosen according to the study objectives and methodology. Conclusions This study emphases the importance in selecting the appropriate tool as a critical success factor in implementing routine Health Related Quality of Life assessment in clinical practice. This decision assumes particularly importance when utilization

  12. Chiropractic clinical practice guideline: evidence-based treatment of adult neck pain not due to whiplash

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Peacock, Elizabeth; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Bryans, Roland; Danis, Normand; Furlan, Andrea; Marcoux, Henri; Potter, Brock; Ruegg, Rick; Gross Stein, Janice; White, Eleanor

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the chiropractic cervical treatment of adults with acute or chronic neck pain not due to whiplash. This is a considerable health concern considered to be a priority by stakeholders, and about which the scientific information was poorly organized. OPTIONS Cervical treatments: manipulation, mobilization, ischemic pressure, clinic- and home-based exercise, traction, education, low-power laser, massage, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, pillows, pulsed electromagnetic therapy, and ultrasound. OUTCOMES The primary outcomes considered were improved (reduced and less intrusive) pain and improved (increased and easier) ranges of motion (ROM) of the adult cervical spine. EVIDENCE An “extraction” team recorded evidence from articles found by literature search teams using 4 separate literature searches, and rated it using a Table adapted from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. The searches were 1) Treatment; August, 2003, using MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, MANTIS, ICL, The Cochrane Library (includes CENTRAL), and EBSCO, identified 182 articles. 2) Risk management (adverse events); October, 2004, identified 230 articles and 2 texts. 3) Risk management (dissection); September, 2003, identified 79 articles. 4) Treatment update; a repeat of the treatment search for articles published between September, 2003 and November, 2004 inclusive identified 121 articles. VALUES To enable the search of the literature, the authors (Guidelines Development Committee [GDC]) regarded chiropractic treatment as including elements of “conservative” care in the search strategies, but not in the consideration of the range of chiropractic practice. Also, knowledge based only on clinical experience was considered less valid and reliable than good-caliber evidence, but where the caliber of the relevant evidence was low or it was non-existent, unpublished clinical experience was considered to be equivalent to

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a postoperative clinical care pathway in head and neck surgery with microvascular reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a postoperative clinical care pathway for patients undergoing major head and neck oncologic surgery with microvascular reconstruction. Methods This is a comparative trial of a prospective treatment group managed on a postoperative clinical care pathway and a historical group managed prior to pathway implementation. Effectiveness outcomes evaluated were total hospital days, return to OR, readmission to ICU and rate of pulmonary complications. Costing perspective was from the government payer. Results 118 patients were included in the study. All outcomes demonstrated that the postoperative pathway group was both more effective and less costly, and is therefore a dominant clinical intervention. The overall mean pre- and post-pathway costs are $22,733 and $16,564 per patient, respectively. The incremental cost reduction associated with the postoperative pathway was $6,169 per patient. Conclusion Implementing the postoperative clinical care pathway in patients undergoing head and neck oncologic surgery with reconstruction resulted in improved clinical outcomes and reduced costs. PMID:24351020

  14. Adaptive Planning in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancers: Single-Institution Experience and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Peter H.; Chen, Chin-Cheng; Ahn, Andrew I.; Hong, Linda; Scripes, Paola G.; Shen Jin; Lee, Chen-Chiao; Miller, Ekeni; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Anatomic changes and positional variability during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer can lead to clinically significant dosimetric changes. We report our single-institution experience using an adaptive protocol and correlate these changes with anatomic and positional changes during treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three sequential head and neck IMRT patients underwent serial computed tomography (CT) scans during their radiation course. After undergoing the planning CT scan, patients underwent planned rescans at 11, 22, and 33 fractions; a total of 89 scans with 129 unique CT plan combinations were thus analyzed. Positional variability and anatomic changes during treatment were correlated with changes in dosimetric parameters to target and avoidance structures between planning CT and subsequent scans. Results: A total of 15/23 patients (65%) benefited from adaptive planning, either due to inadequate dose to gross disease or to increased dose to organs at risk. Significant differences in primary and nodal targets (planning target volume, gross tumor volume, and clinical tumor volume), parotid, and spinal cord dosimetric parameters were noted throughout the treatment. Correlations were established between these dosimetric changes and weight loss, fraction number, multiple skin separations, and change in position of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine. Conclusions: Variations in patient positioning and anatomy changes during IMRT for head and neck cancer can affect dosimetric parameters and have wide-ranging clinical implications. The interplay between random positional variability and gradual anatomic changes requires careful clinical monitoring and frequent use of CT- based image-guided radiation therapy, which should determine variations necessitating new plans.

  15. A Retrospective Evaluation of Clinical Profile of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Nupur; Kumar, J Vijaya; Khurana, Anil; Chauhan, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Incidence of Second Primary Malignancy (SPM) after successful treatment of primary is increasing and may cause the problem for optimal treatment. Aim This study was conducted retrospectively to analyse incidence, disease free survival between malignancies, pattern of treatment and outcome. Materials and Methods Sixteen out of 22 patients of previously treated cases of head and neck cancer those develop SPM of head and neck region managed over a period of January 2012 to December 2015 in Department of Radiotherapy–II, Pt. BD Sharma PGIMS, Rohtak were analyzed retrospectively. Sixteen patients with unresectable disease were given reirradiation with external beam radiotherapy. Results Median age of presentation of first malignancy was 27 years (Ranged 26 -65 years), whereas median age was 60 years for second malignancy (range 45-71 years). All patients were smokers during first malignancy; 87.5% (14/16) had historyof smoking during second malignancy. Oropharynx (50%) was most common site of presentation of primary tumor whereas oral cavity was most common site of presentation in second primary tumor. Conclusion Incidence of Second primary head and neck tumor after successful treatment for primary Head and neck cancer are increasing due to newer treatment strategies, longer survival and follow up. Reirradiation, surgery and or chemotherapy are treatment modalities. However second primary tumor of this region are associated with poor prognosis. PMID:27891442

  16. Effects of nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy: A prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wen-Xing; Li, Wentao; Huang, Shi-Gao; Dang, Yazhang; Gao, Hongxiang

    2016-09-01

    Head and neck malignant tumors have numerous locations of the disease. After patients receive radiotherapy, their nutritional status is very poor, thus the curative effect is unsatisfactory. The aims of the present study were to investigate and analyze the nutritional status of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy (RT) in order to provide positive nutrition intervention for assisting the radiotherapy effect. A total of 40 patients with head and neck cancer were selected using a method of subjective global assessment (SGA) to assess nutritional status, including calorie intake and energy expenditure. In a randomized, controlled study, 20 patients received intensive dietary counseling and nutritional therapy (G1) and 20 received regular dietary as controls (G0) preradiotherapy and postradiotherapy. The primary endpoint was calorie intake and energy expenditure. The secondary endpoint was SGA rating with nutritional therapy. At the end of RT, energy intake showed a net increase in G1 (1,691±301 kcal) compared with that in G0 (1,066±312 kcal) (P<0.05); energy expenditure increased in G1 (1,673±279 kcal) compared with G0 (1,490±298 kcal) (P<0.05). The prevalence of severe malnutrition following radiotherapy was significantly different between the two study groups (10 patients in G0 and 4 patients in G1; P<0.05). The number of the normal malnutrition patients postRT in G0 decreased from 4 to 2 and conversely, in G1 it increased from 3 to 6 (P<0.05). In conclusion, patients with head and neck cancer were most malnutritioned, which impacted on clinical outcome. Timely nutritional intervention can effectively prevent weight loss and muscle wasting. Additionally, it may improve quality of life by decreasing the frequency of severe malnutrition.

  17. Effects of nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy: A prospective randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wen-Xing; Li, Wentao; Huang, Shi-Gao; Dang, Yazhang; Gao, Hongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck malignant tumors have numerous locations of the disease. After patients receive radiotherapy, their nutritional status is very poor, thus the curative effect is unsatisfactory. The aims of the present study were to investigate and analyze the nutritional status of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy (RT) in order to provide positive nutrition intervention for assisting the radiotherapy effect. A total of 40 patients with head and neck cancer were selected using a method of subjective global assessment (SGA) to assess nutritional status, including calorie intake and energy expenditure. In a randomized, controlled study, 20 patients received intensive dietary counseling and nutritional therapy (G1) and 20 received regular dietary as controls (G0) preradiotherapy and postradiotherapy. The primary endpoint was calorie intake and energy expenditure. The secondary endpoint was SGA rating with nutritional therapy. At the end of RT, energy intake showed a net increase in G1 (1,691±301 kcal) compared with that in G0 (1,066±312 kcal) (P<0.05); energy expenditure increased in G1 (1,673±279 kcal) compared with G0 (1,490±298 kcal) (P<0.05). The prevalence of severe malnutrition following radiotherapy was significantly different between the two study groups (10 patients in G0 and 4 patients in G1; P<0.05). The number of the normal malnutrition patients postRT in G0 decreased from 4 to 2 and conversely, in G1 it increased from 3 to 6 (P<0.05). In conclusion, patients with head and neck cancer were most malnutritioned, which impacted on clinical outcome. Timely nutritional intervention can effectively prevent weight loss and muscle wasting. Additionally, it may improve quality of life by decreasing the frequency of severe malnutrition. PMID:27588193

  18. Cervical kinematic training with and without interactive VR training for chronic neck pain - a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sarig Bahat, Hilla; Takasaki, Hiroshi; Chen, Xiaoqi; Bet-Or, Yaheli; Treleaven, Julia

    2015-02-01

    Impairments in cervical kinematics are common in patients with neck pain. A virtual reality (VR) device has potential to be effective in the management of these impairments. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of kinematic training (KT) with and without the use of an interactive VR device. In this assessor-blinded, allocation-concealed pilot clinical trial, 32 participants with chronic neck pain were randomised into the KT or kinematic plus VR training (KTVR) group. Both groups completed four to six training sessions comprising of similar KT activities such as active and quick head movements and fine head movement control and stability over five weeks. Only the KTVR group used the VR device. The primary outcome measures were neck disability index (NDI), cervical range of motion (ROM), head movement velocity and accuracy. Kinematic measures were collected using the VR system that was also used for training. Secondary measures included pain intensity, TAMPA scale of kinesiophobia, static and dynamic balance, global perceived effect and participant satisfaction. The results demonstrated significant (p < 0.05) improvements in NDI, ROM (rotation), velocity, and the step test in both groups post-intervention. At 3-month post-intervention, these improvements were mostly sustained; however there was no control group, which limits the interpretation of this. Between-group analysis showed a few specific differences including global perceived change that was greater in the KTVR group. This pilot study has provided directions and justification for future research exploring training using kinematic training and VR for those with neck pain in a larger cohort.

  19. 'Fiddler's neck'.

    PubMed

    Peachey, R D; Matthews, C N

    1978-06-01

    'Fiddler's neck' is a condition affecting violin and viola players. Although well known to musicians it is not well recognized by dermatologists. Clinically the lesions usually consist of a localized area of lichenification of the left side of the neck--just below the angle of the jaw. Pigmentation, erythema and inflammatory papules or pustules are frequently present, while severe inflammatory induration, cyst formation and scarring occur in more severely affected subjects. The aetiology of the skin changes is probably due to a combination of factors; friction giving rise to lichenification, while local pressure, shearing stress and occlusion may play a part in producing the acne-like changes and cyst formation. In addition, poor hygiene may predispose to local sepsis.

  20. Neck dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are three main types of neck dissection surgery: Radical neck dissection: All the tissue on the side of ... Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2010:chap ...

  1. Randomized clinical trial assessing whether additional massage treatments for chronic neck pain improve 12- and 26-week outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Andrea J.; Wellman, Robert D.; Cherkin, Daniel C.; Kahn, Janet R.; Sherman, Karen J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Context This is the first study to systematically evaluate the value of a longer treatment period for massage. We provide a framework of how to conceptualize an optimal dose in this challenging setting of non-pharmacological treatments. Purpose To determine the optimal dose of massage for neck pain. Study Design/Setting Two-phase randomized trial for persons with chronic non-specific neck pain. Primary randomization to one of 5 groups receiving 4 weeks of massage (30 minutes 2×/ or 3×/week or 60 minutes 1×, 2×, or 3×/week). Booster randomization of participants to receive an additional 6 massages, 60 minute 1×/week, or no additional massage. Patient Sample 179 participants from Group Health and the general population of Seattle, WA USA recruited between June 2010 and August 2011. Outcome Measures Primary outcomes self-reported neck-related dysfunction (Neck Disability Index) and pain (0–10 scale) were assessed at baseline, 12, and 26 weeks. Clinically meaningful improvement was defined as >5 point decrease in dysfunction and > 30% decrease in pain from baseline. Methods Clinically meaningful improvement for each primary outcome with both follow-up times was analyzed using adjusted modified Poisson generalized estimating equations. Secondary analyses for the continuous outcomes used linear generalized estimating equations. This study was funded the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, NIH, USA (R01 AT004411). The funders had no role in the interpretation or reporting of results. Results There were no observed differences by primary treatment group at 12 or 26 weeks. Those receiving booster dose had improvements in both dysfunction and pain at 12 weeks (dysfunction: RR=1.56(1.08–2.25), P=0.018; pain: RR=1.25(0.98–1.61); P=0.077), but those were non-significant at 26 weeks (dysfunction: RR=1.22(0.85–1.74); pain: RR=1.09(0.82–1.43)). Subgroup analysis by primary and booster treatments found the booster dose only

  2. Impact of HPV-related head and neck cancer in clinical trials: opportunity to translate scientific insight into personalized care.

    PubMed

    Chung, Christine H; Schwartz, David L

    2012-08-01

    Patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx (SCCOP) enjoy better treatment outcomes than patients suffering from HPV-negative head and neck cancer. To maintain the integrity and utility of future clinical trials, HPV-positive SCCOP must be studied as a distinct entity. The discovery of HPV-positive disease has (1) convoluted comparison of current phase II trial data to historical controls, (2) made formal stratification for HPV infection status an imperative for future phase III trial design, and (3) drawn focus toward opportunities for personalization of treatment intensity. This review discusses these research issues.

  3. Clinical management of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients: successes and barriers*

    PubMed Central

    Vissink, Arjan; Mitchell, James B; Baum, Bruce J; Limesand, Kirsten H; Jensen, Siri Beier; Fox, Philip C; Elting, Linda S; Langendijk, Johannes A; Coppes, Robert P; Reyland, Mary E

    2010-01-01

    The most significant long-term complication of radiotherapy in the head and neck region is hyposalivation and its related complaints, particularily xerostomia. This paper addresses the pathophysiology underlying irradiation damage to salivary gland tissue, the consequences of radiation injury, and issues contributing to the clinical management of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia. These include ways to: (1) prevent or minimize radiation injury of salivary gland tissue, (2) manage radiation-induced hyposalivation and xerostomia, and (3) restore the function of salivary gland tissue damaged by radiotherapy. PMID:20970030

  4. Clinical Management of Salivary Gland Hypofunction and Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients: Successes and Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Vissink, Arjan; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.; Limesand, Kirsten H.; Jensen, Siri Beier; Fox, Philip C.; Elting, Linda S.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Coppes, Robert P.; Reyland, Mary E.

    2010-11-15

    The most significant long-term complication of radiotherapy in the head-and-neck region is hyposalivation and its related complaints, particularily xerostomia. This review addresses the pathophysiology underlying irradiation damage to salivary gland tissue, the consequences of radiation injury, and issues contributing to the clinical management of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia. These include ways to (1) prevent or minimize radiation injury of salivary gland tissue, (2) manage radiation-induced hyposalivation and xerostomia, and (3) restore the function of salivary gland tissue damaged by radiotherapy.

  5. [Clinical and paraclinical follow-up after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Clément-Colmou, K; Troussier, I; Bardet, É; Lapeyre, M

    2015-10-01

    Head and neck cancer management often involves heavy multimodal treatments including radiotherapy. Despite the improvement of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, acute and late toxicities remain important. After such treatment, patients have to face different potential problems, depending on the post-therapeutic delay. In this way, short-term follow-up permits to appreciate the healing of acute toxicities and response to treatment. Long-term follow-up aims to recognize second primitive tumours and distant failure, and to detect and manage late toxicities. Medical and psychosocial supportive cares are essential, even after several years of complete remission. The objective of this article is to review the modalities of short-term and long-term follow-up of patients who receive a radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

  6. Invasive head and neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma: clinical and histopathological characteristics, frequency of local recurrence and metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Luiza; Melo, Juliana Carneiro; Miot, Hélio Amante; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar; Abbade, Luciana Patricia Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common type of skin malignancy and may evolve to regional lymph node and distant metastases. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to evaluate patients with head and neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma to identify its clinical and histopathological characteristics, as well as the frequency of local recurrence and metastasis. METHODS A retrospective cohort of patients with head and neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Inclusion criteria: histopathological confirmation, follow-up for longer than one year after diagnosis. Exclusion criteria: immunosuppression; lip and oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma; and non-surgical resection of the lesion. We evaluated demographic, clinical and anatomopathologic findings and explored their associations. RESULTS Sixty-one patients with 79 tumors and followed by 4.8±3.0 years were selected. The average age was 67.1 years, and 63% of tumors had up to two centimeters. Seven tumors (8.9%) recurred and two of them had positive margins. Recurrence was associated with higher Broders' grade (p<0.01). Two patients (3.3%) had regional lymph node metastases. There were no distant metastases. Seventy tumors were considered to be usual tumors (89.7%), and 68 (87.2%) were classified as Broders' grade 1 and 2. Additionally, 64.1% of tumors had a depth of invasion below four millimeters. Thirteen tumors (16.7%) had positive histological margins. CONCLUSIONS Most patients had good prognosis in the first year of follow-up, confirming that head and neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma has a better prognosis than squamous cell carcinoma of other regions such as mucosa, oral cavity, and internal organs. PMID:25054741

  7. Future treatment directions for HPV-associated head and neck cancer based on radiobiological rationale and current clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Loredana G

    2016-07-01

    A relatively new entity of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma located in the oropharynx and associated to the human papillomavirus (HPV) is on the rise. This cancer represents a distinct entity from the non-HPV tumours, holds different biological characteristics and responds differently to treatment. An outcome analysis of locoregionally-advanced oropharyngeal versus non-oropharyngeal cancers treated with chemo-radiotherapy revealed a statistically significant improvement for oropharyngeal cancers, which are thought to be due to their HPV-association. Consequently, more attention is paid to HPV-related head and neck cancers, given that HPV status serves as prognostic marker in oropharyngeal cancer patients. Yet, HPV positivity is a simplistic approach for risk stratification, thus more robust biomarkers are needed to fulfil this task. Despite differences in clinical response, HPV-related oral cancers undergo similar therapy to their non-HPV counterparts. This review discusses future treatment directions for HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers based on radiobiological rationale and current clinical evidence.

  8. Prospective Evaluation to Establish a Dose Response for Clinical Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Head-and-Neck Conformal Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Samir Lehmann, Joerg; Coleman, Matthew A.; Vaughan, Andrew; Yang, Claus Chunli; Enepekides, Danny; Farwell, Gregory; Purdy, James A.; Laredo, Grace; Nolan, Kerry A.S.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: We conducted a clinical study to correlate oral cavity dose with clinical mucositis, perform in vivo dosimetry, and determine the feasibility of obtaining buccal mucosal cell samples in patients undergoing head-and-neck radiation therapy. The main objective is to establish a quantitative dose response for clinical oral mucositis. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively studied. Four points were chosen in separate quadrants of the oral cavity. Calculated dose distributions were generated by using AcQPlan and Eclipse treatment planning systems. MOSFET dosimeters were used to measure dose at each sampled point. Each patient underwent buccal sampling for future RNA analysis before and after the first radiation treatment at the four selected points. Clinical and functional mucositis were assessed weekly according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3. Results: Maximum and average doses for sampled sites ranged from 7.4-62.3 and 3.0-54.3 Gy, respectively. A cumulative point dose of 39.1 Gy resulted in mucositis for 3 weeks or longer. Mild severity (Grade {<=} 1) and short duration ({<=}1 week) of mucositis were found at cumulative point doses less than 32 Gy. Polymerase chain reaction consistently was able to detect basal levels of two known radiation responsive genes. Conclusions: In our sample, cumulative doses to the oral cavity of less than 32 Gy were associated with minimal acute mucositis. A dose greater than 39 Gy was associated with longer duration of mucositis. Our technique for sampling buccal mucosa yielded sufficient cells for RNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction.

  9. Angioleiomyomas in the head and neck: A retrospective clinical and immunohistochemical analysis

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YING; LI, BO; LI, LONGJIANG; LIU, YANBIN; WANG, CHENXING; ZHA, LAGABAIYILA

    2014-01-01

    Angioleiomyoma is a benign soft-tissue tumor originating from vascular smooth muscle, and is rare in the head and neck. The present study retrospectively examined a cohort of patients with head and neck angioleiomyoma treated at the West China Hospital of Stomatology, and also subjected archived tissues to modern immunohistochemical analysis. In total, 21 patients were treated for angioleiomyoma between 1978 and 2012 at the West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University (Chengdu, Sichuan, China). Medical records were examined and paraffin block sections were cut and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson’s trichrome stain and Van Gieson stain, prior to being subjected to immunohistochemical analysis to re-evaluate and confirm the diagnoses. Angioleiomyomas were found to account for only 0.18% of the benign head and neck tumors in the patients presenting to the hospital over the past 34 years. The diagnosis was more common in males (male:female ratio, 1.625:1) and the mean age at diagnosis was 42.5 years. The most common sites were the buccal mucosa, parotid gland and palate. More than half of the tumors (61.9%) were >2 cm in diameter. Five tumors presented with pain and/or tenderness. The histological subtype was reported as solid in five cases, venous in six, cavernous in nine and venous-cavernous in one. Three tumors exhibited nerve neurofibrils. All tumors were excised with no subsequent recurrence. Cytological and imaging examinations were not useful for pre-operative diagnosis. Angioleiomyoma is a benign tumor that causes limited morbidity. Surgical excision is the only effective treatment and recurrence is rare. The present study revealed that nerves were present in a small proportion (14.3%) of tumors. It was hypothesized that the compression of nerves accompanying numerous blood vessels in the tumor may cause pain, particularly in venous- and cavernous-type angioleiomyomas. PMID:24959254

  10. Multi-Modal Preemptive Analgesia With Pregabalin, Acetaminophen, Naproxen, and Dextromethorphan in Radical Neck Dissection Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Hamid Reza; Mirzaei, Mojtaba; Beig Mohammadi, Mohammad Taghi; Tavakoli, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    Background Preemptive analgesia may be considered as a method not only to alleviate postoperative pain but also to decrease analgesic consumption. Different regimens are suggested, but there is currently no standard. Objectives The aim was to measure the efficacy of preemptive analgesia with pregabalin, acetaminophen, naproxen, and dextromethorphan in radical neck dissection surgery for reducing the intensity of pain and morphine consumption. Patients and Methods This study was conducted as a randomized double-blind clinical trial. Eighty adult patients (18 to 60 years of age) under the American society of anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I and II undergoing elective radical neck dissection were enrolled. Patients were randomized into two groups of 40 with a simple randomization method. The case group received a combination of 15 mg/kg acetaminophen, 2.5 mg/kg pregabalin, 7 mg/kg naproxen, and 0.3 mg/kg dextromethorphan administered orally one hour prior to surgery. Postoperative pain was assessed with the universal pain assessment tool (UPAT) at 0, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours after surgery. Subjects received morphine based on postoperative pain control protocol. Total administered morphine doses were noted. Results Postoperative pain rates at 0, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours after surgery were significantly lower for the case group than the control group (P values = 0.014, 0.003, 0.00, 0.00, and 0.00, respectively). Total morphine doses for the preemptive analgesia group were 45% lower than those of the other group. Side effects were similar for both groups. Conclusions A single preoperative oral dose of pregabalin, acetaminophen, dextromethorphan, and naproxen one hour before surgery is an effective method for reducing postoperative pain and morphine consumption in patients undergoing radical neck dissection. PMID:27843771

  11. Improved Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Farwell, D. Gregory; Marsano, Joseph; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To compare differences in dosimetric, clinical, and quality-of-life endpoints among a cohort of patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 51 patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Twenty-four patients (47%) were treated using CRT, and 27 (53%) were treated using IMRT. The proportions of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy were 54% and 63%, respectively. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and disease-specific survival for the entire patient population were 86%, 89%, and84%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to radiation therapy technique (p > 0.05 for all). Dosimetric analysis revealed that the use of IMRT resulted in significant improvements with respect to mean dose and V30 to the contralateral (spared) parotid gland. In addition, mean doses to the ipsilateral inner and middle ear structures were significantly reduced with IMRT (p < 0.05 for all). The incidence of severe xerostomia in the late setting was 58% and 11% among patients treated by CRT and IMRT, respectively (p < 0.001). The percentages of patients who were G-tube dependent at 6 months after treatment were 42% and 11%, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT results in significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio among patients treated by radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin.

  12. The influence of age, gender, lifestyle factors and sub-clinical neck pain on the cervical flexion-rotation test and cervical range of motion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenric; Hall, Toby; Robinson, Kim

    2008-12-01

    The flexion-rotation test (FRT) is commonly used when assessing cervicogenic headache. Additionally, active range of motion (AROM) is frequently used to evaluate impairment in neck pain. No studies have investigated the interaction of the FRT and AROM with age, gender, pain and lifestyle factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of these factors on the FRT and cervical AROM. A group of 66 participants (aged 20-78) were studied, 28 experienced sub-clinical neck pain (recurrent neck pain or discomfort which has not received treatment from a healthcare professional) while 38 did not. Age, gender, lifestyle factors and sub-clinical neck pain were assessed using a questionnaire. Measurement of AROM was performed by two examiners blind to the results of the questionnaire. Multiple linear regression analysis found that 59% of the variance in the FRT was explained by the presence of sub-clinical pain and cervical lateral flexion measures. Secondly, 58-72% of the variance in active cervical ROM measures was influenced by factors including the FRT, gender and movements of the neck in other planes. This study found that lifestyle factors do not influence the cervical FRT and AROM.

  13. Identification of a High-Risk Group Among Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and pT1-2N0 Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Chen, I-How; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan; and others

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010 classification system, pT1-2N0 oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is considered an early-stage cancer treatable with surgery alone (National Comprehensive Cancer Network 2010 guidelines). Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of surgery alone for pT1-2N0 OSCC patients. Methods and Materials: Among 1279 previously untreated OSCC patients referred to our hospital between January 1996 and May 2008, we identified 457 consecutive patients with pT1-2N0 disease. All had radical tumor excision with neck dissection. A total of 387 patients showing pathologic margins greater than 4 mm and treated by surgery alone were included in the final analysis. All were followed up for at least 24 months after surgery or until death. The 5-year rates of control, distant metastasis, and survival were the main outcome measures. Results: The 5-year rates in the entire group of pT1-2N0 patients were as follows: local control, 91%; neck control, 92%; distant metastases, 1%; disease-free survival, 85%; disease-specific survival, 93%; and overall survival, 84%. Multivariate analysis identified poor differentiation and pathologic tumor depth of 4 mm or greater as independent risk factors for neck control, disease-free survival, and disease-specific survival. A scoring system using poor differentiation and tumor depth was formulated to define distinct prognostic groups. The presence of both poorly differentiated tumors and a tumor depth of 4 mm or greater resulted in significantly poorer 5-year neck control (p < 0.0001), disease-free (p < 0.0001), disease-specific (p < 0.0001), and overall survival (p = 0.0046) rates. Conclusion: The combination of poor differentiation and pathologic tumor depth of 4 mm or greater identified a subset of pT1-2N0 OSCC patients with poor outcome, who may have clinical benefit from postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy.

  14. TCGA head Neck

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  15. The effect of Neuroform stent-assisted coil embolization of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms and clinical factors on progressive aneurysm occlusion on angiographic follow-up.

    PubMed

    Gu, Da-Qun; Zhang, Xin; Luo, Bin; Long, Xiao-Ao; Duan, Chuan-Zhi

    2013-02-01

    Stent-assisted coil embolization is an endovascular treatment for wide-necked intracranial aneurysms, but the durability of this treatment is not well known. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the Neuroform stent (Boston Scientific/Target, Fremont, CA, USA) in progressive occlusion of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms, and to assess any correlation between clinical factors and angiographic follow-up results. The records of 52 patients treated with a Neuroform stent were retrieved for analysis of population characteristics, initial and follow-up angiographic results, and clinical outcomes. Initial angiographic results showed complete occlusion in 21 (40.4%), neck remnants in 22 (42.3%), and residual aneurysms in nine (17.3%). Angiographic follow-up was available in 45 of 52 (86.5%) patients: complete occlusion was achieved in 32 (71.1%), neck remnants were present in eight (17.8%) and residual aneurysms in five (11.1%). Of 31 patients with immediate incomplete obliteration, progressive complete occlusion was achieved in 16 of 28 (57.1%) patients. Clinical follow-up showed good outcomes according to the modified Rankin Scale score. A univariate analysis showed that there was no effect of the tested clinical variables of patient age (p=0.823), gender (p=0.419), aneurysm location (p=0.394), size (p=0.625) and rupture status (p=0.721) on aneurysm occlusion at follow-up. We conclude that the Neuroform stent-assisted neck remodelling technique improves progressive occlusion of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms with good clinical outcomes.

  16. The emerging role of immunotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC): anti-tumor immunity and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Economopoulou, Panagiota; Perisanidis, Christos; Giotakis, Evaggelos I.

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) carries a poor prognosis, with low survival rates for advanced stage tumors and minimal improvement in survival trends through the past decades. It is becoming increasingly clear that HNSCC oncogenesis and evolution is characterized by profound immune defects, as cancer cells evade immunosurveillance due to accumulation of genetic mutations and tumor heterogeneity. Improved understanding of the role of the immune system in cancer has led to the identification of novel therapeutic targets, which are being investigated for their potential to provide durable responses. In this review, we will summarize the role of the immune system in HNSCC, the rationale behind immunotherapy strategies and their clinical applications. PMID:27275486

  17. Review of the Clinical and Biologic Aspects of Human Papillomavirus-Positive Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Blitzer, Grace C.; Smith, Molly A.; Harris, Stephen L.; Kimple, Randall J.

    2014-03-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), a known etiology of a subset of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNCs), causes numerous alterations in normal cellular functions. This article reviews the biology, detection, and treatment of HPV-positive HNC. The role of HPV oncoproteins in tumor development, the natural history of HPV infection, and risk factors for and prevention of transmission of oral HPV are considered. Commonly used methods for detecting HPV infection, including limitations of these methods, are discussed to aid the practicing clinician in using these tests in their clinical practice. Clinical characteristics of HPV-positive HNC, including potential explanations for the improved outcomes seen in patients with HPV-positive HNC, are assessed. Ongoing clinical trials specific for patients with HPV-positive HNC are described, and areas in need of additional research are summarized. Until the results of ongoing trials are known, treatment of HPV-positive HNC should not differ in clinical practice from treatment of similar non-HPV related cancers.

  18. Use of a Conventional Low Neck Field (LNF) and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT): No Clinical Detriment of IMRT to an Anterior LNF During the Treatment of Head-and Neck-Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Turaka, Aruna; Li Tianyu; Nicolaou, Nicos; Lango, Miriam N.; Burtness, Barbara; Horwitz, Eric M.; Ridge, John A.; Feigenberg, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine differences in clinical outcomes using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or a standard low neck field (LNF) to treat low neck. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective, single-institution study. Ninety-one patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with curative intent. According to physician preference, some patients were treated with LNF (Planning Target Volume 3) field using a single anterior photon field matched to the IMRT field. Field junctions were not feathered. The endpoints were time to failure and use of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube (as a surrogate of laryngeal edema causing aspiration), and analysis was done with {chi}{sup 2} and log-rank tests. Results: Median follow-up was 21 months (range, 2-89 months). Median age was 60 years. Thirty-seven patients (41%) were treated with LNF, 84% were Stage III or IV. A PEG tube was required in 30%, as opposed to 33% without the use of LNF. Node 2 or 3 neck disease was treated more commonly without LNF (38% vs. 24%, p = 0.009). Failures occurred in 12 patients (13%). Only 1 patient treated with LNF failed regionally, 4.5 cm above the match line. The 3-year disease-free survival rate was 87% and 79% with LNF and without LNF, respectively (p = 0.2), and the 3-year LR failure rate was 4% and 21%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Using LNF to treat the low neck did not increase the risk of regional failure 'in early T and early N diseases' or decrease PEG tube requirements.

  19. The application and challenges of clinical PD-PDT in the head and neck region: a short review.

    PubMed

    Bredell, Marius G; Besic, Emina; Maake, Caroline; Walt, Heinrich

    2010-12-02

    We review current clinical applications of photodiagnosis (PD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the head and neck field and highlight the actual status, problems, challenges as well as the future of this emerging treatment modality. In recent years literature presented input from many new developments and their applications. This is due to better awareness and developing knowledge about PD-PDT from the clinical staff, both nurses and doctors. But it is also a result of improved drug and hardware development such as lasers, LEDs and related optical devices. Current photo-medical applications in the head and neck region range from diagnostics, treatment of premalignant and malignant lesions, aesthetic and cosmetic applications to the ever expanding anti-microbial applications. Although treatment of premalignant and early malignant lesions of the oropharyngeal cavity have long been the favourite lesions to treat with PDT patients with unsalvageable tumors have also been responding remarkably well to PDT, adding significant quality of life. There is growing interest in anti-microbiological PDT and recent progress has shown that this application is able to significantly reduce the number or even eradicate specific microbial pathogens. During many surgical treatments better control of microbiological activity through PDT may lead to a better outcome. Despite progressive development in this field a few problems remain: prolonged phototoxicity, limited penetration of the photosensitizer and light, inadequate specificity, PDT-related pain as well as the lack of uniformly accepted protocols both for light application as well as photosensitizers. Recent studies have shown that PDT based pain can be separated from other forms of pain, offering hope that a specific management of pain will be possible. If PDT will become fully accepted by patients and doctors we must care about the negative factors such as pain and prolonged phototoxicity.

  20. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck. If neck pain involves compression of your nerves, you may feel numbness, tingling, or weakness in your arm or ... When to Contact a Medical Professional ... fever and headache, and your neck is so stiff that you cannot touch your chin to your chest. This may be ...

  1. Clinical Outcome of Paraclinoid Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysms After Microsurgical Neck Clipping in Comparison with Endovascular Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Dong-Hyun; Won, Yu-Deok; Choi, Kyu-Sun; Cheong, Jin-Hwan; Yi, Hyeong-Joong; Kim, Choong-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Because of the complex anatomical association among vascular, dural, and bony structures, paraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms remain a major challenge for vascular neurosurgeons. We studied the clinical outcomes of 61 paraclinoid ICA aneurysms after microsurgical clipping in comparison with endovascular coiling. Materials and Methods Between January 2008 and December 2012, we treated 61 paraclinoid ICA aneurysms created by surgical clipping or endovascular coiling. Preoperative neurologic status and postoperative outcome were evaluated using the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and the modified Rankin scale (mRS). Postoperative hydrocephalus and vasospasm were reviewed using the patients' medical charts. Results Most patients were in good clinical condition before the operations and had good treatment outcomes. Clinical vasospasm was observed after the operation in five patients, and hydrocephalus occurred in six patients. No statistically significant difference regarding aneurysm size, sex, GCS score, H-H grade, and mRS was observed between the surgical clipping group and the endovascular coiling group. In addition, the treatment results and complications did not show statistically significant difference in either group. Conclusion Surgical occlusion of paraclinoid ICA aneurysms is difficult; however, no significant differences were observed in the treatment results or complications when compared with coil embolization. In particular, use of an adequate surgical technique may lead to better outcomes than those for coil embolization in the treatment of large and/or wide-neck paraclinoid ICA aneurysms. PMID:25340024

  2. Primary care randomized clinical trial: manual therapy effectiveness in comparison with TENS in patients with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Escortell-Mayor, E; Riesgo-Fuertes, R; Garrido-Elustondo, S; Asúnsolo-Del Barco, A; Díaz-Pulido, B; Blanco-Díaz, M; Bejerano-Álvarez, E

    2011-02-01

    This study investigated effectiveness of manual therapy (MT) with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to reduce pain intensity in patients with mechanical neck disorder (MND). A randomized multi-centered controlled clinical trial was performed in 12 Primary Care Physiotherapy Units in Madrid Region. Ninety patients were included with diagnoses of subacute or chronic MND without neurological damage, 47 patients received MT and 43 TENS. The primary outcome was pain intensity measured in millimeters using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Also disability, quality of life, adverse effects and sociodemographic and prognosis variables were measured. Three evaluations were performed (before, when the procedure finished and six months after). Seventy-one patients (79%) completed the follow-up measurement at six months. In more than half of the treated patients the procedure had a clinically relevant "short term" result after having ended the intervention, when either MT or TENS was used. The success rate decreased to one-third of the patients 6 months after the intervention. No differences can be found in the reduction of pain, in the decrease of disability nor in the quality of life between both therapies. Both analyzed physiotherapy techniques produce a short-term pain reduction that is clinically relevant.

  3. Changes of perfusion of microvascular free flaps in the head and neck: a prospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Mücke, Thomas; Rau, Andrea; Merezas, Andreas; Kanatas, Anastasios; Mitchell, David A; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Steiner, Timm

    2014-11-01

    Reconstruction with a free flap is routine in head and neck surgery. However, reliable assessment of perfusion can be difficult, so we prospectively evaluated it in 4 types of microvascular free flaps in the oral cavity (n=196) and assessed differences in blood flow by non-invasive monitoring with a laser Doppler flowmetry unit. We measured oxygen saturation, haemoglobin concentration, and velocity on the surface of the flap preoperatively at the donor site, and on the flap on the first, second, and seventh postoperative days, and after 4 weeks in 186/196 patients, mean (SD) age of 60 (13) years. We studied the radial forearm (n=76, 41%), fibular (n=45, 24%), anterolateral thigh (n=53, 28%), and soleus perforator (n=12, 7%) flaps. The values for the radial forearm flap differed significantly from the others. There were significant differences in haemoglobin concentrations between the fibular and soleus perforator flaps, and between the anterolateral thigh and soleus perforator flaps (p=0.002 each). Free flaps are unique in the way that perfusion develops after microvascular anastomoses. Knowledge of how each flap is perfused may indicate different patterns of healing that could potentially influence long term rehabilitation and detection of future deficits in perfusion.

  4. Prevalence and clinical features of human papillomavirus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in Okinawa, southern Japan.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zeyi; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Matayoshi, Sen; Kiyuna, Asanori; Yamashita, Yukashi; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Mikio

    2011-11-01

    Previous studies from Okinawa, a subtropical island in southern Japan, demonstrated a higher prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral carcinoma and a higher incidence of oral and pharyngeal carcinoma than those for mainland Japan. The present study aims to investigate epidemiologic and clinical features of HPV in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in Okinawa. A total of 150 DNA samples from 150 Okinawan patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) were screened for HPV sequences by PCR using three consensus primer sets, and HPV types were determined by direct sequencing. The samples were consisted of 46 cases from the hypopharynx, 44 from the oropharynx, 16 from the larynx, 25 from the oral cavity, 10 from the maxillary sinus, and 9 from the nasopharynx. HPV DNA was detected in 45 (30.0%) HNSCCs, and HPV-16 was identified in 86.7% of positive specimens. The highest prevalence of the HPV sequence was found in oropharyngeal carcinomas (50.0%), especially in tonsillar cancer (63.6%). Multivariate analysis showed that oropharyngeal carcinoma (P = 0.002; OR = 5.34; 95% CI = 1.83-15.58), oral cavity carcinoma (P = 0.012; OR = 4.94; 95% CI = 1.43-17.10), and histological poor differentiation (P = 0.011; OR = 4.25; 95% CI = 1.39-13.04) each independently increased the prevalence of HPV infection. The present study reveals that patients with HNSCC, e.g., oropharyngeal and oral cavity carcinomas, in Okinawa have relatively high HPV-16 positive rates and low HPV-18 positive rates comparing with mainland Japan.

  5. Economic Analyses in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: A Review of the Literature From a Clinical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Jonas A. de; Santana, Iuri A.; Castro, Gilberto de; Lima Lopes, Gilberto de; Tina Shih, Ya-Chen

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this review was to describe cost-effectiveness and cost analysis studies across treatment modalities for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), while placing their results in context of the current clinical practice. We performed a literature search in PubMed for English-language studies addressing economic analyses of treatment modalities for SCCHN published from January 2000 to March 2013. We also performed an additional search for related studies published by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the United Kingdom. Identified articles were classified into 3 clinical approaches (organ preservation, radiation therapy modalities, and chemotherapy regimens) and into 2 types of economic studies (cost analysis and cost-effectiveness/cost-utility studies). All cost estimates were normalized to US dollars, year 2013 values. Our search yielded 23 articles: 13 related to organ preservation approaches, 5 to radiation therapy modalities, and 5 to chemotherapy regimens. In general, studies analyzed different questions and modalities, making it difficult to reach a conclusion. Even when restricted to comparisons of modalities within the same clinical approach, studies often yielded conflicting findings. The heterogeneity across economic studies of SCCHN should be carefully understood in light of the modeling assumptions and limitations of each study and placed in context with relevant settings of clinical practices and study perspectives. Furthermore, the scarcity of comparative effectiveness and quality-of-life data poses unique challenges for conducting economic analyses for a resource-intensive disease, such as SCCHN, that requires a multimodal care. Future research is needed to better understand how to compare the costs and cost-effectiveness of different modalities for SCCHN.

  6. Downregulation of SERPINB13 expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas associates with poor clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    de Koning, Pieter J A; Bovenschen, Niels; Leusink, Frank K J; Broekhuizen, Roel; Quadir, Razi; van Gemert, Jan T M; Hordijk, Gerrit J; Chang, Wun-Shaing W; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; Tilanus, Marcel G J; Kummer, J Alain

    2009-10-01

    Tumorigenesis of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) is associated with various genetic changes such as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on human chromosome 18q21. This chromosomal region maps a gene cluster coding for a family of intracellular serine protease inhibitors (serpins), including SERPINB13. As SERPINB13 expression in HNSCC has recently been shown to be downregulated both at the mRNA and protein levels, here we investigated if such a low SERPINB13 expression is associated with histopathological and clinical parameters of HNSCC tumors and patient survival. By generating specific antibodies followed by immunohistochemistry on a well-defined cohort of 99 HNSCC of the oral cavity and oropharynx, SERPINB13 expression was found to be partially or totally downregulated in 75% of the HNSCC as compared with endogenous expression in non-neoplastic epithelial cells. Downregulation of SERPINB13 protein expression in HNSCC was significantly associated with the presence of LOH at the SERPINB13 gene in the tumors (p = 0.006), a poor differentiation grade of the tumors (p = 0.001), the presence of a lymph node metastasis (p = 0.012), and a decreased disease-free (p = 0.033) as well as overall (p = 0.018) survival of the patients. This is the first report demonstrating that downregulation of SERPINB13 protein expression in HNSCC is positively associated with poor clinical outcome. Therefore, SERPINB13 seems to act as an important protease inhibitor involved in the progression of HNSCC.

  7. Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Myofascial Pain Syndromes Involving the Neck and Back: A Review from a Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Climent, José M.; Fenollosa, Pedro; Martin-del-Rosario, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Botulinum toxin inhibits acetylcholine (ACh) release and probably blocks some nociceptive neurotransmitters. It has been suggested that the development of myofascial trigger points (MTrP) is related to an excess release of ACh to increase the number of sensitized nociceptors. Although the use of botulinum toxin to treat myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) has been investigated in many clinical trials, the results are contradictory. The objective of this paper is to identify sources of variability that could explain these differences in the results. Material and Methods. We performed a content analysis of the clinical trials and systematic reviews of MPS. Results and Discussion. Sources of differences in studies were found in the diagnostic and selection criteria, the muscles injected, the injection technique, the number of trigger points injected, the dosage of botulinum toxin used, treatments for control group, outcome measures, and duration of followup. The contradictory results regarding the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in MPS associated with neck and back pain do not allow this treatment to be recommended or rejected. There is evidence that botulinum toxin could be useful in specific myofascial regions such as piriformis syndrome. It could also be useful in patients with refractory MPS that has not responded to other myofascial injection therapies. PMID:23533477

  8. The mutational spectrum of squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck: targetable genetic events and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Mountzios, G; Rampias, T; Psyrri, A

    2014-10-01

    Squamous-cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN) represents a heterogeneous disease entity, with various etiological factors implicated in the genesis of distinct molecular subsets of tumors, which exhibit different biological and clinical behavior. Treatment of SCCHN is expected to change in the next decade as targeted therapies continue to make strides. Recently, next-generation sequencing studies conducted on ∼190 SCCHN specimens shed light into the molecular pathogenesis of the disease. These studies discovered mutations in genes involved in the differentiation program of squamous epithelium and the Notch/p63 axis (such as NOTCH1, TP63 and FBXW7), and validated genetic alterations derived from previous studies (such as mutations in TP53, CDKN2A, PIK3CA, CCND1 and HRAS) as driver genetic events in SCCHN neoplastic transformation. More recently, comprehensive data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project on 306 SCCHN specimens provided further insight into SCCHN inherent molecular complexity, identifying novel significantly mutated genes, including FAT1, MLL2, TGFRBR2, HLA-A, NFE2l2 and CASP8. In this article, we provide an overview of the mutational spectrum of SCCHN, with emphasis on the clinical implementation of this knowledge. We also discuss the potential integration of new data within the framework of precision cancer medicine.

  9. ICF Core Set for Head and Neck Cancer: Do the Categories Discriminate Among Clinically Relevant Subgroups of Patients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschiesner, Uta; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Cieza, Alarcos

    2011-01-01

    The multidisciplinary assessment of functioning in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) according to the "ICF Core Set for Head and Neck Cancer" (ICF-HNC) was developed in an international and multi-disciplinary approach. The ICF-HNC is an application of the ICF that was adopted by the World Health Organization. The objective of this study was…

  10. Significant differences in demographic, clinical, and pathological features in relation to smoking and alcohol consumption among 1,633 head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Moyses, Raquel Ajub; López, Rossana Verónica Mendoza; Cury, Patrícia Maluf; Siqueira, Sheila Aparecida Coelho; Curioni, Otávio Alberto; de Gois Filho, José Francisco; Figueiredo, David Livingstone Alves; Head; GENCAPO, Neck Genome Project; Tajara, Eloiza Helena; Michaluart, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: As a lifestyle-related disease, social and cultural disparities may influence the features of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in different geographic regions. We describe demographic, clinical, and pathological aspects of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck according to the smoking and alcohol consumption habits of patients in a Brazilian cohort. METHODS: We prospectively analyzed the smoking and alcohol consumption habits of 1,633 patients enrolled in five São Paulo hospitals that participated in the Brazilian Head and Neck Genome Project – Gencapo. RESULTS: The patients who smoked and drank were younger, and those who smoked were leaner than the other patients, regardless of alcohol consumption. The non-smokers/non-drinkers were typically elderly white females who had more differentiated oral cavity cancers and fewer first-degree relatives who smoked. The patients who drank presented significantly more frequent nodal metastasis, and those who smoked presented less-differentiated tumors. CONCLUSIONS: The patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck demonstrated demographic, clinical, and pathological features that were markedly different according to their smoking and drinking habits. A subset of elderly females who had oral cavity cancer and had never smoked or consumed alcohol was notable. Alcohol consumption seemed to be related to nodal metastasis, whereas smoking correlated with the degree of differentiation. PMID:23778492

  11. Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the American Cancer Society Guideline.

    PubMed

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Lacchetti, Christina; Davis, Nancy B; Garvey, Thomas Q; Goldstein, David P; Nunnink, J Chris; Ninfea, Jose I Ruades; Salner, Andrew L; Salz, Talya; Siu, Lillian L

    2017-02-27

    Purpose This guideline provides recommendations on the management of adults after head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment, focusing on surveillance and screening for recurrence or second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, care coordination, and practice implications. Methods ASCO has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The American Cancer Society (ACS) HNC Survivorship Care Guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ASCO Expert Panel reviewed the content and recommendations, offering modifications and/or qualifying statements when deemed necessary. Results The ASCO Expert Panel determined that the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, published in 2016, is clear, thorough, clinically practical, and helpful, despite the limited availability of high-quality evidence to support many of the recommendations. ASCO endorsed the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, adding qualifying statements aimed at promoting team-based, multispecialty, multidisciplinary, collaborative head and neck survivorship care. Recommendations The ASCO Expert Panel emphasized that caring for HNC survivors requires a team-based approach that includes primary care clinicians, oncology specialists, otolaryngologists, dentists, and other allied professionals. The HNC treatment team should educate the primary care clinicians and patients about the type(s) of treatment received, the likelihood of potential recurrence, and the potential late and long-term complications. Primary care clinicians should recognize symptoms of recurrence and coordinate a prompt evaluation. They should also be prepared to manage late effects either directly or by referral to appropriate specialists. Health promotion is critical, particularly regarding tobacco cessation and dental care. Additional information is available at www

  12. Clinical Value of High Mobility Group Box 1 and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products in Head and Neck Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Austin; Bhavsar, Sheila; Riley, Erinn; Caponetti, Gabriel; Agrawal, Devendra

    2016-10-01

    Introduction High mobility group box 1 is a versatile protein involved in gene transcription, extracellular signaling, and response to inflammation. Extracellularly, high mobility group box 1 binds to several receptors, notably the receptor for advanced glycation end-products. Expression of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products has been described in many cancers. Objectives To systematically review the available literature using PubMed and Web of Science to evaluate the clinical value of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Data synthesis A total of eleven studies were included in this review. High mobility group box 1 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis and many clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients. Additionally, the receptor for advanced glycation end-products demonstrates potential value as a clinical indicator of tumor angiogenesis and advanced staging. In diagnosis, high mobility group box 1 demonstrates low sensitivity. Conclusion High mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products are associated with clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Further investigation of the prognostic and diagnostic value of these molecules is warranted.

  13. Clinical value of monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Blaszczak, Wiktoria; Barczak, Wojciech; Wegner, Anna; Golusinski, Wojciech; Suchorska, Wiktoria Maria

    2017-04-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a heterogeneous group of malignant tumours that affects over 500,000 patients per year. Treatment failure is generally due to the heterogeneity of these tumours and to the serious adverse effects associated with treatment. Immunological system impairment, which is common in HNSCC, further contributes to treatment failure by mediating tumour escape mechanisms. To date, the only clinically approved targeted therapy agent is cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds to, and inhibits, epidermal growth factor receptor, which is widely overexpressed in HNSCC. Cetuximab has been proven to induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, further magnifying its therapeutic effect. DNA sequencing of HNSCC cells has identified the presence of mutated genes, thus making their protein products potential targets for therapeutic inhibition. Immune mechanisms have been found to have a significant impact on carcinogenesis, thus providing the rationale to support efforts to identify anticancer compounds with immunomodulatory properties. In the context of the rapid development of novel targeted agents, the aim of the present paper is to review our current understanding of HNSCC and to review the novel anticancer agents (mAbs and TKIs) introduced in recent years, including an assessment of their efficacy and mechanisms of action.

  14. Current advances in diagnosis and surgical treatment of lymph node metastasis in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Teymoortash, A.; Werner, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Still today, the status of the cervical lymph nodes is the most important prognostic factor for head and neck cancer. So the individual treatment concept of the lymphatic drainage depends on the treatment of the primary tumor as well as on the presence or absence of suspect lymph nodes in the imaging diagnosis. Neck dissection may have either a therapeutic objective or a diagnostic one. The selective neck dissection is currently the method of choice for the treatment of patients with advanced head and neck cancers and clinical N0 neck. For oncologic reasons, this procedure is generally recommended with acceptable functional and aesthetic results, especially under the aspect of the mentioned staging procedure. In this review article, current aspects on pre- and posttherapeutic staging of the cervical lymph nodes are described and the indication and the necessary extent of neck dissection for head and neck cancer is discussed. Additionally the critical question is discussed if the lymph node metastasis bears an intrinsic risk of metastatic development and thus its removal in a most possible early stage plays an important role. PMID:23320056

  15. Transoral Endoscopic Head and Neck Surgery and Its Role Within the Multidisciplinary Treatment Paradigm of Oropharynx Cancer: Robotics, Lasers, and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Holsinger, F. Christopher; Ferris, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Transoral endoscopic head and neck surgery is a new approach for the treatment of oropharyngeal tumors. Using either a robotic system and/or laser, surgeons gain access through the mouth via minimally invasive technique and thus have improved visualization of the tumors of the oropharynx, without disfiguring incisions. This transoral route of access minimizes long-term speech and swallowing dysfunction. Surgeons view this approach as a considerable technologic advance, analogous to the evolution in radiation therapy from conventional two- and three-dimensional conformal techniques to intensity-modulated techniques. Although the use of radiation with or without chemotherapy to treat oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is supported by evidence from prospective clinical trials, there are no prospective data supporting the use of this new surgical approach for OPC. Here, we review the fundamentals of transoral endoscopic head and neck surgery, with robotics and laser technology, and discuss ongoing clinical trials for patients with OPC. PMID:26351337

  16. Sustained effects of comprehensive inpatient rehabilitative treatment and sleeping neck support in patients with chronic cervicobrachialgia: a prospective and randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bernateck, Michael; Karst, Matthias; Merkesdal, Sonja; Fischer, Michael J; Gutenbrunner, Christoph

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the long-term efficacy of inpatient rehabilitation using sleeping neck support in patients suffering from chronic cervicobrachialgia. A prospective, randomized clinical trial with a 12-month follow-up was done. A total of 149 patients suffering from chronic cervicobrachialgia received a 4-week inpatient rehabilitation programme. The patients were randomly divided into two groups. The patients in one group were given a special neck pillow to use during and after the rehabilitative treatment (n=76); the patients in the other group were not given the pillow (n=73). Two weeks before, during, and after (3, 6, 9, and 12 months) the 4-week treatment period, the patients completed a questionnaire dealing with the intensity of their cervicobrachial complaints (pain intensity, muscular tension, paraesthesia, and sleep disorders caused by pain or paraesthesia). During the inpatient treatment period, no significant differences were detected between the groups; however, 1-12 months after discharge, the group with sleeping neck support showed a significantly (P<0.05) smaller increase in the intensity of cervical spine pain. Sleep disturbances caused by pain were also reduced significantly (P<0.001 after 3 months, respectively, P<0.05 after 12 months). Inpatient rehabilitative treatment has sustained effects in patients suffering from chronic cervicobrachialgia, particularly when a sleeping neck support is added.

  17. Do post-operative changes of neck-shaft angle and femoral component anteversion have an effect on clinical outcome following uncemented total hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Müller, M; Abdel, M P; Wassilew, G I; Duda, G; Perka, C

    2015-12-01

    The accurate reconstruction of hip anatomy and biomechanics is thought to be important in achieveing good clinical outcomes following total hip arthroplasty (THA). To this end some newer hip designs have introduced further modularity into the design of the femoral component such that neck-shaft angle and anteversion, which can be adjusted intra-operatively. The clinical effect of this increased modularity is unknown. We have investigated the changes in these anatomical parameters following conventional THA with a prosthesis of predetermined neck-shaft angle and assessed the effect of changes in the hip anatomy on clinical outcomes. In total, 44 patients (mean age 65.3 years (standard deviation (SD) 7); 17 male/27 female; mean body mass index 26.9 (kg/m²) (SD 3.1)) underwent a pre- and post-operative three-dimensional CT scanning of the hip. The pre- and post-operative neck-shaft angle, offset, hip centre of rotation, femoral anteversion, and stem alignment were measured. Additionally, a functional assessment and pain score were evaluated before surgery and at one year post-operatively and related to the post-operative anatomical changes. The mean pre-operative neck-shaft angle was significantly increased by 2.8° from 128° (SD 6.2; 119° to 147°) to 131° (SD 2.1; 127° to 136°) (p = 0.009). The mean pre-operative anteversion was 24.9° (SD 8; 7.9 to 39.1) and reduced to 7.4° (SD 7.3; -11.6° to 25.9°) post-operatively (p < 0.001). The post-operative changes had no influence on function and pain. Using a standard uncemented femoral component, high pre- and post-operative variability of femoral anteversion and neck-shaft angles was found with a significant decrease of the post-operative anteversion and slight increase of the neck-shaft angles, but without any impact on clinical outcome.

