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Sample records for clinically relevant mutations

  1. Clinical relevance between CALR mutation and myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Chen; Ma, Xiaochao

    2015-01-01

    In late 2013, somatic mutations in calreticulin (CALR), mainly those involving insertions and deletions in exon 9, attracted the great attention of hematologists and researchers. These JAK2- and MPL- mutual exclusive mutations enjoy a favorable specificity and prevalence (20-30%) in patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF), suggesting promise for these mutations in disease management. Moreover, these genetic variations are now also considered as a group of independent risk factors for disease prognosis. In this mini-review, we will document the value of CALR mutations in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic strategy selection, and we will discuss current advances in methods to detect these mutations. PMID:27358872

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Glutamine Synthetase Mutations that Lead to Clinically Relevant Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Frieg, Benedikt; Görg, Boris; Homeyer, Nadine; Keitel, Verena; Häussinger, Dieter; Gohlke, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes ATP-dependent ligation of ammonia and glutamate to glutamine. Two mutations of human GS (R324C and R341C) were connected to congenital glutamine deficiency with severe brain malformations resulting in neonatal death. Another GS mutation (R324S) was identified in a neurologically compromised patient. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the impairment of GS activity by these mutations have remained elusive. Molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations, and rigidity analyses suggest that all three mutations influence the first step of GS catalytic cycle. The R324S and R324C mutations deteriorate GS catalytic activity due to loss of direct interactions with ATP. As to R324S, indirect, water-mediated interactions reduce this effect, which may explain the suggested higher GS residual activity. The R341C mutation weakens ATP binding by destabilizing the interacting residue R340 in the apo state of GS. Additionally, the mutation is predicted to result in a significant destabilization of helix H8, which should negatively affect glutamate binding. This prediction was tested in HEK293 cells overexpressing GS by dot-blot analysis: Structural stability of H8 was impaired through mutation of amino acids interacting with R341, as indicated by a loss of masking of an epitope in the glutamate binding pocket for a monoclonal anti-GS antibody by L-methionine-S-sulfoximine; in contrast, cells transfected with wild type GS showed the masking. Our analyses reveal complex molecular effects underlying impaired GS catalytic activity in three clinically relevant mutants. Our findings could stimulate the development of ATP binding-enhancing molecules by which the R324S mutant can be repaired extrinsically. PMID:26836257

  3. Mutation databases for inherited renal disease: are they complete, accurate, clinically relevant, and freely available?

    PubMed

    Savige, Judy; Dagher, Hayat; Povey, Sue

    2014-07-01

    This study examined whether gene-specific DNA variant databases for inherited diseases of the kidney fulfilled the Human Variome Project recommendations of being complete, accurate, clinically relevant and freely available. A recent review identified 60 inherited renal diseases caused by mutations in 132 genes. The disease name, MIM number, gene name, together with "mutation" or "database," were used to identify web-based databases. Fifty-nine diseases (98%) due to mutations in 128 genes had a variant database. Altogether there were 349 databases (a median of 3 per gene, range 0-6), but no gene had two databases with the same number of variants, and 165 (50%) databases included fewer than 10 variants. About half the databases (180, 54%) had been updated in the previous year. Few (77, 23%) were curated by "experts" but these included nine of the 11 with the most variants. Even fewer databases (41, 12%) included clinical features apart from the name of the associated disease. Most (223, 67%) could be accessed without charge, including those for 50 genes (40%) with the maximum number of variants. Future efforts should focus on encouraging experts to collaborate on a single database for each gene affected in inherited renal disease, including both unpublished variants, and clinical phenotypes.

  4. Clinical Relevance and Molecular Phenotypes in Gastric Cancer, of TP53 Mutations and Gene Expressions, in Combination With Other Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungjin; Lee, Jinhyuk; Kim, Yon Hui; Park, Jaheun; Shin, Jung-Woog; Nam, Seungyoon

    2016-01-01

    While altered TP53 is the most frequent mutation in gastric cancer (GC), its association with molecular or clinical phenotypes (e.g., overall survival, disease-free survival) remains little known. To that end, we can use genome-wide approaches to identify altered genes significantly related to mutated TP53. Here, we identified significant differences in clinical outcomes, as well as in molecular phenotypes, across specific GC tumor subpopulations, when combining TP53 with other signaling networks, including WNT and its related genes NRXN1, CTNNB1, SLITRK5, NCOR2, RYR1, GPR112, MLL3, MTUS2, and MYH6. Moreover, specific GC subpopulations indicated by dual mutation of NRXN1 and TP53 suggest different drug responses, according to the Connectivity Map, a pharmacological drug-gene association tool. Overall, TP53 mutation status in GC is significantly relevant to clinical or molecular categories. Thus, our approach can potentially provide a patient stratification strategy by dissecting previously unknown multiple TP53-mutated patient groups. PMID:27708434

  5. Polymyxin Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii: Genetic Mutations and Transcriptomic Changes in Response to Clinically Relevant Dosage Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Soon-Ee; Johnson, Matthew D.; Zhu, Yan; Tsuji, Brian T.; Forrest, Alan; Bulitta, Jurgen B.; Boyce, John D.; Nation, Roger L.; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Polymyxins are often last-line therapeutic agents used to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. Recent reports of polymyxin-resistant A. baumannii highlight the urgent need for research into mechanisms of polymyxin resistance. This study employed genomic and transcriptomic analyses to investigate the mechanisms of polymyxin resistance in A. baumannii AB307-0294 using an in vitro dynamic model to mimic four different clinically relevant dosage regimens of polymyxin B and colistin over 96 h. Polymyxin B dosage regimens that achieved peak concentrations above 1 mg/L within 1 h caused significant bacterial killing (~5 log10CFU/mL), while the gradual accumulation of colistin resulted in no bacterial killing. Polymyxin resistance was observed across all dosage regimens; partial reversion to susceptibility was observed in 6 of 8 bacterial samples during drug-free passaging. Stable polymyxin-resistant samples contained a mutation in pmrB. The transcriptomes of stable and non-stable polymyxin-resistant samples were not substantially different and featured altered expression of genes associated with outer membrane structure and biogenesis. These findings were further supported via integrated analysis of previously published transcriptomics data from strain ATCC19606. Our results provide a foundation for understanding the mechanisms of polymyxin resistance following exposure to polymyxins and the need to explore effective combination therapies. PMID:27195897

  6. In vitro modeling to determine mutation specificity of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors against clinically relevant EGFR mutants in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Toshiyuki; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Tani, Tetsuo; Hamamoto, Junko; Oashi, Ayano; Ishioka, Kota; Arai, Daisuke; Nukaga, Shigenari; Miyawaki, Masayoshi; Kawada, Ichiro; Naoki, Katsuhiko; Costa, Daniel B; Kobayashi, Susumu S; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Soejima, Kenzo

    2015-11-17

    EGFR mutated lung cancer accounts for a significant subgroup of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Over the last decade, multiple EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) have been developed to target mutated EGFR. However, there is little information regarding mutation specific potency of EGFR-TKIs against various types of EGFR mutations. The purpose of this study is to establish an in vitro model to determine the "therapeutic window" of EGFR-TKIs against various types of EGFR mutations, including EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations. The potency of 1st (erlotinib), 2nd (afatinib) and 3rd (osimertinib and rociletinib) generation EGFR-TKIs was compared in vitro for human lung cancer cell lines and Ba/F3 cells, which exogenously express mutated or wild type EGFR. An in vitro model of mutation specificity was created by calculating the ratio of IC50 values between mutated and wild type EGFR. The in vitro model identified a wide therapeutic window of afatinib for exon 19 deletions and L858R and of osimertinib and rociletinib for T790M positive mutations. The results obtained with our models matched well with previously reported preclinical and clinical data. Interestingly, for EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations, most of which are known to be resistant to 1st and 2nd generation EGFR-TKIS, osimertinib was potent and presented a wide therapeutic window. To our knowledge, this is the first report that has identified the therapeutic window of osimertinib for EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations. In conclusion, this model will provide a preclinical rationale for proper selection of EGFR-TKIs against clinically-relevant EGFR mutations.

  7. Identification of recurrent BRCA1 mutation and its clinical relevance in Chinese Triple-negative breast cancer cohort.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoran; Li, Huiping; Shao, Bin; Wu, Jianmin; Kong, Weiyao; Song, Guohong; Jiang, Hanfang; Wang, Jing; Wan, Fengling

    2017-03-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) accounts for 15-20% of all newly diagnosed breast cancers, and is enriched for germline mutation of BRCA. In Asian patients diagnosed with breast cancer, 268 deleterious mutations of BRCA1 and 242 of BRCA2 have been identified so far, including a reported BRCA1 frameshift mutation (rs80350973), apparently found only in Asian people, with a low prevalence of 0.3-1.7% in different breast cancer cohorts. Here, we reported the high prevalence (7.2%) of rs80350973 among 125 Chinese patients with TNBC, which implies its mutational predilection for certain breast cancer subtypes. Although its low prevalence had not indicated any particular clinical significance in previous studies, our results associated rs80350973 mutation with cell checkpoint malfunction, and was found to be more common in TNBC patients with high Ki-67 indices (P = 0.004). As Ki-67 overexpression is a predictor of poor prognosis in TNBC, inclusion of this mutation into genetic assessments may improve the clinical management of Chinese patients with TNBC.

  8. A combination of TERT promoter mutation and MGMT methylation status predicts clinically relevant subgroups of newly diagnosed glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Arita, Hideyuki; Yamasaki, Kai; Matsushita, Yuko; Nakamura, Taishi; Shimokawa, Asanao; Takami, Hirokazu; Tanaka, Shota; Mukasa, Akitake; Shirahata, Mitsuaki; Shimizu, Saki; Suzuki, Kaori; Saito, Kuniaki; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Higuchi, Fumi; Uzuka, Takeo; Otani, Ryohei; Tamura, Kaoru; Sumita, Kazutaka; Ohno, Makoto; Miyakita, Yasuji; Kagawa, Naoki; Hashimoto, Naoya; Hatae, Ryusuke; Yoshimoto, Koji; Shinojima, Naoki; Nakamura, Hideo; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Okita, Yoshiko; Kinoshita, Manabu; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Shofuda, Tomoko; Kodama, Yoshinori; Mori, Kanji; Tomogane, Yusuke; Fukai, Junya; Fujita, Koji; Terakawa, Yuzo; Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro; Moriuchi, Shusuke; Nonaka, Masahiro; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Shibuya, Makoto; Maehara, Taketoshi; Saito, Nobuhito; Nagane, Motoo; Kawahara, Nobutaka; Ueki, Keisuke; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Miyaoka, Etsuo; Nishikawa, Ryo; Komori, Takashi; Narita, Yoshitaka; Ichimura, Koichi

    2016-08-08

    The prognostic impact of TERT mutations has been controversial in IDH-wild tumors, particularly in glioblastomas (GBM). The controversy may be attributable to presence of potential confounding factors such as MGMT methylation status or patients' treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of TERT status on patient outcome in association with various factors in a large series of adult diffuse gliomas. We analyzed a total of 951 adult diffuse gliomas from two cohorts (Cohort 1, n = 758; Cohort 2, n = 193) for IDH1/2, 1p/19q, and TERT promoter status. The combined IDH/TERT classification divided Cohort 1 into four molecular groups with distinct outcomes. The overall survival (OS) was the shortest in IDH wild-type/TERT mutated groups, which mostly consisted of GBMs (P < 0.0001). To investigate the association between TERT mutations and MGMT methylation on survival of patients with GBM, samples from a combined cohort of 453 IDH-wild-type GBM cases treated with radiation and temozolomide were analyzed. A multivariate Cox regression model revealed that the interaction between TERT and MGMT was significant for OS (P = 0.0064). Compared with TERT mutant-MGMT unmethylated GBMs, the hazard ratio (HR) for OS incorporating the interaction was the lowest in the TERT mutant-MGMT methylated GBM (HR, 0.266), followed by the TERT wild-type-MGMT methylated (HR, 0.317) and the TERT wild-type-MGMT unmethylated GBMs (HR, 0.542). Thus, patients with TERT mutant-MGMT unmethylated GBM have the poorest prognosis. Our findings suggest that a combination of IDH, TERT, and MGMT refines the classification of grade II-IV diffuse gliomas.

  9. Vacuum phenomenon: Clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Ishan; Vilensky, Joel A; Weber, Edward C

    2014-04-01

    Vacuum phenomenon (VP) is an anatomical entity of potential confusion in the diagnosis and evaluation of joint pathology. Observation of this phenomenon has been demonstrated on basic radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Although VP is most often associated with degenerative joint disease, it is observed with other pathologies. Two problematic scenarios can occur: a false-positive diagnosis of serious pathology instead of benign VP and a false-negative diagnosis of benign VP with a more serious underlying process Despite this potential for confusion, criteria for distinguishing VP from other causes of joint pain and for evaluating a suspected case of VP have not been fully established. We reviewed the literature to determine underlying mechanism, symptomology, associated pathologies, and clinical importance of VP. The formation of VP can be explained by gas solubility, pressure-volume relationships, and human physiology. CT, GRE-MRI, and multipositional views are the best imaging studies to view VP. Although most cases of VP are benign, it can be associated with clinical signs and symptoms. VP outside the spine is an underreported finding on imaging studies. VP should be on the differential diagnosis for joint pain, especially in the elderly. We have proposed criteria for diagnosing VP and generated a basic algorithm for its workup. Underreporting of this phenomenon shows a lack of awareness of VP on the part of physicians. By identifying true anatomic VP, we can prevent harm from suboptimal treatment of patients.

  10. [Clinical research VI. Clinical relevance].

    PubMed

    Talavera, Juan O; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Usually, in clinical practice the maneuver selected is the one that achieves a favorable outcome with a direct percentage of superiority of at least 10 %, or when the number needed to treat is approximately equal to 10. While this percentage difference is practical for estimating the magnitude of an association, we need to differentiate the impact measures (attributable risk, preventable fraction), measures of association (RR, OR, HR), and frequency measures (incidence and prevalence) applicable when the outcome is nominal. And we must identify ways to measure the strength of association and the magnitude of the association when the outcome variable is quantitative. It is not uncommon to interpret the measures of association as if they were impact measures. For example, for a RR of 0.68, it is common to assume a 32 % reduction of the outcome, but we must consider that this is a relative reduction, which comes from relations of 0.4/0.6, 0.04/0.06, or 0.00004/0.00006. However the direct reduction is 20 % (60 % - 40 %), 2 %, and 2 per 100,000, respectively. Therefore, to estimate the impact of a maneuver it is important to have the direct difference and/or NNT.

  11. Novel mutations and their functional and clinical relevance in myeloproliferative neoplasms: JAK2, MPL, TET2, ASXL1, CBL, IDH and IKZF1

    PubMed Central

    Tefferi, A

    2010-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) originate from genetically transformed hematopoietic stem cells that retain the capacity for multilineage differentiation and effective myelopoiesis. Beginning in early 2005, a number of novel mutations involving Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), Myeloproliferative Leukemia Virus (MPL), TET oncogene family member 2 (TET2), Additional Sex Combs-Like 1 (ASXL1), Casitas B-lineage lymphoma proto-oncogene (CBL), Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) and IKAROS family zinc finger 1 (IKZF1) have been described in BCR-ABL1-negative MPNs. However, none of these mutations were MPN specific, displayed mutual exclusivity or could be traced back to a common ancestral clone. JAK2 and MPL mutations appear to exert a phenotype-modifying effect and are distinctly associated with polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis; the corresponding mutational frequencies are ∼99, 55 and 65% for JAK2 and 0, 3 and 10% for MPL mutations. The incidence of TET2, ASXL1, CBL, IDH or IKZF1 mutations in these disorders ranges from 0 to 17% these latter mutations are more common in chronic (TET2, ASXL1, CBL) or juvenile (CBL) myelomonocytic leukemias, mastocytosis (TET2), myelodysplastic syndromes (TET2, ASXL1) and secondary acute myeloid leukemia, including blast-phase MPN (IDH, ASXL1, IKZF1). The functional consequences of MPN-associated mutations include unregulated JAK-STAT (Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription) signaling, epigenetic modulation of transcription and abnormal accumulation of oncoproteins. However, it is not clear as to whether and how these abnormalities contribute to disease initiation, clonal evolution or blastic transformation. PMID:20428194

  12. Mutational profiles in triple-negative breast cancer defined by ultradeep multigene sequencing show high rates of PI3K pathway alterations and clinically relevant entity subgroup specific differences.

    PubMed

    Kriegsmann, Mark; Endris, Volker; Wolf, Thomas; Pfarr, Nicole; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Loibl, Sibylle; Denkert, Carsten; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Budczies, Jan; Sinn, Peter; Weichert, Wilko

    2014-10-30

    Mutational profiling of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) by whole exome sequencing (WES) yielded a landscape of genomic alterations in this tumor entity. However, the clinical significance of these findings remains enigmatic. Further, integration of WES in routine diagnostics using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material is currently not feasible. Therefore, we designed and validated a breast cancer specific gene panel for semiconductor-based sequencing comprising 137 amplicons covering mutational hotspots in 44 genes and applied this panel on a cohort of 104 well-characterized FFPE TNBC with complete clinical follow-up. TP53 mutations were present in more than 80% of cases. PI3K pathway alterations (29.8%) comprising mainly PIK3CA mutations (22.1%) but also mutations and/or amplifications/deletions in other PI3K-associated genes (7.7%) were far more frequently observed, when compared to WES data. Alterations in MAPK signaling genes (8.7%) and cell-cycle regulators (14.4%) were also frequent. Mutational profiles were linked to TNBC subgroups defined by morphology and immunohistochemistry. Alterations in cell-cycle pathway regulators were linked with better overall (p=0.053) but not disease free survival. Taken together, we could demonstrate that breast cancer targeted hotspot sequencing is feasible in a routine setting and yields reliable and clinically meaningful results. Mutational spectra were linked to clinical and immunohistochemically defined parameters.

  13. Clinical Relevance of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria, Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mahruqi, Sara H.; Al-Busaidy, Suleiman; Boeree, Martin J.; Al-Zadjali, Samiya; Patel, Arti; Dekhuijzen, P.N. Richard; van Soolingen, Dick

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the clinical relevance of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in the Arabian Peninsula. We assessed the prevalence and studied a random sample of isolates at a reference laboratory in Muscat, Oman. NTM cause disease in this region, and their prevalence has increased. PMID:19193276

  14. Valerian: No Evidence for Clinically Relevant Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nieber, Karen; Kraft, Karin

    2014-01-01

    In recent popular publications as well as in widely used information websites directed to cancer patients, valerian is claimed to have a potential of adverse interactions with anticancer drugs. This questions its use as a safe replacement for, for example, benzodiazepines. A review on the interaction potential of preparations from valerian root (Valeriana officinalis L. root) was therefore conducted. A data base search and search in a clinical drug interaction data base were conducted. Thereafter, a systematic assessment of publications was performed. Seven in vitro studies on six CYP 450 isoenzymes, on p-glycoprotein, and on two UGT isoenzymes were identified. However, the methodological assessment of these studies did not support their suitability for the prediction of clinically relevant interactions. In addition, clinical studies on various valerian preparations did not reveal any relevant interaction potential concerning CYP 1A2, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4. Available animal and human pharmacodynamic studies did not verify any interaction potential. The interaction potential of valerian preparations therefore seems to be low and thereby without clinical relevance. We conclude that there is no specific evidence questioning their safety, also in cancer patients. PMID:25093031

  15. [Clinical relevance of cardiopulmonary reflexes in anesthesiology].

    PubMed

    Guerri-Guttenberg, R A; Siaba-Serrate, F; Cacheiro, F J

    2013-10-01

    The baroreflex, chemoreflex, pulmonary reflexes, Bezold-Jarisch and Bainbridge reflexes and their interaction with local mechanisms, are a demonstration of the richness of cardiovascular responses that occur in human beings. As well as these, the anesthesiologist must contend with other variables that interact by attenuating or accentuating cardiopulmonary reflexes such as, anesthetic drugs, surgical manipulation, and patient positioning. In the present article we review these reflexes and their clinical relevance in anesthesiology.

  16. Women with epilepsy: clinically relevant issues

    PubMed Central

    Bangar, Santosh; Shastri, Abhishek; El-Sayeh, Hany; Cavanna, Andrea E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Women with epilepsy (WWE) face specific challenges throughout their lifespan due to the effects of seizures and antiepileptic drugs on hormonal function, potentially affecting both sexual and reproductive health. This review article addresses the most common issues of practical relevance to clinicians treating WWE: epidemiology and clinical presentations (including catamenial epilepsy), contraception, reproductive and sexual dysfunction, pregnancy, lactation, menopause-related issues (including bone health), and mental health aspects. Awareness of these gender-specific issues and implementation/adaptation of effective interventions for WWE results in significantly improved health-related quality of life in this patient population. PMID:27678205

  17. Potential clinical implications of BRAF mutations in histiocytic proliferations

    PubMed Central

    Bubolz, Anna-Maria; Weissinger, Stephanie E.; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Arndt, Annette; Steinestel, Konrad; Brüderlein, Silke; Cario, Holger; Lubatschofski, Anneli; Welke, Claudia; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Barth, Thomas F. E.; Beer, Ambros J.; Möller, Peter; Gottstein, Martin

    2014-01-01

    For a growing number of tumors the BRAF V600E mutation carries therapeutic relevance. In histiocytic proliferations the distribution of BRAF mutations and their relevance has not been clarified. Here we present a retrospective genotyping study and a prospective observational study of a patient treated with a BRAF inhibitor. Genotyping of 69 histiocytic lesions revealed that 23/48 Langerhans cell lesions were BRAF-V600E-mutant whereas all non-Langerhans cell lesions (including dendritic cell sarcoma, juvenile xanthogranuloma, Rosai-Dorfman disease, and granular cell tumor) were wild-type. A metareview of 29 publications showed an overall mutation frequency of 48.5%; and with N=653 samples, this frequency is well defined. The BRAF mutation status cannot be predicted based on clinical parameters and outcome analysis showed no difference. Genotyping identified a 45 year-old woman with an aggressive and treatment-refractory, ultrastructurally confirmed systemic BRAF-mutant LCH. Prior treatments included glucocorticoid/vinblastine and cladribine-monotherapy. Treatment with vemurafenib over 3 months resulted in a dramatic metabolic response by FDG-PET and stable radiographic disease; the patient experienced progression after 6 months. In conclusion, BRAF mutations in histiocytic proliferations are restricted to lesions of the Langerhans-cell type. While for most LCH-patients efficient therapies are available, patients with BRAF mutations may benefit from the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. PMID:24938183

  18. Fetal magnetocardiography: clinical relevance and feasibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ter Brake, H. J. M.; Rijpma, A. P.; Stinstra, J. G.; Borgmann, J.; Holland, H. J.; Krooshoop, H. J. G.; Peters, M. J.; Flokstra, J.; Quartero, H. W. P.; Rogalla, H.

    2002-03-01

    We investigated the feasibility of a high- Tc SQUID system for fetal magnetocardiography (fetal MCG) aiming at a system without a magnetically shielded room and cooled by a cryocooler. The targeted SQUID resolution was 50 fT/√Hz (1-100 Hz). The research was performed along three lines: environmental noise suppression, cooling and low- Tc experiments. Environmental noise can be suppressed by forming second-order gradiometers from individual magnetometers. Concerning cooling, we investigated the applicability of commercially available coolers. In the low- Tc experiments, the medical relevance of fetal MCG was clearly shown. However, they also indicated that, in order to fully exploit the medical potential, the targeted resolution has to be 10 fT/√Hz. This increased resolution, in combination with the required high reliability of the sensors, will be hard to realize in high- Tc technology. This paper describes the results of the project and discusses the feasibility of a clinical system.

  19. [Sports cardiology : Overview of relevant clinical topics].

    PubMed

    Laszlo, R; Scharhag, J; Burgstahler, C; Striegel, H; Steinacker, J M

    2017-01-23

    Physical activity is nowadays an established therapeutic principle concerning primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases; therefore, in internal sports medicine various aspects go beyond basic cardiological knowledge and require special medical expertise (sports cardiology). Acute cardiac risk is increased during physical activity; therefore, physical activity should be individually phased under consideration of the whole clinical situation. Physical training results in a functional adaptation of the cardiovascular system. Moreover, a structural adaptation can also be observed in competitive athletes but a differentiation between athlete's heart and cardiomyopathy is sometimes challenging. Preparticipation screening verifiably reduces the incidence of sudden cardiac death in athletes. Respective recommendations for the required diagnostics have been published and statutory health insurances are increasingly more willing to bear the incurred costs. Statistically, doping is more frequent in performance-orientated leisure time sports than in competitive sports. Drugs which are relevant for doping have partially irreversible cardiac side effects.

  20. HUPO initiatives relevant to clinical proteomics.

    PubMed

    Hanash, Sam

    2004-04-01

    The past few years have seen a tremendous interest in the potential of proteomics to address unmet needs in biomedicine. Such unmet needs include more effective strategies for early disease detection and monitoring and more effective therapies, in addition to developing a better understanding of disease pathogenesis. Proteomics is particularly suited for investigating biological fluids to identify disease-related alterations and to develop molecular signatures for disease processes. However, much of the effort undertaken in clinical proteomics to date represents either demonstrations of principles or relatively small-scale studies when compared with genomics effort and accomplishments or more pertinently when contrasted with the tremendous untapped potential of clinical proteomics. Clearly, we are in the early stages. What seems to be urgently needed is an organized effort to build a solid foundation for proteomics that includes developing a much needed infrastructure with adequate resources. The Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) is fostering an organized international effort in proteomics that includes initiatives around organ systems and biological fluids that have disease relevance as well as development of proteomics resources.

  1. Mutational signatures in esophageal adenocarcinoma define etiologically distinct subgroups with therapeutic relevance.

    PubMed

    Secrier, Maria; Li, Xiaodun; de Silva, Nadeera; Eldridge, Matthew D; Contino, Gianmarco; Bornschein, Jan; MacRae, Shona; Grehan, Nicola; O'Donovan, Maria; Miremadi, Ahmad; Yang, Tsun-Po; Bower, Lawrence; Chettouh, Hamza; Crawte, Jason; Galeano-Dalmau, Núria; Grabowska, Anna; Saunders, John; Underwood, Tim; Waddell, Nicola; Barbour, Andrew P; Nutzinger, Barbara; Achilleos, Achilleas; Edwards, Paul A W; Lynch, Andy G; Tavaré, Simon; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2016-10-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has a poor outcome, and targeted therapy trials have thus far been disappointing owing to a lack of robust stratification methods. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis of 129 cases demonstrated that this is a heterogeneous cancer dominated by copy number alterations with frequent large-scale rearrangements. Co-amplification of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and/or downstream mitogenic activation is almost ubiquitous; thus tailored combination RTK inhibitor (RTKi) therapy might be required, as we demonstrate in vitro. However, mutational signatures showed three distinct molecular subtypes with potential therapeutic relevance, which we verified in an independent cohort (n = 87): (i) enrichment for BRCA signature with prevalent defects in the homologous recombination pathway; (ii) dominant T>G mutational pattern associated with a high mutational load and neoantigen burden; and (iii) C>A/T mutational pattern with evidence of an aging imprint. These subtypes could be ascertained using a clinically applicable sequencing strategy (low coverage) as a basis for therapy selection.

  2. Pathobiology of human cerebrovascular malformations: basic mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gault, Judith; Sarin, Hemant; Awadallah, Nabil A; Shenkar, Robert; Awad, Issam A

    2004-07-01

    Cerebrovascular malformations affect more than 3% of the population, exposing them to a lifetime risk of hemorrhagic stroke, seizures, and focal neurological deficits. Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) exhibit an immature vessel wall, a brittle hemorrhagic tendency, and epileptogenesis, whereas arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) lack capillary beds and manifest apoplectic bleeding under high-flow conditions. There are also more benign venous anomalies, capillary malformations, and lesions with mixed and transitional features. Advances have been made toward understanding the natural history, radiological and pathological correlates, and clinical management. Yet, mechanisms of lesion genesis and clinical manifestations remain largely unknown, and the clinical behavior in individual patients is highly unpredictable. Lesion pathogenesis likely involves abnormal assembly or maintenance of blood vessels, resulting in dysmorphic vessel phenotypes. Familial CCM disease is in part caused by mutations in a cytoskeletal-related protein that is likely integral to interendothelial cell connectivity and maturation of the vascular wall. Rare familial forms of AVM disease have been correlated with two different transforming growth factor-beta receptor components, possibly causing disturbance in signaling during vascular assembly. Relevance of these mechanisms to the more common and otherwise identical sporadic CCM and AVM lesions is being explored. In this report, basic mechanisms of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and how they possibly relate to the common cerebrovascular malformation lesions are reviewed. Novel concepts are discussed related to the cellular, molecular, and genetic substrates in CCM and AVM as well as to how this knowledge can be applied to predict, explain, and possibly modify clinical disease manifestations.

  3. Clinical mutation assay of tumors: new developments.

    PubMed

    Starostik, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Mutation detection in tumors started with classical cytogenetics as the method of choice more than 50 years ago. Karyotyping proved to be sensitive enough to detect deletions or duplications of large chromosome segments, and translocations. Over time, new techniques were developed to detect mutations that are much smaller in scope. The availability of Sanger sequencing and the invention of the PCR improved the discriminatory power of mutation detection to just one base change in the genomic DNA sequence. Techniques derived from PCR (allele-specific PCR, qPCR) and improved or modified sequencing methods (capillary electrophoresis, pyrosequencing) considerably increased the efficiency and sample throughput of mutation detection assays. With the advent of massive parallel sequencing [also called next-generation sequencing (NGS)] in the past decade, a major shift to even higher sample throughput and a significant decrease in cost per sequenced base occurred. The application of the new technology provided a whole slew of novel biomarkers and potential therapy targets to improve diagnosis and treatment. It even led to changes in cancer classification as new information on the mutation profile of tumors became available that characterizes some disease entities better than morphology. NGS, which usually interrogates multiple genes at once and is a prime example of a multianalyte assay, started to replace older single analyte assays focused on analysis of one target, one gene. However, the transition to these extremely complex NGS-based assays is associated with multiple challenges. There are issues with adequate tissue source of nucleic acids, sequencing library preparation, bioinformatics, government regulations and oversight, reimbursement, and electronic medical records that need to be resolved to successfully implement the new technology in a clinical laboratory.

  4. [The relevance of clinical risk management].

    PubMed

    Gulino, Matteo; Vergallo, Gianluca Montanari; Frati, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Medical activity includes a risk of possible injury or complications for the patients, that should drive the Health Care Institutions to introduce and/ or improve clinical Risk management instruments. Although Italy is still lacking a National project of Clinical Risk Management, a number of efforts have been made by different Italian Regions to introduce instruments of risk management. In addition, most of National Health Care Institutions include actually a Department specifically in charge to manage the clinical risk. Despite the practical difficulties, the results obtained until now suggest that the risk management may represent a useful instrument to contribute to the reduction of errors in clinical conduct. Indeed, the introduction of adequate instruments of prevention and management of clinical risk may help to ameliorate the quality of health care Institution services.

  5. DENDRITIC CELLS: ARE THEY CLINICALLY RELEVANT?

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Roberts, Lee; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Cancer vaccines have undergone a renaissance due to recent clinical trials showing promising immunological data and some clinical benefit to patients. Current trials exploiting dendritic cells (DCs) as vaccines have shown durable tumor regressions in a fraction of patients. Clinical efficacy of current vaccines is hampered by myeloid-derived suppressor cells, inflammatory type 2 T cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs), all of which prevent the generation of effector cells. To improve the clinical efficacy of DC vaccines, we need to design novel and improved strategies that can boost adaptive immunity to cancer, help overcome Tregs and allow the breakdown of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. This can be achieved by exploiting the fast increasing knowledge about the DC system, including the existence of distinct DC subsets. Critical to the design of better vaccines is the concept of distinct DC subsets and distinct DC activation pathways, all contributing to the generation of unique adaptive immune responses. Such novel DC vaccines will be used as monotherapy in patients with resected disease and in combination with antibodies and/or drugs targeting suppressor pathways and modulation of the tumor environment in patients with metastatic disease. PMID:20693842

  6. Clinical Relevance of Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Frijhoff, Jeroen; Winyard, Paul G.; Zarkovic, Neven; Davies, Sean S.; Stocker, Roland; Cheng, David; Knight, Annie R.; Taylor, Emma Louise; Oettrich, Jeannette; Ruskovska, Tatjana; Gasparovic, Ana Cipak; Cuadrado, Antonio; Weber, Daniela; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Grune, Tilman; Schmidt, Harald H.H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative stress is considered to be an important component of various diseases. A vast number of methods have been developed and used in virtually all diseases to measure the extent and nature of oxidative stress, ranging from oxidation of DNA to proteins, lipids, and free amino acids. Recent Advances: An increased understanding of the biology behind diseases and redox biology has led to more specific and sensitive tools to measure oxidative stress markers, which are very diverse and sometimes very low in abundance. Critical Issues: The literature is very heterogeneous. It is often difficult to draw general conclusions on the significance of oxidative stress biomarkers, as only in a limited proportion of diseases have a range of different biomarkers been used, and different biomarkers have been used to study different diseases. In addition, biomarkers are often measured using nonspecific methods, while specific methodologies are often too sophisticated or laborious for routine clinical use. Future Directions: Several markers of oxidative stress still represent a viable biomarker opportunity for clinical use. However, positive findings with currently used biomarkers still need to be validated in larger sample sizes and compared with current clinical standards to establish them as clinical diagnostics. It is important to realize that oxidative stress is a nuanced phenomenon that is difficult to characterize, and one biomarker is not necessarily better than others. The vast diversity in oxidative stress between diseases and conditions has to be taken into account when selecting the most appropriate biomarker. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1144–1170. PMID:26415143

  7. Clinical Relevance Of Systematic CRT Device Optimization.

    PubMed

    Lunati, Maurizio; Magenta, Giovanni; Cattafi, Giuseppe; Moreo, Antonella; Falaschi, Giacomo; Contardi, Danilo; Locati, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) is known as a highly effective therapy in advanced heart failure patients with cardiac dyssynchrony. However, still one third of patients do not respond (or sub-optimally respond) to CRT. Among the many contributors for the high rate of non-responders, the lack of procedures dedicated to CRT device settings optimization (parameters to regulate AV synchrony and VV synchrony) is known as one of the most frequent. The most recent HF/CRT Guidelines do not recommend to carry-out optimization procedures in every CRT patient; they simply state those procedures "could be useful in selected patients", even though their role in improving response has not been proven. Echocardiography techniques still remain the gold-standard reference method to the purpose of CRT settings optimization. However, due to its severe limitations in the routine of CRT patients management (time and resource consuming, scarce reproducibility, inter and intra-operator dependency), echocardiography optimization is widely under-utilized in the real-world of CRT follow-up visits. As a consequence, device-based techniques have been developed to by-pass the need for repeated echo examinations to optimize CRT settings. In this report the available device-based optimization techniques onboard on CRT devices are shortly reviewed, with a specific focus on clinical outcomes observed in trials comparing these methods vs. clinical practice or echo-guided optimization methods. Particular emphasis is dedicated to hemodynamic methods and automaticity of optimization algorithms (making real the concept of "ambulatory CRT optimization"). In fact a hemodynamic-based approach combined with a concept of frequent re-optimization has been associated - although retrospectively - with a better clinical outcome on the long-term follow-up of CRT patients. Large randomized trials are ongoing to prospectively clarify the impact of automatic optimization procedures.