  18. Neck lump

    MedlinePlus

    ... the neck lump treated. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you have an abnormal neck swelling or ... to Expect at Your Office Visit The health care provider will take your medical history and do a physical exam. You may ...

  19. Characterization of the existence of an N0-completion of a partial N0-matrix with an associated directed cycle.

    PubMed

    Jordán, Cristina; Torregrosa, Juan R

    2014-01-01

    An n × n matrix is called an N 0-matrix if all its specified principal minors are nonpositive. In the context of partial matrices, a partial matrix is called a partial N 0-matrix if all its specified principal minors are nonpositive. In this paper we characterize the existence of an N 0-matrix completion of a partial N 0-matrix whose associated graph is a directed cycle.

  20. Characterization of the Existence of an N0-Completion of a Partial N0-Matrix with an Associated Directed Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Jordán, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    An n × n matrix is called an N0-matrix if all its specified principal minors are nonpositive. In the context of partial matrices, a partial matrix is called a partial N0-matrix if all its specified principal minors are nonpositive. In this paper we characterize the existence of an N0-matrix completion of a partial N0-matrix whose associated graph is a directed cycle. PMID:24688437

  1. Clinically significant copy number alterations and complex rearrangements of MYB and NFIB in head and neck adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Persson, Marta; Andrén, Ywonne; Moskaluk, Christopher A; Frierson, Henry F; Cooke, Susanna L; Futreal, Philip Andrew; Kling, Teresia; Nelander, Sven; Nordkvist, Anders; Persson, Fredrik; Stenman, Göran

    2012-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the head and neck is a malignant tumor with poor long-term prognosis. Besides the recently identified MYB-NFIB fusion oncogene generated by a t(6;9) translocation, little is known about other genetic alterations in ACC. Using high-resolution, array-based comparative genomic hybridization, and massively paired-end sequencing, we explored genomic alterations in 40 frozen ACCs. Eighty-six percent of the tumors expressed MYB-NFIB fusion transcripts and 97% overexpressed MYB mRNA, indicating that MYB activation is a hallmark of ACC. Thirty-five recurrent copy number alterations (CNAs) were detected, including losses involving 12q, 6q, 9p, 11q, 14q, 1p, and 5q and gains involving 1q, 9p, and 22q. Grade III tumors had on average a significantly higher number of CNAs/tumor compared to Grade I and II tumors (P = 0.007). Losses of 1p, 6q, and 15q were associated with high-grade tumors, whereas losses of 14q were exclusively seen in Grade I tumors. The t(6;9) rearrangements were associated with a complex pattern of breakpoints, deletions, insertions, inversions, and for 9p also gains. Analyses of fusion-negative ACCs using high-resolution arrays and massively paired-end sequencing revealed that MYB may also be deregulated by other mechanisms in addition to gene fusion. Our studies also identified several down-regulated candidate tumor suppressor genes (CTNNBIP1, CASP9, PRDM2, and SFN) in 1p36.33-p35.3 that may be of clinical significance in high-grade tumors. Further, studies of these and other potential target genes may lead to the identification of novel driver genes in ACC.

  2. Impact of HPV infection on the clinical outcome of p-CAIR trial in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Snietura, Miroslaw; Piglowski, Wojciech; Jaworska, Magdalena; Mucha-Malecka, Anna; Wozniak, Grzegorz; Lange, Dariusz; Suwinski, Rafal

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the influence of HPV infection on the outcome of a randomized clinical trial of conventional (CF) versus 7-days-a-week postoperative radiotherapy (p-CAIR) for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN). Between 2001 and 2004, 279 patients with high-risk SCC of the larynx or cancer of the oral cavity/oropharynx were randomized to receive 63 Gy in fractions of 1.8 Gy given 5 days a week or 7 days a week (Radiother Oncol 87:155-163, 2008). The presence of HPV DNA in 131 archival paraffin blocks was assessed with multiplex quantitative real-time PCR using five consensus primers for the conservative L1 region and molecular beacon probes targeting 14 high-risk HPV subtypes. Following the RT-PCR procedure, we could determine the presence and type of HPV16, HPV18 and the other 12 less frequent oncogenic subtypes. Out of 131 samples, 9 were positive for HPV infection (6.9%), all of them with HPV16 subtype. None of the 65 laryngeal tumours was HPV positive. The 5-year LRC in HPV-positive patients was 100%, compared to 58% in the HPV-negative group (p = 0.02, log-rank test). Amongst 122 patients with HPV-negative tumours, 5-year LRC was 50.3% in p-CF versus 65.2 in p-CAIR (p = 0.37). HPV infection was associated with low expression of EGFR and cyclin D. This study demonstrates a favourable outcome for HPV-positive patients with SCCHN treated with postoperative radiotherapy. While considering the small number of HPV+ tumours, the data set can be considered as hypothesis generating only, the outcome raises new questions on the necessity of aggressive postoperative treatment in HPV+ patients.

  3. Early history of neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio; Silver, Carl E

    2008-12-01

    With the exception of distant metastases, the presence of lymph node metastasis in the neck is accepted as the single most important adverse independent prognostic factor and an indicator of survival in squamous carcinoma of the head and neck. Neck dissection in its various forms is the standard surgical treatment for clinical, subclinical and subpathologic metastatic cancer to the neck. The pertinent literature from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth century was reviewed. The four giants of late nineteenth century surgery: von Langenbeck, Billroth, von Volkmann and Kocher developed and reported the early cases of different types of neck dissection. Butlin, in England, conceived and developed the concept of elective neck dissection. In 1888, the Polish surgeon Jawdyńsky reported and described in detail the first successful extended en bloc neck dissection. Crile, in 1905 and 1906, reported the first significant series of radical en bloc neck dissections, bringing this procedure to the attention of the medical world as an effective operation with reproducible technique and results. The greatest impetus to the status of this surgical procedure came from Martin and colleagues, who published a monumental report in 1951 of 1,450 cases that established the place and technique of radical neck dissection in the modern treatment of head and neck cancer. Neck dissection, for treatment of cervical lymph node metastases in head and neck cancer, was conceived and attempted in the nineteenth century, with some limited success reported by the end of that era. An effective operation was described and reported in the early twentieth century and evolved by the mid century into a fundamental tool in the management of patients with head and neck cancer.

  4. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries and conditions that cause pain and restrict motion. Neck pain causes include: Muscle strains. Overuse, such ... body then forms bone spurs that affect joint motion and cause pain. Nerve compression. Herniated disks or ...

  5. Neck dissection: current concepts and future directions.

    PubMed

    Rigual, Nestor R; Wiseman, Sam M

    2004-01-01

    For individuals diagnosed with head and neck cancer, neck dissection may be performed for therapy or disease staging. The classification of neck dissection and the definition of precise anatomic landmarks have allowed for this operation, and its many variations, to become standardized world-wide. SLNBX shows promise in its ability to accurately stage NO head and neck cancer and may allow patients with no micro metastatic disease to avoid neck dissection. Before this technique becomes adopted into routine clinical practice, however, it must first be prospectively scrutinized in large patient populations. Regardless of the future role of SLNBX in the management of head and neck cancer, currently it is only through a complete understanding of the clinical, theoretic, and technical aspects of neck dis-section that surgeons may benefit individual patients and the head and neck cancer patient population as a whole.

  6. Clinical utility of multimodality imaging with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT for the prediction of neck control in oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Chun; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liao, Chun-Ta; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Wang, Hung-Ming; Chang, Chee-Jen; Wang, Jiun-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of pretreatment imaging techniques for predicting neck control in patients with oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OHSCC) treated with chemoradiation remains unclear. In this prospective study, we investigated the role of pretreatment dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DCE-PWI), diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI), and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET)/CT derived imaging markers for the prediction of neck control in OHSCC patients treated with chemoradiation. Patients with untreated OHSCC scheduled for chemoradiation between August, 2010 and July, 2012 were eligible for the study. Clinical variables and the following imaging parameters of metastatic neck lymph nodes were examined in relation to neck control: transfer constant, volume of blood plasma, and volume of extracellular extravascular space (Ve) on DCE-PWI; apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on DWI; maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume, and total lesion glycolysis on 18F-FDG PET/CT. There were 69 patients (37 with oropharynx SCC and 32 with hypopharynx SCC) with successful pretreatment DCE-PWI and DWI available for analysis. After a median follow-up of 31 months, 25 (36.2%) participants had neck failure. Multivariate analysis identified hemoglobin level <14.3 g/dL (P = 0.019), Ve <0.23 (P = 0.040), and ADC >1.14×10-3 mm2/s (P = 0.003) as independent prognostic factors for 3-year neck control. A prognostic scoring system was formulated by summing up the three significant predictors of neck control. Patients with scores of 2-3 had significantly poorer neck control and overall survival rates than patients with scores of 0-1. We conclude that hemoglobin levels, Ve, and ADC are independent pretreatment prognostic factors for neck control in OHSCC treated with chemoradiation. Their combination may identify a subgroup of patients at high risk of developing neck failure.

  7. When, how and why to treat the neck in patients with esthesioneuroblastoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Zanation, Adam M; Ferlito, Alfio; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Gore, Mitchell R; Lund, Valerie J; McKinney, Kibwei A; Suárez, Carlos; Takes, Robert P; Devaiah, Anand K

    2010-11-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon tumor that presents in the sinonasal cavity and anterior skull base. Cervical metastases are not frequently found on initial presentation but eventually occur in 20-25% of these patients. This presents the treating physician with the difficult decision as to how and when to treat the neck in this disease. The aims of this study were to provide a comprehensive review of the incidence of N+ disease at presentation, make recommendations about the optimal treatment strategy of patients with N+ disease, explain the role of elective neck treatment in patients with N0 disease, and comment on treatment of patients with late cervical metastases that require salvage therapy, using the literature review of the incidence and treatment of neck disease in patients with esthesioneuroblastoma. This review revealed an approximately 5-8% incidence of cervical nodal metastasis at the time of presentation. Combined modality therapy with surgery and radiotherapy is recommended to treat the N+ neck at the time of diagnosis and later. Chemotherapy may have a role combined with radiation treatment, but there are little data to support this. There is limited evidence to substantiate the use of elective neck dissection or elective radiotherapy in the clinically and radiologically N0 neck. Patients who have late cervical metastases have a clear survival advantage (59 vs. 14%) when treated with combined surgery and radiotherapy relative to single modality methods alone. The results indicate that the management of the neck in esthesioneuroblastoma continues to be a significant challenge in the treatment algorithm of these complex patients.

  8. Survivors' Experiences of Dysphagia-Related Services Following Head and Neck Cancer: Implications for Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nund, Rebecca L.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Scarinci, Nerina A.; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is known that people with dysphagia experience a number of negative consequences as a result of their swallowing difficulties following head and neck cancer management (HNC). However their perceptions and experiences of adjusting to dysphagia in the post-treatment phase, and the services received to assist this process, has not been…

  9. Fully Automated Simultaneous Integrated Boosted-Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning Is Feasible for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Binbin; McNutt, Todd; Zahurak, Marianna; Simari, Patricio; Pang, Dalong; Taylor, Russell; Sanguineti, Giuseppe

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively determine whether overlap volume histogram (OVH)-driven, automated simultaneous integrated boosted (SIB)-intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning for head-and-neck cancer can be implemented in clinics. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was designed to compare fully automated plans (APs) created by an OVH-driven, automated planning application with clinical plans (CPs) created by dosimetrists in a 3-dose-level (70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy), head-and-neck SIB-IMRT planning. Because primary organ sparing (cord, brain, brainstem, mandible, and optic nerve/chiasm) always received the highest priority in clinical planning, the study aimed to show the noninferiority of APs with respect to PTV coverage and secondary organ sparing (parotid, brachial plexus, esophagus, larynx, inner ear, and oral mucosa). The sample size was determined a priori by a superiority hypothesis test that had 85% power to detect a 4% dose decrease in secondary organ sparing with a 2-sided alpha level of 0.05. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression model was used for statistical comparison. Results: Forty consecutive patients were accrued from July to December 2010. GEE analysis indicated that in APs, overall average dose to the secondary organs was reduced by 1.16 (95% CI = 0.09-2.33) with P=.04, overall average PTV coverage was increased by 0.26% (95% CI = 0.06-0.47) with P=.02 and overall average dose to the primary organs was reduced by 1.14 Gy (95% CI = 0.45-1.8) with P=.004. A physician determined that all APs could be delivered to patients, and APs were clinically superior in 27 of 40 cases. Conclusions: The application can be implemented in clinics as a fast, reliable, and consistent way of generating plans that need only minor adjustments to meet specific clinical needs.

  10. Primary extra-cranial meningioma of head and neck: clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical study of three cases.

    PubMed

    Possanzini, P; Pipolo, C; Romagnoli, S; Falleni, M; Moneghini, L; Braidotti, P; Salvatori, P; Paradisi, S; Felisati, G

    2012-10-01

    Extracranial meningiomas of the head and neck region are rare neoplasms, the majority being a secondary location of a primary intracranial tumour. We herewith report three rare cases of extracranial meningiomas, located in the temporal muscle, parotid gland and nasal cavity, together with complete pathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies. Prognosis of this tumour is generally excellent. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice, with no need for further treatment; nevertheless, differential diagnosis must consider other more common tumours of the head and neck and be based on histopathologic examination and relative techniques, including examination of frozen sections. This procedure is particularly useful assessing surgical treatment and should be performed whenever possible to exclude the malignant nature of the lesion and avoid over-treatment. All three patients underwent surgery and are alive and disease-free.

  11. Fiddler's neck.

    PubMed

    Moreno, J C; Gata, I M; García-Bravo, B; Camacho, F M

    1997-03-01

    The dermatologic pathological condition of musicians is a rare medical problem. We would like to draw attention to what is called "Fiddler's neck," a process that is peculiar to violin, viola, or cello players and that may be caused by two different mechanisms: contact allergic reaction or a mechanical action.

  12. Clinical evaluation of BIOXTRA in relieving signs and symptoms of dry mouth after head and neck radiotherapy of cancer patients at Seyed-al-Shohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gookizadeh, Abbas; Emami, Hamid; Najafizadeh, Nadia; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy of head and neck cancers causes acute and chronic xerostomia and acute mucositis. Xerostomia increases risk of radiation caries and affects on oral comfort, fit of prostheses, speech, swallowing, and the growth of caries-producing organisms. Salivary flow rate can be measured by asking patients some questions. There are different types of commercial synthetic saliva such as BIOXTRA, but until now, no one can effectively relieve xerostomia. We tried to design a clinical research on BIOXTRA efficacy for treating xerostomia. Materials and Methods: In this research, 58 patients with head and neck cancer (except salivary gland cancers) treated in Seyed-al-Shohada Hospital. The patients received at least 40-50 GY; and after 2 months of compilation treatment, they were evaluated by asking about having xerostomia. Before and after treatment with the BIOXTRA, the PH of the oral cavity, candida albicans, and lactobacillus counts measured and documented in laboratory. We used BIOXTRA for 2 weeks, 3 times daily, and then re-evaluated patients with some questions. Results: The counts of candida albicans and lactobacilli statistically significant decreased. Conclusion: Xerostomia for most patients improved clinically during the day and night while PH of the oral cavity increased. PMID:23326802

  13. Effect of thoracic manipulation and deep craniocervical flexor training on pain, mobility, strength, and disability of the neck of patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwan-Woo; Kim, Won-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of thoracic manipulation and deep craniocervical flexor training on the muscle strength and endurance, range of motion, and the disability index of the neck of patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-six patients with chronic neck pain participated. They received an intervention for 35 minutes a day, three times a week for 10 weeks. Subjects were randomly assigned to one control and two experimental groups: group A (thoracic manipulation combined with deep craniocervical flexor training, n=16), group B (deep craniocervical flexor training, n=15), and group C (active self-exercise as a control group, n=15). Muscle strength and endurance, pain, neck disability index, and range of motion of the cervical and thoracic spine were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] Group A showed significant increases in muscle strength, endurance, and cervical and thoracic range of motion, and significant decreases in the pain and neck disability index, compared with groups B and C. [Conclusion] Although deep craniocervical flexor training is effective at improving neck function, thoracic manipulation combined with deep craniocervical flexor training was a more effective intervention for pain relief and improving the range of motion, muscle function, and neck disability of patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain. PMID:26957752

  14. Laser Doppler flowmetry: an early diagnosis instrument in detecting the soft tissue changes that occur during radiotherapy to the head and neck area, clinical case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, L. C.; Miron, M. I.; Ianes, E.

    2016-03-01

    Aim of the study: Our goal was to monitor soft tissue changes occurring during radiotherapy - both through clinical examination and using LDF - in order to establish Laser Doppler as an early diagnosis instrument in this situation, and also to assess what kind of dental procedures could be provided during radiotherapy, in order to increase patients' quality of life. Material and Method: Our study included two male patients, who received head and neck radiotherapy. Patient A, 68 years old, underwent 31 radiotherapy exposures. Patient B, 52 years old, underwent 24 exposures. They received a thorough clinical examination, and a LDF evaluation of gingival blood flow in areas close to the irradiated site, after the first, the 18th, and the last radiotherapy exposure. Results: Patient A presented radiotherapy induced mucositis, after the 18th radiotherapy exposure. After the last exposure the mucositis worsened, additionally, radiodermitis appeared on the neck. LDF showed an increase in blood flow of the irradiated area, even after the first exposure, and it persisted throughout treatment. Patient B showed no clinical changes, besides a hyperkeratinisation of the gingiva in the irradiated area, after the last exposure. LDF showed an overall increase in vascularity of the area throughout treatment. Discussion: Even after the first radiotherapy exposure, and also when clinical changes were not apparent, LDF measurements revealed an increase in blood flow in the gingiva of irradiated patients. LDF might allow us to establish the most appropriate moment in time for each dental treatment, in order to increase the quality of life.

  15. Clinical Practice Guidance for Radiotherapy Planning After Induction Chemotherapy in Locoregionally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Joseph K.; Haddad, Robert I.; Kies, Merril S.; Busse, Paul M.; Dong Lei; Brizel, David M.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Tishler, Roy B.; Trotti, Andy M.; Garden, Adam S.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: The use of induction chemotherapy (IC) for locoregionally advanced head-and-neck cancer is increasing. The response to IC often causes significant alterations in tumor volume and location and shifts in normal anatomy. Proper determination of the radiotherapy (RT) targets after IC becomes challenging, especially with the use of conformal and precision RT techniques. Therefore, a consensus conference was convened to discuss issues related to RT planning and coordination of care for patients receiving IC. Methods and Materials: Ten participants with special expertise in the various aspects of integration of IC and RT for the treatment of locoregionally advanced head-and-neck cancer, including radiation oncologists, medical oncologists, and a medical physicist, participated. The individual members were assigned topics for focused, didactic presentations. Discussion was encouraged after each presentation, and recommendations were formulated. Results: Recommendations and guidelines emerged that emphasize up-front evaluation by all members of the head-and-neck management team, high-quality baseline and postinduction planning scans with the patient in the treatment position, the use of preinduction target volumes, and the use of full-dose RT, even in the face of a complete response. Conclusion: A multidisciplinary approach is strongly encouraged. Although these recommendations were provided primarily for patients treated with IC, many of these same principles apply to concurrent chemoradiotherapy without IC. A rapid response during RT is quite common, requiring the development of two or more plans in a sizeable fraction of patients, and suggesting the need for similar guidance in the rapidly evolving area of adaptive RT.

  16. The clinical impact of p16 status in fine-needle aspirates of cervical lymph node metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Jakscha, Jens; Zlobec, Inti; Storck, Claudio; Obermann, Ellen C; Tornillo, Luigi; Terracciano, Luigi M; Fischer, Claude A

    2013-02-01

    Lymph node involvement is prognostically the most determinant clinical factor for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Ultrasound of the neck and fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology is one of the first diagnostic procedures and the most accurate diagnostic staging tool for the neck. Patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas (OPSCC) show a significantly better prognosis when compared with HPV-negative OPSCC. P16 overexpression is accepted as surrogate marker for HPV-positive in OPSCC. These HPV/p16-positive OPSCC are localized either in the palatal tonsils or the base of tongue and frequently present with lymph node metastases. We analyzed the correlation and reliability of p16 expression of the FNA of the lymph node metastasis with the immunohistochemical expression of p16 of the same lymph node metastasis and its corresponding primary tumor, as it could be of importance for determining the localization and different prognosis of the primary tumor. 54 HNSCC patients were evaluated, p16 expression of the primary tumors and their lymph node metastases correlated precisely. In 25 of the 54 HNSCC patients, a FNA of the lymph node metastases was taken before the treatment. The positive cytological and immunohistochemical p16 staining correlated exactly. Of the 17 histologically p16-negative lymph node metastases 15 FNA were p16-negative, whereas two samples were p16-positive. In our view, a cytological p16 analysis of cervical lymph node metastasis can facilitate the correct localization of the primary tumor and discriminate reliably HPV-positive OPSCC from HPV-negative HNSCC with their significantly diverse prognosis.

  17. Imaging of pediatric neck masses.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Elliott R; John, Susan D

    2011-07-01

    Palpable neck masses are a common indication for pediatric imaging. Such lesions may be caused by infectious, inflammatory, tumoral, traumatic, lymphovascular, immunologic, or congenital etiologies. Radiological assessment of neck masses in young children should be tailored based on patient presentation and physical examination, as well as clinical suspicion. The goal of imaging should be to help arrive at a diagnosis or limited differential in an efficient manner while minimizing radiation exposure.

  18. [Cervical recurrence in the pathologically negative neck (pNO): finding a needle in a haystack].

    PubMed

    Lassaletta, L; Bernáldez, R; González, T; Gavilán, J

    2002-01-01

    Recurrence in the pathologically negative neck (pN0) is one of the most striking events occurring in head and neck tumors. It is not even mentioned in many neck dissection studies. The presence of micrometastases has been suggested as an explanation for this event. In accordance to a recent study performed in our institution, we bring up this controversial issue. A definitive explanation for recurrence in the pN0 has not yet been proposed.

  19. Is one better than another?: A randomized clinical trial of manual therapy for patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo Pérez, Honorio; Alonso Perez, Jose Luis; Gil Martinez, Alfonso; La Touche, Roy; Lerma-Lara, Sergio; Commeaux Gonzalez, Noelia; Arribas Perez, Hector; Bishop, Mark D; Fernández-Carnero, Josue

    2014-06-01

    Our purpose was to compare the effectiveness of three manual therapy techniques: high velocity, low amplitude (HVLA), mobilization (Mob) and sustained natural apophyseal glide (SNAG) in patients with chronic neck pain (CNP). The randomized controlled trial included patients with mechanically reproducible CNP, who were randomized to the treatment group. Outcome measures were the Visual Analogue scale (VAS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), Global Rating of Change (GROC) and Cervical Range of Motion (CROM). Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance compared outcomes at baseline, at the end of treatment and 1, 2 and 3 months after treatment. A total of 51 subjects completed the trial. No significant differences were found between HVLA, Mob and SNAG at the end of treatment and during the follow-up in any of the analysed outcomes. There were no differences in satisfaction for all techniques. The results lead to the conclusion that there is no long-term difference between the application of HVLA, Mob and SNAG in pain, disability and cervical range of motion for patients with CNP.

  20. Expression of TP53 mutation-associated microRNAs predicts clinical outcome in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Ganci, F.; Sacconi, A.; Bossel Ben-Moshe, N.; Manciocco, V.; Sperduti, I.; Strigari, L.; Covello, R.; Benevolo, M.; Pescarmona, E.; Domany, E.; Muti, P.; Strano, S.; Spriano, G.; Fontemaggi, G.; Blandino, G.

    2013-01-01

    Background TP53 mutation is associated with decreased survival rate in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. We set out to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) whose expression associates with TP53 mutation and survival in HNSCC. Patients and methods We analyzed TP53 status by direct sequencing of exons 2 through 11 of a prospective series of 121 HNSCC samples and assessed its association with outcome in 109 followed-up patients. We carried out miRNA expression profiling on 121 HNSCC samples and 66 normal counterparts. miRNA associations with TP53 mutations and outcome were evaluated. Results A TP53 mutation was present in 58% of the tumors and TP53 mutations were significantly associated with a shorter recurrence-free survival. This association was stronger in the clinical subgroup of patients subjected to adjuvant therapy after surgery. The expression of 49 miRNAs was significantly associated with TP53 status. Among these 49, we identified a group of 12 miRNAs whose expression correlates with recurrence-free survival and a group of 4 miRNAs that correlates with cancer-specific survival. The two groups share three miRNAs. Importantly, miRNAs that correlate with survival are independent prognostic factors either when considered individually or as signatures. Conclusions miRNAs expression associates with TP53 status and with reduced survival after surgical treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. PMID:24107801

  1. D-IMRT verification with a 2D pixel ionization chamber: dosimetric and clinical results in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Stasi, M; Giordanengo, S; Cirio, R; Boriano, A; Bourhaleb, F; Cornelius, I; Donetti, M; Garelli, E; Gomola, I; Marchetto, F; Porzio, M; Sanz Freire, C J; Sardo, A; Peroni, C

    2005-10-07

    Dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (D-IMRT) using the sliding-window technique is currently applied for selected treatments of head and neck cancer at Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment of Candiolo (Turin, Italy). In the present work, a PiXel-segmented ionization Chamber (PXC) has been used for the verification of 19 fields used for four different head and neck cancers. The device consists of a 32x32 matrix of 1024 parallel-plate ionization chambers arranged in a square of 24x24 cm2 area. Each chamber has 0.4 cm diameter and 0.55 cm height; a distance of 0.75 cm separates the centre of adjacent chambers. The sensitive volume of each single ionization chamber is 0.07 cm3. Each of the 1024 independent ionization chambers is read out with a custom microelectronics chip.The output factors in water obtained with the PXC at a depth of 10 cm were compared to other detectors and the maximum difference was 1.9% for field sizes down to 3x3 cm2. Beam profiles for different field dimensions were measured with the PXC and two other types of ionization chambers; the maximum distance to agreement (DTA) in the 20-80% penumbra region of a 3x3 cm2 field was 0.09 cm. The leaf speed of the multileaf collimator was varied between 0.07 and 2 cm s-1 and the detector response was constant to better than 0.6%. The behaviour of the PXC was measured while varying the dose rate between 0.21 and 1.21 Gy min-1; the mean difference was 0.50% and the maximum difference was 0.96%. Using fields obtained with an enhanced dynamic wedge and a staircase-like (step) IMRT field, the PXC has been tested for simple 1D modulated beams; comparison with film gave a maximum DTA of 0.12 cm. The PXC was then used to check four different IMRT plans for head and neck cancer treatment: cervical chordoma, parotid, ethmoid and skull base. In the comparison of the PXC versus film and PXC versus treatment planning system, the number of pixels with gamma parameter

  2. D-IMRT verification with a 2D pixel ionization chamber: dosimetric and clinical results in head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasi, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Cirio, R.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cornelius, I.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Gomola, I.; Marchetto, F.; Porzio, M.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Sardo, A.; Peroni, C.

    2005-10-01

    Dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (D-IMRT) using the sliding-window technique is currently applied for selected treatments of head and neck cancer at Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment of Candiolo (Turin, Italy). In the present work, a PiXel-segmented ionization Chamber (PXC) has been used for the verification of 19 fields used for four different head and neck cancers. The device consists of a 32 × 32 matrix of 1024 parallel-plate ionization chambers arranged in a square of 24 × 24 cm2 area. Each chamber has 0.4 cm diameter and 0.55 cm height; a distance of 0.75 cm separates the centre of adjacent chambers. The sensitive volume of each single ionization chamber is 0.07 cm3. Each of the 1024 independent ionization chambers is read out with a custom microelectronics chip. The output factors in water obtained with the PXC at a depth of 10 cm were compared to other detectors and the maximum difference was 1.9% for field sizes down to 3 × 3 cm2. Beam profiles for different field dimensions were measured with the PXC and two other types of ionization chambers; the maximum distance to agreement (DTA) in the 20-80% penumbra region of a 3 × 3 cm2 field was 0.09 cm. The leaf speed of the multileaf collimator was varied between 0.07 and 2 cm s-1 and the detector response was constant to better than 0.6%. The behaviour of the PXC was measured while varying the dose rate between 0.21 and 1.21 Gy min-1; the mean difference was 0.50% and the maximum difference was 0.96%. Using fields obtained with an enhanced dynamic wedge and a staircase-like (step) IMRT field, the PXC has been tested for simple 1D modulated beams; comparison with film gave a maximum DTA of 0.12 cm. The PXC was then used to check four different IMRT plans for head and neck cancer treatment: cervical chordoma, parotid, ethmoid and skull base. In the comparison of the PXC versus film and PXC versus treatment planning system, the number of pixels with γ parameter <=1 was 97.7% and 97

  3. Efficacy of Electrical Stimulation and Exercise for Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Langmore, Susan E; McCulloch, Timothy M; Krisciunas, Gintas P; Lazarus, Cathy L.; Van Daele, Douglas J; Pauloski, Barbara Roa; Rybin, Denis; Doros, Gheorghe

    2015-01-01

    Background Electrical stimulation (NMES) is a highly sought after but poorly studied treatment for dysphagia among head and neck cancer (HNC) patients with dysphagia. This study investigated the efficacy of NMES in this patient population. Methods In this double-blinded, randomized controlled trial, 170 HNC patients experiencing post-treatment dysphagia were randomized into active NMES + swallow exercise versus sham NMES + swallow exercise groups. Outcomes after a 12-week program included changes in fluoroscopy measures, diet, and quality of life. Results After the 12-week program, the active NMES group had significantly worse Penetration Aspiration Scale scores than the sham group. Both groups reported significantly better diet and quality of life. No other measures were significant. Conclusions NMES did not add benefit to traditional swallow exercises. Unfortunately swallow exercises were not effective by themselves either. For HNC patients with moderate-severe dysphagia caused by radiation therapy, current behavioral therapies are of limited help in reversing long-term dysphagia. PMID:26469360

  4. Phase II clinical trial of cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and ifosfamide as treatment for advanced locoregional head and neck carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Parra, M; Churruca, C; Paredes, A; Lacasta, A; López de Argumedo, G; Alvárez, I; Abad, T; Egana, L; Guimón, E; Piera, J M

    1999-02-01

    The association of ifosfamide with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil for the management of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck was assessed in this trial. Ifosfamide was given initially to 12 patients in combination with standard fixed doses of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, at 1,000 mg/m2 daily on days 2, 3, and 4. Two patients died of neutropenia and severe infection, and the authors recruited seven more patients who were treated with a lower dose of ifosfamide, 800 mg/m2 daily on days 2, 3, and 4. One of the seven patients died of neutropenia and severe infection. Three complete remission were observed in 18 patients evaluable for efficacy. The study was closed early because of the severe toxicity profile demonstrated by this scheme and because of no clear advantage in efficacy versus cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil combinations.

  5. SU-E-T-593: Clinical Evaluation of Direct Aperture Optimization in Head/Neck and Prostate IMRT Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hosini, M; GALAL, M; Emam, I; Kamal, G; Algohary, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the planning and dosimetric advantages of direct aperture optimization (DAO) over beam-let optimization in IMRT treatment of head and neck (H/N) and prostate cancers. Methods: Five Head and Neck as well as five prostate patients were planned using the beamlet optimizer in Elekta-Xio ver 4.6 IMRT treatment planning system. Based on our experience in beamlet IMRT optimization, PTVs in H/N plans were prescribed to 70 Gy delivered by 7 fields. While prostate PTVs were prescribed to 76 Gy with 9 fields. In all plans, fields were set to be equally spaced. All cases were re-planed using Direct Aperture optimizer in Prowess Panther ver 5.01 IMRT planning system at same configurations and dose constraints. Plans were evaluated according to ICRU criteria, number of segments, number of monitor units and planning time. Results: For H/N plans, the near maximum dose (D2) and the dose that covers 95% D95 of PTV has improved by 4% in DAO. For organs at risk (OAR), DAO reduced the volume covered by 30% (V30) in spinal cord, right parotid, and left parotid by 60%, 54%, and 53% respectively. This considerable dosimetric quality improvement achieved using 25% less planning time and lower number of segments and monitor units by 46% and 51% respectively. In DAO prostate plans, Both D2 and D95 for the PTV were improved by only 2%. The V30 of the right femur, left femur and bladder were improved by 35%, 15% and 3% respectively. On the contrary, the rectum V30 got even worse by 9%. However, number of monitor units, and number of segments decreased by 20% and 25% respectively. Moreover the planning time reduced significantly too. Conclusion: DAO introduces considerable advantages over the beamlet optimization in regards to organs at risk sparing. However, no significant improvement occurred in most studied PTVs.

  6. Neck abscess: 79 cases

    PubMed Central

    Bulgurcu, Suphi; Arslan, Ilker Burak; Demirhan, Erhan; Kozcu, Sureyya Hikmet; Cukurova, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Neck abscess is a disease that might cause mortality and severe morbidity, if it is not treated urgently. In our study, patients with diagnosis of neck abscess in our clinic were analyzed retrospectively and presented in the light of the literature. METHODS: In our clinic, age distribution, source of infection, systemic disease, imaging methods that were used in diagnosis, preferred anaesthesia during drainage, abscess sites, culture results of abscess material, complications during treatment procedure, any antibiotherapy before admission and duration of hospitalization of 79 cases with neck abscess who were treated in the hospital between January 2008 and January 2015 were assessed. RESULTS: Cases in our study were aged between 1–79 (mean 28.3) years and 43 of them were female and 36 were male patients. Systemic diseases were determined in 19 of the cases. The most common systemic disease was diabetes mellitus. Abscesses were localized mostly at peritonsillar region and 13 of the cases were operated when abscess were in multipl localizations. In 74 of the cases, drainage was performed under local anaesthesia and in 5 cases under general anaesthesia. Four of these 5 cases, abscesses were localized within retropharyngeal region and 1 of them had multiple abscesses at various regions. Staphylococcus aereus was the most detected microorganism based on culture results. Three adult cases were followed up in the intensive care unit because of development of mediastinitis. One of these 3 cases exited because of sepsis. Hospitalization periods of 79 cases ranged between 2–21 days (mean 7.64 days). Hospitalization period of 19 cases with systemic diseases were 9.47 days (p<0.05) and statistically which were statistically significantly longer when compared with those without any systemic disease. CONCLUSION: Neck abscess must be diagnosed early and treated with surgical drainage and parenteral therapy because it might cause severe complications. PMID:28058371

  7. On realizations of exterior calculus with dN = 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, V.

    1998-11-01

    We study realizations of the q-exterior calculus with exterior differential d satisfying d N = 0, N > 2 on the free associative algebra with one generator and on the generalized Clifford algebras. Analogs of the notions of connection and curvature are discussed in the case of the q-exterior calculus on the generalized Clifford algebra. We show that the q-exterior calculus on the free associative algebra with one generator is related to q-calculus on the braided line.

  8. Investigating Clinical Failure of Bone Grafting through a Window at the Femoral Head Neck Junction Surgery for the Treatment of Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Zhao, Dingyan; Gao, Fuqiang; Su, Yangming; Li, Zirong

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to analyze the clinical factors related to the failure of bone grafting through a window at the femoral head-neck junction. Methods In total, 119 patients (158 hips) underwent bone grafting for treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The patients were classified by their ARCO staging and CJFH classification. All patients were clinically and radiographically followed up every three months during the first year and every six months in the following year. The clinical follow-up comprised determination of pre- and postoperative Harris hip scores, while serial AP, frog lateral radiographs, and CT scan were used for the radiographic follow-up. Results The clinical failure of bone grafting was observed in 40 patients. The clinical failure rates in patients belonging to ARCO stage II period, IIIa, and III (b + c) were 25.9%, 16.2%, and 61.5%, respectively, while those in patients belonging to (C + M + L1) type and L2, L3 type disease groups were 1.7%, 38.9%, and 39%, respectively. The clinical failure rates in patients aged below 40 and those aged 40 and over were 20.5% and 39.0%, respectively (all P < 0.05). Conclusion Disease type, disease stage, and patient age are risk factors for failure of bone graft surgery. Patients belonging to ARCO stage II and IIIa showed a good overall response rate, while patients belonging to ARCO stage IIIb and IIIc and those with necrotic lesions involving the lateral pillar (L2 and L3 type) showed high surgical failure rates. PMID:27285821

  9. (18)F-FDG PET/CT quantification in head and neck squamous cell cancer: principles, technical issues and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Manca, Gianpiero; Vanzi, Eleonora; Rubello, Domenico; Giammarile, Francesco; Grassetto, Gaia; Wong, Ka Kit; Perkins, Alan C; Colletti, Patrick M; Volterrani, Duccio

    2016-07-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). The major clinical applications of this method include diagnosing an unknown primary tumour, identifying regional lymph node involvement and distant metastases, and providing prognostic information. (18)F-FDG PET/CT is also used for precise delineation of the tumour volume for radiation therapy planning and dose painting, and for treatment response monitoring, by detecting residual or recurrent disease. Most of these applications would benefit from a quantitative approach to the disease, but the quantitative capability of (18)F-FDG PET/CT is still underused in HNSCC. Innovations in PET/CT technology promise to overcome the issues that until now have hindered the employment of dynamic procedures in clinical practice and have limited "quantification" to the evaluation of standardized uptake values (SUV), de facto a semiquantitative parameter, the limits of which are well known to the nuclear medicine community. In this paper the principles of quantitative imaging and the related technical issues are reviewed so that professionals involved in HNSCC management can reflect on the advantages of "true" quantification. A discussion is then presented on how semiquantitative information is currently used in clinical (18)F-FDG PET/CT applications in HNSCC, by discussing the improvements that could be obtained with more advanced and "personalized" quantification techniques.

  10. Skin Cancer of the Head and Neck With Perineural Invasion: Defining the Clinical Target Volumes Based on the Pattern of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Gluck, Iris; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Popovtzer, Aron; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Prince, Mark E.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Bradford, Carol R.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To analyze patterns of failure in patients with head-and-neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (HNCSCC) and clinical/radiologic evidence of perineural invasion (CPNI), in order to define neural clinical target volume (CTV) for treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for HNCSCC with CPNI were included in the study. A retrospective review of the clinical charts, radiotherapy (RT) plans and radiologic studies has been conducted. Results: Eleven consecutive patients with HNCSCCs with CPNI were treated from 2000 through 2007. Most patients underwent multiple surgical procedures and RT courses. The most prevalent failure pattern was along cranial nerves (CNs), and multiple CNs were ultimately involved in the majority of cases. In all cases the involved CNs at recurrence were the main nerves innervating the primary tumor sites, as well as their major communicating nerves. We have found several distinct patterns of disease spread along specific CNs depending on the skin regions harboring the primary tumors, including multiple branches of CN V and VII. These patterns and the pertinent anatomy are detailed in the this article. Conclusions: Predictable disease spread patterns along cranial nerves supplying the primary tumor sites were found in this study. Awareness of these patterns, as well as knowledge of the relevant cranial nerve anatomy, should be the basis for CTV definition and delineation for RT treatment planning.

  11. Smartphone Application WeChat for Clinical Follow-up of Discharged Patients with Head and Neck Tumors: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Ke-Xing; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Bin; Xiong, Guan-Xia; Yang, Wei-Qiang; Liu, Qi-Hong; Zhu, Xiao-Lin; Sun, Wei; Jiang, Ai-Yun; Wen, Wei-Ping; Lei, Wen-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, social media tools such as short message service, Twitter, video, and web-based systems are more and more used in clinical follow-up, making clinical follow-up much more time- and cost-effective than ever before. However, as the most popular social media in China, little is known about the utility of smartphone WeChat application in follow-up. In this study, we aimed to investigate the feasibility and superiority of WeChat application in clinical follow-up. Methods: A total of 108 patients diagnosed with head and neck tumor were randomized to WeChat follow-up (WFU) group or telephone follow-up (TFU) group for 6-month follow-up. The follow-ups were delivered by WeChat or telephone at 2 weeks, 1, 2, 3, and 6 months to the patients after being discharged. The study measurements were time consumption for follow-up delivery, total economic cost, lost-to-follow-up rate, and overall satisfaction for the follow-up method. Results: Time consumption in WFU group for each patient (23.36 ± 6.16 min) was significantly shorter than that in TFU group (42.89 ± 7.15 min) (P < 0.001); total economic cost in WFU group (RMB 90 Yuan) was much lower than that in TFU group (RMB 196 Yuan). Lost-to-follow-up rate in the WFU group was 7.02% (4/57) compared with TFU group, 9.80% (5/51), while no significance was observed (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.176–2.740; P = 0.732). The overall satisfaction rate in WFU group was 94.34% (50/53) compared with 80.43% (37/46) in TFU group (95% CI: 0.057–0.067; P = 0.034). Conclusions: The smartphone WeChat application was found to be a viable option for follow-up in discharged patients with head and neck tumors. WFU was time-effective, cost-effective, and convenient in communication. This doctor-led follow-up model has the potential to establish a good physician-patient relationship by enhancing dynamic communications and providing individual health instructions. Trial Registration: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, Chi

  12. Expression and clinical significance of connective tissue growth factor in advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Ryoko; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Maekawa, Hitoshi; Kozaki, Ken-Ichi; Imoto, Issei; Tamai, Seiichi; Shiotani, Akihiro; Iwaya, Keiichi; Sakamoto, Masaru; Sekiya, Takao; Matsubara, Osamu

    2014-07-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been reported to play critical roles in the tumorigenesis of several human malignancies. This study was performed to evaluate CTGF protein expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Surgical specimens from 76 primary HNSCC were obtained with written informed consents and the expression level of CTGF was immunohistochemically evaluated. The cytoplasmic immunoreactivity of CTGF in cancer cells was semiquantitatively classified into low and high expression. Among all 76 cases with or without neoadjuvant therapy, low CTGF showed significantly longer (P = 0.0282) overall survival (OS), but not disease-free survival (DFS) than high CTGF. Although low CTGF in patients with stage I, II and III did not result in any significant difference of the OS and DFS, stage IV HNSCC patients with low CTGF showed significantly longer OS (P = 0.032) and DFS (P = 0.0107) than those with high CTGF. These differences in stage IV cases were also confirmed using multivariate analyses. These results suggest that low CTGF in stage IV HNSCC is an independent prognostic factor, despite with or without neoadjuvant therapy.

  13. Treatment of Femoral Neck Fracture with a Minimal Invasive Surgical Approach for Hemiarthroplasty – Clinical and Radiological Results in 180 Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Unger, A.C; Dirksen, B; Renken, F. G; Wilde, E; Willkomm, M; Schulz, A.P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : The Direct Anterior Approach (DAA) is well established as a minimal access approach in elective orthopaedic hip surgery. For the growing number of elderly patients with femoral neck fractures treated with Bipolar Hip Hemiarthroplasty (BHH), only a few results do exist. The study shows the clinical and radiological outcome for 180 patients treated by a modified DAA with BHH. Materials and Methods : The data of 180 geriatric patients with medial femoral neck fractures were evaluated retrospectively. The general and surgical complications, mobilisation using the Timed Up and Go test (TUG), the social environment pre- and postoperative and the radiological results have been compared with established approaches for geriatric hip surgery. Results : After joint replacement, 18 (10%) patients were developed pneumonia, of which 3 (1.7%) died during hospitalisation. In 7 cases (4%), surgical revision had to be carried out: three times (1.7%) because of a seroma, three times (1.7%) because of subcutaneous infection, and one time (0.6%) because the BHH was removed, owing to deep wound infection. One dislocation (0.6%) occurred, as well as one femoral nerve lesion (0.6%) occured. 88.3% of patients were mobilised on walkers or crutches; the Timed Up and Go Test showed a significant improvement during inpatient rehabilitation. 83% were discharged to their usual social environment, 10% were transferred to a short-term care facility and 7% were relocated permanently to a nursing home. 3/4 of patients had a cemented stem alignment in the range between -5° and 5°, while 2/3 of patients had a maximum difference of 1 cm in leg length. Conclusion : Using the modified DAA, a high patient satisfaction is achieved after implantation of a BHH. The rate of major complications is just as low as in conventional approaches, and rapid mobilisation is possible. PMID:25136389

  14. Near-Infrared Fluorescence Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping of the Oral Cavity in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    van der Vorst, Joost R.; Schaafsma, Boudewijn E.; Verbeek, Floris P.R.; Keereweer, Stijn; Jansen, Jeroen C.; van der Velden, Lilly-Ann; Langeveld, Antonius; Hutteman, Merlijn; Löwik, Clemens; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Frangioni, John V.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Elective neck dissection is frequently performed during surgery in head and neck cancer patients. The sentinel lymph node (SLN) procedure can prevent the morbidity of a neck dissection and improve lymph node staging by fine pathology. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging is a promising technique to identify the sentinel lymph node (SLN) intraoperatively. This feasibility study explored the use of indocyanine green adsorbed to human serum albumin (ICG:HSA) for SLN mapping in head and neck cancer patients. Materials and Methods A total of 10 consecutive patients with oral cavity or oropharyngeal cancer and a clinical N0 neck were included. After exposure of the neck, 1.6 mL of ICG:HSA (500 μM) was injected at 4 quadrants around the tumor. During the neck dissection, levels I, II, III and IV were measured for fluorescence using the Mini-FLARE imaging system. Results In all 10 patients, NIR fluorescence imaging enabled visualization of one or more SLNs. A total of 17 SLNs were identified. The mean contrast between the fluorescent signal of the lymph nodes and of the surrounding tissue was 8.7 ± 6.4. In 3 patients, of which 1 was false-negative, lymph node metastases were found. After administration of ICG:HSA, the average number of fluorescent lymph nodes significantly increased over time (P < 0.001). Conclusion This study demonstrated feasibility to detect draining lymph nodes in head and neck cancer patients using NIR fluorescence imaging. However, the fluorescent tracer quickly migrated beyond the SLN to higher tier nodes. PMID:22939692

  15. Radiation therapy for head and neck neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book presents the clinical manifestations of disease, applied anatomy pertaining to the management of head and neck tumors, and results of conventional radiation therapy for uncommon tumors have been explored. It also contains an additional chapter on altered fractionation radiation therapy pertaining to irradiation of major head and neck tumors.

  16. Esthesioneuroblastoma: Is There a Need for Elective Neck Treatment?

    SciTech Connect

    Demiroz, Candan; Gutfeld, Orit; Aboziada, Mohamed; Brown, Doris; Marentette, Lawrence J.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the risk of cervical lymph node metastases after definitive treatment for esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) that did not include elective neck therapy. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 26 ENB patients treated at University of Michigan between 1995 and 2007. Tumor stage was Kadish A in 1 patient, B in 19, C in 5, and unknown in 1. Craniofacial or subcranial resection was performed in 24 patients (92%), with negative margins in 22 (92%). Postoperative radiotherapy (RT) to the primary site was given in 12 patients (46%), and 14 patients (54%) had surgery alone. All patients had clinically N0 disease, and no patient underwent elective neck dissection or radiation. Median follow-up was 72 months. Results: Local relapse-free survival was significantly better for patients who received postoperative RT compared with those who had surgery alone: 100% vs. 29% at 5 years, respectively (p = 0.005). Five-year disease-free survival was 87.5% in the RT group vs. 31% in the surgery-alone group (p = 0.05). Regional failure was observed in 7 patients (27%), 6 with Kadish Stage B and 1 with Stage C disease. The most common site of nodal failure was Level II, and 3 patients failed in the contralateral neck. Only 3 patients with regional failure were successfully salvaged. Conclusion: The high rate of regional failures when the neck is not electively treated justifies elective nodal RT in patients with both Kadish Stages B and C. In addition, our experience confirms the beneficial effect on local control of adjuvant RT to the tumor bed.

  17. Clinical significance of Anoctamin-1 gene at 11q13 in the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Juan P.; Menéndez, Sofía Tirados; Hermida-Prado, Francisco; Álvarez-Teijeiro, Saúl; Villaronga, M. Ángeles; Alonso-Durán, Laura; Vallina, Aitana; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Astudillo, Aurora; Suárez, Carlos; María García-Pedrero, Juana

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the clinical significance of Anoctamin-1 gene mapping at 11q13 amplicon in both the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). ANO1 protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 372 surgically treated HNSCC patients and also in 35 laryngeal precancerous lesions. ANO1 gene amplification was determined by real-time PCR in all the laryngeal premalignancies and 60 of the HNSCCs, and molecular data correlated with clinical outcome. ANO1 gene amplification was frequently detected in both premalignant lesions (63%) and HNSCC tumours (58%), whereas concomitant ANO1 expression occurred at a much lower frequency (20 and 22%). Interestingly, laryngeal dysplasias harbouring ANO1 gene amplification showed a higher risk of malignant transformation (HR = 3.62; 95% CI 0.79–16.57; P = 0.097; Cox regression). ANO1 expression and gene amplification showed no significant associations with clinicopathological parameters in HNSCC. However, remarkably ANO1 expression differentially influenced patient survival depending on the tumour site. Collectively, this study provides original evidence demonstrating the distinctive impact of ANO1 expression on HNSCC prognosis depending on the tumour site. PMID:26498851

  18. Stabilization of p21 by mTORC1/4E-BP1 predicts clinical outcome of head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Susana; García-Pedrero, Juana M.; Morgado-Palacin, Lucia; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Serrano, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The levels, regulation and prognostic value of p21 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) has been puzzling for years. Here, we report a new mechanism of regulation of p21 by the mTORC1/4E-BP1 pathway. We find that non-phosphorylated 4E-BP1 interacts with p21 and induces its degradation. Accordingly, hyper-activation of mTORC1 results in phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and stabilization of p21. In HNSCC, p21 levels strongly correlate with mTORC1 activity but not with p53 status. Finally, clinical data indicate that HNSCC patients with p21 and phospho-S6-double-positive tumours present a better disease-specific survival. We conclude that over-activation of the mTORC1/4E-BP1/p21 pathway is a frequent and clinically relevant alteration in HNSCC. PMID:26832959

  19. Clinical significance of Anoctamin-1 gene at 11q13 in the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Juan P; Menéndez, Sofía Tirados; Hermida-Prado, Francisco; Álvarez-Teijeiro, Saúl; Villaronga, M Ángeles; Alonso-Durán, Laura; Vallina, Aitana; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Astudillo, Aurora; Suárez, Carlos; María García-Pedrero, Juana

    2015-10-26

    This study investigates the clinical significance of Anoctamin-1 gene mapping at 11q13 amplicon in both the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). ANO1 protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 372 surgically treated HNSCC patients and also in 35 laryngeal precancerous lesions. ANO1 gene amplification was determined by real-time PCR in all the laryngeal premalignancies and 60 of the HNSCCs, and molecular data correlated with clinical outcome. ANO1 gene amplification was frequently detected in both premalignant lesions (63%) and HNSCC tumours (58%), whereas concomitant ANO1 expression occurred at a much lower frequency (20 and 22%). Interestingly, laryngeal dysplasias harbouring ANO1 gene amplification showed a higher risk of malignant transformation (HR = 3.62; 95% CI 0.79-16.57; P = 0.097; Cox regression). ANO1 expression and gene amplification showed no significant associations with clinicopathological parameters in HNSCC. However, remarkably ANO1 expression differentially influenced patient survival depending on the tumour site. Collectively, this study provides original evidence demonstrating the distinctive impact of ANO1 expression on HNSCC prognosis depending on the tumour site.

  20. Integrating Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Assay With Clinical Parameters Improves Risk Classification for Relapse and Survival in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Christine H.; Hammond, Elizabeth M.; Trotti, Andy M.; Wang Huijun; Spencer, Sharon; Zhang Huazhong; Cooper, Jay; Jordan, Richard; Rotman, Marvin H.; Ang, K. Kian

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression has been consistently found to be an independent predictor of local-regional relapse (LRR) after radiotherapy. We assessed the extent by which it can refine risk classification for overall survival (OS) and LRR in patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: EGFR expression in locally advanced HNSCC was measured by immunohistochemistry in a series of patients randomized to receive accelerated or conventional radiation regimens in a Phase III trial. Subsequently, data of the two series were pooled (N = 533) for conducting a recursive partitioning analysis that incorporated clinical parameters (e.g., performance status, primary site, T and N categories) and four molecular markers (EGFR, p53, Ki-67, and microvessel density). Results: This study confirmed that patients with higher than median levels of tumor EGFR expression had a lower OS (relative risk [RR]: 1.90, p = 0.0010) and a higher LRR (RR: 1.91, p = 0.0163). Of the four markers analyzed, only EGFR was found to contribute to refining classification of patients into three risk classes with distinct OS and LRR outcomes. The addition of EGFR to three clinical parameters could identify patients having up to a fivefold difference in the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Adding pretreatment EGFR expression data to known robust clinical prognostic variables improved the estimation of the probability for OS and LRR after radiotherapy. Its use for stratifying or selecting patients with defined tumor feature and pattern of relapse for enrollment into clinical trials testing specific therapeutic strategy warrants further investigation.

  1. Comparison of King Vision and Truview Laryngoscope for Postextubation Visualization of Vocal Cord Mobility in Patients Undergoing Thyroid and Major Neck Surgeries: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Priyanka, Anto Sahaya; Nag, Kusha; Hemanth Kumar, V. R.; Singh, Dewan Roshan; Kumar, Senthil; Sivashanmugam, T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Visualization of vocal cords following extubation after thyroid and major neck surgeries is highly desirable for the surgeon as well as the anaesthesiologist to rule out vocal cord palsy or oedema. As the patient is emerging from general anaesthesia, it may be challenging for the anaesthesiologist to optimally visualise and grade vocal cord movement following extubation. Setting: Randomized clinical trial at a tertiary care centre. Methodology: After obtaining institutional ethics committee approval, 60 patients posted for thyroid and major neck surgeries under American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade I and II were recruited for the study. Written informed consent was obtained. Pre-operatively indirect laryngoscopy was performed in all the patients to assess baseline vocal cord function. All patients were premedicated and induced and maintained as per standardized anaesthesia protocol. Patients were randomized using a sealed envelope technique to either Group K where intubation was performed using Kings vision laryngoscope or Group T where intubation was performed using True view laryngoscope. Glottis visualization was graded in all patients and intubated. Ten minutes prior to extubation injection. dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg was administered. Once patients satisfied extubation criteria, laryngoscopy was performed using respective video-laryngoscope in each group, patient extubated under vision and assessed for vocal cord visualization and mobility grade (VMG) and patient reactivity score (PRS). Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure was also noted. Total intraoperative morphine consumption was recorded. Vocal cord function was assessed again before the day of discharge by indirect laryngoscopy. Results: Age (P = 0.27), sex (P = 0.08), body mass index (P = 0.70), ASA (P = 0.39), mallampati class (P = 0.72) and morphine used (P = 0.39) were comparable in both groups. There was no statistically

  2. Clinical potential of boron neutron capture therapy for locally recurrent inoperable previously irradiated head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Diana; Quah, Daniel S C; Leech, Michelle; Marignol, Laure

    2015-12-01

    This review compares the safety and efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of previously irradiated, inoperable locoregional recurrent HNC patients and compares BNCT against the standard treatment of platinum-based chemotherapy. Our analysis of published clinical trials highlights efficacy of BNCT associated with mild side effects. However, the use of BNCT should be explored in stratified randomised trials.

  3. Clinical benefit of nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel in recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma resistant to cremophor-based paclitaxel or docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Ley, Jessica; Wildes, Tanya M; Daly, Kristin; Oppelt, Peter; Adkins, Douglas

    2017-02-01

    The clinical benefit of nab-paclitaxel monotherapy for recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (RM-HNSCC) that progressed on other taxanes (cremophor-based paclitaxel or docetaxel) is unknown. A retrospective analysis of patients treated at a single institution with nab-paclitaxel for taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC. The exploratory hypothesis was that nab-paclitaxel would result in clinical benefit (tumor response) in patients with taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC. Twelve patients who were treated with nab-paclitaxel monotherapy for taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC and met all eligibility criteria were identified. The majority of patients (n = 9; 75%) received three or more lines of therapy for RM-HNSCC. All patients had platin-resistant, and ten patients (83%) had cetuximab-resistant disease. Patients had RM-HNSCC that progressed on cremophor-based paclitaxel (8), docetaxel (1), or both (3). With prior taxane, the best tumor response was partial (PR) in 4 patients (33%), stable (SD) in 3 (25%), and progression in 5 (42%). The median time-to-progression (TTP) with prior taxane was 1.7 (range 0.7-9.0) months. The median interval from last dose of taxane to first dose of nab-paclitaxel was 3 (0.7-31.3) months. With nab-paclitaxel, tumor response occurred in two patients (17%; PR in both) and disease control (PR and SD) occurred in five (42%). Median TTP with nab-paclitaxel was 2.1 months (range 0.6-6.2), and median overall survival was 4.9 months (range 1.9-13.5). nab-Paclitaxel provided clinical benefit in some patients with taxane-resistant RM-HNSCC. The median TTP with nab-paclitaxel and with prior taxane were similar. This exploratory observation warrants further investigation in prospective studies.

  4. The possibility of clinical application of the solid state lasers: Nd:YAG, Ho:YAG, and Er:YAG in otolaryngology - head and neck surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaszewska, M.; Kukwa, A.; Tulibacki, M.; Wójtowicz, P.; Olędzka, I.; Jeżewska, E.

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize our experiences in clinical application of Nd:YAG, Ho:YAG and Er:YAG in otolaryngology- head and neck surgery. Choosing the laser type and parameters for the particular procedures was based on our previous research on tissue effects of those lasers. During the period of 1993-2006 we performed 3988 surgical procedures with the Nd:YAG laser. Over 87% of those were made for the nasal cavity pathologies as polyps, hyperplasia of inferior nasal turbinate, granulation tissue, postoperative adhesions, vascular malformations, under the local anesthesia conditions. In our experience Nd:YAG laser gives the possibility of good clinical control and low risk of side effects for disorders of high recurrence and frequent interventions necessity, as nasal polyps or respiratory papillomatosis. Nd:YAG assisted uvulopalatoplasty gives an interesting alternative for surgical procedures for snoring and slight/mild OSA-recognized patients. Due to its good hemostatic properties, it is a perfect tool for removal of the chemodectoma from meddle ear. During the period of 1995-2006 we performed 229 surgical procedures with the Ho:YAG laser, mostly for larynx pathologies (adhesion and scar tissue removal). In our experience Ho:YAG laser can serve as a precise laser knife for both soft and bony tissue. The ER:YAG laser still remain under clinical trial. Since 2001 year we performed 24 procedures of removing stone deposits from salivary glands. We believe it may become a promising method to cope with sialolithiasis which allows for glandule function preservation. All of the laser types mentioned above, can be easily coupled with endoscopes, what makes them available for all of the head and necklocalized disorders.

  5. Japanese Board Certification System for head and neck surgeons.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Seiichi; Nakashima, Torahiko; Fujii, Takashi; Matsuura, Kazuto; Otsuki, Naoki; Asakage, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Hanai, Nobuhiro; Homma, Akihiro; Monden, Nobuya; Okami, Kenji; Sugasawa, Masashi; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Nibu, Ken-ichi; Kamata, Shin-etsu; Kishimoto, Seiji; Kohno, Naoyuki; Fukuda, Satoshi; Hisa, Yasuo

    2014-08-01

    The Japan Society for Head and Neck Surgery (JSHNS) started a board certification system for head and neck surgeons in 2010. To become certified, the following qualification and experiences are required: (1) board certification as otorhinolaryngologist, (2) 2 years of clinical experience in a board-certified training facility, (3) clinical care of 100 patients with head and neck cancer under the supervision of board-certified faculty and (4) surgical experience in 50 major head and neck surgical procedures, including 20 neck dissections, under the supervision of board-certified faculty. The following scientific activities are also required during the preceding 5 years: (1) two clinical papers on head and neck cancers presented at major scientific meetings, (2) one clinical paper on head and neck cancer published in a major journal, (3) attendance at two annual meetings of JSHNS and (4) enrolment in three educational programs approved by JSHNS. The qualifying examination consists of multiple choice tests and oral examinations. A total of 151 head and neck surgeons were certified in 2010 followed by 43 in 2011 and 34 in 2012, while the membership of JSHNS dramatically increased from 1201 in 2007 to 1748 in 2013. Although the board certification system for head and neck surgeons was started only recently, it has encouraged many residents and fellows as well as established head and neck surgeons. We believe that this system will contribute to further advancement in the clinical practice for head and neck cancers in Japan.

  6. Neck-shoulder crossover: how often do neck and shoulder pathology masquerade as each other?

    PubMed

    Sembrano, Jonathan N; Yson, Sharon C; Kanu, Okezika C; Braman, Jonathan P; Santos, Edward Rainier G; Harrison, Alicia K; Polly, David W

    2013-09-01

    Cases of consecutive new patients seen at orthopedic spine and shoulder clinics were reviewed. Four percent of spine patients had significant shoulder pathology, and 3.6% of shoulder patients had significant spine pathology. Identification of the correct pain generator is a prerequisite for effective treatment in patients with neck and/or shoulder problems. However, distinguishing between the two can be difficult. Relative frequencies of how often one is mistaken for the other have not been well established. Six hundred ninety-four new patients were seen at the orthopedic shoulder clinic (n = 452) or spine clinic (n = 242) at an academic institution during a 2-year period. One hundred seven patients had previous shoulder surgery, and 39 had previous neck surgery. The 548 patients (shoulder clinic, 345; spine clinic, 203) who had no previous surgery were reviewed with respect to workup performed, final diagnosis, subsequent operative procedures, and incidence of referral from the shoulder clinic to the spine clinic and vice versa. Among the patients seen at the shoulder clinic, 325 (94.2%) had shoulder pathology, 6 (1.7%) had neck but no shoulder pathology, 6 (1.7%) had shoulder and neck pathology, and 8 (2.3%) had an unidentifiable cause of pain. Of the 12 patients with neck pathology, none underwent neck surgery. Among the patients seen at the spine clinic, 182 (89.7%) had neck pathology, 5 (2.5%) had shoulder but no neck pathology, 3 (1.5%) had neck and shoulder pathology, and 13 (6.4%) had an unidentifiable cause of pain. Of the 8 patients with shoulder pathology, 1 (12.5%) underwent shoulder surgery. Our analysis suggests that for patients who present to a shoulder surgeon's clinic for shoulder pain, 3.6% will turn out to have neck pathology. For patients who present to a spine surgeon's clinic for neck pain, 4% may turn out to have shoulder pathology. Thus, approximately 1 in 25 patients seen at a surgeon's clinic for a presumed shoulder or neck problem may

  7. DICOM for quantitative imaging biomarker development: a standards based approach to sharing clinical data and structured PET/CT analysis results in head and neck cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Clunie, David; Ulrich, Ethan; Bauer, Christian; Wahle, Andreas; Brown, Bartley; Onken, Michael; Riesmeier, Jörg; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron; Buatti, John; Beichel, Reinhard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Imaging biomarkers hold tremendous promise for precision medicine clinical applications. Development of such biomarkers relies heavily on image post-processing tools for automated image quantitation. Their deployment in the context of clinical research necessitates interoperability with the clinical systems. Comparison with the established outcomes and evaluation tasks motivate integration of the clinical and imaging data, and the use of standardized approaches to support annotation and sharing of the analysis results and semantics. We developed the methodology and tools to support these tasks in Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography (PET/CT) quantitative imaging (QI) biomarker development applied to head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment response assessment, using the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM®) international standard and free open-source software. Methods. Quantitative analysis of PET/CT imaging data collected on patients undergoing treatment for HNC was conducted. Processing steps included Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) normalization of the images, segmentation of the tumor using manual and semi-automatic approaches, automatic segmentation of the reference regions, and extraction of the volumetric segmentation-based measurements. Suitable components of the DICOM standard were identified to model the various types of data produced by the analysis. A developer toolkit of conversion routines and an Application Programming Interface (API) were contributed and applied to create a standards-based representation of the data. Results. DICOM Real World Value Mapping, Segmentation and Structured Reporting objects were utilized for standards-compliant representation of the PET/CT QI analysis results and relevant clinical data. A number of correction proposals to the standard were developed. The open-source DICOM toolkit (DCMTK) was improved to simplify the task of DICOM encoding by introducing new API abstractions

  8. DICOM for quantitative imaging biomarker development: a standards based approach to sharing clinical data and structured PET/CT analysis results in head and neck cancer research.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Andriy; Clunie, David; Ulrich, Ethan; Bauer, Christian; Wahle, Andreas; Brown, Bartley; Onken, Michael; Riesmeier, Jörg; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron; Buatti, John; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Imaging biomarkers hold tremendous promise for precision medicine clinical applications. Development of such biomarkers relies heavily on image post-processing tools for automated image quantitation. Their deployment in the context of clinical research necessitates interoperability with the clinical systems. Comparison with the established outcomes and evaluation tasks motivate integration of the clinical and imaging data, and the use of standardized approaches to support annotation and sharing of the analysis results and semantics. We developed the methodology and tools to support these tasks in Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography (PET/CT) quantitative imaging (QI) biomarker development applied to head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment response assessment, using the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM(®)) international standard and free open-source software. Methods. Quantitative analysis of PET/CT imaging data collected on patients undergoing treatment for HNC was conducted. Processing steps included Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) normalization of the images, segmentation of the tumor using manual and semi-automatic approaches, automatic segmentation of the reference regions, and extraction of the volumetric segmentation-based measurements. Suitable components of the DICOM standard were identified to model the various types of data produced by the analysis. A developer toolkit of conversion routines and an Application Programming Interface (API) were contributed and applied to create a standards-based representation of the data. Results. DICOM Real World Value Mapping, Segmentation and Structured Reporting objects were utilized for standards-compliant representation of the PET/CT QI analysis results and relevant clinical data. A number of correction proposals to the standard were developed. The open-source DICOM toolkit (DCMTK) was improved to simplify the task of DICOM encoding by introducing new API abstractions

  9. High RAB25 expression is associated with good clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Gabriel, Marta; Arroyo-Solera, Irene; León, Xavier; Gallardo, Alberto; López, Montserrat; Céspedes, Maria V; Casanova, Isolda; López-Pousa, Antonio; Quer, Miquel; Mangues, Maria A; Barnadas, Agustí; Mangues, Ramón; Pavón, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Currently there are no molecular markers able to predict clinical outcome in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In a previous microarray study, RAB25 was identified as a potential prognostic marker. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between RAB25 expression and clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced HNSCC treated with standard therapy. In a retrospective immunohistochemical study (n = 97), we observed that RAB25-negative tumors had lower survival (log-rank, P = 0.01) than patients bearing positive tumors. In an independent prospective mRNA study (n = 117), low RAB25 mRNA expression was associated with poor prognosis. Using classification and regression tree analysis (CART) we established two groups of patients according to their RAB25 mRNA level and their risk of death. Low mRNA level was associated with poor local recurrence-free (log-rank, P = 0.005), progression-free (log-rank, P = 0.002) and cancer-specific (log-rank, P < 0.001) survival. Multivariate Cox model analysis showed that low expression of RAB25 was an independent poor prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio: 3.84, 95% confidence interval: 1.93–7.62, P < 0.001). Patients whose tumors showed high RAB25 expression had a low probability of death after treatment. We also found lower RAB25 expression in tumors than in normal tissue (Mann–Whitney U, P < 0.001). Moreover, overexpression of RAB25 in the UM-SCC-74B HNSCC cell line increased cisplatin sensitivity, and reduced cell migration and invasion. Our findings support a tumor suppressor role for RAB25 in HNSCC and its potential use to identify locally advanced patients with a high probability of survival after genotoxic treatment. PMID:24403269

  10. Two-year clinical performance of glass ionomer and resin composite restorations in xerostomic head- and neck-irradiated cancer patients.

    PubMed

    De Moor, Roeland J G; Stassen, Inge G; van 't Veldt, Yoke; Torbeyns, Dries; Hommez, Geert M G

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of adhesive filling materials in class V cavities in xerostomic head- and neck-irradiated cancer patients, in terms of marginal adaptation, anatomical form and recurrent caries. We selected 35 high-caries-risk, post-radiation, xerostomic adults with ≥3 cervical carious lesions in the same arch. Every patient received a KetacFil (KF), PhotacFil (PF) and Herculite XRV (HX) restoration. Patients were instructed to use a neutral 1% sodium fluoride gel in custom trays, on a daily basis. After 6, 12, 18 and 24 months, the restorations were examined for material loss, marginal integrity and recurrent caries. Fluoride compliance was determined at each recall appointment and recorded as the percentage of recommended use during that interval [compliance of ≤50% = NFUs, >50% = FUs]. Only 30 patients were available for recall at 6 months, with 28 patients at 12 and 18 months, and 27 patients at 24 months. In the NFU group, differences in recurrent caries were found between KF and HX at all observation times (p < 0.05). Differences (p < 0.05) in adaptation and/or anatomical form were found between KF and PF in NFUs after 18 and 24 months. In FUs, significant differences were observed between KF and PF, and KF and HX after 6 and 12 months, between KF and HX, PF and HX after 18 and 24 months. In summary, glass ionomers (especially the conventionally setting formulation) provide clinical caries inhibition but erode easily, while composite resin provides greater structural integrity.

  11. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... find out more. Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ... find out more. Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ...

  12. Neck Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... the neck, is also called neck sprain or strain. Treatment depends on the cause, but may include applying ice, taking pain relievers, getting physical therapy or wearing a cervical collar. You rarely need surgery.

  13. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  14. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting

    SciTech Connect

    Kumarasiri, Akila Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Kim, Jinkoo

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm{sup 3}. Organs with volumes <3 cm{sup 3} and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm{sup 3}), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours

  15. Elective Neck Dissection for Head and Neck Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Skull Base Invasion.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Richard B; Dundar, Yusuf; Thomas, Andrew; Monroe, Marcus M; Buchmann, Luke O; Witt, Benjamin L; Sowder, Aleksandra M; Hunt, Jason P

    2017-04-01

    Objectives Skull base invasion from cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) via perineural spread affects survival and the rate of regional metastasis. Our objective is to investigate the factors associated with elective neck dissection (END) in this population and the survival difference with END compared with observation for patients with a cN0 neck. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Academic. Subjects and Methods Patients were treated surgically for head and neck cSCC with skull base invasion via perineural spread with a cN0 neck from 2004 to 2014. Clinicopathologic data were collected and analyzed. Primary outcomes were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Fifty-nine patients met inclusion criteria: 28 underwent an END and 31 underwent neck observation. Free tissue transfer reconstruction was significantly associated with END ( P < .001). Patients treated with an END had significantly improved 5-year DFS (57% and 32%, P = .042) and OS (60% and 37%, P = .036) compared with those who were observed and a significantly reduced rate of regional recurrence (9% and 37%, P = .024). The rate of occult nodal metastasis identified with END was 36% and is approximately equal to the regional failure rate of the neck observation group (37%). Conclusion END was more commonly used in cases requiring free tissue transfer. The use of END for head and neck cSCCs that have invaded the skull base is not routinely performed but was found to be associated with a survival advantage and reduced regional recurrence rate.

  16. Expression and clinical significance of the Kv3.4 potassium channel subunit in the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Sofía Tirados; Rodrigo, Juan P; Allonca, Eva; García-Carracedo, Darío; Alvarez-Alija, Gustavo; Casado-Zapico, Sara; Fresno, Manuel F; Rodríguez, Carmen; Suárez, Carlos; García-Pedrero, Juana M

    2010-08-01

    The concept of ion channels as membrane therapeutic targets and diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers has attracted growing attention. We therefore investigated the expression pattern and clinical significance of the Kv3.4 potassium channel subunit during the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). KCNC4 mRNA levels were determined by real-time RT-PCR in both HNSCC tissue specimens and derived cell lines. Kv3.4 protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 84 patients with laryngeal/pharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas and 67 patients with laryngeal dysplasias. Molecular alterations were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and patient outcome. Increased KCNC4 mRNA levels were found in 15 (54%) of 28 tumours, compared to the corresponding normal epithelia and varied mRNA levels were detected in 12 HNSCC-derived cell lines analysed. Increased Kv3.4 protein expression was observed in 34 (40%) of 84 carcinomas and also at early stages of HNSCC tumourigenesis. Thus, 35 (52%) of 67 laryngeal lesions displayed Kv3.4-positive staining in the dysplastic areas, whereas both stromal cells and normal adjacent epithelia exhibited negligible expression. No significant correlations were found between Kv3.4-positive expression in HNSCC and clinical data; however, Kv3.4 expression tended to diminish in advanced-stage tumours. Interestingly, patients carrying Kv3.4-positive dysplasias experienced a significantly higher laryngeal cancer incidence than did those with negative lesions (p = 0.0209). In addition, functional studies using HNSCC cells revealed that inhibition of Kv3.4 expression by siRNA leads to the inhibition of cell proliferation via selective cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase without affecting apoptosis. Collectively, these data demonstrate for the first time that Kv3.4 expression is frequently increased during HNSCC tumourigenesis and correlated significantly with a

  17. Predicting the Effect of Accelerated Fractionation in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Based on Molecular Marker Profiles: Data From a Randomized Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Suwinski, Rafal; Jaworska, Magdalena; Nikiel, Barbara; Grzegorz, Wozniak; Bankowska-Wozniak, Magdalena; Wojciech, Majewski; Krzysztof, Skladowski; Dariusz, Lange

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic and predictive values of molecular marker expression profiles based on data from a randomized clinical trial of postoperative conventional fractionation (p-CF) therapy versus 7-day-per-week postoperative continuous accelerated irradiation (p-CAIR) therapy for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Tumor samples from 148 patients (72 p-CF and 76 p-CAIR patients) were available for molecular studies. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess levels of EGFR, nm23, Ki-67, p-53, and cyclin D1 expression. To evaluate the effect of fractionation relative to the expression profiles, data for locoregional tumor control (LRC) were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Survival curves were compared using the Cox f test. Results: Patients who had tumors with low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression levels and oral cavity/oropharyngeal primary cancer sites tended to benefit from p-CAIR. A joint score for the gain in LRC from p-CAIR based of these features was used to separate the patients into two groups: those who benefited significantly from p-CAIR with respect to LRC (n = 49 patients; 5-year LRC of 28% vs. 68%; p = 0.01) and those who did not benefit from p-CAIR (n = 99 patients; 5-year LRC of 72% vs. 66%; p = 0.38). The nm23 expression level appeared useful as a prognostic factor but not as a predictor of fractionation effect. Conclusions: These results support the studies that demonstrate the potential of molecular profiles to predict the benefit from accelerated radiotherapy. The molecular profile that favored accelerated treatment (low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression) was in a good accordance with results provided by other investigators. Combining individual predictors in a joint score may improve their predictive potential.

  18. Incidence of Small Lymph Node Metastases With Evidence of Extracapsular Extension: Clinical Implications in Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Simcock, Mathew; Schreiber-Facklam, Heide; Zimmer, Yitzhak; Graeter, Ruth; Evers, Christina; Arnold, Andreas; Wilkens, Ludwig; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Small lymph nodes (LN) show evidence of extracapsular extension (ECE) in a significant number of patients. This study was performed to determine the impact of ECE in LN {<=}7 mm as compared with ECE in larger LN. Methods and Materials: All tumor-positive LN of 74 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients with at least one ECE positive LN were analyzed retrospectively for the LN diameter and the extent of ECE. Clinical endpoints were regional relapse-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 2.1 years (range, 0.3-9.2 years). Results: Forty-four of 74 patients (60%) had at least one ECE positive LN {<=}10 mm. These small ECE positive LN had a median diameter of 7 mm, which was used as a cutoff. Thirty patients (41%) had at least one ECE positive LN {<=}7 mm. In both univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses, the incidence of at least one ECE positive LN {<=}7 mm was a statistically significant prognostic factor for decreased regional relapse-free survival (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 2.7, p = 0.03, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-6.4), distant metastasis-free survival (HR: 2.6, p = 0.04, 95% CI: 1.0-6.6), and overall survival (HR: 2.5, p = 0.03, 95% CI: 1.1-5.8). Conclusions: The incidence of small ECE positive LN metastases is a significant prognostic factor in HNSCC patients. Small ECE positive LN may represent more invasive tumor biology and could be used as prognostic markers.

  19. Imaging of pediatric head and neck masses.

    PubMed

    Stern, Jessica S; Ginat, Daniel T; Nicholas, Jennifer L; Ryan, Maura E

    2015-02-01

    Medical imaging is an important tool in the evaluation and classification of pediatric head and neck masses. Such lesions may include congenital, inflammatory, infectious, vascular, or neoplastic processes. Ultrasound is often the first line modality in the workup of a neck mass in a child, followed by MRI or CT depending on the scenario. This information must be interpreted in the context of the patient's clinical history, physical examination, and demographics. The medical imaging workup of a neck mass in a child must be focused to yield the maximum information possible while minimizing the risks of radiation and sedation.

  20. Clinical feasibility of cervical exercise to improve neck pain, body function, and psychosocial factors in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Doo; Kim, Suhn Yeop

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effect of cervical exercise on neck pain, disability, and psychosocial factors in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder. [Subjects] Thirty patients with post-traumatic stress disorder, who also complained of neck pain. [Methods] The cervical exercise group (n = 15) participated in cervical exercises for 30 min, 3 times/week for 6 weeks, and the control group (n = 16) underwent conventional physical therapy alone, without exercise. The exercises were performed in the following order: cervical relaxation, local muscle stabilization, and global muscle stabilization using a sling system. [Results] Compared to the control group, the cervical exercise group demonstrated significant decreases as follows: Visual analogue scale score, 4.2 vs. 1.0; Neck disability index, 3.9 vs. 1.9; and depression on the Symptom checklist-90-revised, 9.4 vs. 4.3 and on the Hopkins symptom checklist-25, 6.3 vs. 2.8. However, anxiety on the Symptom checklist-90-revised (3.1 vs. 1.3) was not significantly different. Effect sizes were as follows: Visual analogue scale score, 1.8; Neck disability index, 0.9; depression, 1.0; and anxiety on Symptom checklist-90-revised and Hopkins symptom checklist-25, 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. [Conclusion] Cervical exercise is effective in improving neck pain, disability, and efficacy of psychological treatment for depression in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder.

  1. The evolution of surgery in the management of neck metastases

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, S; Chiesa, F; Lyubaev, V; Aidarbekova, A; Brzhezovskiy, V

    2006-01-01

    Summary In spite of advancement in science, molecular medicine and target therapies, surgical treatment of metastases using different techniques, from selective neck dissection to extended radical neck dissections, form a major part in the management of neck metastases. This is due to the fact that, so far, there is no treatment more effective for resectable neck metastases, than surgery. Since most head and neck cancer patients die due to loco-regional progression of disease, and a very large majority of them do not live long enough to develop distant metastases, the status of neck lymph nodes remains the single most important prognostic factor, in these cases. In the 100 years since George Washington Crile described Radical Neck Dissection, we now have a much better understanding of the biological and clinical behaviour of neck metastases. This has ultimately led to the conservative approaches of selective neck dissections depending on the primary site of the tumour, type of tumour and the characteristic features of the metastases themselves. A search of the literature on neck lymph nodes and neck dissections, on the internet and in old publications, not available in the electronic media, has been carried out. Using this as the basis, we arranged, in sequence, the dates of various landmarks in the treatment of head and neck cancer related to neck dissections to emphasize the overall process of evolution of neck dissection thereby showing how the field of head and neck surgery has travelled a long way from radical neck dissection to its modifications and further to selective neck dissections and sentinel node biopsies. The present understanding of the patterns of neck metastases enables us not only to adequately treat the neck metastases, but also to diagnose metastases from unknown primaries. Therefore, depending on the site of the primary tumour, it is now easy to predict the most probable route of metastatic spread and vice versa. This has enabled us to adopt

  2. Exploring patient satisfaction: a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial of spinal manipulation, home exercise, and medication for acute and subacute neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Leininger, Brent D; Evans, Roni; Bronfort, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess satisfaction with specific aspects of care for acute neck pain and explore the relationship between satisfaction with care, neck pain and global satisfaction. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of patient satisfaction from a randomized trial of spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) delivered by doctors of chiropractic, home exercise and advice (HEA) delivered by exercise therapists, and medication (MED) prescribed by a medical physician for acute/subacute neck pain. Differences in satisfaction with specific aspects of care were analyzed using a linear mixed model. The relationship between specific aspects of care and 1) change in neck pain (primary outcome of the randomized trial) and 2) global satisfaction were assessed using Pearson’s correlation and multiple linear regression. Results Individuals receiving SMT or HEA were more satisfied with the information and general care received than MED group participants. SMT and HEA groups reported similar satisfaction with information provided during treatment; however, the SMT group was more satisfied with general care. Satisfaction with general care (r=−0.75 to −0.77, R2= 0.55 to 0.56) had a stronger relationship with global satisfaction compared to satisfaction with information provided (r=−0.65 to 0.67, R2=0.39 to 0.46). The relationship between satisfaction with care and neck pain was weak (r=0.17 to 0.38, R2=0.08 to 0.21). Conclusions Individuals with acute/subacute neck pain were more satisfied with specific aspects of care from SMT delivered by doctors of chiropractic or HEA interventions compared to MED prescribed by a medical physician. PMID:25199824

  3. Inclusion of thoracic spine thrust manipulation into an electro-therapy/thermal program for the management of patients with acute mechanical neck pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    González-Iglesias, Javier; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, Cesar; Cleland, Joshua A; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Palomeque-del-Cerro, Luis; Méndez-Sánchez, Roberto

    2009-06-01

    Our aim was to examine the effects of a seated thoracic spine distraction thrust manipulation included in an electrotherapy/thermal program on pain, disability, and cervical range of motion in patients with acute neck pain. This randomized controlled trial included 45 patients (20 males, 25 females) between 23 and 44 years of age presenting with acute neck pain. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: an experimental group which received a thoracic manipulation, and a control group which did not receive the manipulative procedure. Both groups received an electrotherapy program consisting of 6 sessions of TENS (frequency 100Hz; 20min), superficial thermo-therapy (15min) and soft tissue massage. The experimental group also received a thoracic manipulation once a week for 3 consecutive weeks. Outcome measures included neck pain (numerical pain rate scale; NPRS), level of disability (Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire; NPQ) and neck mobility. These outcomes were assessed at baseline and 1 week after discharge. A 2-way repeated-measures ANOVA with group as between-subject variable and time as within-subject variable was used. Patients receiving thoracic manipulation experienced greater reductions in both neck pain, with between-group difference of 2.3 (95% CI 2-2.7) points on a 11-NPRS, and perceived disability with between-group differences 8.5 (95% CI 7.2-9.8) points. Further, patients receiving thoracic manipulation experienced greater increases in all cervical motions with between-group differences of 10.6 degrees (95% CI 8.8-12.5 degrees) for flexion; 9.9 degrees (95% CI 8.1-11.7 degrees) for extension; 9.5 degrees (95% CI 7.6-11.4 degrees) for right lateral-flexion; 8 degrees (95% CI 6.2-9.8 degrees) for left lateral-flexion; 9.6 degrees (95% CI 7.7-11.6 degrees) for right rotation; and 8.4 degrees (95% CI 6.5-10.3 degrees) for left rotation. We found that the inclusion of a thoracic manipulation into an electrotherapy/thermal program was effective in

  4. Short term treatment versus long term management of neck and back disability in older adults utilizing spinal manipulative therapy and supervised exercise: a parallel-group randomized clinical trial evaluating relative effectiveness and harms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Back and neck disability are frequent in older adults resulting in loss of function and independence. Exercise therapy and manual therapy, like spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), have evidence of short and intermediate term effectiveness for spinal disability in the general population and growing evidence in older adults. For older populations experiencing chronic spinal conditions, long term management may be more appropriate to maintain improvement and minimize the impact of future exacerbations. Research is limited comparing short courses of treatment to long term management of spinal disability. The primary aim is to compare the relative effectiveness of 12 weeks versus 36 weeks of SMT and supervised rehabilitative exercise (SRE) in older adults with back and neck disability. Methods/Design Randomized, mixed-methods, comparative effectiveness trial conducted at a university-affiliated research clinic in the Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota metropolitan area. Participants Independently ambulatory community dwelling adults ≥ 65 years of age with back and neck disability of minimum 12 weeks duration (n = 200). Interventions 12 weeks SMT + SRE or 36 weeks SMT + SRE. Randomization Blocked 1:1 allocation; computer generated scheme, concealed in sequentially numbered, opaque, sealed envelopes. Blinding Functional outcome examiners are blinded to treatment allocation; physical nature of the treatments prevents blinding of participants and providers to treatment assignment. Primary endpoint 36 weeks post-randomization. Data collection Self-report questionnaires administered at 2 baseline visits and 4, 12, 24, 36, 52, and 78 weeks post-randomization. Primary outcomes include back and neck disability, measured by the Oswestry Disability Index and Neck Disability Index. Secondary outcomes include pain, general health status, improvement, self-efficacy, kinesiophobia, satisfaction, and medication use. Functional outcome assessment occurs

  5. Clinical Significance of Postradiotherapy [{sup 18}F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in Management of Head-and-Neck Cancer-A Long-Term Outcome Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Min Smith, Russell B.; Hoffman, Henry T.; Funk, Gerry F.; Lu Minggen; Menda, Yusuf; Graham, Michael M.; Buatti, John M.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy and prognostic significance of post-treatment [{sup 18}F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 188 patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma who had undergone FDG-PET within 12 months after completing RT. All living patients had {>=}1 year of follow-up after FDG-PET. All patients had undergone intensity-modulated RT, 128 with definitive and 60 with postoperative intensity-modulated RT. Results: For all patients, the median follow-up after RT completion was 32.6 months and after FDG-PET was 29.2 months. For the neck, 171 patients had negative FDG-PET findings. Of these results, two were falsely negative. Seventeen patients had positive FDG-PET findings, of which 12 were true-positive findings. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for FDG-PET in the assessment of the treatment response in the neck was 86%, 97%, 71%, and 99%, respectively. For the primary site, 151 patients had negative FDG-PET findings, of which two were falsely negative. Thirty-seven patients had positive FDG-PET findings, of which 12 were true-positive findings. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for FDG-PET in the assessment of the treatment response in the primary site was 86%, 86%, 32.4%, and 98.7%, respectively. Patients with positive post-RT PET findings had significantly worse 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the findings of post-RT FDG-PET have a high negative predictive value and are a significant prognostic factor. It can provide guidance for the management of head-and-neck cancer after definitive treatment.

  6. The role of lymphoscintigraphy, sentinel mode biopsy and positron emission tomography in the staging of the neck in early oral squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Nicholas Charles

    This thesis explores the limitations of current imaging modalities in the evaluation of the clinically node negative (N0) neck in early oral squamous cell carcinoma and evaluates the utility of two new interventions. It will become evident that the use of clinical parameters and conventional imaging to detect clinically occult cervical lymph node metastases is an imprecise science. The presence of metastases in the neck is the single most important determinant of survival. Hitherto the lack of timely intervention in this regard may have been contributory in amplifying their effect upon survival. There is an obvious requirement for a more accurate technique to stage the neck in this patient group. Therefore the application of lymphoscintigraphy in combination with sentinel node biopsy (SNB), and positron emission tomography (PET) have been investigated. It appears that PET, whilst having a number of useful roles in the generic head and neck oncology patient, has little to contribute in the diagnosis of occult neck disease. In contra-distinction lymphoscintigraphy and SNB are not only feasible in the diagnosis of occult metastases, but also enhance our knowledge of lymphatic drainage from the oral cavity. This has, in some circumstances, led to the modification of initially prescribed treatment plans. Such is the current pace of technological advance that over the course of this research an entirely new imaging modality has emerged - PET/CT. Whilst it has not been possible to apply this retrospectively to the original patient population early experience of this novel technique in head and neck malignancy is explored and reported. The results of these initial applications are encouraging.

  7. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What ... there any new developments in treating my disease? Head and neck cancer overview The way a particular head and ...

  8. Osteoid Osteoma of the Talar Neck With Subacute Presentation.

    PubMed

    Assafiri, Ibrahim; Sraj, Shafic

    2015-10-01

    Osteoid osteoma of the talar neck is a rare clinical entity that is frequently missed on initial assessment in patients with ankle pain. We present a case report of an adolescent with talar neck osteoid osteoma who presented with persistent pain after an injury. We review the differential diagnosis of persistent anterior ankle pain and review the treatment options for osteoid osteoma of the talar neck.

  9. Anti-Malassezia-Specific IgE Antibodies Production in Japanese Patients with Head and Neck Atopic Dermatitis: Relationship between the Level of Specific IgE Antibody and the Colonization Frequency of Cutaneous Malassezia Species and Clinical Severity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Enshi; Tanaka, Takafumi; Tajima, Mami; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Kato, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Akemi; Sugita, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis of the head and neck (HNAD) is recognized as a separate condition. Malassezia, the predominant skin microbiota fungus, is considered to exacerbate atopic dermatitis (AD), especially HNAD. In the present study, we investigated the relationships between the levels of specific IgE antibodies, colonization frequency of eight predominant Malassezia species, and clinical severity in 61 patients with HNAD (26 mild, 24 moderate, and 11 severe cases). As clinical severity increased, the levels of specific IgE antibodies against eight Malassezia species also increased. Species diversity of the Malassezia microbiota in scale samples from patients was analyzed by nested PCR using species-specific primers. The clinical severity of HNAD was correlated with the total level of specific IgE antibodies against Malassezia species and the number of Malassezia species detected. PMID:22253636

  10. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person’s risk of head and neck cancer. Marijuana use. Research suggests that people who have used marijuana may be at higher risk for head and ... head and neck cancer include: Avoiding alcohol Discussing marijuana as a risk factor with your doctor and ...

  11. Neck x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... look at cervical vertebrae. These are the 7 bones of the spine in the neck. ... A neck x-ray can detect: Bone joint that is out of position (dislocation) Breathing in a foreign object Broken bone (fracture) Disk problems (disks ...

  12. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced (Stage II and worse) head-and-neck cancer: Dosimetric and clinical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Portaluri, Maurizio . E-mail: portaluri@hotmail.com; Fucilli, Fulvio I.M.; Castagna, Roberta; Bambace, Santa; Pili, Giorgio; Tramacere, Francesco; Russo, Donatella; Francavilla, Maria Carmen

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric parameters of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in locally advanced head-and-neck tumors (Stage II and above) and the effects on xerostomia. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients with histologically proven squamous cell cancer of the head and neck were consecutively treated with 3D-CRT using a one-point setup technique; 17 had larynx cancer, 12 oropharynx, 12 oral cavity, and 6 nasopharynx cancer; 2 had other sites of cancer. Of the 49 patients, 41 received postoperative RT and 8 definitive treatment. Also, 13 were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy before and during RT; in 6 cases, 5-fluorouracil was added. The follow-up time was 484-567 days (median, 530 days). Results: One-point setup can deliver 96% of the prescribed dose to the isocenter, to the whole planning target volume, including all node levels of the neck and without overdosages. The mean dose to the primary planning target volume was 49.54 {+-} 4.82 Gy (51.53 {+-} 5.47 Gy for larynx cases). The average dose to the contralateral parotid gland was approximately 38 Gy (30 Gy for larynx cases). The maximal dose to the spinal cord was 46 Gy. A Grade 0 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer xerostomia score corresponded to a mean dose of 30 Gy to one parotid gland. A lower xerostomia score with a lower mean parotid dose and longer follow-up seemed to give rise to a sort of functional recovery phenomenon. Conclusion: Three dimensional-CRT in head-and-neck cancers permits good coverage of the planning target volume with about 10-11 segments and one isocenter. With a mean dose of approximately 30 Gy to the contralateral parotid, we observed no or mild xerostomia.

  13. Continuous accelerated 7-days-a-week radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: Long-term results of Phase III clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Skladowski, Krzysztof . E-mail: skladowski@io.gliwice.pl; Maciejewski, Boguslaw; Golen, Maria; Tarnawski, Rafal; Slosarek, Krzysztof; Suwinski, Rafal; Sygula, Mariusz; Wygoda, Andrzej

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: To update 5-year results of a previously published study on special 7-days-a-week fractionation continuous accelerated irradiation (CAIR) for head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: One hundred patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck in Stage T{sub 2-4}N{sub 0-1}M were randomized between two definitive radiation treatments: accelerated fractionation 7 days a week including weekends (CAIR) and conventional 5 days a week (control). Hence the overall treatment time was 2 weeks shorter in CAIR. Results: Five-year local tumor control was 75% in the CAIR group and 33% in the control arm (p < 0.00004). Tumor-cure benefit corresponded with significant improvement in disease-free survival and overall survival rates. Confluent mucositis was the main acute toxicity, with the incidence significantly higher in CAIR patients than in control (respectively, 94% vs. 53%). When 2.0-Gy fractions were used, radiation necrosis developed in 5 patients (22%) in the CAIR group as a consequential late effect (CLE), but when fraction size was reduced to 1.8 Gy no more CLE occurred. Actuarial 5-year morbidity-free survival rate was similar for both treatments. Conclusions: Selected head-and-neck cancer patients could be treated very effectively with 7-days-a-week radiation schedule with no compromise of total dose and with slight 10% reduction of fraction dose (2 Gy-1.8 Gy), which article gives 1 week reduction of overall treatment time compared with standard 70 Gy in 35 fractions over 47-49 days. Although this report is based on the relatively small group of patients, its results have encouraged us to use CAIR fractionation in a standard radiation treatment for moderately advanced head-and-neck cancer patients.

  14. Evaluation of Efficacy of an Herbal Compound on Dry Mouth in Patients With Head and Neck Cancers: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Ameri, Ahmad; Heydarirad, Ghazaleh; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Choopani, Rasool; Ghobadi, Ali; Gachkar, Latif

    2016-01-01

    Dry mouth is a common complication of radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. This study compared the efficacy of an herbal compound containing Malva sylvestris and Alcea digitata (Boiss) with artificial saliva (Hypozalix) for improving the symptoms of dry mouth in head and neck cancer patients. The study examined a total of 62 subjects assigned to 2 groups. The herbal compound and Hypozalix were administered for 4 weeks. Efficacy was assessed using the visual analog scale and by grading the degree of dry mouth. Both groups showed a significant difference between visual analog scale before and following intervention. There was also a significant difference in visual analog scale between groups at 4 weeks after onset of intervention. The herbal group showed a significant difference between the grade of dry mouth before and after intervention, but no change was observed for grade of dry mouth in the Hypozalix group. This study supports the efficacy of the herbal compound for controlling symptoms of dry mouth in head and neck cancer patients.

  15. The relationship between superficial muscle activity during the cranio-cervical flexion test and clinical features in patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Shaun; Falla, Deborah; Jull, Gwendolen

    2011-10-01

    Changes in motor behavior are a known feature of chronic mechanical neck pain disorders. This study examined the strength of the association between reported levels of pain and disability from 84 individuals (63 women, 21 men) with chronic mechanical neck pain and levels of electromyographic activity recorded from superficial cervical flexor (sternocleidomastoid; SCM and anterior scalene; AS) muscles during progressive stages of the cranio-cervical flexion muscle test. A significant positive association was observed between superficial muscle activity and pain intensity (P < 0.003), but not pain duration (P > 0.5) or perceived disability (P > 0.21). The strongest relationship between pain intensity and superficial muscle activity occurred at the final increment of the cranio-cervical flexion test (inner-range test position) for both the SCM and AS muscles (R(2) = 0.16). Although a positive and significant relationship between pain intensity and superficial muscle activity was shown, the relationship was only modest (16% explained variance), indicating that multiple factors contribute to the altered motor function observed in individuals with chronic mechanical neck pain.

  16. The ratio of change in muscle thickness between superficial and deep cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test and a suggestion regarding clinical treatment of patients with musculoskeletal neck pain.

    PubMed

    Goo, Miran; Kim, Seong-Gil; Jun, Deokhoon

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the imbalance of muscle recruitment in cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test by using ultrasonography and to propose the optimal level of pressure in clinical craniocervical flexion exercise for people with neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 18 students (9 males and 9 females) with neck pain at D University in Gyeongsangbuk-do, South Korea, participated in this study. The change in muscle thickness in superficial and deep cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test was measured using ultrasonography. The ratio of muscle thickness changes between superficial and deep muscles during the test were obtained to interpret the imbalance of muscle recruitment in cervical flexor muscles. [Results] The muscle thickness ratio of the sternocleidomastoid muscle/deep cervical flexor muscles according to the incremental pressure showed significant differences between 22 mmHg and 24 mmHg, between 24 mmHg and 28 mmHg, between 24 mmHg and 30 mmHg, and between 26 mmHg and 28 mmHg. [Conclusion] Ultrasonography can be applied for examination of cervical flexor muscles in clinical environment, and practical suggestion for intervention exercise of craniocervical flexors can be expected on the pressure level between 24 mmHg and 26 mmHg enabling the smallest activation of the sternocleidomastoid muscle.

  17. Pattern of neck recurrence after lateral neck dissection for cervical metastases in papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, William F.; Wang, Laura Y.; Palmer, Frank L.; Nixon, Iain J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Patel, Snehal G.; Ganly, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine the rate and pattern of nodal recurrence in patients who underwent a therapeutic, lateral neck dissection (LND) for papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) with clinically evident cervical metastases and to determine if there was any correlation between the extent of initial dissection and the rate and pattern of neck recurrence. Methods A total of 3,664 patients with PTC treated between 1986 and 2010 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center were identified from our institutional database. Tumor factors, patient demographics, extent of initial LND, and adjuvant therapy were recorded. Patterns of recurrent lateral neck metastases by level involvement were recorded and outcomes calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results A total of 484 patients had an LND for cervical metastases; 364 (75%) had a comprehensive LND (CLND) and 120 (25%) had a selective neck dissection (SND). The median duration of follow-up was 63.5 months. As expected, patients with CLND had a greater number of nodes removed as well as a greater number of positive nodes (P < .001). There was no difference in overall lateral neck recurrence-free status (CLND 94.4% vs SND 89.4%, P = .158), but in the dissected neck, the ipsilateral lateral neck recurrence-free status was superior in the CLND patients (97.7% vs 89.4%, P < .001). Conclusion Patients with clinically evident neck metastases from PTC managed by CLND have lesser rates of recurrence in the dissected neck compared with patients managed by SND. SND should only be done in highly selected cases with small volume disease. PMID:26994486

  18. A Modified Dissection Method to Preserve Neck Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankin, Mark H.; Stoller, Jeremy L.

    2009-01-01

    The neck is not only one of the more challenging anatomical regions to dissect but also has important application to clinical conditions, diseases, and procedures. In this study, we describe two simple modifications for dissection of the neck that (1) aid in the identification and preservation of the cutaneous branches of the cervical plexus and…

  19. Gene therapy in head and neck cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, E; Bapat, U; Chisholm, C; Alusi, G; Vassaux, G

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy for cancer is a rapidly evolving field with head and neck squamous cell cancer being one of the more frequently targeted cancer types. The number of clinical trials in the UK is growing and there is already a commercially available agent in China. Various gene therapy strategies along with delivery mechanisms for targeting head and neck cancer are reviewed. PMID:18057169

  20. pN0(i+) Breast Cancer: Treatment Patterns, Locoregional Recurrence, and Survival Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Karam, Irene; Lesperance, Maria F.; Berrang, Tanya; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott; Truong, Pauline T.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To examine treatment patterns, recurrence, and survival outcomes in patients with pN0(i+) breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5999 women with AJCC (6th edition) pT1-3, pN0-N1a, M0 breast cancer diagnosed between 2003 and 2006. Of these, 4342 (72%) had pN0, 96 (2%) had pN0(i+), 349 (6%) had pNmic (micrometastases >0.2 mm to ≤2 mm), and 1212 (20%) had pN1a (1-3 positive macroscopic nodes) disease. Treatment characteristics and 5-year Kaplan-Meier local recurrence, regional recurrence (RR), locoregional recurrence (LRR), and overall survival were compared between nodal subgroups. Multivariable analysis was performed using Cox regression modeling. A 1:3 case-match analysis examined outcomes in pN0(i+) cases compared with pN0 controls matched for similar tumor and treatment characteristics. Results: Median follow-up was 4.8 years. Adjuvant systemic therapy use increased with nodal stage: 81%, 92%, 95%, and 94% in pN0, pN0(i+), pNmic, and pN1a disease, respectively (P<.001). Nodal radiation therapy (RT) use also increased with nodal stage: 1.7% in pN0, 27% in pN0(i+), 33% in pNmic, and 63% in pN1a cohorts (P<.001). Five-year Kaplan-Meier outcomes in pN0 versus pN0(i+) cases were as follows: local recurrence 1.7% versus 3.7% (P=.20), RR 0.5% versus 2.2% (P=.02), and LRR 2.1% versus 5.8% (P=.02). There were no RR events in 26 patients with pN0(i+) disease who received nodal RT and 2 RR events in 70 patients who did not receive nodal RT. On multivariable analysis, pN0(i+) was not associated with worse locoregional control or survival. On case-match analysis, LRR and overall survival were similar between pN0(i+) and matched pN0 counterparts. Conclusions: Nodal involvement with isolated tumor cells is not a significant prognostic factor for LRR or survival in this study's multivariable and case-match analyses. These data do not support the routine use of nodal RT in the setting of pN0(i+) disease. Prospective studies are needed to define optimal

  1. Fiddler's neck: A review.

    PubMed

    Myint, Calvin W; Rutt, Amy L; Sataloff, Robert T

    2017-02-01

    Fiddler's neck is a common dermatologic condition associated with instrument use in violin and viola players. It typically manifests as a submandibular and/or supraclavicular lesion. It is a benign condition, but it may be mistaken for lymphedema or a salivary gland malignancy. Otolaryngologists who treat patients with fiddler's neck should be aware of appropriate management protocols and the need to avoid surgical excision. We obtained informed consent from 3 violinists to present their cases as specific examples of fiddler's neck. In addition, we present a literature review based on our PubMed search for articles about this instrument-induced dermatitis. The literature suggests that submandibular fiddler's neck is caused by mechanical pressure and shear stress on the skin and that it can present as erythema, scarring, edema, and lichenification. Supraclavicular fiddler's neck, on the other hand, is caused by allergic contact dermatitis, and it can present as an eczematous, scaly, and/or vesicular lesion. In most cases, a good history (especially of string instrument use), physical examination, and a patch test are sufficient to diagnose this condition. Management of fiddler's neck includes a topical steroid, proper instrument handling, neck padding, changing the instrument's materials, and/or reducing the amount of playing time. Surgical excision is usually not advisable.

  2. Effect of Global Posture Reeducation and of Static Stretching on Pain, Range of Motion, and Quality of Life in Women with Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Ana Cláudia Violino; Burke, Thomaz Nogueira; França, Fábio Jorge Renovato; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE Compare the effect of conventional static stretching and muscle chain stretching, as proposed by the global posture reeducation method, in the manual therapy of patients with chronic neck pain. METHODS Thirty-three female patients aged 35 to 60 years old, 31 of whom completed the program, were randomly divided into two groups: The global posture reeducation group (n=15) performed muscle chain stretching, while the conventional stretching group (n=16) performed conventional static muscle stretching. Both groups also underwent manual therapy. Patients were evaluated before and after treatment and at a six-week follow-up appointment and tested for pain intensity (by means of visual analog scale), range of motion (by goniometry), and health-related quality of life (by the SF-36 questionnaire). The treatment program consisted of two 1-hour individual sessions per week for six weeks. Data were statistically analyzed at a significance level of p<0.05. RESULTS Significant pain relief and range of motion improvement were observed after treatment in both groups, with a slight reduction at follow-up time. Quality of life also improved after treatment, except for the global posture reeducation group in one domain; at follow-up, there was improvement in all domains, except that both groups reported increased pain. There were no significant differences between groups CONCLUSION Conventional stretching and muscle chain stretching in association with manual therapy were equally effective in reducing pain and improving the range of motion and quality of life of female patients with chronic neck pain, both immediately after treatment and at a six-week follow-up, suggesting that stretching exercises should be prescribed to chronic neck pain patients. PMID:19060998

  3. Melanoma - neck (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This melanoma on the neck is variously colored with a very darkly pigmented area found centrally. It has irregular ... be larger than 0.5 cm. Prognosis in melanoma is best defined by its depth on resection.

  4. Torticollis (wry neck) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Torticollis is a form of dystonia (prolonged muscle contractions) in which the neck muscles, particularly the sternocleidomastoid muscle, contract involuntarily causing the head to turn. Torticollis may occur without known cause (idiopathic), ...

  5. Neck dissection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... If pain in your neck and throat is making it hard to eat: Take your pain medicine 30 minutes before meals. Choose soft foods, such as ripe bananas, hot cereal, and moist chopped meat and vegetables. Limit ...

  6. Applying Joint Mobilization at Different Cervical Vertebral Levels does not Influence Immediate Pain Reduction in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Rafaela L; Caires, Priscila M; Furtado, Fernanda C; Loureiro, Aline V; Ferreira, Paulo H; Ferreira, Manuela L

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of applying joint mobilization at symptomatic and asymptomatic cervical levels in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. Forty-eight patients aged between 18 and 65 years and presenting nonspecific neck pain with a minimum duration of 3 months were recruited for the study. Included patients were randomized to one of two treatment groups: (i) control group: the most symptomatic vertebral level was mobilized; (ii) experimental group: a randomly selected vertebral level was chosen and mobilized. All patients received one treatment session. Pain intensity in resting position during the most painful active cervical movement as well as during vertebral palpation was quantified using an 11-point pain scale. Follow-up measures were taken immediately after intervention by a blinded assessor. The results showed no significant difference in pain intensity immediately after treatment between groups (symptomatic level treated vs. randomly chosen cervical vertebral level treated) during resting position, painful active movement, or vertebral palpation. Within-group comparisons showed significant pain relief after treatment during the most painful active movement as well as during vertebral palpation for both groups, but not during resting position. Significant change in immediate pain intensity during painful active movement and vertebral palpation was achieved after vertebral mobilization. however, both groups presented similar pain reductions suggesting that pain reduction due to joint mobilization is not specific to the vertebral level being mobilized. PMID:20046551

  7. Quantification of Trade-Off Between Parotid Gland Sparing and Planning Target Volume Underdosages in Clinically Node-Negative Head-and-Neck Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kruijf, Wilhelmus de . E-mail: kruijf.de.w@bvi.nl; Heijmen, Ben; Levendag, Peter C.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To quantify the trade-off between parotid gland sparing and planning target volume (PTV) underdosages for head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A planning study was performed for 4 patients with either soft palate or tonsil tumors treated with external radiotherapy up to 46 Gy. The trade-off between underdosages in the PTV and sparing of the parotid glands was investigated by systematically varying the optimization objectives for the inverse planning. A new way of presenting dose-volume information allows easy detection of small PTV subvolumes with underdosages that cannot be assessed in conventional cumulative dose-volume histograms. A simple radiobiological model to estimate the control probability for an electively irradiated neck level was developed. Results: The average dose to the parotid glands can decrease by >10 Gy by allowing the PTV to be underdosed in such a way that the radiobiological model predicts a decrease in subclinical disease control probability of (typically) 1% to a few percent. Conclusion: The trade-off between parotid gland sparing and underdosages in the PTV has been quantified by the use of an alternative method to present dose-volume information and by the use of a radiobiological model to predict subclinical disease control probability.

  8. Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Thariat, Juliette; Ahamad, Anesa; Williams, Michelle D.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Rosenthal, David I.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2012-03-01

    Background: This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. Methods: Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log-rank test and prognostic factors by Cox's proportional hazard model. Results: Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients, of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p < 0.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. Conclusions: With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge.

  9. Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Thariat, Juliette; Ang, K. Kian; Allen, Pamela K.; Ahamad, Anesa; Williams, Michelle D.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Rosenthal, David I.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Morrison, William H.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation, and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. METHODS Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log-rank test and prognostic factors by Cox analyses. RESULTS Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p <.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. CONCLUSIONS With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge. PMID:22284033

  10. The clinical significance of immediate symptom responses to manual therapy treatment for neck pain: observational secondary data analysis of a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Trott, Caelum A; Ruiz Aguila, Maria Eliza; Leaver, Andrew M

    2014-12-01

    The objective was to explore aspects of symptom responses to manual therapy treatment for neck pain. An observational secondary data analysis of a randomized trial was conducted. 181 participants seeking care from a physiotherapist or chiropractor for a new episode of neck pain were included. Outcome variables included recovery-time and participant-perceived effect of treatment (GPE) at 3-months. There was a significant reduction of ≥1.4 points (95%CI 1.2-1.5) in pre- and post-treatment pain scores at each occasion of treatment. There was also small but significant increases in pain of ≤0.7 points (95%CI 0.4-1.0) between each treatment session, without regression to the preceding pre-treatment level. The relationships between immediate post-treatment effects and longer-term outcomes were explored using multivariate regression analyses. There was significant univariate association between recovery time and cumulative post-treatment changes in pain from the second, third and fourth (Exp(B) = 1.2) treatment sessions, as well as the presence of post-treatment headache (Exp(B) = 0.7) and other minor adverse symptoms (Exp(B) = 0.6). There was significant univariate association between GPE at 3-months and cumulative pain responses from first (B = 0.2), second (B = 0.3), third (B = 0.3) and fourth (B = 0.4) treatment sessions. The change in pain after session 1 was independently associated with GPE (B = 0.2). There was a consistently significant difference of ≥0.7 points (95%CI 0.43-0.89) in the different methods of reporting pain. Our results showed that manual therapy for neck pain involves a "two-steps forward, one-step back" recovery pattern. Whilst minor adverse events are undesirable, they do not seem to be significantly associated with long-term recovery.

  11. [Necrotizing fasciitis in head and neck area].

    PubMed

    Sántha, Beáta; Sári, Katalin; Fülep, Zoltán; Patyi, Márta; Oberna, Ferenc

    2017-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a fulminant infection of the deeper layers of skin and subcutaneous tissues characterized by progressive soft tissue necrosis and high mortality. It rarely occurs in the head and neck area. The clinical picture includes non-specific but typical local and systemic symptoms. The treatment is a complex, multidisciplinary task which includes radical surgical exploration, debridement and drainage, empirically started and then targeted intravenous antibiotics and supportive therapy. Authors report a case of necrotizing fasciitis localized on the right side of the face which caused multi-organ failure and phlegmone of the neck.

  12. SU-F-19A-10: Recalculation and Reporting Clinical HDR 192-Ir Head and Neck Dose Distributions Using Model Based Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson Tedgren, A; Persson, M; Nilsson, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively re-calculate dose distributions for selected head and neck cancer patients, earlier treated with HDR 192Ir brachytherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and compare results to distributions from the planning system derived using TG43 formalism. To study differences between dose to medium (as obtained with the MC code) and dose to water in medium as obtained through (1) ratios of stopping powers and (2) ratios of mass energy absorption coefficients between water and medium. Methods: The MC code Algebra was used to calculate dose distributions according to earlier actual treatment plans using anonymized plan data and CT images in DICOM format. Ratios of stopping power and mass energy absorption coefficients for water with various media obtained from 192-Ir spectra were used in toggling between dose to water and dose to media. Results: Differences between initial planned TG43 dose distributions and the doses to media calculated by MC are insignificant in the target volume. Differences are moderate (within 4–5 % at distances of 3–4 cm) but increase with distance and are most notable in bone and at the patient surface. Differences between dose to water and dose to medium are within 1-2% when using mass energy absorption coefficients to toggle between the two quantities but increase to above 10% for bone using stopping power ratios. Conclusion: MC predicts target doses for head and neck cancer patients in close agreement with TG43. MC yields improved dose estimations outside the target where a larger fraction of dose is from scattered photons. It is important with awareness and a clear reporting of absorbed dose values in using model based algorithms. Differences in bone media can exceed 10% depending on how dose to water in medium is defined.

  13. Randomized phase II/III trial of post-operative chemoradiotherapy comparing 3-weekly cisplatin with weekly cisplatin in high-risk patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study (JCOG1008).

    PubMed

    Kunieda, Futoshi; Kiyota, Naomi; Tahara, Makoto; Kodaira, Takeshi; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Mizusawa, Junki; Nakamura, Kenichi; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Fujii, Masato

    2014-08-01

    A randomized Phase II/III study was launched in Japan to evaluate the non-inferiority of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m(2)) compared with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with 3-weekly cisplatin (100 mg/m(2)) for post-operative high-risk patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck. This study began in October 2012, and a total of 260 patients will be accrued from 18 institutions within 5 years. The primary endpoint of the Phase II part is proportion of treatment completion and that of the Phase III part is overall survival. The secondary endpoints are relapse-free survival, local relapse-free survival, nutrition-support-free survival, non-hospitalized treatment period during permissible treatment period and adverse events. This trial was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN 000009125 [http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/].