  8. Clinically relevant pharmacogenomic testing in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Korbel, Lindsey; George, Mathew; Kitzmiller, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    Clinicians and patients continue to convey interest in personalized medicine. The objective of personalized medicine is to improve healthcare by tailoring disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment strategies for individuals based on their unique clinical history and genetic composition. This article offers an overview of pharmacogenomics, discusses caveats specific to pharmacogenomics in pediatric populations, provides evidence-based recommendations for pediatric clinicians, and offers insight regarding the future role of pharmacogenomics testing in pediatric medicine. Reviews of the current literature and thoughtful discussions are presented regarding the pharmacogenomics of antidepressants, codeine and oncologic, asthma, and immunomodulatory pharmacotherapies.

  9. Clinical relevance of fascial tissue and dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Klingler, W; Velders, M; Hoppe, K; Pedro, M; Schleip, R

    2014-01-01

    Fascia is composed of collagenous connective tissue surrounding and interpenetrating skeletal muscle, joints, organs, nerves, and vascular beds. Fascial tissue forms a whole-body, continuous three-dimensional viscoelastic matrix of structural support. The classical concept of its mere passive role in force transmission has recently been disproven. Fascial tissue contains contractile elements enabling a modulating role in force generation and also mechanosensory fine-tuning. This hypothesis is supported by in vitro studies demonstrating an autonomous contraction of human lumbar fascia and a pharmacological induction of temporary contraction in rat fascial tissue. The ability of spontaneous regulation of fascial stiffness over a time period ranging from minutes to hours contributes more actively to musculoskeletal dynamics. Imbalance of this regulatory mechanism results in increased or decreased myofascial tonus, or diminished neuromuscular coordination, which are key contributors to the pathomechanisms of several musculoskeletal pathologies and pain syndromes. Here, we summarize anatomical and biomechanical properties of fascial tissue with a special focus on fascial dysfunctions and resulting clinical manifestations. Finally, we discuss current and future potential treatment options that can influence clinical manifestations of pain syndromes associated with fascial tissues.

  10. Clinically relevant advances in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Neumann, Elena; Tarner, Ingo H

    2009-09-14

    Owing to the success of biologics in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), several novel drugs have been introduced in the therapeutic armamentarium, although not all of them have been approved in all countries worldwide. Among the drugs are tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors such as certolizumab pegol and golimumab (the latter of which was the first TNF blocker shown to be effective in patients who had been unsuccessfully treated with other TNF blockers and which can be applied only once a month), and the interleukin-6 receptor antagonist tocilizumab, which not only opens up a completely new field of anti-inflammatory modulation of RA pathophysiology, but also highlights the challenge of novel potential side effects. Moreover, aside from clinical studies showing efficacy in the inhibition of osteoclast activation by the anti-RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand) antibody denosumab, an improved form of steroid application known as slow-release 'tempus tablet' for treatment of RA and several developments in the small-molecule area have been addressed by clinical trials.

  11. A Semantic Web-based System for Mining Genetic Mutations in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Priya, Sambhawa; Jiang, Guoqian; Dasari, Surendra; Zimmermann, Michael T; Wang, Chen; Heflin, Jeff; Chute, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Textual eligibility criteria in clinical trial protocols contain important information about potential clinically relevant pharmacogenomic events. Manual curation for harvesting this evidence is intractable as it is error prone and time consuming. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a Semantic Web-based system that captures and manages mutation evidences and related contextual information from cancer clinical trials. The system has 2 main components: an NLP-based annotator and a Semantic Web ontology-based annotation manager. We evaluated the performance of the annotator in terms of precision and recall. We demonstrated the usefulness of the system by conducting case studies in retrieving relevant clinical trials using a collection of mutations identified from TCGA Leukemia patients and Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology. In conclusion, our system using Semantic Web technologies provides an effective framework for extraction, annotation, standardization and management of genetic mutations in cancer clinical trials.

  12. A Semantic Web-based System for Mining Genetic Mutations in Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Priya, Sambhawa; Jiang, Guoqian; Dasari, Surendra; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Wang, Chen; Heflin, Jeff; Chute, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Textual eligibility criteria in clinical trial protocols contain important information about potential clinically relevant pharmacogenomic events. Manual curation for harvesting this evidence is intractable as it is error prone and time consuming. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a Semantic Web-based system that captures and manages mutation evidences and related contextual information from cancer clinical trials. The system has 2 main components: an NLP-based annotator and a Semantic Web ontology-based annotation manager. We evaluated the performance of the annotator in terms of precision and recall. We demonstrated the usefulness of the system by conducting case studies in retrieving relevant clinical trials using a collection of mutations identified from TCGA Leukemia patients and Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology. In conclusion, our system using Semantic Web technologies provides an effective framework for extraction, annotation, standardization and management of genetic mutations in cancer clinical trials. PMID:26306257

  13. Biofilms: Survival Mechanisms of Clinically Relevant Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Donlan, Rodney M.; Costerton, J. William

    2002-01-01

    Though biofilms were first described by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the theory describing the biofilm process was not developed until 1978. We now understand that biofilms are universal, occurring in aquatic and industrial water systems as well as a large number of environments and medical devices relevant for public health. Using tools such as the scanning electron microscope and, more recently, the confocal laser scanning microscope, biofilm researchers now understand that biofilms are not unstructured, homogeneous deposits of cells and accumulated slime, but complex communities of surface-associated cells enclosed in a polymer matrix containing open water channels. Further studies have shown that the biofilm phenotype can be described in terms of the genes expressed by biofilm-associated cells. Microorganisms growing in a biofilm are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents by one or more mechanisms. Biofilm-associated microorganisms have been shown to be associated with several human diseases, such as native valve endocarditis and cystic fibrosis, and to colonize a wide variety of medical devices. Though epidemiologic evidence points to biofilms as a source of several infectious diseases, the exact mechanisms by which biofilm-associated microorganisms elicit disease are poorly understood. Detachment of cells or cell aggregates, production of endotoxin, increased resistance to the host immune system, and provision of a niche for the generation of resistant organisms are all biofilm processes which could initiate the disease process. Effective strategies to prevent or control biofilms on medical devices must take into consideration the unique and tenacious nature of biofilms. Current intervention strategies are designed to prevent initial device colonization, minimize microbial cell attachment to the device, penetrate the biofilm matrix and kill the associated cells, or remove the device from the patient. In the future, treatments may be based on inhibition of genes

  14. Molecular landscape of acute myeloid leukemia in younger adults and its clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Grimwade, David; Ivey, Adam; Huntly, Brian J P

    2016-01-07

    Recent major advances in understanding the molecular basis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) provide a double-edged sword. Although defining the topology and key features of the molecular landscape are fundamental to development of novel treatment approaches and provide opportunities for greater individualization of therapy, confirmation of the genetic complexity presents a huge challenge to successful translation into routine clinical practice. It is now clear that many genes are recurrently mutated in AML; moreover, individual leukemias harbor multiple mutations and are potentially composed of subclones with differing mutational composition, rendering each patient's AML genetically unique. In order to make sense of the overwhelming mutational data and capitalize on this clinically, it is important to identify (1) critical AML-defining molecular abnormalities that distinguish biological disease entities; (2) mutations, typically arising in subclones, that may influence prognosis but are unlikely to be ideal therapeutic targets; (3) mutations associated with preleukemic clones; and (4) mutations that have been robustly shown to confer independent prognostic information or are therapeutically relevant. The reward of identifying AML-defining molecular lesions present in all leukemic populations (including subclones) has been exemplified by acute promyelocytic leukemia, where successful targeting of the underlying PML-RARα oncoprotein has eliminated the need for chemotherapy for disease cure. Despite the molecular heterogeneity and recognizing that treatment options for other forms of AML are limited, this review will consider the scope for using novel molecular information to improve diagnosis, identify subsets of patients eligible for targeted therapies, refine outcome prediction, and track treatment response.

  15. Chronic HCV infection: epidemiological and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Zaltron, S; Spinetti, A; Biasi, L; Baiguera, C; Castelli, F

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), first recognized as a cause of transfusion-associated acute and chronic hepatitis in 1989, plays a major role as a cause of chronic liver injury, with potential for neoplastic degeneration. It is mainly transmitted by the parenteral route. However, although with lower efficiency, it may be also transmitted by sexual intercourses and by the mother-to-child route. Epidemiological evidence shows that a wave of infection occurred in the 1945-65 period (baby boomers) in western countries. After acute infection, as many as 50-85% of the patients fail to clear the virus resulting in chronic liver infection and/or disease. It is estimated that, on a global scale, about 170 million people are chronically infected with HCV, leading to about 350.000 deaths yearly. Among western countries southern Europe, and particularly Italy, is among the most affected areas. The impact on the public health systems is noteworthy, with high number of hospitalizations due to chronic liver disease, cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. While waiting for a safe and effective vaccine to be made available, new promising direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs offer a better therapeutic scenario than in the past even for the poor responder genotypes 1 and 4, provided that effective screening and care is offered. However, the long and aspecific prodromic period before clinical symptoms develop is a major obstacle to early detection and treatment. Effective screening strategies may target at-risk groups or age specific groups, as recently recommended by the CDC.

  16. Chronic HCV infection: epidemiological and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), first recognized as a cause of transfusion-associated acute and chronic hepatitis in 1989, plays a major role as a cause of chronic liver injury, with potential for neoplastic degeneration. It is mainly transmitted by the parenteral route. However, although with lower efficiency, it may be also transmitted by sexual intercourses and by the mother-to-child route. Epidemiological evidence shows that a wave of infection occurred in the 1945-65 period (baby boomers) in western countries. After acute infection, as many as 50-85% of the patients fail to clear the virus resulting in chronic liver infection and/or disease. It is estimated that, on a global scale, about 170 million people are chronically infected with HCV, leading to about 350.000 deaths yearly. Among western countries southern Europe, and particularly Italy, is among the most affected areas. The impact on the public health systems is noteworthy, with high number of hospitalizations due to chronic liver disease, cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. While waiting for a safe and effective vaccine to be made available, new promising direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs offer a better therapeutic scenario than in the past even for the poor responder genotypes 1 and 4, provided that effective screening and care is offered. However, the long and aspecific prodromic period before clinical symptoms develop is a major obstacle to early detection and treatment. Effective screening strategies may target at-risk groups or age specific groups, as recently recommended by the CDC. PMID:23173556

  17. Human RAG mutations: biochemistry and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kim, Min-Sung; Walter, Jolan E; Lee, Yu Nee

    2016-04-01

    The recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG1) and RAG2 proteins initiate the V(D)J recombination process, which ultimately enables the generation of T cells and B cells with a diversified repertoire of antigen-specific receptors. Mutations of the RAG genes in humans are associated with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes, ranging from severe combined immunodeficiency to autoimmunity. Recently, novel insights into the phenotypic diversity of this disease have been provided by resolving the crystal structure of the RAG complex, by developing novel assays to test recombination activity of the mutant RAG proteins and by characterizing the molecular and cellular basis of immune dysregulation in patients with RAG deficiency.

  18. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve.

  19. Molecular driver alterations and their clinical relevance in cancer of unknown primary site.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Harald; Pfarr, Nicole; Kriegsmann, Mark; Endris, Volker; Hielscher, Thomas; Lohneis, Philipp; Folprecht, Gunnar; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Dietel, Manfred; Weichert, Wilko; Krämer, Alwin

    2016-07-12

    Cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is defined as metastatic solid malignancy where no primary tumor is detected despite appropriate staging. About 90% of CUP represent adenocarcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma. Since therapy regimens are only modestly effective, identification of the molecular landscape of these neoplasms might be a promising approach to direct CUP therapy and aid in tumor classification. We screened a cohort of 128 patients with adenocarcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma meeting the definition of CUP. Massive parallel multigene sequencing of 50 genes, which had been selected due to their relevance as oncogenic drivers or druggable molecular targets could ultimately be performed on samples from 55 patients for whom complete clinical datasets were also available. Overall, 60 tumor-specific mutations and 29 amplifications/deletions, as revealed by coverage analysis, were detected in 46 cases (84%). The most frequently mutated genes were TP53 (30 cases, 55%), KRAS (9 cases, 16%), CDKN2A (5 cases, 9%), and SMAD4 (5 cases, 9%). The most frequently deleted gene was CDKN2A (8 cases, 15%). KRAS and CDKN2A mutations significantly correlated with poor progression-free survival (PFS) and, in case of KRAS, overall survival (OS). WIldtype TP53 and female sex defined a relatively favorable category, with favorable PFS and OS. 8 cases (15%) harbored mutations that may be targetable by currently approved drugs. Taken together, Mutations of relevant driver genes are present in the vast majority of CUP tumors. Some of them impact on prognosis and a subset is putatively druggable.

  20. Clinical disease presentation and ECG characteristics of LMNA mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ollila, Laura; Nikus, Kjell; Holmström, Miia; Jalanko, Mikko; Jurkko, Raija; Kaartinen, Maija; Koskenvuo, Juha; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kärkkäinen, Satu; Palojoki, Eeva; Reissell, Eeva; Piirilä, Päivi; Heliö, Tiina

    2017-01-01

    Objective Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C of the nuclear lamina are a frequent cause of cardiomyopathy accounting for 5–8% of familial dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Our aim was to study disease onset, presentation and progression among LMNA mutation carriers. Methods Clinical follow-up data from 27 LMNA mutation carriers and 78 patients with idiopathic DCM without an LMNA mutation were collected. In addition, ECG data were collected and analysed systematically from 20 healthy controls. Results Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed no difference in event-free survival (death, heart transplant, resuscitation and appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy included as events) between LMNA mutation carriers and DCM controls (p=0.5). LMNA mutation carriers presented with atrial fibrillation at a younger age than the DCM controls (47 vs 57 years, p=0.003). Male LMNA mutation carriers presented with clinical manifestations roughly a decade earlier than females. In close follow-up non-sustained ventricular tachycardia was detected in 78% of LMNA mutation carriers. ECG signs of septal remodelling were present in 81% of the LMNA mutation carriers, 21% of the DCM controls and none of the healthy controls giving a high sensitivity and specificity for the standard ECG in distinguishing LMNA mutation carriers from patients with DCM and healthy controls. Conclusions Male LMNA mutation carriers present clinical manifestations at a younger age than females. ECG septal remodelling appears to distinguish LMNA mutation carriers from healthy controls and patients with DCM without LMNA mutations. PMID:28123761

  1. Complement Factor B Mutations in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome—Disease-Relevant or Benign?

    PubMed Central

    Marinozzi, Maria Chiara; Vergoz, Laura; Rybkine, Tania; Ngo, Stephanie; Bettoni, Serena; Pashov, Anastas; Cayla, Mathieu; Tabarin, Fanny; Jablonski, Mathieu; Hue, Christophe; Smith, Richard J.; Noris, Marina; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Donadelli, Roberta; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a genetic ultrarare renal disease associated with overactivation of the alternative pathway of complement. Four gain-of-function mutations that form a hyperactive or deregulated C3 convertase have been identified in Factor B (FB) ligand binding sites. Here, we studied the functional consequences of 10 FB genetic changes recently identified from different aHUS cohorts. Using several tests for alternative C3 and C5 convertase formation and regulation, we identified two gain-of-function and potentially disease-relevant mutations that formed either an overactive convertase (M433I) or a convertase resistant to decay by FH (K298Q). One mutation (R178Q) produced a partially cleaved protein with no ligand binding or functional activity. Seven genetic changes led to near-normal or only slightly reduced ligand binding and functional activity compared with the most common polymorphism at position 7, R7. Notably, none of the algorithms used to predict the disease relevance of FB mutations agreed completely with the experimental data, suggesting that in silico approaches should be undertaken with caution. These data, combined with previously published results, suggest that 9 of 15 FB genetic changes identified in patients with aHUS are unrelated to disease pathogenesis. This study highlights that functional assessment of identified nucleotide changes in FB is mandatory to confirm disease association. PMID:24652797

  2. Clinical Relevance of Discourse Characteristics after Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Margaret Lehman

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Discourse characteristics of adults with right hemisphere brain damage are similar to those reported for healthy older adults, prompting the question of whether changes are due to neurological lesions or normal aging processes. The clinical relevance of potential differences across groups was examined through ratings by speech-language…

  3. Clinically relevant pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions in antiretroviral therapy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In t...

  4. Molecular landscape of acute myeloid leukemia in younger adults and its clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Ivey, Adam; Huntly, Brian J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Recent major advances in understanding the molecular basis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) provide a double-edged sword. Although defining the topology and key features of the molecular landscape are fundamental to development of novel treatment approaches and provide opportunities for greater individualization of therapy, confirmation of the genetic complexity presents a huge challenge to successful translation into routine clinical practice. It is now clear that many genes are recurrently mutated in AML; moreover, individual leukemias harbor multiple mutations and are potentially composed of subclones with differing mutational composition, rendering each patient’s AML genetically unique. In order to make sense of the overwhelming mutational data and capitalize on this clinically, it is important to identify (1) critical AML-defining molecular abnormalities that distinguish biological disease entities; (2) mutations, typically arising in subclones, that may influence prognosis but are unlikely to be ideal therapeutic targets; (3) mutations associated with preleukemic clones; and (4) mutations that have been robustly shown to confer independent prognostic information or are therapeutically relevant. The reward of identifying AML-defining molecular lesions present in all leukemic populations (including subclones) has been exemplified by acute promyelocytic leukemia, where successful targeting of the underlying PML-RARα oncoprotein has eliminated the need for chemotherapy for disease cure. Despite the molecular heterogeneity and recognizing that treatment options for other forms of AML are limited, this review will consider the scope for using novel molecular information to improve diagnosis, identify subsets of patients eligible for targeted therapies, refine outcome prediction, and track treatment response. PMID:26660431

  5. Key Clinical Features to Identify Girls with "CDKL5" Mutations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Nectoux, Juliette; Rosas-Vargas, Haydee; Milh, Mathieu; Boddaert, Nathalie; Girard, Benoit; Cances, Claude; Ville, Dorothee; Afenjar, Alexandra; Rio, Marlene; Heron, Delphine; Morel, Marie Ange N'Guyen; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Philippe, Christophe; Jonveaux, Philippe; Chelly, Jamel; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the human X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 ("CDKL5") gene have been shown to cause infantile spasms as well as Rett syndrome (RTT)-like phenotype. To date, less than 25 different mutations have been reported. So far, there are still little data on the key clinical diagnosis criteria and on the natural history of…

  6. Assay Platform for Clinically Relevant Metallo-β-lactamases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) are a growing threat to the use of almost all clinically used β-lactam antibiotics. The identification of broad-spectrum MBL inhibitors is hampered by the lack of a suitable screening platform, consisting of appropriate substrates and a set of clinically relevant MBLs. We report procedures for the preparation of a set of clinically relevant metallo-β-lactamases (i.e., NDM-1 (New Delhi MBL), IMP-1 (Imipenemase), SPM-1 (São Paulo MBL), and VIM-2 (Verona integron-encoded MBL)) and the identification of suitable fluorogenic substrates (umbelliferone-derived cephalosporins). The fluorogenic substrates were compared to chromogenic substrates (CENTA, nitrocefin, and imipenem), showing improved sensitivity and kinetic parameters. The efficiency of the fluorogenic substrates was exemplified by inhibitor screening, identifying 4-chloroisoquinolinols as potential pan MBL inhibitors. PMID:23898798

  7. Antidrug Antibody Formation in Oncology: Clinical Relevance and Challenges.

    PubMed

    van Brummelen, Emilie M J; Ros, Willeke; Wolbink, Gertjan; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M

    2016-10-01

    : In oncology, an increasing number of targeted anticancer agents and immunotherapies are of biological origin. These biological drugs may trigger immune responses that lead to the formation of antidrug antibodies (ADAs). ADAs are directed against immunogenic parts of the drug and may affect efficacy and safety. In other medical fields, such as rheumatology and hematology, the relevance of ADA formation is well established. However, the relevance of ADAs in oncology is just starting to be recognized, and literature on this topic is scarce. In an attempt to fill this gap in the literature, we provide an up-to-date status of ADA formation in oncology. In this focused review, data on ADAs was extracted from 81 clinical trials with biological anticancer agents. We found that most biological anticancer drugs in these trials are immunogenic and induce ADAs (63%). However, it is difficult to establish the clinical relevance of these ADAs. In order to determine this relevance, the possible effects of ADAs on pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety parameters need to be investigated. Our data show that this was done in fewer than 50% of the trials. In addition, we describe the incidence and consequences of ADAs for registered agents. We highlight the challenges in ADA detection and argue for the importance of validating, standardizing, and describing well the used assays. Finally, we discuss prevention strategies such as immunosuppression and regimen adaptations. We encourage the launch of clinical trials that explore these strategies in oncology.

  8. Polymorphic Mutation Frequencies of Clinical and Environmental Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Populations▿

    PubMed Central

    Turrientes, María Carmen; Baquero, María Rosario; Sánchez, María Blanca; Valdezate, Sylvia; Escudero, Esther; Berg, Gabrielle; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando; Galán, Juan Carlos; Martínez, José Luis

    2010-01-01

    Mutation frequencies were studied in 174 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates from clinical and nonclinical environments by detecting spontaneous rifampin-resistant mutants in otherwise-susceptible populations. The distribution of mutation frequencies followed a pattern similar to that found for other bacterial species, with a modal value of 1 × 10−8. Nevertheless, the proportion of isolates showing mutation frequencies below the modal value (hypomutators) was significantly higher for S. maltophilia than those so far reported in other organisms. Low mutation frequencies were particularly frequent among environmental S. maltophilia strains (58.3%), whereas strong mutators were found only among isolates with a clinical origin. These results indicate that clinical environments might select bacterial populations with high mutation frequencies, likely by second-order selection processes. In several of the strong-mutator isolates, functional-complementation assays with a wild-type allele of the mutS gene demonstrated that the mutator phenotype was due to the impairment of MutS activity. In silico analysis of the amino acid changes present in the MutS proteins of these hypermutator strains in comparison with the normomutator isolates suggests that the cause of the defect in MutS might be a H683P amino acid change. PMID:20097818

  9. Polymorphic mutation frequencies of clinical and environmental Stenotrophomonas maltophilia populations.

    PubMed

    Turrientes, María Carmen; Baquero, María Rosario; Sánchez, María Blanca; Valdezate, Sylvia; Escudero, Esther; Berg, Gabrielle; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando; Galán, Juan Carlos; Martínez, José Luis

    2010-03-01

    Mutation frequencies were studied in 174 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates from clinical and nonclinical environments by detecting spontaneous rifampin-resistant mutants in otherwise-susceptible populations. The distribution of mutation frequencies followed a pattern similar to that found for other bacterial species, with a modal value of 1 x 10(-8). Nevertheless, the proportion of isolates showing mutation frequencies below the modal value (hypomutators) was significantly higher for S. maltophilia than those so far reported in other organisms. Low mutation frequencies were particularly frequent among environmental S. maltophilia strains (58.3%), whereas strong mutators were found only among isolates with a clinical origin. These results indicate that clinical environments might select bacterial populations with high mutation frequencies, likely by second-order selection processes. In several of the strong-mutator isolates, functional-complementation assays with a wild-type allele of the mutS gene demonstrated that the mutator phenotype was due to the impairment of MutS activity. In silico analysis of the amino acid changes present in the MutS proteins of these hypermutator strains in comparison with the normomutator isolates suggests that the cause of the defect in MutS might be a H683P amino acid change.

  10. Clinical and biological implications of driver mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Papaemmanuil, Elli; Gerstung, Moritz; Malcovati, Luca; Tauro, Sudhir; Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Yoon, Chris J.; Ellis, Peter; Wedge, David C.; Pellagatti, Andrea; Shlien, Adam; Groves, Michael John; Forbes, Simon A.; Raine, Keiran; Hinton, Jon; Mudie, Laura J.; McLaren, Stuart; Hardy, Claire; Latimer, Calli; Della Porta, Matteo G.; O’Meara, Sarah; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Galli, Anna; Butler, Adam P.; Walldin, Gunilla; Teague, Jon W.; Quek, Lynn; Sternberg, Alex; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Cross, Nicholas C. P.; Green, Anthony R.; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Vyas, Paresh; Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva; Bowen, David; Cazzola, Mario; Stratton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of chronic hematological malignancies characterized by dysplasia, ineffective hematopoiesis and a variable risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Sequencing of MDS genomes has identified mutations in genes implicated in RNA splicing, DNA modification, chromatin regulation, and cell signaling. We sequenced 111 genes across 738 patients with MDS or closely related neoplasms (including chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and MDS–myeloproliferative neoplasms) to explore the role of acquired mutations in MDS biology and clinical phenotype. Seventy-eight percent of patients had 1 or more oncogenic mutations. We identify complex patterns of pairwise association between genes, indicative of epistatic interactions involving components of the spliceosome machinery and epigenetic modifiers. Coupled with inferences on subclonal mutations, these data suggest a hypothesis of genetic “predestination,” in which early driver mutations, typically affecting genes involved in RNA splicing, dictate future trajectories of disease evolution with distinct clinical phenotypes. Driver mutations had equivalent prognostic significance, whether clonal or subclonal, and leukemia-free survival deteriorated steadily as numbers of driver mutations increased. Thus, analysis of oncogenic mutations in large, well-characterized cohorts of patients illustrates the interconnections between the cancer genome and disease biology, with considerable potential for clinical application. PMID:24030381

  11. G388R mutation of the FGFR4 gene is not relevant to breast cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Jézéquel, P; Campion, L; Joalland, M-P; Millour, M; Dravet, F; Classe, J-M; Delecroix, V; Deporte, R; Fumoleau, P; Ricolleau, G

    2004-01-12

    This study screened large cohorts of node-positive and node-negative breast cancer patients to determine whether the G388R mutation of the FGFR4 gene is a useful prognostic marker for breast cancer as reported by Bange et al in 2002. Node-positive (n=139) and node-negative (n=95) breast cancer cohorts selected for mutation screening were followed up for median periods of 89 and 87 months, respectively. PCR - RFLP analysis was modified to facilitate molecular screening. Curves for disease-free survival were plotted according to the Kaplan - Meier method, and a log-rank test was used for comparisons between groups. Three other nonparametric linear rank-tests particularly suitable for investigating possible relations between G388R mutation and early cancer progression were also used. Kaplan - Meier analysis based on any of the four nonparametric linear rank tests performed for node-positive and node-negative patients was not indicative of disease-free survival time. G388R mutation of the FGFR4 gene is not relevant for breast cancer prognosis.

  12. Symptoms and clinical relevance: a dilemma for clinical trials on prevention of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Bounameaux, Henri; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2013-04-01

    The outcomes of thromboprophylactic trials have been debated for decades. Recently, the 9th edition of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) evidence-based clinical practice guidelines based their strong recommendations only on patient-important outcomes. Practically, symptoms were considered the crucial element. Consequently, studies that primarily aimed at reducing venographic thrombi were considered less pertinent than studies that focused on symptomatic thrombosis. In the present viewpoint, we challenge the argument that "symptomatic" and "clinically relevant" are interchangeable. In particular, the case is made that asymptomatic events may be clinically relevant and that asymptomatic venographically detected thrombosis is a clinically relevant surrogate outcome for fatal pulmonary embolism.

  13. Juxtaposed atrial appendages: A curiosity with some clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Singhi, Anil Kumar; Pradhan, Priya; Agarwal, Ravi; Sivakumar, Kothandum

    2016-01-01

    If the atrial appendages lie adjacent to each other on same side of the great arteries, instead of encircling their roots, they are referred as juxtaposed. Right juxtaposition of atrial appendages is less common than left juxtaposition. The images demonstrate the classical radiological, echocardiographic, and surgical images of juxtaposed atrial appendages. Their clinical incidence, associations, and relevance during interventional and surgical procedures are discussed. PMID:27212860

  14. Walnut allergens: molecular characterization, detection and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Costa, J; Carrapatoso, I; Oliveira, M B P P; Mafra, I

    2014-03-01

    Food-induced allergies have been regarded as an emergent problem of public health. Classified as important allergenic ingredients, the presence of walnut and other nuts as hidden allergens in processed foods constitutes a risk for sensitized individuals, being a real problem of allergen management. Attending to the increasing importance dedicated to walnut allergy, this review intends to provide the relevant and up-to-date information on main issues such as the prevalence of walnut allergy, the clinical threshold levels, the molecular characterization of walnut allergens and their clinical relevance, as well as the methodologies for walnut allergen detection in foods. As the walnut used in human diet comes from Juglans regia and Juglans nigra, the molecular characterization of the allergens from both species included in the prolamins (Jug r 1, Jug n 1 and Jug r 3), cupins (Jug r 2, Jug n 2 and Jug r 4) and profilins (Jug r 5), together with respective clinical relevance, were compiled in this review. The most recent progresses on walnut allergen detection techniques (protein- and DNA-based) are described and critically compared, including the emergent multitarget approaches.

  15. Prognostic Relevance of Tumor Purity and TERT Promoter Mutations on MGMT Promoter Methylation in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schulze Heuling, Eva; Knab, Felix; Radke, Josefine; Eskilsson, Eskil; Martinez-Ledesma, Emmanuel; Koch, Arend; Czabanka, Marcus; Dieterich, Christoph; Verhaak, Roel G; Harms, Christoph; Euskirchen, Philipp

    2017-02-01

    Promoter methylation status of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair enzyme, is a critical biomarker in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) as treatment decisions and clinical trial inclusion rely on its accurate assessment. However, interpretation of results is complicated by poor inter-assay reproducibility as well as weak a correlation between methylation status and expression levels of MGMT. The present study systematically investigates the influence of tumor purity on tissue subjected to MGMT analysis. A quantitative, allele-specific real-time PCR (qAS-PCR) assay was developed to determine genotype and mutant allele frequency of telomerase promoter (pTERT) mutations as a direct measure of tumor purity. We studied tumor purity, pTERT mutation by Sanger sequencing, MGMT methylation by pyrosequencing, IDH1 mutation status, and clinical parameters in a cohort of high-grade gliomas (n=97). The qAS-PCR reliably predicted pTERT genotype and tumor purity compared with independent methods. Tumor purity positively and significantly correlated with the extent of methylation in MGMT methylated GBMs. Extent of MGMT methylation differed significantly with respect to pTERT mutation hotspot (C228T vs. C250T). Interestingly, frontal lobe tumors showed greater tumor purity than those in other locations. Above all, tumor purity was identified as an independent prognostic factor in GBM. In conclusion, we determined mutual associations of tumor purity with MGMT methylation and pTERT mutations and found that the extent of MGMT methylation reflects tumor purity. In turn, tumor purity is prognostic in IDH1 wildtype GBM.