  14. Distinctive Head and Neck Bone and Soft Tissue Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Purgina, Bibianna; Lai, Chi K

    2017-03-01

    Benign and malignant primary bone and soft tissue lesions of the head and neck are rare. The uncommon nature of these tumors, combined with the complex anatomy of the head and neck, pose diagnostic challenges to pathologists. This article describes the pertinent clinical, radiographic, and pathologic features of selected bone and soft tissue tumors involving the head and neck region, including angiofibroma, glomangiopericytoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma, chordoma, chondrosarcoma, and osteosarcoma. Emphasis is placed on key diagnostic pitfalls, differential diagnosis, and the importance of correlating clinical and radiographic information, particularly for tumors involving bone.

  15. Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of neck pain.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven P

    2015-02-01

    Neck pain is the fourth leading cause of disability, with an annual prevalence rate exceeding 30%. Most episodes of acute neck pain will resolve with or without treatment, but nearly 50% of individuals will continue to experience some degree of pain or frequent occurrences. History and physical examination can provide important clues as to whether the pain is neuropathic or mechanical and can also be used to identify "red flags" that may signify serious pathology, such as myelopathy, atlantoaxial subluxation, and metastases. Magnetic resonance imaging is characterized by a high prevalence of abnormal findings in asymptomatic individuals but should be considered for cases involving focal neurologic symptoms, pain refractory to conventional treatment, and when referring a patient for interventional treatment. Few clinical trials have evaluated treatments for neck pain. Exercise treatment appears to be beneficial in patients with neck pain. There is some evidence to support muscle relaxants in acute neck pain associated with muscle spasm, conflicting evidence for epidural corticosteroid injections for radiculopathy, and weak positive evidence for cervical facet joint radiofrequency denervation. In patients with radiculopathy or myelopathy, surgery appears to be more effective than nonsurgical therapy in the short term but not in the long term for most people.

  16. The impact of tissue glue in wound healing of head and neck patients undergoing neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Che-Wei; Wang, Chen-Chi; Jiang, Rong-San; Huang, Yu-Chia; Ho, Hui-Ching; Liu, Shih-An

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the impact of fibrin glue on postoperative drainage amount and duration in head and neck cancer patients who underwent neck dissection. This study was a prospective randomized controlled trial. Patients who were scheduled to undergo neck dissection due to head and neck cancer were eligible for this study. After receiving a detailed explanation, all patients signed an informed consent form before enrollment. Patients were then randomly assigned to the study group (fibrin glue) or control group. In the study group, 2 ml of fibrin glue (Tissucol(®); Duploject, Baxter AG) was applied on the surface of the surgical wound before closure. Basic demographic data along with tumor-related features, operation-related variables, postoperative drainage amount/duration, postoperative pain, and analgesic usage were collected and analyzed. A total of 15 patients were included in the final analyses, with eight patients in the study group and seven patients in the control group. No significant differences were found between the two groups in age, gender, primary site, clinical N stage, neck dissection levels, perioperative bleeding, postoperative drainage amount/duration, hospitalization duration, and postoperative pain status. The application of 2 ml fibrin glue by the method described herein did not reduce the postoperative drainage amount/duration nor the postoperative pain status in patients who underwent neck dissection.

  17. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... f t k e P Types of Cancer Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  18. Primary Tumor Volume Is an Important Predictor of Clinical Outcomes Among Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Treated With Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Strongin, Anna; Yovino, Susannah; Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey; Cullen, Kevin; Zimrin, Ann; Strome, Scott; Regine, William; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The tumor volume has been established as a significant predictor of outcomes among patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy alone. The present study attempted to add to the existing data on tumor volume as a prognostic factor among patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients who had undergone definitive chemoradiotherapy for Stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the hypopharynx, oropharynx, and larynx were identified. The primary tumor volumes were calculated from the treatment planning computed tomography scans, and these were correlated to the survival and tumor control data obtained from the retrospective analysis. Results: The interval to progression correlated with the primary tumor volume (p = .007). The critical cutoff point for the tumor volume was identified as 35 cm{sup 3}, and patients with a tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a significantly better prognosis than those with a tumor volume >35 cm{sup 3} at 5 years (43% vs. 71%, p = .010). Longer survival was also correlated with smaller primary tumor volumes (p = .022). Similarly, patients with a primary tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a better prognosis in terms of both progression-free survival (61% vs. 33%, p = .004) and overall survival (84% vs. 41%, p = < .001). On multivariate analysis, the primary tumor volume was the best predictor of recurrence (hazard ratio 4.7, 95% confidence interval 1.9-11.6; p = .001) and survival (hazard ratio 10.0, 95% confidence interval 2.9-35.1; p = < .001). In contrast, the T stage and N stage were not significant factors. Analysis of variance revealed that tumors with locoregional failure were on average 21.6 cm{sup 3} larger than tumors without locoregional failure (p = .028) and 27.1-cm{sup 3} larger than tumors that recurred as distant metastases (p = .020). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the primary tumor volume is a significant prognostic factor in patients with advanced cancer

  19. CT angiography - head and neck

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007677.htm CT angiography - head and neck To use the sharing features on this page, ... create pictures of the blood vessels in the head and neck. How the Test is Performed You will be ...

  20. Malignant neoplasms of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Paxton V; Davidoff, Andrew M

    2006-05-01

    Head and neck masses represent a common clinical entity in children. In general, these masses are classified as developmental, inflammatory, or neoplastic. Having a working knowledge of lesions within this region and conducting a thorough history and physical examination generally enables the clinician to facilitate an appropriate workup and establish a diagnosis. The differential diagnosis is broad, and expeditiously distinguishing benign from malignant masses is critical for instituting a timely multidisciplinary approach to the management of malignant lesions. Neoplasms of the head and neck account for approximately 5% of all childhood malignancies. A diagnosis of malignancy may represent a primary tumor or metastatic foci to cervical nodes. In this review, we discuss the general approach to evaluating suspicious masses and adenopathy in the head and neck region and summarize the most common malignant neoplasms of the head and neck with regard to their incidence, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, staging, and management. Thyroid, parathyroid, and salivary gland tumors are discussed elsewhere in this issue of Seminars in Pediatric Surgery.

  1. The Danish Head and Neck Cancer database

    PubMed Central

    Overgaard, Jens; Jovanovic, Aleksandar; Godballe, Christian; Grau Eriksen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the database The Danish Head and Neck Cancer database is a nationwide clinical quality database that contains prospective data collected since the early 1960s. The overall aim of this study was to describe the outcome of the national strategy for multidisciplinary treatment of head and neck cancer in Denmark and to create a basis for clinical trials. Study population The study population consisted of all Danish patients referred for treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, pharynx, oral cavity, or neck nodes from unknown primary or any histopathological type (except lymphoma) of cancer in the nasal sinuses, salivary glands, or thyroid gland (corresponding to the International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision, classifications C.01–C.11, C.30–C.32, C.73, and C.80). Main variables The main variables used in the study were symptoms and the duration of the symptoms; etiological factors; pretreatment and diagnostic evaluation, including tumor–node–metastasis classification, imaging, histopathology, and laboratory tests; primary treatment with semidetailed information of radiotherapy, surgery, and medical treatment; follow-up registration of tumor status and side effects; registration of relapse and treatment thereof; and registration of death and cause of death. Main results Data from >33,000 patients have been recorded during a period of >45 years. In this period, the outcome of treatment improved substantially, partly due to better treatment as a result of a series of continuous clinical trials and subsequent implementation in national guidelines. The database has furthermore been used to describe the effect of reduced waiting time, changed epidemiology, and influence of comorbidity and socioeconomic parameters. Conclusion Half a century of registration of head and neck cancer treatment and outcome has created the basis for understanding and has substantially contributed to improve the treatment of head and neck cancer at both

  2. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    SciTech Connect

    Ruetten, Heidi; Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J.; Takes, Robert P.; Knuijt, Simone; Berg, Manon van den; Merkx, Matthias A.; Herpen, Carla M.L. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  3. Neck schwannoma diagnosed by core needle biopsy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nasrollah, N; Trimboli, P; Bianchi, D; Taccogna, S

    2015-12-01

    Here we present a case of a 58 year old man referred to our hospital to undergo neck and thyroid ultrasonography (US) following palpable neck mass. US revealed a solid hypoechoic nodule in right thyroid lobe, and a solid lesion on the right laterocervical neck region with ultrasound suspicious features of neoplastic lymph node. In order to achieve a diagnosis of the neck mass and to get a proper evaluation of the thyroid nodule, we decided to perform a fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of both lesions. At cytopathologic examination the thyroid nodule appeared as benign, while cytologic sampling of the neck lesion was inadequate for a proper evaluation. Thus, we performed core needle biopsy (CNB) of the neck lesion like recently proposed for thyroid lesions; also, to definitively exclude malignancy of thyroid nodule, this also underwent CNB. Histologic report of CNB confirmed benign thyroid nodule, while the neck lesion revealed a proliferation of neuronal type consistent with schwannoma. The patient has been addressed to clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up. CNB appears as a safe and minimally-invasive approach to diagnose indeterminate neck masses and avoid unnecessary diagnostic surgery.

  4. Sagittal alignment of the cervical spine after neck injury.

    PubMed

    Beltsios, Michail; Savvidou, Olga; Mitsiokapa, Evanthia A; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kaspiris, Angelos; Efstathopoulos, Nikolaos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2013-07-01

    The normal sagittal alignment of the cervical spine is lordotic and is affected by the posture of the head and neck. The question of whether loss of cervical lordosis is the result of muscle spasm after injury or a normal variation, and the clinical significance of such changes in sagittal profile of the cervical spine has been an issue of several studies. The purpose of this paper is to study the incidence of normal cervical lordosis and its changes after neck injury compared to the healthy population. We studied the lateral radiographs of the cervical spine of 60 patients with neck injury compared to 100 patients without a neck injury. Lateral radiographs were obtained in the standing or sitting position, and the curvature of the cervical spine was measured using the angle formed between the inferior end plates of the C2 and C7 vertebrae. In the patients without neck injury, lordotic and straight cervical spine sagittal alignment was observed in 36.5% each, double curvature in 17%, and kyphotic in 10%. In the patients with neck injury, lordotic sagittal alignment was observed in 36%, straight in 34%, double curvature in 26% and kyphotic in 4%. No significant difference between the two groups regarding all types of sagittal alignment of the cervical spine was found (p > 0.100). The alterations in normal cervical lordosis in patients with neck injury must be considered coincidental. These alterations should not be associated with muscle spasm caused by neck pain.

  5. Low-level laser therapy for the prevention of low salivary flow rate after radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Gonnelli, Fernanda Aurora Stabile; Palma, Luiz Felipe; Giordani, Adelmo José; Deboni, Aline Lima Silva; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether low-level laser therapy can prevent salivary hypofunction after radiotherapy and chemotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Materials and Methods We evaluated 23 head and neck cancer patients, of whom 13 received laser therapy and 10 received clinical care only. An InGaAlP laser was used intra-orally (at 660 nm and 40 mW) at a mean dose of 10.0 J/cm2 and extra-orally (at 780 nm and 15 mW) at a mean dose of 3.7 J/cm2, three times per week, on alternate days. Stimulated and unstimulated sialometry tests were performed before the first radiotherapy and chemotherapy sessions (N0) and at 30 days after the end of treatment (N30). Results At N30, the mean salivary flow rates were significantly higher among the laser therapy patients than among the patients who received clinical care only, in the stimulated and unstimulated sialometry tests (p = 0.0131 and p = 0.0143, respectively). Conclusion Low-level laser therapy, administered concomitantly with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, appears to mitigate treatment-induced salivary hypofunction in patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:27141130

  6. Effectiveness of a tailored neck training program on neck strength, movement, and fatigue in under-19 male rugby players: a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Matthew D; McLoughlin, Terence F; Gallagher, Kieran R; Gatherer, Don; Parratt, Michael TR; Perera, Jonathan R; Briggs, Tim WR

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of a tailored neck muscle conditioning program on neck muscle strength, neck muscle fatigue, and range of neck movement in 16–18-year-old male rugby players. Materials and methods Thirty-four male rugby players were divided into forward and back playing positions and randomized within these groups. Seventeen players were randomly assigned to each group. The test group was given a tailored 6-week exercise regime based on their baseline measurements to be performed three times a week in addition to their normal training and playing. The control group trained and played as normal. The outcome measures used were cervical spine range of movement, neck strength, and neck muscle fatigability. Results There were no clinically relevant statistically significant differences between the two groups. Trends identified between the two groups suggest that a tailored neck exercise program increases neck strength, particularly neck extension, and increases resistance to fatigue, as well as influencing right- and left-sided neck muscle balance. A reduction in range of movement was also demonstrated in the test group. There was a great deal of variability in range of movement and strength within this age group. No previously undiagnosed neck conditions were detected, and there were no adverse events reported. Conclusion This study has shown that neck strength, range of movement, and susceptibility of the neck muscles to fatigue can be influenced using a focused neck training regime. It forms an important basis for a larger, multicenter study to ensure the neck is given due attention in rugby training and receives the same focus of conditioning as other parts of the body. PMID:25999771

  7. Penetrating neck traumas

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarski, Jacek; Brzeziński, Daniel; Cieślik-Wolski, Bartosz; Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study Aim of the study is to present our own experiences in the treatment of people suffering from penetrating neck traumas. Material and methods In the years 1996-2012, 10 patients with penetrating neck traumas were treated, including 3 women and 7 men. The patients’ age ranged from 16 to 55 (the average age being 40.7 years). In 9 cases the wound was caused by cutting or stabbing, while in one case it was inflicted by a gunshot. In 8 patients it was a single cut wound, while one patient suffered from 34 stab wounds to the neck, chest and stomach. Two cut wounds resulted from a suicide attempt. The remaining injuries were the result of a crime. Results All patients underwent immediate surgery, which involved revision of the neck wounds in 8 cases, one longitudinal sternotomy and one left-sided thoracotomy. The indications for surgery included increased subcutaneous emphysema in 5 patients, bleeding from the wound in 3 patients, and mediastinal hematoma in 2 patients. The damage assessed intraoperatively included tracheal damage in 6 patients, damage to carotid vessels in 3 patients, larynx in 2 patients, thoracic vessels in 2 patients, oesophagus in 1 patient and thyroid gland in 1 patient. In 9 patients, the treatment yielded positive results. The patient with a gunshot wound died during the surgery due to massive bleeding from the aorta. Conclusions In patients with penetrating neck wounds, early and rapid diagnostics allows one to determine the indications for surgery and prevent serious fatal complications. PMID:26336390

  8. Treatment of Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Eric L.; Cheng, Ivan; Carroll, Linda J.; Nordin, Margareta; Guzman, Jaime; Peloso, Paul; Holm, Lena W.; Côthé, Pierre; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Cassidy, J. David; Haldeman, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Study Design Best evidence synthesis. Objective To identify, critically appraise, and synthesize literature from 1980 through 2006 on surgical interventions for neck pain alone or with radicular pain in the absence of serious pathologic disease. Summary of Background Data There have been no comprehensive systematic literature or evidence-based reviews published on this topic. Methods We systematically searched Medline for literature published from 1980 to 2006 on percutaneous and open surgical interventions for neck pain. Publications on the topic were also solicited from experts in the field. Consensus decisions were made about the scientific merit of each article; those judged to have adequate internal validity were included in our Best Evidence Synthesis. Results Of the 31,878 articles screened, 1203 studies were relevant to the Neck Pain Task Force mandate and of these, 31 regarding treatment by surgery or injections were accepted as scientifically admissible. Radiofrequency neurotomy, cervical facet injections, cervical fusion and cervical arthroplasty for neck pain without radiculopathy are not supported by current evidence. We found there is support for short-term symptomatic improvement of radicular symptoms with epidural corticosteroids. It is not clear from the evidence that long-term out comes are improved with the surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy compared to non operative measures. However, relatively rapid and substantial symptomatic relief after surgical treatment seems to be reliably achieved. It is not evident that one open surgical technique is clearly superior to others for radiculopathy. Cervical foramenal or epidural injections are associated with relatively frequent minor adverse events (5%–20%); however, serious adverse events are very uncommon (<1%). After open surgical procedures on the cervical spine, potentially serious acute complications are seen in approximately 4% of patients. Conclusion Surgical treatment and limited

  9. Lesions of the equine neck resulting in lameness or poor performance.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Sue J

    2011-12-01

    Lesions of the neck are an uncommon primary cause of pain resulting in either lameness or poor performance but should be considered if local analgesic techniques of the limbs fail to abolish lameness or if there are clinical signs directly referable to the neck such as pain, abnormal neck posture, stiffness, or patchy sweating. Accurate diagnosis requires careful clinical examination, exclusion of other causes of lameness or poor performance, and accurate interpretation of diagnostic imaging findings.

  10. Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy With Mitomycin C and Cisplatin in Advanced Unresectable Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Phase I-II Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Strojan, Primoz Karner, Katarina; Smid, Lojze; Soba, Erika; Fajdiga, Igor; Jancar, Boris; Anicin, Aleksandar; Budihna, Marjan; Zakotnik, Branko

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of concomitant chemoradiotherapy with mitomycin C and cisplatin in the treatment of advanced unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: Treatment consisted of conventional radiotherapy (70 Gy in 35 fractions), mitomycin C 15 mg/m{sup 2} IV, applied after the delivery of 10 Gy, and cisplatin at an initial dose of 10 mg/m{sup 2}/d IV, applied during the last 10 fractions of irradiation ('chemoboost'). The cisplatin dose was escalated with respect to the toxic side effects by 2 mg/m{sup 2}/d up to the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or at the most 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d (Phase I study), which was tested in the subsequent Phase II study. Results: All 36 patients had Stage T4 and/or N3 disease, and the majority had oropharyngeal (50%) or hypopharyngeal (39%) primary tumors. Six patients were treated at each of the three cisplatin dose levels tested (Phase I study). Dose-limiting toxicity was not reached even at 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d of cisplatin, which was determined as the MTD and tested in an additional 18 patients (Phase II study). After a median follow-up time of 48 months, 4-year locoregional control, failure-free, and overall survival rates were 30%, 14%, and 20%, respectively. In 24 patients treated at the cisplatin dose level of 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d, the corresponding rates were 40%, 20%, and 22%, respectively. Conclusion: Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with mitomycin C and cisplatin 'chemoboost' at 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d is feasible, with encouraging survival results if the extremely poor disease profile of the treated patients is considered.

  11. TU-AB-303-05: Clinical Guidelines for Determining When An Adaptive Replan May Be Warranted for Head and Neck Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, K; Lee, C; Samuels, S; Robbe, M; Lockhart, C; Schipper, M; Matuszak, M; Eisbruch, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tools are now available to perform daily dose assessment in radiotherapy, however, guidance is lacking as to when to replan to limit increase in normal tissue dose. This work performs statistical analysis to provide guidance for when adaptive replanning may be necessary for head/neck (HN) patients. Methods: Planning CT and daily kVCBCT images for 50 HN patients treated with VMAT were retrospectively evaluated. Twelve of 50 patients were replanned due to anatomical changes noted over their RT course. Daily dose assessment was performed to calculate the variation between the planned and delivered dose for the 38 patients not replanned and the patients replanned using their delivered plan. In addition, for the replanned patients, the dose that would have been delivered if the plan was not modified was also quantified. Deviations in dose were analyzed before and after replanning, the daily variations in patients who were not replanned assessed, and the predictive power of the deviation after 1, 5, and 15 fractions determined. Results: Dose deviations were significantly reduced following replanning, compared to if the original plan would have been delivered for the entire course. Early deviations were significantly correlated with total deviations (p<0.01). Using the criteria that a 10% increase in the final delivered dose indicates a replan may be needed earlier in the treatment course, the following guidelines can be made with a 90% specificity after the first 5 fractions: deviations of 7% in the mean dose to the inferior constrictors and 5% in the mean dose to the parotid glands and submandibular glands. No significant dose deviations were observed in any patients for the CTV -70Gy (max deviation 4%). Conclusions: A 5–7% increase in mean dose to normal tissues within the first 5 fractions strongly correlate to an overall deviatios in the delivered dose for HN patients. This work is funded in part by NIH 2P01CA059827-16.

  12. Molecular and Clinical Responses in a Pilot Study of Gefitinib With Paclitaxel and Radiation in Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Van Waes, Carter; Allen, Clint T.; Citrin, Deborah; Gius, David; Colevas, A. Dimetrios; Harold, Nancy A.; Rudy, Susan; Nottingham, Liesl; Muir, Christine; Chen, Zhong; Singh, Anurag K.; Dancey, Janet; Morris, John C.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) stimulates tumor cell proliferation, inhibits apoptosis, and increases chemotherapy and radiation resistance. We examined the toxicity, safety and the effects on EGFR signaling in tumor biopsy samples from patients with locally advanced HNSCC treated with the EGFR signaling inhibitor gefitinib (GEF) combined with weekly intravenous paclitaxel (PAC) and radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: This was a pilot Phase I dose-escalation study. Eligibility included Stage III to IVB HNSCC, age >=18 years, no prior RT or chemotherapy, adequate organ function, and informed consent. Endpoints included determination of maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and analysis of treatment effect on EGFR signaling, tumor cell proliferation, and apoptosis in biopsy samples. Results: Ten patients were treated. The MTD of this combination was GEF 250 mg/d with PAC 36 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously weekly x 6 with concurrent RT. Grade 3/4 toxicities included prolonged (>8 weeks) stomatitis (7 patients), infection (2 patients), and interstitial pneumonitis (1 patient). There were five complete responses (CR) and two partial responses (PR). Of 7 patients undergoing serial biopsies, only 1 patient demonstrated a reduction in phosphorylated EGFR, decreased downstream signaling, and reduced cellular proliferation after initiating GEF. Conclusions: Inhibition of EGFR by GEF was observed in only one of seven tumors studied. The addition of GEF to PAC and RT did not appear to improve the response of locally advanced HNSCC compared with our prior experience with PAC and RT alone. This treatment appeared to delay recovery from stomatitis.

  13. A comparison of MRI, radiographic and clinical findings of the position of the TMJ articular disc following open treatment of condylar neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Alexander; Zahnert, Diana; Klengel, Steffen; Loukota, Richard; Eckelt, Uwe

    2007-10-01

    We examined the position and function of the articular disc after open treatment of condylar fractures by comparing magnetic resonance images (MRI) and radiographs with clinical data. MRI and radiographs were taken after treatment of 28 patients with 33 fractures of the mandibular condyles. In all cases, the disc was located in the fossa after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). The MRI, radiographic and clinical findings did not correlate, and damage to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) could be seen more clearly on MRI than on clinical or radiographic examination. Damage to soft tissues seen on MRI after treatment was more pronounced in dislocated than in displaced fractures.

  14. Lymph node positive head and neck carcinoma after curative radiochemotherapy: a long lasting debate on elective post-therapeutic neck dissections comes to a conclusion.

    PubMed

    Hermann, R M; Christiansen, H; Rödel, R M

    2013-01-01

    There has been a long lasting debate, whether planned neck dissections after curative radio(chemo)therapy for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas offer some benefit in tumor control or survival. We did a thorough literature research on that topic. The results of several recently published studies are described, summarized, and reviewed. Patients with residual disease in clinical or radiographic examinations (CT or MRI scans) up to 3 months after completion of radiochemotherapy profit from neck dissections. In patients with an initial or delayed clinical complete remission after completion of radiochemotherapy, a neck dissection can be safely omitted. In conclusion, there is no longer evidence for a benefit of prophylactic post-radiochemotherapy neck dissections, but strong evidence for a therapeutic post-radiochemotherapy neck dissection in this group of patients.

  15. Neck swelling with renal stone.

    PubMed

    Khan, M K; Taous, A; Sultana, S Z; Sharif, A; Hossain, M M; Mostafa, G; Hussain, M A; Azim, M A; Siddique, M A

    2010-10-01

    Since the advent of screening of calcium and imaging techniques (CT and MRI), hyperparathyroidism has been detected with increasing frequency. Although in the past, most patients present with severe bone and renal diseases, a large number of patients are asymptomatic. Number of parathyroid glands and their ectopic locations in individuals are the problem of its management. Parathyroid adenoma or hyperplasia may be a part of Multiple Endocrine neoplasia type II. This is the story of a boy of 18 years who had got admitted in the department of Otolaryngology, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital with the complaints of a neck swelling, abdominal discomfort, inability to walk, frequency of micturation for almost same duration of 1 year. After search, hypercalcaemia, bilateral renal stone, raised parathormone level and enlarged one parathyroid gland in lower pole of left thyroid lobe was identified. Clinically it was diagnosed as parathyroid adenoma which was proved histologically after surgical excision. Many controversies still exist regarding the treatment policy of parathyroid adenoma.

  16. [Head and neck adaptive radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Graff, P; Huger, S; Kirby, N; Pouliot, J

    2013-10-01

    Onboard volumetric imaging systems can provide accurate data of the patient's anatomy during a course of head and neck radiotherapy making it possible to assess the actual delivered dose and to evaluate the dosimetric impact of complex daily positioning variations and gradual anatomic changes such as geometric variations of tumors and normal tissues or shrinkage of external contours. Adaptive radiotherapy is defined as the correction of a patient's treatment planning to adapt for individual variations observed during treatment. Strategies are developed to selectively identify patients that require replanning because of an intolerable dosimetric drift. Automated tools are designed to limit time consumption. Deformable image registration algorithms are the cornerstones of these strategies, but a better understanding of their limits of validity is required before adaptive radiotherapy can be safely introduced to daily practice. Moreover, strict evaluation of the clinical benefits is yet to be proven.

  17. Imaging of granulomatous neck masses in children.

    PubMed

    Nadel, D M; Bilaniuk, L; Handler, S D

    1996-10-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection is the most common cause of granulomatous inflammation in pediatric neck masses. Diagnosis relies upon culture, acid-fast bacilli (AFB) staining, chest radiograph, purified protein derivative (PPD) test, and clinical features. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may provide valuable information in the work-up of children with cervical masses. We reviewed 11 CT and 5 MR studies of children with a clinical diagnosis of NTM infection. Specific findings included stranding of the subcutaneous fat, thickening and enhancement of the overlying skin, obliteration of the tissue palnes, and multichambered masses. One patient had calcifications within the mass. MR with contrast better demonstrated the soft tissues and is our recommended imaging modality, although CT is more likely to detect calcifications within the neck mass.

  18. SBRT for recurrent head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, M.; Kabarriti, R.; Baliga, S.; Guha, C.; Tome, W.; Kalnicki, S.

    2017-01-01

    The management of patients with recurrent head and neck cancers is complex. Concerns over toxicity with re-irradiation have limited its use in the clinical setting. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) has emerged as a highly conformal and precise type of radiotherapy and has the advantage of sparing normal tissue. Although SBRT is an attractive treatment modality, its use in the clinic is limited, given the technically challenging nature of the procedure. In this review, we attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of re-irradiation in patients with recurrent head and neck cancers, with particular attention to the advent of SBRT and its use with systemic therapies such as cetuximab.

  19. Comparative aspects of chronic pain in the head and neck versus trunk and appendages: experiences of the Multidisciplinary University of North Carolina Pain Clinic.

    PubMed

    Gregg, J M; Ghia, J N

    1981-05-01

    The interdisciplinary University of North Carolina Pain Clinic, in existence since 1973, is a coordination center for research, pre and postdoctoral and resident training, and clinical services. It functions primarily as a tertiary care center for outpatients as a component of the North Carolina Memorial Hospital. Inpatient consultations and therapy direction are carried out on request. Approximately 400 new patient visits and 1,200 consults and return visits are made yearly. The clinic is administered by codirectors from the Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Anesthesiology. Consultants to the clinic include the disciplines of psychiatry, neurosurgery, family medicine, pathology-oral pathology, dentistry, physical therapy, social work and nursing. Support staff includes a head nurse, half-time transcription and half-time general secretary and a financial technician. Facilities consist of an 8-room clinic dual equipped for patient care and clinical research. An adjacent conference room is used for research and patient presentation conferences. In addition to routine examining and interview rooms, a minor procedure operating room is equipped with resuscitation equipment, suction, oxygen, anesthesia machine, a physiologic monitoring system with polygraph, a cryosurgical unit and a radiofrequency lesion generator. A second room is equipped for neurosensory studies of peripheral nerve functions including a battery of tactile-mechanical and thermal threshold stimuli tests, as well as nerve conduction and EMG. A system for psychophysical testing is available through tie-in with a computer, which is located in an adjacent laboratory used for data analysis and also subhuman primate experiments. Another room is equipped with psychophysiologic training equipment, particularly EMG biofeedback. A computer terminal on line to the University IBM 360 is located in the Pain Clinic for use in entering patient-research data. A library with dictating space is available

  20. Epigenetics in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, Syeda Marriam; Ali, Amjad; Barh, Debmalya

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to the study of heritable changes in gene expression that occur without a change in DNA sequence. Research has shown that epigenetic mechanisms provide an "extra" layer of transcriptional control that regulates how genes are expressed. These mechanisms are critical components in the normal development and growth of cells. Epigenetic abnormalities have been found to be causative factors in cancer, genetic disorders, and pediatric syndromes. Head and neck cancers are a group of malignancies with diverse biological behaviors and a strong, well-established association with environmental effects. Although the hunt for genetic alterations in head and neck cancer has continued in the past two decades, with unequivocal proof of a genetic role in multistage head and neck carcinogenesis, epigenetic alteration in association with promoter CpG islands hypermethylation has emerged in the past few years as one of the most active areas of cancer research. Silencing of the genes by hypermethylation or induction of oncogenes by promoter hypomethylation is a frequent mechanism in head and neck cancer and achieves increasing diagnostic and therapeutic importance. In this context it is important for clinicians to understand the principles of epigenetic mechanisms and how these principles relate to human health and disease. It is important to address the use of epigenetic pathways in new approaches to molecular diagnosis and novel targeted treatments across the clinical spectrum.

  1. Osteoma with cholesteatoma of the external auditory canal: neck manifestation of this rare association†

    PubMed Central

    Khoyratty, Fadil; Sweed, Ahmed; Douglas, Susan; Magdy, Tawfik

    2013-01-01

    Osteoma and cholesteatoma of the external auditory canal is a rare clinical finding, presenting specific challenges in patients suffering from this dual pathology of the ear. We report on a unique complication of this association in a patient suffering with recurrent neck abscesses. Neck disease secondary to cholesteatoma has become nearly extinct with better clinical imaging and sensible antibiotic usage. PMID:24964451

  2. Osteoma with cholesteatoma of the external auditory canal: neck manifestation of this rare association†.

    PubMed

    Khoyratty, Fadil; Sweed, Ahmed; Douglas, Susan; Magdy, Tawfik

    2013-06-26

    Osteoma and cholesteatoma of the external auditory canal is a rare clinical finding, presenting specific challenges in patients suffering from this dual pathology of the ear. We report on a unique complication of this association in a patient suffering with recurrent neck abscesses. Neck disease secondary to cholesteatoma has become nearly extinct with better clinical imaging and sensible antibiotic usage.

  3. Multi-institutional Quantitative Evaluation and Clinical Validation of Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE) Autosegmentation of Target Structures and Normal Tissues on Computer Tomography Images in the Head and Neck, Thorax, Liver, and Male Pelvis Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bzdusek, Karl; Brink, Carsten; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Hansen, Olfred; Jensen, Helle Anita; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Widder, Joachim; Brouwer, Charlotte L.; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Vanhauten, Hubertus A.M.; Cao, Jeffrey Q.; McBrayne, Gail; Patel, Salil H.; Cannon, Donald M.; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Tomé, Wolfgang A.; Guckenberg, Matthias; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Clinical validation and quantitative evaluation of computed tomography (CT) image autosegmentation using Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE). Methods and Materials: CT images of 125 treated patients (32 head and neck [HN], 40 thorax, 23 liver, and 30 prostate) in 7 independent institutions were autosegmented using SPICE and computational times were recorded. The number of structures autocontoured were 25 for the HN, 7 for the thorax, 3 for the liver, and 6 for the male pelvis regions. Using the clinical contours as reference, autocontours of 22 selected structures were quantitatively evaluated using Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and Mean Slice-wise Hausdorff Distance (MSHD). All 40 autocontours were evaluated by a radiation oncologist from the institution that treated the patients. Results: The mean computational times to autosegment all the structures using SPICE were 3.1 to 11.1 minutes per patient. For the HN region, the mean DSC was >0.70 for all evaluated structures, and the MSHD ranged from 3.2 to 10.0 mm. For the thorax region, the mean DSC was 0.95 for the lungs and 0.90 for the heart, and the MSHD ranged from 2.8 to 12.8 mm. For the liver region, the mean DSC was >0.92 for all structures, and the MSHD ranged from 5.2 to 15.9 mm. For the male pelvis region, the mean DSC was >0.76 for all structures, and the MSHD ranged from 4.8 to 10.5 mm. Out of the 40 autocontoured structures reviews by experts, 25 were scored useful as autocontoured or with minor edits for at least 90% of the patients and 33 were scored useful autocontoured or with minor edits for at least 80% of the patients. Conclusions: Compared with manual contouring, autosegmentation using SPICE for the HN, thorax, liver, and male pelvis regions is efficient and shows significant promise for clinical utility.

  4. Elective neck irradiation in the treatment of cancer of the oral tongue

    SciTech Connect

    Leborgne, F.; Leborgne, J.H.; Barlocci, L.A.; Ortega, B.

    1987-08-01

    A total of 69 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue Stages T1-2-3 N0 were treated between 1952 and 1982 at one cancer center in Montevideo, Uruguay. Of 52 patients with the primary disease controlled, 2 had elective cervical lymph node dissection, and were therefore excluded from the study, 25 were treated with elective neck irradiation, and 25 were followed without irradiation to the neck. In the untreated group, 40% developed neck node metastases, while this was observed only in 20% of the group receiving elective neck irradiation, but only 4% recurred in the elective irradiated areas of the neck (p: 0.0028). The survival was the same for each group (5-year absolute survival with NED 67% for the neck irradiation group and 64% for the unirradiated group). From this retrospective study, we conclude that elective neck irradiation in carcinoma of the oral tongue decreases the incidence of neck metastases but an improvement in survival of these patients was not demonstrated.

  5. Myofascial trigger point-focused head and neck massage for recurrent tension-type headache: A randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Moraska, Albert F.; Stenerson, Lea; Butryn, Nathan; Krutsch, Jason P.; Schmiege, Sarah J.; Mann, J. Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Objective Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are focal disruptions in skeletal muscle that can refer pain to the head and reproduce the pain patterns of tension-type headache (TTH). The present study applied massage focused on MTrPs of subjects with TTH in a placebo-controlled, clinical trial to assess efficacy on reducing headache pain. Methods Fifty-six subjects with TTH were randomized to receive 12 massage or placebo (detuned ultrasound) sessions over six weeks, or to wait-list. Trigger point release (TPR) massage focused on MTrPs in cervical musculature. Headache pain (frequency, intensity and duration) was recorded in a daily headache diary. Additional outcome measures included self-report of perceived clinical change in headache pain and pressure-pain threshold (PPT) at MTrPs in the upper trapezius and sub-occipital muscles. Results From diary recordings, group differences across time were detected in headache frequency (p=0.026), but not for intensity or duration. Post hoc analysis indicated headache frequency decreased from baseline for both massage (p<0.0003) and placebo (p=0.013), but no difference was detected between massage and placebo. Subject report of perceived clinical change was a greater reduction in headache pain for massage than placebo or wait-list groups (p=0.002). PPT improved in all muscles tested for massage only (all p's<0.002). Discussion Two findings from this study are apparent: 1) MTrPs are important components in the treatment of TTH, and 2) TTH, like other chronic conditions, is responsive to placebo. Clinical trials on headache that do not include a placebo group are at risk for overestimating the specific contribution from the active intervention. PMID:25329141

  6. Developmental biomechanics of neck musculature.

    PubMed

    Lavallee, Amy V; Ching, Randal P; Nuckley, David J

    2013-02-01

    Neck mechanics is central to head injury prevention since it is the musculoskeletal neck, which dictates the position and movement of the head. In the US, traumatic injury is the leading cause of death for children; however prevention is hampered by the lack of data concerning the mechanics of the immature head-and-neck. Thus, the objective of this study was to quantify neck muscle strength and endurance across the maturation spectrum and correlate these with head-and-neck anthropometry. A factorial study was performed on 91 human subjects measuring head-and-neck anthropometry and neck strength and endurance in three bending directions (flexion, extension, and lateral) as a function of age (6-23 years). Using a custom device, neck maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) force was measured in triplicate. Next, neck muscle endurance (sustained effort) was measured as the subjects' ability to maintain 70% of peak force over 30s. Linear regression of peak force and endurance as a function of age revealed each direction to significantly (p<0.0001) increase with age. The MVC force, averaged across all directions and normalized to the adult values, exhibits the following maturation curve: %MVC Force=-0.0879(age)(2)+6.018(age)+8.120. Neck muscle strength, similar between young males and females, becomes disparate in adolescence and adulthood with males exhibiting greater strength. Bending direction differences were also found with extension strength being the greatest regardless of age and sex. Furthermore, neck circumference appears predictive of neck strength and endurance in children. Together, these relationships may facilitate improved design of injury prevention interventions.

  7. Developmental biomechanics of neck musculature

    PubMed Central

    Lavallee, Amy V.; Ching, Randal P.; Nuckley, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Neck mechanics is central to head injury prevention since it is the musculoskeletal neck, which dictates the position and movement of the head. In the US, traumatic injury is the leading cause of death for children; however prevention is hampered by the lack of data concerning the mechanics of the immature head-and-neck. Thus, the objective of this study was to quantify neck muscle strength and endurance across the maturation spectrum and correlate these with head-and-neck anthropometry. A factorial study was performed on 91 human subjects measuring head-and-neck anthropometry and neck strength and endurance in three bending directions (flexion, extension, and lateral) as a function of age (6–23 years). Using a custom device, neck maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) force was measured in triplicate. Next, neck muscle endurance (sustained effort) was measured as the subjects’ ability to maintain 70% of peak force over 30 s. Linear regression of peak force and endurance as a function of age revealed each direction to significantly (p<0.0001) increase with age. The MVC force, averaged across all directions and normalized to the adult values, exhibits the following maturation curve: %MVC Force= −0.0879(age)2+6.018(age)+8.120. Neck muscle strength, similar between young males and females, becomes disparate in adolescence and adulthood with males exhibiting greater strength. Bending direction differences were also found with extension strength being the greatest regardless of age and sex. Furthermore, neck circumference appears predictive of neck strength and endurance in children. Together, these relationships may facilitate improved design of injury prevention interventions. PMID:23127787

  8. Basal oxidative stress ratio of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas correlates with nodal metastatic spread in patients under therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dequanter, D; Dok, R; Nuyts, S

    2017-01-01

    Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a type of cancer that is strongly associated with oxidative damage and oxidative stress. Tobacco and alcohol – sources of massive quantities of reactive oxygen species (ROS) – have been clearly identified as etiologic factors that contribute to these malignancies. Considering the role of glutathione (GSH) in ROS detoxification, we hypothesized that potential biological markers can be found in addition to the parameters of oxidative stress. In line with previous studies that emphasized the accumulation of GSH in tumor cells, in this study, we have reported a lower ratio of oxidized versus reduced GSH in head and neck tumors. Objective The aim of the paper was to evaluate the prognostic and clinical significance of the ratio of oxidized versus reduced GSH in patients with head and neck cancers. Methods Thirty-six patients with HNSCC were included in this study. The tumoral redox status was determined by measuring the ratio of oxidized/reduced GSH (GSSG/GSH) by capillary electrophoresis. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the correlation between patient, clinical factors and the redox status. Results The results showed a low tumoral ratio of GSSG/GSH and a better locoregional control. Moreover, a significant correlation between the tumoral redox status ratio (GSSG/GSH) and nodal stage (N0 versus N1, N2 and N3) was also observed. A higher tumoral redox status ratio was found to be associated with the presence of lymph node metastasis (N1, N2 and N3). Conclusion A strong correlation was observed between the oxidative status and locoregional control of the tumors. Moreover, a higher basal tumoral redox status ratio was found to be correlated with the presence of lymph node metastasis. PMID:28123307

  9. Patterns of Care in Elderly Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiation Oncology Patients: A Single-Center Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shaohui; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John; Lockwood, Gina; Bayley, Andrew; Kim, John; Cummings, Bernard; Dawson, Laura A.; Hope, Andrew; Cho, John; Witterick, Ian; Chen, Eric X.; Ringash, Jolie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the patterns of care for elderly head-and-neck cancer patients with those of younger patients. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of all new mucosal head-and-neck cancer referrals to radiation oncology between July 1, 2003 and December 31, 2007 at our institution. The clinical characteristics, treatment pattern, tolerance, and outcomes were compared between the elderly (aged {>=}75 years) and younger (aged <75 years) cohorts. Results: A total of 2,312 patients, including 452 (20%) elderly and 1,860 (80%) younger patients, were studied. The elderly patients were more likely to be women (36% vs. 27%, p <.01) and to have other malignancies (23% vs. 13%, p <.01), Stage I or II disease (38% vs. 32%, p <.01), and N0 status (56% vs. 42%, p <.01). Treatment was less often curative in intent (79% vs. 93%, p <.01). For the 1,487 patients who received definitive radiotherapy (RT), no differences were found between the elderly (n = 238) and younger (n = 1,249) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. Within the subset of 760 patients who received intensified treatment (concurrent chemoradiotherapy or hyperfractionated accelerated RT), no difference was seen between the elderly (n = 46) and younger (n = 714) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. After a median follow-up of 2.5 years, the 2-year cause-specific survival rate after definitive RT was 72% (range, 65-78%) for the elderly vs. 86% (range, 84-88%) for the younger patients (p <.01). Conclusion: Elderly head-and-neck cancer patients exhibited different clinical characteristics and experienced different patterns of care from younger patients. Although age itself was an adverse predictor of cause-specific survival, its effect was modest. Elderly patients selected for definitive RT or intensified RT showed no evidence of impaired treatment tolerance.

  10. Integration of Fluorescence Differential Path-Length Spectroscopy to Photodynamic Therapy of the Head and Neck Tumors is Useful in Monitoring Clinical Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakullukcu, Baris; Kanick, Stephen; Aans, Jan Bonne; Sterenborg, Henricus; Tan, Bing; Amelink, Arjen; Robinson, Dominic

    2015-04-01

    The use of fluorescence differential pathlength spectroscopy (FDPS) has the potential to provide real-time information on photosensitiser pharmacokinetics, vascular physiology and photosensitizer photobleaching based dosimetry of tumors in the oral cavity receiving m-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC) photodynamic therapy (PDT). Reflectance spectra can be used provide quantitative values of oxygen saturation, blood volume fraction, blood vessel diameter, and to determine the local optical properties that can be used to correct raw fluorescence for tissue absorption. Patients and methods: Twenty-seven lesions in the oral cavity, either dysplasias or cancer were interrogated using FDPS, before and immediately after the therapeutic illumination. The average tumor center to normal mucosa ratio of fluorescence was 1.50 ± 0.66. mTHPC photobleaching was observed in 24 of the lesions treated. The average extent of photobleaching was 81% ± 17%. Information from FDPS spectroscopy coupled with the clinical results of the treatment identified 3 types of correctable errors in the application of mTHPC-PDT: Two patients exhibited very low concentrations of photosensitizer in tumour center, indicating an ineffective i.v. injection of photosensitiser or an erroneous systemic distribution of mTHPC. In one in tumor we observed no photobleaching accompanied by a high blood volume fraction in the illuminated tissue, suggesting that the presence of blood prevented therapeutic light reaching the target tissue. All 3 of the these lesions had no clinical response to PDT. In four patients we observed less than 50% photobleaching at the tumor margins , suggesting a possible geographic miss. One patient in this group had a recurrence within 2 months after PDT even though the initial response was good. The integration of FDPS to clinical PDT yields data on tissue physiology, photosensitiser content and photobleaching that can help identify treatment errors that can potentially be corrected.

  11. Hypothyroidism after radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Hiroyuki; Saitou, Hideyuki; Mizutari, Kunio; Takata, Yasunori; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2007-01-01

    We report on 2 cases of hypothyroidism presenting clinical symptoms that occurred after radiotherapy for cancer of the head and neck and on the results of estimating thyroid function in patients with head and neck cancer who received radiotherapy. The first patient underwent total laryngectomy for laryngeal cancer without sacrificing the thyroid gland and partial gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Radiotherapy of the neck was carried out postoperatively. Two years later, the patient developed chest pain; pericardial effusion was detected, leading to a diagnosis of myxedema caused by hypothyroidism. The second patient received radiotherapy alone for laryngeal cancer. Two months later, low serum sodium concentration and anemia were detected in this patient. The cause of these changes was subsequently found to be hypothyroidism. Based on our experience with these 2 cases, we measured thyroid function in 35 patients who had undergone neck radiation for head and neck cancer at our hospital over the past 10 years. Hypothyroidism was observed in 13 of the 35 patients (37%). The prevalence of hypothyroidism was 46% (6/13) for patients treated with both radiation and surgery, as compared with 32% (7/22) for those who received radiation alone. The risk factors responsible for hypothyroidism were not evident from the statistical analysis of these cases. We believe that thyroid function should be evaluated periodically in patients who have undergone neck radiation because it is often difficult to diagnose hypothyroidism only from clinical symptoms.

  12. Neck pain in children: a retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jocelyn; Davidian, Christine; Mior, Silvano

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Spinal pain in the paediatric population is a significant health issue, with an increasing prevalence as they age. Paediatric patients attend for chiropractor care for spinal pain, yet, there is a paucity of quality evidence to guide the practitioner with respect to appropriate care planning. Methods: A retrospective chart review was used to describe chiropractic management of paediatric neck pain. Two researchers abstracted data from 50 clinical files that met inclusion criteria from a general practice chiropractic office in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. Data were entered into SPSS 15 and descriptively analyzed. Results: Fifty paediatric neck pain patient files were analysed. Patients’ age ranged between 6 and 18 years (mean 13 years). Most (98%) were diagnosed with Grade I–II mechanical neck pain. Treatment frequency averaged 5 visits over 19 days; with spinal manipulative therapy used in 96% of patients. Significant improvement was recorded in 96% of the files. No adverse events were documented. Conclusion: Paediatric mechanical neck pain appears to be successfully managed by chiropractic care. Spinal manipulative therapy appears to benefit paediatric mechanical neck pain resulting from day-today activities with no reported serious adverse events. Results can be used to inform clinical trials assessing effectiveness of manual therapy in managing paediatric mechanical neck pain. PMID:27713576

  13. Carotid artery disease after head and neck radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, Christoph; Husmann, Marc; Glanzmann, Christoph; Studer, Gabriela; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice R

    2015-01-01

    Radiation induced atherosclerosis of the carotid artery is a clinically relevant late complication after head and neck radiotherapy. Improved long-term survival after multimodality therapy in neck malignancies result in an increased risk of carotid artery disease in patients after radiotherapy (RT). This review focuses on the current knowledge of occlusive carotid disease after head and neck radiotherapy and highlights the exceeding morphologic post-radiation vessel wall pathologies. More severe and extensive carotid artery atherosclerosis with plaque in all segments including the common carotid artery is a frequent finding after RT. Therefore, colour coded duplex ultrasound surveillance in patients after head and neck RT is recommended. Some histopathological studies indicate differences to “classical” atherosclerosis, and pathogenesis of chronic radiation vasculopathy is still under discussion.

  14. Abductor pollicis longus tendon division with swan neck thumb deformity.

    PubMed

    Zacharia, Balaji; Puthezhath, Kishore

    2012-08-01

    Swan neck thumb deformity can be caused by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, tendon transfers and paralytic diseases. Abductor pollicis longus is one of the major stabilizing tendon of the carpometacarpal joint of thumb. To the best of our knowledge, swan neck thumb deformity owing to division of abductor pollicis longus tendon is rare. In this article, we describe a case of isolated division of abductor pollicis longus tendon presenting with swan-neck deformity of thumb and discuss the mechanism, management and outcome. The patient was treated by repair of the divided tendon using palmaris longus tendon graft. At approximately 107 weeks following treatment, the patient was having full range of thumb movement and the deformity completely disappeared. We also describe the unusual mechanism whereby an isolated division of abductor pollicis longus tendon results in swan neck thumb deformity. Level of clinical evidence IV.

  15. Management of the neck in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaha, A R

    1998-10-01

    The incidence of nodal metastasis in differentiated thyroid cancer ranges between 40% to 75%. Elective neck dissection is generally not advised in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer; however, if clinically apparent nodal disease is noted in the tracheoesophageal groove during surgery, central compartment clearance is advised. If clinically apparent nodal disease is present in the lateral compartment of the neck, modified neck dissection preserving the sternomastoid, accessory nerve, and jugular vein is advised. The "berry picking procedure" is generally not recommended because of the higher incidence of regional recurrence. Due consideration should be given for parathyroidal transplantation if the blood supply to the parathyroids is damaged during central compartment clearance. The incidence of lymph node metastasis is highest in young patients, however, lymph node metastasis has no bearing on long-term survival. There seems to be a higher incidence of regional recurrence in elderly individuals. If patients present with bulky nodal disease, consideration may be given for postoperative radioactive iodine dosimetry and ablation if necessary. Differentiated thyroid cancer represents a unique disease in the human body, where lymph node metastasis has no prognostic implication. Aggressive surgical clearance is advised in patients with medullary thyroid cancer in the central compartment and the jugular chain lymph nodes.

  16. Volumetric analysis of bone substitute material performance within the human sinus cavity of former head and neck cancer patients: A prospective, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Jonas; Eichler, Kathrin; Barbeck, Mike; Lerner, Henriette; Stübinger, Stefan; Seipel, Catherine; Vogl, Thomas J.; Kovács, Adorján F.; Ghanaati, Shahram; Sader, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In numerous animal and human studies, it could be detected that in bone augmentation procedures, material's physicochemical characteristics can influence the cellular inflammatory pattern and therefore the integration in the host tissue. Histological, histomorphometrical, and clinical analyses of the integration of the biomaterial in the surrounding tissue are well established methodologies; however, they do not make a statement on volume and density changes of the augmented biomaterial. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess the volume and density of a xenogeneic (Bio-Oss®, BO) and a synthetic (NanoBone®, NB) bone substitute material in split-mouth sinus augmentations in former tumor patients to complete histological and histomorphometrical assessment. Methods: Immediately and 6 months after sinus augmentation computed tomography scans were recorded, bone grafts were marked, and the volume was calculated with radiologic RIS-PACS software (General Electric Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, Great Britain) to determine the integration and degradation behavior of both biomaterials. Results: Radiographic analysis revealed a volume reduction of the initial augmented bone substitute material (i.e. 100%) to 77.36 (±11.68) % in the BO-group, respectively, 75.82 (±22.28) % in the NB-group six months after augmentation. In both materials, the volume reduction was not significant. Bone density significantly increased in both groups. Conclusion: The presented radiological investigation presents a favorable method to obtain clinically relevant information concerning the integration and degradation behavior of bone substitute materials. PMID:28299254

  17. [Intermuscular and intramuscular lipomas of the neck].

    PubMed

    Giacomelli, L; Miglietta, A M; Pulcini, A; Granai, A; Fabrizio, G; Manno, A; Messinetti, S

    1992-01-01

    Two cases of deep lipomas of the neck developed between the skeletal muscles were presented: one intermuscular and the other intramuscular. Taking into consideration the rarity of the case, the authors examined the clinical surgical aspect, paying special attention to the relationship between sonographic and computerized tomographic characteristics and the histological aspects in order to define whether the lipomatous tumors were benign or malignant. They also studied the localization of cervical lipomas, of lipoblastomas of hibernomas and of liposarcomas and defined an anatomo-clinical classification of both superficial and deep cervical lipomas.

  18. Interventional radiology neck procedures.

    PubMed

    Zabala Landa, R M; Korta Gómez, I; Del Cura Rodríguez, J L

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonography has become extremely useful in the evaluation of masses in the head and neck. It enables us to determine the anatomic location of the masses as well as the characteristics of the tissues that compose them, thus making it possible to orient the differential diagnosis toward inflammatory, neoplastic, congenital, traumatic, or vascular lesions, although it is necessary to use computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging to determine the complete extension of certain lesions. The growing range of interventional procedures, mostly guided by ultrasonography, now includes biopsies, drainages, infiltrations, sclerosing treatments, and tumor ablation.

  19. Effects of Hip Implant Modular Neck Material and Assembly Method on Fatigue Life and Distraction Force.

    PubMed

    Aljenaei, Fahad; Catelas, Isabelle; Louati, Hakim; Beaulé, Paul E; Nganbe, Michel

    2016-11-16

    Hip implant neck fractures and adverse tissue reactions associated with fretting-corrosion damage at modular interfaces are a major source of concern. Therefore, there is an urgent clinical need to develop accurate in vitro test procedures to better understand, predict, and prevent in vivo implant failures. This study aimed to simulate in vivo fatigue fracture and distraction of modular necks in an in vitro setting, and to assess the effects of neck material (Ti6Al4V vs. CoCrMo) and assembly method (hand vs. impact) on the fatigue life and distraction of the necks. Fatigue tests were performed on the cementless PROFEMUR® Total Hip Modular Neck System under two different loads and number of cycles: 2.3 kN for 5 million cycles, and 7.0 kN for 1.3 million cycles. The developed in vitro simulation setup successfully reproduced in vivo modular neck fracture mode and location. Neck failure occurred at the neck-stem taper and the fracture ran from the distal lateral neck surface to the proximal medial entry point of the neck into the stem. None of the necks failed under the 2.3 kN load. However, all hand-assembled Ti6Al4V necks failed under the 7.0 kN load. In contrast, none of the hand-assembled CoCrMo necks and impact-assembled necks (Ti6Al4V or CoCrMo) failed under this higher load. In conclusion, Ti6Al4V necks were more susceptible to fatigue failure than CoCrMo necks. In addition, impact assembly substantially improved the fatigue life of Ti6Al4V necks and also led to overall higher distraction forces for both neck materials. Overall, this study shows that the material and assembly method can affect the fatigue strength of modular necks. Finally, improper implant assembly during surgery may result in diminished modular neck survivability and increased failure rates. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  20. Effect of Assistive Device for Neck Retraction (ANR) on Neck Muscles during Neck Retraction Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kwon, Hun; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2013-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of present study was to develop an exercise device for assisting neck retraction exercise and to investigate its effectiveness. [Subjects] Fifteen male subjects were recruited. [Methods] The subjects performed the neck retraction exercises with and without assistive device for neck retraction (ANR). EMG activities of the lower cervical erector spinae (LCE), and sternocleidomatoid (SCM) muscles were recorded. [Results] The ANR condition significantly increased LCE activation compared to the control condition. The ANR condition significantly decreased SCM activation compared to the control condition. [Conclusion] We suggest that the ANR condition will help the efficacy of the neck retraction exercise.

  1. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Induced Head & Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Retrospect

    PubMed Central

    Nishat, Roquaiya; Ramachandra, Sujatha; Kumar, Harish; Bandyopadhyay, Alokenath

    2015-01-01

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma accounts for the sixth most common malignancy occurring worldwide with tobacco and alcohol being the two well established risk factors. In the recent years, substantial evidence has been obtained that Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) associated head and neck cancers are on the rise. This article provides an insight into the structure of HPV genome, molecular pathogenesis, detection methods and clinical implications of HPV positive Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma. PMID:26266234

  2. Osteoid Osteoma of the Femoral Neck in Athletes: Two Case Reports Differentiating From Femoral Neck Stress Injuries.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Christopher B; Dembowski, Scott C; Johnson, Michael R; Combs, John J; Svoboda, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of an intra-articular osteoid osteoma can be a challenging and lengthy process, with reports of delayed diagnosis of greater than 2 years. In the young, athletic patient with an atraumatic onset of groin pain, an overuse injury or muscle strain is the most likely etiology. However, an overuse injury of femoral neck stress fracture must be identified because of the potentially disastrous outcome of fracture completion. The similar clinical presentation of a femoral neck stress fracture and intra-articular osteoid osteoma of the femoral neck can further delay the diagnosis of the osteoid osteoma. In a patient with these differential diagnoses that do not improve with a period of nonweightbearing activity, a more intensive workup must ensue. The purpose of this case report is to describe the initial presentations, subsequent follow-up, and imaging findings leading to the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma as well as to differentiate an osteoid osteoma from femoral neck stress injuries.