  16. Molecular driver alterations and their clinical relevance in cancer of unknown primary site

    PubMed Central

    Endris, Volker; Hielscher, Thomas; Lohneis, Philipp; Folprecht, Gunnar; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Dietel, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is defined as metastatic solid malignancy where no primary tumor is detected despite appropriate staging. About 90% of CUP represent adenocarcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma. Since therapy regimens are only modestly effective, identification of the molecular landscape of these neoplasms might be a promising approach to direct CUP therapy and aid in tumor classification. We screened a cohort of 128 patients with adenocarcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma meeting the definition of CUP. Massive parallel multigene sequencing of 50 genes, which had been selected due to their relevance as oncogenic drivers or druggable molecular targets could ultimately be performed on samples from 55 patients for whom complete clinical datasets were also available. Overall, 60 tumor-specific mutations and 29 amplifications/deletions, as revealed by coverage analysis, were detected in 46 cases (84%). The most frequently mutated genes were TP53 (30 cases, 55%), KRAS (9 cases, 16%), CDKN2A (5 cases, 9%), and SMAD4 (5 cases, 9%). The most frequently deleted gene was CDKN2A (8 cases, 15%). KRAS and CDKN2A mutations significantly correlated with poor progression-free survival (PFS) and, in case of KRAS, overall survival (OS). WIldtype TP53 and female sex defined a relatively favorable category, with favorable PFS and OS. 8 cases (15%) harbored mutations that may be targetable by currently approved drugs. Taken together, Mutations of relevant driver genes are present in the vast majority of CUP tumors. Some of them impact on prognosis and a subset is putatively druggable. PMID:27322425

  17. A Systematic Approach for Discovering Novel, Clinically Relevant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Simmon, Keith E.; Fisher, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (16S) is a reference method for bacterial identification. Its expanded use has led to increased recognition of novel bacterial species. In most clinical laboratories, novel species are infrequently encountered, and their pathogenic potential is often difficult to assess. We reviewed partial 16S sequences from >26,000 clinical isolates, analyzed during February 2006–June 2010, and identified 673 that have <99% sequence identity with valid reference sequences and are thus possibly novel species. Of these 673 isolates, 111 may represent novel genera (<95% identity). Isolates from 95 novel taxa were recovered from multiple patients, indicating possible clinical relevance. Most repeatedly encountered novel taxa belonged to the genera Nocardia (14 novel taxa, 42 isolates) and Actinomyces (12 novel taxa, 52 isolates). This systematic approach for recognition of novel species with potential diagnostic or therapeutic relevance provides a basis for epidemiologic surveys and improvement of sequence databases and may lead to identification of new clinical entities. PMID:22377371

  18. Hypersensitivities for acetaldehyde and other agents among cancer cells null for clinically relevant Fanconi anemia genes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soma; Sur, Surojit; Yerram, Sashidhar R; Rago, Carlo; Bhunia, Anil K; Hossain, M Zulfiquer; Paun, Bogdan C; Ren, Yunzhao R; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Azad, Nilofer A; Kern, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    Large-magnitude numerical distinctions (>10-fold) among drug responses of genetically contrasting cancers were crucial for guiding the development of some targeted therapies. Similar strategies brought epidemiological clues and prevention goals for genetic diseases. Such numerical guides, however, were incomplete or low magnitude for Fanconi anemia pathway (FANC) gene mutations relevant to cancer in FANC-mutation carriers (heterozygotes). We generated a four-gene FANC-null cancer panel, including the engineering of new PALB2/FANCN-null cancer cells by homologous recombination. A characteristic matching of FANCC-null, FANCG-null, BRCA2/FANCD1-null, and PALB2/FANCN-null phenotypes was confirmed by uniform tumor regression on single-dose cross-linker therapy in mice and by shared chemical hypersensitivities to various inter-strand cross-linking agents and γ-radiation in vitro. Some compounds, however, had contrasting magnitudes of sensitivity; a strikingly high (19- to 22-fold) hypersensitivity was seen among PALB2-null and BRCA2-null cells for the ethanol metabolite, acetaldehyde, associated with widespread chromosomal breakage at a concentration not producing breaks in parental cells. Because FANC-defective cancer cells can share or differ in their chemical sensitivities, patterns of selective hypersensitivity hold implications for the evolutionary understanding of this pathway. Clinical decisions for cancer-relevant prevention and management of FANC-mutation carriers could be modified by expanded studies of high-magnitude sensitivities.

  19. Relevance of ID3-TCF3-CCND3 pathway mutations in pediatric aggressive B-cell lymphoma treated according to the NHL-BFM protocols.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Marius; Bonn, Bettina R; Zimmermann, Martin; Lange, Jonas; Möricke, Anja; Klapper, Wolfram; Oschlies, Ilske; Szczepanowski, Monika; Nagel, Inga; Schrappe, Martin; Loeffler, Markus; Siebert, Reiner; Reiter, Alfred; Burkhardt, Birgit

    2017-02-16

    Mature B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is the most common subtype of Non-Hodgkin lymphoma in childhood and adolescence. B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma are further classified into histological subtypes, with Burkitt lymphoma and Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma being the most common subgroups in pediatric patients. Translocations involving the MYC oncogene are known as relevant but not sufficient hit for Burkitt lymphoma pathogenesis. Recently published large-scale next-generation sequencing studies unveiled sets of additional recurrently mutated genes in samples of pediatric and adult B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients. ID3, TCF3 and CCND3 are potential drivers of Burkitt-lymphomagenesis. In the present study frequency and clinical relevance of mutations in ID3, TCF3 and CCND3 were analyzed within a well-defined cohort of 84 uniformly diagnosed and treated pediatric B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients of the Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster group (NHL-BFM). Mutation frequency was 78% (ID3), 13% (TCF3) and 36% (CCND3) in Burkitt lymphoma (including Burkitt leukemia). ID3 and CCND3 mutations were associated with more advanced stages of the disease in MYC rearrangement positive Burkitt lymphoma. In conclusion ID3-TCF3-CCND3 pathway genes are mutated in more than 88% of MYC-rearranged pediatric B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and the pathway may represent a highly relevant second hit of Burkitt lymphoma pathogenesis especially in children and adolescents.

  20. Clinically relevant drug–drug interactions in oncology

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Howard L

    1998-01-01

    Although anticancer agents are one of the most toxic classes of medication prescribed today, there is relatively little information available about clinically relevant drug–drug interactions. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions have been described, including alterations in absorption, catabolism, and excretion. For example, an increased bioavailability of 6-mercaptopurine has been observed when combined with either allopurinol or methotrexate, leading to increased toxicity in some patients. Induction of etoposide or teniposide clearance by anticonvulsants has also been described, resulting in a lower systemic exposure and risk for lower anticancer activity. Alterations in elimination of methotrexate has been observed with probenecid, presumably through competition for renal secretion. There are also several examples of pharmacodynamic interactions. The combination of 5-fluorouracil plus folinic acid results in more efficient inhibition of thymidylate synthase, a finding which is now utilized routinely in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Improvements in the in vitro and early clinical testing now allow a relatively high degree of prediction of potential clinical drug interactions, prior to observations of untoward drug effects. In conclusion, drug interactions among commonly used anticancer agents have been identified. Their clinical significance can have more impact than many other classes of medications due to the narrow therapeutic index of antineoplastic agents and the potential for lethal side-effects. It is only through prospective, preclinical and early clinical evaluation that the presence of clinically significant drug interactions can be identified and the information used to provide better therapy for this significant health problem. PMID:9663808

  1. Metabolism of psilocybin and psilocin: clinical and forensic toxicological relevance.

    PubMed

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge

    2017-02-01

    Psilocybin and psilocin are controlled substances in many countries. These are the two main hallucinogenic compounds of the "magic mushrooms" and both act as agonists or partial agonists at 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A subtype receptors. During the last few years, psilocybin and psilocin have gained therapeutic relevance but considerable physiological variability between individuals that can influence dose-response and toxicological profile has been reported. This review aims to discuss metabolism of psilocybin and psilocin, by presenting all major and minor psychoactive metabolites. Psilocybin is primarily a pro-drug that is dephosphorylated by alkaline phosphatase to active metabolite psilocin. This last is then further metabolized, psilocin-O-glucuronide being the main urinary metabolite with clinical and forensic relevance in diagnosis.

  2. Clinically-Relevant Cell Sources for TMJ Disc Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Johns, D.E.; Wong, M. E.; Athanasiou, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue-engineering of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc aims to provide patients with TMJ disorders an option to replace diseased tissue with autologous, functional tissue. This study examined clinically-relevant cell sources by comparing costal chondrocytes, dermal fibroblasts, a mixture of the two, and TMJ disc cells in a scaffoldless tissue-engineering approach. It was hypothesized that all constructs would produce matrix relevant to the TMJ disc, but the mixture constructs were expected to appear most like the TMJ disc constructs. Costal chondrocyte and mixture constructs were morphologically and biochemically superior to the TMJ disc and dermal fibroblast constructs, and their compressive properties were not significantly different. Costal chondrocyte constructs produced almost 40 times more collagen and 800 times more glycosaminoglycans than TMJ constructs. This study demonstrates the ability of costal chondrocytes to produce extracellular matrix that may function in a TMJ disc replacement. PMID:18502963

  3. Real time and label free profiling of clinically relevant exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sina, Abu Ali Ibn; Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Dey, Shuvashis; Carrascosa, Laura G.; Shiddiky, Muhammad J. A.; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-derived exosomes possess significant clinical relevance due to their unique composition of genetic and protein material that is representative of the parent tumor. Specific isolation as well as identification of proportions of these clinically relevant exosomes (CREs) from biological samples could help to better understand their clinical significance as cancer biomarkers. Herein, we present a simple approach for quantification of the proportion of CREs within the bulk exosome population isolated from patient serum. This proportion of CREs can potentially inform on the disease stage and enable non-invasive monitoring of inter-individual variations in tumor-receptor expression levels. Our approach utilises a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) platform to quantify the proportion of CREs in a two-step strategy that involves (i) initial isolation of bulk exosome population using tetraspanin biomarkers (i.e., CD9, CD63), and (ii) subsequent detection of CREs within the captured bulk exosomes using tumor-specific markers (e.g., human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)). We demonstrate the isolation of bulk exosome population and detection of as low as 10% HER2(+) exosomes from samples containing designated proportions of HER2(+) BT474 and HER2(−) MDA-MB-231 cell derived exosomes. We also demonstrate the successful isolation of exosomes from a small cohort of breast cancer patient samples and identified that approximately 14–35% of their bulk population express HER2. PMID:27464736

  4. Hazelnut Allergens: Molecular Characterization, Detection, and Clinical Relevance.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Mafra, Isabel; Carrapatoso, Isabel; Oliveira, Maria Beatriz P P

    2016-11-17

    In last few years, special attention has been given to food-induced allergies, in which hazelnut allergy is highlighted. Hazelnut is one of the most commonly consumed tree nuts, being largely used by the food industry in a variety of processed foods. It has been regarded as a food with potential health benefits, but also as a source of allergens capable of inducing mild to severe allergic reactions in sensitized individuals. Considering the great number of reports addressing hazelnut allergens, with an estimated increasing trend, this review intends to assemble all the relevant information available so far on the following main issues: prevalence of tree nut allergy, clinical threshold levels, molecular characterization of hazelnut allergens (Cor a 1, Cor a 2, Cor a 8, Cor a 9, Cor a 10, Cor a 11, Cor a 12, Cor a 14, and Cor a TLP) and their clinical relevance, and methodologies for detection of hazelnut allergens in foods. A comprehensive overview of the current data about the molecular characterization of hazelnut allergens is presented, relating to biochemical classification and biological function with clinical importance. Recent advances in hazelnut allergen detection methodologies are summarized and compared, including all the novel protein-based and DNA-based approaches.

  5. Clinically Relevant Pharmacokinetic Herb-drug Interactions in Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fasinu, Pius S; Gurley, Bill J; Walker, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In this review, the bases for potential interaction of medicinal herbs with specific antiretroviral drugs are presented, and several botanicals are discussed for which clinically relevant interactions in humans are established. Such studies have provided, in most cases, sufficient ground to warrant the avoidance of concurrent administration of antiretroviral (ARVs) drugs with St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), black pepper (Piper species) and grapefruit juice. Other botanicals that require caution in the use with antiretrovirals include African potato (Hypoxis hemerocallidea), ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), ginseng (Panax species), garlic (Allium sativum), goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and kava kava (Piper methysticum). The knowledge of clinically significant herb-drug interaction will be important in order to avoid herb-induced risk of sub-therapeutic exposure to ARVs (which can lead to viral resistance) or the precipitation of toxicity (which may lead to poor compliance and/or discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy).

  6. Glucocerebrosidase mutations in clinical and pathologically proven Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Juliane; Bras, Jose; Deas, Emma; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Parkkinen, Laura; Lachmann, Robin H.; Li, Abi; Holton, Janice; Guerreiro, Rita; Paudel, Reema; Segarane, Badmavady; Singleton, Andrew; Lees, Andrew; Hardy, John; Houlden, Henry; Revesz, Tamas; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) are associated with Gaucher's disease, the most common lysosomal storage disorder. Parkinsonism is an established feature of Gaucher's disease and an increased frequency of mutations in GBA has been reported in several different ethnic series with sporadic Parkinson's disease. In this study, we evaluated the frequency of GBA mutations in British patients affected by Parkinson's disease. We utilized the DNA of 790 patients and 257 controls, matched for age and ethnicity, to screen for mutations within the GBA gene. Clinical data on all identified GBA mutation carriers was reviewed and analysed. Additionally, in all cases where brain material was available, a neuropathological evaluation was performed and compared to sporadic Parkinson's disease without GBA mutations. The frequency of GBA mutations among the British patients (33/790 = 4.18%) was significantly higher (P = 0.01; odds ratio = 3.7; 95% confidence interval = 1.12–12.14) when compared to the control group (3/257 = 1.17%). Fourteen different GBA mutations were identified, including three previously undescribed mutations, K7E, D443N and G193E. Pathological examination revealed widespread and abundant α-synuclein pathology in all 17 GBA mutation carriers, which were graded as Braak stage of 5–6, and had McKeith's limbic or diffuse neocortical Lewy body-type pathology. Diffuse neocortical Lewy body-type pathology tended to occur more frequently in the group with GBA mutations compared to matched Parkinson's disease controls. Clinical features comprised an early onset of the disease, the presence of hallucinations in 45% (14/31) and symptoms of cognitive decline or dementia in 48% (15/31) of patients. This study demonstrates that GBA mutations are found in British subjects at a higher frequency than any other known Parkinson's disease gene. This is the largest study to date on a non-Jewish patient sample with a detailed genotype/phenotype/pathological analyses

  7. Expanding the clinical and mutational spectrum of Kaufman oculocerebrofacial syndrome with biallelic UBE3B mutations.

    PubMed

    Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Yilmaz, Rüstem; Tang, Sha; Reuter, Miriam S; Rahner, Nils; Grange, Dorothy K; Mortenson, Megan; Koty, Patrick; Feenstra, Heather; Farwell Gonzalez, Kelly D; Sticht, Heinrich; Boddaert, Nathalie; Désir, Julie; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Zweier, Christiane; Reis, André; Kubisch, Christian; Jewett, Tamison; Zeng, Wenqi; Borck, Guntram

    2014-07-01

    Biallelic mutations of UBE3B have recently been shown to cause Kaufman oculocerebrofacial syndrome (also reported as blepharophimosis-ptosis-intellectual disability syndrome), an autosomal recessive condition characterized by hypotonia, developmental delay, intellectual disability, congenital anomalies, characteristic facial dysmorphic features, and low cholesterol levels. To date, six patients with either missense mutations affecting the UBE3B HECT domain or truncating mutations have been described. Here, we report on the identification of homozygous or compound heterozygous UBE3B mutations in six additional patients from five unrelated families using either targeted UBE3B sequencing in individuals with suggestive facial dysmorphic features, or exome sequencing. Our results expand the clinical and mutational spectrum of the UBE3B-related disorder in several ways. First, we have identified UBE3B mutations in individuals who previously received distinct clinical diagnoses: two sibs with Toriello-Carey syndrome as well as the patient reported to have a "new" syndrome by Buntinx and Majewski in 1990. Second, we describe the adult phenotype and clinical variability of the syndrome. Third, we report on the first instance of homozygous missense alterations outside the HECT domain of UBE3B, observed in a patient with mildly dysmorphic facial features. We conclude that UBE3B mutations cause a clinically recognizable and possibly underdiagnosed syndrome characterized by distinct craniofacial features, hypotonia, failure to thrive, eye abnormalities, other congenital malformations, low cholesterol levels, and severe intellectual disability. We review the UBE3B-associated phenotypes, including forms that can mimick Toriello-Carey syndrome, and suggest the single designation "Kaufman oculocerebrofacial syndrome".

  8. [FeLV infection in the cat: clinically relevant aspects].

    PubMed

    Boretti, F S; Lutz, H; Hofmann-Lehmann, R

    2011-11-01

    The feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a retrovirus of the domestic cat that was described almost 50 years ago. The FeLV-infection may lead to fatal diseases in domestic and small wild cats. The use of efficacious diagnostics assays and vaccines led to a reduction of the FeLV prevalence; however, FeLV still poses a problem for the cat presented with the infection. This article aims to describe recent developments in diagnostics and findings in the infection pathogenesis that are clinically relevant.

  9. Nonmotor Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease in 2012: Relevant Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Anne Marie; Jutras, Marie France; Czernecki, Virginie; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Vidailhet, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) of Parkinson's disease (PD) are common, but they are often underrecognized in clinical practice, because of the lack of spontaneous complaints by the patients, and partly because of the absence of systematic questioning by the consulting physician. However, valid specific instruments for identification and assessment of these symptoms are available in 2012. The administration of the self-completed screening tool, NMSQuest, associated with questioning during the consultation, improves the diagnosis of NMSs. NMSs play a large role in degradation of quality of life. More relevant NMSs are described in this review, mood disorders, impulse control disorders, cognitive deficits, hallucinations, pain, sleep disorders, and dysautonomia. PMID:22888466

  10. Clinical relevance and biology of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Most breast cancer patients die due to metastases, and the early onset of this multistep process is usually missed by current tumor staging modalities. Therefore, ultrasensitive techniques have been developed to enable the enrichment, detection, isolation and characterization of disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow and circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. There is increasing evidence that the presence of these cells is associated with an unfavorable prognosis related to metastatic progression in the bone and other organs. This review focuses on investigations regarding the biology and clinical relevance of circulating tumor cells in breast cancer. PMID:22114869

  11. Cervical ribs: identification on MRI and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Walden, Michael J; Adin, Mehmet E; Visagan, Ravindran; Viertel, Valentina G; Intrapiromkul, Jarunee; Maluf, Fernando; Patel, Neil V; Alluwaimi, Fatma; Lin, Doris; Yousem, David M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of cervical ribs on cervical spine MRI and clinical relevance, we reviewed 2500 studies for cervical ribs and compression of neurovascular structures and compared to CT, when available. Brachial plexus or subclavian artery contact by cervical rib was identified on MRI and/or CT in 12 cases with diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome in one. Cervical ribs were identified on 1.2% (25/2083) of examinations, lower than on CT (2%), but MRI may offer equivalent anatomic explanation for patient symptoms.

  12. Dissociative absorption: An empirically unique, clinically relevant, dissociative factor.

    PubMed

    Soffer-Dudek, Nirit; Lassri, Dana; Soffer-Dudek, Nir; Shahar, Golan

    2015-11-01

    Research of dissociative absorption has raised two questions: (a) Is absorption a unique dissociative factor within a three-factor structure, or a part of one general dissociative factor? Even when three factors are found, the specificity of the absorption factor is questionable. (b) Is absorption implicated in psychopathology? Although commonly viewed as "non-clinical" dissociation, absorption was recently hypothesized to be specifically associated with obsessive-compulsive symptoms. To address these questions, we conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses on 679 undergraduates. Analyses supported the three-factor model, and a "purified" absorption scale was extracted from the original inclusive absorption factor. The purified scale predicted several psychopathology scales. As hypothesized, absorption was a stronger predictor of obsessive-compulsive symptoms than of general psychopathology. In addition, absorption was the only dissociative scale that longitudinally predicted obsessive-compulsive symptoms. We conclude that absorption is a unique and clinically relevant dissociative tendency that is particularly meaningful to obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in diabetes: New insights of clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy; Lenin, Raji; Monickaraj, Finny

    2010-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a cellular compartment responsible for multiple important cellular functions including the biosynthesis and folding of newly synthesized proteins destined for secretion, such as insulin. A myriad of pathological and physiological factors perturb ER function and cause dysregulation of ER homeostasis, leading to ER stress. Accumulating evidence suggests that ER stress plays a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes, contributing to pancreatic β-cell loss and insulin resistance. ER stress may also link obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. In this review, we address the transition from physiology to pathology, namely how and why the physiological UPR evolves to a proapoptotic ER stress response in diabetes and its complications. Special attention was given to elucidate how ER stress could explain some of the 'clinical paradoxes' such as secondary sulfonylurea failure, initial worsening of retinopathy during tight glycemic control, insulin resistance induced by protease inhibitors and other clinically relevant observations.

  14. Clinically relevant drug interactions with anti-Alzheimer's drugs.

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Sultana, Janet; Drago, Filippo; Spina, Edoardo

    2017-03-03

    The aging world population had led to an increase in the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The drugs used to slow down the onset of AD, galantamine, donepezil, rivastigmine and memantine, are generally well-tolerated. However, drug interactions between these drugs and other drugs are an important aspect of patient safety that should be borne in mind, particularly given the high burden of polypharmacy in the elderly. The aim of this review is to provide an updated review of clinically significant drug-drug interactions concerning drugs approved for AD. PubMed was searched for relevant keywords. No time limit was imposed but only articles in English published in peer-reviewed journals were selected. Relevant literature was also identified from the references of identified articles. Further information was obtained from drug summary of product characteristics. The major pharmacokinetic interactions identified concerned fluoxetine, paroxetine and ketoconazole when used with galantamine or donepezil. On the other hand, the major potential pharmacodynamic interactions concerned anti-dementia drugs and general anesthesia agents, anti-cholinergic drugs, conventional antipsychotics and bradycardia-inducing drugs. In clinical practice memantine shows a lower potential for pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) compared to other drug classes. In conclusion, the concomitant use of anti-dementia drugs with other drugs can have variable clinical effects, making appropriate prescribing of these drugs very challenging. A simple and coherent way of presenting evidence on complex drug interaction information from heterogenous sources to clinicians is needed in order for the voluminous data available to have an impact on clinical practice.

  15. Quantifying Clinical Relevance in the Treatment of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Correll, Christoph U.; Kishimoto, Taishiro; Nielsen, Jimmi; Kane, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Background To optimize the management of patients with schizophrenia, quantification of treatment effects is crucial. While in research studies, the use of quantitative assessments is ubiquitous; this is not the case in routine clinical practice, creating an important translational practice gap. Objective To examine the relevance, methodology, reporting and application of measurement based approaches in the management of schizophrenia. Methods We summarize methodological aspects in the assessment of therapeutic and adverse antipsychotic effects in schizophrenia, including definitions and methods of measurement based assessments and factors that can interfere with the valid quantification of treatment effects. Finally, we propose pragmatic and clinically meaningful ways to measure and report treatment outcomes. Results While rating scales are ubiquitous in schizophrenia research and provide the evidence base for treatment guidelines, time constraints, lack of familiarity with and/or training in validated assessment tools limits their routine clinical use. Simple, but valid assessment instruments need to be developed and implemented to bridge this research-practice gap. Moreover, results from research trials need to be communicated in clinically meaningful ways. This includes the reporting of effect sizes, numbers-needed-to-treat and -harm, confidence intervals and absolute risk differences. Some important outcomes, such as treatment response, should be reported in escalating intervals using incrementally more stringent psychopathology improvements. Nevertheless, even with quantification, it remains challenging to weigh individual efficacy and adverse effect outcomes against each other and to decide on the targeted/desired improvement or outcome, while also incorporating that in patient-centered and shared decision methods. Conclusions Quantification of treatment effects in schizophrenia is relevant for patient management, research, and the evaluation of health care

  16. Clinical relevance of dissolution testing in quality by design.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Paul A; Lee, Wang Wang; Stott, Paul W; Townsend, Andy I; Smart, John P; Ghahramani, Parviz; Hammett, Tracey; Billett, Linda; Behn, Sheena; Gibb, Ryan C; Abrahamsson, Bertil

    2008-06-01

    Quality by design (QbD) has recently been introduced in pharmaceutical product development in a regulatory context and the process of implementing such concepts in the drug approval process is presently on-going. This has the potential to allow for a more flexible regulatory approach based on understanding and optimisation of how design of a product and its manufacturing process may affect product quality. Thus, adding restrictions to manufacturing beyond what can be motivated by clinical quality brings no benefits but only additional costs. This leads to a challenge for biopharmaceutical scientists to link clinical product performance to critical manufacturing attributes. In vitro dissolution testing is clearly a key tool for this purpose and the present bioequivalence guidelines and biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) provides a platform for regulatory applications of in vitro dissolution as a marker for consistency in clinical outcomes. However, the application of these concepts might need to be further developed in the context of QbD to take advantage of the higher level of understanding that is implied and displayed in regulatory documentation utilising QbD concepts. Aspects that should be considered include identification of rate limiting steps in the absorption process that can be linked to pharmacokinetic variables and used for prediction of bioavailability variables, in vivo relevance of in vitro dissolution test conditions and performance/interpretation of specific bioavailability studies on critical formulation/process variables. This article will give some examples and suggestions how clinical relevance of dissolution testing can be achieved in the context of QbD derived from a specific case study for a BCS II compound.

  17. Laboratory Exercises to Teach Clinically Relevant Chemistry of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Chelette, Candace T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To design, implement, and evaluate student performance on clinically relevant chemical and spectral laboratory exercises on antibiotics. Design. In the first of 2 exercises, second-year pharmacy students enrolled in an integrated laboratory sequence course studied the aqueous stability of ß-lactam antibiotics using a spectral visual approach. In a second exercise, students studied the tendency of tetracycline, rifamycins, and fluoroquinolones to form insoluble chelate complexes (turbidity) with polyvalent metals. Assessment. On a survey to assess achievement of class learning objectives, students agreed the laboratory activities helped them better retain important information concerning antibiotic stability and interactions. A significant improvement was observed in performance on examination questions related to the laboratory topics for 2012 and 2013 students compared to 2011 students who did not complete the laboratory. A 1-year follow-up examination question administered in a separate course showed >75% of the students were able to identify rifamycins-food interactions compared with <25% of students who had not completed the laboratory exercises. Conclusion. The use of spectral visual approaches allowed students to investigate antibiotic stability and interactions, thus reinforcing the clinical relevance of medicinal chemistry. Students’ performance on questions at the 1-year follow-up suggested increased retention of the concepts learned as a result of completing the exercises. PMID:24672070

  18. Selective IgG subclass deficiency: quantification and clinical relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Jefferis, R; Kumararatne, D S

    1990-01-01

    Each of the four human IgG subclasses exhibits a unique profile of effector functions relevant to the clearance and elimination of infecting microorganisms. The quantitative response within each IgG subclass varies with the nature of the antigen, its route of entry and, presumably, the form in which it is presented to the immune system. This results in antibody responses to certain antigens being predominantly or exclusively of a single IgG subclass. An inability to produce antibody of the optimally protective isotype can result in a selective immunodeficiency state. This is particularly apparent for responses to certain bacterial carbohydrate antigens that are normally of IgG2 isotype. A failure to produce the appropriate specific antibody response may result in recurrent upper and/or lower respiratory tract infection. Careful patient investigation can identify such deficiencies and suggest appropriate clinical management. In this review we outline the biology and clinical relevance of the IgG subclasses and summarize current rational treatment approaches. PMID:2204502

  19. Clinical relevance of abnormal scintigraphic findings of adult equine ribs.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Jessica A; Ross, Michael W; Martin, Benson B; Davidson, Elizabeth J; Leitch, Midge

    2011-01-01

    Horses with cranial rib abnormalities may exhibit severe acute lameness and may have unusual gait deficits characterized by forelimb abduction during protraction at the walk. Horses with caudal rib abnormalities may resent being saddled and ridden. In a retrospective evaluation of 20 horses with a documented rib lesion, 25 sites of increased radiopharmaceutical uptake were found in one or more ribs. Thirteen (52%) scintigraphic lesions involved the first rib; four were located immediately dorsal to the sternal articulation, eight were near the costochondral junction and one was at the costovertebral junction. Six (24%) scintigraphic rib lesions involved ribs 2-8; one was located immediately dorsal to the sternal articulation, three were at the costovertebral junction and two were near the costochondral junction. Six (24%) scintigraphic rib lesions involved the mid-portion (five) or costovertebral junction (one) of ribs 9-18. The 20 horses were divided into three groups based on the clinical relevance of the scintigraphic findings. Group 1 (n=3) horses had clinical signs attributed to a rib abnormality; Group 2 (n=6) horses had a rib abnormality that was a plausible explanation for clinical signs; Group 3 (n=11) horses had clinical signs that could not be attributed to a rib abnormality. For horses with cranial rib abnormalities, a modified lateral scintigraphic image with the ipsilateral limb pulled caudally and a left (right) 45° caudal-right (left) radiograph facilitated the diagnosis.

  20. Epileptic activity in Alzheimer's disease: causes and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Vossel, Keith A; Tartaglia, Maria C; Nygaard, Haakon B; Zeman, Adam Z; Miller, Bruce L

    2017-04-01

    Epileptic activity is frequently associated with Alzheimer's disease; this association has therapeutic implications, because epileptic activity can occur at early disease stages and might contribute to pathogenesis. In clinical practice, seizures in patients with Alzheimer's disease can easily go unrecognised because they usually present as non-motor seizures, and can overlap with other symptoms of the disease. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, seizures can hasten cognitive decline, highlighting the clinical relevance of early recognition and treatment. Some evidence indicates that subclinical epileptiform activity in patients with Alzheimer's disease, detected by extended neurophysiological monitoring, can also lead to accelerated cognitive decline. Treatment of clinical seizures in patients with Alzheimer's disease with select antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), in low doses, is usually well tolerated and efficacious. Moreover, studies in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease suggest that certain classes of AEDs that reduce network hyperexcitability have disease-modifying properties. These AEDs target mechanisms of epileptogenesis involving amyloid β and tau. Clinical trials targeting network hyperexcitability in patients with Alzheimer's disease will identify whether AEDs or related strategies could improve their cognitive symptoms or slow decline.

  1. Recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 strains with targeted mutations relevant for aciclovir susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Brunnemann, Anne-Kathrin; Liermann, Kristin; Deinhardt-Emmer, Stefanie; Maschkowitz, Gregor; Pohlmann, Anja; Sodeik, Beate; Fickenscher, Helmut; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Krumbholz, Andi

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a novel reliable method to assess the significance of individual mutations within the thymidine kinase (TK) gene of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) to nucleoside analogue resistance. Eleven defined single nucleotide polymorphisms that occur in the TK gene of clinical HSV-1 isolates and a fluorescence reporter were introduced into the HSV-1 strain 17+ that had been cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome. The susceptibility of these different strains to aciclovir, penciclovir, brivudin, and foscarnet was determined with a modified cytopathic effect reduction assay. The strains were also tested for their aciclovir susceptibility by measuring the relative fluorescence intensity as an indicator for HSV-1 replication and by quantifying the virus yield. Our data indicate that the amino acid substitutions R41H, R106H, A118V, L139V, K219T, S276R, L298R, S345P, and V348I represent natural polymorphisms of the TK protein, whereas G61A and P84L mediate broad cross-resistance against aciclovir, penciclovir, brivudin, and susceptibility to foscarnet. This method allows the definition of the resistance genotype of otherwise unclear mutations in the TK gene of HSV-1. Thus, it provides a scientific basis for antiviral testing in clinical isolates of patients suffering from serious diseases and will facilitate testing of new antivirals against HSV-1. PMID:27426251

  2. Clinical, Pathological and Mutational Spectrum of Dystroglycanopathy Due to LARGE Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Meilleur, Katherine G.; Zukosky, Kristen; Medne, Livija; Fequiere, Pierre; Powell-Hamilton, Nina; Winder, Thomas L.; Alsaman, Abdulaziz; El-Hattab, Ayman W.; Dastgir, Jahannaz; Hu, Ying; Donkervoort, Sandra; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Eagle, Ralph; Finkel, Richard; Scavina, Mena; Hood, Ian C.; Rorke-Adams, Lucy B.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.

    2015-01-01

    Dystroglycanopathies are a subtype of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) of varying severity that can affect the brain and eyes, ranging from Walker-Warburg syndrome with severe brain malformation to milder CMD presentations with affected or normal cognition and later onset. Mutations in dystroglycanopathy genes affect a specific glycoepitope on α-dystroglycan (αDG); of the 14 genes implicated to date, LARGE is the glycosyltransferase that adds the final xylose and glucuronic acid, allowing αDG to bind ligands including laminin 211 and neurexin. Only 11 patients with LARGE mutations have been reported. We report the clinical, neuroimaging and genetic features of 4 additional patients. We confirm that gross deletions and rearrangements are important mutational mechanisms for LARGE. The brain abnormalities overshadowed the initially mild muscle phenotype in all 4 patients. We present the first comprehensive postnatal neuropathology of the brain, spinal cord and eyes of 1 patient with a homozygous LARGE mutation at Cys443; in this patient, polymicrogyria was the predominant cortical malformation; densely festooned polymicrogyria were overlaid by a continuous agyric surface. In view of the severity of these abnormalities, Cys443 may be a functionally important residue in the LARGE protein whereas the mutation p.Glu509Lys of Patient 1 in this study may confer a milder phenotype. Overall, these results expand the clinical and genetic spectrum of dystroglycanopathy. PMID:24709677

  3. Sundowning in Dementia: Clinical Relevance, Pathophysiological Determinants, and Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Canevelli, Marco; Valletta, Martina; Trebbastoni, Alessandro; Sarli, Giuseppe; D’Antonio, Fabrizia; Tariciotti, Leonardo; de Lena, Carlo; Bruno, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Sundowning means the emergence or worsening of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in the late afternoon or early evening. This syndrome has been recognized since a long time in the field of dementing illnesses and is well known among most of health-care providers involved in the assistance of people with dementia. Indeed, it represents a common manifestation among persons with dementia and is associated with several adverse outcomes (such as institutionalization, faster cognitive worsening, and greater caregiver burden). Its occurrence and phenotypic characteristics may be influenced by diverse neurobiological, psychosocial, and environmental determinants. Moreover, it may pose diagnostic challenges in relation to other common causes of behavioral disruptions. Beside these considerations, this phenomenon has so far drawn limited clinical and scientific interest compared to other specific NPS occurring in dementias, as indicated by the lack of commonly agreed definitions, specific screening/assessment tools, and robust estimates on its prevalence. Accordingly, no randomized controlled trial specifically investigating the effectiveness of pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies in managing this condition among demented patients has been yet conducted. In the present narrative review, we present and discuss available evidence concerning sundowning occurring in people with dementia. A special focus is given to its definitions, pathophysiological determinants, and clinical relevance, as well as to the clinical and therapeutic approaches required for its management in the daily practice. PMID:28083535

  4. Development of clinically relevant implantable pressure sensors: perspectives and challenges.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Ingelin; Glott, Thomas

    2014-09-22

    This review describes different aspects to consider when developing implantable pressure sensor systems. Measurement of pressure is in general highly important in clinical practice and medical research. Due to the small size, light weight and low energy consumption Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology represents new possibilities for monitoring of physiological parameters inside the human body. Development of clinical relevant sensors requires close collaboration between technological experts and medical clinicians.  Site of operation, size restrictions, patient safety, and required measurement range and resolution, are only some conditions that must be taken into account. An implantable device has to operate under very hostile conditions. Long-term in vivo pressure measurements are particularly demanding because the pressure sensitive part of the sensor must be in direct or indirect physical contact with the medium for which we want to detect the pressure. New sensor packaging concepts are demanded and must be developed through combined effort between scientists in MEMS technology, material science, and biology. Before launching a new medical device on the market, clinical studies must be performed. Regulatory documents and international standards set the premises for how such studies shall be conducted and reported.

  5. Development of Clinically Relevant Implantable Pressure Sensors: Perspectives and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Ingelin; Glott, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This review describes different aspects to consider when developing implantable pressure sensor systems. Measurement of pressure is in general highly important in clinical practice and medical research. Due to the small size, light weight and low energy consumption Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology represents new possibilities for monitoring of physiological parameters inside the human body. Development of clinical relevant sensors requires close collaboration between technological experts and medical clinicians. Site of operation, size restrictions, patient safety, and required measurement range and resolution, are only some conditions that must be taken into account. An implantable device has to operate under very hostile conditions. Long-term in vivo pressure measurements are particularly demanding because the pressure sensitive part of the sensor must be in direct or indirect physical contact with the medium for which we want to detect the pressure. New sensor packaging concepts are demanded and must be developed through combined effort between scientists in MEMS technology, material science, and biology. Before launching a new medical device on the market, clinical studies must be performed. Regulatory documents and international standards set the premises for how such studies shall be conducted and reported. PMID:25248071

  6. Expanding the mutation and clinical spectrum of Roberts syndrome.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Hanan H; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Eid, Maha M; Tosson, Angie M S; Shousha, Wafaa Gh; Abdel Azeem, Amira A; Farag, Mona K; Mehrez, Mennat I; Gaber, Khaled R

    2016-07-01

    Roberts syndrome and SC phocomelia syndrome are rare autosomal recessive genetic disorders representing the extremes of the spectrum of severity of the same condition, caused by mutations in ESCO2 gene. We report three new patients with Roberts syndrome from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families. All patients presented with growth retardation, mesomelic shortening of the limbs more in the upper than in the lower limbs and microcephaly. Patients were subjected to clinical, cytogenetic and radiologic examinations. Cytogenetic analysis showed the characteristic premature separation of centromeres and puffing of heterochromatic regions. Further, sequencing of the ESCO2 gene identified a novel mutation c.244_245dupCT (p.T83Pfs*20) in one family besides two previously reported mutations c.760_761insA (p.T254Nfs*27) and c.764_765delTT (p.F255Cfs*25). All mutations were in homozygous state, in exon 3. The severity of the mesomelic shortening of the limbs and craniofacial anomalies showed variability among patients. Interestingly, patient 1 had abnormal skin hypopigmentation. Serial fetal ultrasound examinations and measurements of long bones diagnosed two affected fetuses in two of the studied families. A literature review and case comparison was performed. In conclusion, we report a novel ESCO2 mutation and expand the clinical spectrum of Roberts syndrome.

  7. Clinical Outcomes of Lung Transplantation in Patients with Telomerase Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Tokman, Sofya; Singer, Jonathan P.; Devine, Megan S.; Westall, Glen P.; Aubert, John-David; Tamm, Michael; Snell, Gregory I.; Lee, Joyce S.; Goldberg, Hilary J.; Kukreja, Jasleen; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Leard, Lorriana E.; Garcia, Christine K.; Hays, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Successful lung transplantation (LT) for patients with pulmonary fibrosis from telomerase mutations is limited by systemic complications of telomerase dysfunction including myelosuppression, cirrhosis, and malignancy. We describe clinical outcomes among 14 LT recipients with telomerase mutations. Methods Subjects underwent LT between February 2005 and April 2014 at 5 LT centers. We abstracted data from medical records, focusing on outcomes reflecting post-LT treatment effects likely to be complicated by telomerase mutations. Results The median age of subjects was 60.5 years (IQR 52.0–62.0), 64.3% were male, and the mean post-LT observation time was 3.2 years (SD ±2.9). Eleven subjects had a mutation in telomerase reverse transcriptase, 2 in telomerase RNA component, and 1 had an uncharacterized mutation. Ten subjects were leukopenic post-LT; leukopenia prompted cessation of mycophenolate mofetil in 5 and treatment with filgrastim in 4. Six subjects had recurrent lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), 7 had acute cellular rejection (ACR) (A1), and 4 developed chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). Ten LT recipients developed chronic renal insufficiency and 8 experienced acute, reversible renal failure. Three developed cancer, none had cirrhosis. Thirteen subjects were alive at data censorship. Conclusions The clinical course for LT recipients with telomerase mutations is complicated by renal disease, leukopenia prompting a change in the immunosuppressive regimen, and recurrent LTRI. In contrast, cirrhosis was absent, ACR was mild, and development of CLAD was comparable to other LT populations. While posing challenges, lung transplantation may be feasible for patients with pulmonary fibrosis due to telomerase mutations. PMID:26169663

  8. Clinical relevance of advanced glycation endproducts for vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, R; van der Vaart, M G; van Dam, G M; Tio, R A; Hillebrands, J-L; Smit, A J; Zeebregts, C J

    2008-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is the main contributor to cardiovascular disease and leads to intimal plaque formation, which may progress to plaque rupture with subsequent thromboembolic events and/or occlusion of the arterial lumen. There is increasing evidence that the development or progression of atherosclerosis is associated with advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). AGEs are a heterogeneous group of compounds formed by the non-enzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. An increased understanding of the mechanisms of formation and interaction of AGEs has allowed the development of several potential anti-AGE strategies. This review summarizes AGE formation and biochemistry, the pathogeneic role of AGEs in cardiovascular disease, anti-AGE therapies and clinical relevance to vascular surgery.

  9. Making the history of psychology clinically and philosophically relevant.

    PubMed

    Vande Kemp, Hendrika

    2002-08-01

    The author discusses ways to make the history of psychology course relevant for a clinical psychology doctoral program within a multidenominational Protestant theological seminary. She uses a personalist orientation to emphasize the need to integrate psychology, philosophy, and theology. She differentiates among the intrapersonal, interpersonal, impersonal, and transpersonal dimensions of experience. She illustrates the rich multidisciplinary historical roots of contemporary psychology by tracing the the history of the term psychology and examining its meanings in the existential psychology of Søren Kierkegaard and in the 19th-century novel. She includes brief histories of the "new psychology" and of the unconscious. She describes how she uses the field of psychotheological integration to illustrate principles of historiography and summarizes resources used to supplement traditional textbooks.

  10. Epilepsy in hemiplegic migraine: Genetic mutations and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Prontera, P; Sarchielli, P; Caproni, S; Bedetti, C; Cupini, L M; Calabresi, P; Costa, C

    2017-01-01

    Objective We performed a systematic review on the comorbidities of familial/sporadic hemiplegic migraine (F/SHM) with seizure/epilepsy in patients with CACNA1A, ATP1A2 or SCN1A mutations, to identify the genotypes associated and investigate for the presence of mutational hot spots. Methods We performed a search in MEDLINE and in the Human Gene Mutation and Leiden Open Variation Databases for mutations in the CACNA1A, ATP1A2 and SCN1A genes. After having examined the clinical characteristics of the patients, we selected those having HM and seizures, febrile seizures or epilepsy. For each gene, we determined both the frequency and the positions at protein levels of these mutations, as well as the penetrance of epilepsy within families. Results Concerning F/SHM-Epilepsy1 (F/SHME1) and F/SHME2 endophenotypes, we observed a prevalent involvement of the transmembrane domains, and a strong correlation in F/SHME1 when the positively charged amino acids were involved. The penetrance of epilepsy within the families was highest for patients carrying mutation in the CACNA1A gene (60%), and lower in those having SCN1A (33.3%) and ATP1A2 (30.9%) mutations. Conclusion Among the HM cases with seizure/epilepsy, we observed mutational hot spots in the transmembrane domains of CACNA1A and ATP1A2 proteins. These findings could lead to a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying migraine and epilepsy, therein guaranteeing the most appropriate therapeutic approach.

  11. Streptococcus pyogenes biofilms—formation, biology, and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Tomas; Köller, Thomas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS) is an exclusive human bacterial pathogen. The virulence potential of this species is tremendous. Interactions with humans range from asymptomatic carriage over mild and superficial infections of skin and mucosal membranes up to systemic purulent toxic-invasive disease manifestations. Particularly the latter are a severe threat for predisposed patients and lead to significant death tolls worldwide. This places GAS among the most important Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. Many recent reviews have highlighted the GAS repertoire of virulence factors, regulators and regulatory circuits/networks that enable GAS to colonize the host and to deal with all levels of the host immune defense. This covers in vitro and in vivo studies, including animal infection studies based on mice and more relevant, macaque monkeys. It is now appreciated that GAS, like many other bacterial species, do not necessarily exclusively live in a planktonic lifestyle. GAS is capable of microcolony and biofilm formation on host cells and tissues. We are now beginning to understand that this feature significantly contributes to GAS pathogenesis. In this review we will discuss the current knowledge on GAS biofilm formation, the biofilm-phenotype associated virulence factors, regulatory aspects of biofilm formation, the clinical relevance, and finally contemporary treatment regimens and future treatment options. PMID:25717441

  12. [Relevance of nutrition knowledge on clinical practice: medical opinion survey].

    PubMed

    Alvares, Luísa; Moreira, Isabel; Oliveira, António

    2007-01-01

    Although previous studies show that physicians generally agree that nutrition knowledge is important for their daily clinical practice, several other studies report their poor knowledge of the subject. One of the strongest reasons given for this is the non-incorporation of Nutrition as a compulsory subject for the medical sciences degree. Dietary counselling and assessment of the patients' nutritional status don't seem to be systematic. The aim of this study is to asses how relevant physicians consider Nutrition to be in the successful running of a good practice. The study was undertaken at the general hospital of Vila Real/Peso da Régua (CHVR/PR) by distribution of a self- administered questionnaire to 153 of the physicians of the clinical body. Mean values were compared with the Student's t test and proportions with the Chi-square test. Of the 153 physicians, 108 replies were received (70,6%). Of these 108 replies, 53,3% consider nutrition knowledge important although 29,6% state their knowledge is poor. More than half say that Clinical Nutrition should be a compulsory subject of the Medical Sciences syllabus, and 99,1% deem it important to assess the patient's nutritional status. About 95% stated they provided written or verbal nutritional guidance, and most of the physicians had already sought the assistance of a nutritionist. This study shows that the clinical body of the CHVR/PR is aware of the importance nutrition knowledge has in their daily practice. It must be noted, though, that although almost one third of the physicians rate their nutrition knowledge poor, most of them provide nutritional guidance to their patients.

  13. The clinical implications of gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a molecularly heterogeneous disease as revealed by recent genomic studies. Among genetic lesions that are recurrent in CLL, few clinically validated prognostic markers, such as TP53 mutations and 17p deletion, are available for the use in clinical practice to guide treatment decisions. Recently, several novel molecular markers have been identified in CLL. Though these mutations have not yet gained the qualification of predictive factors for treatment tailoring, they have shown to be promising to refine the prognostic stratification of patients. The introduction of targeted drugs is changing the genetics of CLL, and has disclosed the acquisition of previously unexpected drug resistant mutations in signalling pathway genes. Ultra-deep next generation sequencing has allowed to reach deep levels of resolution of the genetic portrait of CLL providing a precise definition of its subclonal genetic architecture. This approach has shown that small subclones harbouring drug resistant mutations anticipate the development of a chemorefractory phenotype. Here we review the recent advances in the definition of the genomic landscape of CLL and the ongoing research to characterise the clinical implications of old and new molecular lesions in the setting of both conventional chemo-immunotherapy and targeted drugs. PMID:27031852

  14. Comprehensive Genomic Profiling of Advanced Penile Carcinoma Suggests a High Frequency of Clinically Relevant Genomic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sumanta K.; Wang, Kai; Palma, Norma A.; Sanford, Eric; Bailey, Mark; He, Jie; Elvin, Julia A.; Chmielecki, Juliann; Squillace, Rachel; Dow, Edward; Morosini, Deborah; Buell, Jamie; Yelensky, Roman; Lipson, Doron; Frampton, Garrett M.; Howley, Peter; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Stephens, Philip J.; Miller, Vincent A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Advanced penile squamous cell carcinoma (PSCC) is associated with poor survival due to the aggressiveness of the disease and lack of effective systemic therapies. Comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) was performed to identify clinically relevant genomic alterations (CRGAs). Materials and Methods. DNA was extracted from 40 μm of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections in patients with advanced PSCC. CGP was performed on hybridization-captured, adaptor ligation-based libraries to a mean coverage depth of 692× for 3,769 exons of 236 cancer-related genes plus 47 introns from 19 genes frequently rearranged in cancer. CRGAs were defined as genomic alterations (GAs) linked to targeted therapies on the market or under evaluation in mechanism-driven clinical trials. Results. Twenty male patients with a median age of 60 years (range, 46–87 years) were assessed. Seventeen (85%) cases were stage IV and three cases (15%) were stage III. CGP revealed 109 GAs (5.45 per tumor), 44 of which were CRGAs (2.2 per tumor). At least one CRGA was detected in 19 (95%) cases, and the most common CRGAs were CDKN2A point mutations and homozygous deletion (40%), NOTCH1 point mutations and rearrangements (25%), PIK3CA point mutations and amplification (25%), EGFR amplification (20%), CCND1 amplification (20%), BRCA2 insertions/deletions (10%), RICTOR amplifications (10%), and FBXW7 point mutations (10%). Conclusion. CGP identified CRGAs in patients with advanced PSCC, including EGFR amplification and PIK3CA alterations, which can lead to the rational administration of targeted therapy and subsequent benefit for these patients. Implications for Practice: Few treatment options exist for patients with advanced penile squamous cell carcinoma (PSCC). Outcomes are dismal with platinum-based chemotherapy, with median survival estimated at 1 year or less across multiple series. Biological studies of patients with PSCC to date have principally focused on human papillomavirus status

  15. Clinically relevant interpretation of solid phase assays for HLA antibody

    PubMed Central

    Bettinotti, Maria P.; Zachary, Andrea A.; Leffell, Mary S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Accurate and timely detection and characterization of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies are critical for pre-transplant and post-transplant immunological risk assessment. Solid phase immunoassays have provided increased sensitivity and specificity, but test interpretation is not always straightforward. This review will discuss the result interpretation considering technical limitations; assessment of relative antibody strength; and the integration of data for risk stratification from complementary testing and the patient's immunological history. Recent findings Laboratory and clinical studies have provided insight into causes of test failures – false positive reactions because of antibodies to denatured HLA antigens and false negative reactions resulting from test interference and/or loss of native epitopes. Test modifications permit detection of complement-binding antibodies and determination of the IgG subclasses. The high degree of specificity of single antigen solid phase immunoassays has revealed the complexity and clinical relevance of antibodies to HLA-C, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DP antigens. Determination of antibody specificity for HLA epitopes enables identification of incompatible antigens not included in test kits. Summary Detection and characterization of HLA antibodies with solid phase immunoassays has led to increased understanding of the role of those antibodies in graft rejection, improved treatment of antibody-mediated rejection, and increased opportunities for transplantation. However, realization of these benefits requires careful and accurate interpretation of test results. PMID:27200498

  16. UV and skin cancer: specific p53 gene mutation in normal skin as a biologically relevant exposure measurement.

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, H; English, D; Randell, P L; Nakazawa, K; Martel, N; Armstrong, B K; Yamasaki, H

    1994-01-01

    Many human skin tumors contain mutated p53 genes that probably result from UV exposure. To investigate the link between UV exposure and p53 gene mutation, we developed two methods to detect presumptive UV-specific p53 gene mutations in UV-exposed normal skin. The methods are based on mutant allele-specific PCRs and ligase chain reactions and designed to detect CC to TT mutations at codons 245 and 247/248, using 10 micrograms of DNA samples. These specific mutations in the p53 gene have been reported in skin tumors. CC to TT mutations in the p53 gene were detected in cultured human skin cells only after UV irradiation, and the mutation frequency increased with increasing UV dose. Seventeen of 23 samples of normal skin from sun-exposed sites (74%) on Australian skin cancer patients contained CC to TT mutations in one or both of codons 245 and 247/248 of the p53 gene, and only 1 of 20 samples from non-sun-exposed sites (5%) harbored the mutation. None of 15 biopsies of normal skin from non-sun-exposed or intermittently exposed sites on volunteers living in France carried such mutations. Our results suggest that specific p53 gene mutations associated with human skin cancer are induced in normal skin by solar UV radiation. Measurement of these mutations may be useful as a biologically relevant measure of UV exposure in humans and as a possible predictor of risk for skin cancer. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8278394

  17. UV and skin cancer: Specific p53 gene mutation in normal skin as a biologically relevant exposure measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazawa, H.; Martel, N.; Armstrong, B.K.; Yamasaki, H. ); English, D.; Randell, P.L. ); Nakazawa, K. )

    1994-01-04

    Many human skin tumors contain mutated p53 genes that probably results from UV exposure. To investigate the link between UV exposure and p53 gene mutation, the authors developed two methods to detect presumptive UV-specific p53 gene mutations in UV-exposed normal skin. The methods are based on mutant allele-specific PCRs and ligase chain reactions and designed to detect CC to TT mutations at codons 245 and 247/248, using 10 [mu]g of DNA samples. These specific mutations in the p53 gene have been reported in skin tumors. CC to TT mutations in the p53 gene were detected in cultured human skin cells only after UV irradiation, and the mutation frequency increased with increasing UV dose. Seventeen of 23 samples of normal skin from sun-exposed sites (74%) on Australian skin cancer patients contained CC to TT mutations in one or both of codons 245 and 247/248 of the p53 gene, and only 1 of 20 samples form non-sun-exposed sites (5%) harbored the mutation. None of 15 biopsies of normal skin from non-sun-exposed or intermittently exposed sites on volunteers living in France carried such mutations. The results suggest that specific p53 gene mutations associated with human skin cancer are induced in normal skin by solar UV radiation. Measurement of these mutations may be useful as a biologically relevant measure of UV exposure in humans and as a possible predictor of risk for skin cancer.

  18. Clinical effect of driver mutations of JAK2, CALR, or MPL in primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rumi, Elisa; Pietra, Daniela; Pascutto, Cristiana; Guglielmelli, Paola; Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Casetti, Ilaria; Colomer, Dolors; Pieri, Lisa; Pratcorona, Marta; Rotunno, Giada; Sant’Antonio, Emanuela; Bellini, Marta; Cavalloni, Chiara; Mannarelli, Carmela; Milanesi, Chiara; Boveri, Emanuela; Ferretti, Virginia; Astori, Cesare; Rosti, Vittorio; Cervantes, Francisco; Barosi, Giovanni; Vannucchi, Alessandro M.

    2014-01-01

    We studied the impact of driver mutations of JAK2, CALR, (calreticulin gene) or MPL on clinical course, leukemic transformation, and survival of patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Of the 617 subjects studied, 399 (64.7%) carried JAK2 (V617F), 140 (22.7%) had a CALR exon 9 indel, 25 (4.0%) carried an MPL (W515) mutation, and 53 (8.6%) had nonmutated JAK2, CALR, and MPL (so-called triple-negative PMF). Patients with CALR mutation had a lower risk of developing anemia, thrombocytopenia, and marked leukocytosis compared with other subtypes. They also had a lower risk of thrombosis compared with patients carrying JAK2 (V617F). At the opposite, triple-negative patients had higher incidence of leukemic transformation compared with either CALR-mutant or JAK2-mutant patients. Median overall survival was 17.7 years in CALR-mutant, 9.2 years in JAK2-mutant, 9.1 years in MPL-mutant, and 3.2 years in triple-negative patients. In multivariate analysis corrected for age, CALR-mutant patients had better overall survival than either JAK2-mutant or triple-negative patients. The impact of genetic lesions on survival was independent of current prognostic scoring systems. These observations indicate that driver mutations define distinct disease entities within PMF. Accounting for them is not only relevant to clinical decision-making, but should also be considered in designing clinical trials. PMID:24986690

  19. Clinical effect of driver mutations of JAK2, CALR, or MPL in primary myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rumi, Elisa; Pietra, Daniela; Pascutto, Cristiana; Guglielmelli, Paola; Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Casetti, Ilaria; Colomer, Dolors; Pieri, Lisa; Pratcorona, Marta; Rotunno, Giada; Sant'Antonio, Emanuela; Bellini, Marta; Cavalloni, Chiara; Mannarelli, Carmela; Milanesi, Chiara; Boveri, Emanuela; Ferretti, Virginia; Astori, Cesare; Rosti, Vittorio; Cervantes, Francisco; Barosi, Giovanni; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Cazzola, Mario

    2014-08-14

    We studied the impact of driver mutations of JAK2, CALR, (calreticulin gene) or MPL on clinical course, leukemic transformation, and survival of patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Of the 617 subjects studied, 399 (64.7%) carried JAK2 (V617F), 140 (22.7%) had a CALR exon 9 indel, 25 (4.0%) carried an MPL (W515) mutation, and 53 (8.6%) had nonmutated JAK2, CALR, and MPL (so-called triple-negative PMF). Patients with CALR mutation had a lower risk of developing anemia, thrombocytopenia, and marked leukocytosis compared with other subtypes. They also had a lower risk of thrombosis compared with patients carrying JAK2 (V617F). At the opposite, triple-negative patients had higher incidence of leukemic transformation compared with either CALR-mutant or JAK2-mutant patients. Median overall survival was 17.7 years in CALR-mutant, 9.2 years in JAK2-mutant, 9.1 years in MPL-mutant, and 3.2 years in triple-negative patients. In multivariate analysis corrected for age, CALR-mutant patients had better overall survival than either JAK2-mutant or triple-negative patients. The impact of genetic lesions on survival was independent of current prognostic scoring systems. These observations indicate that driver mutations define distinct disease entities within PMF. Accounting for them is not only relevant to clinical decision-making, but should also be considered in designing clinical trials.

  20. Expanding the Clinical Spectrum Associated With GLIS3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Habeb, A. M.; Garbuz, F.; Millward, A.; Wallis, S.; Moussa, K.; Akcay, T.; Taha, D.; Hogue, J.; Slavotinek, A.; Wales, J. K. H.; Shetty, A.; Hawkes, D.; Hattersley, A. T.; Ellard, S.; De Franco, E.

    2015-01-01

    Context: GLIS3 (GLI-similar 3) is a member of the GLI-similar zinc finger protein family encoding for a nuclear protein with 5 C2H2-type zinc finger domains. The protein is expressed early in embryogenesis and plays a critical role as both a repressor and activator of transcription. Human GLIS3 mutations are extremely rare. Objective: The purpose of this article was determine the phenotypic presentation of 12 patients with a variety of GLIS3 mutations. Methods: GLIS3 gene mutations were sought by PCR amplification and sequence analysis of exons 1 to 11. Clinical information was provided by the referring clinicians and subsequently using a questionnaire circulated to gain further information. Results: We report the first case of a patient with a compound heterozygous mutation in GLIS3 who did not present with congenital hypothyroidism. All patients presented with neonatal diabetes with a range of insulin sensitivities. Thyroid disease varied among patients. Hepatic and renal disease was common with liver dysfunction ranging from hepatitis to cirrhosis; cystic dysplasia was the most common renal manifestation. We describe new presenting features in patients with GLIS3 mutations, including craniosynostosis, hiatus hernia, atrial septal defect, splenic cyst, and choanal atresia and confirm further cases with sensorineural deafness and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Conclusion: We report new findings within the GLIS3 phenotype, further extending the spectrum of abnormalities associated with GLIS3 mutations and providing novel insights into the role of GLIS3 in human physiological development. All but 2 of the patients within our cohort are still alive, and we describe the first patient to live to adulthood with a GLIS3 mutation, suggesting that even patients with a severe GLIS3 phenotype may have a longer life expectancy than originally described. PMID:26259131

  1. Insular primary glioblastomas with IDH mutations: Clinical and biological specificities.

    PubMed

    Hata, Nobuhiro; Hatae, Ryusuke; Yoshimoto, Koji; Murata, Hideki; Kuga, Daisuke; Akagi, Yojiro; Sangatsuda, Yuhei; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Iwaki, Toru; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Iihara, Koji

    2017-01-24

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation is a good prognostic marker for glioblastoma (GBM). Although it is infrequent in primary tumors, it is found in most lower-grade gliomas. Thus, it is unclear whether IDH mutation is a marker for a specific phenotype of apparently primary de novo GBMs (pGBMs), or a marker for secondary tumors (sGBMs). We addressed this issue by analyzing clinical, radiographic and molecular findings in our institutional case series. Our cases included 92 pGBMs, with five cases of IDH1 mutations at R132 and no IDH2 mutations. The median overall survival of these five patients was 29 months (range: 4 to >40 months), which is considered good prognoses. Clinical and radiographic characteristics were distinct from IDH-wildtype (IDH-wt) pGBMs. IDH-mutant (IDH-mut) tumors consistently involved insular lesions and were subdivided into: (i) the two cases of elderly patients with long clinical histories and features implying multistep tumor development; and (ii) the three cases of younger patients with diffusely swelling insular tumors, slight contrast enhancement and no necrosis. Genetic and expression analyses of IDH-mut pGBMs were similar to those of sGBMs, suggesting that they are indeed distinct from their IDH-wt counterparts. TERT promoter mutation, a genetic marker of oligodendroglial derivation, was detected in one long-surviving case, but genetic alterations in the astrocyte-sGBM pathway were generally prevalent in IDH-mut pGBMs. Our results present a unique phenotype of IDH-mut pGBMs arising from insular cortex region, the molecular backgrounds of which are similar to sGBMs.

  2. Progranulin gene mutation with an unusual clinical and neuropathologic presentation.

    PubMed

    Wider, Christian; Uitti, Ryan J; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Fang, John Y; Josephs, Keith A; Baker, Matthew C; Rademakers, Rosa; Hutton, Michael L; Dickson, Dennis W

    2008-06-15

    Progranulin gene (PGRN) mutations cause frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U). Patients usually present with a frontotemporal dementia syndrome and have prominent atrophy and neuronal loss in frontal and temporal cortices and the striatum, with neuronal intranuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions. Clinical, neuropathological, and genetic studies are reported on an individual with PGRN mutation and her family members. We describe a patient with a PGRN c.26C>A mutation who presented with progressive stuttering dysarthria, oculomotor abnormalities, choreic buccolingual movements, and mild parkinsonism. Two other family members were affected, one with a behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia syndrome, the other with a diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease. At autopsy there was no neuronal loss in the cortex or medial temporal lobe structures, but there was striatal gliosis. Immunohistochemistry for ubiquitin and TDP-43 revealed neuronal cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions as well as neurites. This study further expands the clinical and pathological spectrum of PGRN mutations, and suggests the diagnosis could be missed in some individuals with atypical presentations.

  3. Relevance and efficacy of breast cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers above 60 years: a national cohort study.

    PubMed

    Saadatmand, Sepideh; Vos, Janet R; Hooning, Maartje J; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Koppert, Linetta B; de Bock, Geertruida H; Ausems, Margreet G; van Asperen, Christi J; Aalfs, Cora M; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Piek, Marianne; Seynaeve, Caroline; Verhoef, Cornelis; Rookus, Matti; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M

    2014-12-15

    Annual MRI and mammography is recommended for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers to reduce breast cancer mortality. Less intensive screening is advised ≥60 years, although effectiveness is unknown. We identified BRCA1/2 mutation carriers without bilateral mastectomy before age 60 to determine for whom screening ≥60 is relevant, in the Rotterdam Family Cancer Clinic and HEBON: a nationwide prospective cohort study. Furthermore, we compared tumour stage at breast cancer diagnosis between different screening strategies in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ≥60. Tumours >2 cm, positive lymph nodes, or distant metastases at detection were defined as "unfavourable." Of 548 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ≥60 years in 2012, 395 (72%) did not have bilateral mastectomy before the age of 60. Of these 395, 224 (57%) had a history of breast or other invasive carcinoma. In 136 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, we compared 148 breast cancers (including interval cancers) detected ≥60, of which 84 (57%) were first breast cancers. With biennial mammography 53% (30/57) of carcinomas were detected in unfavourable stage, compared to 21% (12/56) with annual mammography (adjusted odds ratio: 4·07, 95% confidence interval [1.79-9.28], p = 0.001). With biennial screening 40% of breast cancers were interval cancers, compared to 20% with annual screening (p = 0.016). Results remained significant for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, and first breast cancers separately. Over 70% of 60-year old BRCA1/2 mutation carriers remain at risk for breast cancer, of which half has prior cancers. When life expectancy is good, continuation of annual breast cancer screening of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ≥60 is worthwhile.

  4. Survey of CF mutations in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Huber, Klaus; Mirkovic, Borka; Nersesian, Rhea; Myers, Angela; Saiki, Randall; Bauer, Kurt

    2002-11-19

    BACKGROUND: Since it is impossible to sequence the complete CFTR gene routinely, clinical laboratories must rely on test systems that screen for a panel of the most frequent mutations causing disease in a high percentage of patients. Thus, in a cohort of 257 persons that were referred to our laboratory for analysis of CF gene mutations, reverse line probe assays for the most common CF mutations were performed. These techniques were evaluated as routine first-line analyses of the CFTR gene status. METHODS: DNA from whole blood specimens was extracted and subjected to PCR amplification of 9 exons and 6 introns of the CFTR gene. The resulting amplicons were hybridised to probes for CF mutations and polymorphisms, immobilised on membranes supplied by Roche Molecular Systems, Inc. and Innogenetics, Inc. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing of suspicious fragments indicating mutations were done with CF exon and intron specific primers. RESULTS: Of the 257 persons tested over the last three years (referrals based on 1) clinical symptoms typical for/indicative of CF, 2) indication for in vitro fertilisation, and 3) gene status determination because of anticipated parenthood and partners or relatives affected by CF), the reverse line blots detected heterozygote or homozygote mutations in the CFTR gene in 68 persons (26%). Eighty-three percent of those affected were heterozygous (47 persons) or homozygous (10 persons) for the DeltaF508 allele. The only other CF-alleles that we found with these tests were the G542X allele (3 persons), the G551D allele (3 persons), the 3849+10kb C-T allele (2 persons) the R117H allele (2 persons) and the 621+1G-T allele (1 person).Of the fifteen IVS8-5T-polymorphisms detected in intron 8, seven (47%) were found in males referred to us from IVF clinics. These seven 5T-alleles were all coupled with a heterozygous DeltaF508 allele, they make up 35% of the males with fertility problems (20 men) referred to us. CONCLUSIONS: In

  5. Epileptic Neuronal Networks: Methods of Identification and Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Stefan, Hermann; Lopes da Silva, Fernando H.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to examine evidence for the concept that epileptic activity should be envisaged in terms of functional connectivity and dynamics of neuronal networks. Basic concepts regarding structure and dynamics of neuronal networks are briefly described. Particular attention is given to approaches that are derived, or related, to the concept of causality, as formulated by Granger. Linear and non-linear methodologies aiming at characterizing the dynamics of neuronal networks applied to EEG/MEG and combined EEG/fMRI signals in epilepsy are critically reviewed. The relevance of functional dynamical analysis of neuronal networks with respect to clinical queries in focal cortical dysplasias, temporal lobe epilepsies, and “generalized” epilepsies is emphasized. In the light of the concepts of epileptic neuronal networks, and recent experimental findings, the dichotomic classification in focal and generalized epilepsy is re-evaluated. It is proposed that so-called “generalized epilepsies,” such as absence seizures, are actually fast spreading epilepsies, the onset of which can be tracked down to particular neuronal networks using appropriate network analysis. Finally new approaches to delineate epileptogenic networks are discussed. PMID:23532203

  6. Clinical Relevance of Microparticles from Platelets and Megakaryocytes

    PubMed Central

    Italiano, Joseph E.; Mairuhu, Albert T.A.; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Platelet microparticles were identified more than forty years ago and are the most abundant circulating microparticle subtype. Yet fundamental questions about their formation and role in human disease are just beginning to be understood at the cellular and molecular level. This review will address mechanisms of platelet microparticle generation and evaluate our current understanding of their clinical relevance. Recent findings New evidence indicates that the majority of CD41+ microparticles circulating in healthy individuals derive directly from megakaryocytes. CD41+ microparticles also form from activated platelets upon loss of cytoskeleton-membrane adhesion, which occurs in a multitude of disease states characterized by elevated platelet microparticle levels. More recent studies have demonstrated that platelet microparticles function as a transport and delivery system for bioactive molecules, participating in hemostasis and thrombosis, inflammation, malignancy infection transfer, angiogenesis, and immunity. The mechanism of platelet microparticle participation in specific disease entities such as rheumatoid arthritis has been elucidated. Summary Continued research into how platelet microparticles are generated and function as a transcellular delivery system will advance our basic understanding of microparticle physiology and may enable new strategies for treatment of select disease entities. PMID:20739880

  7. Clinically and pharmacologically relevant interactions of antidiabetic drugs

    PubMed Central

    May, Marcus; Schindler, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus often require multifactorial pharmacological treatment due to different comorbidities. An increasing number of concomitantly taken medications elevate the risk of the patient experiencing adverse drug effects or drug interactions. Drug interactions can be divided into pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions affecting cytochrome (CYP) enzymes, absorption properties, transporter activities and receptor affinities. Furthermore, nutrition, herbal supplements, patient’s age and gender are of clinical importance. Relevant drug interactions are predominantly related to sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones and glinides. Although metformin has a very low interaction potential, caution is advised when drugs that impair renal function are used concomitantly. With the exception of saxagliptin, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors also show a low interaction potential, but all drugs affecting the drug transporter P-glycoprotein should be used with caution. Incretin mimetics and sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors comprise a very low interaction potential and are therefore recommended as an ideal combination partner from the clinical–pharmacologic point of view. PMID:27092232

  8. Almond allergens: molecular characterization, detection, and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Mafra, Isabel; Carrapatoso, Isabel; Oliveira, Maria Beatriz P P

    2012-02-15

    Almond ( Prunus dulcis ) has been widely used in all sorts of food products (bakery, pastry, snacks), mostly due to its pleasant flavor and health benefits. However, it is also classified as a potential allergenic seed known to be responsible for triggering several mild to life-threatening immune reactions in sensitized and allergic individuals. Presently, eight groups of allergenic proteins have been identified and characterized in almond, namely, PR-10 (Pru du 1), TLP (Pru du 2), prolamins (Pru du 2S albumin, Pru du 3), profilins (Pru du 4), 60sRP (Pru du 5), and cupin (Pru du 6, Pru du γ-conglutin), although only a few of them have been tested for reactivity with almond-allergic sera. To protect sensitized individuals, labeling regulations have been implemented for foods containing potential allergenic ingredients, impelling the development of adequate analytical methods. This work aims to present an updated and critical overview of the molecular characterization and clinical relevance of almond allergens, as well as review the main methodologies used to detect and quantitate food allergens with special emphasis on almond.