  3. Post-mastectomy Radiation Therapy for T3N0: A SEER Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew E.; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Martin, Jeffrey M.; Hayes, Shelly B.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is conflicting evidence regarding the benefit of post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) for pathologic stage T3N0M0 breast cancers. We analyzed data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database to investigate the benefit of PMRT in these patients. Methods We queried the SEER database for T3N0M0 breast cancer patients diagnosed from 2000–2010 who underwent modified radical mastectomy. We excluded males, patients with unknown radiation timing/type, other primary tumors, or survival <6 months. 2525 patients were included in this analysis. We performed univariate and multivariate statistical analysis using Chi-squared tests, log rank test, and Cox proportional hazards regression. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and breast cancer-specific survival (CSS). Results Of the 2525 patients identified, 1063 received PMRT. The median follow-up was 56 months (range: 6–131). On univariate analysis, PMRT improved OS (76.5% vs. 61.8%, p<0.01) and CSS (85.0% vs. 82.4%, p<0.01) at 8 years. The use of PMRT remained significant on multivariate analysis: PMRT improved OS (HR 0.63, p<0.001) and CSS (HR 0.77, p=0.045). Low tumor grade (p<0.01) and marital status "married" (p=0.01) also predicted for improved CSS on multivariate analysis. Conclusion(s) PMRT was associated with significant improvements in both CSS and OS in patients with T3N0M0 breast cancers treated with modified radical mastectomy from 2000 to 2010. PMRT should be strongly considered in T3N0M0 patients. PMID:24985911

  4. The association between cervical spine curvature and neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Grob, D.; Frauenfelder, H.

    2006-01-01

    Degenerative changes of the cervical spine are commonly accompanied by a reduction or loss of the segmental or global lordosis, and are often considered to be a cause of neck pain. Nonetheless, such changes may also remain clinically silent. The aim of this study was to examine the correlation between the presence of neck pain and alterations of the normal cervical lordosis in people aged over 45 years. One hundred and seven volunteers, who were otherwise undergoing treatment for lower extremity problems in our hospital, took part. Sagittal radiographs of the cervical spine were taken and a questionnaire was completed, enquiring about neck pain and disability in the last 12 months. Based on the latter, subjects were divided into a group with neck pain (N = 54) and a group without neck pain (N = 53). The global curvature of the cervical spine (C2–C7) and each segmental angle were measured from the radiographs, using the posterior tangent method, and examined in relation to neck complaints. No significant difference between the two groups could be found in relation to the global curvature, the segmental angles, or the incidence of straight-spine or kyphotic deformity (P > 0.05). Twenty-three per cent of the people with neck pain and 17% of those without neck pain showed a segmental kyphosis deformity of more than 4° in at least one segment—most frequently at C4/5, closely followed by C5/6 and C3/4. The average segmental angle at the kyphotic level was 6.5° in the pain group and 6.3° in the group without pain, with a range of 5–10° in each group. In the group with neck pain, there was no association between any of the clinical characteristics (duration, frequency, intensity of pain; radiating pain; sensory/motor disturbances; disability; healthcare utilisation) and either global cervical curvature or segmental angles. The presence of such structural abnormalities in the patient with neck pain must be considered coincidental, i.e. not necessarily

  5. Frequent aberrant expression of the human ether à go-go (hEAG1) potassium channel in head and neck cancer: pathobiological mechanisms and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Sofía Tirados; Villaronga, María Angeles; Rodrigo, Juan P; Alvarez-Teijeiro, Saúl; García-Carracedo, Darío; Urdinguio, Rocío G; Fraga, Mario F; Pardo, Luis A; Viloria, Cristina Gutiérrez; Suárez, Carlos; García-Pedrero, Juana María

    2012-10-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that the human ether-à-go-go voltage-gated potassium channels (hEAG1) may represent new valuable membrane therapeutic targets and diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers in various cancers. This study is the first to investigate the expression of hEAG1 potassium channel subunit in both primary tumors and HNSCC-derived cell lines to ascertain its clinical and biological role in tumor progression. Our findings demonstrate that hEAG1 is frequently aberrantly expressed in a high percentage of primary tumors (83 %, 45/54 cases) and HNSCC-derived cell lines (83 %, 10/12 cell lines). hEAG1 expression increased during HNSCC progression and was more frequent in advanced tumors. Strikingly, hEAG1 expression was also detected in a notable proportion (39 %, 17/44 cases) of patient-matched normal adjacent mucosa, whereas no expression was detected in normal epithelia from non-oncologic patients without exposure to tobacco carcinogens. In an attempt to identify the underlying mechanisms of aberrant hEAG1 expression in HNSCC, we found that hEAG1 gene copy gain occurred at a low frequency (15 %, 13/88 cases) in primary tumors but was not observed in early stages of HNSCC tumorigenesis. Furthermore, this study provides original evidence supporting the involvement of histone acetylation (i.e., H3Ac and H4K16Ac activating marks) in the regulation of hEAG1 expression in HNSCC. In addition, functional studies in HNSCC cells further revealed that hEAG1 expression is a biologically relevant feature that promotes cell proliferation and invasion, although independently of its ion-conducting function. Our findings strongly support the notion that hEAG1 may represent a promising candidate as tumor marker and membrane therapeutic target for HNSCC treatment.

  6. [Results of surgical treatment of oral cavity cancer T1-2N0M0].

    PubMed

    Karpenko, A V; Sibgatullin, R R; Belova, E N; Boĭko, A A; Zolotykh, V G; Roman, L D

    2014-01-01

    The article shows the results of treatment of 20 patients (aged from 46 to 85 years old) with early oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma at the period from April 2009 to January 2011. The surgery included the resection of primary tumor and neck dissection in all the patients. The primary tumor was removed by mouth access in 10 patients and combined method was used in 10 cases. The selective neck dissection was carried out in 22 cases. The oral cavity wounds were closed primarily by local flaps in 10 patients, some small residual defects were left open in 3 cases. The reconstructions with remote skin-muscular infrahyoid flap were performed in 7 patients. The free revascularized radial skin-fascia flap was used in 3 cases. A follow-up period was from 24 to 44 months. The primary local regional control consisted of 85% in given group of patients. The rate of recurrence of the second primary metachronous tumor was 15%. Tumors were located in the oral cavity. Overall 3-year survival was 90% (18 out of 20 patients).

  7. Sternocleidomastoid muscle flap used for repairing the dead space after supraomohyoid neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinzhong; Han, Zhengxue

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication followed neck dissection and dead space is a common reason of SSI. The present study is aimed to explore whether the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) flap transposition to repair the dead space in level II of neck could decrease the postoperative SSI in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) underwent supraomohyoid neck dissection (SOND). Ninety-six patients with cT2-3N0 OSCC who underwent extended resection of primary cancer combined SOND and reconstructed with free flap from March 2011 to October 2014 in our department were included. Forty-eight cases underwent SCM transposition to repair the potential dead space in level II of the neck, the other 48 cases did not. The two groups were matched at age, gender, concomitant diseases, and perioperative treatments. All the patients underwent exhaustive hemostasis and careful placement of negative pressure drainage. The wound healing was observed on 7 days postoperatively. The SSI rates of neck between the two groups were compared using Fisher's exact test. The dead space in level II was observed in all the neck wounds after SOND. The neck wounds healed by primary intention in 46 cases underwent SCM flap transposition, and in 39 cases underwent routine SOND only. Two cases with SCM flap transposition and 9 cases in the group without SCM flap transposition presented SSI in neck. There was significant difference in the SSI rate between the two groups (P = 0.0248). The dead space in level II could be an important cause of SSI in neck followed SOND. Repairing of the dead space in level II using SCM flap transposition reduce the SSI rate of neck followed SOND.

  8. Planned neck dissection for patients with complete response to chemoradiotherapy: a concept approaching obsolescence.

    PubMed

    Ferlito, Alfio; Corry, June; Silver, Carl E; Shaha, Ashok R; Thomas Robbins, K; Rinaldo, Alessandra

    2010-02-01

    The question of efficacy of "planned" neck dissection following complete response to chemoradiation of head and neck cancer is discussed. There is general agreement that preemptive neck dissection in patients who present initially with low volume (N1) neck disease is not necessary. However, routine performance of planned neck dissection for patients who present initially with high volume (> or =N2) disease remains controversial. The authors reviewed a large number of studies reported in the recent literature and discuss how they affect this debate.Twenty-four of the reviewed studies indicate a benefit in regional control obtained by "planned" neck dissection among patients who had bulky neck disease pretreatment. All these studies are retrospective, they do not assess treatment response prior to surgery, although they do show very good regional control rates. Twenty-six studies demonstrate no benefit from "planned" neck dissection after complete clinical response. The reasons for these different conclusions include the development of more effective chemoradiation regimens which have improved the initial locoregional control rates of patients undergoing primary chemoradiation treatment, and improvements in diagnostic technology which have increased ability to detect low volume persistent tumor in the post treatment period. When neck dissection is necessary for persistent or recurrent disease, recent studies have shown that selective or superselective neck dissection may produce results therapeutically equivalent to those obtained with more extensive procedures, with less morbidity.There is now a large body of evidence, based on long-term clinical outcomes, that patients who have achieved a complete clinical (including radiologic) response to chemoradiation have a low rate of isolated neck failure, and the continued use of planned neck dissection for these patients cannot be justified.

  9. Initial Experience of Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated in an Oncologist Led Palliative Cancer Care Clinic at a Tertiary Cancer Care Center in Uttar Pradesh: Is the Initiative of a Full-fledged Palliative Care for Cancer Patients Justified

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Punita; Verma, Mranalini; Kumar, Gaurav; Shrivastava, Resham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Poor socioeconomic status and illiteracy attribute to the advanced presentation of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients in India and are candidates for palliation in our setup. We set up a palliative cancer care clinic (PCCC), and an audit of initial 153 HNC patients is presented. Aims and Objectives: To assess the impact of palliative cancer care services. Methodology: Data of advanced HNC patients suited for palliation were collected to document demography, symptomatology, cancer treatment, and supportive care. Results: One hundred and fifty-three patients were seen during January 2013 to March 2015 in the PCCC. Seventy-two (47%) referral cases were due to disease progression and 81 (53%) due to de novo advanced cases. Median follow-up for this group was 5.3 months. Ninety (59%) cases needed some degree of assistance for their normal activities. Sixty-seven (44%) patients belonged to poor socioeconomic status and 65 (43%) were educated up to equivalent of high school. One hundred and thirty-five (88%) patients had an adequate family support. Pain was the most common presenting symptom in 134 (87%) cases with adequate relief in 112 (84%) patients with another 13 (09%) could not be assessed. Overall median duration of symptoms was 6 months. Cancer-directed therapy was used in 143 (93%) patients. Near the end of life in 47 (73%) out of 63 documented cases, caregivers were psychologically prepared for the inevitable. Conclusion: The role of palliative care team in alleviating physical, psychosocial, and emotional issues of patient and family members was significant. PCCC seems to be a feasible working model in our setup. PMID:27803571

  10. A Planned Neck Dissection Is Not Necessary in All Patients With N2-3 Head-and-Neck Cancer After Sequential Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Soltys, Scott G.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Fee, Willard E.; Pinto, Harlan A.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of a planned neck dissection (PND) after sequential chemoradiotherapy for patients with head-and-neck cancer with N2-N3 nodal disease. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 90 patients with N2-N3 head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated between 1991 and 2001 on two sequential chemoradiotherapy protocols. All patients received induction and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorocuracil, with or without tirapazamine. Patients with less than a clinical complete response (cCR) in the neck proceeded to a PND after chemoradiation. The primary endpoint was nodal response. Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up durations for living and all patients were 8.3 years (range, 1.5-16.3 year) and 5.4 years (range, 0.6-16.3 years), respectively. Of the 48 patients with nodal cCR whose necks were observed, 5 patients had neck failures as a component of their recurrence [neck and primary (n = 2); neck, primary, and distant (n = 1); neck only (n = 1); neck and distant (n = 1)]. Therefore, PND may have benefited only 2 patients (4%) [neck only failure (n = 1); neck and distant failure (n = 1)]. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for those with a clinical partial response (cPR) undergoing PND (n = 30) was 53%. The 5-year neck control rates after cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR were 90%, 93%, and 78%, respectively (p = 0.36). The 5-year disease-free survival rates for the cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR groups were 53%, 75%, and 42%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusion: In our series, patients with N2-N3 neck disease achieving a cCR in the neck, PND would have benefited only 4% and, therefore, is not recommended. Patients with a cPR should be treated with PND. Residual tumor in the PND specimens was associated with poor outcomes; therefore, aggressive therapy is recommended. Studies using novel imaging modalities are needed to better assess treatment response.

  11. Prognostic factors of recurrence and neck metastasis in oral carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Behcet; Bulgurcu, Suphi; Arslan, Ilker Burak; Cukurova, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of tumor size, proximity to midline and invasion depth of oral cancer of the tongue (TC) on neck metastasis and recurrence. Methods: In this retrospective observational study, was conducted through a chart review of the 11 male and 9 female patients who underwent surgeries with the diagnosis of tongue squamous cell carcinoma and at least one side neck dissection. We wanted to assess effects of tumor size, proximity to midline, and invasion depth of TC, according to the surgical specimens and pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging, on neck metastasis and recurrence between 2007 and 2014. The study was conducted in a training hospital-based otorhinolaryngology clinic. Statistical analyses were performed to determine possible relationship between such tumor features and tumor recurrence and neck metastasis. Results: Statistically significant relationship were detected between recurrence and the proximity of tumor to midline (p=0.031) and between invasion depth and neck metastasis (p=0.017). No relationship was found between tumor size and recurrence and neck metastasis (p=0.721 and p=0.827, respectively). Conclusions: Parameters like invasion depth and tumor proximity to midline might provide useful information about prognosis and may help to determine a treatment schedule in patients suffering fdrom cancer of the tongue. The present TNM classification might not be sufficient to provide enough information to determine prognosis and staging adequately in these patients. PMID:28083063

  12. ASCO highlights podcast: head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Merlano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Click here to listen to the Podcast A critical review of the head and neck cancer research highlights of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting 2016, held in June 2016 in Chicago, is presented in this podcast. Considering the most interesting and practice-changing trials reported at the meeting, the key trial comparing gemcitabine plus cisplatin against 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) plus cisplatin in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is highlighted. The GORTEC2007-02 trial comparing induction docetaxel/platinum/5-FU followed by cetuximab-radiotherapy against concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for N2b/c-N3 non operated stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the head and neck is also discussed. An overview of the research reported using immunotherapy in head and neck cancer is also given, considering maturing data and particularly in relapsing patients, where response rates, though low, are better than with current therapies, and the responses are long lasting. Future developments are also considered, again with a focus on immunotherapy, but also considering combination with radiotherapy and chemoradiation. PMID:27843642

  13. ASCO highlights podcast: head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Merlano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A critical review of the head and neck cancer research highlights of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting 2016, held in June 2016 in Chicago, is presented in this podcast. Considering the most interesting and practice-changing trials reported at the meeting, the key trial comparing gemcitabine plus cisplatin against 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) plus cisplatin in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is highlighted. The GORTEC2007-02 trial comparing induction docetaxel/platinum/5-FU followed by cetuximab-radiotherapy against concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for N2b/c-N3 non operated stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the head and neck is also discussed. An overview of the research reported using immunotherapy in head and neck cancer is also given, considering maturing data and particularly in relapsing patients, where response rates, though low, are better than with current therapies, and the responses are long lasting. Future developments are also considered, again with a focus on immunotherapy, but also considering combination with radiotherapy and chemoradiation.

  14. Neck incision planning for total laryngectomy: A finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Allen L; Clark, James H; Agrawal, Nishant; Moussa, Walied; Richmon, Jeremy D

    2015-11-26

    Post-operative complications can be attributed to technical aspects of surgery, yet no studies have investigated the mechanics behind commonly used incisions for total laryngopharyngectomies (TLP). This procedure, seen in head and neck cancer patients, necessitates free tissue transfer to construct a neo-pharynx, creating an inherently greater risk of complications. We sought to investigate the impact of neck incision location on these post-operative complications for TLP using finite element analysis (FEA). A nonlinear hyperelastic 2-D finite element model was used to evaluate the stress and strain along the incision line of two separate neck incision models commonly used for TLP: low-neck apron (LNA) incisions that incorporate the patient׳s tracheostoma and mid-neck apron (MNA) incisions that do not communicate with the tracheostoma. A constant displacement was applied to the incision to simulate normal neck extension experienced during the post-operative phase. Each neck incision was also modeled at varying strain energy densities to simulate various stages of wound healing. For a constant displacement of 40mm, the principal von Mises stress of the LNA incision varied between 5.87 and 6.41MPa, depending on the hyperelastic properties of the healing incision. This stress was concentrated at the junction of the incision and the fixed tracheostomal edge. The MNA model demonstrated a principal von Mises stress that varied between 0.558 and 0.711MPa and was concentrated along the midline of the neck incision. MNA incisions for TL patients result in principal von Mises stresses which are up to 11 times lower than those seen in LNA incisions. These results coincided with clinical observations from a concurrent study that showed a decrease in rate of wound dehiscence for patients undergoing TLP with an MNA incision.

  15. The Benefits and Risks of Prophylactic Central Neck Dissection for Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doh Young; Oh, Kyoung Ho; Cho, Jae-Gu; Kwon, Soon-Young; Woo, Jeong-Soo; Baek, Seung-Kuk; Jung, Kwang-Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the benefits of performing prophylactic central neck dissection (CND) with total thyroidectomy (TT) in management of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) patients who were clinically node-negative at presentation. Methods. A total of 257 patients with stage T1 or T2 PTC and without preoperative evidence of lymph node involvement (N0) were enrolled in this prospective study. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: (1) a total thyroidectomy (TT) group (n = 104) or (2) a TT plus CND group (n = 153). The two groups were compared for their perioperative data, complication rates, disease recurrence rates, and clinical outcomes. Results. The two groups of patients were similar in age, sex ratio, follow-up duration, and tumor size (P = 0.227, 0.359, 0.214, and 0.878, resp.). The two groups showed similar rates of disease recurrence (3.9% in the TT group versus 3.3% in the TT plus CND group); however, complications occurred more frequently in the TT plus CND group; especially transient hypocalcemia (P = 0.043). Conclusions. Patients treated with TT plus CND had a higher rate of complications with similar recurrence rate. We believe that CND may not be routinely recommended when treating patients with PTC.

  16. Maternal Obesity and Neck Circumference.

    PubMed

    Anglim, B; O'Higgins, A; Daly, N; Farren, M; Turner, M J

    2015-06-01

    Obese women are more likely to require general anaesthesia for an obstetric intervention than non-obese. Difficult tracheal intubation and oxygen desaturation is more common in pregnancy. Failed tracheal intubation has been associated with an increase in neck circumference (NC). We studied the relationship between maternal obesity and NC as pregnancy advanced in women attending a standard antenatal clinic. Of the 96 women recruited, 13.5% were obese. The mean NC was 36.8cm (SD 1.9) in the obese women compared with 31.5cm (SD 1.6) in women with a normal BMI (p < 0.001) at 18-22 weeks gestation. In the obese women it increased on average by 1.5cm by 36-40 weeks compared with an increase of 1.6 cm in women with a normal BMI. The antenatal measurement of NC is a simple, inexpensive tool that is potentially useful for screening obese women who may benefit from an antenatal anaesthetic assessment.

  17. Imaging in head and neck oncology.

    PubMed

    Alberico, Ronald A; Husain, Syed Hamed S; Sirotkin, Igor

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of head and neck cancer with imaging is a topic that is far more extensive than can be covered in this article. The main reason for head and neck imaging is to evaluate the true extent of disease to best determine surgical and therapeutic options. This process includes evaluation of the size, location, and extent of tumor infiltration into surrounding vascular and visceral structures. Important anatomic variants must be pointed out so the surgeon can avoid potential intraoperative complications. These variant scan be evaluated with the appropriate multiplanar and three-dimensional images to provide as much information as possible to the surgeon preoperatively. Second, nodal staging should be assessed in an effort to increase the number of abnormal nodes detected by physical examination and, more important, to precisely define their location by a standard classification system that can be understood and consistently applied by the radiologist, surgeon, radiation oncologist, and pathologist. Although secondary to the previously described tasks, imaging frequently enables a limitation of the diagnostic and histologic possibilities based on lesion location and signal-attenuation characteristics, which may lead the clinical investigation along a different path. saving the patient unnecessary risk and shortening the time to diagnosis and ultimate treatment. This article has attempted to detail the current state of the controversy between CT, MRI, and other modalities, and has emphasized the constant evolution of this controversy because of the evolving imaging technology. Although CT and MRI are both well suited to evaluation of the deep spaces and submucosal spaces of the head and neck, each has some limitations.MRI has the advantages of higher soft tissue contrast resolution, the lack of iodine-based contrast agents, and high sensitivity for perineural and intracranial disease. The disadvantages of MRI include lower patient tolerance, contraindications in

  18. Are neck flexion, neck rotation, and sitting at work risk factors for neck pain? Results of a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ariens, G; Bongers, P; Douwes, M; Miedema, M; Hoogendoorn, W; van der Wal, G; Bouter, L; van Mechelen, W

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To study the relation between neck pain and work related neck flexion, neck rotation, and sitting.
METHODS—A prospective cohort study was performed with a follow up of 3 years among 1334 workers from 34 companies. Work related physical load was assessed by analysing objectively measured exposure data (video recordings) of neck flexion, neck rotation, and sitting posture. Neck pain was assessed by a questionnaire. Adjustments were made for various physical factors that were related or not related to work, psychosocial factors, and individual characteristics.
RESULTS—A significant positive relation was found between the percentage of the working time in a sitting position and neck pain, implying an increased risk of neck pain for workers who were sitting for more than 95% of the working time (crude relative risk (RR) 2.01, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.04 to 3.88; adjusted RR 2.34, 95% CI 1.05 to 5.21). A trend for a positive relation between neck flexion and neck pain was found, suggesting an increased risk of neck pain for people working with the neck at a minimum of 20° of flexion for more than 70% of the working time (crude RR 2.01, 95% CI 0.98 to 4.11; adjusted RR 1.63, 95% CI 0.70 to 3.82). No clear relation was found between neck rotation and neck pain.
CONCLUSION—Sitting at work for more than 95% of the working time seems to be a risk factor for neck pain and there is a trend for a positive relation between neck flexion and neck pain. No clear relation was found between neck rotation and neck pain.


Keywords: neck pain; physical risk factors; longitudinal cohort study PMID:11171934

  19. Efficacy of manipulation for non-specific neck pain of recent onset: design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Leaver, Andrew M; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Maher, Christopher G; Latimer, Jane; Herbert, Rob D; Jull, Gwendolen; McAuley, James H

    2007-01-01

    Background Manipulation is a common treatment for non-specific neck pain. Neck manipulation, unlike gentler forms of manual therapy such as mobilisation, is associated with a small risk of serious neurovascular injury and can result in stroke or death. It is thought however, that neck manipulation provides better results than mobilisation where clinically indicated. There is long standing and vigorous debate both within and between the professions that use neck manipulation as well as the wider scientific community as to whether neck manipulation potentially does more harm than good. The primary aim of this study is to determine whether neck manipulation provides more rapid resolution of an episode of neck pain than mobilisation. Methods/Design 182 participants with acute and sub-acute neck pain will be recruited from physiotherapy, chiropractic and osteopathy practices in Sydney, Australia. Participants will be randomly allocated to treatment with either manipulation or mobilisation. Randomisation will occur after the treating practitioner decides that manipulation is an appropriate treatment for the individual participant. Both groups will receive at least 4 treatments over 2 weeks. The primary outcome is number of days taken to recover from the episode of neck pain. Cox regression will be used to compare survival curves for time to recovery for the manipulation and mobilisation treatment groups. Discussion This paper presents the rationale and design of a randomised controlled trial to compare the effectiveness of neck manipulation and neck mobilisation for acute and subacute neck pain. PMID:17324291

  20. Polarization asymmetries in the 9Be(γ ,n0) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, J. M.; Ahmed, M. W.; Davis, B. J.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Myers, L. S.; Spraker, M. C.; Stave, S.; Tompkins, J. R.; Weller, H. R.; Zimmerman, W. R.

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of the 9Be (γ ,n0 ) reaction were performed using nearly 100% linearly polarized, high-intensity, and nearly monoenergetic γ -ray beams having energies between 5.5 and 15.5 MeV at the High Intensity γ -ray Source located at Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Eighteen liquid scintillator detectors were used to measure neutron yields parallel and perpendicular to the plane of beam polarization. Polarization asymmetries, which are the differences between yields observed in detectors located in-plane and out-of-plane divided by their sums, were measured for the neutrons which left the residual nucleus (8Be ) in its ground state, termed the n0 group. Asymmetries between 0.4 to 0.7 were discovered over this energy region in addition to a clear trend of increasing asymmetries with increasing beam energy. A prediction of the polarization asymmetry based on a pure E 1 direct capture model shows good agreement with the experimental measurements. These data and the prediction could be of interest for methods that rely on neutron measurements following photofission to identify the presence of special nuclear material.

  1. Outcome With Neck Dissection After Chemoradiation for N3 Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Igidbashian, Levon; Fortin, Bernard; Guertin, Louis; Soulieres, Denis; Coulombe, Genevieve; Belair, Manon; Charpentier, Danielle; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of neck dissection (ND) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with N3 disease. Methods and Materials: From March 1998 to September 2006, 70 patients with HNSCC and N3 neck disease were treated with concomitant CRT as primary therapy. Response to treatment was assessed using clinical examination and computed tomography 6 to 8 weeks posttreatment. Neck dissection was not routinely performed and considered for those with less than complete response. Of the patients, 26 (37.1%) achieved clinical complete response (cCR) after CRT. A total of 31 (44.3%) underwent ND after partial response (cPR-ND). Thirteen patients (29.5%) did not achieve cCR and did not undergo ND for the following reasons: incomplete response/progression at primary site, refusal/contraindication to surgery, metastatic progression, or death. These patients were excluded from the analysis. Outcomes were computed using Kaplan-Meier curves and were compared with log rank tests. Results: Comparing the cCR and cPR-ND groups at 2 years, the disease-free survival was respectively 62.7% and 84.9% (p = 0.048); overall survival was 63.0% and 79.4% (p = 0.26), regional relapse-free survival was 87.8% and 96.0% (p = 0.21); and distant disease-free survival was 67.1% and 92.6% (p = 0.059). In the cPR-ND group, 71.0% had no pathologic evidence of disease (PPV of 29.0%). Conclusions: Patients with N3 disease achieving regional cPR and primary cCR who underwent ND seemed to have better outcomes than patients achieving global cCR without ND. Clinical assessment with computed tomography is not adequate for evaluating response to treatment. Because of the inherent limitations of our study, further confirmatory studies are warranted.

  2. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cancer and the stage (extent) of the disease. In general, patients with early-stage head and neck cancers (particularly those limited to the site of origin) are treated with one modality—either radiation therapy ...

  3. Integrated media presentation in multidisciplinary head and neck oncology meetings.

    PubMed

    Simo, Ricard; Morgan, Peter; Jeannon, Jean-Pierre; Odell, Edward; Harrison, John; Almeida, Bernice; McGurk, Mark; Lyons, Andrew; Hussain, Karim; Gleeson, Michael; O'Connell, Mary; Calman, Frances; Ng, Roy; Roblin, Paul; Connor, Steve; Fenlon, Michael; Burke, Mary; Chandra, Ashish; Herbert, Amanda; Patt, Sarah; Steward-Bagley, Lizzie; Donnelly, Rachael; Freeman, Lesley; Twinn, Claire; Mason, Carolyn

    2009-02-01

    Multidisciplinary meetings (MDMs) are an essential part of the management of head and neck cancer. Practice care guidance set up by the British Association of Head and Neck Oncologists has recommended that MDMs should have appropriate projection equipment for computer-generated images so that all members of group have access to the same information. The aim of this paper is to review our experience with the integrated visual presentation of head and neck oncology patients and to demonstrate its advantages over conventional approaches. Digital photographs are taken of patients and of their index tumour at presentation or at the time of diagnostic endoscopy. All relevant pre-treatment digitised images from tumour sites and radiological images and histological slides are incorporated into a single presentation using Microsoft PowerPoint software. During the past 2 years, on-line radiological scans have also become accessible for the meeting to aid treatment planning. Subsequently, all peri-operative pictures and post-surgical macroscopic and microscopic histopathological images are added to each patient's presentation, which is then hyperlinked into the agenda. The Guy's and St Thomas' Head and Neck Cancer Centre treats over 400 patients a year, and since 2002, all new cancer diagnoses have been discussed in the weekly MDM as described above. A total of 1,638 presentations have been incorporated in a centralized database that is updated in the event of recurrence, further primary tumours or other clinical developments. Satisfactory documentation and staging of head and neck tumours must include a verbal description, accurate measurement, diagrammatic representation, photographic recording and appropriate radiological imaging. Integrated presentation at MDM collates all relevant findings for clinical management decisions on patients with head and neck cancer. This approach is also an extremely valuable adjunct to long-term clinical monitoring.

  4. Design of a phase I clinical trial to evaluate intratumoral delivery of ErbB-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T-cells in locally advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    van Schalkwyk, May C I; Papa, Sophie E; Jeannon, Jean-Pierre; Guerrero Urbano, Teresa; Spicer, James F; Maher, John

    2013-09-01

    Despite several advances, 5-year survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains unchanged at only 50%. The commonest cause of death is locally advanced/recurrent disease. Consequently, there is an unmet need for new approaches to improve local control in HNSCC. T4 immunotherapy is an autologous cell therapy in which peripheral blood T-cells are genetically engineered using a retroviral vector to coexpress two chimeric receptors: (i) T1E28z is a chimeric antigen receptor that engages multiple ErbB dimers that are commonly upregulated in HNSCC; (ii) 4αβ is a chimeric cytokine receptor that converts the weak mitogenic stimulus provided by interleukin (IL)-4 into a strong and selective growth signal, allowing preferential expansion and enrichment of T4(+) T-cells ex vivo. T4 immunotherapy exerts antitumor activity against HNSCC cell lines and tumors in vivo, without significant toxicity. Human T4(+) T-cells also engage mouse ErbB receptors, permitting safety testing in SCID Beige mice. Severe toxicity caused by cytokine release syndrome ensues when human T4(+) T-cells are administered at high doses to mice, particularly with advanced tumor burdens. However, such toxicity is not required for efficacy and is never seen if T-cells are administered by the intratumoral route. To exploit this, we have designed a first-in-man clinical trial in which T4(+) T-cells are administered to patients with locally advanced/recurrent HNSCC. Cells will be administered at a single sitting to multiple sites around the viable tumor circumference. A 3+3 dose escalation design will be used, starting at 10(7) cells (cohort 1), escalating to 10(9) cells (cohort 5). If maximum tolerated dose remains undefined, cohorts 6/7 will receive either low- or high-dose cyclophosphamide before 10(9) T4(+) T-cells. A panel of routine/in-house assays and imaging techniques will be used to monitor safety, efficacy, perturbation of endogenous antitumor immunity

  5. Effects of spiral taping applied to the neck and ankle on the body balance index

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Hoon; Lee, Hye Rim; Kim, Kyeong Mi; Lee, Jeong Hun; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to investigate the changes in the body balance index when spiral taping is applied to the neck and ankle. The findings are expected to serve as evidence of the usefulness of taping the neck instead of the ankle when ankle taping is not feasible in clinical practice. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy male students at A university were enrolled in this study. Balance measurements were made under three conditions: no intervention, ankle intervention and neck intervention. Static balance was measured with subjects’ eyes open and closed, and dynamic balance was measured with subjects’ eyes closed. [Results] There were significant differences in dynamic balance assessed by the Overall Balance Index (OBI), and the Anteroposterior Balance Index (ABI) with subjects’ eyes open when ankle or neck taping was applied compared to no intervention. The static balance (OBI) of subjects with eyes open showed significant differences from the no intervention condition in both the ankle and neck intervention. The static balance (OBI) with subjects’ eyes closed also showed significant differences in both the ankle and neck interventions compared to the no intervention condition. [Conclusion] Our results indicate that neck taping stimulates the somatic senses around the neck and increase proprioception, resulting in balance improvement similar to that elicited by ankle taping. Further studies with larger sample sizes various experimental conditions should be performed to more systematically and objectively elucidate the effects of neck taping. PMID:25642043

  6. The role of myofascial trigger points in musculoskeletal pain syndromes of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Simons, David; Cuadrado, Maria Luz; Pareja, Juan

    2007-10-01

    Neck and head pain syndromes are common problems seen in clinical practice. Pain features of commonly designated idiopathic neck pain and some primary headaches (ie, tension-type headache or migraine) fit the descriptions of referred pain originating in muscle trigger points (TrPs). This article discusses the scientific evidence supporting the role of muscle TrPs in chronic musculo-skeletal disorders of the neck and head. The relevance of referred pain elicited by muscle TrPs in patients with neck pain has been investigated in few studies. Some authors found that both muscle TrPs in neck-shoulder muscles and cervical joint dysfunctions contribute at the same time to neck pain perception. Furthermore, it seems that referred pain originated in muscle TrPs could also contribute to neck symptoms perceived by subjects after a rear-end crash. In addition, several recent studies reported that both TTH and migraine are associated with referred pain from TrPs in the suboccipital, upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, temporalis, or superior oblique muscles. Referred pain elicited by active TrPs mimics the pain areas observed during head pain attacks in these primary headaches. Based on available data, it seems that the pain profile of neck and head syndromes may be provoked referred pain from TrPs in the posterior cervical, head, and shoulder muscles. Additional studies are needed to delineate more information on the relation between muscle TrPs and musculoskeletal pain syndromes of the head and neck.

  7. Analysis of deep tissue hypersensitivity to pressure pain in professional pianists with insidious mechanical neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether pressure pain hyperalgesia is a feature of professional pianists suffering from neck pain as their main playing-related musculoskeletal disorder. Methods Twenty-three active expert pianists, 6 males and 17 females (age: 36 ± 12 years) with insidious neck pain and 23 pianists, 9 males and 14 females (age: 38 ± 10 years) without neck pain the previous year were recruited. A numerical pain rate scale, Neck Disability Index, hand size and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed bilaterally over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, deltoid muscle, the second metacarpal and the tibialis anterior muscle in a blinded design. Results The results showed that PPT levels were significantly decreased bilaterally over the second metacarpal and tibialis anterior muscles (P < 0.05), but not over C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint and deltoid muscle (P > 0.10), in pianists with neck pain as compared to healthy pianists. Pianists with neck pain had a smaller (P < 0.05) hand size (mean: 181.8 ± 11.8) as compared to pianists without neck pain (mean: 188. 6 ± 13.1). PPT over the tibialis anterior muscles was negatively correlated with the intensity of neck pain. Conclusions Our findings revealed pressure pain hypersensitivity over distant non-symptomatic distant points but not over the symptomatic areas in pianists suffering from neck pain. In addition, pianists with neck pain also had smaller hand size than those without neck pain. Future studies are needed to further determine the relevance of these findings in the clinical course of neck pain as playing-related musculoskeletal disorder in professional pianists. PMID:22111912

  8. Head and neck pain review: traditional and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M H; Nelson, A J

    1996-10-01

    A variety of conditions are frequently associated with the occurrence of head and neck pain. The purposes of this review are: to describe the characteristics of several musculoskeletal, neurological, and systemic conditions frequently cited as possible causes of head and neck pain and to suggest a new technique for treating head and neck pain. The characteristics of musculoskeletal conditions, such as muscle spasm, tendinitis, trigger points, and joint inflammation, and their relationship to head and neck pain are considered. The features and clinical implications of neurologic conditions, such as atypical facial pain, trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, and neurogenic inflammation, are also described. The distinguishing characteristics of headaches, including cluster, tension, chronic daily, rebound, posttraumatic, and postlumbar puncture, are detailed. This review also addresses the contributions of systemic disorders, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and the variants, and rheumatoid-related conditions, like dermatomyositis, temporal arteritis, Lyme's disease, and fibromyalgia, to head and neck pain. The results of a recent pilot study of the effectiveness of intraoral circulating ice water for resolving symptoms related to head and neck pain secondary to neurogenic inflammation are presented in this work. Ice water circulating through hollow metal tubes was placed intraorally for 15 minutes in the posterior maxillary area on 12 individuals with cervical pain and muscle spasm. In nine of these individuals, reduced cervical pain perception, upper trapezius electromyography signal reduction, and increased cervical range of motion was produced. Six out of 12 individuals had accompanying headache, which was reduced or eliminated in four cases. These findings suggest a strong trigemino-cervical relationship to neck pain and headache.

  9. Treatment Outcome of Combined Modalities for Buccal Cancers: Unilateral or Bilateral Neck Radiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.-Y.; Lee, L.-Y.; Huang, S.-F.; Kang, C.-J.; Fan, K.-H.; Wang, H.-M.; Chen, I.-H.; Liao, C.-T.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of treatment for buccal cancers and assess the impact of unilateral vs. bilateral adjuvant neck radiation. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the course of 145 patients newly diagnosed with buccal squamous cell carcinoma without distant metastases who completed definitive treatment between January 1994 and December 2000. Of 145 patients, 112 (77%) had Stage III or IV disease. All underwent radical surgery with postoperative radiotherapy (median dose, 64 Gy), including unilateral neck treatment in most (n = 120, 82.8%). After 1997, cisplatin-based concomitant chemoradiotherapy was given for high-risk patients with more than two involved lymph nodes, extracapsular spread, and/or positive margins. Results: The 5-year disease-specific survival rate for Stages I-IV was 87%, 83%, 61%, and 60%, respectively (p = 0.01). The most significant prognostic factor was N stage, with the 5-year disease-specific survival rate for N0, N1, and N2 being 79%, 65%, and 54%, respectively (p 0.001). For patients with more than two lymph nodes or positive extracapsular spread, cisplatin-based concomitant chemoradiotherapy improved locoregional control (p = 0.02). Locoregional control did not differ between patients undergoing unilateral or bilateral neck treatments (p = 0.95). Contralateral neck failure occurred in only 2.1%. Conclusions: In patients with buccal carcinoma after radical resection, ipsilateral neck radiation is adequate. Bilateral prophylactic neck treatment does not confer an added benefit.

  10. Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Accorona, Remo; Botti, Gerardo; Farina, Davide; Fossati, Piero; Gatta, Gemma; Gogas, Helen; Lombardi, Davide; Maroldi, Roberto; Nicolai, Piero; Ravanelli, Marco; Vanella, Vito

    2017-04-01

    Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck is a very rare and aggressive malignancy with a very poor prognosis. The nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and oral cavity are the most common locations. One-, 3- and 5-year survival rates between 2000 and 2007 were 63%, 30% and 20%, respectively. Cigarette smoking seems to be a risk factor even though the evidence for this is very low. Clinical signs and symptoms are usually nonspecific. While surgery is considered the mainstay of treatment for most mucosal melanomas of the head and neck region, radiotherapy has a role in local control of the disease after surgery. Many new treatment options in the last years, in particular targeted therapies (i.e. inhibitors of c-KIT, NRAS/MEK or BRAF) and immunotherapies (anti CTLA-4 and anti PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies), have changed the history of cutaneous melanoma. Despite the different biology, mucosal melanoma is currently treated in the same way as cutaneous melanoma; however, patients with mucosal melanoma were excluded from the majority of recent clinical trials. Recent molecular findings offer new hope for the development of more effective systemic therapy.

  11. Radiation-Free Weekend Rescued! Continuous Accelerated Irradiation of 7-Days per Week Is Equal to Accelerated Fractionation With Concomitant Boost of 7 Fractions in 5-Days per Week: Report on Phase 3 Clinical Trial in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Skladowski, Krzysztof; Hutnik, Marcin; Wygoda, Andrzej; Golen, Maria; Pilecki, Boleslaw; Przeorek, Wieslawa; Rutkowski, Tomasz; Lukaszczyk-Widel, Beata; Heyda, Alicja; Suwinski, Rafal; Tarnawski, Rafal; Maciejewski, Boguslaw

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of randomized trial comparing 2 accelerated fractionations of definitive radiation therapy assessing the need to irradiate during weekend in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 345 patients with SCC of the oral cavity, larynx, and oro- or hypo-pharynx, stage T2-4N0-1M0, were randomized to receive continuous accelerated irradiation (CAIR: once per day, 7 days per week) or concomitant accelerated boost (CB: once per day, 3 days per week, and twice per day, 2 days per week). Total dose ranged from 66.6-72 Gy, dose per fraction was 1.8 Gy, number of fractions ranged from 37-40 fractions, and overall treatment time ranged from 37-40 days. Results: No differences for all trial end-points were noted. At 5 and 10 years, the actuarial rates of local-regional control were 63% and 60% for CAIR vs 65% and 60% for CB, and the corresponding overall survival were 40% and 25% vs 44% and 25%, respectively. Confluent mucositis was the main acute toxicity, with an incidence of 89% in CAIR and 86% in CB patients. The 5-year rate of grade 3-4 late radiation morbidity was 6% for both regimens. Conclusions: Results of this trial indicate that the effects of accelerated fractionation can be achieve by delivering twice-per-day irradiation on weekday(s). This trial has also confirmed that an accelerated, 6-weeks schedule is a reasonable option for patients with intermediate-stage head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma because of the associated high cure rate and minimal severe late toxicity.

  12. Comparison of external beam treatment techniques for T1-2, N0, M0 glottic cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Camingue, Pamela; Christian, Rochelle; Ng, Davin; Williams, Preston; Amin, Mayankkumar; Roniger, Dominique L.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 4 different external beam radiation therapy treatment techniques for the treatment of T1-2, N0, M0 glottic cancers: traditional lateral beams with wedges (3D), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and proton therapy. Treatment plans in each technique were created for 10 patients using consistent planning parameters. The photon treatment plans were optimized using Philips Pinnacle{sub 3} v.9 and the IMRT and VMAT plans used the Direct Machine Parameter Optimization algorithm. The proton treatment plans were optimized using Varian Eclipse Proton v.8.9. The prescription used for each plan was 63 Gy in 28 fractions. The contours for spinal cord, right carotid artery, left carotid artery, and normal tissue were created with respect to the patient's bony anatomy so that proper comparisons of doses could be made with respect to volume. An example of the different isodose distributions will be shown. The data collection for comparison purposes includes: clinical treatment volume coverage, dose to spinal cord, dose to carotid arteries, and dose to normal tissue. Data comparisons will be displayed graphically showing the maximum, mean, median, and ranges of doses.

  13. When is a neck lump not a neck lump? Initial presentation of a solitary sternocleidomastoid muscle in an adult.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sonia; Jervis, Suzie; Uppal, Harpreet

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman was referred to us for evaluation of a presumed left-sided neck mass. The referral was based on the visual appearance of subtle neck asymmetry. The patient reported no ENT symptoms. Clinical examination and ultrasonography identified no pathology, but computed tomography revealed that the asymmetry was present because the patient's right sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) was absent. The SCM on the left side was normal. Congenital absence of an SCM is uncommon, and to the best of our knowledge, an initial presentation in an adult has not been previously reported in the literature.

  14. Giant cell tumor of the femoral neck: case report.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paulo; Amaral, Rogério Andrade do; Oliveira, Leandro Alves de; Moraes, Frederico Barra de; Chaibe, Eduardo Damasceno

    2016-01-01

    The authors present the case of a patient with a giant cell tumor of the left femoral neck, with adjacent progressive invasion of bone tissue. Initial treatment was done with local curettage and autologous bone graft from fibula, electrocauterization and filling with methyl methacrylate. A local tumoral relapse was present after one year; therefore a new surgical procedure was necessary, with proximal femoral wide resection and unconventional endoprosthesis fixation. The article discusses the clinical aspects and surgical treatment. This report aimed to demonstrate the necessity to perform wide resection for giant cell tumor of the femoral neck, prioritizing total resection of the tumor and its local extension, preserving limb integrity and demonstrating the complete failure of preserving surgery in cases of femoral neck involvement.

  15. Femoral head-neck junction reconstruction, after iatrogenic bone resection.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Alvarez, Alberto; Lash, Nicholas; Beck, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Arthroscopic over-resection of the head-neck junction during the treatment of a cam deformity can be a devastating complication and is difficult to treat. Large defects of the femoral head-neck junction (FHNJ) increase the risk of femoral neck fracture and can also affect hip biomechanics. We describe a case of an iatrogenic defect of the FHNJ due to excessive bone resection, and a previously non-described treatment using iliac crest autograft to restore femoral head-neck sphericity and hip joint stability. After protecting the femoral neck with an angled blade plate, the large anterior FHNJ defect was reconstructed using autogenous iliac crest bone graft; sphericity was restored by contouring the graft using spherical templates. Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed up to 2 years. Results at 2 years showed no residual groin pain and normal range of motion. The Oxford Hip Score was 46/48, rated as excellent. Computed tomography (CT) scanning showed union of bone graft without resorption, and CT arthrogram indicating retained sphericity of the FHNJ without evidence of degenerative changes in the articular surface. This novel surgical technique can be used to restore the structural integrity and contour of the FHNJ that contains a significant anterior defect.

  16. A review of drugs in development for the personalized treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Andrew C.; Swiecicki, Paul L.; Brenner, J. Chad; Shuman, Andrew G.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains a highly morbid and fatal disease, with poor survival rates among patients with advanced and recurrent disease. Recent advances in next generation sequencing, targeted therapeutics, and precision medicine trials are expanding treatment options for head and neck cancers; thus greater awareness of this rapidly evolving field is important. Areas Covered Recent next-generation sequencing studies in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, targeted therapy clinical trials involving head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Expert Commentary This review discusses the current state of head and neck cancer treatment, and considerations and implications for the incorporation of personalized medicine and targeted therapy for head and neck cancers in a dynamic clinical landscape. PMID:28251187

  17. The Promher Study: An Observational Italian Study on Adjuvant Therapy for HER2-Positive, pT1a-b pN0 Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Stefania; Inno, Alessandro; Fiorio, Elena; Foglietta, Jennifer; Ferro, Antonella; Gulisano, Marcella; Pinotti, Graziella; Gubiotti, Marta; Cavazzini, Maria Giovanna; Turazza, Monica; Duranti, Simona; De Simone, Valeria; Iezzi, Laura; Bisagni, Giancarlo; Spazzapan, Simon; Cavanna, Luigi; Saggia, Chiara; Bria, Emilio; Cretella, Elisabetta; Vici, Patrizia; Santini, Daniele; Fabi, Alessandra; Garrone, Ornella; Frassoldati, Antonio; Amaducci, Laura; Saracchini, Silvana; Evangelisti, Lucia; Barni, Sandro; Gamucci, Teresa; Mentuccia, Lucia; Laudadio, Lucio; Zoboli, Alessandra; Marchetti, Fabiana; Bogina, Giuseppe; Lunardi, Gianluigi; Boni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background The management of pT1a-b pN0 HER2-positive breast cancer is controversial and no data about the efficacy of trastuzumab in this setting are available from randomized clinical trials. The aims of this retrospective study were to assess how patients are managed in clinical practice in Italy, which clinical or biological characteristics influenced the choice of adjuvant systemic therapy and the outcome of patients. Methods Data of consecutive patients who underwent surgery from January 2007 to December 2012 for HER2-positive, pT1a-b pN0 M0 breast cancer were retrospectively collected from 28 Italian centres. Analysis of contingency tables and multivariate generalized logit models were used to investigate the association between the baseline clinical and biological features and the treatment strategy adopted. Results Among 303 enrolled patients, 204 received adjuvant systemic therapy with trastuzumab, 65 adjuvant systemic therapy without trastuzumab and 34 did not receive adjuvant systemic therapy. At the multivariate analysis age, tumor size, proliferation index and hormone receptor status were significantly associated with the treatment choice. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) probability was 95%, 94.3% and 69.6% for patients treated with adjuvant systemic therapy and trastuzumab, with adjuvant systemic therapy without trastuzumab and for patients who did not receive adjuvant systemic therapy, respectively (p<0.001). Conclusions The majority of patients (66%) with pT1a-b pN0 HER2-positive breast cancer enrolled in this retrospective study received adjuvant systemic therapy with trastuzumab, whereas only 11% patients did not receive any adjuvant systemic therapy. The choice of treatment type seems to be mainly influenced by tumor size, proliferation index, hormone receptor status and age. The 5-year DFS probability was significantly higher for patients receiving adjuvant systemic therapy with trastuzumab compared with patients not receiving adjuvant

  18. Head & neck optical diagnostics: vision of the future of surgery

    PubMed Central

    Upile, Tahwinder; Jerjes, Waseem; Sterenborg, Henricus JCM; El-Naggar, Adel K; Sandison, Ann; Witjes, Max JH; Biel, Merrill A; Bigio, Irving; Wong, Brian JF; Gillenwater, Ann; MacRobert, Alexander J; Robinson, Dominic J; Betz, Christian S; Stepp, Herbert; Bolotine, Lina; McKenzie, Gordon; Mosse, Charles Alexander; Barr, Hugh; Chen, Zhongping; Berg, Kristian; D'Cruz, Anil K; Stone, Nicholas; Kendall, Catherine; Fisher, Sheila; Leunig, Andreas; Olivo, Malini; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Soo, Khee Chee; Bagnato, Vanderlei; Choo-Smith, Lin-Ping; Svanberg, Katarina; Tan, I Bing; Wilson, Brian C; Wolfsen, Herbert; Yodh, Arjun G; Hopper, Colin

    2009-01-01

    Review paper and Proceedings of the Inaugural Meeting of the Head and Neck Optical Diagnostics Society (HNODS) on March 14th 2009 at University College London. The aim of our research must be to provide breakthrough translational research which can be applied clinically in the immediate rather than the near future. We are fortunate that this is indeed a possibility and may fundamentally change current clinical and surgical practice to improve our patients' lives. PMID:19594907

  19. Performance characterization tests of three 0.44-N (0.1 lbf) hydrazine catalytic thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, P. I.; Bjorklund, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The 0.44-N (0.1-lbf) class of hydrazine catalytic thruster has been evaluated to assess its capability for spacecraft limit-cycle attitude control with thruster pulse durations on the order of 10 milliseconds. Dynamic-environment and limit-cycle simulation tests were performed on three commercially available thruster/valve assemblies, purchased from three different manufacturers. The results indicate that this class of thruster can sustain a launch environment and, when properly temperature-conditioned, can perform limit-cycle operations over the anticipated life span of a multi-year mission. The minimum operating temperature for very short pulse durations was determined for each thruster. Pulsing life tests were then conducted on each thruster under a thermally controlled condition which maintained the catalyst bed at both a nominal 93 C (200 F) and 205 C (400 F). These were the temperatures believed to be slightly below and very near the minimum recommended operating temperature, respectively. The ensuing life tests ranged from 100,000 to 250,000 pulses at these temperatures, as would be required for spacecraft limit-cycle attitude control applications.

  20. Proton Beam Therapy as a Nonsurgical Approach to Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Nishio, Teiji; Kohno, Ryosuke; Nihei, Keiji; Onozawa, Masakatsu; Arahira, Satoko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this pilot study was to assess the clinical benefit of proton beam therapy for mucosal melanoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Patients with mucosal melanoma of the head and neck with histologically confirmed malignant melanoma and N0 and M0 disease were enrolled. Proton therapy was delivered three times per week with a planned total dose of 60 Gy equivalents (GyE) in 15 fractions. Results: Fourteen consecutive patients were enrolled from January 2004 through February 2008. Patient characteristics were as follows: median age 73 years old (range, 56 to 79 years); male/female ratio, 7/7; and T stage 1/2/3/4, 3/2/0/9. All patients were able to receive the full dose of proton therapy. The most common acute toxicities were mucositis (grade 3, 21%) and mild dermatitis (grade 3, 0%). As for late toxicity, 2 patients had a unilateral decrease in visual acuity, although blindness did not occur. No treatment-related deaths occurred throughout the study. Initial local control rate was 85.7%, and, with a median follow-up period of 36.7 months, median progression-free survival was 25.1 months, and 3-year overall survival rates were 58.0%. The most frequent site of first failure was cervical lymph nodes (6 patients), followed by local failure in 1 patient and lung metastases in 1 patient. On follow-up, 5 patients died of disease, 4 died due to cachexia caused by distant metastases, and 1 patient by carotid artery perforation cause by lymph nodes metastases. Conclusions: Proton beam radiotherapy showed promising local control benefits and would benefit from ongoing clinical study.

  1. C, N co-doped TiO2/TiC0.7N0.3 composite coatings prepared from TiC0.7N0.3 powder using ball milling followed by oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang; Wang, Zhenwei; Zheng, Yaoqing; Li, Qianqian; Guan, Sujun; Zhao, Qian; Cheng, Lijun; Lu, Yun; Liu, Jizi

    2017-01-01

    Ball milling followed by heat oxidation was used to prepared C, N co-doped TiO2 coatings on the surfaces of Al2O3 balls from TiC0.7N0.3 powder. The as-prepared coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer (UV-vis). The results show that continuous TiC0.7N0.3 coatings were formed after ball milling. C, N co-doped TiO2/TiC0.7N0.3 composite coatings were prepared after the direct oxidization of TiC0.7N0.3 coatings in the atmosphere. However, TiO2 was hardly formed in the surface layer of TiC0.7N0.3 coatings within a depth less than 10 nm during the heat oxidation of TiC0.7N0.3 coatings in carbon powder. Meanwhile, the photocatalytic activity evaluation of these coatings was conducted under the irradiation of UV and visible light. All the coatings showed photocatalytic activity in the degradation of MB no matter under the irradiation of UV or visible light. The C, N co-doped TiO2/TiC0.7N0.3 composite coatings showed the most excellent performance. The enhancement under visible light irradiation should attribute to the co-doping of carbon and nitrogen, which enhances the absorption of visible light. The improvement of photocatalytic activity under UV irradiation should attribute to the synergistic effect of C, N co-doping, the formation of rutile-anatase mixed phases and the TiO2/TiC0.7N0.3 composite microstructure.

  2. To Identify Predictors of Central Lymph Node Metastasis in Patients with Clinically Node-Negative Conventional Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gang; Du, Jialin; Chen, Xiaoyi; Lin, Xiaodong; Chen, Zhengbo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with central lymph node metastasis (CLNM) in patients with clinically node-negative conventional papillary thyroid carcinoma (cN0 CPTC). Methods. A total of 190 cN0 CPTC patients who underwent thyroidectomy with prophylactic central neck dissection (pCND) in the Department of General Surgery at Guangdong General Hospital between March 2014 and December 2015 were assessed retrospectively. The relations of CLNM with clinicopathologic characteristics of cN0 CPTC were analyzed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results. The incidence of CLNM in patients with cN0 CPTC was 63.2% (120 of 190 cases). Univariate analysis showed that age <45 years (P = 0.000), tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.009), multifocality (P = 0.001), and bilaterality (P = 0.000) were significantly associated with the increased incidence of CLNM in cN0 CPTC. No significant correlations were found between CLNM and other variables such as gender (P = 0.150), capsular invasion (P = 0.973), extrathyroidal invasion (P = 0.616), and lymphadenectomy (P = 0.062). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age <45 years (P = 0.000), tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.025), and bilaterality (P = 0.000) were independent risk factors of CLNM in patients with cN0 CPTC. Conclusions. Metastatic disease to central compartment lymph nodes is prevalent in patients with cN0 CPTC. Age <45 years, tumor size >2 cm, and bilaterality are independent risk factors of CLNM, which allow for selective CND in patients with cN0 CPTC. PMID:28074094

  3. Initial conformation of kinesin's neck linker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yi-Zhao; Ji, Qing; Liu, Shu-Xia; Yan, Shi-Wei

    2014-10-01

    How ATP binding initiates the docking process of kinesin's neck linker is a key question in understanding kinesin mechanisms. By exploiting a molecular dynamics method, we investigate the initial conformation of kinesin's neck linker in its docking process. We find that, in the initial conformation, the neck linker has interactions with β0 and forms a ‘cover-neck bundle’ structure with β0. From this initial structure, the formation of extra turns and the docking of the cover-neck bundle structure can be achieved. The motor head provides a forward force on the initial cover-neck bundle structure through ATP-induced rotation. This force, together with the hydrophobic interaction of ILE327 with the hydrophobic pocket on the motor head, drives the formation of the extra turn and initiates the neck linker docking process. Based on these findings, a pathway from ATP binding-induced motor head rotation to neck linker docking is proposed.