  9. Clinical Relevance of HLA Gene Variants in HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Zou, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Host gene variants may influence the natural history of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans, is one of the most important host factors that are correlated with the clinical course of HBV infection. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near certain HLA gene loci are strongly associated with not only persistent HBV infection but also spontaneous HBV clearance and seroconversion, disease progression, and the development of liver cirrhosis and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB). These variations also influence the efficacy of interferon (IFN) and nucleot(s)ide analogue (NA) treatment and response to HBV vaccines. Meanwhile, discrepant conclusions were reached with different patient cohorts. It is therefore essential to identify the associations of specific HLA allele variants with disease progression and viral clearance in chronic HBV infection among different ethnic populations. A better understanding of HLA polymorphism relevance in HBV infection outcome would enable us to elucidate the roles of HLA SNPs in the pathogenesis and clearance of HBV in different areas and ethnic groups, to improve strategies for the prevention and treatment of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27243039

  10. Epileptic neuronal networks: methods of identification and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Hermann; Lopes da Silva, Fernando H

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to examine evidence for the concept that epileptic activity should be envisaged in terms of functional connectivity and dynamics of neuronal networks. Basic concepts regarding structure and dynamics of neuronal networks are briefly described. Particular attention is given to approaches that are derived, or related, to the concept of causality, as formulated by Granger. Linear and non-linear methodologies aiming at characterizing the dynamics of neuronal networks applied to EEG/MEG and combined EEG/fMRI signals in epilepsy are critically reviewed. The relevance of functional dynamical analysis of neuronal networks with respect to clinical queries in focal cortical dysplasias, temporal lobe epilepsies, and "generalized" epilepsies is emphasized. In the light of the concepts of epileptic neuronal networks, and recent experimental findings, the dichotomic classification in focal and generalized epilepsy is re-evaluated. It is proposed that so-called "generalized epilepsies," such as absence seizures, are actually fast spreading epilepsies, the onset of which can be tracked down to particular neuronal networks using appropriate network analysis. Finally new approaches to delineate epileptogenic networks are discussed.

  11. The neuropathology and clinical phenotype of FTD with progranulin mutations.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Ian R A

    2007-07-01

    Mutations in the progranulin gene (PGRN), on chromosome 17q21, have recently been identified as a major cause of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD). These cases have a characteristic pattern of neuropathology that is a distinct subtype of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions (FTLD-U), with lentiform neuronal intranuclear inclusions being a consistent feature. There is no abnormal accumulation of PGRN protein in the brain and immunohistochemical and biochemical analysis indicates that the ubiquitinated pathological protein is TDP-43. In these families, FTD is inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion with high penetrance. The clinical phenotype is usually a combination of behavioural abnormality and language disturbance that is most often a form of primary progressive aphasia. Mild parkinsonism is common but motor neuron disease is notably rare. Marked variation in the disease course and clinical features are common, not only between families with different mutations, but also within individual families. This degree of clinical variability makes it difficult to predict which cases of familial FTD will turn out to have a PGRN mutation.

  12. Complementing mutations in core binding factor leukemias: from mouse models to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Müller, A M S; Duque, J; Shizuru, J A; Lübbert, M

    2008-10-02

    A great proportion of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) display cytogenetic abnormalities including chromosomal aberrations and/or submicroscopic mutations. These abnormalities significantly influence the prognosis of the disease. Hence, a thorough genetic work-up is an essential constituent of standard diagnostic procedures. Core binding factor (CBF) leukemias denote AMLs with chromosomal aberrations disrupting one of the CBF transcription factor genes; the most common examples are translocation t(8;21) and inversion inv(16), which result in the generation of the AML1-ETO and CBFbeta-MYH11 fusion proteins, respectively. However, in murine models, these alterations alone do not suffice to generate full-blown leukemia, but rather, complementary events are required. In fact, a substantial proportion of primary CBF leukemias display additional activating mutations, mostly of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) c-KIT. The awareness of the impact and prognostic relevance of these 'second hits' is increasing with a wider range of mutations tested in clinical trials. Furthermore, novel agents targeting RTKs are emanating rapidly and entering therapeutic regimens. Here, we present a concise review on complementing mutations in CBF leukemias including pathophysiology, mouse models, and clinical implications.

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in adenocarcinoma lung in a North Indian population: Prevalence and relation with different clinical variables

    PubMed Central

    Kasana, Basharat Ahmad; Dar, Waseem Raja; Aziz, Sheikh Aijaz; Lone, Abdul Rashid; Sofi, Najeeb Ullah; Dar, Imtiyaz Ahmad; Latief, Muzamil; Arshad, Faheem; Hussain, Moomin; Hussain, Mir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Adenocarcinoma is taking over squamous cell lung cancer as the predominant histological subtype. Several cytotoxic drugs are available for the treatment of lung cancer, but side effects limit their use. Recently, targeted therapies for cancers have come into clinical practice. Aims and Objectives: To determine the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation in adenocarcinoma lung in a North Indian population and its relation with different clinical variables. Materials and Methods: A total of 57 patients who met inclusion criteria were recruited into the study. Relevant history, clinical examination and investigations were done. EGFR mutation was done in all patients. Results: A total of twenty patients tested positive for EGFR mutation. EGFR was more frequently detected in female patients (53.8%), while as only 19.4% of the male patients expressed EGFR mutation, which was statistically very significant (P = 0.007). EGFR mutation was more frequently detected in nonsmokers (52%) as compared to smokers (21.9%) which also was statistically significant (P value of 0.018). EGFR mutation was more common in Stage III and IV adenocarcinomas (48%) as compared to Stage I and II (21.4%) which was statistically significant (P value 0.034). Conclusion: EGFR mutation should be routinely done in all patients of adenocarcinoma lung particularly non-smoker females with Stage III and IV disease. PMID:27688613

  14. Preclinical Models Provide Scientific Justification and Translational Relevance for Moving Novel Therapeutics into Clinical Trials for Pediatric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Langenau, David M; Sweet-Cordero, Alejandro; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Dyer, Michael A

    2015-12-15

    Despite improvements in survival rates for children with cancer since the 1960s, progress for many pediatric malignancies has slowed over the past two decades. With the recent advances in our understanding of the genomic landscape of pediatric cancer, there is now enthusiasm for individualized cancer therapy based on genomic profiling of patients' tumors. However, several obstacles to effective personalized cancer therapy remain. For example, relatively little data from prospective clinical trials demonstrate the selective efficacy of molecular-targeted therapeutics based on somatic mutations in the patient's tumor. In this commentary, we discuss recent advances in preclinical testing for pediatric cancer and provide recommendations for providing scientific justification and translational relevance for novel therapeutic combinations for childhood cancer. Establishing rigorous criteria for defining and validating druggable mutations will be essential for the success of ongoing and future clinical genomic trials for pediatric malignancies.

  15. Mutation of the CH1 Domain in the Histone Acetyltransferase CREBBP Results in Autism-Relevant Behaviors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fei; Kasper, Lawryn H.; Bedford, David C.; Lerach, Stephanie; Teubner, Brett J. W.; Brindle, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental afflictions characterized by repetitive behaviors, deficits in social interaction, and impaired communication skills. For most ASD patients, the underlying causes are unknown. Genetic mutations have been identified in about 25 percent of ASD cases, including mutations in epigenetic regulators, suggesting that dysregulated chromatin or DNA function is a critical component of ASD. Mutations in the histone acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP, CREBBP) cause Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RTS), a developmental disorder that includes ASD-like symptoms. Recently, genomic studies involving large numbers of ASD patient families have theoretically modeled CBP and its paralog p300 (EP300) as critical hubs in ASD-associated protein and gene interaction networks, and have identified de novo missense mutations in highly conserved residues of the CBP acetyltransferase and CH1 domains. Here we provide animal model evidence that supports this notion that CBP and its CH1 domain are relevant to autism. We show that mice with a deletion mutation in the CBP CH1 (TAZ1) domain (CBPΔCH1/ΔCH1) have an RTS-like phenotype that includes ASD-relevant repetitive behaviors, hyperactivity, social interaction deficits, motor dysfunction, impaired recognition memory, and abnormal synaptic plasticity. Our results therefore indicate that loss of CBP CH1 domain function contributes to RTS, and possibly ASD, and that this domain plays an essential role in normal motor function, cognition and social behavior. Although the key physiological functions affected by ASD-associated mutation of epigenetic regulators have been enigmatic, our findings are consistent with theoretical models involving CBP and p300 in ASD, and with a causative role for recently described ASD-associated CBP mutations. PMID:26730956

  16. The functional relevance of somatic synonymous mutations in melanoma and other cancers

    PubMed Central

    Gotea, Valer; Gartner, Jared J.; Qutob, Nouar; Elnitski, Laura; Samuels, Yardena

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent technological advances in sequencing have flooded the field of cancer research with knowledge about somatic mutations for many different cancer types. Most cancer genomics studies focus on mutations that alter the amino acid sequence, ignoring the potential impact of synonymous mutations. However, accumulating experimental evidence has demonstrated clear consequences for gene function, leading to a widespread recognition of the functional role of synonymous mutations and their causal connection to various diseases. Here, we review the evidence supporting the direct impact of synonymous mutations on gene function via gene splicing; mRNA stability, folding, and translation; protein folding; and miRNA-based regulation of expression. These results highlight the functional contribution of synonymous mutations to oncogenesis and the need to further investigate their detection and prioritization for experimental assessment. The identification of cancer-causing mutations and the corresponding functionally impacted processes represents the main goal of cancer genomics. The inception of large collaborative efforts such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) has led to the discovery of numerous causal or driver mutations in many cancer types. Nevertheless, tumors continue to be found in the absence of conspicuous mutational events, such as nucleotide substitutions, translocations or copy number variants involving genes with well-established tumorigenic connections. The lack of clear driver events in some cancers motivates the search for somatically acquired events that are more rare or have less obvious functional consequences but mechanistically converge on genes and pathways involved in oncogenesis and tumor progression. PMID:26300548

  17. Direct identification of clinically relevant neoepitopes presented on native human melanoma tissue by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bassani-Sternberg, Michal; Bräunlein, Eva; Klar, Richard; Engleitner, Thomas; Sinitcyn, Pavel; Audehm, Stefan; Straub, Melanie; Weber, Julia; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Specht, Katja; Martignoni, Marc E.; Werner, Angelika; Hein, Rüdiger; H. Busch, Dirk; Peschel, Christian; Rad, Roland; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias; Krackhardt, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Although mutations may represent attractive targets for immunotherapy, direct identification of mutated peptide ligands isolated from human leucocyte antigens (HLA) on the surface of native tumour tissue has so far not been successful. Using advanced mass spectrometry (MS) analysis, we survey the melanoma-associated immunopeptidome to a depth of 95,500 patient-presented peptides. We thereby discover a large spectrum of attractive target antigen candidates including cancer testis antigens and phosphopeptides. Most importantly, we identify peptide ligands presented on native tumour tissue samples harbouring somatic mutations. Four of eleven mutated ligands prove to be immunogenic by neoantigen-specific T-cell responses. Moreover, tumour-reactive T cells with specificity for selected neoantigens identified by MS are detected in the patient's tumour and peripheral blood. We conclude that direct identification of mutated peptide ligands from primary tumour material by MS is possible and yields true neoepitopes with high relevance for immunotherapeutic strategies in cancer. PMID:27869121

  18. The nocebo effect and its relevance for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Luana; Miller, Franklin G.

    2011-01-01

    Negative expectations deriving from the clinical encounter can produce negative outcomes, known as nocebo effects. Specifically, research on the nocebo effect indicates that information disclosure about potential side effects can itself contribute to producing adverse effects. Neurobiological processes play a role in the nocebo effect and this paper provides a selective review of mechanistic research on the nocebo effect. Comparatively little attention has been directed to clinical studies and their implications for daily clinical practice. The nocebo response is influenced by the content and the way information is presented to patients in clinical trials in both the placebo as well as active treatment conditions. Nocebo effect adversely influences quality of life and therapy adherence, emphasizing the need for minimizing these responses to the extent possible. Evidence further indicates that the informed consent process in clinical trials may induce nocebo effects. This paper concludes with ethical directions for future patient-oriented research and routine practice. PMID:21862825

  19. Clinical relevance of host immunity in breast cancer: from TILs to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Savas, Peter; Salgado, Roberto; Denkert, Carsten; Sotiriou, Christos; Darcy, Phillip K; Smyth, Mark J; Loi, Sherene

    2016-04-01

    The clinical relevance of the host immune system in breast cancer has long been unexplored. Studies developed over the past decade have highlighted the biological heterogeneity of breast cancer, prompting researchers to investigate whether the role of the immune system in this malignancy is similar across different molecular subtypes of the disease. The presence of high levels of lymphocytic infiltration has been consistently associated with a more-favourable prognosis in patients with early stage triple-negative and HER2-positive breast cancer. These infiltrates seem to reflect favourable host antitumour immune responses, suggesting that immune activation is important for improving survival outcomes. In this Review, we discuss the composition of the immune infiltrates observed in breast cancers, as well as data supporting the clinical relevance of host antitumour immunity, as represented by lymphocytic infiltration, and how this biomarker could be used in the clinical setting. We also discuss the rationale for enhancing immunity in breast cancer, including early data on the efficacy of T-cell checkpoint inhibition in this setting.

  20. Clinical Manifestations in Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia Patients with Proline-Rich Transmembrane Protein 2 Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Jinyoung; Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Munhyang; Lee, Jeehun; Roh, Hakjae

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Given the diverse phenotypes including combined non-dyskinetic symptoms in patients harboring mutations of the gene encoding proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2), the clinical significance of these mutations in paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is questionable. In this study, we investigated the clinical characteristics of PKD patients with PRRT2 mutations. Methods Familial and sporadic PKD patients were enrolled and PRRT2 gene sequencing was performed. Demographic and clinical data were compared between PKD patients with and without a PRRT2 mutation. Results Among the enrolled PKD patients (8 patients from 5 PKD families and 19 sporadic patients), PRRT2 mutations were detected in 3 PKD families (60%) and 2 sporadic cases (10.5%). All familial patients with a PRRT2 gene mutation had the c.649dupC mutation, which is the most commonly reported mutation. Two uncommon mutations (c.649delC and c.629dupC) were detected only in the sporadic cases. PKD patients with PRRT2 mutation were younger at symptom onset and had more non-dyskinetic symptoms than those without PRRT2 mutation. However, the characteristics of dyskinetic movement did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions This is the first study of PRRT2 mutations in Korea. The presence of a PRRT2 mutation was more strongly related to familial PKD, and was clinically related with earlier age of onset and common non-dyskinetic symptoms in PKD patients. PMID:24465263

  1. [Dose-response relation: relevance for clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Klinkhardt, U; Harder, S

    1998-12-15

    Dose-finding studies are performed routinely in patients and--if appropriate surrogate models exist--also in healthy volunteers. Such studies aim at establishing the optimal dose range for further clinical studies on the efficacy and the risk-benefit ratio of a new drug. The dose-response relationship of a drug is most often described by a sigmoidal curve. Its parameters include the mean effective dose, the maximal effect and the steepness. Interpretation of such curves should be done in the context of the intended clinical indications of the drug. The risk-benefit ratio of a drug can be assessed by overlapping the dose-response curve of wanted and unwanted clinical effects, again, any overlapping (which can be described e.g. by the therapeutic index) should be seen in the context of the indication and available therapeutic alternatives.

  2. Anomalous course of the extensor pollicis longus: clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Guy; Wolovelsky, Alejandro; Rinott, Micha; Rozen, Nimrod

    2011-11-01

    The extensor pollicis longus (EPL) is a consistent structure with rare anomalies, the most common being a group of different tendon duplications passing through the fourth compartment without symptoms. The second form comprises anomalies in the course of the EPL having significant clinical importance due to the predisposition for creating tenosynovitis of the EPL mimicking other types of tendon tenosynovitis. Clinical symptoms of radial dorsal wrist pain mimicking intersection syndrome or de-Quervain disease with the "absent snuff box" sign should raise suspicions for an anomaly in the course of the EPL.

  3. Clinical relevance of sonographically estimated amniotic fluid volume: polyhydramnios.

    PubMed

    Sandlin, Adam T; Chauhan, Suneet P; Magann, Everett F

    2013-05-01

    Polyhydramnios is an excessive amount of amniotic fluid within the amniotic cavity. The etiology of polyhydramnios may be idiopathic, the consequence of fetal structural anomalies, or the consequence of various fetal and maternal conditions. The clinical importance of polyhydramnios is found in its association with adverse pregnancy outcomes and the risk of perinatal mortality. The antenatal management of polyhydramnios can be challenging as there are no formalized guidelines on the topic. The purpose of this review is to provide a literature-based overview on the subject of polyhydramnios in singleton pregnancies, demonstrate its clinical implications, and describe a practical approach to its management.

  4. Brain white matter tracts: functional anatomy and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gerrish, Amy C; Thomas, Adam G; Dineen, Robert A

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is increasingly available on clinical magnetic resonance scanners and can be acquired in a relatively short time. There has been an explosion of applications in the research field but the use to the practicing radiologist may seem obscure. This paper aims to highlight how diffusion tensor imaging can be used to prompt a dedicated neuroanatomical search for white matter lesions in clinical presentations relating to motor, sensory, language, and visuospatial deficits. The enhanced depiction of white matter tracts in the temporal stem is also highlighted, which is a region of importance in epilepsy surgery planning.

  5. A clinically relevant frailty index for aging rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Frailty is a clinical syndrome that is increasingly prevalent during aging. Frailty involves the confluence of reduced strength, speed, physical activity, and endurance, and it is associated with adverse health outcomes. Frailty indices have been developed to diagnose frailty in older adult populati...

  6. A Laboratory Course in Clinical Biochemistry Emphasizing Interest and Relevance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Peter L.

    1975-01-01

    Ten laboratory experiments are described which are used in a successful clinical biochemistry laboratory course (e.g. blood alcohol, glucose tolerance, plasma triglycerides, coronary risk index, gastric analysis, vitamin C and E). Most of the experiments are performed on the students themselves using simple equipment with emphasis on useful…

  7. Assessment of relevant fungal species in clinical solid wastes.

    PubMed

    Noman, Efaq Ali; Al-Gheethi, A A; Rahman, Nik Norulaini Nik Ab; Nagao, H; Ab Kadir, M O

    2016-10-01

    The study aimed to determine the fungal diversity in clinical waste samples from a healthcare facility in Penang Malaysia. Different fungi species were detected in 83.75 % of the 92 clinical waste samples that were screened from different sections of the healthcare facility. One hundred fifty fungal isolates comprising of 8 genera and 36 species were obtained. They were purified by using single spore isolation technique. Subsequently, the isolates were identified by phenotypic method based on morphological and culture characteristics on different culture media. Among all fungal isolates, Aspergillus spp. in section Nigri 10.2 %, Aspergillus niger 9.5 %, Aspergillus fumigatus 8.8 %, Penicillium. simplicissium 8 %, Aspergillus tubingensis 7.3 %, Aspergillus terreus var. terreus 6.6 %, Penicillium waksmanii 5.9 % and Curvularia lunata 6.5 % were the most frequent. Among five sections of the Wellness Centre, the clinical wastes collected from the diagnostic labs of haematology section had the highest numbers of fungal species (29 species). Glove wastes had the highest numbers of fungal species (19 species) among 17 types of clinical wastes screened. Among all fungal species, Aspergillus spp. exhibited higher growth at 37 °C than at 28 °C, indicating the potential of these opportunistic fungi to cause diseases in human. These results indicated the potential of hospital wastes as reservoirs for fungal species.

  8. The potential clinical relevance of visible particles in parenteral drugs.

    PubMed

    Doessegger, Lucette; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Szczesny, Piotr; Rockstroh, Helmut; Kallmeyer, Georg; Langenkamp, Anja; Herrmann, Joerg; Famulare, Joseph

    2012-08-01

    Visible particulates (VP) are one subclass of defects seen during the final visual inspection of parenteral products and are currently one of the top ten reasons for recalls 1,2. The risk posed by particles is still unclear with limited experience reported in humans but remains an important consideration during the manufacture and use of parenteral products. From the experimental and clinical knowledge of the distribution of particulate matter in the body, clinical complications would include events occurring around parenteral administration e.g., as a result of mechanical pulmonary artery obstruction and injection site reaction, or sub-acute or chronic events e.g., granuloma. The challenge is to better understand the implication for patients of single vials with VP and align the risk with the probabilistic detection process used by manufacturers for accept/reject decisions of individual units of product.

  9. Classification of Clinically Relevant Microorganisms in Non-Medical Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    humans. S . aureus should always be considered a potential pathogen, while most strains of S . epidermidis are nonpathogenic and may even play a...pure culture. He named them Staphylococcus aureus because of their golden color. S . aureus remains one of the most important pathogens in clinical...settings largely due to the rapidity of its evolutionary response to treatment. The first antibiotic-resistant strains of S . aureus were isolated only

  10. Tolerance in liver transplantation: Biomarkers and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Revilla-Nuin, Beatriz; Parrilla, Pascual; Martínez-Alarcón, Laura; Ramírez, Pablo; Pons, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation is the optimal treatment for end-stage organ failure, and modern immunosuppression has allowed important progress in short-term outcomes. However, immunosuppression poorly influences chronic rejection and elicits chronic toxicity in current clinical practice. Thus, a major goal in transplantation is to understand and induce tolerance. It is well established that human regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3 play important roles in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. The major regulatory T cell subsets and mechanisms of expansion that are critical for induction and long-term maintenance of graft tolerance and survival are being actively investigated. Likewise, other immune cells, such as dendritic cells, monocyte/macrophages or natural killer cells, have been described as part of the process known as “operational tolerance”. However, translation of these results towards clinical practice needs solid tools to identify accurately and reliably patients who are going to be tolerant. In this way, a plethora of genetic and cellular biomarkers is raising and being validated worldwide in large multi-center clinical trials. Few of the studies performed so far have provided a detailed analysis of the impact of immunosuppression withdrawal on pre-existing complications derived from the long-term administration of immunosuppressive drugs and the side effects associated with them. The future of liver transplantation is aimed to develop new therapies which increase the actual low tolerant vs non-tolerant recipients ratio. PMID:27678350

  11. [Clinical relevance of immunotyping of oncologic and hematologic diseases].

    PubMed

    Diehl, V; Pfreundschuh, M

    1987-06-01

    Progress in immunology and molecular biology have provided a better understanding of etiology, pathogenesis and biology of many oncological and hematological diseases. In clinical practice, certain new methods of immunotyping (IT) are of diagnostic importance in assigning undifferentiated tumors to lymphoid, epithelial or mesenchymal origin and in defining subgroups of leukemias and lymphomas. The demonstration of rearrangements of gene coding for immunoglobulins or T-cell receptors assigns hematological malignancies of early differentiation to the B- or T-cell lineage, discriminates between reactive lymphoid changes and clonal lymphoid expansion and detects persistent clonal growth after therapy. In certain clinical entities (e.g. ALL) the immunological subtypes are of importance for differential therapy. By means of IT new clinical entities have been defined (Ki-1-lymphoma, T gamma-lymphoproliferative, LFA-1-deficiency) and the pathomechanisms of others have been elucidated (Bernard-Soulier-disease Syndrome, Glanzmann-Nägeli thrombasthenia). Of immediate therapeutic importance is the identification by IT of receptors for specific hormones or biological response modifiers on malignant cells. In-vivo diagnosis by monoclonal antibodies opens a way to define more exactly the extent of malignant disease by scintigrams or NMR.

  12. The Assessment of Schizotypy and Its Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Oliver J.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews several approaches to assessing schizotypal traits using a wide variety of self-report and interview measures. It makes a distinction between clinical approaches largely based on syndrome and symptom definitions, and psychometric approaches to measuring personality traits. The review presents a brief description of the content and psychometric properties of both sets of measures; these cover both the broad rubric of schizotypy often, but not exclusively based on DSM conceptions, as well as measures with a more specific focus. Measurement of schizotypy has taken place within clinical and nonclinical research utilizing a range of designs and methodologies. Several of these are elucidated with respect to the assessment choices open to researchers, and the implications of the measures chosen. These paradigms include the case–control study, “high risk”/“ultra-high risk” groups, a variety of nonclinical groups and other groups of interest, large scale epidemiology and “in vivo” designs. Evidence from a wide variety of designs continues to provide evidence of the validity of both clinical and personality approaches to schizotypal assessment. PMID:25810054

  13. The Clinical Relevance of Beta Blockers in Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hefner, J.; Csef, H.

    2016-01-01

    The last ten years have seen hardly any improvement in the prognosis of ovarian carcinoma. There is a great need for new treatment strategies, and a recent retrospective study showing a survival advantage with the use of beta blockers met with a very positive response. This systematic review summarizes the current state of knowledge and research on the topic: A database analysis identified six clinical studies showing inconsistent results with respect to the administration of beta blockers and disease course. The 13 preclinical studies identified showed almost without exception both that catecholamines had detrimental effects on tumour progression, and that these effects could be influenced by pharmacological blockade. Overall the available evidence does not justify the use of beta blockers in clinical practice for ovarian carcinoma at the present time. This article also outlines details of research design required for further studies needed on the subject. Preclinical research findings are however very impressive: They not only form an important basis for the development of future clinical studies but also, through revealing new pathomechanisms, they already make an important contribution towards the development of new treatment strategies for ovarian carcinoma. PMID:27761025

  14. The inherited ataxias: genetic heterogeneity, mutation databases, and future directions in research and clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Hersheson, Joshua; Haworth, Andrea; Houlden, Henry

    2012-09-01

    The inherited cerebellar ataxias are a diverse group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders. Inheritance patterns of these disorders can be complex with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and mitochondrial inheritance demonstrated by one or more ataxic syndromes. The broad range of mutation types found in inherited ataxia contributes to the complex genetic etiology of these disorders. The majority of inherited ataxias are caused by repeat expansions; however, conventional mutations are important causes of the rarer dominant and recessive ataxias. Advances in sequencing technology have allowed for much broader testing of these rare ataxia genes. This is relevant to the aims of the Human Variome Project, which aims to collate and store gene variation data through mutation databases. Variant data is currently located in a range of public and commercial resources. Few locus-specific databases have been created to catalogue variation in the dominant ataxia genes although there are several databases for some recessive genes. Developing these resources will facilitate a better understanding of the complex genotype-phenotype relationships in these disorders and assist interpretation of gene variants as testing for rarer ataxia genes becomes commonplace.

  15. Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Validation Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    1 1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0596 TITLE: Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer. A Multi-Institutional...Validation Trial PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jesse McKenney, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Cleveland Clinic Foundation Cleveland, OH 44195 REPORT DATE...COVERED 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer. A

  16. Functional and clinical relevance of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4.

    PubMed

    Campoli, Michael; Ferrone, Soldano; Wang, Xinhui

    2010-01-01

    The lack of effective conventional therapies for the treatment of advanced stage melanoma has stimulated interest in the development of novel strategies for the management of patients with malignant melanoma. Among them, immunotherapy has attracted much attention because of the potential role played by immunological events in the clinical course of melanoma. For many years, T cell-based immunotherapy has been emphasized in part because of the disappointing results of the monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based clinical trials conducted in the early 1980s and in part because of the postulated major role played by T cells in tumor growth control. More recently, mAb-based therapies have gained in popularity given their clinical and commercial success for a variety of malignant diseases. As a result, there has been increased interest in identifying and characterizing antibody-defined melanoma antigens. Among them, the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4), also known as high molecular weight-melanoma associated antigen (HMW-MAA) or melanoma chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP), has attracted much attention in recent years because of the growing experimental evidence that it fulfills two requirements for immunotherapy to be therapeutically effective: (1) targeting of cancer stem cells (CSC) and (2) development of combinatorial therapies to counteract the escape mechanisms driven by the genetic instability of tumor cells. With this in mind, in this chapter, we have reviewed recent information related to the distribution of CSPG4 on various types of tumors, including CSC, its expression on pericytes in the tumor microenvironment, its recognition by T cells, its role in cell biology as well as the potential mechanisms underlying the ability of CSPG4-specific immunity to control malignant cell growth.

  17. The clinical relevance of sexual dysfunction in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bruni, C; Raja, J; Denton, C P; Matucci-Cerinic, M

    2015-12-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a chronic multi-organ autoimmune disease, leading to important clinical and psychological implications. Among organ complications, sexual dysfunction is a major issue for both male and female gender, with high prevalence and great impact on quality of life, although frequently not addressed by both clinicians and patients. While erectile dysfunction is the most common cause of sexual problems in males, genital tract and general physical changes are major contributors to sexual impairment in females. This review presents current state of the art on this topic, discussing published data on presentation, evaluation and therapeutic options.

  18. [Clinical research IV. Relevancy of the statistical test chosen].

    PubMed

    Talavera, Juan O; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    When we look at the difference between two therapies or the association of a risk factor or prognostic indicator with its outcome, we need to evaluate the accuracy of the result. This assessment is based on a judgment that uses information about the study design and statistical management of the information. This paper specifically mentions the relevance of the statistical test selected. Statistical tests are chosen mainly from two characteristics: the objective of the study and type of variables. The objective can be divided into three test groups: a) those in which you want to show differences between groups or inside a group before and after a maneuver, b) those that seek to show the relationship (correlation) between variables, and c) those that aim to predict an outcome. The types of variables are divided in two: quantitative (continuous and discontinuous) and qualitative (ordinal and dichotomous). For example, if we seek to demonstrate differences in age (quantitative variable) among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with and without neurological disease (two groups), the appropriate test is the "Student t test for independent samples." But if the comparison is about the frequency of females (binomial variable), then the appropriate statistical test is the χ(2).

  19. Vitamin E-drug interactions: molecular basis and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Podszun, Maren; Frank, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Vitamin E (α-, β-, γ- and δ-tocopherol and -tocotrienol) is an essential factor in the human diet and regularly taken as a dietary supplement by many people, who act under the assumption that it may be good for their health and can do no harm. With the publication of meta-analyses reporting increased mortality in persons taking vitamin E supplements, the safety of the micronutrient was questioned and interactions with prescription drugs were suggested as one potentially underlying mechanism. Here, we review the evidence in the scientific literature for adverse vitamin E-drug interactions and discuss the potential of each of the eight vitamin E congeners to alter the activity of drugs. In summary, there is no evidence from animal models or randomised controlled human trials to suggest that the intake of tocopherols and tocotrienols at nutritionally relevant doses may cause adverse nutrient-drug interactions. Consumption of high-dose vitamin E supplements ( ≥  300 mg/d), however, may lead to interactions with the drugs aspirin, warfarin, tamoxifen and cyclosporine A that may alter their activities. For the majority of drugs, however, interactions with vitamin E, even at high doses, have not been observed and are thus unlikely.

  20. Taxonomy, Epidemiology, and Clinical Relevance of the Genus Arcobacter

    PubMed Central

    Collado, Luis; Figueras, Maria José

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The genus Arcobacter, defined almost 20 years ago from members of the genus Campylobacter, has become increasingly important because its members are being considered emergent enteropathogens and/or potential zoonotic agents. Over recent years information that is relevant for microbiologists, especially those working in the medical and veterinary fields and in the food safety sector, has accumulated. Recently, the genus has been enlarged with several new species. The complete genomes of Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter nitrofigilis are available, with the former revealing diverse pathways characteristic of free-living microbes and virulence genes homologous to those of Campylobacter. The first multilocus sequence typing analysis showed a great diversity of sequence types, with no association with specific hosts or geographical regions. Advances in detection and identification techniques, mostly based on molecular methods, have been made. These microbes have been associated with water outbreaks and with indicators of fecal pollution, with food products and water as the suspected routes of transmission. This review updates this knowledge and provides the most recent data on the taxonomy, species diversity, methods of detection, and identification of these microbes as well as on their virulence potential and implication in human and animal diseases. PMID:21233511

  1. Cashew Nut Allergy: Clinical Relevance and Allergen Characterisation.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Cíntia; Costa, Joana; Vicente, António A; Oliveira, Maria Beatriz P P; Mafra, Isabel

    2016-09-01

    Cashew plant (Anacardium occidentale L.) is the most relevant species of the Anacardium genus. It presents high economic value since it is widely used in human nutrition and in several industrial applications. Cashew nut is a well-appreciated food (belongs to the tree nut group), being widely consumed as snacks and in processed foods by the majority of world's population. However, cashew nut is also classified as a potent allergenic food known to be responsible for triggering severe and systemic immune reactions (e.g. anaphylaxis) in sensitised/allergic individuals that often demand epinephrine treatment and hospitalisation. So far, three groups of allergenic proteins have been identified and characterised in cashew nut: Ana o 1 and Ana o 2 (cupin superfamily) and Ana o 3 (prolamin superfamily), which are all classified as major allergens. The prevalence of cashew nut allergy seems to be rising in industrialised countries with the increasing consumption of this nut. There is still no cure for cashew nut allergy, as well as for other food allergies; thus, the allergic patients are advised to eliminate it from their diets. Accordingly, when carefully choosing processed foods that are commercially available, the allergic consumers have to rely on proper food labelling. In this sense, the control of labelling compliance is much needed, which has prompted the development of proficient analytical methods for allergen analysis. In the recent years, significant research advances in cashew nut allergy have been accomplished, which are highlighted and discussed in this review.