  4. Is there a role for neck manipulation in elderly falls prevention? – An overview

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Julie C.; Hartvigsen, Jan; French, Simon D.; Azari, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Many risk factors exist for falls in the elderly. Dizziness is an important risk factor for such falls. Spinal pain has also been identified as a risk factor for these falls. In this overview of the literature, we examine studies, including trials, of neck manipulation for neck pain, unsteadiness and falls risk relevant to the elderly. We also examine two related, but not mutually exclusive, mechanisms through which a putative beneficial effect may be mediated. These are the effects of neck manipulation on neck pain and on non-specific dizziness. We focus on the available evidence primarily in terms of clinical data rather than laboratory-based measures of balance. We conclude that chiropractors may have a role in falls prevention strategies in the subpopulation of the elderly that suffer from mechanical neck pain or dysfunction and non-specific dizziness. However, this role remains to be rigorously studied and properly defined. PMID:25729086

  5. Acupuncture at Houxi (SI 3) acupoint for acute neck pain caused by stiff neck: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhong-ren; Yue, Jin-huan; Tian, Hong-zhao; Zhang, Qin-hong

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The use of acupuncture has been suggested for the treatment of acute neck pain caused by stiff neck in China. However, current evidence is insufficient to draw any conclusions about its efficacy. Therefore this pilot study was designed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of acupuncture at the Houxi (SI3) acupoint for treatment of acute neck pain. Methods/analysis This pilot study will be a two-parallel-group, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial. Thirty-six stiff neck participants with acute neck pain will be recruited and randomly divided into two groups in a 1:1 ratio. Participants in the control group will receive massage on the local neck region (5 min each session, three times a day for 3 days). In addition to massage, patients in the treatment group will receive acupuncture (one session a day for 3 days). Measures will be taken at 0, 3 and 15 days. The primary outcome is the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). The secondary outcome is the Short Form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ). Ethics/dissemination The protocol for this pilot randomised clinical trial has undergone ethics scrutiny and been approved by the ethics review boards of the First Affiliated Hospital of Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Permission number: HZYLL201303502). The findings of this study will provide important clinical evidence on the feasibility and efficacy of acupuncture treatment for stiff neck patients with acute neck pain. In addition, it will explore the feasibility of further acupuncture research. Trial registration number ChiCTR-TRC-13003911. PMID:25537784

  6. Electron attachment to Fe(CO)n (n = 0-5).

    PubMed

    Shuman, Nicholas S; Miller, Thomas M; Friedman, Jeffrey F; Viggiano, Albert A

    2013-02-14

    The rate constants of thermal electron attachment at 300 and 400 K to Fe(CO)(n) (n = 0-5) have been measured using a flowing afterglow Langmuir probe apparatus. The stable species Fe(CO)(5) was studied using the traditional method of monitoring electron depletion as a function of reaction time, and the remaining short-lived species were studied using the variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) technique. Attachment to Fe(CO)(5) is purely dissociative and about 20% efficient with a rate constant of (7.9 ± 1.4) × 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1) at 300 K and (8.8 ± 2) × 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1) at 400 K. The attachment rate constants decrease significantly as each CO ligand is removed, with Fe(CO)(n) (n = 4 to 1) attaching with efficiencies on the order of 10%, 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01% respectively. Under the conditions here, attachment to Fe(CO)(4) and Fe(CO)(3) are likely entirely dissociative, whereas attachment to Fe(CO)(2) and Fe(CO) are almost entirely associative. A statistical kinetic modeling approach is used to explain the strong dependence of the attachment rate constant on the number of ligands present in the neutral species through a combination of increasing autodetachment rates and decreasing exothermicities to dissociative attachment. The VENDAMS data also define the 300 K mutual neutralization rate constant of Fe(CO)(4)(-) + Ar(+) to be (5.0 ± 0.8) × 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1) with an upper limit to branching fraction of 0.5 to yield Fe(CO)(4), indicating that significant fragmentation to smaller Fe(CO)(n) occurs.

  7. Anatomical coverage in elective irradiation of the neck for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue

    SciTech Connect

    Meoz, R.T.; Fletcher, G.H.; Lindberg, R.D.

    1982-11-01

    From January 1954 through December 1978, 146 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue and clinically negative neck had their primary lesion conrolled with irradiation. Metastases to the neck developed later in: 27 of 76 patients (36%) treated by interstitial implantation; nine of 27 patients (33%) who received 2,000 rad in five fractions to the upper neck prior to the implant; eight of 19 (42%) patients who received 5,000 rad through an upper ipsilateral neck field prior to the implant; four of 24 patients (16.6%) who received 5,000 rad through bilateral portals to the upper neck with or without irradiation of the lower neck. In the 43 ipsilateral neck failures, 23 were in the upper jugular chain, (posterior subdigastric nodes), 12 in the mid-jugular, three in the lower jugular, and four in the more anterior part of the subdigastric area. There was one failure in the posterior cervical chain, and five contralateral neck failures. A review of the treatment charts showed that the patients who had an ipsilateral upper neck field only, had smaller portals because the irradiation was tailored to produce shrinkage of the primary tumor prior to needling. To include adequate coverage of the posterior subdigastric nodes (upper jugular), the bodies of the vertebrae must be seen on the simulator films. Also the junction of the subdigastric and the mid-jugular lymphatics must be covered. Although there were only three failures in the lower jugular nodes, it is technically easier to treat the upper mid-jugular nodes through an anterior appositional portal to the lower neck. A dose of 5,000 rad must be given since 2,000 rad, even if delivered in five fractions, gives a failure rate as if there had been no irradiation to the neck.

  8. Anatomical coverage in elective irradiation of the neck for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue

    SciTech Connect

    Meoz, R.T.; Fletcher, G.H.; Lindberg, R.D.

    1982-11-01

    From January 1954 through December 1978, 146 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue and clinically negative neck had their primary lesion controlled with irradiation. Metastases to the neck developed later in: 27 of 76 patients (36%) treated by interstitial implantation: nine of 27 patients (33%) who received 2,000 rad in five fractions to the upper neck prior to the implant; eight of 19 (42%) patients who received 5,000 rad through an upper ipsilateral neck field prior to the implant; four of 24 patients (16.6%) who received 5,000 rad through bilateral portals to the upper neck with or without irradiation of the lower neck. In the 43 ipsilateral neck failures, 23 were in the upper jugular chain, (posterior subdigastric nodes), 12 in the mid-jugular, three in the lower jugular, and four in the more anterior part of the subdigastric area. There was one failure in the posterior cervical chain, and five contralateral neck failures. A review of the treatment charts showed that the patients who had ipsilateral upper neck field only, had smaller portals because the irradiation was tailored to produce shrinkage of the primary tumor prior to needling. To include adequate coverage of the posterior subdigastric nodes (upper jugular), the bodies of the vertebrae must be seen on the simulator films. Also the junction of the subdigastric and the mid-jugular lymphatics must be covered. Although there were only three failures in the lower jugular nodes, it is technically easier to treat the upper mid-jugular nodes through an anterior appositional portal to the lower neck. A dose of 5,000 rad must be given since 2,000 rad, even if delivered in five fractions, gives a failure rate as if there had been no irradition to the neck.

  9. Sporadic Multifocal Venous Malformations of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Michael V.; Patel, Neha A.; Hu, Shirley; Pantelides, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To report a case of unusually widespread sporadic venous malformations of the head and neck associated with normal D-dimer levels and, due to the protean clinical manifestations and increased risk of coagulopathy of these lesions, to review their diagnosis and clinical management. Case Report. A 25-year-old man presented with a one-year history of intermittent right-sided neck swelling and tongue swelling. Physical exam revealed additional lesions present throughout the head and neck. There was no family history suggestive of heritable vascular malformations. Radiographic imaging demonstrated 15 lesions located in various tissue layers consistent with venous malformations. A coagulation screen showed a normal prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, international normalized ratio, D-dimer level, and fibrinogen level. It was determined that the patient was not at increased risk for intraoperative coagulopathy and preoperative heparin administration would not be necessary. The patient's buccal and tongue lesions were subsequently excised with no complications. The patient also underwent sclerotherapy evaluation for his neck mass. Conclusion. This case describes a unique presentation of sporadic multifocal venous malformations. It also emphasizes the importance of prompt diagnosis and workup when multiple venous malformations are present to prevent morbidity during surgical excision secondary to intravascular coagulopathy. PMID:26483982

  10. Trial of Postoperative Radiation, Cisplatin, and Panitumumab in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Cancer of Head; Cancer of Head and Neck; Cancer of Neck; Cancer of the Head; Cancer of the Head and Neck; Cancer of the Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Head Cancer; Head Neoplasms; Head, Neck Neoplasms; Neck Cancer; Neck Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Head; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Neoplasms, Neck; Neoplasms, Upper Aerodigestive Tract; UADT Neoplasms; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Neoplasms

  11. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES SID-IIsD Side Impact Crash Test Dummy, Small Adult Female § 572.193 Neck assembly. (a) The neck assembly consists of parts shown in drawing 180-2000. For purposes of this test, the neck assembly is mounted within the...

  12. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES SID-IIsD Side Impact Crash Test Dummy, Small Adult Female § 572.193 Neck assembly. (a) The neck assembly consists of parts shown in drawing 180-2000. For purposes of this test, the neck assembly is mounted within the...

  13. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Neck KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Neck Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: cuello What It Is A neck X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  14. HPV Associated Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Tara; Bruce, Jeff; Yip, Kenneth W.; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNCs) are a highly heterogeneous group of tumours that are associated with diverse clinical outcomes. Recent evidence has demonstrated that human papillomavirus (HPV) is involved in up to 25% of HNCs; particularly in the oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) subtype where it can account for up to 60% of such cases. HPVs are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial cells; numerous HPV subtypes, including 16, 18, 31, 33, and 35, drive epithelial cell transformation and tumourigenesis. HPV positive (HPV+) HNC represents a distinct molecular and clinical entity from HPV negative (HPV−) disease; the biological basis for which remains to be fully elucidated. HPV positivity is strongly correlated with a significantly superior outcome; indicating that such tumours should have a distinct management approach. This review focuses on the recent scientific and clinical investigation of HPV+ HNC. In particular, we discuss the importance of molecular and clinical evidence for defining the role of HPV in HNC, and the clinical impact of HPV status as a biomarker for HNC. PMID:27527216

  15. Prediction of lymph node metastases by lymphoscintigraphy of the neck after peri-cancer injection of a radiocolloid

    SciTech Connect

    Parell, G.J.; Becker, G.D.; Simpson, G.T.

    1981-01-01

    Radionuclide imaging is used to evaluate the status of neck nodes preoperatively in small group of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. An area adjacent to the carcinoma, and a similar area on the opposite side of the oral cavity, are injected with Technetium (Tc) 99m labeled sulfur minicolloid. Differences in imaging intensity between both sides of the neck are used to predict the presence of metastases. Neck dissection confirms the histologic status of the nodes. The scan correctly predicts the presence of metastases in 100% (2/2) of patients with palpable nodes, and the absence of metastases in 75% (3/4) of patients with clinically tested negative necks.

  16. Neck control after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck control outcomes after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed medical records of fifty patients with node-positive head and neck cancer who received definitive radiochemotherapy. Twelve patients subsequently underwent neck dissection for suspicious recurrent or persistent disease. A median dose of 70 Gy (range 60-70.6) was delivered to involved nodes. Response evaluation was performed at a median of 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Results Neck failure was observed in 11 patients and the 3-year regional control (RC) rate was 77.1%. Neck dissection was performed in 10 of the 11 patients; seven of these cases were successfully salvaged, and the ultimate rate of neck control was 92%. The remaining two patients who received neck dissection had negative pathologic results. On univariate analysis, initial nodal size > 2 cm, a less-than-complete response at the primary site, post-radiotherapy nodal size > 1.5 cm, and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were associated with RC. On multivariate analysis, less-than-complete primary site response and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were identified as independent prognostic factors for RC. Conclusions The neck failure rate after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection was 22%. Two-thirds of these were successfully salvaged with neck dissection and the ultimate neck control rate was 92%. Our results suggest that planned neck dissection might not be necessary in patients with complete response of primary site, no evidence of residual lesion > 1.5 cm, or no necrotic lymph nodes at the 1-2 months follow-up evaluation after radiotherapy. PMID:22313843

  17. Anatomical Variations in the Emergence of the Cutaneous Nerves from the Nerve Point in the Neck and Identification of the Landmarks to Locate the Nerve Point with Its Clinical Implications: A Cadaveric Study on South Indian Human Foetuses

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Chandni; D’souza, Antony Sylvan; Raythe, Biswabswabina

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The cutaneous nerves from the cervical plexuses are anaesthetized by using local anaesthetics for pain relief or when minor surgical operations are performed. Knowing the variations in these nerves is important for anaestheticists to administer an effective anaesthesia to a particular nerve. So, the aim of this study was to look for the variations in the emerging patterns of the cervical cutaneous nerves in the neck and to locate the nerve point in the neck by using the superficial landmarks. Materials and Methods: The neck was dissected in 16 foetal cadavers (total 32). The foetuses were divided into 2 groups, depending upon their ages- group 1 (13-24wks) and group 2 (24-38wks). The cervical cutaneous nerves were dissected. Measurements for locating the nerve point, were taken in both the groups. Results: The statistical analysis of the measurements was done. In group 1, the mean distances of the nerve point from the External Acoustic Meatus (EAM), on the right and left sides, were 2.06cm and1.85cm and in group 2, the distances on the right and left sides were 2.32cm and 2.08cm. The mean distance of the nerve point from the clavicle in group 1, on both the right and the left sides was 1.85cm, and in group 2, the mean distances on the right and left sides were 2.67cm and 2.62cm. The variations in the cutaneous nerves which emerged from the nerve point were recorded and photographed. Conclusion: These landmarks will help the anaestheticists in locating the nerve point. These variations in the branches of the cervical plexus should be known to the anaestheticists while they give anaesthesia to a particular nerve during a nerve block. PMID:23634386

  18. Outcomes for patients with papillary thyroid cancer who do not undergo prophylactic central neck dissection

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, I. J.; Wang, L. Y.; Ganly, I.; Patel, S. G.; Morris, L. G.; Migliacci, J. C.; Tuttle, R. M.; Shah, J. P.; Shaha, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of prophylactic central neck dissection (CND) in the management of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is controversial. This report describes outcomes of an observational approach in patients without clinical evidence of nodal disease in PTC. Methods All patients who had surgery between 1986 and 2010 without CND for PTC were identified. All patients had careful clinical assessment of the central neck during preoperative and perioperative evaluation, with any suspicious nodal tissue excised for analysis. The cohort included patients in whom lymph nodes had been removed, but no patient had undergone a formal neck dissection. Recurrence-free survival (RFS), central neck RFS and disease-specific survival (DSS) were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results Of 1798 patients, 397 (22·1 per cent) were men, 1088 (60·5 per cent) were aged 45 years or more, and 539 (30·0 per cent) had pT3 or pT4 disease. Some 742 patients (41·3 per cent) received adjuvant treatment with radioactive iodine. At a median follow-up of 46 months the 5-year DSS rate was 100 per cent. Five-year RFS and central neck RFS rates were 96·6 and 99·1 per cent respectively. Conclusion Observation of the central neck is safe and should be recommended for all patients with PTC considered before and during surgery to be free of central neck metastasis. PMID:26511531

  19. Recurrent plunging ranula of the neck.

    PubMed

    Al Ruhaimi, Khalid A

    2013-03-01

    The reported case describes a mismanaged extensive recurrent plunging ranula that occupied a large portion of the neck. The ranula is usually clinically diagnosed. However, absence of visible intra-oral signs may mislead the diagnosis and leads to improper surgical management. Presence of amylase in the aspirated fluids is an important aid in the differential diagnosis. Thereby confirming the salivary origin of the fluids and thus avoiding extensive investigations. The recurrence rate varies according to the procedure performed. Diverse methods of treating ranula have been reported in the literature with variable results. These include marsuplization, excision of the ranula, incision of the ranula and drainage of the contents, excision of the sublingual gland and drainage. The successful procedure to treat plunging ranula depends on complete excision of the affected sublingual gland and drainage of its contents. In this paper, the useful diagnostic investigations and the recommended surgical intervention procedure were described.

  20. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    SciTech Connect

    Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

    1985-02-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  1. Outcome of pN0 Triple-Negative Breast Cancer with or without Lymph Node Irradiation: A Single Institution Experience.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Jonathan; Duprez-Paumier, Raphaelle; Filleron, Thomas; Lacroix Triki, Magali; Jouve, Eva; Dalenc, Florence; Massabeau, Carole

    2016-09-01

    The optimal management of patients with pathologically node-negative triple-negative breast cancer (pN0 TNBC) remains unclear. We hypothesized that lymph node irradiation (LNI; internal mammary chain/periclavicular irradiation) had an impact on outcomes of pN0 TNBC. A cohort of 126 consecutive patients with pN0 TNBC treated between 2007 and 2010 at a single institute were included. All radiotherapy (breast/chest wall, ±LNI) was delivered adjuvantly, following completion of surgery ± chemotherapy. Tumors were reviewed and histologic features were described. Tissue microarrays were constructed and tumors were assessed by immunohistochemistry using antibodies against ER, PR, HER2, Ki-67, cytokeratins 5/6, 14, epidermal growth factor receptor and androgen receptor. Patients were divided into two groups for statistical analysis: LNI (LNI+) or no LNI (LNI-). We focused on disease-free survival (DFS), metastasis-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS). Fifty-seven and 69 patients received or not LNI, respectively. Median age was 52 (range [25-76]) and 55 (range [29-79]) in LNI+ and LNI- group (p = 0.23). LNI was associated with larger tumors (p = 0.033), central/internal tumors (33 versus 4, p < 0.01) and more chemotherapy (86% versus 59.4% p < 0.01). The median follow-up was 53.5 months. The rate of first regional relapse (associated or not with distant relapse) was low in both groups. There was no difference in 4-year DFS (82.2% versus 89.9%; p = 0.266), MFS (87.0% versus 91.1%; p = 0.286) and OS (85.8% versus 89.9%; p = 0.322) between LNI+ and LNI- group, respectively. In univariate analysis, only clinical size (T >10 mm versus ≤10 mm), histologic size (pT >10 mm versus ≤10 mm) and grade 3 (versus grade 2) were found to be significantly associated with shorter DFS. Omission of LNI in patients with pN0 TNBC does not seem to result in poorer outcome. Further studies are needed to specifically evaluate LNI in pN0 TNBC with histologic grade

  2. Antenatal hemorrhage of a cervical lymphatic malformation presenting as a draining neck mass: An unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Haricharan, R N; Nawaz, M; Bettolli, M; Ferretti, E

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic malformations in the neck can present as large fetal neck masses causing airway obstructions with potential perinatal demise and can pose a therapeutic challenge. We present a rare case of prenatally diagnosed large fetal neck mass with features of lymphatic malformation with intralesional hemorrhage of uncertain origin. Postnatal evaluation showed a complex cystic-solid lesion eroding through the skin with an open wound that made it clinically hard to differentiate from a teratoma. Given that malignancy could not be completely ruled out, surgery was favored. Final pathology showed a complex lymphatic malformation with intralesional hemorrhage, despite having no associated capillary, venous or arterial malformations.

  3. A case of isolated neck extensor myopathy responding favorably to immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Håvard; Bogaard, Pauline W; Oppel, Lorenz

    2013-12-01

    We report on a case of a 79-year-old man with dropped head syndrome, where diagnostic tests, ruling out other differential diagnoses, confirmed the relatively rarely occurring condition known as isolated neck extensor myopathy. Biopsy of the neck extensor musculature was with classical pronounced fibrosis, without signs of myositis. The patient was treated with 3 cycles of corticosteroids with pronounced clinical improvement of his symptoms. This emphasizes the importance of considering isolated neck extensor myopathy as a differential diagnosis when encountered with a patient with dropped head syndrome and the importance of trying therapy with corticosteroids even when myositis is absent.

  4. Airway management in laryngotracheal injuries from blunt neck trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debnath; Agarwal, Rita; Bajaj, Lalit; Teng, Sarena N; Prager, Jeremy D

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric laryngotracheal injuries from blunt neck trauma are extremely rare, but can be potentially catastrophic. Early diagnosis and skillful airway management is critical in avoiding significant morbidity and mortality associated with these cases. We present a case of a patient who suffered a complete tracheal transection and cervical spine fracture following a clothesline injury to the anterior neck. A review of the mechanisms of injury, clinical presentation, initial airway management, and anesthetic considerations in laryngotracheal injuries from blunt neck trauma in children are presented.

  5. Correlation of corrosion and biomechanics in the retrieval of a single modular neck total hip arthroplasty design: modular neck total hip arthroplasty system.

    PubMed

    Lanting, Brent A; Teeter, Matthew G; Vasarhelyi, Edward M; Ivanov, Todor G; Howard, James L; Naudie, Douglas D R

    2015-01-01

    Increased modularity of total hip arthroplasty components has occurred, with theoretical advantages and disadvantages. Recent literature indicates the potential for elevated revision rates of modular neck systems and the potential for local pseudotumor and metallosis formation at the modular neck/stem site. Retrieval analysis of one modular neck implant design including SEM (SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY) assessment was done and correlated with FEA (finite element analysis) as well as clinical features of patient demographics, implant and laboratory analysis. Correlation of the consistent corrosion locations to FEA indicates that the material and design features of this system may result in a biomechanical reason for failure. The stem aspect of the modular neck/stem junction may be at particular risk.

  6. Factors Associated With Neck Hematoma After Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sayaka; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Saito, Yuki; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To identify risk factors for post-thyroidectomy hematoma requiring airway intervention or surgery (“wound hematoma”) and determine post-thyroidectomy time to intervention. Post-thyroidectomy hematoma is rare but potentially lethal. Information on wound hematoma in a nationwide clinical setting is scarce. Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we extracted data from records of patients undergoing thyroidectomy from July 2010 to March 2014. Patients with clinical stage IV cancer or those with bilateral neck dissection were excluded because they could have undergone planned tracheotomy on the day of thyroidectomy. We assessed the association between background characteristics and wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy, using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Among 51,968 patients from 880 hospitals, wound hematoma occurred in 920 (1.8%) ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy and in 203 (0.4%) ≥3 days post-thyroidectomy (in-hospital mortality = 0.05%). Factors significantly associated with wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy were male sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30–1.77); higher age (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.02); overweight or obese (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04–1.44); type of surgery (partial thyroidectomy for benign tumor compared with: total thyroidectomy, benign tumor [OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.45–2.63]; partial thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.00–1.46]; total thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.82–3.49]; and thyroidectomy for Graves disease [OR 3.88, 95% CI 2.59–5.82]); neck dissection (OR, 1.53, 95% CI 1.05–2.23); antithrombotic agents (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.15–2.17); and blood transfusion (OR 5.33, 95% CI 2.39–11.91). Closer monitoring of airway and neck is recommended for patients with risk factors, and further cautious monitoring beyond 3 days post-thyroidectomy. PMID:26886632

  7. [What would you do with an adult patient who complains of a neck mass?].

    PubMed

    Piera-Salmerón, A; Buil-Arasanz, M E; Bobé-Armant, F; Carrión-Monllor, M

    2016-09-01

    Family physicians frequently encounter patients with neck mass. There are multiple causes that range from no clinical importance to malignant tumours. The critical challenge for the primary care physician is to identify which cases are secondary to malignancies or other serious conditions. With a good knowledge of the complex anatomy of the neck and a careful clinical history, including a complete physical examination, the different causes can be narrowed down, as well as to differentiate between significant and non-significant neck masses and select the appropriate studies. Lymphoma commonly presents as a painless enlarged lump in the neck, as in the case of the patient presented. An algorithm is provided to help practioners.

  8. A Novel Digital Patient-Reported Outcome Platform for Head and Neck Oncology Patients—A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Maria K.; Lehikoinen, Joel S.; Sippola, Lauri T.; Saarilahti, Kauko; Mäkitie, Antti A.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The patient’s role in toxicity reporting is increasingly acknowledged. There is also a need for developing modern communication methods between the patient and the medical personnel. Furthermore, the increasing number of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients is reflected in the volume of treatment follow-up visits, which remains a challenge for the health care. Electronic patient-reported outcome (ePRO) measures may provide a cost-efficient way to organize follow-up for cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS We tested a novel ePRO application called Kaiku®, which enables real-time, online collection of patient-reported outcomes, such as side effects caused by treatment and quality of life. We conducted a pilot study to assess the suitability of Kaiku® for HNC patients at the Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. Patients used Kaiku® during and one month after radiotherapy to report treatment-related side effects and quality of life. Two physicians and a nurse performed the practical electronic communication part of the study. RESULTS Five of the nine patients agreed to participate in the study: three of them had local early-stage larynx cancer (T2N0, T1aN0, and T2N0) and the remaining two patients had early-stage base of tongue cancer (T2N0 and T1N2b). The degree of side effects reported by the patients via Kaiku® ranged from mild to life threatening. The number of outcome data points on patients’ progress was significantly increased, which resulted in a better follow-up and improved communication between the patient and the care team. CONCLUSIONS Kaiku® seems to be a suitable tool to monitor side effects and quality of life during and after radiotherapy among HNC patients. Kaiku® and similar tools could be useful in organizing a cost-effective follow-up process for HNC patients. We recommend conducting a larger study to further assess the impact of an ePRO solution in routine clinical practice. ePRO solutions

  9. Immunotherapy With MK-3475 in Surgically Resectable Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-08

    Cancer of Head and Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Head and Neck

  10. Comparison of build-up dose between Elekta and Varian linear accelerators for high-energy photon beams using radiochromic film and clinical implications for IMRT head and neck treatments.

    PubMed

    Paelinck, L; De Wagter, C; Van Esch, A; Duthoy, W; Depuydt, T; De Neve, W

    2005-02-07

    Skin toxicity has been reported for IMRT of head and neck cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose in the build-up region delivered by a 6 MV treatment plan for which important skin toxicity was observed. We also investigated if the different designs of the treatment head of an Elekta and a Varian linear accelerator, especially the lower position of the Varian multi-leaf collimator, give rise to different build-up doses. For regular square open beams, the build-up dose along the central beam axis is higher for the Varian machine than for the Elekta machine, both for 6 MV and 18 MV. At the Elekta machine at 18 MV, the superficial dose of a diamond shaped 10 x 10 cm2 field is 3.6% lower than the superficial dose of a regular 10 x 10 cm2 field. This effect is not seen at 6 MV. At the Varian machine, the superficial dose of the diamond shaped field is respectively 3.5 and 14.2% higher than the superficial dose of the regular 10 x 10 cm2 field for 6 MV and 18 MV. Despite the differences measured in build-up dose for single beams between the Elekta and the Varian linear accelerator, there were no measurable differences in superficial dose when a typical IMRT dose plan of 6 MV for a head and neck tumour is executed at the two machines.

  11. Posttraumatic Boutonnière and Swan Neck Deformities.

    PubMed

    McKeon, Kathleen E; Lee, Donald H

    2015-10-01

    Boutonnière and swan neck deformities of the finger can be the result of trauma. The complex anatomy of the extensor mechanism of the finger makes understanding the pathomechanics of these deformities challenging. These posttraumatic deformities should not be confused with those associated with inflammatory arthritis because the treatment options are often very different. An accurate clinical assessment is essential for selecting the appropriate treatment method. Physical examination, including Elson and intrinsic-plus tests, and plain radiography are important tools for diagnosis. A variety of nonsurgical and surgical treatment modalities can be used to restore the motion of the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints and rebalance the forces across these joints. An understanding of the anatomy, clinical presentation, treatment options, and expected outcomes is crucial for optimal treatment of posttraumatic boutonnière and swan neck deformities.

  12. Laryngeal Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting with Neck Mass in an Adult Woman

    PubMed Central

    Jahandideh, Hesam; Nasoori, Yasser; Rostami, Sara; Safdarian, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a very rare condition that commonly affects the head and neck region. There are very few cases of isolated laryngeal involvement by LCH, mostly reported in pediatric patients. Here, we report a case of laryngeal LCH in a 62-year-old woman presenting with a neck mass several weeks ago. The clinical and histopathological findings are reported with a brief discussion about the disease. PMID:27127670

  13. Manual therapy and exercise for neck pain: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jordan; Gross, Anita; D'Sylva, Jonathan; Burnie, Stephen J; Goldsmith, Charles H; Graham, Nadine; Haines, Ted; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L

    2010-06-01

    Manual therapy is often used with exercise to treat neck pain. This cervical overview group systematic review update assesses if manual therapy, including manipulation or mobilisation, combined with exercise improves pain, function/disability, quality of life, global perceived effect, and patient satisfaction for adults with neck pain with or without cervicogenic headache or radiculopathy. Computerized searches were performed to July 2009. Two or more authors independently selected studies, abstracted data, and assessed methodological quality. Pooled relative risk (pRR) and standardized mean differences (pSMD) were calculated. Of 17 randomized controlled trials included, 29% had a low risk of bias. Low quality evidence suggests clinically important long-term improvements in pain (pSMD-0.87(95% CI:-1.69,-0.06)), function/disability, and global perceived effect when manual therapy and exercise are compared to no treatment. High quality evidence suggests greater short-term pain relief [pSMD-0.50(95% CI:-0.76,-0.24)] than exercise alone, but no long-term differences across multiple outcomes for (sub)acute/chronic neck pain with or without cervicogenic headache. Moderate quality evidence supports this treatment combination for pain reduction and improved quality of life over manual therapy alone for chronic neck pain; and suggests greater short-term pain reduction when compared to traditional care for acute whiplash. Evidence regarding radiculopathy was sparse. Specific research recommendations are made.

  14. Manual therapy and exercise for neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jordan; Gross, Anita; D'Sylva, Jonathan; Burnie, Stephen J; Goldsmith, Charles H; Graham, Nadine; Haines, Ted; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L

    2010-08-01

    Manual therapy is often used with exercise to treat neck pain. This cervical overview group systematic review update assesses if manual therapy, including manipulation or mobilisation, combined with exercise improves pain, function/disability, quality of life, global perceived effect, and patient satisfaction for adults with neck pain with or without cervicogenic headache or radiculopathy. Computerized searches were performed to July 2009. Two or more authors independently selected studies, abstracted data, and assessed methodological quality. Pooled relative risk (pRR) and standardized mean differences (pSMD) were calculated. Of 17 randomized controlled trials included, 29% had a low risk of bias. Low quality evidence suggests clinically important long-term improvements in pain (pSMD-0.87(95% CI: -1.69, -0.06)), function/disability, and global perceived effect when manual therapy and exercise are compared to no treatment. High quality evidence suggests greater short-term pain relief [pSMD-0.50(95% CI: -0.76, -0.24)] than exercise alone, but no long-term differences across multiple outcomes for (sub)acute/chronic neck pain with or without cervicogenic headache. Moderate quality evidence supports this treatment combination for pain reduction and improved quality of life over manual therapy alone for chronic neck pain; and suggests greater short-term pain reduction when compared to traditional care for acute whiplash. Evidence regarding radiculopathy was sparse. Specific research recommendations are made.

  15. Epidemiologic survey of head and neck cancers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Moon; Kim, Young Mo; Shim, Yoon-Sang; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Chang, Hyuck Soon; Choi, Jong Ouck; Rho, Young Soo; Kim, Min-Sik; Choi, Eun Chang; Choi, Geon; Sung, Myung-Whun; Kim, Sang-Yun; Lee, Yong-Sik; Baek, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Young-Ho; Im, Jung-Hyuk; Choi, Sang-Hak; Kim, Jae-Hee

    2003-02-01

    Head and neck cancers have never been systematically studied for clinical purposes yet in Korea. This epidemiological survey on head and neck cancer patients was undertaken from January to December 2001 in 79 otorhinolaryngology resident-training hospitals nationwide. The number of head and neck cancer patients was 1,063 cases in the year. The largest proportion of cases arose in the larynx, as many as 488 cases, which accounted for 45.9%. It was followed by, in order of frequency, oral cavity (16.5%), oropharynx (10.0%), and hypopharynx (9.5%). The male:female ratio was 5:1, and the mean age was 60.3 yr. Surgery was the predominant treatment modality in head and neck cancers: 204 (21.5%) cases were treated with only surgery, 198 (20.8%) cases were treated with surgery and radiotherapy, 207 cases (21.8%) were treated with combined therapy of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Larynx and hypopharynx cancers had a stronger relationship with smoking and alcohol drinking than other primary site cancers. Of them, 21 cases were found to be metastasized at the time of diagnosis into the lung, gastrointestinal tract, bone, or brain. Coexisting second primary malignancies were found in 23 cases. At the time of diagnosis, a total of 354 cases had cervical lymph node metastasis accounting for 42.0%.

  16. The effectiveness of balneotherapy in chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Koyuncu, Engin; Ökmen, Burcu Metin; Özkuk, Kağan; Taşoğlu, Özlem; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of balneotherapy (BT), which is applied in addition to physical therapy (PT), in the treatment of chronic neck pain. Sixty patients with chronic neck pain were divided into study (n = 30) and control (n = 30) groups. All of the patients in both groups were treated with a 15-session standard PT program consisting of hot pack, ultrasound, and transcutaneous electrical stimulation. Patients in the study group were also treated with a 15-session BT program lasting 20 min/day in addition to the standard PT program. Visual analogue scale (VAS), modified neck disability index (mNDI), and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) scores of all patients were evaluated at three different times as pretreatment, posttreatment, and posttreatment third week. There was no statistically significant difference between the clinical and demographic characteristics of the patients in different groups before treatment. Intragroup analysis revealed significant improvement in all parameters for both of the groups at all time intervals. Intergroup analysis uncovered the superiority of the study group. According to the results of this study, BT in combination with PT is superior to PT alone in reducing pain and disability and improving quality of life in patients with chronic neck pain.

  17. Elective neck dissection in oral carcinoma: a critical review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, L P; Sanabria, A

    2007-06-01

    More than 50% of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity have lymph node metastases and histological confirmation of metastatic disease is the most important prognostic factor. Among patients with a clinically negative neck, the incidence of occult metastases varies with the site, size and thickness of the primary tumour. The high incidence rate of occult cervical metastases (> 20%) in tumours of the lower part of the oral cavity is the main argument in favour of elective treatment of the neck. The usual treatment of patients with clinically palpable metastatic lymph nodes has been radical neck dissection. This classical surgical procedure involves not only resection of level I to V lymph nodes of the neck but also the tail of the parotid, submandibular gland, sternocleidomastoid muscle, internal jugular vein and spinal accessory nerve. It is a safe oncological surgical procedure that significantly reduces the risk of regional recurrences, however it produces significant post-operative morbidity, mainly shoulder dysfunction. Aiming to reduce morbidity, Ward and Roben described a modification of the procedure sparing the spinal accessory nerve to prevent post-operative shoulder morbidity. Several clinical and pathological studies have demonstrated that the pattern of metastatic lymph node metastases occurs in a predictable fashion in patients with oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma. The use of selective supraomohyoid neck dissection as the elective treatment of the neck, in oral cancer patients, is now well established. However, its role in the treatment of clinically positive neck patients is controversial. Some Authors advocate this type of selective neck dissection in patients with limited neck disease at the upper levels of the neck, without jeopardizing neck control. The main factors supporting this approach are the usually good prognosis in patients with single levels I or II metastasis independent of the extent of neck dissection, and the low

  18. Emerging applications for OCT in the head and neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Marc; Kim, Jason H.; Armstrong, William B.; Djalilian, Hamid R.; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2010-02-01

    Objectives: To describe the current and promising new applications of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) as a helpful tool when imaging the different sites in the head and neck. We used the OCT Niris system, which is the first commercially available OCT device for applications outside the field of ophthalmology. Methods: OCT images were obtained of normal, benign, premalignant and malignant lesions in different areas of the head and neck. The OCT imaging system has a tissue penetration depth of approximately 1-2mm, a scanning range of 2mm and a spatial depth resolution of approximately 10-20μm. Imaging was performed using a flexible probe in two different settings, the outpatient clinic and the operating room. Results: High-resolution cross-sectional images from the larynx were obtained with the patient awake, without the need for general anesthesia, under direct visualization with a flexible fiberoptic endoscope. The OCT probe was inserted through the nasal cavity and placed in slight contact with the laryngeal tissue. In the ears, cholesteatoma was differentiated from inflamed middle ear mucosa by the different hyperintensity. In the neck, normal as well as different pathologies of the thyroid were identified. Conclusions: This system is non invasive and easy to incorporate into the operating room setting as well as the outpatient clinic. It requires minimal set-up and only one person is required to operate the system. OCT has the distinctive capability to obtain highresolution images, and the microanatomy of different sites can be observed. OCT technology has the potential to offer a quick, efficient and reliable imaging method to help the surgeon not only in the operating room but also in the clinical setting to guide surgical biopsies and aid in clinical decision making of different head and neck pathologies, especially those arising form the larynx.

  19. Potential biomarkers for radiosensitivity in head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Reoyo, Sherly; Roig-Lopez, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay of treatment for head and neck cancer. However, the morbidity of treatment remains a clinical challenge. Molecular profiling has provided further insight into tumor biology and tumor sensitivity to radiation, and this information could be used to personalize treatment. In this review, we discuss published signatures of radiosensitivity and discuss the pathways that may be important in dictating radiation sensitivity. Applications of these signatures could result in less morbidity if dose de-escalation efforts are successful. PMID:28149885

  20. The Levator Claviculae Muscle Presenting as a Neck Mass.

    PubMed

    Schlarb, Haley C; Williams, Daniel W; Schlarb, Alexander C; Judhan, Rudy; Schlarb, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    The levator claviculae muscle is an uncommonly encountered muscle variant, occurring in 1% to 2% of the human population. Most accounts of the levator claviculae muscle have been reported in association with routine cadaveric examination and as an incidental finding by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We report a case of this variant muscle presenting as a soft-tissue mass within the neck of a young male. Furthermore, we discuss the embryologic origin, imaging features and clinical implication.

  1. Catastrophic neck injuries in the collision sport athlete.

    PubMed

    Langer, Phillip R; Fadale, Paul D; Palumbo, Mark A

    2008-03-01

    Catastrophic neck injury is defined as a structural distortion of the cervical spinal column associated with actual (or potential) damage to the spinal cord. Although uncommon, this type of traumatic injury can lead to severe neurologic sequelae in the collision sport athlete. Emergency care is complicated by the helmet and shoulder pads worn by the athlete. A thorough understanding of the clinical anatomy, diagnostic considerations, and protocols for on-site evaluation and management is necessary to optimize outcome.

  2. Head and neck position sense.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Bridget; McNair, Peter; Taylor, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic minor cervical strains are common place in high-impact sports (e.g. tackling) and premature degenerative changes have been documented in sports people exposed to recurrent impact trauma (e.g. scrummaging in rugby) or repetitive forces (e.g. Formula 1 racing drivers, jockeys). While proprioceptive exercises have been an integral part of rehabilitation of injuries in the lower limb, they have not featured as prominently in the treatment of cervical injuries. However, head and neck position sense (HNPS) testing and re-training may have relevance in the management of minor sports-related neck injuries, and play a role in reducing the incidence of ongoing pain and problems with function. For efficacious programmes to be developed and tested, fundamental principles associated with proprioception in the cervical spine should be considered. Hence, this article highlights the importance of anatomical structures in the cervical spine responsible for position sense, and how their interaction with the CNS affects our ability to plan and execute effective purposeful movements. This article includes a review of studies examining position sense in subjects with and without pathology and describes the effects of rehabilitation programmes that have sought to improve position sense. In respect to the receptors providing proprioceptive information for the CNS, the high densities and complex arrays of spindles found in cervical muscles suggest that these receptors play a key role. There is some evidence suggesting that ensemble encoding of discharge patterns from muscle spindles is relayed to the CNS and that a pattern recognition system is used to establish joint position and movement. Sensory information from neck proprioceptive receptors is processed in tandem with information from the vestibular system. There are extensive anatomical connections between neck proprioceptive inputs and vestibular inputs. If positional information from the vestibular system is inaccurate or

  3. Impact of targeting insulin-like growth factor signaling in head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Limesand, Kirsten H; Chibly, Alejandro Martinez; Fribley, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    The IGF system has been shown to have either negative or negligible impact on clinical outcomes of tumor development depending on specific tumor sites or stages. This review focuses on the clinical impact of IGF signaling in head and neck cancer, the effects of IGF targeted therapies, and the multi-dimensional role of IRS 1/2 signaling as a potential mechanism in resistance to targeted therapies. Similar to other tumor sites, both negative and positive correlations between levels of IGF-1/IGF-1-R and clinical outcomes in head and neck cancer have been reported. In addition, utilization of IGF targeted therapies has not demonstrated significant clinical benefit; therefore the prognostic impact of the IGF system on head and neck cancer remains uncertain.

  4. Age Moderates the Relationships between Family Functioning and Neck Pain/Disability

    PubMed Central

    Guzy, Grażyna; Polczyk, Romuald; Szpitalak, Malwina; Vernon, Howard

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional clinical study was designed to explore the relationships between family functioning, coping styles, and neck pain and neck disability. It was hypothesized that better family functioning and more effective coping styles would be associated with less pain and pain-related disability. It also was hypothesized that these relationships would be stronger in older people because they have fewer resources, more limited coping styles, and may depend more on their family for support. In this study, 88 women with chronic non-traumatic neck pain completed the Family Assessment Measure (FAM), Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and a Visual-Analogue Scale (VAS) measuring the subjective intensity of neck pain. Zero-order and partial correlations and hierarchical stepwise regression were performed. CISS was not correlated with the NDI orVAS. Good family functioning was correlated with lower NDI and VAS scores. Age was found to moderate the relationship between the FAM and both NDI and VAS. This relationship was significant and positive in older patients, but non-significant in younger patients. It was concluded that better family functioning is associated with lower neck disability and pain intensity, especially in the case of older women suffering from non-traumatic neck pain. PMID:27078854

  5. The impact of gross anatomy on the future head and neck surgeon.

    PubMed

    Archibald, David J; Carlson, Matthew L

    2009-01-01

    Gross anatomy is not only a rite of passage for medical students as they enter the world of practicing medicine but may also be an unrecognized fork in the road in their pursuit of choosing a medical specialty. Otolaryngology: head and neck surgery tends to be poorly represented in medical school curriculum, often only offered as an elective rotation. However, head and neck anatomy remains a constant in most medical schools, granting some exposure to otolaryngology whether students realize it or not. A common thread among most head and neck surgeons in their decision to pursue this surgical specialty is a love for head and neck anatomy, spawned in that first year gross anatomy course. This first and potentially only exposure to otolaryngology should be optimized, as it can have a profound effect in the selection of otolaryngology as a specialty. This introduction can be facilitated by (1) inviting otolaryngology residents to assist during the dissection of the head and neck, (2) soliciting otolaryngology attending physicians to provide clinical correlation lectures, and (3) anatomy professors should identify students who excel in the head and neck portion of the curriculum and direct them towards otolaryngology mentors. There may be a great missed opportunity if a career in otolaryngology is not discussed with students during the dissection of the head and neck.

  6. Age Moderates the Relationships between Family Functioning and Neck Pain/Disability.

    PubMed

    Guzy, Grażyna; Polczyk, Romuald; Szpitalak, Malwina; Vernon, Howard

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional clinical study was designed to explore the relationships between family functioning, coping styles, and neck pain and neck disability. It was hypothesized that better family functioning and more effective coping styles would be associated with less pain and pain-related disability. It also was hypothesized that these relationships would be stronger in older people because they have fewer resources, more limited coping styles, and may depend more on their family for support. In this study, 88 women with chronic non-traumatic neck pain completed the Family Assessment Measure (FAM), Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and a Visual-Analogue Scale (VAS) measuring the subjective intensity of neck pain. Zero-order and partial correlations and hierarchical stepwise regression were performed. CISS was not correlated with the NDI orVAS. Good family functioning was correlated with lower NDI and VAS scores. Age was found to moderate the relationship between the FAM and both NDI and VAS. This relationship was significant and positive in older patients, but non-significant in younger patients. It was concluded that better family functioning is associated with lower neck disability and pain intensity, especially in the case of older women suffering from non-traumatic neck pain.

  7. Clinical-dosimetric analysis of measures of dysphagia including gastrostomy-tube dependence among head and neck cancer patients treated definitively by intensity-modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between dose to various anatomical structures and dysphagia among patients with head and neck cancer treated by definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy. Methods and materials Thirty-nine patients with squamous cancer of the head and neck were treated by definitive concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT to a median dose of 70 Gy (range, 68 to 72). In each patient, a gastrostomy tube (GT) was prophylacticly placed prior to starting treatment. Prolonged GT dependence was defined as exceeding the median GT duration of 192 days. Dysphagia was scored using standardized quality-of-life instruments. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data incorporating the superior/middle pharyngeal constrictors (SMPC), inferior pharyngeal constrictor (IPC), cricoid pharyngeal inlet (CPI), and cervical esophagus (CE) were analyzed in relation to prolonged GT dependence, dysphagia, and weight loss. Results At 3 months and 6 months after treatment, 87% and 44% of patients, respectively, were GT dependent. Spearman's ρ analysis identified statistical correlations (p < 0.05) between prolonged GT dependence or high grade dysphagia with IPC V65, IPC V60, IPC Dmean, and CPI Dmax. Logistic regression model showed that IPC V65 > 30%, IPC V60 > 60%, IPC Dmean > 60 Gy, and CPI Dmax > 62 Gy predicted for greater than 50% probability of prolonged GT dependence. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that adhering to the following parameters may decrease the risk of prolonged GT dependence and dysphagia: IPC V65 < 15%, IPC V60 < 40%, IPC Dmean < 55 Gy, and CPI Dmax < 60 Gy. PMID:19909531

  8. Anatomic Variations in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bien-Keem; Wong, Chin-Ho; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck reconstruction is a technically challenging procedure. Variations encountered in the recipient vessels and commonly used flaps add to the complexity of surgery. This article reviews the commonly encountered variations in the recipient vessels in the neck with emphasis on alternatives and techniques to circumvent these variations. Flaps commonly used in head and neck reconstruction are also reviewed in detail. Furthermore, safety, potential pitfalls, and technical pearls are highlighted. PMID:22550436

  9. Tapentadol extended release for the management of chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Billeci, Domenico; Coluzzi, Flaminia

    2017-01-01

    Background The role of opioids in the management of chronic neck pain is still poorly investigated. No data are available on tapentadol extended release (ER). In this article, we present 54 patients with moderate-to-severe chronic neck pain treated with tapentadol ER. Patients and methods Patients received tapentadol ER 100 mg/day; dosage was then adjusted according to clinical needs. The following parameters were recorded: pain; Douleur Neuropathique 4 score; Neck Disability Index score; range of motion; pain-associated sleep interference; quality of life (Short Form [36] Health Survey); Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC); Clinician GIC; opioid-related adverse effects; and need for other analgesics. Results A total of 44 of 54 patients completed the 12-week observation. Tapentadol ER daily doses increased from 100 mg/day to a mean (standard deviation) dosage of 204.5 (102.8) mg/day at the final evaluation. Mean pain intensity at movement significantly decreased from baseline (8.1 [1.1]) to all time points (P<0.01). At baseline, 70% of patients presented a positive neuropathic component. This percentage dropped to 23% after 12 weeks. Tapentadol improved Neck Disability Index scores from 55.6 (18.6) at baseline to 19.7 (20.9) at the final evaluation (P<0.01). Tapentadol significantly improved neck range of motion in all three planes of motion, particularly in lateral flexion. Quality of life significantly improved in all Short Form (36) Health Survey subscales (P<0.01) and in both physical and mental status (P<0.01). Based on PGIC results, approximately 90% of patients rated their overall condition as much/very much improved. Tapentadol was well tolerated: no patients discontinued due to side effects. The use of other analgesics was reduced during the observed period. Conclusion Our results suggest that tapentadol ER, started at 100 mg/day, is effective and well tolerated in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic neck pain, including opioid-naïve subjects

  10. Complications of free radial forearm flap transfers for head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Ming; Lin, Gau-Tyan; Fu, Yin-Chih; Shieh, Tien-Yu; Huang, I-Yueh; Shen, Yee-Shyong; Chen, Chung-Ho

    2005-06-01

    Free tissue transfer using microvascular anastomosis has been established as an accepted maxillofacial reconstructive procedure. The free radial forearm flap (FRFF) has become a workhorse flap as a means of reconstructing surgical defects in the head and neck region. Since 1992, we have carried out 38 FRFF transfers in 37 patients for reconstruction after head and neck cancer ablative surgery. We present our clinical experience with head and neck reconstruction using the FRFF and the morbidity of the donor sites. Of the 38 FRFFs, 35 FRFFs were performed successfully. The survival rate of FRFF was 92%. Donor site complications included partial loss of skin graft in 4 donor sites (11%), abnormal sensations in 10 (26%), poor appearance in 3 (8%), and reduced grip strength in 4 (11%). Therefore, we believe that, because of the reliability, functional characteristics, and low donor site morbidity, the FRFF is a useful and versatile flap for reconstruction of head and neck defects.

  11. High-resolution Imaging of Neural Anatomy and Pathology of the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kai-Lung; Choi, Young Jun; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2017-01-01

    The neck has intricately connected neural structures, including cervical and brachial plexi, the sympathetic system, lower cranial nerves, and their branches. Except for brachial plexus, there has been little research regarding the normal imaging appearance or corresponding pathologies of neural structures in the neck. The development in imaging techniques with better spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio has made it possible to see many tiny nerves to predict complications related to image-guided procedures and to better assess treatment response, especially in the management of oncology patients. The purposes of this review is to present imaging-based anatomy of major nerves in the neck and explain their relevant clinical significance according to representative pathologies of regarded nerves in the neck. PMID:28096728

  12. When should a cervical collar be used to treat neck pain?

    PubMed

    Muzin, Stefan; Isaac, Zacharia; Walker, Joseph; Abd, Omar El; Baima, Jennifer

    2008-06-01

    Neck pain is one of the most prevalent and costly health problems in the United States. It remains a complex, subjective experience with a variety of musculoskeletal causes. Although, cervical collars are a seemingly benign intervention, they can have adverse effects, especially when used for longer periods of time. It is feared that a long period of immobilization, can result in atrophy-related secondary damage. Many physicians cite anecdotal evidence of their clinical utility and soft cervical collars are often prescribed by convention for patients complaining of neck pain. The use of cervical collars to treat neck pain is an area of controversy. This review article examines the current evidence and studies related to recommending cervical collars for neck pain of a variety of etiologies.

  13. [The role definition of lateral arm free flap in reconstruction after head and neck cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Li, C; Cai, Y C; Wang, W; He, Y X; Lan, X J; Li, Q L; Zhou, Y Q; Liu, J F; Zhu, G Q; Liu, K; Wang, S X; Wang, K; Fan, J C; Sun, R H

    2016-02-01

    Application of free flap is one of the important repair means in head and neck surgery. A variety of free flaps, such as anterolateral thigh flap, have showed unique advantages in repair for tissue defects after resection of head and neck tumor, and have became increasing popularity. Lateral arm flee flap is an important repair means in plastic surgery, which has developed more than 30 years, but the application of this flap for reconstruction in head and neck surgery is relatively backward, with few reports. This review focuses on the creativity and innovation, the relationship between anatomy and clinical application, and the application status and prospects for lateral arm flee flap in individual head and neck reconstruction surgery.

  14. Current relevance of hypoxia in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bredell, Marius G.; Ernst, Jutta; El-Kochairi, Ilhem; Dahlem, Yuliya; Ikenberg, Kristian; Schumann, Desiree M.

    2016-01-01

    Head and Neck cancer (HNC) is a complex mix of cancers and one of the more common cancers with a relatively poor prognosis. One of the factors that may assist us in predicting survival and allow us to adjust our treatment strategies is the presence of tumor hypoxia. In this overview we aim to evaluate the current evidence and potential clinical relevance of tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancer according to an extensive search of current literature. An abundance of evidence and often contradictory evidence is found in the literature. Even the contradictory evidence and comparisons are difficult to judge as criteria and methodologies differ greatly, furthermore few prospective observational studies exist for verification of the pre-clinical studies. Despite these discrepancies there is clear evidence of associations between prognosis and poor tumor oxygenation biomarkers such as HIF-1α, GLUT-1 and lactate, though these associations are not exclusive. The use of genetic markers is expanding and will probably lead to significantly more and complex evidence. The lack of oxygenation in head and neck tumors is of paramount importance for the prediction of treatment outcomes and prognosis. Despite the wide array of conflicting evidence, the drive towards non-invasive prediction of tumor hypoxia should continue. PMID:27434126

  15. HPV-Related Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Marszałek, Andrzej; Szylberg, Łukasz

    Since more than 5 years, it becomes evident that there is a new group of patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck area, namely human papillomavirus (HPV)-related (caused) tumors. As clinical statistics indicate, those patients have better prognosis, even despite more advanced stage compared to those with HPV-negative tumors. In fact, as a surrogate of HPV infection for clinical studies, an immunohistochemical expression of p16 protein is used. In the following chapter, the spectrum of squamous cell carcinomas variants with indication of the percentage cases with proved HPV infection will be presented.

  16. Moving Toward Bioadjuvant Approaches to Head and Neck Cancer Prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Saba, Nabil F.; Hammond, Anthea; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.

    2007-10-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma affects >45,000 Americans annually. Patients who are successfully treated for their primary tumor are at high risk of developing a second primary tumor, making effective preventive strategies highly desirable for this disease. Although a landmark study in 1990 suggested some benefit of high-dose retinoids in head and neck cancer prevention, subsequent trials using more tolerable doses have shown limited clinical success. Newer preventive strategies have included bioadjuvant therapy combining retinoids with interferon and {alpha}-tocopherol, combinations of molecularly targeted agents, and oncolytic viruses. Furthermore, considerable evidence has supported a cancer protective role for several nutrients, including green tea and curcumin analogs. Natural compounds such as these with favorable long-term safety profiles might be particularly suited to the cancer prevention setting, in which patients will usually tolerate only moderate risk and toxicity.

  17. Head-Neck Taper Corrosion in Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hussenbocus, S.; Kosuge, D.; Solomon, L. B.; Howie, D. W.; Oskouei, R. H.

    2015-01-01

    Modularity at the head-neck junction of the femoral component in THA became popular as a design feature with advantages of decreasing implant inventory and allowing adjustment of leg length, offset, and soft tissue balancing through different head options. The introduction of a new modular interface to femoral stems that were previously monoblock, or nonmodular, comes with the potential for corrosion at the taper junction through mechanically assisted crevice corrosion. The incidence of revision hip arthroplasty is on the rise and along with improved wear properties of polyethylene and ceramic, use of larger femoral head sizes is becoming increasingly popular. Taper corrosion appears to be related to all of its geometric parameters, material combinations, and femoral head size. This review article discusses the pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical assessment, and management of taper corrosion at the head-neck junction. PMID:25954757

  18. Photodynamic therapy of head and neck cancer with different sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoulovskaya, Elena G.; Shental, Victor V.; Abdoullin, N. A.; Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Tabolinovskaia, T. D.; Edinak, N. J.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Kondratjeva, T. T.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Agafonov, Valery V.

    1997-12-01

    This paper deals with the results of clinical trials for sulfated aluminum phthalocyanine (PHS) (Photosens, Russia; Photogeme (PG) in Russia. The results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of head and neck tumors (HNT), side effects and ways of their correction and prevention, as well as possibility to work out less toxic regimes of PDT with photosense, choice of laser and type of irradiation are discussed. PDT have been provided in 79 patients with different head and neck tumors. Efficacy of PDT depended on tumor size and its histological type. Undesirable changes in plasma content of antioxidants by means of high pressure liquid chromatography (HLPC) have been found in patients after PHS injection. Influence of short-term and long-term supplementation with beta-carotene and vitamin E on this parameters are discussed.

  19. The trumpet player with a swelling in the neck

    PubMed Central

    Edmiston, Rachel; Hariri, Ahmad; Karagama, Yakubu

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral neck swelling in patients following valsalva manouveres could lead to a diagnosis of either a pharyngocele or laryngocele. Distinguishing between them can be complicated but is vital given the possibility for an acute airway in patients with laryngoceles. A 20-year-old trumpet player presents with a 5-year history of neck swelling. Clinical suspicion is that of a pharyngocele but imaging introduces some confusion with the diagnosis. Both pharyngoceles and laryngoceles can occur as a result of prolonged positive pressure. Accurate assessment with fibreoptic examination and imaging is needed to confirm the diagnosis. Pharyngoceles are often misdiagnosed as laryngoceles. Though treatment is similar between the two patient groups it is vital that a distinction is made to enable careful observation of the airway in patients with laryngoceles. PMID:25795752

  20. Surgical correction of bladder neck contracture following prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Bugeja, Simon; Andrich, Daniela E; Mundy, Anthony R

    2014-01-01

    The surgical and non-surgical treatment of localised prostate cancer may be complicated by bladder neck contractures, prostatic urethral stenoses and bulbomembranous urethral strictures. In general, such complications following radical prostatectomy are less extensive, easier to treat and associated with a better outcome and more rapid recovery than the same complications following radiotherapy, high-intensity focussed ultrasound and cryotherapy. Treatment options range from minimally invasive endoscopic procedures to more complex and specialised open surgical reconstruction.In this chapter the surgical management of bladder neck contractures following the treatment of prostate cancer is described together with the management of prostatic urethral stenoses and bulbomembranous urethral strictures, given the difficulty in distinguishing them from one another clinically.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions head and neck squamous cell carcinoma head and neck squamous cell carcinoma Enable Javascript to view the ... body cavities such as the airways and intestines. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) develops in the mucous ...

  2. Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Main Content Are ... Being Treated With Radiation for Cancer in Your Head or Neck? If so, this booklet can help you. While ...

  3. Current philosophy in the surgical management of neck metastases for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, H. Hakan; Medina, Jesus E.; Robbins, K. Thomas; Silver, Carl E.; Strojan, Primož; Teymoortash, Afshin; Pellitteri, Phillip K.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Stoeckli, Sandro J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Suçrez, Carlos; Hartl, Dana M.; de Bree, Remco; Takes, Robert P.; Hamoir, Marc; Pitman, Karen T.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2016-01-01

    Neck dissection is an important treatment for metastases from upper aerodigestive carcinoma; an event that markedly reduces survival. Since its inception, the philosophy of the procedure has undergone significant change from one of radicalism to the current conservative approach. Furthermore, nonsurgical modalities have been introduced, and, in many situations, have supplanted neck surgery. The refinements of imaging the neck based on the concept of neck level involvement has encouraged new philosophies to evolve that seem to benefit patient outcomes particularly as this relates to diminished morbidity. The purpose of this review was to highlight the new paradigms for surgical removal of neck metastases using an evidence-based approach. PMID:24623715

  4. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for T3 and T4N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eriguchi, Takahisa; Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Nishimura, Shuichi; Takagawa, Yoshiaki; Enomoto, Tatsuji; Saeki, Noriyuki; Yashiro, Kae; Mizuno, Tomikazu; Aoki, Yousuke; Oku, Yohei; Yokosuka, Tetsuya; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the outcomes and feasibility of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for cT3 and cT4N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 25 patients with localized primary NSCLC diagnosed as cT3 or cT4N0M0, given SBRT between May 2005 and July 2013, were analyzed. All patients had inoperable tumors. The major reasons for tumors being unresectable were insufficient respiratory function for curative resection, advanced age (>80 years old) or technically inoperable due to invasion into critical organs. The median patient age was 79 years (range; 60-86). The median follow-up duration was 25 months (range: 5-100 months). The 2-year overall survival rates for T3 and T4 were 57% and 69%, respectively. The 2-year local control rates for T3 and T4 were 91% and 68%, respectively. As for toxicities, Grade 0-1, Grade 2 and Grade 3 radiation pneumonitis occurred in 23, 1 and 1 patient, respectively. No other acute or symptomatic late toxicities were reported. Thirteen patients who had no local, mediastinal or intrapulmonary progression at one year after SBRT underwent pulmonary function testing. The median variation in pre-SBRT and post-SBRT forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) values was -0.1 (-0.8-0.8). This variation was not statistically significant (P = 0.56). Forced vital capacity (FVC), vital capacity (VC), %VC and %FEV1 also showed no significant differences. SBRT for cT3 and cT4N0M0 NSCLC was both effective and feasible. Considering the favorable survival and low morbidity rate, SBRT is a potential treatment option for cT3 and cT4N0M0 NSCLC.

  5. Prognostic relevance of β-catenin expression in T2-3N0M0 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Situ, Dong-Rong; Hu, Yi; Zhu, Zhi-Hua; Wang, Jian; Long, Hao; Rong, Tie-Hua

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression of β-catenin in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) at stage T2-3N0M0 and its relation with the prognosis of ESCC patients. METHODS: Expression of β-catenin in 227 ESCC specimens was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). A reproducible semi-quantitative method which takes both staining percentage and intensity into account was applied in IHC scoring, and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to select the cut-off score for high or low IHC reactivity. Then, correlation of β-catenin expression with clinicopathological features and prognosis of ESCC patients was determined. RESULTS: No significant correlation was observed between β-catenin expression and clinicopathological parameters in terms of gender, age, tumor size, tumor grade, tumor location, depth of invasion and pathological stage. The Kaplan-Meier survival curve showed that the up-regulated expression of β-catenin indicated a poorer post-operative survival rate of ESCC patients at stage T2-3N0M0 (P = 0.004), especially of those with T3 lesions (P = 0.014) or with stage IIB diseases (P = 0.007). Multivariate analysis also confirmed that β-catenin was an independent prognostic factor for the overall survival rate of ESCC patients at stage T2-3N0M0 (relative risk = 1.642, 95% CI: 1.159-2.327, P = 0.005). CONCLUSION: Elevated β-catenin expression level may be an adverse indicator for the prognosis of ESCC patients at stage T2-3N0M0, especially for those with T3 lesions or stage IIB diseases. PMID:21049553

  6. Postoperative irradiation in patients with pT3-4N0 laryngeal cancer: results and prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Skóra, Tomasz; Nowak-Sadzikowska, Jadwiga; Mucha-Małecka, Anna; Szyszka-Charewicz, Bogumiła; Jakubowicz, Jerzy; Gliński, Bogdan

    2015-03-01

    Approximately 60 % of patients with locally advanced laryngeal cancer (LALC) treated primarily with surgery require adjuvant radiotherapy. In the available literature predominate series of patients were with pathologically confirmed node-positive status. Subgroups of pN0 patients with LALC are scarce. The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of postoperative radiotherapy in patients with pathological stage T3-4N0M0 and identification of prognostic factors in this group. Between 1975 and 2005, 138 patients with squamous pT3-4N0 laryngeal cancer were irradiated postoperatively. Primary surgical treatment consisted of total laryngectomy and cervical lymphadenectomy. The median time between surgery and the implementation of radiotherapy was 56 days. The median total dose was 60 Gy (range 40-70 Gy). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS5) was achieved in 76 % of patients. Cancer recurrence was observed in 34 patients. In 28 (82 %) cases it was locoregional failure. DFS5 rates for pT3 and pT4 were 92 and 69 %, for margin status R0, R1 and R2 were 82, 72 and 67 %, respectively. The pharyngeal invasion was related to a decrease in DFS5 from 80 to 59 %. Postoperative irradiation in patients with pT3-4N0 LALC is an effective treatment method. The main reason of the failure is local recurrence. The following independent prognostic factors were identified in this group of patients: pT stage, surgical margin status and pharyngeal invasion.

  7. Preventing head and neck injury.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, A S; McCrory, P

    2005-06-01

    A wide range of head and neck injury risks are present in sport, including catastrophic injury. The literature since 1980 on prevention of head and neck injury in sport was reviewed, focusing on catastrophic and brain injury and identifying the range of injury prevention methods in use. There have been few formal evaluations of injury prevention methods. Approaches that are considered, or have been proven, to be successful in preventing injury include: modification of the baseball; implementation of helmet standards in ice hockey and American football and increased wearing rates; use of full faceguards in ice hockey; changes in rules associated with body contact; implementation of rules to reduce the impact forces in rugby scrums. Helmets and other devices have been shown to reduce the risk of severe head and facial injury, but current designs appear to make little difference to rates of concussion. Research methods involving epidemiological, medical, and human factors are required in combination with biomechanical and technological approaches to reduce further injury risks in sport.

  8. Position paper of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and the German Society of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology – Current state of clinical and endoscopic diagnostics, evaluation, and therapy of swallowing disorders in children

    PubMed Central

    Arens, Christoph; Herrmann, Ingo F.; Rohrbach, Saskia; Schwemmle, Cornelia; Nawka, Tadeus

    2015-01-01

    Swallowing disorders are frequent. The main concern is mortality due to aspiration-induced pneumonia and malnutrition. In addition, quality of life is severely affected. The demographic trend indicates an increase of dysphagia in the future. Neurodegenerative diseases, tumors of the digestive tract, and sequelae of tumor treatment in the head and neck region are the main pathologic entities. Predominantly ENT physicians and phoniatricians are asked for diagnostics and therapy, and will coordinate the interdisciplinary treatment according to the endoscopic findings. A differentiated approach in history, diagnostics, and symptom-oriented treatment is necessary for these mostly complex disorders. Integration of non-medical staff such as speech therapists, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists in planning and executing an effective therapy expands and completes the patient-oriented care. Conservative treatment by these therapists is an important pillar in the treatment. Parts of the specific diagnostics can be taken over in close cooperation. In particular, an interdisciplinary cooperation with the staff of intensive care medicine is essential. The diagnostic procedures of specific endoscopy as described in this position paper are part of the primary and fundamental tasks of ENT specialists and phoniatrists. Endoscopy is a medical service that is basically not delegable. Consequently, substitution of the physician is excluded. PMID:26770277

  9. Position paper of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and the German Society of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology - Current state of clinical and endoscopic diagnostics, evaluation, and therapy of swallowing disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Arens, Christoph; Herrmann, Ingo F; Rohrbach, Saskia; Schwemmle, Cornelia; Nawka, Tadeus

    2015-01-01

    Swallowing disorders are frequent. The main concern is mortality due to aspiration-induced pneumonia and malnutrition. In addition, quality of life is severely affected. The demographic trend indicates an increase of dysphagia in the future. Neurodegenerative diseases, tumors of the digestive tract, and sequelae of tumor treatment in the head and neck region are the main pathologic entities. Predominantly ENT physicians and phoniatricians are asked for diagnostics and therapy, and will coordinate the interdisciplinary treatment according to the endoscopic findings. A differentiated approach in history, diagnostics, and symptom-oriented treatment is necessary for these mostly complex disorders. Integration of non-medical staff such as speech therapists, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists in planning and executing an effective therapy expands and completes the patient-oriented care. Conservative treatment by these therapists is an important pillar in the treatment. Parts of the specific diagnostics can be taken over in close cooperation. In particular, an interdisciplinary cooperation with the staff of intensive care medicine is essential. The diagnostic procedures of specific endoscopy as described in this position paper are part of the primary and fundamental tasks of ENT specialists and phoniatrists. Endoscopy is a medical service that is basically not delegable. Consequently, substitution of the physician is excluded.

  10. SU-E-T-63: Carotid Sparing Tomohelical Three Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for T1N0 Glottic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, C; Ju, S; Ahn, Y; Oh, D; Noh, J; Chung, K; Kim, J; Han, Y; Choi, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We investigated the dosimetric benefit and treatment efficiency of carotid-sparing TomoHelical (TH) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for early glottic cancer. Methods: Computed tomography (CT) simulation was performed for 10 patients with early-stage (T1N0M0) glottic squamous cell carcinoma. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), carotid artery (CA), and spinal cord (SP) were delineated for each CT data set. Two-field 3DCRT (2F-3DCRT), three-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (3F-IMRT), TomoHelical-IMRT (TH-IMRT), and TH-3DCRT plans were generated, with a total prescribed dose of 67.5 Gy in 30 fractions to the PTV for each patient. In order to evaluate plan quality, dosimetric characteristics were compared in terms of the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for the PTV, V35, V50, and V63 for the CAs and in terms of the maximum dose for the SP. Additionally, treatment planning and delivery times were compared to evaluate treatment efficiency. Results: The CIs for 3F-IMRT (0.650±0.05), TH-IMRT (0.643±0.03), and TH-3DCRT (0.631±0.03) were much better than that for 2F-3DCRT (0.318±0.03). The HIs for TH-IMRT (1.053±0.01) and TH-3DCRT (1.055±0.01) were slightly better than those for 2F-3DCRT (1.062±0.01) and 3F-IMRT (1.091±0.007). 2F-3DCRT showed poor CA sparing in terms of the V35, V50, and V63 compared to 3F-IMRT, TH-IMRT, and TH-3DCRT (p<0.05), whereas there was no significant dose difference between 3F-IMRT, TH-IMRT, and TH-3DCRT (p>0.05). The maximum dose to the SP with all plans was below 45 Gy. The treatment planning times for 2F-3DCRT (5.9±0.66 min) and TH-3DCRT (7.32±0.94 min) were much lower than those for 3F-IMRT (45.51±2.76 min) and TH-IMRT (35.58±4.41 min), whereas the delivery times with all plans was below 3 minutes. Conclusion: TH-3DCRT showed excellent carotid sparing capability, comparable to that with TH-IMRT, with high treatment efficiency and short planning and

  11. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... sensor of the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by the “X” axis force sensor... Fx is the force measured in lbs by the “X” axis force sensor (Channel Class 600) of the six axis neck... is vertical and coincides with the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal axis....

  12. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  13. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  14. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  15. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  16. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... ER20MY97.000 ER20MY97.001 (c) Test procedure. (1) Soak the test material in a test environment at any... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Test Dummy § 572.33 Neck. (a... least four hours prior to its application in a test. (2) Torque the jamnut (78051-64) on the neck...

  17. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... ER20MY97.000 ER20MY97.001 (c) Test procedure. (1) Soak the test material in a test environment at any... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Test Dummy § 572.33 Neck. (a... least four hours prior to its application in a test. (2) Torque the jamnut (78051-64) on the neck...

  18. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... ER20MY97.000 ER20MY97.001 (c) Test procedure. (1) Soak the test material in a test environment at any... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Test Dummy § 572.33 Neck. (a... least four hours prior to its application in a test. (2) Torque the jamnut (78051-64) on the neck...

  19. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... ER20MY97.000 ER20MY97.001 (c) Test procedure. (1) Soak the test material in a test environment at any... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Test Dummy § 572.33 Neck. (a... least four hours prior to its application in a test. (2) Torque the jamnut (78051-64) on the neck...

  20. Inter-Vertebral Flexibility of the Ostrich Neck: Implications for Estimating Sauropod Neck Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Cobley, Matthew J.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Barrett, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The flexibility and posture of the neck in sauropod dinosaurs has long been contentious. Improved constraints on sauropod neck function will have major implications for what we know of their foraging strategies, ecology and overall biology. Several hypotheses have been proposed, based primarily on osteological data, suggesting different degrees of neck flexibility. This study attempts to assess the effects of reconstructed soft tissues on sauropod neck flexibility through systematic removal of muscle groups and measures of flexibility of the neck in a living analogue, the ostrich (Struthio camelus). The possible effect of cartilage on flexibility is also examined, as this was previously overlooked in osteological estimates of sauropod neck function. These comparisons show that soft tissues are likely to have limited the flexibility of the neck beyond the limits suggested by osteology alone. In addition, the inferred presence of cartilage, and varying the inter-vertebral spacing within the synovial capsule, also affect neck flexibility. One hypothesis proposed that flexibility is constrained by requiring a minimum overlap between successive zygapophyses equivalent to 50% of zygapophyseal articular surface length (ONP50). This assumption is tested by comparing the maximum flexibility of the articulated cervical column in ONP50 and the flexibility of the complete neck with all tissues intact. It is found that this model does not adequately convey the pattern of flexibility in the ostrich neck, suggesting that the ONP50 model may not be useful in determining neck function if considered in isolation from myological and other soft tissue data. PMID:23967284

  1. Treatments for the Fifth Metacarpal Neck Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Shuang-Le; Zhao, Gang; Su, Li-Xin; Liang, Wei-Dong; Li, Li-Geng; Cheng, Guang; Wang, Ai-Jun; Cao, Xiao-Qiang; Zheng, Qiu-Tao; Li, Li-Dong; Kan, Shi-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The fifth metacarpal neck fractures (commonly termed boxer's fractures) are the most common type of metacarpal fractures. Many types of treatments are available in clinical practice, some of which have already been compared with other treatments by various researchers. However, a comprehensive treatment comparison is lacking. We estimated the comparative efficacy of different interventions for total complications, through a network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. We conducted a systematic search of the literature through October 2015. The outcome measurements were the total complications. We used a Bayesian network meta-analysis to combine direct and indirect evidence and to estimate the relative effects of treatment. We identified 6 RCTs registering a total of 288 patients who were eligible for our network meta-analysis. The literature's quality is relatively high. The median Structured Effectiveness for Quality Evaluation of Study score for the included trials was 33.8. The overall methodological quality was high. Of the 6 studies, all were 2-arm controlled trials comparing active intervention. Among the 4 treatments—conservative treatment (CT), antegrade intramedullary nailing (AIMN), transverse pinning (TP) with K-wires, and plate fixation (PF)—CT had the best rankings (ie, lowest risk of total complications), followed by PF, AIMN, and TP (ie, highest risk of total complications). Furthermore, we also presented the results using surface under the cumulative ranking curve. The surface under the cumulative ranking curve probabilities were 94.1%, 52.9%, 37.3%, and 15.7% for CT, PF, AIMN, and TP, respectively. In conclusion, current evidence suggested that conservative treatment is the optimum treatment for the fifth metacarpal neck fractures because of reduced total complication rates. Moreover, the TP with K-wires is the worst option with highly total complication rates. PF and AIMN therapy should be considered as the first

  2. Chronic Neck Pain: Making the Connection Between Capsular Ligament Laxity and Cervical Instability

    PubMed Central

    Steilen, Danielle; Hauser, Ross; Woldin, Barbara; Sawyer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    excessive motion between two adjacent cervical vertebrae and these associated symptoms is described as cervical instability. Therefore, we propose that in many cases of chronic neck pain, the cause may be underlying joint instability due to capsular ligament laxity. Currently, curative treatment options for this type of cervical instability are inconclusive and inadequate. Based on clinical studies and experience with patients who have visited our chronic pain clinic with complaints of chronic neck pain, we contend that prolotherapy offers a potentially curative treatment option for chronic neck pain related to capsular ligament laxity and underlying cervical instability. PMID:25328557

  3. Chronic neck pain: making the connection between capsular ligament laxity and cervical instability.

    PubMed

    Steilen, Danielle; Hauser, Ross; Woldin, Barbara; Sawyer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    excessive motion between two adjacent cervical vertebrae and these associated symptoms is described as cervical instability. Therefore, we propose that in many cases of chronic neck pain, the cause may be underlying joint instability due to capsular ligament laxity. Currently, curative treatment options for this type of cervical instability are inconclusive and inadequate. Based on clinical studies and experience with patients who have visited our chronic pain clinic with complaints of chronic neck pain, we contend that prolotherapy offers a potentially curative treatment option for chronic neck pain related to capsular ligament laxity and underlying cervical instability.

  4. An Unusual Neck Mass: Ingested Chicken Bone

    PubMed Central

    Demirhan, Erhan; İber, Metin; Yağız, Özlem; Kandoğan, Tolga; Çukurova, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background Foreign bodies in the upper aerodigestive tract are frequently seen in otolaryngological practice, but migration of an ingested foreign body to the neck is a very rare condition. Case Report We present a 66-year-old woman admitted to our outpatient department with a painful neck mass. She had a history of emergency department admission 4 months prior with odynophagia after eating chicken meal. A physical examination revealed a painful and hyperemic mass on the left neck. Antibiotherapy did not relieve the patient’s symptoms and signs. A 3-cm linear foreign body was observed in X-ray and computed tomography scans. The symptoms of the patient were relieved after excision of the foreign body. Conclusion Although it is a rare situation, migration of a foreign body ingested through the aerodigestive tract to the neck should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with neck masses. PMID:27994927

  5. Pharmacological and Other Interventions for Head and Neck Cancer Pain: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, Patrick B.; Norton, Lindsey A.; Loo, Ann S.; Munn, Jonathan I.; Voge, Elena; Ah-See, Kim W.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Pain is a common complication in head and neck cancer. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the evidence from randomised control trials investigating pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods of pain management in head and neck cancer. Material and Methods Medline, Embase and the Cochrane library databases were searched. Squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck excluding nasopharyngeal and salivary gland cancers were included. The limits were "human" and "randomised clinical trials". A quality assessment was carried out. Results 13 studies were included with a total of 644 participants. The primary outcome for most of these papers was pain control post-treatment. Levels of bias varied between the studies. Majority (12 out of the 13 studies) reported intervention to be superior to the control or standard therapy in pain management. Only 46% of the studies were carried out on an intention to treat basis. Two studies reported high dropout rates, with one at 66%. Conclusions There is insufficient evidence from randomised clinical trials to suggest an optimal pharmacological intervention for head and neck cancer pain post-treatment. Further high quality randomised clinical trials should be conducted to develop an optimal management strategy for head and neck cancer pain. PMID:24422019

  6. Assessment of nutritional status and quality of life in patients treated for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Prevost, V; Joubert, C; Heutte, N; Babin, E

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify tools for the assessment of nutritional status in head and neck cancer patients, to evaluate the impact of malnutrition on therapeutic management and quality of life and to propose a simple screening approach adapted to routine clinical practice. The authors conducted a review of the literature to identify tools for the assessment of nutritional status in head and neck cancer patients published in French and English. Articles were obtained from the PubMed database and from the references of these articles and selected journals, using the keywords: "nutritional assessment", and "head and neck" and "cancer". Anthropometric indices, laboratory parameters, dietary intake assessment, clinical scores and nutritional risk scores used in patients with head and neck cancers are presented. The relevance of these tools in clinical practice and in research is discussed, together with the links between nutritional status and quality of life. This article is designed to help teams involved in the management of patients with head and neck cancer to choose the most appropriate tools for assessment of nutritional status according to their resources and their objectives.

  7. Position of document holder and work related risk factors for neck pain among computer users: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Ambusam, S; Baharudin, O; Roslizawati, N; Leonard, J

    2015-01-01

    Document holder is used as a remedy to address occupational neck pain among computer users. An understanding on the effects of the document holder along with other work related risk factors while working in computer workstation requires attention. A comprehensive knowledge on the optimal location of the document holder in computer use and associated work related factors that may contribute to neck pain reviewed in this article. A literature search has been conducted over the past 14 years based on the published articles from January 1990 to January 2014 in both Science Direct and PubMed databases. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) keywords for search were neck muscle OR head posture OR muscle tension' OR muscle activity OR work related disorders OR neck pain AND/OR document location OR document holder OR source document OR copy screen holder.Document holder placed lateral to the screen was most preferred to reduce neck discomfort among occupational typists. Document without a holder was placed flat on the surface is least preferred. The head posture and muscle activity increases when the document is placed flat on the surface compared to when placed on the document holder. Work related factors such as static posture, repetitive movement, prolong sitting and awkward positions were the risk factors for chronic neck pain. This review highlights the optimal location for document holder for computer users to reduce neck pain. Together, the importance of work related risk factors for to neck pain on occupational typist is emphasized for the clinical management.

  8. Necessity of routine histopathological evaluation subsequent to bladder neck contracture resection

    PubMed Central

    Kaynar, Mehmet; Kucur, Mustafa; Çelik, Esin; Bugday, M. Serdar; Goktas, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bladder neck contracture is a well-known complication following some urologic surgical procedures. Regardless of the surgical procedure, any specimen resected should be submitted for histopathological evaluation worldwide. However, the charges of histopathological evaluation may bring a heavy burden to the hospital and health care system. Also, waiting the period of the pathological evaluation process can be an anxious time for patients. Hence, we aimed to investigate the necessity of routine histopathological evaluation of bladder neck contracture bladder neck contraction specimens. Material and methods Patients undergoing bladder neck contraction resection, from 2010 to 2015 were identified. Patient demographics, type of surgery and histopathological diagnosis and cost of histopathological analyses of the specimens were recorded and analyzed. Results Findings of the histopathologic evaluations of 340 bladder neck specimens were reviewed. Out of these, 294 had underwent transurethral resection of the prostate, 38 open prostatectomy, and 8 radical prostatectomy. Evidence of malignant disease involving prostate cancer was present in only 2 specimens. Both of the specimens had a known preexisting history of malignant disease. The remaining 338 specimens showed chronic inflammation (n = 176), chronic active inflammation (n = 64), adenomatous hyperplasia (n = 78) or cystitis (n = 20). Conclusions Our results indicate that routine histopathological examination of bladder neck contraction specimens is clinically unnecessary. We recommend that the surgeon should decide the need for histological examination on individual basis, depending on known preoperative risk factors. PMID:28127450

  9. Feasibility of robot-assisted modified radical neck dissection by post-auricular facelift approach.

    PubMed

    Tae, K; Ji, Y B; Song, C M; Sung, E S; Chung, J H; Lee, S H; Park, H J

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility and safety of robot-assisted modified radical neck dissection (MRND) for head and neck cancer patients with a clinically node-positive neck. The cases of 10 head and neck cancer patients who underwent unilateral therapeutic robot-assisted MRND by post-auricular facelift approach were analyzed. The robot-assisted MRND was completed successfully in all patients without any conversion to conventional neck dissection. The mean number of lymph nodes removed was 36.7±8.6. The mean duration of surgery for robot-assisted MRND was 274±65min (range 175-395min). Transient marginal nerve palsy occurred in two patients and partial necrosis of the skin flap occurred in one patient. In terms of cosmetic satisfaction, 70% of patients were very satisfied or satisfied with postoperative cosmesis. In conclusion, robot-assisted MRND by post-auricular facelift approach is technically feasible and safe in selected patients with head and neck cancer, and yields excellent postoperative cosmesis.

  10. Association Between Preoperative Nutritional Status and Postoperative Outcome in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Leung, John S L; Seto, Alfred; Li, George K H

    2017-04-01

    Head and neck cancer patients treated with surgery often experience significant postoperative morbidities. Administering preoperative nutritional intervention may improve surgical outcomes, but there is currently a paucity of data reviewing the association between preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome. It is therefore of importance to investigate this association among head and neck cancer patients. To assess the association between preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome in head and neck cancer patients treated with surgery, a retrospective study of 70 head and neck cancer patients who were surgically treated between 2013 and 2014 in a tertiary referral head and neck surgery center in Hong Kong was conducted. Clinical data regarding preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome were retrieved from a computer record system. Logistic and linear regressions were used to analyze the appropriate parameters. A higher preoperative albumin level was associated with lower rates of postoperative complications and better wound healing (P < 0.05). In contrast, preoperative body mass index, hemoglobin level, and absolute lymphocyte count did not demonstrate significant associations with postoperative outcome. As high albumin levels are associated with better surgical outcome in head and neck cancer patients, preoperative intervention strategies that boost albumin levels could be considered for improving surgical outcome.

  11. American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ezra E W; LaMonte, Samuel J; Erb, Nicole L; Beckman, Kerry L; Sadeghi, Nader; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Abbott, Dennis M; Fisher, Penelope S; Stein, Kevin D; Lyman, Gary H; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L

    2016-05-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  12. Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kyrgias, George; Hajiioannou, Jiannis; Tolia, Maria; Kouloulias, Vassilios; Lachanas, Vasileios; Skoulakis, Charalambos; Skarlatos, Ioannis; Rapidis, Alexandros; Bizakis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Multimodality therapy constitutes the standard treatment of advanced and recurrent head and neck cancer. Since locoregional recurrence comprises a major obstacle in attaining cure, the role of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) as an add-on in improving survival and local control of the disease has been investigated. IORT allows delivery of a single tumoricidal dose of radiation to areas of potential residual microscopic disease while minimizing doses to normal tissues. Advantages of IORT include the conformal delivery of a large dose of radiation in an exposed and precisely defined tumor bed, minimizing the risk of a geographic miss creating the potential for subsequent dose reduction of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). This strategy allows for shortening overall treatment time and dose escalation. The aim of this review is to summarize recent published work on the use of IORT as an adjuvant modality to treat common head and neck cancer in the primary or recurrent setting. Methods: We searched the Medline, Scopus, Ovid, Cochrane, Embase, and ISI Web of Science databases for articles published from 1980 up to March 2016. Results: Based on relevant publications it appears that including IORT in the multimodal treatment may contribute to improved local control. However, the benefit in overall survival is not so clear. Conclusion: IORT seems to be a safe, promising adjunct in the management of head and neck cancer and yet further well organized clinical trials are required to determine its role more precisely. PMID:27977569

  13. Extracranial non-vestibular head and neck schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoxin; Yuan, Junjie; Chen, Xinwei; Xu, Hongming; Zhou, Yuan; Dong, Pin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To retrospectively describe our 10-year experience with extracranial non-vestibular head and neck schwannomas by presenting their clinical features, diagnostic methods, surgical decisions, and treatment outcomes. Methods: This is a retrospective study conducted at the Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai, China. The medical records of 46 patients diagnosed with schwannoma in the extracranial head and neck region as confirmed on paraffin-embedded sections from January 2003 to December 2012 were reviewed. Results: All tumors were benign, and 52% presented as asymptomatic palpable solitary masses. Compressive symptoms, which can represent meaningful indicators of the nerve of origin were commonly noted. The most common nerve of origin was the brachial plexus (n=13, 28.3%). Conclusion: While postoperative histopathologic examination is still the gold standard, fine needle aspiration cytology, CT scan, and magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the diagnosis of schwannomas. As schwannomas are radioresistant, and as, despite their benign nature, can cause severe secondary symptoms, the best treatment of choice is complete excision with preservation of functions. PMID:26593174

  14. Amide proton transfer-weighted imaging of the head and neck at 3 T: a feasibility study on healthy human subjects and patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Chen, Shuzhong; King, Ann D; Zhou, Jinyuan; Bhatia, Kunwar S; Zhang, Qinwei; Yeung, David Ka Wei; Wei, Juan; Mok, Greta Seng Peng; Wang, Yi-Xiang

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility and repeatability of amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) MRI for the head and neck on clinical MRI scanners. Six healthy volunteers and four patients with head and neck tumors underwent APTw MRI scanning at 3 T. The APTw signal was quantified by the asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) at 3.5 ppm. Z spectra of normal tissues in the head and neck (masseter muscle, parotid glands, submandibular glands and thyroid glands) were analyzed in healthy volunteers. Inter-scan repeatability of APTw MRI was evaluated in six healthy volunteers. Z spectra of patients with head and neck tumors were produced and APTw signals in these tumors were analyzed. APTw MRI scanning was successful for all 10 subjects. The parotid glands showed the highest APTw signal (~7.6% average), whereas the APTw signals in other tissues were relatively moderate. The repeatability of APTw signals from the masseter muscle, parotid gland, submandibular gland and thyroid gland of healthy volunteers was established. Four head and neck tumors showed positive mean APTw ranging from 1.2% to 3.2%, distinguishable from surrounding normal tissues. APTw MRI was feasible for use in the head and neck regions at 3 T. The preliminary results on patients with head and neck tumors indicated the potential of APTw MRI for clinical applications.

  15. Correlation between Trunk Posture and Neck Reposition Sense among Subjects with Forward Head Neck Postures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han Suk; Chung, Hyung Kuk; Park, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the correlation of abnormal trunk postures and reposition sense of subjects with forward head neck posture (FHP). Methods. In all, postures of 41 subjects were evaluated and the FHP and trunk posture including shoulder, scapular level, pelvic side, and anterior tilting degrees were analyzed. We used the head repositioning accuracy (HRA) test to evaluate neck position senses of neck flexion, neck extension, neck right and left side flexion, and neck right and left rotation and calculated the root mean square error in trials for each subject. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and regression analysis were used to assess the degree of correlation between the trunk posture and HRA value, and a significance level of α = 0.05 was considered. Results. There were significant correlations between the HRA value of right side neck flexion and pelvic side tilt angle (p < 0.05). If pelvic side tilting angle increases by 1 degree, right side neck flexion increased by 0.76 degrees (p = 0.026). However, there were no significant correlations between other neck motions and trunk postures. Conclusion. Verifying pelvic postures should be prioritized when movement is limited due to the vitiation of the proprioceptive sense of neck caused by FHP. PMID:26583125

  16. A simple synthesis of MnN0.43@C nanocomposite: characterization and application as battery material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milke, Bettina; Wall, Clemens; Metzke, Sarah; Clavel, Guylhaine; Fichtner, Maximilian; Giordano, Cristina

    2014-12-01

    In the search of new materials for advanced batteries, manganese nitride is an appealing choice. However, in order to fully explore its potentiality, a suitable synthesis is the first mandatory step. In this contribution, nanosized manganese nitride covered by a graphitic shell has been prepared by a simple sol-gel-based process. Since graphite has a high thermal and chemical stability, it acts as stabilizing agent for the MnN0.43 nanoparticles. As a consequence, the particles do not oxidize for instance during the handling of the material and can be stored in air without special precautions. Furthermore, the graphitic shell makes the material more interesting for electrochemical applications, because graphite provides on the one hand an electrical conductivity, which is necessary for the function of active materials, and on the other hand also contributes to the Li storage capacity. The as-prepared nanocomposite was tested as anode material versus lithium metal as counter electrode, showing excellent cyclic stability, 230 mAh/g of capacity, and coulombic efficiencies close to 100 %. Since MnN0.43 possesses a theoretical capacity higher than commercial graphite and exhibits less polarization than several previously reported metal nitrides, it represents an attractive candidate as alternative/novel anode material. The method presented herein offers a simple route to prepare MnN0.43 nanoparticles encapsulated in carbon. The formation mechanism has been investigated, and the detailed characterization of the material before and after battery test (via XRD, HR-TEM, SAED, EELS) is discussed in the text.

  17. Optimization of radiotherapy for neck carcinoma metastasis from unknown primary sites: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Zhu, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis was designed to evaluate radiotherapy (RT) options preferable for neck cancer metastases from unknown primary sites (NCUP). Relevant articles published up through September 2015 were selected from EMBASE, Cochrane, PubMed and Web of Science. Thirty-three articles were identified, and relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs for all pre-specified endpoints were calculated. Surgery plus RT showed an advantage for 5-year overall survival (OS) (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.52–0.83, p = 0.0004) and neck recurrence (NR) (RR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.59–0.92, p = 0.008) compared to RT alone. The RRs for NR, primary tumor emergence (PTE), and 5-year disease free survival (DFS) for bilateral neck compared to ipsilateral neck irradiation were 0.61 (95% CI 0.41–0.91, p = 0.01), 0.44(95% CI 0.26–0.77, p = 0.004), and 0.81 (95% CI 0.64–1.03, p = 0.09), respectively. Irradiation of the neck plus potential primary tumor sites (PPTS) showed a benefit for 5-year DFS (RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.61–0.92, p = 0.005), NR (RR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.56–0.92, p = 0.009), and PTE (RR = 0.23, 95% CI 0.12–0.45, p < 0.0001) compared to neck-only irradiation. Adverse events occurred more frequently with bilateral neck plus PPTS irradiation. For NCUP, surgery plus RT of the bilateral neck and PPTS was associated with greater improvement of clinical outcomes. PMID:27791201

  18. Risk factors in the onset of neck/shoulder pain in a prospective study of workers in industrial and service companies

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, J; Kaergaard, A; Mikkelsen, S; Jensen, U; Frost, P; Bonde, J; Fallentin, N; Thomsen, J

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To quantify the relative contribution of work related physical factors, psychosocial workplace factors, and individual factors and aspects of somatisation to the onset of neck/shoulder pain. Methods: Four year prospective cohort study of workers from industrial and service companies in Denmark. Participants were 3123 workers, previously enrolled in a cross sectional study, where objective measurement of physical workplace factors was used. Eligible participants were followed on three subsequent occasions with approximately one year intervals. Outcomes of interest were: new onset of neck/shoulder pain (symptom cases); and neck/shoulder pain with pressure tenderness in the muscles of the neck/shoulder region (clinical cases). Results: During follow up, 636 (14.1%) participants reported neck/shoulder pain of new onset; among these, 82 (1.7%) also had clinical signs of substantial muscle tenderness. High shoulder repetition was related to being a future symptom case, and a future clinical case. Repetition was strongly intercorrelated with other physical measures. High job demands were associated with future status as a symptom case, and as a clinical case. A high level of distress predicted subsequent neck/shoulder pain, and neck/shoulder pain with pressure tenderness. Conclusions: High levels of distress, and physical and psychosocial workplace factors are predictors of onset of pain in the neck and/or shoulders, particularly pain with pressure tenderness in the muscles. PMID:12937185

  19. [Malignant mucosal melanoma of the head and neck].

    PubMed

    Slavícek, A; Astl, J; Válková, D; Betka, J; Petruzelka, L

    2000-01-01

    Mucosal melanoma comparison to cutaneous melanoma of the head and neck are rare and do poorly. Approximately 0.5-2% of all melanomas occur from the mucous membranes of aerodigestive tract. Most common site of the tumor are the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses but melanoma of the oral cavity are described too. Therapy usually consists of surgical resection with or without postoperative radiotherapy and immunochemotherapy eventually. The definite role of a kind of therapy in the treatment of mucosal melanoma is not remains to be defined as the small number of cases make prospective study challenging. This article reviews 19 patients with mucosal melanoma of the head and neck treated at the Department of ENT and Head and Neck Surgery Charles University of Prague since 1980 to 1999. Clinical data were obtained from the patient's charts. Analysis of the metastatic disease, type of therapy and follow-up was retrospectively reviewed. The site of the tumor was the lateral wall of the nasal cavity (five cases), nasal septum (four cases), maxilar cavity (two cases), and ethmoidal cavity, orbitoethmoidal complex, nasopharynx, saccus lacrimalis to ethmoidal sinuses diffused, tonsilla (one case each) and hypopharynx (two cases). Primary treatment was surgical resection in ten cases, in one case with radiation therapy, and in seven cases chemotherapy. In three cases were diagnostic surgery only and one patient was without therapy. Three patients received radical neck dissection more. Four patients were treated radiation therapy and three chemotherapy after surgery. In two cases were surgery after primary radiotherapy. For nine cases of recurrence of the disease were surgery (in five cases) and chemotherapy (in four cases). Overal and disease free interval was from 2 to 22 month, approximately 9.3 month and 3-year survival was 41.18%.

  20. Cortical and trabecular load sharing in the human femoral neck.

    PubMed

    Nawathe, Shashank; Nguyen, Bich Phuong; Barzanian, Nasim; Akhlaghpour, Hosna; Bouxsein, Mary L; Keaveny, Tony M

    2015-03-18

    The relative role of the cortical vs trabecular bone in the load-carrying capacity of the proximal femur-a fundamental issue in both basic-science and clinical biomechanics-remains unclear. To gain insight into this issue, we performed micro-CT-based, linear elastic finite element analysis (61.5-micron-sized elements; ~280 million elements per model) on 18 proximal femurs (5M, 13F, ages 61-93 years) to quantify the fraction of frontal-plane bending moment shared by the cortical vs trabecular bone in the femoral neck, as well as the associated spatial distributions of stress. Analyses were performed separately for a sideways fall and stance loading. For both loading modes and across all 18 bones, we found consistent patterns of load-sharing in the neck: most proximally, the trabecular bone took most of the load; moving distally, the cortical bone took increasingly more of the load; and more distally, there was a region of uniform load-sharing, the cortical bone taking the majority of the load. This distal region of uniform load-sharing extended more for fall than stance loading (77 ± 8% vs 51 ± 6% of the neck length for fall vs. stance; mean ± SD) but the fraction of total load taken by the cortical bone in that region was greater for stance loading (88 ± 5% vs. 64 ± 9% for stance vs. fall). Locally, maximum stress levels occurred in the cortical bone distally, but in the trabecular bone proximally. Although the distal cortex showed qualitative stress distributions consistent with the behavior of an Euler-type beam, quantitatively beam theory did not apply. We conclude that consistent and well-delineated regions of uniform load-sharing and load-transfer between the cortical and trabecular bone exist within the femoral neck, the details of which depend on the external loading conditions.

  1. Estrogen/Progesterone Receptor Negativity and HER2 Positivity Predict Locoregional Recurrence in Patients With T1a,bN0 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Guray, Merih; Sahin, Aysegul

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Data have suggested that the molecular features of breast cancer are important determinants of outcome; however, few studies have correlated these features with locoregional recurrence (LRR). In the present study, we evaluated estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) as predictors of LRR in patients with lymph node-negative disease and tumors {<=}1 cm, because these patients often do not receive adjuvant chemotherapy or trastuzumab. Methods and Materials: The data from 911 patients with stage T1a,bN0 breast cancer who had received definitive treatment at our institution between 1997 and 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. We prospectively analyzed ER/PR/HER2 expression from the archival tissue blocks of 756 patients. These 756 patients represented the cohort for the present study. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.0 years, the 5- and 8-year Kaplan-Meier LRR rate was 1.6% and 5.9%, respectively, with no difference noted in those who underwent breast conservation therapy vs. mastectomy (p = .347). The 8-year LRR rates were greater in the patients with ER-negative (10.6% vs. 4.2%, p = .016), PR-negative (9.0% vs. 4.2%, p = .009), or HER2-positive (17.5% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.009) tumors. On multivariate analysis, ER-negative and PR-negative disease (hazard ratio, 2.37; p = .046) and HER2-positive disease (hazard ratio, 3.13, p = .016) independently predicted for LRR. Conclusion: Patients with ER/PR-negative or HER2-positive T1a,bN0 breast cancer had a greater risk of LRR. Therapeutic strategies, such as the use of chemotherapy and/or anti-HER2 therapies, should be considered for future clinical trials for these patients.

  2. Penetrating Neck Trauma: Review of 192 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodie, Mohsen; Sanei, Behnam; Moazeni-Bistgani, Mohammad; Namgar, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Background The neck region contains a high density of vital organ structures within a relatively small and unprotected anatomic region, making it one of the most vulnerable areas of the body for all types of injuries. Objectives In this article, we studied penetrating neck trauma cases in Alzahra Hospital over a 10-year period. Patients and Methods In this retrospective, descriptive, analytical study, penetrating neck trauma cases admitted to Alzahra Hospital between April 2000 and April 2010 were analyzed for epidemiology, mechanism of trauma, zone of trauma, therapeutic method, injuries to other organs, complications, and mortality. Results Among 192 penetrating neck injuries, the mean age at the time of injury was 25.08 ± 15.02 years. Of these cases, 96.4% occurred in men. The most common mechanisms of trauma was stab wounds (85.93%). In 56.3% of penetrating neck injuries, zone 2 was involved. Neck exploration was positive in 84.4% of cases, and 52.1% of patients underwent surgery. Vascular exploration was the most common cause of surgery (67.2% of patients). The most common surgical intervention was vein ligation (50.8% of cases). In 11.98% of cases, another organ injury occurred simultaneously, and chest injury was the most common coexisting problem (65.2%). Complications were reported in 9.3% of patients, and the need for intubation was the most common complication (5.2% of patients). Mortality rate was 1.5%. Conclusions According to the findings of this study, the most common cause of penetrating neck injuries was stab wounds, and the majority of patients were young men, therefore, preventive measures should be implemented. Because of fatal complications associated with neck injuries, we recommend early neck exploration in unstable cases or when injuries are deeper than the platysma. PMID:24719835

  3. Diversified and Unusual Presentations of Neck Space Infections: Still a Big Concern for Physicians.

    PubMed

    Laskar, Hanifa A; Karim, Habib Md Reazaul; Jamil, Md; Yunus, Mohd; Shunyu, N B

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to find similarities; dissimilarities of neck space infections along with challenges faced by treating physician for their diversified clinical presentations and complications. Patients with neck space infections were compared for the purpose. The classic manifestations of these infections, such as high fever, systemic toxicity, and local signs were not present in all cases leading to dilemma in physician's decision making. They progress towards fatality very fast. Prompt recognition, diagnosis and management of such cases and complications are of paramount importance to reduce morbidity and mortality. In addition to broad spectrum antibiotic therapy along airway protection, surgical drainage is necessary in nearly all cases. Neck space infections still continue to be a well prevalent health problem in poor socioeconomic group in developing countries having significant morbidity as well as mortality.

  4. What Does PET Imaging Add to Conventional Staging of Head and Neck Cancer Patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Pohar, Surjeet . E-mail: poharss@evms.edu; Brown, Robert B.S.; Newman, Nancy; Koniarczyk, Michael; Hsu, Jack; Feiglin, David

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of PET scans in the staging of patients with head and neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: The charts of 25 patients who underwent neck dissection, computed tomography (CT) scan, and F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging as part of their initial work-up for a head and neck squamous cell cancer between 2000-2003 were reviewed. All patients underwent clinical examination, triple endoscopy, and chest radiograph as part of their clinical staging, adhering to American Joint Commission for Cancer criteria. In addition to the clinical nodal (N) stage, PET findings were incorporated to determine a second type of N staging: clinical N + PET stage. The number of neck sides and nodal levels involved on CT or PET and on pathologic examination were recorded. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for detection of nodal disease were similar for CT and FDG-PET. Positive and negative likelihood ratios were similar for both diagnostic tests. None of our 25 patients had unsuspected distant disease detected by PET. Conclusion: The addition of PET imaging did not improve diagnostic accuracy in our patients compared with CT. PET scanning did not alter clinical management in any of the patients.

  5. Evaluation of document location during computer use in terms of neck muscle activity and neck movement.

    PubMed

    Goostrey, Sonya; Treleaven, Julia; Johnston, Venerina

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the impact on neck movement and muscle activity of placing documents in three commonly used locations: in-line, flat desktop left of the keyboard and laterally placed level with the computer screen. Neck excursion during three standard head movements between the computer monitor and each document location and neck extensor and upper trapezius muscle activity during a 5 min typing task for each of the document locations was measured in 20 healthy participants. Results indicated that muscle activity and neck flexion were least when documents were placed laterally suggesting it may be the optimal location. The desktop option produced both the greatest neck movement and muscle activity in all muscle groups. The in-line document location required significantly more neck flexion but less lateral flexion and rotation than the laterally placed document. Evaluation of other holders is needed to guide decision making for this commonly used office equipment.

  6. Electronic and vibrational properties of stable isomers of (SiO)n((0,±)) (n = 2-7) clusters.

    PubMed

    Du, Hong-Bo; Huang, Shu-Ping; De Sarkar, Abir; Fan, Wen-Jie; Jia, Yu; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2014-10-02

    First-principles calculations based on density functional theory have been performed to explore the stable configurations, electronic structures, and vibrational spectra of neutral and charged silicon monoxide clusters (SiO)n((0,±)) (n = 2-7), which could be used as precursors in the synthesis of silicon nanowires. Our theoretical calculations provide new results on characteristic electron affinity, ionization potential, and vibrational spectroscopy, guiding future experiments in the synthesis of high-quality silicon nanowires. Specifically, as the number of SiO units n increases, IR spectra of (SiO)n(±) and Raman spectra of (SiO)n(-) show an evident blue shift, and Raman spectra of (SiO)n demonstrate a red shift. Moreover, most of the neutral silicon monoxide clusters have strong IR intensities and weak Raman activities, while most of the anionic counterparts have relatively weak IR intensities and strong Raman activities. Some other energetically competitive isomers of some (SiO)n((0,±)) species were also studied for comparison.

  7. Left/right neck rotation judgments are affected by age, gender, handedness and image rotation.

    PubMed

    Wallwork, Sarah B; Butler, David S; Fulton, Ian; Stewart, Halton; Darmawan, Igusti; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2013-06-01

    Understanding motor imagery of the hands and feet has led to promising new treatments for neurological and chronic pain disorders. We aimed to extend this line of research to the neck with a view to developing the definitive platform study upon which clinical and experimental studies can be based. In a cross-sectional experiment with a convenience sample, volunteers were shown 40 photographs of a model with their head turned to the left or right. Images were presented in random order and orientation. Participants judged the direction of neck rotation. They also completed a left/right hand judgment task. 1361 pain-free participants volunteered. Mean ± standard deviation response time (RT) for making left/right judgments of neck rotation was 1.621 ± 0.501 s. Median accuracy was 92.5%. RT was related to age, gender, and handedness (p < 0.001). That is, RT increased with age, was greater in females than in males and was greater in left-handers than in right-handers. Accuracy reduced with age (p < 0.001), but was unaffected by gender or handedness. Judgments were more accurate when images showed a neck rotated to the right than when they showed a neck rotated to the left (p < 0.001). The magnitude of image rotation affected both response time and accuracy (p < 0.001). In general, the performance parameters established for left/right limb judgments also apply for left/right neck rotation judgments. The current work establishes the definitive normative values against which clinical and experimental groups can be compared and reveals unpredicted effects of the direction neck rotation and the orientation of the image.

  8. M-CAVI, a neoadjuvant carboplatin-based regimen for the treatment of T2-4N0M0 carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Bellmunt, J; Ribas, A; Albanell, J; Bermejo, B; Vera, R; De Torres, J A; Morote, J; Lopez-Pacios, M A; Banus, J M; Rovirosa, A; Carulla, J; Sole, L A

    1996-08-01

    Carboplatin, methotrexate, and vinblastine (M-CAVI) is an active and well-tolerated regimen for bladder cancer patients ineligible for cisplatin-based regimens. We treated 47 T2-4 N0 M0 bladder cancer patients with M-CAVI in a neoadjuvant phase II trial. These 47 patients are evaluable for clinical response and toxicity. Clinical overall response rate was 34%, for a 95% confidence interval (CI95%) of 21-49%. Pathological response was seen in 40% of the patients (CI95%, 26-56%) with a 26.5% rate of pathological complete response (CI95%, 15-42%). Factors associated with the achievement of a response to therapy were the initial TNM stage (pT3a or lower, greater than pT3a, p = 0.001) and a Karnofsky score greater or equal than 90%, which was marginally significant (p = 0.08). With a median follow-up of 14 months, the disease-specific actuarial survival at 2 years is 42%. No patient has relapsed beyond 21 months of follow-up in a disease-free status. Toxic effects have been moderate. In conclusion, M-CAVI is an active and well-tolerated regimen that should be compared in terms of response rate and survival with a cisplatin-based regimen for invasive bladder cancer.

  9. Thyroid function following neck irraidation for malignant lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.H.; Fayos, J.V.; Sisson, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Thyroid function tests for T/sub 3/ resin (T/sub 3/-r), serum thyroxine (T/sub 4/), and serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were measured in 70 consecutive patients who had previously undergone lymphangiography and neck irradiation for malignant lymphoma. All were in remission and clinically euthyroid. The abnormalities found were: 23 (33%) patients hypothyroid by TSH, 14 (20%) with subnormal T/sub 4/, and 21 (30%) with subnormal T/sub 3/-r values. None of the patients were biochemically hyperthyroid. The prevalence and magnitude of abnormalities were highest during the third year after irradiation, thereafter decreasing with time.

  10. [Distant metastases of malignant tumors of head and neck].

    PubMed

    Totan, C; Dincă, O; Negureanu, M; Vlădan, C; Bucur, Al

    2010-01-01

    The charts of 176 previously untreated patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who completed treatment during 2006 in Oro-Maxillo-Facial Clinic, UMF "Carol Davila" Bucharest were reviewed. These patients had no evidence of distant metastases when initially evaluated. The overall incidence of distant metastases was 27.84%, varying from 10.52% for buccal mucosa to 63.63% for tongue and floor of the mouth (p < 0.05). 80% of the metastases were detected within two years after treatment. The rate also increased with the T and N classification; however, the N stage had greater influence on the rate of metastases than the T stage.

  11. Complications of head and neck radiation therapy and their management

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmeier, R.L.; King, G.E.

    1983-04-01

    Patients who receive radiation therapy to the head and neck suffer potential complications and undesirable side-effects of this therapy. The extent of undesirable responses is dependent on the source of irradiation, the fields of irradiation, and the dose. The radiotherapist determines these factors by the extent, location, and radiosensitivity of the tumor. The potential undesirable side-effects are xerostomia, mucositis, fibrosis, trismus, dermatitis, photosensitivity, radiation caries, soft tissue necrosis, and osteoradionecrosis. Each of these clinical entities and their proposed management have been discussed.

  12. Impact of immunohistochemistry in sentinel lymph node biopsy in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Chone, Carlos Takahiro; Aniteli, Marcello B; Magalhães, Rodrigo S; Freitas, Leandro L; Altemani, Albina; Ramos, Celso D; Etchebehere, Elba; Crespo, Agricio N

    2013-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining compared to immunohistochemistry (IHC) in sentinel lymph node (SLN) histological analyses of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The Clinical prospective study was carried out at Tertiary referral university hospital. Patients with oral, lip and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma undergoing elective neck dissection with clinically and radiologically negative necks were included. All patients were submitted to computer tomography scan for the evaluation of lymphatic metastases. The surgical procedure consisted of tumor resection, SLN sampling and elective neck dissection. Negative SLNs via HE were then submitted for IHC analysis of cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and step serial section (SSS). The main outcome measures were the negative predictive value of conventional HE staining techniques in the diagnosis of lymphatic metastases with the SSS/IHC analysis. Of 46 patients undergoing 63 neck procedures, 53 were SLN negative and 10 were positive on HE analysis. Using SSS/IHC analysis of these 53 negative SLNs on HE, two (3.8 %) were found to be positive. For HE, the sensitivity, specificity, NPV and accuracy were 77, 100, 94, and 95 %, respectively. With subsequent analysis with SSS/IHC, these values increased to 92, 100, 98 and 98 %, respectively. SSS/IHC is important in SLN analysis as the false negative rate decreased significantly while increasing the inherent sensitivity of the analyses.

  13. Extension and flexion in the upper cervical spine in neck pain patients.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Markus J; Crawford, Rebecca J; Schelldorfer, Sarah; Rausch-Osthoff, Anne-Kathrin; Barbero, Marco; Kool, Jan; Bauer, Christoph M

    2015-08-01

    Neck pain is a common problem in the general population with high risk of ongoing complaints or relapses. Range of motion (ROM) assessment is scientifically established in the clinical process of diagnosis, prognosis and outcome evaluation in neck pain. Anatomically, the cervical spine (CS) has been considered in two regions, the upper and lower CS. Disorders like cervicogenic headache have been clinically associated with dysfunctions of the upper CS (UCS), yet ROM tests and measurements are typically conducted on the whole CS. A cross-sectional study assessing 19 subjects with non-specific neck pain was undertaken to examine UCS extension-flexion ROM in relation to self-reported disability and pain (via the Neck Disability Index (NDI)). Two measurement devices (goniometer and electromagnetic tracking) were employed and compared. Correlations between ROM and the NDI were stronger for the UCS compared to the CS, with the strongest correlation between UCS flexion and the NDI-headache (r = -0.62). Correlations between UCS and CS ROM were fair to moderate, with the strongest correlation between UCS flexion and CS extension ROM (r = -0.49). UCS flexion restriction is related to headache frequency and intensity. Consistency and agreement between both measurement systems and for all tests was high. The results demonstrate that separate UCS ROM assessments for extension and flexion are useful in patients with neck pain.

  14. Human papillomavirus induced transformation in cervical and head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Adams, Allie K; Wise-Draper, Trisha M; Wells, Susanne I

    2014-09-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed.

  15. Vascular anomalies of the head and neck in children.

    PubMed

    Mahady, Kate; Thust, Stefanie; Berkeley, Rupert; Stuart, Sam; Barnacle, Alex; Robertson, Fergus; Mankad, Kshitij

    2015-12-01

    Sixty percent of vascular anomalies in children are found in the head and neck. These lesions can present throughout antenatal, perinatal and childhood development. They broadly fall into two categories: vascular tumours and vascular malformations. Their clinical and, often, psychological impact is determined by both pathological type and location: many lesions follow an uncomplicated natural course and other more complex, extensive or progressive lesions can present a threat to life from mass effect, haemorrhage or large volume arteriovenous shunting. Vascular tumours include infantile haemangioma (IH), congenital haemangioma (CH) and kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KH); of which IH is the most common. Management options for vascular tumours include conservative approaches, oral medications and surgical intervention as determined by tumour type, location and associated complications. Vascular malformations can be categorised into low flow and high flow lesions. Low flow lesions include capillary, venous and lymphatic malformations (LMs). High flow lesions describe the arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), a highly heterogeneous group of lesions which can present in a variety of ways-the mainstay of treatment for these dynamic lesions is endovascular or surgical obliteration. We provide a practical framework for clinical classification of vascular anomalies of the head and neck in children. We also explore principles of their clinical and radiological assessment along with management, highlighting the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach.