  2. Clinically relevant study end points in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Martos, Carlos; Guerrero, Angel; Minsky, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    In rectal cancer currently there are no clearly validated early end points which can serve as surrogates for long-term clinical outcome such as local control and survival. However, the use of a variety of response rates (i.e. pathological complete response, downsizing the primary tumor, tumor regression grade (TRG), radiological response) as endpoints in early (phase II) clinical trials is common since objective response to therapy is an early indication of activity. Disease-free survival (DFS) has been proposed as the most appropriate end point in adjuvant trials and is one of the most frequently used in newer rectal cancer trials. Due to the devastating nature of local recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer, local control (which is itself a subset of the overall DFS endpoint) is still considered an important endpoint. Recently, circumferential resection margin (CRM) has been proposed as novel early end point because the CRM status can account for effects on DFS and overall survival after chemoradiation, radiation (RT), or surgery alone. Consensus is needed to define the most appropriate end points in both early and phase III trials in locally advanced cancer.

  3. Exercise blood pressure: clinical relevance and correct measurement.

    PubMed

    Sharman, J E; LaGerche, A

    2015-06-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a mandatory safety measure during graded intensity clinical exercise stress testing. While it is generally accepted that exercise hypotension is a poor prognostic sign linked to severe cardiac dysfunction, recent meta-analysis data also implicate excessive rises in submaximal exercise BP with adverse cardiovascular events and mortality, irrespective of resting BP. Although more data is needed to derive submaximal normative BP thresholds, the association of a hypertensive response to exercise with increased cardiovascular risk may be due to underlying hypertension that has gone unnoticed by conventional resting BP screening methods. Delayed BP decline during recovery is also associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Thus, above and beyond being used as a routine safety measure during stress testing, exercise (and recovery) BP may be useful for identifying high-risk individuals and also as an aid to optimise care through appropriate follow-up after exercise stress testing. Accordingly, careful attention should be paid to correct measurement of exercise stress test BP (before, during and after exercise) using a standardised approach with trained operators and validated BP monitoring equipment (manual or automated). Recommendations for exercise BP measurement based on consolidated international guidelines and expert consensus are presented in this review.

  4. Clinical relevance of molecular diagnosis in pet allergy.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, S A; Sastre, J

    2016-07-01

    We describe the pattern of sensitisation to pet IgE components and its association with clinical symptoms. Hundred and fifty nine consecutive patients with rhinitis/asthma sensitised to dog, cat, and horse were recruited. Specific IgE to whole extracts and to pet recombinant allergens were performed. Only 5% of patients were monosensitised to animal allergens. Specific IgE to Can f 1 was significantly associated with persistent rhinitis, Can f 2 with asthma diagnosis, Can f 3 with moderate/severe rhinitis (M/S-R) and asthma diagnosis (AD), and Can f 5 with persistent and M/S-R. Positive IgE to Fel d 2 was significantly associated with M/S-R and AD, Equ c 1 with M/S-R and Equ c 3 with persistent rhinitis, AD and severe asthma. Sensitisation to ≥2 molecules or to pet albumins was associated with more severe respiratory symptoms. Molecular diagnosis in patients with pet allergy may also help clinicians to predict clinical symptoms and their severity.

  5. Update on Eosinophilic Meningoencephalitis and Its Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; da Silva, Ana Cristina Arámburu; Yoshimura, Kentaro

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis is caused by a variety of helminthic infections. These worm-specific infections are named after the causative worm genera, the most common being angiostrongyliasis, gnathostomiasis, toxocariasis, cysticercosis, schistosomiasis, baylisascariasis, and paragonimiasis. Worm parasites enter an organism through ingestion of contaminated water or an intermediate host and can eventually affect the central nervous system (CNS). These infections are potentially serious events leading to sequelae or death, and diagnosis depends on currently limited molecular methods. Identification of parasites in fluids and tissues is rarely possible, while images and clinical examinations do not lead to a definitive diagnosis. Treatment usually requires the concomitant administration of corticoids and anthelminthic drugs, yet new compounds and their extensive and detailed clinical evaluation are much needed. Eosinophilia in fluids may be detected in other infectious and noninfectious conditions, such as neoplastic disease, drug use, and prosthesis reactions. Thus, distinctive identification of eosinophils in fluids is a necessary component in the etiologic diagnosis of CNS infections. PMID:19366917

  6. The Clinical Relevance of Anti-DFS70 Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Karsten; Röber, Nadja; Andrade, Luis E C; Mahler, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Despite all the progress in the establishment of specific autoantibody assays, screening for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells for quality-oriented laboratory diagnosis of ANA associated rheumatic diseases (AARD) remains indispensable but is not without limitations. Recent data on the relevance of the dense fine speckled (DFS) pattern and anti-DFS70 antibodies disclosed novel possibilities to optimize the serological stepwise diagnostics of AARD. The DFS pattern on HEp-2 cells is well differentiated from the classic "homogeneous" ANA pattern associated with dsDNA antibodies. This is the most frequent pattern in high titer ANA-positive healthy persons. The most characteristic ANA specificity associated with DFS pattern is the anti-DFS70 antibody (synonym LEDGF antibody). The prevalence of anti-DFS70 antibodies in AARD patients is significantly lower compared with the prevalence in ANA-positive healthy persons. There is a negative association between anti-DFS70 antibodies and AARD, especially if no concomitant AARD-specific autoantibodies are found. Isolated anti-DFS70 antibodies are detectable in less than 1 % of AARD but are detectable in 2-22 % of healthy persons. In the presence of an isolated anti-DFS70 antibody, the posttest probability for AARD is reduced significantly. The significance of anti-DFS70 antibodies as a criterion that helps to exclude AARD is also confirmed by follow-up studies on anti-DFS70 antibodies of positive, healthy individuals, who did not develop any AARD during a 4 year observation period. Consequently, anti-DFS70 antibodies are valuable novel biomarkers for better interpretation of positive ANA in cases of negative AARD-associated autoantibodies and should be integrated in modified test algorithms to avoid unnecessary referrals and examinations of ANA-positive persons.

  7. Compound EGFR mutation is frequently detected with co-mutations of actionable genes and associated with poor clinical outcome in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Cho, Eun Na; Park, Heae Surng; Hong, Ji Young; Lim, Seri; Youn, Jong Pil; Hwang, Seung Yong; Chang, Yoon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Compound EGFR mutations, defined as double or multiple mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain, are frequently detected with advances in sequencing technology but its clinical significance is unclear. This study analyzed 61 cases of EGFR mutation positive lung adenocarcinoma using next-generation sequencing (NGS) based repeated deep sequencing panel of 16 genes that contain actionable mutations and investigated clinical implication of compound EGFR mutations. Compound EGFR mutation was detected in 15 (24.6%) of 61 cases of EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma. The majority (12/15) of compound mutations are combination of the atypical mutation and typical mutations such as exon19 deletion, L858R or G719X substitutions, or exon 20 insertion whereas 3 were combinations of rare atypical mutations. The patients with compound mutation showed shorter overall survival than those with simple mutations (83.7 vs. 72.8 mo; P = 0.020, Breslow test). Among the 115 missense mutations discovered in the tested genes, a few number of actionable mutations were detected irrelevant to the subtype of EGFR mutations, including ALK rearrangement, BCL2L11 intron 2 deletion, KRAS c.35G>A, PIK3CA c.1633G>A which are possible target of crizotinib, BH3 mimetics, MEK inhibitors, and PI3K-tyrosine kinase inhibitors, respectively. 31 missense mutations were detected in the cases with simple mutations whereas 84 in those with compound mutation, showing that the cases with compound missense mutation have higher burden of missense mutations (P = 0.001, independent sample t-test). Compound EGFR mutations are detected at a high frequency using NGS-based repeated deep sequencing. Because patients with compound EGFR mutations showed poor clinical outcomes, they should be closely monitored during follow-up.

  8. MicroRNAs: Clinical Relevance in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joe; Ohtsuka, Masahisa; Pichler, Martin; Ling, Hui

    2015-11-25

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancer diagnoses and causes of mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs are a class of small, non-coding regulatory RNAs that have shown strong associations with colorectal cancer. Through the repression of target messenger RNAs, microRNAs modulate many cellular pathways, such as those involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. The utilization of microRNAs has shown significant promise in the diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer, owing to their unique expression profile associations with cancer types and malignancies. Moreover, microRNA therapeutics with mimics or antagonists show great promise in preclinical studies, which encourages further development of their clinical use for colorectal cancer patients. The unique ability of microRNAs to affect multiple downstream pathways represents a novel approach for cancer therapy. Although still early in its development, we believe that microRNAs can be used in the near future as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for colorectal cancer.

  9. Adipose Tissue Dysfunction: Clinical Relevance and Diagnostic Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Schrover, I M; Spiering, W; Leiner, T; Visseren, F L J

    2016-04-01

    Adipose tissue dysfunction is defined as an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines, causing insulin resistance, systemic low-grade inflammation, hypercoagulability, and elevated blood pressure. These can lead to cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus type 2. Although quantity of adipose tissue is an important determinant of adipose tissue dysfunction, it can be diagnosed in both obese and lean individuals. This implies that not only quantity of adipose tissue should be used as a measure for adipose tissue dysfunction. Instead, focus should be on measuring quality of adipose tissue, which can be done with diagnostic modalities ranging from anthropometric measurements to tissue biopsies and advanced imaging techniques. In daily clinical practice, high quantity of visceral adipose tissue (reflected in high waist circumference or adipose tissue imaging), insulin resistance, or presence of the metabolic syndrome are easy and low-cost diagnostic modalities to evaluate presence or absence of adipose tissue dysfunction.

  10. [Nitrofurantoin--clinical relevance in uncomplicated urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2014-07-01

    The nitrofuran derivative nitrofurantoin has been used for more than 60 years for the antibacterial therapy of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). Despite its long application, this antibiotic retained good activity against Escherichia coli and some other pathogens of uncomplicated urinary tract infections such as Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterococcus species. Nitrofurantoin therapy has been shown to be accompanied by numerous adverse drug effects. Among these, there are also serious side effects such as pulmonary reactions and polyneuropathy, which mainly occur in long-term use. Recent studies, however, have shown a good efficacy and tolerability of short-term nitrofurantoin therapy comparable to previous established standard therapeutic regimens applying cotrimoxazole or quinolones. Because of these data and the alarming resistance rates of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to cotrimoxazole and quinolones that have been increased markedly in several countries, the clinical significance ofnitrofurantoin has been raised again. In many current treatment guidelines, e. g., the international clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, nitrofurantoin has been recommended as one first-line antibiotic of empiric antibacterial treatment of uncomplicated cystitis in otherwise healthy women. In Germany, however, nitrofurantoin should only be applied if more effective and less risky antibiotics cannot be used. Nitrofurantoin is contraindicated in the last three months of pregnancy and in patients suffering from renal impairment of each degree. Despite compatibility concerns, nitrofurantoin has also been recommended for the re-infection prophylaxis of recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in Germany and several other countries.

  11. Circulating Tumor Cells: Clinically Relevant Molecular Access Based on a Novel CTC Flow Cell

    PubMed Central

    Winer-Jones, Jessamine P.; Vahidi, Behrad; Arquilevich, Norma; Fang, Cong; Ferguson, Samuel; Harkins, Darren; Hill, Cory; Klem, Erich; Pagano, Paul C.; Peasley, Chrissy; Romero, Juan; Shartle, Robert; Vasko, Robert C.; Strauss, William M.; Dempsey, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Contemporary cancer diagnostics are becoming increasing reliant upon sophisticated new molecular methods for analyzing genetic information. Limiting the scope of these new technologies is the lack of adequate solid tumor tissue samples. Patients may present with tumors that are not accessible to biopsy or adequate for longitudinal monitoring. One attractive alternate source is cancer cells in the peripheral blood. These rare circulating tumor cells (CTC) require enrichment and isolation before molecular analysis can be performed. Current CTC platforms lack either the throughput or reliability to use in a clinical setting or they provide CTC samples at purities that restrict molecular access by limiting the molecular tools available. Methodology/Principal Findings Recent advances in magetophoresis and microfluidics have been employed to produce an automated platform called LiquidBiopsy®. This platform uses high throughput sheath flow microfluidics for the positive selection of CTC populations. Furthermore the platform quantitatively isolates cells useful for molecular methods such as detection of mutations. CTC recovery was characterized and validated with an accuracy (<20% error) and a precision (CV<25%) down to at least 9 CTC/ml. Using anti-EpCAM antibodies as the capture agent, the platform recovers 78% of MCF7 cells within the linear range. Non specific recovery of background cells is independent of target cell density and averages 55 cells/mL. 10% purity can be achieved with as low as 6 CTCs/mL and better than 1% purity can be achieved with 1 CTC/mL. Conclusions/Significance The LiquidBiopsy platform is an automated validated platform that provides high throughput molecular access to the CTC population. It can be validated and integrated into the lab flow enabling CTC enumeration as well as recovery of consistently high purity samples for molecular analysis such as quantitative PCR and Next Generation Sequencing. This tool opens the way for

  12. Clinically relevant copy number variations detected in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Oskoui, Maryam; Gazzellone, Matthew J.; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Zarrei, Mehdi; Andersen, John; Wei, John; Wang, Zhuozhi; Wintle, Richard F.; Marshall, Christian R.; Cohn, Ronald D.; Weksberg, Rosanna; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J.; Fehlings, Darcy; Shevell, Michael I.; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) represents a group of non-progressive clinically heterogeneous disorders that are characterized by motor impairment and early age of onset, frequently accompanied by co-morbidities. The cause of CP has historically been attributed to environmental stressors resulting in brain damage. While genetic risk factors are also implicated, guidelines for diagnostic assessment of CP do not recommend for routine genetic testing. Given numerous reports of aetiologic copy number variations (CNVs) in other neurodevelopmental disorders, we used microarrays to genotype a population-based prospective cohort of children with CP and their parents. Here we identify de novo CNVs in 8/115 (7.0%) CP patients (∼1% rate in controls). In four children, large chromosomal abnormalities deemed likely pathogenic were found, and they were significantly more likely to have severe neuromotor impairments than those CP subjects without such alterations. Overall, the CNV data would have impacted our diagnosis or classification of CP in 11/115 (9.6%) families. PMID:26236009

  13. [Neurodermatitis and food allergy. Clinical relevance of testing procedures].

    PubMed

    Stiening, H; Szczepanski, R; von Mühlendahl, K E; Kalveram, C

    1990-12-01

    In 132 children with neurodermitis, we measured specific IgG and IgE antibodies against components of cow's milk, soy milk, and egg. In addition we performed epidermal tests by rubbing the nutrients onto the intact skin. The results were compared to the effect of complete omission of milk, egg, and soy during four weeks and with the outcome of subsequent reexposition. We used standardized scales to evaluate the neurodermitis and the skin reactions and for the clinical response to the oral challenge. The best prediction for the outcome of the oral challenge was obtained by the epidermal test which had to be done with whole milk, soy milk and egg white; there was no further advantage in testing egg yolk or soy oil. IgE antibodies followed next in their predictive value. No further precision was gained by the combination of epidermal testing with IgE results, by the measurement of IgE antibodies to the constituents of cow's milk, of IgG antibodies, and of the platelet count during oral challenging. Positive reactions to oral administration after four weeks' omission of allergenic food were relatively frequent in the age group below three years, but rare in school children and adolescents.

  14. Longitudinal Metagenomic Analysis of Hospital Air Identifies Clinically Relevant Microbes

    PubMed Central

    King, Paula; Pham, Long K.; Waltz, Shannon; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T.; Conrad, Douglas; Taplitz, Randy; Torriani, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    We describe the sampling of sixty-three uncultured hospital air samples collected over a six-month period and analysis using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Our primary goals were to determine the longitudinal metagenomic variability of this environment, identify and characterize genomes of potential pathogens and determine whether they are atypical to the hospital airborne metagenome. Air samples were collected from eight locations which included patient wards, the main lobby and outside. The resulting DNA libraries produced 972 million sequences representing 51 gigabases. Hierarchical clustering of samples by the most abundant 50 microbial orders generated three major nodes which primarily clustered by type of location. Because the indoor locations were longitudinally consistent, episodic relative increases in microbial genomic signatures related to the opportunistic pathogens Aspergillus, Penicillium and Stenotrophomonas were identified as outliers at specific locations. Further analysis of microbial reads specific for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia indicated homology to a sequenced multi-drug resistant clinical strain and we observed broad sequence coverage of resistance genes. We demonstrate that a shotgun metagenomic sequencing approach can be used to characterize the resistance determinants of pathogen genomes that are uncharacteristic for an otherwise consistent hospital air microbial metagenomic profile. PMID:27482891

  15. Osteoarthritis: an update with relevance for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Berenbaum, Francis; Lafeber, Floris P J G

    2011-06-18

    Osteoarthritis is thought to be the most prevalent chronic joint disease. The incidence of osteoarthritis is rising because of the ageing population and the epidemic of obesity. Pain and loss of function are the main clinical features that lead to treatment, including non-pharmacological, pharmacological, and surgical approaches. Clinicians recognise that the diagnosis of osteoarthritis is established late in the disease process, maybe too late to expect much help from disease-modifying drugs. Despite efforts over the past decades to develop markers of disease, still-imaging procedures and biochemical marker analyses need to be improved and possibly extended with more specific and sensitive methods to reliably describe disease processes, to diagnose the disease at an early stage, to classify patients according to their prognosis, and to follow the course of disease and treatment effectiveness. In the coming years, a better definition of osteoarthritis is expected by delineating different phenotypes of the disease. Treatment targeted more specifically at these phenotypes might lead to improved outcomes.

  16. [Drug interactions and clinical relevance: it all began with cheese].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Norte, Juan Antonio

    2012-04-01

    In a drug interaction, the effects of one drug can be increased or decreased or a quite new effect produced by the previous, concurrent or subsequent administration of another substance, including prescription and nonprescription drugs, food, tobacco or alcohol. The effect of the interaction can be desirable, inconsequential, or adverse. The increasing number of drugs available and the increasing use of multidrug therapeutic regimens enhance the potential for drug interactions. However, in clinical practice, most interactions are not significant or rarely of significance. It is when the interaction leads to adverse consequences that it comes to the attention of the patient and physician. Interactions may occur by pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamics mechanisms. Pharmacokinetic interactions represent the modification of one substance (the interacting substance) on the ADME processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism or excretion of a drug (the index drug). Subsequently, it may lead to changes in the concentration of the index drug at the receptor sites. Drug interactions with a pharmacodynamic basis involve actions on the same receptor or physiological systems through either synergism or antagonism. Many drug interactions can be predicted if the pharmacodynamics effects, pharmacokinetic properties and mechanisms of action of the interacting agents are known. The most obvious interactions are those producing altered pharmacokinetic of drugs with a low therapeutic index (oral anticoagulants, antidiabetic drugs, digoxin, benzodiazepines and immunosuppressant and cytotoxic drugs).

  17. MicroRNAs: Clinical Relevance in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Joe; Ohtsuka, Masahisa; Pichler, Martin; Ling, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancer diagnoses and causes of mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs are a class of small, non-coding regulatory RNAs that have shown strong associations with colorectal cancer. Through the repression of target messenger RNAs, microRNAs modulate many cellular pathways, such as those involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. The utilization of microRNAs has shown significant promise in the diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer, owing to their unique expression profile associations with cancer types and malignancies. Moreover, microRNA therapeutics with mimics or antagonists show great promise in preclinical studies, which encourages further development of their clinical use for colorectal cancer patients. The unique ability of microRNAs to affect multiple downstream pathways represents a novel approach for cancer therapy. Although still early in its development, we believe that microRNAs can be used in the near future as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for colorectal cancer. PMID:26602923

  18. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Patel, Mitesh; Paturi, Durga K; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Complete delineation of the HIV-1 life cycle has resulted in the development of several antiretroviral drugs. Twenty-five therapeutic agents belonging to five different classes are currently available for the treatment of HIV-1 infections. Advent of triple combination antiretroviral therapy has significantly lowered the mortality rate in HIV patients. However, fungal infections still represent major opportunistic diseases in immunocompromised patients worldwide. Areas covered Antiretroviral drugs that target enzymes and/or proteins indispensable for viral replication are discussed in this article. Fungal infections, causative organisms, epidemiology and preferred treatment modalities are also outlined. Finally, observed/predicted drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals are summarized along with clinical recommendations. Expert opinion Concomitant use of amphotericin B and tenofovir must be closely monitored for renal functioning. Due to relatively weak interactive potential with the CYP450 system, fluconazole is the preferred antifungal drug. High itraconazole doses (> 200 mg/day) are not advised in patients receiving booster protease inhibitor (PI) regimen. Posaconazole is contraindicated in combination with either efavirenz or fosamprenavir. Moreover, voriconazole is contraindicated with high-dose ritonavir-boosted PI. Echino-candins may aid in overcoming the limitations of existing antifungal therapy. An increasing number of documented or predicted drug-drug interactions and therapeutic drug monitoring may aid in the management of HIV-associated opportunistic fungal infections. PMID:24521092

  19. Longitudinal Metagenomic Analysis of Hospital Air Identifies Clinically Relevant Microbes.

    PubMed

    King, Paula; Pham, Long K; Waltz, Shannon; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T; Conrad, Douglas; Taplitz, Randy; Torriani, Francesca; Forsyth, R Allyn

    2016-01-01

    We describe the sampling of sixty-three uncultured hospital air samples collected over a six-month period and analysis using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Our primary goals were to determine the longitudinal metagenomic variability of this environment, identify and characterize genomes of potential pathogens and determine whether they are atypical to the hospital airborne metagenome. Air samples were collected from eight locations which included patient wards, the main lobby and outside. The resulting DNA libraries produced 972 million sequences representing 51 gigabases. Hierarchical clustering of samples by the most abundant 50 microbial orders generated three major nodes which primarily clustered by type of location. Because the indoor locations were longitudinally consistent, episodic relative increases in microbial genomic signatures related to the opportunistic pathogens Aspergillus, Penicillium and Stenotrophomonas were identified as outliers at specific locations. Further analysis of microbial reads specific for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia indicated homology to a sequenced multi-drug resistant clinical strain and we observed broad sequence coverage of resistance genes. We demonstrate that a shotgun metagenomic sequencing approach can be used to characterize the resistance determinants of pathogen genomes that are uncharacteristic for an otherwise consistent hospital air microbial metagenomic profile.

  20. Clinical relevance of FASII bypass in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Gloux, Karine; Guillemet, Mélanie; Soler, Charles; Morvan, Claire; Halpern, David; Pourcel, Christine; Vu Thien, Hoang; Lamberet, Gilles; Gruss, Alexandra

    2017-02-13

    The need for new antimicrobials to treat bacterial infections has led to the use of fatty acid synthesis (FASII) enzymes as front-line targets. However, recent studies suggest that FASII inhibitors may not work against the opportunist pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, as environmental fatty acids favor emergence of multi-anti-FASII resistance. As fatty acids are abundant in the host, and one FASII inhibitor, triclosan, is widespread, we investigated whether fatty acid pools impact resistance in clinical and veterinary S. aureus isolates. Simple addition of fatty acids to screening medium led to a 50% increase in triclosan resistance, as tested in 700 isolates. Moreover, non-culturable triclosan-resistant fatty acid auxotrophs, which escape detection under routine conditions, were uncovered in primary patient samples. FASII bypass in selected isolates correlated with polymorphisms in acc and fabD loci. We conclude that fatty-acid-dependent strategies to escape FASII inhibition are common among S. aureus isolates and correlate with anti-FASII resistance and emergence of non-culturable variants.

  1. Uterine fibroid vascularization and clinical relevance to uterine fibroid embolization.

    PubMed

    Pelage, Jean-Pierre; Cazejust, Julien; Pluot, Etienne; Le Dref, Olivier; Laurent, Alexandre; Spies, James B; Chagnon, Sophie; Lacombe, Pascal

    2005-10-01

    Embolization has become a first-line treatment for symptomatic uterine fibroid tumors. Selective catheterization and embolization of both uterine arteries, which are the predominant source of blood flow to fibroid tumors in most cases, is the cornerstone of treatment. Although embolization for treatment of uterine fibroid tumors is widely accepted, great familiarity with the normal and variant pelvic arterial anatomy is needed to ensure the safety and success of the procedure. The uterine artery classically arises as a first or second branch of the anterior division of the internal iliac artery and is usually dilated in the presence of a uterine fibroid tumor. Angiography is used for comprehensive pretreatment assessment of the pelvic arterial anatomy; for noninvasive evaluation, Doppler ultrasonography, contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR angiography also may be used. After the uterine artery is identified, selective catheterization should be performed distal to its cervicovaginal branch. For targeted embolization of the perifibroid arterial plexus, injection of particles with diameters larger than 500 mum is generally recommended. Excessive embolization may injure normal myometrium, ovaries, or fallopian tubes and lead to uterine necrosis or infection or to ovarian failure. Incomplete treatment or additional blood supply to the tumor (eg, via an ovarian artery) may result in clinical failure. The common postembolization angiographic end point is occlusion of the uterine arterial branches to the fibroid tumor while antegrade flow is maintained in the main uterine artery.

  2. Clinically Relevant Genetic Variations in Drug Metabolizing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Navin; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2011-01-01

    In the field of pharmacogenetics, we currently have a few markers to guide physicians as to the best course of therapy for patients. For the most part, these genetic variants are within a drug metabolizing enzyme that has a large effect on the degree or rate at which a drug is converted to its metabolites. For many drugs, response and toxicity are multi-genic traits and understanding relationships between a patient's genetic variation in drug metabolizing enzymes and the efficacy and/or toxicity of a medication offers the potential to optimize therapies. This review will focus on variants in drug metabolizing enzymes with predictable and relatively large impacts on drug efficacy and/or toxicity; some of these drug/gene variant pairs have impacted drug labels by the United States Food and Drug Administration. The challenges in identifying genetic markers and implementing clinical changes based on known markers will be discussed. In addition, the impact of next generation sequencing in identifying rare variants will be addressed. PMID:21453273

  3. Does the dawn phenomenon have clinical relevance in normal pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Mandujano, Alicia; Thomas, Alicia; Presley, Larraine Huston; Amini, Saeid B.; de Mouzon, Sylvie Hauguel; Catalano, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The dawn phenomenon is a transient rise in blood glucose between 4 and 6 AM that is attributed to the pulsatile release of pituitary growth hormone (GH). In pregnancy, GH is suppressed by placental GH. Hence, we hypothesize that there is no evidence for the dawn phenomenon in late pregnancy in healthy women. STUDY DESIGN Twenty glucose-tolerant women with singleton gestations between 28 weeks and 36 weeks 6 days’ gestation were recruited. The women were admitted overnight to the Clinical Research Unit and had continuous glucose monitoring. Insulin and GH were measured at 2-hour intervals from 8 PM to 8 AM. GH was grouped into times 1A (8–10 PM), 2A (12–2 AM), and 3A (4–8 AM) for changes over time. Further analysis was performed with time 1B (8 PM to 2 AM) and 2B (4–8 AM). Insulin was measured between 4 and 8 AM. RESULTS Plasma glucose decreased over time (P < .001). There were no significant changes in GH among times 1A, 2A, and 3A (P = .45) or times 1B and 2B (P = .12). Insulin concentrations increased after meals, but there were no changes from 4 AM (8.5 ± 1.4 μU/mL) through 8 AM (8.6 ± 1.1 μU/mL; P = .98). CONCLUSION Glucose and insulin concentrations show no increase from 4–8 AM; although there is variability in GH, there is no evidence for the dawn phenomenon in late pregnancy in healthy women. PMID:23583837

  4. [Ibogaine - structure, influence on human body, clinical relevance].

    PubMed

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmunt; Kuszczak, Bartłomiej; Olszak, Natalia

    2016-07-29

    Ibogaine is a natural chemical compound, which belongs to the indole alkaloid family. It can be naturally found within the root bark of african plant Tabernanthe iboga. Ibogaine plays a significant role among tribal cultures. Ibogaine, in small amount, causes reduction of hunger, thirst and exhaustion. In bigger amount, however, it can cause intensive visions. Other effects include reduction or complete disappearance of absitnence symptoms visible in people addicted to the nicotine, alcohol, methamphetamine, cocaine or opioids, what has been scientifically proven after the tests on animals and small groups of people. After oral application, 80% of ibogaine is subjected to the Odemethylation into noribogaine; main catalyzing enzyme is cytochrome CYP2D6. Research suggests, that ibogaine acts in many places within central nervous system. NMDA receptors seem to play main role in its anti-addiction properties. It is important to mention the side effects of the compound, which are cardiotoxicity and neurotoxicity, what makes it harder to use its beneficial properties. Because of this, Ibogaine is included among the dangerous substance. However, there are a few clinics in the world which specializes in the use of the compound in order to interrupt the sypmtoms acute opioid withdrawal syndrome as well as a substance benficial in curing other addictions. There is more hope with synthetic derivatives of ibogaine, which although are less toxic still keep their anti-addiction properties. The aim is to collect the available knowledge related to the structure and effects on human body of alkaloid Tabernanthe iboga and consider the possibility of commercial medical use.

  5. Clinical relevance of sarcopenia in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Montano-Loza, Aldo J

    2014-07-07

    The most commonly recognized complications in cirrhotic patients include ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, variceal bleeding, susceptibility for infections, kidney dysfunction, and hepatocellular carcinoma; however, severe muscle wasting or sarcopenia are the most common and frequently unseen complications which negatively impact survival, quality of life, and response to stressor, such as infections and surgeries. At present, D'Amico stage classification, Child-Pugh, and MELD scores constitute the best tools to predict mortality in patients with cirrhosis; however, one of their main limitations is the lack of assessing the nutritional and functional status. Currently, numerous methods are available to evaluate the nutrition status of the cirrhotic patient; nevertheless, most of these techniques have limitations primarily because lack of objectivity, reproducibility, and prognosis discrimination. In this regard, an objective and reproducible technique, such as muscle mass quantification with cross-sectional imaging studies (computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging) constitute an attractive index of nutritional status in cirrhosis. Sarcopenia is part of the frailty complex present in cirrhotic patients, resulting from cumulative declines across multiple physiologic systems and characterized by impaired functional capacity, decreased reserve, resistance to stressors, and predisposition to poor outcomes. In this review, we discuss the current accepted and new methods to evaluate prognosis in cirrhosis. Also, we analyze the current knowledge regarding incidence and clinical impact of malnutrition and sarcopenia in patients with cirrhosis and their impact after liver transplantation. Finally, we discuss existing and potential novel therapeutic approaches for malnutrition in cirrhosis, emphasizing the recognition of sarcopenia in an effort to reduced morbidity related and improved survival in cirrhosis.

  6. DMSO increases mutation-scanning detection sensitivity in clinical samples using high resolution melting

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chen; Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Bejar, Rafael; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mutation scanning provides the simplest, lowest cost method for identifying DNA variations on single PCR amplicons, and it may be performed prior to sequencing to avoid screening of non-informative wild type samples. High resolution melting (HRM) is the most commonly used method for mutation scanning. However, by using PCR-HRM mutations below ≈ 3–10% that can still be clinically significant may often be missed. Therefore, enhancing HRM detection sensitivity is important for mutation scanning and its clinical application. METHODS We used serial dilution of TP53 exon 8 mutation containing cell lines to demonstrate the improvement in detection sensitivity for conventional-PCR-HRM in the presence of DMSO. We also conducted full-COLD-PCR to further enrich low-level mutations prior to HRM±DMSO and employed droplet-digital PCR to derive the optimal conditions for mutation enrichment. Both conventional-PCR-HRM and full-COLD-PCR-HRM ±DMSO were used for mutation scanning in TP53 exon 8 in cancer samples containing known mutations and in myelodysplastic syndrome samples with unknown mutations. Mutations in other genes were also examined. RESULTS The detection sensitivity of PCR-HRM-scanning increases 2–5-fold in the presence of DMSO, depending also on mutation type and sequence context, and can typically detect mutation abundance of about 1%. When mutation enrichment is applied during amplification using full-COLD-PCR and followed by HRM in the presence of DMSO, mutations with 0.2–0.3% mutation abundance in TP53 exon 8 can be detected. CONCLUSIONS DMSO improves HRM mutation scanning sensitivity. When full-COLD-PCR is employed, followed by DMSO-HRM, the overall improvement is about 20-fold as compared to conventional PCR-HRM. PMID:26432802

  7. Clinical Relevance of Cranial Nerve Injury following Carotid Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fokkema, M.; de Borst, G.J.; Nolan, B.W.; Indes, J.; Buck, D.B.; Lo, R.C.; Moll, F.L.; Schermerhorn, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The benefit of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) may be diminished by cranial nerve injury (CNI). Using a quality improvement registry, we aimed to identify the nerves affected, duration of symptoms (transient vs. persistent), and clinical predictors of CNI. Methods We identified all patients undergoing CEA in the Vascular Study Group of New England (VSGNE) between 2003 and 2011. Surgeon-observed CNI rate was determined at discharge (postoperative CNI) and at follow-up to determine persistent CNI (CNIs that persisted at routine follow-up visit). Hierarchical multivariable model controlling for surgeon and hospital was used to assess independent predictors for postoperative CNI. Results A total of 6,878 patients (33.8% symptomatic) were included for analyses. CNI rate at discharge was 5.6% (n = 382). Sixty patients (0.7%) had more than one nerve affected. The hypoglossal nerve was most frequently involved (n = 185, 2.7%), followed by the facial (n = 128, 1.9%), the vagus (n = 49, 0.7%), and the glossopharyngeal (n = 33, 0.5%) nerve. The vast majority of these CNIs were transient; only 47 patients (0.7%) had a persistent CNI at their follow-up visit (median 10.0 months, range 0.3–15.6 months). Patients with perioperative stroke (0.9%, n = 64) had significantly higher risk of CNI (n = 15, CNI risk 23.4%, p < .01). Predictors for CNI were urgent procedures (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2–2.1, p < .01), immediate re-exploration after closure under the same anesthetic (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.3–3.0, p < .01), and return to the operating room for a neurologic event or bleeding (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4–3.8, p < .01), but not redo CEA (OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.5–1.9, p = .90) or prior cervical radiation (OR 0.9, 95% CI 0.3–2.5, p = .80). Conclusions As patients are currently selected in the VSGNE, persistent CNI after CEA is rare. While conditions of urgency and (sub)acute reintervention carried increased risk for postoperative CNI, a history of prior ipsilateral CEA or cervical

  8. Predominance of precore mutations and clinical significance of basal core promoter mutations in chronic hepatitis B virus infection in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Juniastuti; Utsumi, Takako; Aksono, Eduardus Bimo; Yano, Yoshihiko; Soetjipto; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Hotta, Hak; Rantam, Fedik Abdul; Kusumobroto, Hernomo Ontoseno; Lusida, Maria Inge

    2013-07-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health problem worldwide, with a particularly high prevalence in the Asian-Pacific region. During chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, mutations commonly occur in the basal core promoter (BCP) and precore (PC) regions of HBV, affecting HBeAg expression, particularly following HBeAg serocon-version. Mutations in the B- and T-cell epitopes of the HBV core have also been observed during disease progression. The clinical significance of HBV genome variability has been demonstrated, however the results are a subject of controversy. Considering the characteristics of the virus associated with geographical location, the profiles of BCP, PC and core mutations and their clinical implications in patients with chronic HBV infection in Surabaya, Indonesia, were investigated. The BCP, PC and core mutations and HBV genotypes were detected by direct sequencing. The HBeAg/anti-HBe status and HBV DNA levels were also assessed. This study enrolled 10 patients with chronic HBV infection (UC) from Dr Soetomo General Hospital and Indonesian Red Cross, Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia, 10 patients with chronic hepatitis B and liver cirrhosis (LC) and 4 patients with chronic hepatitis B and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from Dr Soetomo General Hospital. The PC mutation A1896 was predominant in all the groups (60-100%), together with the PC variant T1858, which was associated with HBV genotype B. The number of detected core mutations (Thr/Ser130) was higher in HCC patients (50%). However, the BCP mutations T1762/A1764 were predominant in LC patients (50-60%). The LC and HCC patients carried HBV isolates with additional mutations, at least at BCP or PC, mainly following HBeAg seroconversion. In the majority of anti-HBe-positive samples, the BCP T1762/A1764 mutations were associated with a high viral load, regardless of the PC 1896 status. In conclusion, the PC mutations were found to be predominant in all the groups. However, the

  9. Predominance of precore mutations and clinical significance of basal core promoter mutations in chronic hepatitis B virus infection in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    JUNIASTUTI; UTSUMI, TAKAKO; AKSONO, EDUARDUS BIMO; YANO, YOSHIHIKO; SOETJIPTO; HAYASHI, YOSHITAKE; HOTTA, HAK; RANTAM, FEDIK ABDUL; KUSUMOBROTO, HERNOMO ONTOSENO; LUSIDA, MARIA INGE

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health problem worldwide, with a particularly high prevalence in the Asian-Pacific region. During chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, mutations commonly occur in the basal core promoter (BCP) and precore (PC) regions of HBV, affecting HBeAg expression, particularly following HBeAg serocon-version. Mutations in the B- and T-cell epitopes of the HBV core have also been observed during disease progression. The clinical significance of HBV genome variability has been demonstrated, however the results are a subject of controversy. Considering the characteristics of the virus associated with geographical location, the profiles of BCP, PC and core mutations and their clinical implications in patients with chronic HBV infection in Surabaya, Indonesia, were investigated. The BCP, PC and core mutations and HBV genotypes were detected by direct sequencing. The HBeAg/anti-HBe status and HBV DNA levels were also assessed. This study enrolled 10 patients with chronic HBV infection (UC) from Dr Soetomo General Hospital and Indonesian Red Cross, Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia, 10 patients with chronic hepatitis B and liver cirrhosis (LC) and 4 patients with chronic hepatitis B and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from Dr Soetomo General Hospital. The PC mutation A1896 was predominant in all the groups (60–100%), together with the PC variant T1858, which was associated with HBV genotype B. The number of detected core mutations (Thr/Ser130) was higher in HCC patients (50%). However, the BCP mutations T1762/A1764 were predominant in LC patients (50–60%). The LC and HCC patients carried HBV isolates with additional mutations, at least at BCP or PC, mainly following HBeAg seroconversion. In the majority of anti-HBe-positive samples, the BCP T1762/A1764 mutations were associated with a high viral load, regardless of the PC 1896 status. In conclusion, the PC mutations were found to be predominant in all the groups. However

  10. Dynamic changes of driver genes' mutations across clinical stages in nine cancer types.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia

    2016-07-01

    The driver genes play critical roles for tumorigenesis, and the number of identified driver genes reached plateau. But how they act during different cancer development stages is lack of knowledge. We investigated 138 driver genes' mutation changes across clinical stages using 3,477 cases in nine cancer types from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and constructed their temporal order relationships. We also examined the codon changes for the widely mutated TP53 and PIK3CA in tumor stages. Combinations of one to three driver genes specifically dominated in each cancer. Across the clinical stages, we categorized three patterns for the behaviors of driver genes' mutation changes in the nine cancer types: recurrently mutated in all the stages and triggering other mutations; certain mutations lost meanwhile other mutations emerged; mutations dominated across entire stages, while other mutations gradually appeared or disappeared. We observed different codon changes dominated in different stages and revealed mutations recurrently occurring on the hotspot regions of the coding sequence may be the core factor for driver genes' tumorigenesis. Our results highlighted the dynamic changes of oncogenesis roles in different clinical stages and suggested different diagnostic decision making according to the clinical stages of patients.

  11. Clinical and mutational features of X-linked agammaglobulinemia in Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-García, E; Staines-Boone, A T; Vargas-Hernández, A; González-Serrano, M E; Carrillo-Tapia, E; Mogica-Martínez, D; Berrón-Ruíz, L; Segura-Mendez, N H; Espinosa-Rosales, F J; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, M A; Santos-Argumedo, L; López-Herrera, G

    2016-04-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is caused by BTK mutations, patients typically show <2% of peripheral B cells and reduced levels of all immunoglobulins; they suffer from recurrent infections of bacterial origin; however, viral infections, autoimmune-like diseases, and an increased risk of developing gastric cancer are also reported. In this work, we report the BTK mutations and clinical features of 12 patients diagnosed with XLA. Furthermore, a clinical revision is also presented for an additional cohort of previously reported patients with XLA. Four novel mutations were identified, one of these located in the previously reported mutation refractory SH3 domain. Clinical data support previous reports accounting for frequent respiratory, gastrointestinal tract infections and other symptoms such as the occurrence of reactive arthritis in 19.2% of the patients. An equal proportion of patients developed septic arthritis; missense mutations and mutations in SH1, SH2 and PH domains predominated in patients who developed arthritis.

  12. Distinct mutation profile and prognostic relevance in patients with hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndromes (h-MDS).

    PubMed

    Yao, Chi-Yuan; Hou, Hsin-An; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Lin, Chien-Chin; Chou, Wen-Chien; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Chiang, Ying-Chieh; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Wu, Shang-Ju; Liao, Xiu-Wen; Lin, Chien-Ting; Ko, Bor-Shen; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Li, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shang-Yi; Yao, Ming; Tang, Jih-Luh; Tsay, Woei; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2016-09-27

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies. Although most MDS patients have normal or increased BM cellularity (NH-MDS), some have hypocellular BM (h-MDS). The reports concerning the differences in genetic alterations between h-MDS and NH-MDS patients are limited. In this study, 369 MDS patients diagnosed according to the WHO 2008 criteria were recruited. h-MDS patients had lower PB white blood cell and blast counts, and lower BM blast percentages, than those with NH-MDS. h-MDS was closely associated with lower-risk MDS, defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and revised IPSS (IPSS-R). IPSS-R could properly predict the prognosis in h-MDS (P<0.001) as in NH-MDS patients. The h-MDS patients had lower incidences of RUNX1, ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2 and TP53 mutations than NH-MDS patients. The cumulated incidence of acute leukemic transformation at 5 years was 19.3% for h-MDS and 40.4% for NH-MDS patients (P= 0.001). Further, the patients with h-MDS had longer overall survival (OS) than those with NH-MDS (P= 0.001), and BM hypocellularity remains an independent favorable prognostic factor for OS irrespective of age, IPSS-R, and gene mutations. Our findings provide evidence that h-MDS indeed represent a distinct clinico-biological subgroup of MDS and can predict better leukemia-free survival and OS.

  13. Distinct mutation profile and prognostic relevance in patients with hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndromes (h-MDS)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzung-Yi; Lin, Chien-Chin; Chou, Wen-Chien; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Chiang, Ying-Chieh; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Wu, Shang-Ju; Liao, Xiu-Wen; Lin, Chien-Ting; Ko, Bor-Shen; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Li, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shang-Yi; Yao, Ming; Tang, Jih-Luh; Tsay, Woei; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies. Although most MDS patients have normal or increased BM cellularity (NH-MDS), some have hypocellular BM (h-MDS). The reports concerning the differences in genetic alterations between h-MDS and NH-MDS patients are limited. In this study, 369 MDS patients diagnosed according to the WHO 2008 criteria were recruited. h-MDS patients had lower PB white blood cell and blast counts, and lower BM blast percentages, than those with NH-MDS. h-MDS was closely associated with lower-risk MDS, defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and revised IPSS (IPSS-R). IPSS-R could properly predict the prognosis in h-MDS (P<0.001) as in NH-MDS patients. The h-MDS patients had lower incidences of RUNX1, ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2 and TP53 mutations than NH-MDS patients. The cumulated incidence of acute leukemic transformation at 5 years was 19.3% for h-MDS and 40.4% for NH-MDS patients (P= 0.001). Further, the patients with h-MDS had longer overall survival (OS) than those with NH-MDS (P= 0.001), and BM hypocellularity remains an independent favorable prognostic factor for OS irrespective of age, IPSS-R, and gene mutations. Our findings provide evidence that h-MDS indeed represent a distinct clinico-biological subgroup of MDS and can predict better leukemia-free survival and OS. PMID:27527853

  14. Mutation spectrum of NF1 and clinical characteristics in 78 Korean patients with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jung Min; Sohn, Young Bae; Jeong, Seon Yong; Kim, Hyon-Ju; Messiaen, Ludwine M

    2013-06-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common autosomal dominant disorders in humans. NF1 is caused by mutations of the NF1 gene. Mutation detection is complex owing to the large size of the NF1 gene, the presence of pseudogenes, and the great variety of mutations. Also, few probable genotype-phenotype correlations have been found in NF1. In this study 78 Korean patients from 60 families were screened for NF1 mutations. Mutation analysis of the entire coding region and flanking splice sites was carried out and included the use of a combination of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, multiplex ligation probe amplification, or fluorescence in situ hybridization. Mutation spectrum and genotype-phenotype relationship were assessed. Fifty-two distinct NF1 mutations were identified in 60 families. The mutations included 30 single base substitutions (12 missense and 18 nonsense), 11 missplicing mutations, seven small insertion or deletions, and four gross deletions. Sixteen (30.8%) mutations were novel; c.1A>G, c.2033_2034insC, c.2540T>C, c.4537C>T, c.5546G>A, c.6792C>A, and c.6792C>G were recurrently identified. The mutations were evenly distributed across exon 1 through intron 47 of NF1, and no mutational hot spots were found. A genotype-phenotype analysis suggests that there is no clear relationship between specific mutations and clinical features. This analysis revealed a wide spectrum of NF1 mutations in Korean patients. As technologies advance in molecular genetics, the mutation detection rate will increase. Considering that 30.8% of detected mutations were novel, exhaustive mutation analysis of NF1 may be an important tool in early diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  15. Prognostic Factors Toward Clinically Relevant Radiographic Progression in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Tomohiro; Okada, Akitomo; Fukuda, Takaaki; Hidaka, Toshihiko; Ishii, Tomonori; Ueki, Yukitaka; Kodera, Takao; Nakashima, Munetoshi; Takahashi, Yuichi; Honda, Seiyo; Horai, Yoshiro; Watanabe, Ryu; Okuno, Hiroshi; Aramaki, Toshiyuki; Izumiyama, Tomomasa; Takai, Osamu; Miyashita, Taiichiro; Sato, Shuntaro; Kawashiri, Shin-ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Tamai, Mami; Origuchi, Tomoki; Nakamura, Hideki; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Eguchi, Katsumi; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine prognostic factors of clinically relevant radiographic progression (CRRP) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice. We performed a multicenter prospective study in Japan of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD)-naive RA patients with moderate to high disease activity treated with conventional synthetic DMARDs (csDMARDs) at study entry. We longitudinally observed 408 patients for 1 year and assessed disease activity every 3 months. CRRP was defined as yearly progression of modified total Sharp score (mTSS) > 3.0 U. We also divided the cohort into 2 groups based on disease duration (<3 vs ≥3 years) and performed a subgroup analysis. CRRP was found in 10.3% of the patients. A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the independent variables to predict the development of CRRP were: CRP at baseline (0.30 mg/dL increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.11), time-integrated Disease Activity Score in 28 joints-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR) during the 1 year postbaseline (12.4-unit increase, 95%CI 1.17–2.59), RA typical erosion at baseline (95%CI 1.56–21.1), and the introduction of bDMARDs (95%CI 0.06–0.38). The subgroup analysis revealed that time-integrated DAS28-ESR is not a predictor whereas the introduction of bDMARDs is a significant protective factor for CRRP in RA patients with disease duration <3 years. We identified factors that could be used to predict the development of CRRP in RA patients treated with DMARDs. These variables appear to be different based on the RA patients’ disease durations. PMID:27124044

  16. Mutations in collagen 18A1 and their relevance to the human phenotype.

    PubMed

    Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Suzuki, Oscar T; Armelin-Correa, Lucia M; Sertié, Andréa L; Errera, Flavia I V; Bagatini, Kelly; Kok, Fernando; Leite, Katia R M

    2006-03-01

    Collagen XVIII, a proteoglycan, is a component of basement membranes (BMs). There are three distinct isoforms that differ only by their N-terminal, but with a specific pattern of tissue and developmental expression. Cleavage of its C-terminal produces endostatin, an inhibitor of angiogenesis. In its N-terminal, there is a frizzled motif which seems to be involved in Wnt signaling. Mutations in this gene cause Knobloch syndrome KS), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by vitreoretinal and macular degeneration and occipital encephalocele. This review discusses the effect of both rare and polymorphic alleles in the human phenotype, showing that deficiency of one of the collagen XVIII isoforms is sufficient to cause KS and that null alleles causing deficiency of all collagen XVIII isoforms are associated with a more severe ocular defect. This review besides illustrating the functional importance of collagen XVIII in eye development and its structure maintenance throughout life, it also shows its role in other tissues and organs, such as nervous system and kidney.

  17. Self-Esteem and Dimensions of Clinically Relevant Behavior Among Ten Year Olds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Philip; Pearman, William A.

    Although self-concept has been linked with many behavioral variables, most studies do not deal with dependent variables which would provide an understanding of such clinically relevant behaviors as sociability, aggression, activity level, somatization, inhibition, and sleep disturbance. The relationship between self-esteem and clinically relevant…

  18. Clinical effects of phosphodiesterase 3A mutations in inherited hypertension with brachydactyly.

    PubMed

    Toka, Okan; Tank, Jens; Schächterle, Carolin; Aydin, Atakan; Maass, Philipp G; Elitok, Saban; Bartels-Klein, Eireen; Hollfinger, Irene; Lindschau, Carsten; Mai, Knut; Boschmann, Michael; Rahn, Gabriele; Movsesian, Matthew A; Müller, Thomas; Doescher, Andrea; Gnoth, Simone; Mühl, Astrid; Toka, Hakan R; Wefeld-Neuenfeld, Yvette; Utz, Wolfgang; Töpper, Agnieszka; Jordan, Jens; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Klussmann, Enno; Bähring, Sylvia; Luft, Friedrich C

    2015-10-01

    Autosomal-dominant hypertension with brachydactyly is a salt-independent Mendelian syndrome caused by activating mutations in the gene encoding phosphodiesterase 3A. These mutations increase the protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of phosphodiesterase 3A resulting in enhanced cAMP-hydrolytic affinity and accelerated cell proliferation. The phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein is diminished, and parathyroid hormone-related peptide is dysregulated, potentially accounting for all phenotypic features. Untreated patients die prematurely of stroke; however, hypertension-induced target-organ damage is otherwise hardly apparent. We conducted clinical studies of vascular function, cardiac functional imaging, platelet function in affected and nonaffected persons, and cell-based assays. Large-vessel and cardiac functions indeed seem to be preserved. The platelet studies showed normal platelet function. Cell-based studies demonstrated that available phosphodiesterase 3A inhibitors suppress the mutant isoforms. However, increasing cGMP to indirectly inhibit the enzyme seemed to have particular use. Our results shed more light on phosphodiesterase 3A activation and could be relevant to the treatment of severe hypertension in the general population.

  19. Relationship Between Patients with Clinical Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder and Mutations in Gjb2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Guilherme M.; Z. Ramos, Priscila; M. Castilho, Arthur; C. Guimarães, Alexandre; L. Sartorato, Edi

    2016-01-01

    The auditory neuropathy is a condition which there is a dyssynchrony in the nerve conduction of the auditory nerve fibers. There is no evidence about the relationship between patients with clinical auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder and mutations in GJB2 gene. There are only two studies about this topic in the medical literature. Connexin 26 (GJB2 gene) mutations are common causes of genetic deafness in many populations and we also being reported in subjects with auditory neuropathy. Objective: To analyze the pattern of clinical relationship between patients with clinical diagnosis with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder and GJB2 gene. Patients and Methods: Study Design - Retrospective analysis and genetic evaluation. Setting - Tertiary referral center. Subjects - 40 patients with Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder. Intervention - Clinical information and genetic evaluation (GJB2 gene) were analyzed. Results: Biallelic mutations that accounted for hearing loss (HL) were found in three patients, both with c.35delG mutation in homozygous state. The splice site mutation IVS1+1G>A was detected in heterozygous state in one individual. However, since the second mutant allele was not identified, it was not possible to establish its correlation with the phenotype. Conclusion: Mutations in GJB2 gene mutations were found in 7.5% of the patients with ANSD. We found no relationship between patients with clinical auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder and mutations in GJB2 gene (p>0.05). PMID:27843504

  20. PFAPA and 12 Common MEFV Gene Mutations Our Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Salehzadeh, Farhad; Vahedi, Maryam; Hosseini-Asl, Saeid; Jahangiri, Sepideh; Habibzadeh, Shahram; Hosseini-Khotbesara, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Marshall Syndrome or PFAPA is an inflammatory periodic disease characterized by periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis. Although PFAPA is an auto inflammatory disease, it doesn't have genetic basis such as other periodic fevers. This study evaluates the 12 common MEFV gene mutations in patients with PFAPA syndrome. Methods: 21 patients with PFAPA syndrome who had diagnostic criteria were enrolled in this study and 12 common MEFV gene mutations i.e. P369S, F479L, M680I (G/C), M680I (G/A), I692del, M694V, M694I, K695R, V726A, A744S, R761H, E148Q evaluated. All the patients were screened for MEFV gene mutations by a reverse hybridization assay (FMF Strip Assay, Vienna lab, Vienna, Austria) according to the instructions provided by the manufacturer. Findings : The age of patients was between 6 months to 14 years, and 15 were males. Seven patients had heterozygote and one had compound heterozygote (K695R, V725A) mutation. There were 4 alleles M694V, 3 alleles V726A, 1 allele E148Q and 1 allele K694R. No significant difference existed between mutated patients with non-mutated in symptoms like aphthous and stomatitis, duration of attacks, episodes of fever and response to treatment. Gaslini score test was not helpful to predict the probability of gene mutations. Conclusion: About 30 percent of patients had MEFV gene mutations but these mutations did not play a main role in presentation of PFAPA symptoms. PMID:25793047

  1. System analysis of gene mutations and clinical phenotype in Chinese patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Meiling; Xie, Yuansheng; Chen, Zhiqiang; Liao, Yujie; Li, Zuoxiang; Hu, Panpan; Qi, Yan; Yin, Zhiwei; Li, Qinggang; Fu, Ping; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited kidney disorder mainly caused by mutation in PKD1/PKD2. However, ethnic differences in mutations, the association between mutation genotype/clinical phenotype, and the clinical applicable value of mutation detection are poorly understood. We made systematically analysis of Chinese ADPKD patients based on a next-generation sequencing platform. Among 148 ADPKD patients enrolled, 108 mutations were detected in 127 patients (85.8%). Compared with mutations in Caucasian published previously, the PKD2 mutation detection rate was lower, and patients carrying the PKD2 mutation invariably carried the PKD1 mutation. The definite pathogenic mutation detection rate was lower, whereas the multiple mutations detection rate was higher in Chinese patients. Then, we correlated PKD1/PKD2 mutation data and clinical data: patients with mutation exhibited a more severe phenotype; patients with >1 mutations exhibited a more severe phenotype; patients with pathogenic mutations exhibited a more severe phenotype. Thus, the PKD1/PKD2 mutation status differed by ethnicity, and the PKD1/PKD2 genotype may affect the clinical phenotype of ADPKD. Furthermore, it makes sense to detect PKD1/PKD2 mutation status for early diagnosis and prognosis, perhaps as early as the embryo/zygote stage, to facilitate early clinical intervention and family planning. PMID:27782177

  2. Clinical features of MELAS and its relation with A3243G gene point mutation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Guo, Junhong; Fang, Wanghui; Jun, Qili; Shi, Kaili

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) mostly occur in children. The point mutation A3243G of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may work as a specific bio-marker for mitochondrial disorders. The related clinical features, however, may vary among individuals. This study therefore investigated the relation between MELAS clinical features and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA, in an attempt to provide further evidences for genetic diagnosis of MELAS. Children with MELAS-like syndromes were tested for both blood lactate level and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA. Further family study was performed by mtDNA mutation screening at the same loci for those who had positive gene mutation at A3243G loci. Those who were negative for A3243G point mutation were examined by muscle biopsy and genetic screening. Both clinical and genetic features were analyzed. In all 40 cases with positive A3243G mutation, 36 children fitted clinical diagnosis of MELAS. In other 484 cases with negative mutation, only 8 children were clinically diagnosed with MELAS. Blood lactate levels in both groups were all elevated (P>0.05). In a further genetic screening of 28 families, 10 biological mothers and 8 siblings of MELAS children had positive A3243G point mutations but without any clinical symptoms. Certain difference existed in the clinical manifestations between children who were positive and negative for A3243G mutation of mtDNA but without statistical significance. MELAS showed maternal inheritance under most circumstances.

  3. Clinical features of MELAS and its relation with A3243G gene point mutation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Guo, Junhong; Fang, Wanghui; Jun, Qili; Shi, Kaili

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) mostly occur in children. The point mutation A3243G of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may work as a specific bio-marker for mitochondrial disorders. The related clinical features, however, may vary among individuals. This study therefore investigated the relation between MELAS clinical features and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA, in an attempt to provide further evidences for genetic diagnosis of MELAS. Children with MELAS-like syndromes were tested for both blood lactate level and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA. Further family study was performed by mtDNA mutation screening at the same loci for those who had positive gene mutation at A3243G loci. Those who were negative for A3243G point mutation were examined by muscle biopsy and genetic screening. Both clinical and genetic features were analyzed. In all 40 cases with positive A3243G mutation, 36 children fitted clinical diagnosis of MELAS. In other 484 cases with negative mutation, only 8 children were clinically diagnosed with MELAS. Blood lactate levels in both groups were all elevated (P>0.05). In a further genetic screening of 28 families, 10 biological mothers and 8 silbings of MELAS children had positive A3243G point mutations but without any clinical symptoms. Certain difference existed in the clinical manifestations between children who were positive and negative for A3243G mutation of mtDNA but without statistical significance. MELAS showed maternal inheritance under most circumstances. PMID:26722549

  4. IDH1/2 Mutation and MGMT Promoter Methylation - the Relevant Survival Predictors in Czech Patients with Brain Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Kramář, F; Minárik, M; Benešová, L; Halková, T; Netuka, D; Bradáč, O; Beneš, V

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are a heterogeneous group of tumours varying in prognosis, treatment approach, and overall survival. Recently, novel markers have been identified which are linked to patient prognosis and therapeutic response. Especially the mutation of the enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/2) gene and the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status seem to be the most important predictors of survival. From 2012 to 2015, 94 Czech patients with primary brain tumours were enrolled into the study. The IDH1/2 mutation was detected by denaturing capillary electrophores.The methylation status of the MGMT gene and other 46 genes was revealed by MS-MLPA. In all 94 patients, the clinical data were correlated with molecular markers by Kaplan-Meier analyses and Cox regression model. The MGMT promoter methylation status was established and compared to clinical data. In our study eight different probes were used to elucidate the MGMT methylation status; hypermethylation was proclaimed if four and more probes were positive. This 3 : 5 ratio was tested and confirmed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox analyses. The study confirmed the importance of the IDH1/2 mutation and hypermethylation of the MGMT gene promoter being present in tumour tissue. Both markers are independent positive survival predictors; in the Cox model the IDH hazard ratio was 0.10 and in the case of MGMT methylation it reached 0.32. The methylation analysis of the panel of additional 46 genes did not reveal any other significant epigenetic markers; none of the candidate genes have been confirmed in the Cox regression analyses as an independent prognostic factor.

  5. Contact allergy to colophony. Clinical and experimental studies with emphasis on clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Färm, G

    1998-01-01

    Colophony--also called rosin--is a material obtained from coniferous trees. It is used widely in many products, particularly because of its good tackifying properties. Colophony is also used in paper sizing to increase water resistance. Colophony may cause contact allergy, and around 5% of Swedish dermatitis patients show allergic reactions to colophony at patch testing. There are many case reports of colophony in different products causing contact dermatitis. Often, however, the clinical relevance of a positive patch-test reaction to colophony is difficult to evaluate. The principal aims of the present thesis were to study the prevalence of contact allergy to colophony and of skin disease in individuals with an occupational exposure to colophony; to study the prognosis of dermatitis in colophony-sensitive subjects, and to investigate the outcome of repeated open applications of colophony, thereby trying to elucidate the clinical relevance of contact allergy to colophony. Employees of a tall-oil rosin (colophony) factory (n = 180), and of an opera company where colophony was used in dancers' rosin, mascara and wig glues (n = 132), were interviewed, examined and patch tested. 3.9% and 2% of these two groups respectively had a positive patch test to colophony. More than every fourth participant showed some kind of skin disease, but only few cases were related to work. Eighty-three patients with previously diagnosed contact allergy to colophony were followed-up 72% showed a positive patch-test reaction to colophony at re-testing. Around one third had hand eczema. There was no significant correlation between colophony exposure and current hand eczema. Adhesive bandages containing colophony and zinc oxide (ZnO), colophony and mixes of colophony and ZnO, were tested in 7 colophony-sensitive subjects to see whether addition of zinc oxide inhibited elicitation of allergic dermatitis to colophony, which has been proposed. No difference in reactivity between colophony and

  6. Detection of Clinically Relevant Genetic Variants in Autism Spectrum Disorder by Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yong-hui; Yuen, Ryan K.C.; Jin, Xin; Wang, Mingbang; Chen, Nong; Wu, Xueli; Ju, Jia; Mei, Junpu; Shi, Yujian; He, Mingze; Wang, Guangbiao; Liang, Jieqin; Wang, Zhe; Cao, Dandan; Carter, Melissa T.; Chrysler, Christina; Drmic, Irene E.; Howe, Jennifer L.; Lau, Lynette; Marshall, Christian R.; Merico, Daniele; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann; Uddin, Mohammed; Walker, Susan; Luo, Jun; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Ring, Robert H.; Wang, Jian; Lajonchere, Clara; Wang, Jun; Shih, Andy; Szatmari, Peter; Yang, Huanming; Dawson, Geraldine; Li, Yingrui; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) demonstrates high heritability and familial clustering, yet the genetic causes remain only partially understood as a result of extensive clinical and genomic heterogeneity. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) shows promise as a tool for identifying ASD risk genes as well as unreported mutations in known loci, but an assessment of its full utility in an ASD group has not been performed. We used WGS to examine 32 families with ASD to detect de novo or rare inherited genetic variants predicted to be deleterious (loss-of-function and damaging missense mutations). Among ASD probands, we identified deleterious de novo mutations in six of 32 (19%) families and X-linked or autosomal inherited alterations in ten of 32 (31%) families (some had combinations of mutations). The proportion of families identified with such putative mutations was larger than has been previously reported; this yield was in part due to the comprehensive and uniform coverage afforded by WGS. Deleterious variants were found in four unrecognized, nine known, and eight candidate ASD risk genes. Examples include CAPRIN1 and AFF2 (both linked to FMR1, which is involved in fragile X syndrome), VIP (involved in social-cognitive deficits), and other genes such as SCN2A and KCNQ2 (linked to epilepsy), NRXN1, and CHD7, which causes ASD-associated CHARGE syndrome. Taken together, these results suggest that WGS and thorough bioinformatic analyses for de novo and rare inherited mutations will improve the detection of genetic variants likely to be associated with ASD or its accompanying clinical symptoms. PMID:23849776

  7. Thyroid hyperfunctioning adenomas with and without Gsp/TSH receptor mutations show similar clinical features.

    PubMed

    Arturi, F; Capula, C; Chiefari, E; Filetti, S; Russo, D

    1998-01-01

    Activating mutations of Gs alpha protein (gsp) and TSH receptor (TSH-R) identified in autonomously hyperfunctioning thyroid adenomas have been proposed as the primary event responsible for this disease. Since mutations have not been detected in 100% (ranging from less than 10% to 90%) of the patients, we evaluated whether the presence of gsp and TSH-R mutations cause differences in the clinical and biochemical parameters of the affected patients. Fifteen consecutive patients (11 women and 4 men) with autonomously hyperfunctioning thyroid adenomas who underwent thyroidectomy, previously examined for the presence of gsp or TSH-R mutations, were investigated. In all of the patients we examined plasma free T3, free T4, TSH levels and ultrasound volume of the nodules. The patients with mutations in gsp or TSH-R were similar to the patients without mutations for clinical presentation, sex distribution and mean age. Furthermore, basal serum FT3, TSH and tumor volume in the patients with mutations were not significantly different from the group without mutations. Our preliminary data demonstrate that no significant differences are present in the two groups of patients examined, suggesting that factors other than gsp or TSH-R mutations play a role in the clinical presentation of the disease.

  8. Mutation screening of PALB2 in clinically ascertained families from the Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Dumont, Tú; Hammet, Fleur; Mahmoodi, Maryam; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teo, Zhi L; Li, Roger; Pope, Bernard J; Terry, Mary Beth; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary; Hopper, John L; Winship, Ingrid; Goldgar, David E; Park, Daniel J; Southey, Melissa C

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in PALB2 are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, with recent data showing that female breast cancer risks for PALB2 mutation carriers are comparable in magnitude to those for BRCA2 mutation carriers. This study applied targeted massively parallel sequencing to characterize the mutation spectrum of PALB2 in probands attending breast cancer genetics clinics in the USA. The coding regions and proximal intron-exon junctions of PALB2 were screened in probands not known to carry a mutation in BRCA1 or BCRA2 from 1,250 families enrolled through familial cancer clinics by the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Mutation screening was performed using Hi-Plex, an amplicon-based targeted massively parallel sequencing platform. Screening of PALB2 was successful in 1,240/1,250 probands and identified nine women with protein-truncating mutations (three nonsense mutations and five frameshift mutations). Four of the 33 missense variants were predicted to be deleterious to protein function by in silico analysis using two different programs. Analysis of tumors from carriers of truncating mutations revealed that the majority were high histological grade, invasive ductal carcinomas. Young onset was apparent in most families, with 19 breast cancers under 50 years of age, including eight under the age of 40 years. Our data demonstrate the utility of Hi-Plex in the context of high-throughput testing for rare genetic mutations and provide additional timely information about the nature and prevalence of PALB2 mutations, to enhance risk assessment and risk management of women at high risk of cancer attending clinical genetic services.

  9. Mutation screening of PALB2 in clinically ascertained families from the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Dumont, Tú; Hammet, Fleur; Mahmoodi, Maryam; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teo, Zhi L.; Li, Roger; Pope, Bernard J.; Terry, Mary Beth; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary; Hopper, John L.; Winship, Ingrid; Goldgar, David E.; Park, Daniel J.; Southey, Melissa C.

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in PALB2 are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, with recent data showing that female breast cancer risks for PALB2 mutation carriers are comparable in magnitude to those for BRCA2 mutation carriers. This study applied targeted massively parallel sequencing to characterize the mutation spectrum of PALB2 in probands attending breast cancer genetics clinics in the USA. The coding regions and proximal intron–exon junctions of PALB2 were screened in probands not known to carry a mutation in BRCA1 or BCRA2 from 1,250 families enrolled through familial cancer clinics by the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Mutation screening was performed using Hi-Plex, an amplicon-based targeted massively parallel sequencing platform. Screening of PALB2 was successful in 1,240/1,250 probands and identified nine women with protein-truncating mutations (three nonsense mutations and five frameshift mutations). Four of the 33 missense variants were predicted to be deleterious to protein function by in silico analysis using two different programs. Analysis of tumors from carriers of truncating mutations revealed that the majority were high histological grade, invasive ductal carcinomas. Young onset was apparent in most families, with 19 breast cancers under 50 years of age, including eight under the age of 40 years. Our data demonstrate the utility of Hi-Plex in the context of high-throughput testing for rare genetic mutations and provide additional timely information about the nature and prevalence of PALB2 mutations, to enhance risk assessment and risk management of women at high risk of cancer attending clinical genetic services. PMID:25575445

  10. Clinical outcomes in pancreatic adenocarcinoma associated with BRCA-2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Ojas; Leung, Keith; Ledbetter, Leslie; Kaley, Kristin; Rodriguez, Teresa; Garcon, Marie C; Saif, Muhammad W

    2015-02-01

    Patients with BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 germ line mutations are at an increased risk of developing pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC). In particular, the BRCA-2 mutation has been associated with a relative risk of developing PAC of 3.51. The BRCA-2 protein is involved in repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. Recent reports have suggested that in the setting of impaired DNA repair, chemotherapeutic agents that induce DNA damage, such as platinum-based antineoplastic drugs (platins) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARP inhibitors), have improved efficacy. However, because of the relative rarity of BRCA-related PAC, studies evaluating such agents in this setting are scarce. Patients with a known BRCA-2 mutation and PAC were retrospectively reviewed. Ten patients with PAC and BRCA-2 mutation were identified. Four patients (40%) were of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. Seven patients (70%) received platinum agents, two (20%) received mitomycin-C, one (10%) received a PARP inhibitor, and seven (70%) received a topoisomerase-I inhibitor. Overall, chemotherapy was well tolerated with expected side effects. Patients with a BRCA-2 mutation and PAC represent a group with a unique biology underlying their cancer. Chemotherapies such as platinum derivatives, mitomycin-C, topoisomerase-I inhibitors, and PARP inhibitors targeting DNA require further investigation in this population. Genetic testing may guide therapy in the future.