  16. Neck muscle function in violinists/violists with and without neck pain.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Anke; Claus, Andrew; Hodges, Paul W; Jull, Gwendolen A

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is associated with changes in neuromuscular control of cervical muscles. Violin and viola playing requires good function of the flexor muscles to stabilize the instrument. This study investigated the flexor muscle behaviour in violin/viola players with and without neck pain using the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT). In total, 12 violin/viola players with neck pain, 21 violin/viola players without neck pain in the preceding 12 weeks and 21 pain-free non-musicians were included. Activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) was measured with surface electromyography (EMG) during the CCFT. Violin/viola players with neck pain displayed greater normalised SCM EMG amplitudes during CCFT than the pain-free musicians and non-musicians (P < 0.05). Playing-related neck pain in violinists/violists is associated with altered behaviour of the superficial neck flexor muscles consistent with neck pain, despite the specific use of the deep and superficial neck flexors during violin playing.

  17. Aging small Canada geese by neck plumage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, K.F.; Schoonover, L.J.

    1969-01-01

    The neck plumage method, a new technique for separating immature from adult Canada geese (Branta canadensis) in the hand, was evaluated by comparison with the notched tail feather and cloacal examination methods. Two (1.4 percent) of 141 geese examined were misaged, resulting in a 6 percent error in the immature-adult ratio obtained by the neck plumage method. The neck plumage method is a rapid aging method and reasonable accuracy (94 percent) can be obtained. It can also be used to differentiate immatures from adults on the ground at distances up to 175 yards, but was almost impossible to use when geese were in flight. As yet, the neck plumage method has only been tested on the subspecies (B. c. hutchinsii-parvipes complex) in the Tall-Grass Prairie population of small Canada geese.

  18. Neck pain or spasms - self care

    MedlinePlus

    ... of physical therapy, you may receive massage and stretching exercises along with exercises to strengthen your neck. ... improve flexibility A complete exercise program should include: Stretching and strength training: Follow the instructions of your ...

  19. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Neck and scleral hemorrhage in drowning.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Russell T; Jentzen, Jeffrey M

    2011-03-01

    The determination of the cause and manner of death for a body recovered from the water can be difficult because of a lack of autopsy findings specific for drowning. This case report describes a 30-year-old man found submerged at the bottom of a hotel pool. An autopsy revealed scleral hemorrhages and fascial hemorrhages of multiple muscles of the anterior and posterior neck bilaterally. No evidence of traumatic injury was on the surface of the body. An investigation by law enforcement found no evidence of foul play. The occurrence of petechial and neck hemorrhage in a body recovered from the water is controversial, and a review of this literature will be given. We suggest that fascial hemorrhages of the muscles of the neck, as well as cephalic hemorrhages, can be explained by drowning-related elevated central venous pressure that is communicated to the head through the valveless veins of the neck.

  1. Update from the 4th Edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Head and Neck Tumours: What Is New in the 2017 WHO Blue Book for Tumors and Tumor-Like Lesions of the Neck and Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Katabi, Nora; Lewis, James S

    2017-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) 2017 Classification of Head and Neck Tumors ("Blue Book") will now include a new chapter on tumors and tumor-like lesions of the neck and lymph nodes, which was not included in the previous edition. Tumors and tumor-like lesions, including a variety of cysts and metastases, can arise in any component in the neck, including soft tissue, lymph nodes, and developmental remnants. The pathology and clinical features of metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary in the head and neck has changed dramatically in the last several years. Many of these tumors which were previously diagnosed as unknown primary are now identified as oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal carcinomas related to human papillomavirus (HPV), less commonly to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and occasionally even to Merkel cell polyomavirus. Many unusual features can arise in these metastases, such as undifferentiated morphology, extensive cystic change with central degeneration, gland formation, and even ciliated cells. Rarely, carcinoma in the neck can arise in association with a heterotopic tissue, primarily thyroid or salivary gland tissue. Tumor-like lesions include branchial cleft cysts, thyroglossal duct cyst, dermoid and teratoid cyst, and ranula. Pathologists should be familiar with the diagnostic features and clinicopathologic corrections of these neck lesions in order to correctly diagnosis them and to provide for proper clinical management. This article will briefly describe the pathologic and clinical features of these entities as they are covered in the new 2017 Blue Book.

  2. Neck Muscle Fatigue Resulting from Prolonged Wear of Weighted Helmets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    documented neck injury rates of 50% or higher ranging from minor neck strain to cervical vertebral fracture3,11-14,17. Lighter helmets were developed...greater neck fatigue and susceptibility to neck injury. There may be an increase in cervical loads during aircraft ejections (catapult, windblast...and compromised effectiveness for long missions. The neck load limits ( flexion , extension, and rotation) under operational conditions are

  3. [Congenital neck mass. Diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Proto, F; Sarría-Echegaray, P; Epprecht-González, M P; Alba-Mesquida, J

    2016-01-01

    Congenital neck masses are a challenge for general practitioners and specialists. Although some of them are diagnosed in utero, most of them remain silent until complications appear in the adult age. The anatomical location, consistency and age are determinants in guiding the possible diagnosis. A midline infrahyoid mass may be a thyroglossal cyst, however a lateral neck mass is more possible to result in a brachial cyst. Complementary imaging studies are essential such as pathological tests like needle aspiration fine needle aspiration (FNA).

  4. Spinal metastasis in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of head and neck cancer is relatively low in developed countries and highest in South East Asia. Notwithstanding advances in surgery and radiotherapy over the past several decades, the 5-year survival rate for head and neck cancer has stagnated and remains at 50–55%. This is due, in large part, to both regional and distant disease spread, including spinal metastasis. Spinal metastasis from head and neck cancer is rare, has a poor prognosis and can significantly impede end-stage quality of life; normally only palliative care is given. This study aims to conduct a systematic review of the evidence available on management of spinal metastasis from head and neck cancer and to use such evidence to draw up guiding principles in the management of the distant spread. Methods Systematic review of the electronic literature was conducted regarding the management of spinal metastasis of head and neck malignancies. Results Due to the exceptional rarity of head and neck cancers metastasizing to the spine, there is a paucity of good randomized controlled trials into the management of spinal metastasis. This review produced only 12 case studies/reports and 2 small retrospective cohort studies that lacked appropriate controls. Conclusion Management should aim to improve end-stage quality of life and maintain neurological function. This review has found that radiotherapy +/− medical adjuvant is considered the principle treatment of spinal metastasis of head and neck cancers. There is an absence of a definitive treatment protocol for head and neck cancer spinal metastasis. Our failure to find and cite high-quality scientific evidence only serves to stress the need for good quality research in this area. PMID:22716187

  5. Modeling neck mobility in fossil turtles.

    PubMed

    Werneburg, Ingmar; Hinz, Juliane K; Gumpenberger, Michaela; Volpato, Virginie; Natchev, Nikolay; Joyce, Walter G

    2015-05-01

    Turtles have the unparalleled ability to retract their heads and necks within their shell but little is known about the evolution of this trait. Extensive analysis of neck mobility in turtles using radiographs, CT scans, and morphometry reveals that basal turtles possessed less mobility in the neck relative to their extant relatives, although the anatomical prerequisites for modern mobility were already established. Many extant turtles are able to achieve hypermobility by dislocating the central articulations, which raises cautions about reconstructing the mobility of fossil vertebrates. A 3D-model of the Late Triassic turtle Proganochelys quenstedti reveals that this early stem turtle was able to retract its head by tucking it sideways below the shell. The simple ventrolateral bend seen in this stem turtle, however, contrasts with the complex double-bend of extant turtles. The initial evolution of neck retraction therefore occurred in a near-synchrony with the origin of the turtle shell as a place to hide the unprotected neck. In this early, simplified retraction mode, the conical osteoderms on the neck provided further protection.

  6. Head and neck cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Stepnick, David; Gilpin, David

    2010-05-01

    Ablative surgery for malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract is the most common reason why the reconstructive surgeon is called upon to reconstruct adult head and neck defects. An understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of head and neck malignancy is vital to the reconstructive surgeon so that restoration of both form and function can be achieved. It is important to understand the behavior of cancers of each head and neck subsite, as staging and ultimately the treatment of tumors from each subsite is different. Historically, the standard treatment of head and neck cancer was surgery and/or primary radiation therapy with surgical salvage for failure. Beginning in the 1980s, advances in chemotherapy and concurrent delivery with radiation offered new options to standard surgical therapy. Over the past two decades, the concept of organ preservation using chemotherapy together with radiation therapy has been definitively established. Yet, even with the strides made over these two decades with chemoradiation, surgical treatment of head and neck cancer and reconstruction thereof will be an important treatment option for the foreseeable future. Therefore, the relationship between the extirpative and reconstructive surgeon is vital, and a clear understanding of the biology and behavior of head and neck malignancy is crucial to successful patient outcomes.

  7. [Necrotizing fasciitis of the neck].

    PubMed

    Kovacić, Marijan; Kovacić, Ivan; Delalija, Boris

    2013-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and rapidly progressive infection characterized by necrosis of the superficial fascia and spread on the surrounding skin or muscles, which can be fatal. It usually occurs in the limbs, abdominal wall and perineum. In this retrospective review, the authors present 15 patients with cervical necrotizing fasciitis. The patient mean age was 54.7 years and they had one or more comorbid health problems. Five of them had descending necrotizing mediastinitis and three had progressive sepsis with toxic shock syndrome. Broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotic therapy was administered to all patients immediately, and in three of them we used five-day intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for the signs of toxic shock syndrome. After positive computed tomography imaging for necrotizing fasciitis, we used surgical exploration and debridement of necrotic tissue. In five patients, the initial surgery also included mediastinal transcervical drainage. Preoperative tracheotomy was performed in six patients and delayed tracheotomy in one patient. Histopathologically, all cases showed extensive necrosis of debrided fascia and vascular thrombosis of the neck soft tissue. The mortality rate was 6.7% (1/15). The authors point to the importance of early diagnosis and timely surgical management, broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy when patients are too unstable to undergo surgery.

  8. Preparation of UC0.07-0.10N0.90-0.93 spheres for TRISO coated fuel particles

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Jack Lee; Hunt, Rodney Dale; Johnson, Jared A; Silva, Chinthaka M; Lindemer, Terrence

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is considering a new nuclear fuel, which should be much more impervious during a loss of coolant accident. The fuel would consist of tristructural isotropic coated particles with dense uranium nitride (UN) kernels. The objectives of this effort are to make uranium oxide microspheres with adequately dispersed carbon nanoparticles and to convert these microspheres into UN kernels. Recent improvements to internal gelation process were successfully applied to the production of uranium gel spheres with different concentrations of carbon black. After the spheres were washed, a simple, two-step heat profile was used to produce kernels with a chemical composition of UC0.07 0.10N0.90 0.93. The first step involved heating the microspheres to 2023 K in a vacuum, and in the second step, the microspheres were held at 1873 K for 6 hrs in nitrogen.

  9. Photo-induced reactions of hemin (DMSO) n clusters (n = 0-3) produced with electrospray ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonose, S.; Tanaka, H.; Okai, N.; Shibakusa, T.; Fuke, K.

    2002-09-01

    Photo-induced reaction of [Fe(III)-protoporphyrin]^+ (hemin^+) ions solvated with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) is investigated by using a tandem mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization. We measure the photodissociation yields of mass-selected hemin^+(DMSO)n clusters for n = 0 3 in the energy region of 15 800 28 200 cm^{-1}. The mass spectra of the fragment ions show the β-cleavage of carboxymethyl groups in addition to the evaporation of solvent molecules. Yield of the β-cleavage reaction is found to depend strongly on the excitation energy and the number of solvent molecules. We also examine the metastable decomposition of the clusters following primary mass selection and determine the incremental solvent binding energies and internal energies for the clusters using evaporative ensemble model. From these results, we investigate the reaction mechanism of β-cleavage of hemin^+ ion.

  10. Transport gap and hysteretic behavior of the Ising quantum Hall ferromagnets in |N |>0 Landau levels of bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wenchen; Côté, R.

    2014-12-01

    The chiral two-dimensional electron gas in Landau levels |N |>0 of a Bernal-stacked graphene bilayer has a valley-pseudospin Ising quantum Hall ferromagnetic behavior at odd filling factors νN=1 ,3 of these fourfold degenerate states. At zero interlayer electrical bias, the ground state at these fillings is spin polarized and electrons occupy one valley or the other while a finite electrical bias produces a series of valley pseudospin-flip transitions. In this work, we discuss the hysteretic behavior of the Ising quantum Hall ferromagnets. We compute the transport gap due to different excitations: bulk electron-hole pairs, electron-hole pairs confined to the coherent region of a valley-pseudospin domain wall, and spin or valley-pseudospin skyrmion-antiskyrmion pairs. We determine which of these excitations has the lowest energy at a given value of the Zeeman coupling, bias, and magnetic field.

  11. Automatic planning of head and neck treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Hazell, Irene; Bzdusek, Karl; Kumar, Prashant; Hansen, Christian R; Bertelsen, Anders; Eriksen, Jesper G; Johansen, Jørgen; Brink, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Treatment planning is time-consuming and the outcome depends on the person performing the optimization. A system that automates treatment planning could potentially reduce the manual time required for optimization and could also provide a method to reduce the variation between persons performing radiation dose planning (dosimetrist) and potentially improve the overall plan quality. This study evaluates the performance of the Auto-Planning module that has recently become clinically available in the Pinnacle(3) radiation therapy treatment planning system. Twenty-six clinically delivered head and neck treatment plans were reoptimized with the Auto-Planning module. Comparison of the two types of treatment plans were performed using DVH metrics and a blinded clinical evaluation by two senior radiation oncologists using a scale from one to six. Both evaluations investigated dose coverage of target and dose to healthy tissues. Auto-Planning was able to produce clinically acceptable treatment plans in all 26 cases. Target coverages in the two types of plans were similar, but automatically generated plans had less irradiation of healthy tissue. In 94% of the evaluations, the autoplans scored at least as high as the previously delivered clinical plans. For all patients, the Auto-Planning tool produced clinically acceptable head and neck treatment plans without any manual intervention, except for the initial target and OAR delineations. The main benefit of the method is the likely improvement in the overall treatment quality since consistent, high-quality plans are generated which even can be further optimized, if necessary. This makes it possible for the dosimetrist to focus more time on difficult dose planning goals and to spend less time on the more tedious parts of the planning process. PACS number: 87.55.de.

  12. Automatic planning of head and neck treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Hazell, Irene; Bzdusek, Karl; Kumar, Prashant; Hansen, Christian R; Bertelsen, Anders; Eriksen, Jesper G; Johansen, Jørgen; Brink, Carsten

    2016-01-08

    Treatment planning is time-consuming and the outcome depends on the person performing the optimization. A system that automates treatment planning could potentially reduce the manual time required for optimization and could also provide a method to reduce the variation between persons performing radiation dose planning (dosimetrist) and potentially improve the overall plan quality. This study evaluates the performance of the Auto-Planning module that has recently become clinically available in the Pinnacle3 radiation therapy treatment planning system. Twenty-six clinically delivered head and neck treatment plans were reoptimized with the Auto-Planning module. Comparison of the two types of treatment plans were performed using DVH metrics and a blinded clinical evaluation by two senior radiation oncologists using a scale from one to six. Both evaluations investigated dose coverage of target and dose to healthy tissues. Auto-Planning was able to produce clinically acceptable treatment plans in all 26 cases. Target coverages in the two types of plans were similar, but automatically generated plans had less irradiation of healthy tissue. In 94% of the evaluations, the autoplans scored at least as high as the previously delivered clinical plans. For all patients, the Auto-Planning tool produced clinically acceptable head and neck treatment plans without any manual intervention, except for the initial target and OAR delineations. The main benefit of the method is the likely improvement in the overall treatment quality since consistent, high-quality plans are generated which even can be further optimized, if necessary. This makes it possible for the dosimetrist to focus more time on difficult dose planning goals and to spend less time on the more tedious parts of the planning process.

  13. Radiation therapy alone or in combination with surgery in head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Marcial, V.A.; Pajak, T.F.

    1985-05-01

    Radiation therapy alone, surgery alone, or the combination of these two modalities, remain the accepted treatments in the management of epidermoid carcinomas of the mucosa of the head and neck. These modalities of therapy produce comparable results; but, radiotherapy alone has the advantage that it can conserve anatomy and function. Irradiation with teletherapy techniques, at times supplemented by interstitial brachytherapy, with doses ranging from 6600 to 8000 cGy, results in satisfactory tumor response (CR). The CR of T1N0 and T2N0 lesions will be 99% and 90% respectively, but only 29% in T4N3 tumors treated with radiation only. To improve on the limited CR rate achieved in the advanced stages, surgery is combined pre or post-irradiation, or reserved for the salvage of failures. In the oral cavity and oropharynx, these possible options give comparable tumor control and survival, but in the supraglottic larynx post-operative irradiation is superior to pre- operative radiotherapy. Tumor recurrence rates in the head and neck range from 15 to 34% depending on initial site, stage and type of therapy. Cancer control activities that emphasize prevention and early diagnosis should present a better future for these patients.

  14. Comparison of electromyographic activity and range of neck motion in violin students with and without neck pain during playing.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyue-nam; Kwon, Oh-yun; Ha, Sung-min; Kim, Su-jung; Choi, Hyun-jung; Weon, Jong-hyuck

    2012-12-01

    Neck pain is common in violin students during a musical performance. The purpose of this study was to compare electromyographic (EMG) activity in superficial neck muscles with neck motion when playing the violin as well as neck range of motion (ROM) at rest, between violin students with and without neck pain. Nine violin students with neck pain and nine age- and gender-matched subjects without neck pain were recruited. Muscle activity of the bilateral upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and superficial cervical extensor muscles was measured using surface EMG. Kinematic data on neck motion while playing and active neck ROM were also measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Independent t-tests were used to compare EMG activity with kinematic data between groups. These analyses revealed that while playing, both the angle of left lateral bending and leftward rotation of the cervical spine were significantly greater in the neck pain group than among those without neck pain. Similarly, EMG activity of the left upper trapezius, both cervical extensors, and both sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly greater in the neck pain group. The active ROM of left axial rotation was significantly lower in the neck pain group. These results suggest that an asymmetric playing posture and the associated increased muscle activity as well as decreased neck axial rotation may contribute to neck pain in violin students.

  15. [Avascular osteonecrosis of femoral head and neck in an AIDS patient].

    PubMed

    Villafañe, Maria F; Corti, Marcelo E; Candela, Miguel; Perez Bianco, Raul; Tezanos Pinto, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    Avascular osteonecrosis (AON) has increased in the last few years in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). The most commonly affected bone is the femoral head and neck. Frequently these bilateral and clinical findings include moderate to severe pain and functional impotence of the affected joints. The etiology is multifactorial and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) with protease inhibitors (PI) is probably related to its development. In the evolution, a total hip replacement may be needed. We present an hemophilic patient with AIDS, who developed a bilateral AON of the femoral head and neck during HAART.

  16. The ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure for fetal head and neck masses.

    PubMed

    Filipchuck, Debora; Avdimiretz, Lourdes

    2009-11-01

    A congential head or neck mass increase the risk of airway obstruction and imminent respiratory failure at birth. The ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure is an option to secure the infant's airway in some clinical situations when an antenatal diagnosis of a head or neck mass or potentials airway obstruction has been established. This article discusses an EXIT procedure performed on a maternal patient whose 38-week gestation age fetus was diagnosed with a lymphatic malformation. Planning and coordination between surgical teams to achieve a safe, successful outcome for the mother and child.

  17. Femoral neck stress fracture a potentially disabling condition: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lemire, Joe J; O’Connor, Sandra M

    1993-01-01

    Femoral neck stress fracture represents a focal weakening of the bone often associated with a recent increase in activity level. Since plain film radiographs are initially normal, the clinical diagnosis is based solely on the history and physical examination. The consequence of a delayed diagnosis could result in a complete fracture or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. This paper includes a case report illustrating the important aspects of recognizing patients presenting with an underlying femoral neck stress fracture. The need for radionuclide bone scanning for the early diagnosis of this potentially disabling condition is stressed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4

  18. Evaluation of short neck: new neck length percentiles and linear correlations with height and sitting height.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, P V; Bharucha, B A

    1994-10-01

    Qualitative impressions of neck length are often used as aids to dysmorphology in syndromes like Turner, Noonan, Klippel-Feil and in craniovertebral anomalies, some of which have serious neurological implications. There are no national or international standards for neck length. The present study attempted to create standards and percentile charts for Indian children and compute age-independent correlations of neck length with linear measurements such as standing and sitting height. A total of 2724 children of both sexes between 3 and 15 years, whose heights and weights conformed to ICMR standards were inducted. Neck length was measured by a modified two-point discriminator between two fixed bony points-inion and spinous process of C7 with the head held in neutral position. Percentiles (5th-95th) were constructed for both sexes. Growth was rapid from 3 to 6 years. Neck length formed a mean of 12.7 +/- 4.58% of height and 20.1 +/- 6.73% of sitting height. Age independent linear regression equations: Neck length = 10 + (0.035 x height) and Neck length = 9.65 + (0.07 x sitting height) were highly significant (p < 0.001). Neck length relationships of 30 randomly selected normal children clustered around the regression lines and 16 with genetic syndromes fell below the regression lines.

  19. Physician-Delivered Injection Therapies for Mechanical Neck Disorders: A Systematic Review Update (Non-Oral, Non-Intravenous Pharmacological Interventions for Neck Pain)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Anita R.; Peloso, Paul M.; Galway, Erin; Navasero, Neenah; Essen, Karis Van; Graham, Nadine; Goldsmith, Charlie H; Gzeer, Wisam; Shi, Qiyun; Haines, Ted and COG

    2013-01-01

    Background: Controversy persists regarding medicinal injections for mechanical neck disorders (MNDs). Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of physician-delivered injections on pain, function/disability, quality of life, global perceived effect and patient satisfaction for adults with MNDs. Search Methods: We updated our previous searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE from December 2006 through to March 2012. Selection Criteria: We included randomized controlled trials of adults with neck disorders treated by physician-delivered injection therapies. Data Collection and Analysis: Two authors independently selected articles, abstracted data and assessed methodological quality. When clinical heterogeneity was absent, we combined studies using random-effects models. Results: We included 12 trials (667 participants). No high or moderate quality studies were found with evidence of benefit over control. Moderate quality evidence suggests little or no difference in pain or function/disability between nerve block injection of steroid and bupivacaine vs bupivacaine alone at short, intermediate and long-term for chronic neck pain. We found limited very low quality evidence of an effect on pain with intramuscular lidocaine vs control for chronic myofascial neck pain. Two low quality studies showed an effect on pain with anaesthetic nerve block vs saline immediately post treatment and in the short-term. All other studies were of low or very low quality with no evidence of benefit over controls. Authors' Conclusions: Current evidence does not confirm the effectiveness of IM-lidocaine injection for chronic mechanical neck pain nor anaesthetic nerve block for cervicogenic headache. There is moderate evidence of no benefit for steroid blocks vs controls for mechanical neck pain. PMID:24155806

  20. Prevalence of neck and back pain among dentists and dental auxiliaries in South-western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Abiodun-Solanke, I M F; Agbaje, J O; Ajayi, D M; Arotiba, J T

    2010-06-01

    Dental health workers like other workers have occupation related health problems and hazards which include neck and low back pain. Previous studies have shown that the prevalence and location of pain may be influenced by posture and work habits and as well as demographic factors. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of neck and back problems among dentists and dental auxiliaries in private and government dental hospitals in south western Nigeria. Structured self administered questionnaire was sent to dentist and dental auxiliaries by randomly selecting 3 out of the 6 state capital from the southwestern Nigeria. Participants included those in private clinics, teaching hospitals and general hospitals. The questionnaire was composed of respondents biodata, questions about specific information on neck and back pain and routine practice posture while working at chairside. The total number of properly filled questionnaire was 210 with a male to female ratio of 1.04:1. Respondents included 147 dentists, 37 dental surgeon assistants (DSA), 14 dental therapists and 12 dental technologists. Prevalence of back and neck pain among the respondents was 88.1% and 81.9% respectively. Among the male respondents, the prevalence of back pain was 86.9% and 89.3% in female while for neck pain, the prevalence was 83.2% in male and 80.6% in female. Within the different professional groups, the prevalence of back pain was highest among the DSA (89.2%), closely followed by the dentists (88.4%), then therapists (85.7%) and least among the technologists (83.3%). For neck pain, the prevalence was highest among therapists followed by technologists, dentists and least among the DSA. More females missed work due to back and neck pain than males. There is therefore the need to address ergonomic issues and change the way dentistry is practiced.

  1. Predictors for the immediate responders to cervical manipulation in patients with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yuh-Liang; Wang, Wendy T J; Chen, Wen-Yin; Hou, Tsun-Jen; Chen, Tzu-Ching; Lieu, Fu-Kong

    2006-11-01

    Cervical manipulation has been considered an effective treatment for managing neck pain. However, clinical observation showed that cervical manipulation was not effective for every patient. Development of clinical prediction rules for identifying patients with neck pain who are likely to respond to cervical manipulation may improve clinical decision-making and the treatment success rate. The purpose of the study was to identify predictors for the immediate responders to cervical manipulation treatment in patients with neck pain. One hundred patients with neck pain (34 males and 66 females, mean age = 46 +/- 11 years) participated in the study. Patient's demographic data, symptom aggravating or easing factors, pain, and disability level were obtained through an initial assessment. A series of physical examinations were also administered. After receiving a single session of cervical manipulation, the patient was re-evaluated immediately to determine if a successful response to treatment was obtained. The successful response was determined by improvements seen in one of the three outcome variables that included reduction of pain intensity, significant perceived improvement, and high satisfaction level. From these judgment criteria, patients were classified into either responders or nonresponders to the cervical manipulation. Univariate analyses were used to assess if the treatment responders and nonresponders were different in their clinical presentations. The clinical factors that showed significant differences between two groups were then entered into a stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis to identify significant predictors and the prediction rule for treatment responders. Six predictors including "initial scores on Neck Disability Index < 11.50", "having bilateral involvement pattern", "not performing sedentary work > 5 h/day", "feeling better while moving the neck", "without feeling worse while extending the neck", and "the diagnosis of spondylosis

  2. Developing a protocol for gastrostomy tube insertion in patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Habib, Syed F; Ahmed, Suhail; Skelly, Rachel; Bhatt, Kavita; Patel, Bhaveshree; Lowe, Derek; Tuson, Julian; Rogers, Simon N

    2014-05-01

    Selecting patients with head and neck cancer requiring a pretreatment gastrostomy feeding tube is not straightforward. The nutritional status and functional deficits associated with the cancer, its treatment, and the long-term side effects predicate the need for gastrostomy tube placement. However, gastrostomy tubes are not without morbidity and are an added burden to the patient. The aim of this retrospective case series review was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of newly diagnosed patients with head and neck cancer treated with curative intent having gastrostomy placement, with the intent of developing a protocol to help with the timely selection of patients for pretreatment gastrostomy insertion. A gastrostomy tube was placed in 32%. A regression model identified 5 independent predictors (P < .001) to predict gastrostomy tube placement: overall clinical stage, tumor site, clinical T stage, patient age, and clinical N stage. A protocol to help the multidisciplinary team to decide whether a pretreatment gastrostomy tube should be placed is suggested.

  3. Less known non-infectious and neuromusculoskeletal system-originated anterolateral neck and craniofacial pain disorders.

    PubMed

    Aydil, Utku; Kizil, Yusuf; Köybaşioğlu, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Pain syndromes of neuromusculoskeletal origin are not well-known by most of the clinicians working on head and neck area. As a result, most of the patients with these syndromes are either overlooked without having any treatment or they inappropriately have antibiotic treatments or surgical interventions such as dental extractions and tonsillectomies. Better recognition of the pain syndromes of the neck and face region or entities related to neuromusculoskeletal system may result in more appropriate and effective management of such conditions while avoiding unnecessary medical and surgical treatments. In this review, causes, clinical characteristics, diagnostic and treatment modalities of relatively less known craniofacial and neck pain entities including Eagle syndrome, carotidynia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, superior laryngeal neuralgia, hyoid bone syndrome, acute calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis, temporal tendinitis, thyroid and cricoid cartilage syndromes, and mastoid process syndrome are summarized.

  4. Immune Mediated Necrotizing Myopathy: a Cause of Isolated Myopathy of Neck Extensor Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Rahul; Medina-Flores, Rafael; Yachoui, Ralph; Kenney, Charles V

    2016-01-01

    Immune mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) is a unique form of myositis that is characterized by distinct muscle biopsy features including abundant myofiber necrosis, degeneration, and regeneration with only minimal, if any, inflammation on muscle biopsy. IMNM is clinically similar to idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM); hence, muscle biopsy is essential to diagnose IMNM. Herein we describe a case of neck extensor weakness due to necrotizing myopathy. Isolated weakness of the neck extensor muscles is uncommon in IIM and IMNM. This case describes the diagnostic work-up, treatments utilized, and 2 year follow-up course without involvement of other muscle groups and without progression of neck extensor muscle weakness. Advanced imaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facilitated the diagnosis by identifying the affected muscles and site for muscle biopsy. PMID:27573534

  5. Osteopathic manipulative treatment to resolve head and neck pain after tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Patricia M; Gustowski, Sharon M

    2012-07-01

    Pain is a common occurrence after tooth extraction and is usually localized to the extraction site. However, clinical experience shows that patients may also have pain in the head or neck in the weeks after this procedure. The authors present a case representative of these findings. In the case, cranial and cervical somatic dysfunction in a patient who had undergone tooth extraction was resolved through the use of osteopathic manipulative treatment. This case emphasizes the need to include a dental history when evaluating head and neck pain as part of comprehensive osteopathic medical care. The case can also serve as a foundation for a detailed discussion regarding how to effectively incorporate osteopathic manipulative treatment into primary care practice for patients who present with head or neck pain after tooth extraction.

  6. Fiddler's Neck Accompanied by Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Nickel in a Viola Player.

    PubMed

    Jue, Mihn Sook; Kim, Yong Seok; Ro, Young Suck

    2010-02-01

    "Fiddler's neck" is an irritant contact dermatitis that frequently affects violin and viola players. The etiology of the skin changes associated with this condition are probably attributable to a combination of factors--including increased pressure, friction, poor hygiene, and excessive perspiration. Clinically, the lesions generally consist of a localized area of lichenification on the left side of the neck just below the angle of the jaw. Herein, we report a case of fiddler's neck in a viola player, attended by allergic contact dermatitis to the nickel in the metal fixtures of a viola. We hope that our case report draws the attention of dermatologists toward this, and many other skin problems that affect musicians.

  7. The Italian Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (SIMFER) recommendations for neck pain.

    PubMed

    Monticone, Marco; Iovine, Roberto; de Sena, Giampaolo; Rovere, Giancarlo; Uliano, Domenico; Arioli, Giovanni; Bonaiuti, Donatella; Brugnoni, Guido; Ceravolo, Gabriella; Cerri, Cesare; Dalla Toffola, Elena; Fiore, Pietro; Foti, Calogero

    2013-01-01

    The paper represents the Italian Society of Physical " and Rehabilitation Medicine (SIMFER) recommendations to Neck Pain. We searched the principal scientific databases for papers concerning the main approaches to NP, including international guidelines, clinical trials of high methodological value and systematic reviews without any temporal limits. The recommendations were graded on the basis of the National Plan for Guidelines of the Italian Istituto Superiore di Sanità, which includes the level of evidence and strength of the recommendation. The principal sections of the recommendations deal with the Evaluation and Therapy for Neck Pain. The first describes the main evidence concerning the evaluation of patients with NP with or without limb involvement and/or headache: medical history, physical examination, neurological examination, laboratory tests, electrodiagnostics, diagnostic imaging and self-administered questionnaires. The second describes the best evidence synthesis concernig the therapy for Neck Pain: education, exercise, medical therapy, manual therapy, traction, physical therapy, acupuncture, orthoses, multimodal treatment, behavioural treatment.

  8. Local hyperthermia in head and neck cancer: mechanism, application and advance

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaohua; Tang, Yaling; Liang, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    Local hyperthermia (HT), particularly in conjunction with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy was useful for the treatment of human malignant tumors including head and neck cancer. However, at present it suffered from many limitations such as thermal dose control, target treatment regions and discrimination between healthy and cancer cells. Recent developments in nanotechnology have introduced novel and smart therapeutic nanomaterials to local HT of head and neck cancer that basically take advantage of various targeting approaches. The aim of this paper is to give a brief review of the mechanism, methods and clinical applications of local HT in head and neck cancer, mainly focusing on photothermal therapy (PTT) and nanoparticle-based hyperthermia. PMID:27384678

  9. Head and neck inflammatory pseudotumor: Case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kansara, Sagar; Bell, Diana; Johnson, Jason; Zafereo, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor (IP) is an uncommon idiopathic lesion that often imitates malignancy clinically and radiologically. Inflammatory pseudotumors have been found to occur in various sites but rarely in the head and neck. The histopathology, imaging, and treatment of three unique cases of head and neck inflammatory pseudotumors are described in this case series. Patients in Cases 1 and 2 presented with right level II neck mass and left parotid tail mass, respectively. The patient in Case 3 presented with otalgia, jaw pain and trismus, and a left parapharyngeal space mass. The tumors in Cases 1 and 3 significantly decreased in size with tapered courses of oral corticosteroids. The tumor in Case 2 was surgically excised without disease recurrence. Malignancy must be ruled out with incisional or excisional biopsy. Treatment includes surgical excision, oral corticosteroids, or both. The literature shows that radiotherapy and small-molecule inhibitors may be promising alternatives.

  10. Neuroendocrine tumours of the head and neck: anatomical, functional and molecular imaging and contemporary management

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Navaraj; Prestwich, Robin; Chowdhury, Fahmid; Patel, Chirag

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the head and neck are rare neoplasms and can be of epithelial or non-epithelial differentiation. Although the natural history of NETs is variable, it is crucial to establish an early diagnosis of these tumours as they can be potentially curable. Conventional anatomical imaging and functional imaging using radionuclide scintigraphy and positron emission tomography/computed tomography can be complementary for the diagnosis, staging and monitoring of treatment response. This article describes and illustrates the imaging features of head and neck NETs, discusses the potential future role of novel positron-emitting tracers that are emerging into clinical practice and reviews contemporary management of these tumours. Familiarity with the choice of imaging techniques and the variety of imaging patterns and treatment options should help guide radiologists in the management of this rare but important subgroup of head and neck neoplasms. PMID:24240099

  11. Head and Neck Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Treated By Superficial X-Ray Therapy: An Analysis of 1021 Cases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To report a single-institutional experience with the use of Superficial X-Ray Therapy (SXRT) for head and neck non-melanoma skin cancer (N-MSC) and to compare outcomes by prescribed fractionation schedules. Materials and Methods The medical records of 597 patients with 1021 lesions (720 BCC, 242 SCC, 59 SCC in situ) treated with kilovoltage radiation from 1979–2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The majority of patients were treated according to 1 of 3 institutional protocols based on the discretion of the radiation oncologist: 1) 22 x 2.5 Gy; 2) 20 x 2.5 Gy; 3) 30 x 2.0 Gy. "T" stage at first presentation was as follows: Tis (59); T1 (765); T2 (175); T3 (6), T4 (9); Tx, (7). All patients were clinical N0 and M0 at presentation. Chi-square test was used to evaluate any potential association between variables. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze survival with the Log Rank test used for comparison. A Cox Regression analysis was performed for multivariate analysis. Results The median follow up was 44 months. No significant difference was observed among the 3 prescribed fractionation schemes (p = 0.78) in terms of RTOG toxicity. There were no failures among SCC in situ, 37 local failures (23 BCC, 14 SCC), 5 regional failures (all SCC) and 2 distant failures (both SCC). For BCC, the 5-year LC was 96% and the 10-year LC was 94%. For SCC the corresponding rates of local control were 92% and 87%, respectively (p = 0.03). The use of >2.0 Gy daily was significantly associated with improved LC on multivariate analysis (HR: 0.17; CI 95%: 0.05–0.59). Conclusion SXRT for N-MSC of the head and neck is well tolerated, achieves excellent local control, and should continue to be recommended in the management of this disease. Fractionation schedules using >2.0 Gy daily appear to be associated with improved LC. PMID:27367229

  12. Multipaddled Anterolateral Thigh Chimeric Flap for Reconstruction of Complex Defects in Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Liu, Wen; Su, Tong; Chen, Xinqun; Zheng, Lian; Jian, Xinchun

    2014-01-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap has been the workhouse flap for coverage of soft-tissue defects in head and neck for decades. However, the reconstruction of multiple and complex soft-tissue defects in head and neck with multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps is still a challenge for reconstructive surgeries. Here, a clinical series of 12 cases is reported in which multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps were used for complex soft-tissue defects with several separately anatomic locations in head and neck. Of the 12 cases, 7 patients presented with trismus were diagnosed as advanced buccal cancer with oral submucous fibrosis, 2 tongue cancer cases were found accompanied with multiple oral mucosa lesions or buccal cancer, and 3 were hypopharyngeal cancer with anterior neck skin invaded. All soft-tissue defects were reconstructed by multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps, including 9 tripaddled anterolateral thigh flaps and 3 bipaddled flaps. The mean length of skin paddle was 19.2 (range: 14–23) cm and the mean width was 4.9 (range: 2.5–7) cm. All flaps survived and all donor sites were closed primarily. After a mean follow-up time of 9.1 months, there were no problems with the donor or recipient sites. This study supports that the multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flap is a reliable and good alternative for complex and multiple soft-tissue defects of the head and neck. PMID:25180680

  13. Elective neck management for squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the parotid area lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Herman, Michael P; Amdur, Robert J; Werning, John W; Dziegielewski, Peter; Morris, Christopher G; Mendenhall, William M

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine if radiotherapy (RT) alone to the cervical lymphatics is a suitable alternative to elective neck dissection (END) in patients who undergo parotidectomy and postoperative RT for squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the parotid area lymph nodes (PALN). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 107 patients consecutively treated from November 1969 to March 2012 for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the PALN with a clinically node-negative neck. Primary therapy consisted of parotidectomy in all cases. We compared regional (cervical) control in two subgroups: 42 patients treated with END and RT and 65 patients treated with elective neck irradiation (ENI) alone. The median time of follow-up was 5.5 years (range 0.3-30 years) for all patients and 11 years for living patients (range 1.8-26 years). There was 1 neck recurrence in each subgroup: END and RT, 1/42 (2 %); and ENI alone, 1/65 (1.5 %). No patient experienced a complication related to neck RT. ENI to a dose of approximately 50-60 Gy is a suitable alternative to END and postoperative RT in patients with squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the PALN.

  14. Minimizing shoulder syndrome with intra-operative spinal accessory nerve monitoring for neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Lee, C-H; Huang, N-C; Chen, H-C; Chen, M-K

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the safety and results of intra-operative SAN (spinal accessary nerve) monitoring during selective neck dissection, with emphasis on shoulder syndrome. Twenty-five consecutive patients with head and neck cancer were studied. Selective neck dissection was performed by a single clinical fellow under the supervision of the department chief using an intra-operative SAN monitor. Electrophysiological data were recorded after initial identification of the SAN and continued until just before closure. Electromyographic evaluation was carried out to assess SAN function one month postoperatively. Shoulder disability was also evaluated at this time using a questionnaire for shoulder syndrome (shrug, flexion, abduction, winging, and pain). No patients had postoperative shoulder syndrome involving shrug, flexion, abduction, or winging. Twenty-two of the 25 (88%) patients had shoulder pain, but the average pain score was low (2.3 ± 1.3). No patients had neck recurrence during at least 1 year of follow up. By using nerve monitoring during selective neck dissection, no patient developed significant "shoulder syndrome", with the exception of slight pain.

  15. MicroRNAs Involvement in Radioresistance of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Parwez; Slavik, Marek; Slampa, Pavel; Smilek, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to the ionizing radiation is a current problem in the treatment and clinical management of various cancers including head and neck cancer. There are several biological and molecular mechanisms described to be responsible for resistance of the tumors to radiotherapy. Among them, the main mechanisms include alterations in intracellular pathways involved in DNA damage and repair, apoptosis, proliferation, and angiogenesis. It has been found that regulation of these complex processes is often controlled by microRNAs. MicroRNAs are short endogenous RNA molecules that posttranscriptionally modulate gene expression and their deregulated expression has been observed in many tumors including head and neck cancer. Specific expression patterns of microRNAs have also been shown to predict prognosis and therapeutic response in head and neck cancer. Therefore, microRNAs present promising biomarkers and therapeutic targets that might overcome resistance to radiation and improve prognosis of head and neck cancer patients. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the functional role of microRNAs in radioresistance of cancer with special focus on head and neck cancer. PMID:28325958

  16. Phonoaudiology guidance in the preoperative period in the head and neck tumors

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, Grasiella Aparecida Nau; Fleig, Raquel; do Nascimento, Iramar Baptistella

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The habit of smoking and intake of alcoholic drinks can lead to the incidence of malignant tumors in several areas, including the head or neck. Phonoaudiology is an area of oncology that is always seeking to expand its applications in oncological head and neck cases, with intervention in pre- and post-operative periods and in different clinical fields. Aim: To evaluate and describe the impact of phonoaudiology preoperative guidance in patients, specifically smokers and alcohol drinkers, with head and neck cancer. Methods: Series Study. Interviews were conducted by telephone with 40 individuals diagnosed with malignant head and neck tumors. Questionnaires regarding the use of tobacco and alcohol were administered before and after the phonoaudiology preoperative guidance. Results: Among the 40 individuals who received phonoaudiology preoperative guidance, 26 were smokers before the orientation. Of these 26 individuals, 18 (69.24%) abandoned tobacco dependence, 4 (15.38%) did not quit smoking, and 4 (15.38%) quit smoking for a few months before resuming smoking after receiving phonoaudiology preoperative guidance. Regarding alcohol consumption, 31 individuals ingested alcohol before phonoaudiology preoperative guidance. Of these 31 individuals, 17 (54.84%) abandoned alcohol dependence, 8 (25.81%) did not abstain from alcohol consumption, and 6 (19.35%) resumed alcohol consumption after a period of abstinence after receiving phonoaudiology preoperative guidance. Conclusion: Phonoaudiology preoperative orientations are effective in the treatment of head and neck malignant tumors. PMID:25992003

  17. HPV Infection of the Head and Neck Region and Its Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Pullos, A N; Castilho, R M; Squarize, C H

    2015-11-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is an etiologic agent associated with the development of head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC)-in particular, oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The HPV-positive HNSCC is characterized by genetic alterations, clinical progression, and therapeutic response, which are distinct from HPV-negative head and neck cancers, suggesting that virus-associated tumors constitute a unique entity among head and neck cancers. Malignant stem cells, or cancer stem cells, are a subpopulation of tumor cells that self-renew, initiate new tumors upon transplantation, and are resistant to therapy, and their discovery has revealed novel effects of oncovirus infection in cancer. In this review, we provide a virus-centric view and novel insights into HPV-positive head and neck pathogenesis. We discuss the influence of cancer stem cells, HPV oncoproteins, altered molecular pathways, and mutations in cancer initiation and cancer progression. We compiled a catalogue of the mutations associated with HPV-positive HNSCC, which may be a useful resource for genomic-based studies aiming to develop personalized therapies. We also explain recent changes in mass vaccination campaigns against HPV and the potential long-term impact of vaccinations on the prevention and treatment of HPV-positive head and neck cancers.

  18. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for recurrent head and neck cancer: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Baliga, Sujith; Kabarriti, Rafi; Ohri, Nitin; Haynes-Lewis, Hilda; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K

    2017-03-01

    The management of patients with recurrent head and neck cancers remains a challenging clinical dilemma. Concerns over toxicity with re-irradiation have limited its use in the clinical setting. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) has emerged as a highly conformal and precise type of radiotherapy and has the advantage of sparing normal tissue. Although SBRT is an attractive treatment modality, its use in the clinic is limited, given the technically challenging nature of the procedure. In this review, we attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of re-irradiation in patients with recurrent head and neck cancers, with particular attention to the advent of SBRT and its use with systemic therapies such as cetuximab. In the second portion of this review, we present our systematic review of published experiences with SBRT in recurrent head and neck cancers in an attempt to provide data on response rates (RR), overall survival and toxicity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 595-601, 2017.

  19. Training in head and neck surgery and oncology.

    PubMed

    Shaha, Ashok R

    2008-06-15

    Management of head and neck cancer truly represents the need for a multimodality approach. This manuscript discusses the history of head and neck surgery, head and neck fellowships and the current trends in the practice of head and neck surgery and oncology. Increasing emphasis is placed on organ preservation and non-operative treatment modalities. The head and neck surgeon (leader of the orchestra) must be familiar with appropriate indications of each treatment modality and outcome. The head and neck surgeon of today should be an all-rounder.

  20. Integrative Medicine in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Matovina, Chloe; Birkeland, Andrew C; Zick, Suzanna; Shuman, Andrew G

    2017-02-01

    Objective Complementary and alternative medicine, or integrative medicine, has become increasingly popular among patients with head and neck cancer. Despite its increasing prevalence, many patients feel uncomfortable discussing such therapies with their physicians, and many physicians are unaware and underequipped to evaluate or discuss their use with patients. The aim of this article is to use recent data to outline the decision making inherent to integrative medicine utilization among patients with head and neck cancer, to discuss the ethical implications inherent to balancing integrative and conventional approaches to treatment, and to highlight available resources to enhance head and neck cancer providers' understanding of integrative medicine. Data Sources Randomized controlled trials involving integrative medicine or complementary and alternative medicine treatment for cancer patients. Review Methods Trials were drawn from a systematic PubMed database search categorized into cancer prevention, treatment, and symptom management. Conclusions Integrative medicine is gaining popularity for the management of cancer and is most commonly used for symptom management. A number of randomized controlled trials provide data to support integrative therapies, yet physicians who treat head and neck cancer may be faced with ethical dilemmas and practical barriers surrounding incorporation of integrative medicine. Implications for Practice In the management of head and neck cancer, there is an increasing demand for awareness of, dialogue about, and research evaluating integrative medicine therapies. It is important for otolaryngologists to become aware of integrative therapy options, their risks and benefits, and resources for further information to effectively counsel their patients.

  1. Study of Cs/NF3 adsorption on GaN (0 0 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Yu; Liu, Lei; Xia, Sihao; Kong, Yike

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the optoelectronics properties of Cs/NF3 adsorption on GaN (0 0 1) photocathode surface, different adsorption models of Cs-only, Cs/O, Cs/NF3 adsorption on GaN clean surface were established, respectively. Atomic structures, work function, adsorption energy, E-Mulliken charge distribution, density of states and optical properties of all these adsorption systems were calculated using first principles. Compared with Cs/O co-adsorption, Cs/NF3 co-adsorption show better stability and more decline of work function, which is more beneficial for photoemission efficiency. Besides, surface band structures of Cs/NF3 co-adsorption system exhibit metal properties, implying good conductivity. Meanwhile, near valence band minimum of Cs/NF3 co-adsorption system, more acceptor levels emerges to form a p-type emission surface, which is conductive to the escape of photoelectrons. In addition, imaginary part of dielectric function curve and absorption curve of Cs/NF3 co-adsorption system both move towards lower energy side. This work can direct the optimization of activation process of NEA GaN photocathode.

  2. Structures, spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of U₂On (n = 0 ∼ 2, 4) molecules: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Niu, Wen-Xia; Gao, Tao; Wang, Fan; Jia, Ting-Ting; Meng, Da-Qiao; Li, Gan

    2013-12-01

    The equilibrium structures, spectroscopic and thermodynamic parameters [entropy (S), internal energy (E), heat capacity (C p)] of U₂, U₂O, U₂O₂ and U₂O₄ uranium oxide molecules were investigated systematically using density functional theory (DFT). Our computations indicated that the ground electronic state of U₂ is the septet state and the equilibrium bond length is 2.194 Å; the ground electronic state of U₂O and U₂O₂ were found to be X³Φ and X³Σ(g) with stable C(∞v) and D(∞h) linear structures, respectively. The bridge-bonded structure with D(2h) symmetry and X³B₁(g) state is the most stable configuration for the U₂O₄ molecule. Mulliken population analyses show that U atoms always lose electrons to become the donor and O atoms always obtain electrons as the acceptor. Molecular orbital analyses demonstrated that the frontier orbitals of the title molecules were contributed mostly by 5f atomic orbitals of U atoms. Vibrational frequencies analyses indicate that the maximum absorption peaks stem from the stretching mode of U-O bonds in U₂O, U₂O₂ and U₂O₄. In addition, thermodynamic data of U₂O(n) (n = 0 ∼ 4) molecules at elevated temperatures of 293.0 K to 393.0 K was predicted.

  3. Preparation of UC0.07-0.10N0.90-0.93 spheres for TRISO coated fuel particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, R. D.; Silva, C. M.; Lindemer, T. B.; Johnson, J. A.; Collins, J. L.

    2014-05-01

    The US Department of Energy is considering a new nuclear fuel that would be less susceptible to ruptures during a loss-of-coolant accident. The fuel would consist of tristructural isotropic coated particles with dense uranium nitride (UN) kernels with diameters of 650 or 800 μm. The objectives of this effort are to make uranium oxide microspheres with adequately dispersed carbon nanoparticles and to convert these microspheres into UN spheres, which could be then sintered into kernels. Recent improvements to the internal gelation process were successfully applied to the production of uranium gel spheres with different concentrations of carbon black. After the spheres were washed and dried, a simple two-step heat profile was used to produce porous microspheres with a chemical composition of UC0.07-0.10N0.90-0.93. The first step involved heating the microspheres to 2023 K in a vacuum, and in the second step, the microspheres were held at 1873 K for 6 h in flowing nitrogen.

  4. Structural and magnetic properties of Fe7- n Pt n with n = 0, 1, 2, . . . 7, bimetallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce-Tadeo, A. P.; Morán-López, J. L.; Ricardo-Chavez, J. L.

    2016-11-01

    An exhaustive study of the structural and magnetic properties of Fe7- n Pt n with n = 0, 1, 2, …7, bimetallic clusters is presented. Based on ab initio density functional theory that includes spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and graph theory, the ground state geometry, the local chemical order, and the orbital and spin magnetic moments are calculated. We show how the systems evolves from the 3-d Fe to the quasi-planar Pt clusters. These calculations show that SOC are necessary to describe correctly the composition dependence of the binding energy of these nanoalloys. We observe that the ground state geometries on the Fe rich side resemble the fcc structure adopted by bulk samples. Furthermore, we observe how the spin and orbital magnetic moments depend on the chemical concentration and chemical order. Based on these results, we estimated the magnetic anisotropy energy and found that the largest values correspond to some of the most symmetric structures, Fe5Pt2 and FePt6. To determine the degree of non-collinearity, we define an index that shows that in FePt6 the total magnetic moments, on each atom, are the less collinear.

  5. Vestibular disorders following different types of head and neck trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kolev, Ognyan I.; Sergeeva, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Summary This review focuses on the published literature on vestibular disorders following different types of head and neck trauma. Current knowledge of the different causes and underlying mechanisms of vestibular disorders, as well as the sites of organic damage, is presented. Non-organic mechanisms are also surveyed. The frequency of occurrence of vestibular symptoms, and of other accompanying subjective complaints, associated with different types of trauma is presented and related to the specific causes. Hypotheses about the pathogenesis of traumatic vestibular disorders are presented, and the knowledge derived from animal experiments is also discussed. We believe this to be a very important topic, since vestibular complaints in traumatic patients often remain undiagnosed or underestimated in clinical practice. This review article aims to suggest directions for additional research and to provide guidance to both the scientific and clinical practice communities. PMID:27358219

  6. Preservation of organ function in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tschiesner, Uta

    2012-01-01

    Preservation of function is a crucial aspect for the evaluation of therapies applied in the field of head and neck cancer. However, preservation of anatomic structures cannot automatically be equated with preservation of function. Functional outcome becomes increasingly important particularly for the evaluation of alternative treatment options with equivalent oncological outcomes. As a result, present studies take into account three topic areas with varying emphasis: (1) the effects of cancer therapy on essential physiological functions, (2) additional therapy-induced side-effects and complications, and (3) health-related quality of life. The present article summarizes vital aspects of clinical research from recent years. Functional outcomes after surgical and non-surgical treatment approaches are presented according to tumor localization and staging criteria. Additional methodological aspects relating to data gathering and documentation as well as challenges in implementing the results in clinical practice are also discussed. PMID:23320059

  7. The Role of Computed Tomography in the Management of the Neck After Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Clavel, Sebastien; Charron, Marie-Pierre; Belair, Manon; Delouya, Guila; Fortin, Bernard; Despres, Philippe; Soulieres, Denis; Filion, Edith; Guertin, Louis; and others

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe the outcome in patients with head-and neck-squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) followed up without neck dissection (ND) after concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) based on computed tomography (CT) response. The second objective was to establish CT characteristics that can predict which patients can safely avoid ND. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, 369 patients with node-positive HNSCC were treated with primary CRT at our institution. After a clinical and a radiologic evaluation based on CT done 6 to 8 weeks after CRT, patients were labeled with a complete neck response (CR) or with a partial neck response (PR). Results: The median follow-up was 44 months. The number of patients presenting with N3, N2, or N1 disease were 54 (15%), 268 (72%), and 47 (13%), respectively. After CRT, 263 (71%) patients reached a CR, and 253 of them did not undergo ND. Ninety-six patients reached a PR and underwent ND. Of those, 34 (35%) had residual disease on pathologic evaluation. A regression of the diameter of {>=}80% and a residual largest diameter of 15 mm of nodes had negative pathologic predictive values of 100% and 86%, respectively. The 3-year regional control and survival rates were not different between patients with CR who had no ND and patients with PR followed by ND. Conclusion: Node-positive patients presenting a CR as determined by CT evaluation 6 to 8 weeks after CRT had a low rate of regional recurrence without ND. This study also suggests that lymph node residual size and percentage of regression on CT after CRT may be useful criteria to guide clinical decisions regarding neck surgery. Those results can help diminish the number of ND procedures with negative results and their associated surgical complications.

  8. Neck kinematics and sternocleidomastoid muscle activation during neck rotation in subjects with forward head posture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated differences in the kinematics of the neck and activation of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle during neck rotation between subjects with and without forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight subjects participated in the study (14 with FHP, 14 without FHP). Subjects performed neck rotation in two directions, left and right. The kinematics of rotation-lateral flexion movement patterns were recorded using motion analysis. Activity in the bilateral SCM muscles was measured using surface electromyography. Differences in neck kinematics and activation of SCM between the groups were analyzed by independent t-tests. [Results] Maintaining FHP increased the rotation-lateral flexion ratio significantly in both directions. The FHP group had significantly faster onset time for lateral flexion movement in both directions during neck rotation. Regarding the electromyography of the SCM muscles during neck rotation in both directions, the activity values of subjects with FHP were greater than those of subjects without FHP for the contralateral SCM muscles. [Conclusion] FHP can induce changes in movement in the frontal plane and SCM muscle activation during neck rotation. Thus, clinicians should consider movement in the frontal plane as well as in the sagittal plane when assessing and treating patients with forward head posture.

  9. Neck kinematics and sternocleidomastoid muscle activation during neck rotation in subjects with forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated differences in the kinematics of the neck and activation of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle during neck rotation between subjects with and without forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight subjects participated in the study (14 with FHP, 14 without FHP). Subjects performed neck rotation in two directions, left and right. The kinematics of rotation-lateral flexion movement patterns were recorded using motion analysis. Activity in the bilateral SCM muscles was measured using surface electromyography. Differences in neck kinematics and activation of SCM between the groups were analyzed by independent t-tests. [Results] Maintaining FHP increased the rotation-lateral flexion ratio significantly in both directions. The FHP group had significantly faster onset time for lateral flexion movement in both directions during neck rotation. Regarding the electromyography of the SCM muscles during neck rotation in both directions, the activity values of subjects with FHP were greater than those of subjects without FHP for the contralateral SCM muscles. [Conclusion] FHP can induce changes in movement in the frontal plane and SCM muscle activation during neck rotation. Thus, clinicians should consider movement in the frontal plane as well as in the sagittal plane when assessing and treating patients with forward head posture. PMID:26696712

  10. Chronic Neck Pain and Cervico-Craniofacial Pain Patients Express Similar Levels of Neck Pain-Related Disability, Pain Catastrophizing, and Cervical Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-García, Daniel; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; López-López, Almudena; Lopez-de-Uralde-Vi