  11. Evaluating the performance of clinical criteria for predicting mismatch repair gene mutations in Lynch syndrome: a comprehensive analysis of 3,671 families.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Verena; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Loeffler, Markus; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Schackert, Hans K; Görgens, Heike; Pox, Christian; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; von Knebel-Doeberitz, Magnus; Büttner, Reinhard; Propping, Peter; Engel, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    Carriers of mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations have a high lifetime risk for colorectal and endometrial cancers, as well as other malignancies. As mutation analysis to detect these patients is expensive and time-consuming, clinical criteria and tumor-tissue analysis are widely used as pre-screening methods. The aim of our study was to evaluate the performance of commonly applied clinical criteria (the Amsterdam I and II Criteria, and the original and revised Bethesda Guidelines) and the results of tumor-tissue analysis in predicting MMR gene mutations. We analyzed 3,671 families from the German HNPCC Registry and divided them into nine mutually exclusive groups with different clinical criteria. A total of 680 families (18.5%) were found to have a pathogenic MMR gene mutation. Among all 1,284 families with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) colorectal cancer, the overall mutation detection rate was 53.0%. Mutation frequencies and their distribution between the four MMR genes differed significantly between clinical groups (p < 0.001). The highest frequencies were found in families fulfilling the Amsterdam Criteria (46.4%). Families with loss of MSH2 expression had higher mutation detection rates (69.5%) than families with loss of MLH1 expression (43.1%). MMR mutations were found significantly more often in families with at least one MSI-H small-bowel cancer (p < 0.001). No MMR mutations were found among patients under 40-years-old with only colorectal adenoma. Familial clustering of Lynch syndrome-related tumors, early age of onset, and familial occurrence of small-bowel cancer were clinically relevant predictors for Lynch syndrome.

  12. Association of PAX2 and Other Gene Mutations with the Clinical Manifestations of Renal Coloboma Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Higashide, Tomomi; Sakurai, Mayumi; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Shinozaki, Yasuyuki; Hara, Akinori; Iwata, Yasunori; Sakai, Norihiko; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Background Renal coloboma syndrome (RCS) is characterized by renal anomalies and optic nerve colobomas. PAX2 mutations contribute to RCS. However, approximately half of the patients with RCS have no mutation in PAX2 gene. Methods To investigate the incidence and effects of mutations of PAX2 and 25 candidate genes, patient genes were screened using next-generation sequence analysis, and candidate mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. The correlation between mutations and clinical manifestation was evaluated. Result Thirty patients, including 26 patients (two families of five and two, 19 sporadic cases) with RCS, and 4 optic nerve coloboma only control cases were evaluated in the present study. Six PAX2 mutations in 21 probands [28%; two in family cohorts (n = 5 and n = 2) and in 4 out of 19 patients with sporadic disease] including four novel mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. Moreover, four other sequence variants (CHD7, SALL4, KIF26B, and SIX4) were also confirmed, including a potentially pathogenic novel KIF26B mutation. Kidney function and proteinuria were more severe in patients with PAX2 mutations than in those without the mutation. Moreover, the coloboma score was significantly higher in patients with PAX2 gene mutations. Three out of five patients with PAX2 mutations had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) diagnosed from kidney biopsies. Conclusion The results of this study identify several new mutations of PAX2, and sequence variants in four additional genes, including a novel potentially pathogenic mutation in KIF26B, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of RCS. PMID:26571382

  13. Coexistence of JAK2 and CALR mutations and their clinical implications in patients with essential thrombocythemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Hyung; Choi, Yong Jun; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Szardenings, Michael; Kim, Hye-Ran; Shin, Myung-Geun

    2016-01-01

    Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and calreticulin (CALR) constitute the two most frequent mutations in essential thrombocythemia (ET), and both are reported to be mutually exclusive. Hence, we examined a cohort of 123 myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) patients without BCR-ABL1 rearrangement and additional ET patients (n=96) for coexistence of JAK2 and CALR mutations. The frequency of CALR mutations was 20.3% in 123 MPN patients; 31.1% in ET (n=74), 25% in primary myelofibrosis (n=4) and 2.2% in polycythemia vera (n=45). JAK2 and CALR mutations coexisted in 7 (4.2%) of 167 ET patients. Clinical characteristics, progression-free survival (PFS), and elapsed time to achieve partial remission across 4 groups (JAK2+/CALR+, JAK2+/CALR-, JAK2-/CALR+, JAK2-/CALR-) were reviewed. The JAK2+/CALR- group had higher leukocyte counts and hemoglobin levels and more frequent thrombotic events than JAK2-/CALR- group. JAK2 mutations have a greater effect on the disease phenotype and the clinical features of MPN patients rather than do CALR mutation. JAK2+ groups showed a tendency of poor PFS than JAK2- groups regardless of CALR mutation. CALR+ was a predictor of late response to the treatment. Our study also showed that thrombosis was more frequent in ET patients with type 2 CALR mutations than in those with type 1 CALR mutations. PMID:27486987

  14. Coexistence of JAK2 and CALR mutations and their clinical implications in patients with essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Gu; Choi, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Jun Hyung; Choi, Yong Jun; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Szardenings, Michael; Kim, Hye-Ran; Shin, Myung-Geun

    2016-08-30

    Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and calreticulin (CALR) constitute the two most frequent mutations in essential thrombocythemia (ET), and both are reported to be mutually exclusive. Hence, we examined a cohort of 123 myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) patients without BCR-ABL1 rearrangement and additional ET patients (n=96) for coexistence of JAK2 and CALR mutations. The frequency of CALR mutations was 20.3% in 123 MPN patients; 31.1% in ET (n=74), 25% in primary myelofibrosis (n=4) and 2.2% in polycythemia vera (n=45). JAK2 and CALR mutations coexisted in 7 (4.2%) of 167 ET patients. Clinical characteristics, progression-free survival (PFS), and elapsed time to achieve partial remission across 4 groups (JAK2+/CALR+, JAK2+/CALR-, JAK2-/CALR+, JAK2-/CALR-) were reviewed. The JAK2+/CALR- group had higher leukocyte counts and hemoglobin levels and more frequent thrombotic events than JAK2-/CALR- group. JAK2 mutations have a greater effect on the disease phenotype and the clinical features of MPN patients rather than do CALR mutation. JAK2+ groups showed a tendency of poor PFS than JAK2- groups regardless of CALR mutation. CALR+ was a predictor of late response to the treatment. Our study also showed that thrombosis was more frequent in ET patients with type 2 CALR mutations than in those with type 1 CALR mutations.

  15. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: reporting clinically relevant features.

    PubMed

    Del Chiaro, Marco; Verbeke, Caroline

    2016-11-22

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas can exhibit a wide spectrum of macroscopic and microscopic appearances. This not only causes occasional difficulties for the reporting pathologist in distinguishing these tumours from other lesions, but is also relevant clinically. As evidence accumulates, it becomes clear that multiple macroscopic and histological features of these neoplasms are relevant to the risk for malignant transformation and, consequently, of prime importance for clinical patient management. The need for detailed reporting is therefore increasing. This review discusses the panoply of gross and microscopic features of IPMN as well as the recommendations from recent consensus meetings regarding the pathology reporting on this tumour entity.

  16. Differential clinical effects of different mutation subtypes in CALR-mutant myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Pietra, D; Rumi, E; Ferretti, V V; Buduo, C A Di; Milanesi, C; Cavalloni, C; Sant'Antonio, E; Abbonante, V; Moccia, F; Casetti, I C; Bellini, M; Renna, M C; Roncoroni, E; Fugazza, E; Astori, C; Boveri, E; Rosti, V; Barosi, G; Balduini, A; Cazzola, M

    2016-01-01

    A quarter of patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis carry a driver mutation of CALR, the calreticulin gene. A 52-bp deletion (type 1) and a 5-bp insertion (type 2 mutation) are the most frequent variants. These indels might differentially impair the calcium binding activity of mutant calreticulin. We studied the relationship between mutation subtype and biological/clinical features of the disease. Thirty-two different types of CALR variants were identified in 311 patients. Based on their predicted effect on calreticulin C-terminal, mutations were classified as: (i) type 1-like (65%); (ii) type 2-like (32%); and (iii) other types (3%). Corresponding CALR mutants had significantly different estimated isoelectric points. Patients with type 1 mutation, but not those with type 2, showed abnormal cytosolic calcium signals in cultured megakaryocytes. Type 1-like mutations were mainly associated with a myelofibrosis phenotype and a significantly higher risk of myelofibrotic transformation in essential thrombocythemia. Type 2-like CALR mutations were preferentially associated with an essential thrombocythemia phenotype, low risk of thrombosis despite very-high platelet counts and indolent clinical course. Thus, mutation subtype contributes to determining clinical phenotype and outcomes in CALR-mutant myeloproliferative neoplasms. CALR variants that markedly impair the calcium binding activity of mutant calreticulin are mainly associated with a myelofibrosis phenotype. PMID:26449662

  17. Clinical and Mutational Analysis of the GCDH Gene in Malaysian Patients with Glutaric Aciduria Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Yakob, Yusnita; Abdul Azize, Nor Azimah; Md Yunus, Zabedah; Huey Yin, Leong; Mohd Khalid, Mohd Khairul Nizam; Lock Hock, Ngu

    2016-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by deficiency of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase enzyme encoded by the GCDH gene. In this study, we presented the clinical and molecular findings of seven GA1 patients in Malaysia. All the patients were symptomatic from infancy and diagnosed clinically from large excretion of glutaric and 3-hydroxyglutaric acids. Bidirectional sequencing of the GCDH gene revealed ten mutations, three of which were novel (Gln76Pro, Glu131Val, and Gly390Trp). The spectrum of mutations included eight missense mutations, a nonsense mutation, and a splice site mutation. Two mutations (Gln76Pro and Arg386Gln) were homozygous in two patients with parental consanguinity. All mutations were predicted to be disease causing by MutationTaster2. In conclusion, this is the first report of both clinical and molecular aspects of GA1 in Malaysian patients. Despite the lack of genotype and phenotype correlation, early diagnosis and timely treatment remained the most important determinant of patient outcome. PMID:27672653

  18. Novel mutations conferring resistance to kanamycin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Northern India.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simerpreet; Rana, Vibhuti; Singh, Pooja; Trivedi, Garima; Anand, Shashi; Kaur, Amanpreet; Gupta, Pawan; Jain, Amita; Sharma, Charu

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-nine Kanamycin resistant clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Northern India were screened to evaluate genetic mutations in rrs gene, eis gene with its promoter, and whiB7 gene along with its 5'UTR. 14 strains (~48.0%) collectively exhibited mutations in rrs, eis or whiB7 target regions. While the highest frequency of mutations was found in rrs gene, eis and whiB7 loci displayed novel mutations. The novel mutations displayed by eis and whiB7 loci were found to be associated specifically with the Kanamycin resistance as none of the twenty nine Kanamycin sensitive strains harbor them. The inclusion of novel mutations of eis and whiB7 loci will be useful in improving the specificity of future diagnostics.

  19. Clinical significance in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma of pathogenic somatic mitochondrial mutations.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Hsiung; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Liao, Chun-Ta; Chen, I-How; Wang, Hung-Ming; Hsieh, Ling-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Somatic mutations affecting the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been frequently observed in human cancers and proposed as important oncological biomarkers. However, the clinical significance of mtDNA mutations in cancer remains unclear. This study was therefore performed to explore the possible clinical use in assessing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) of pathogenic mtDNA mutations. The entire mitochondrial genome of 300 OSCC with their matched control DNAs was screened by direct sequencing and criteria were set to define a pathogenic somatic mutation. The patients' TP53 R72P genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The relationships between pathogenic somatic mutations, clinicopathogical features, TP53 R72P genotype and clinical prognosis were analyzed. Overall, 645 somatic mtDNA mutations were identified and 91 of these mutations were defined as pathogenic. About one quarter (74/300) of the OSCC tumor samples contained pathogenic mutations. Individuals with the TP53 R allele had a higher frequency of pathogenic somatic mutation than those with the PP genotype. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that TP53 R allele patients with pathogenic somatic mutations demonstrated a significant association with a poorer disease-free survival than other individuals (HR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.15-2.57; p = 0.009) and this phenomenon still existed after adjusting for mtDNA haplogroup, tumor stage with treatment regimens, differentiation and age at diagnosis (HR = 1.59; 95% CI, 1.06-2.40; p = 0.03). Subgroup analyses showed that this phenomenon was limited to patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy/chemo-radiotherapy after surgery. The results strongly indicated that pathogenic mtDNA mutations are a potential prognostic marker for OSCCs. Furthermore, functional mitochondria may play an active role in cancer development and the patient's response to radiotherapy/chemo-radiotherapy.

  20. How relevant is undergraduate medical law teaching to clinical practice? A graduates' perspective.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Nicole; McMenamin, Christine

    2012-12-01

    The Monash University medical law tutorial program was implemented in 2002. A major aim of this program is to enable medical students to recognise and understand their legal obligations in clinical practice, thereby improving clinical standards and contributing to better patient outcomes. The present study examined whether, from a graduate perspective, the medical law tutorial program provides adequate legal information of relevance for a clinical context. Monash University medical graduates from 2007 to 2009 who were working at a Victorian hospital or who were members of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners were invited to participate in the study. Fifty-six participants completed the survey. Overall, participants had positive perceptions of the medical law program. The medical law program is an essential component of students' medical education and provides information relevant to future clinical practice.

  1. Genetic spectrum and clinical correlates of somatic mutations in aldosterone-producing adenoma.

    PubMed

    Fernandes-Rosa, Fabio Luiz; Williams, Tracy Ann; Riester, Anna; Steichen, Olivier; Beuschlein, Felix; Boulkroun, Sheerazed; Strom, Tim M; Monticone, Silvia; Amar, Laurence; Meatchi, Tchao; Mantero, Franco; Cicala, Maria-Verena; Quinkler, Marcus; Fallo, Francesco; Allolio, Bruno; Bernini, Giampaolo; Maccario, Mauro; Giacchetti, Gilberta; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Mulatero, Paolo; Reincke, Martin; Zennaro, Maria-Christina

    2014-08-01

    Primary aldosteronism is the most common form of secondary hypertension. Somatic mutations in KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3, and CACNA1D have been described in aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs). Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of somatic mutations in these genes in unselected patients with APA (n=474), collected through the European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors. Correlations with clinical and biochemical parameters were first analyzed in a subset of 199 patients from a single center and then replicated in 2 additional centers. Somatic heterozygous KCNJ5 mutations were present in 38% (180/474) of APAs, whereas ATP1A1 mutations were found in 5.3% (25/474) and ATP2B3 mutations in 1.7% (8/474) of APAs. Previously reported somatic CACNA1D mutations as well as 10 novel CACNA1D mutations were identified in 44 of 474 (9.3%) APAs. There was no difference in the cellular composition of APAs or in CYP11B2, CYP11B1, KCNJ5, CACNA1D, or ATP1A1 gene expression in APAs across genotypes. Patients with KCNJ5 mutations were more frequently female, diagnosed younger, and with higher minimal plasma potassium concentrations compared with CACNA1D mutation carriers or noncarriers. CACNA1D mutations were associated with smaller adenomas. These associations were largely dependent on the population structure of the different centers. In conclusion, recurrent somatic mutations were identified in 54% of APAs. Young women with APAs are more likely to be KCNJ5 mutation carriers; identification of specific characteristics or surrogate biomarkers of mutation status may lead to targeted treatment options.

  2. Interaction of human serum albumin and its clinically relevant modification with oligoribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, Yuliya V; Erchenko, Irina A; Shakirov, Makhmut M; Godovikova, Tatyana S

    2008-08-15

    Human serum albumin (HSA) was shown to mediate oligoribonucleotide cleavage. Nonenzymatic glycation of HSA decreased the ribonuclease-like activity of the protein. According to (31)P NMR data, both native and glycated albumins induced hydrolysis of RNA molecule through 2',3'-cyclophosphate intermediates. A feasible mechanism of RNA hydrolysis by native albumin and its clinically relevant modification was discussed.

  3. Clinically Relevant Changes in Emotional Expression in Children with ADHD Treated with Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katic, Alain; Ginsberg, Lawrence; Jain, Rakesh; Adeyi, Ben; Dirks, Bryan; Babcock, Thomas; Scheckner, Brian; Richards, Cynthia; Lasser, Robert; Turgay, Atilla; Findling, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe clinically relevant effects of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) on emotional expression (EE) in children with ADHD. Method: Children with ADHD participated in a 7-week, open-label, LDX dose-optimization study. Expression and Emotion Scale for Children (EESC) change scores were analyzed post hoc using two methods to…

  4. A Bridge between Two Cultures: Uncovering the Chemistry Concepts Relevant to the Nursing Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Corina E.; Henry, Melissa L. M.; Barbera, Jack; Hyslop, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the undergraduate course that covers basic topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry at a mid-sized state university in the western United States. The central objective of the research was to identify the main topics of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was…

  5. Distinct clinical and pathological characteristics of frontotemporal dementia associated with C9ORF72 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rollinson, Sara; Thompson, Jennifer C.; Harris, Jennifer M.; Stopford, Cheryl L.; Richardson, Anna M. T.; Jones, Matthew; Gerhard, Alex; Davidson, Yvonne S.; Robinson, Andrew; Gibbons, Linda; Hu, Quan; DuPlessis, Daniel; Neary, David; Pickering-Brown, Stuart M.

    2012-01-01

    The identification of a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene as the cause of chromosome 9-linked frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease offers the opportunity for greater understanding of the relationship between these disorders and other clinical forms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. In this study, we screened a cohort of 398 patients with frontotemporal dementia, progressive non-fluent aphasia, semantic dementia or mixture of these syndromes for mutations in the C9ORF72 gene. Motor neuron disease was present in 55 patients (14%). We identified 32 patients with C9ORF72 mutations, representing 8% of the cohort. The patients’ clinical phenotype at presentation varied: nine patients had frontotemporal dementia with motor neuron disease, 19 had frontotemporal dementia alone, one had mixed semantic dementia with frontal features and three had progressive non-fluent aphasia. There was, as expected, a significant association between C9ORF72 mutations and presence of motor neuron disease. Nevertheless, 46 patients, including 22 familial, had motor neuron disease but no mutation in C9ORF72. Thirty-eight per cent of the patients with C9ORF72 mutations presented with psychosis, with a further 28% exhibiting paranoid, deluded or irrational thinking, whereas <4% of non-mutation bearers presented similarly. The presence of psychosis dramatically increased the odds that patients carried the mutation. Mutation bearers showed a low incidence of motor stereotypies, and relatively high incidence of complex repetitive behaviours, largely linked to patients’ delusions. They also showed a lower incidence of acquired sweet food preference than patients without C9ORF72 mutations. Post-mortem pathology in five patients revealed transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 pathology, type A in one patient and type B in three. However, one patient had corticobasal degeneration pathology. The findings indicate that C9ORF72 mutations cause some but not all

  6. Expanded national database collection and data coverage in the FINDbase worldwide database for clinically relevant genomic variation allele frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Viennas, Emmanouil; Komianou, Angeliki; Mizzi, Clint; Stojiljkovic, Maja; Mitropoulou, Christina; Muilu, Juha; Vihinen, Mauno; Grypioti, Panagiota; Papadaki, Styliani; Pavlidis, Cristiana; Zukic, Branka; Katsila, Theodora; van der Spek, Peter J.; Pavlovic, Sonja; Tzimas, Giannis; Patrinos, George P.

    2017-01-01

    FINDbase (http://www.findbase.org) is a comprehensive data repository that records the prevalence of clinically relevant genomic variants in various populations worldwide, such as pathogenic variants leading mostly to monogenic disorders and pharmacogenomics biomarkers. The database also records the incidence of rare genetic diseases in various populations, all in well-distinct data modules. Here, we report extensive data content updates in all data modules, with direct implications to clinical pharmacogenomics. Also, we report significant new developments in FINDbase, namely (i) the release of a new version of the ETHNOS software that catalyzes development curation of national/ethnic genetic databases, (ii) the migration of all FINDbase data content into 90 distinct national/ethnic mutation databases, all built around Microsoft's PivotViewer (http://www.getpivot.com) software (iii) new data visualization tools and (iv) the interrelation of FINDbase with DruGeVar database with direct implications in clinical pharmacogenomics. The abovementioned updates further enhance the impact of FINDbase, as a key resource for Genomic Medicine applications. PMID:27924022

  7. Expanded national database collection and data coverage in the FINDbase worldwide database for clinically relevant genomic variation allele frequencies.

    PubMed

    Viennas, Emmanouil; Komianou, Angeliki; Mizzi, Clint; Stojiljkovic, Maja; Mitropoulou, Christina; Muilu, Juha; Vihinen, Mauno; Grypioti, Panagiota; Papadaki, Styliani; Pavlidis, Cristiana; Zukic, Branka; Katsila, Theodora; van der Spek, Peter J; Pavlovic, Sonja; Tzimas, Giannis; Patrinos, George P

    2017-01-04

    FINDbase (http://www.findbase.org) is a comprehensive data repository that records the prevalence of clinically relevant genomic variants in various populations worldwide, such as pathogenic variants leading mostly to monogenic disorders and pharmacogenomics biomarkers. The database also records the incidence of rare genetic diseases in various populations, all in well-distinct data modules. Here, we report extensive data content updates in all data modules, with direct implications to clinical pharmacogenomics. Also, we report significant new developments in FINDbase, namely (i) the release of a new version of the ETHNOS software that catalyzes development curation of national/ethnic genetic databases, (ii) the migration of all FINDbase data content into 90 distinct national/ethnic mutation databases, all built around Microsoft's PivotViewer (http://www.getpivot.com) software (iii) new data visualization tools and (iv) the interrelation of FINDbase with DruGeVar database with direct implications in clinical pharmacogenomics. The abovementioned updates further enhance the impact of FINDbase, as a key resource for Genomic Medicine applications.

  8. There’s an App for That? Highlighting the Difficulty in Finding Clinically Relevant Smartphone Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wiechmann, Warren; Kwan, Daniel; Bokarius, Andrew; Toohey, Shannon L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The use of personal mobile devices in the medical field has grown quickly, and a large proportion of physicians use their mobile devices as an immediate resource for clinical decision-making, prescription information and other medical information. The iTunes App Store (Apple, Inc.) contains approximately 20,000 apps in its “Medical” category, providing a robust repository of resources for clinicians; however, this represents only 2% of the entire App Store. The App Store does not have strict criteria for identifying content specific to practicing physicians, making the identification of clinically relevant content difficult. The objective of this study is to quantify the characteristics of existing medical applications in the iTunes App Store that could be used by emergency physicians, residents, or medical students. Methods We found applications related to emergency medicine (EM) by searching the iTunes App Store for 21 terms representing core content areas of EM, such as “emergency medicine,” “critical care,” “orthopedics,” and “procedures.” Two physicians independently reviewed descriptions of these applications in the App Store and categorized each as the following: Clinically Relevant, Book/Published Source, Non-English, Study Tools, or Not Relevant. A third physician reviewer resolved disagreements about categorization. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results We found a total of 7,699 apps from the 21 search terms, of which 17.8% were clinical, 9.6% were based on a book or published source, 1.6% were non-English, 0.7% were clinically relevant patient education resources, and 4.8% were study tools. Most significantly, 64.9% were considered not relevant to medical professionals. Clinically relevant apps make up approximately 6.9% of the App Store’s “Medical” Category and 0.1% of the overall App Store. Conclusion Clinically relevant apps represent only a small percentage (6.9%) of the total App volume within the

  9. Novel point mutations in the ERG11 gene in clinical isolates of azole resistant Candida species.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danielly Beraldo dos Santos; Rodrigues, Luana Mireli Carbonera; Almeida, Adriana Araújo de; Oliveira, Kelly Mari Pires de; Grisolia, Alexéia Barufatti

    2016-03-01

    The azoles are the class of medications most commonly used to fight infections caused by Candida sp. Typically, resistance can be attributed to mutations in ERG11 gene (CYP51) which encodes the cytochrome P450 14α-demethylase, the primary target for the activity of azoles. The objective of this study was to identify mutations in the coding region of theERG11 gene in clinical isolates of Candida species known to be resistant to azoles. We identified three new synonymous mutations in the ERG11 gene in the isolates of Candida glabrata (C108G, C423T and A1581G) and two new nonsynonymous mutations in the isolates of Candida krusei--A497C (Y166S) and G1570A (G524R). The functional consequence of these nonsynonymous mutations was predicted using evolutionary conservation scores. The G524R mutation did not have effect on 14α-demethylase functionality, while the Y166S mutation was found to affect the enzyme. This observation suggests a possible link between the mutation and dose-dependent sensitivity to voriconazole in the clinical isolate of C. krusei. Although the presence of the Y166S in phenotype of reduced azole sensitivity observed in isolate C. krusei demands investigation, it might contribute to the search of new therapeutic agents against resistant Candida isolates.

  10. [The drug resistance mutation detection and relevant factors analysis of HBV P region in chronic hepatitis B patients in Weifang City, Shandong Province].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianqiang; Liu, Jiafa

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the mutation of HBV polymerase gene reverse transcription conserved region (P region) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients, 212 CHB patients who took antiretroviral treatment with nucleotide analogues were chosen. The drug resistance mutations of HBV P region and HBV genotype were detected by Pyrosequencing. Sequence analysis showed that the drug resistance sites of HBV P region located at sites 173; 180; 181; 184; 204; 236 and 250. The main site of HBV P region drug resistance was 204 and 180, accounting for 35.8% and 23.5%, respectively. There were significant differences in the mutation rate of site 180 among different age groups. There were also significant differences in the mutation rate of site 204 among younger than 30 age group, 41 to 50 age group and 51 to 60 age group. (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). The mutation rate of site 180 combined with site 204 was 66.6%. The mutation rate of site 181 combined with site 236 was 23.3%. The age of C genotype infected patients was significantly older than B genotype infected patients (P < 0.01). M204V/I mutation mostly existed in the form of joint L180M mutation, the mutation rate was age-related. The detection of HBV genotypes and drug resistance sites of HBV P region have important clinical implications for the treatment and prognosis of patients with CHB.

  11. A software system to collect expert relevance ratings of medical record items for specific clinical tasks.

    PubMed

    Harvey, H Benjamin; Krishnaraj, Arun; Alkasab, Tarik K

    2014-02-28

    Development of task-specific electronic medical record (EMR) searches and user interfaces has the potential to improve the efficiency and safety of health care while curbing rising costs. The development of such tools must be data-driven and guided by a strong understanding of practitioner information requirements with respect to specific clinical tasks or scenarios. To acquire this important data, this paper describes a model by which expert practitioners are leveraged to identify which components of the medical record are most relevant to a specific clinical task. We also describe the computer system that was created to efficiently implement this model of data gathering. The system extracts medical record data from the EMR of patients matching a given clinical scenario, de-identifies the data, breaks the data up into separate medical record items (eg, radiology reports, operative notes, laboratory results, etc), presents each individual medical record item to experts under the hypothetical of the given clinical scenario, and records the experts' ratings regarding the relevance of each medical record item to that specific clinical scenario or task. After an iterative process of data collection, these expert relevance ratings can then be pooled and used to design point-of-care EMR searches and user interfaces tailored to the task-specific needs of practitioners.

  12. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia associated with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Usuki, Kensuke; Kurosawa, Saiko; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Kawata, Eri; Tajika, Kenji; Gomi, Seiji; Kanda, Junya; Kobayashi, Anna; Omori, Ikuko; Marumo, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yui, Shunsuke; Terada, Kazuki; Fukunaga, Keiko; Hirakawa, Tsuneaki; Arai, Kunihito; Kitano, Tomoaki; Kosaka, Fumiko; Tamai, Hayato; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Wakita, Satoshi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that the frequency of DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutationsmutations of the genes that regulate gene expression through DNA methylation – is high in acute myeloid leukemia. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia with associated DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation. We studied 308 patients with acute myeloid leukemia. DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations were observed in 135 of the 308 cases (43.8%). Acute myeloid leukemia associated with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was more frequent in older patients (P<0.0001) and in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk (P<0.0001) accompanied by a high white blood cell count (P=0.0032). DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival in the whole cohort (P=0.0018), in patients aged ≤70 years, in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk, and in FLT3-ITD-negative patients (P=0.0409). Among the patients with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations, 26.7% were found to have two or more such mutations and prognosis worsened with increasing number of mutations. In multivariate analysis DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival (P=0.0424). However, patients with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first remission had a significantly better prognosis than those who did not undergo such transplantation (P=0.0254). Our study establishes that DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation is an important unfavorable prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27247325

  13. LMNA mutations in Polish patients with dilated cardiomyopathy: prevalence, clinical characteristics, and in vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background LMNA mutations are most frequently involved in the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy with conduction disease. The goal of this study was to identify LMNA mutations, estimate their frequency among Polish dilated cardiomyopathy patients and characterize their effect both in vivo and in vitro. Methods Between January, 2008 and June, 2012 two patient populations were screened for the presence of LMNA mutations by direct sequencing: 66 dilated cardiomyopathy patients including 27 heart transplant recipients and 39 dilated cardiomyopathy patients with heart failure referred for heart transplantation evaluation, and 44 consecutive dilated cardiomyopathy patients, referred for a family evaluation and mutation screening. Results We detected nine non-synonymous mutations including three novel mutations: p.Ser431*, p.Val256Gly and p.Gly400Argfs*11 deletion. There were 25 carriers altogether in nine families. The carriers were mostly characterized by dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure with conduction system disease and/or complex ventricular arrhythmia, although five were asymptomatic. Among the LMNA mutation carriers, six underwent heart transplantation, fourteen ICD implantation and eight had pacemaker. In addition, we obtained ultrastructural images of cardiomyocytes from the patient carrying p.Thr510Tyrfs*42. Furthermore, because the novel p.Val256Gly mutation was found in a sporadic case, we verified its pathogenicity by expressing the mutation in a cellular model. Conclusions In conclusion, in the two referral centre populations, the screening revealed five mutations among 66 heart transplant recipients or patients referred for heart transplantation (7.6%) and four mutations among 44 consecutive dilated cardiomyopathy patients referred for familial evaluation (9.1%). Dilated cardiomyopathy patients with LMNA mutations have poor prognosis, however considerable clinical variability is present among family members. PMID:23702046

  14. The Frequency and Clinical Significance of IDH1 Mutations in Chinese Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Li, Meng; Yin, Yue; Yu, Li; Gao, Chunji

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mutations in the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenease 1 (IDH1) occur in various hematopoietic tumors including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic syndromes. IDH1 mutations are significant in both diagnosis and prognosis of these conditions. In the present study we determined the prevalence and clinical significance of IDH1 mutations in 349 samples from newly diagnosed AML patients. Results Of the 349 AML patient specimens analyzed, 35 (10.03%) were found to have IDH1 mutations including 4 IDH1 R132 mutations and 31 non-R132 mutations. IDH1 non-R132 mutations were largely concentrated within AML-M1 (35.72%, p<0.01). We identified five IDH1 mutations that were novel to AML: (1) c.299 G>A, p.R100Q; (2) c.311G>T, p.G104V; (3) c.322T>C, p.F108L; (4) c.356G>A, p.R119Q; and (5) c.388A>G, p.I130V. In addition, we identified three IDH1 mutations that were previously described in AML. The frequency of IDH1 mutations in AML patients with normal karyotype was 9.9%. IDH1 non-R132 mutations were concurrent with mutations in FLT3-ITD (p<0.01), CEBPA (p<0.01), and NRAS (p<0.01), as well as the overexpression of MN1 (p<0.01) and WT1(p<0.01). The overall survival (OS) in the patients with IDH1 non-R132 mutations compared to patients without IDH1 mutations don't reach statistically significance (median 521 days vs median: not reached; n.s.). Conclusion IDH1 non-R132 mutations occurred frequently in newly diagnosed adult Chinese AML patients, and these mutations were associated with genetic alterations. The OS was not influenced by IDH1 non-R132 mutations in the present study. PMID:24376688

  15. New mutations in the ATM gene and clinical data of 25 AT patients.

    PubMed

    Demuth, Ilja; Dutrannoy, Véronique; Marques, Wilson; Neitzel, Heidemarie; Schindler, Detlev; Dimova, Petja S; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H; Bojinova, Veneta; Gregorek, Hanna; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; von Moers, Arpad; Schulze, Ilka; Nicke, Marion; Bora, Elcin; Cankaya, Tufan; Oláh, Éva; Kiss, Csongor; Bessenyei, Beáta; Szakszon, Katalin; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Kroisel, Peter Michael; Sodia, Sigrun; Goecke, Timm O; Dörk, Thilo; Digweed, Martin; Sperling, Karl; de Sá, Joaquim; Lourenco, Charles Marques; Varon, Raymonda

    2011-11-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar degeneration, immunodeficiency, oculocutaneous telangiectasias, chromosomal instability, radiosensitivity, and cancer predisposition. The gene mutated in the patients, ATM, encodes a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase family proteins. The ATM protein has a key role in the cellular response to DNA damage. Truncating and splice site mutations in ATM have been found in most patients with the classical AT phenotype. Here we report of our extensive ATM mutation screening on 25 AT patients from 19 families of different ethnic origin. Previously unknown mutations were identified in six patients including a new homozygous missense mutation, c.8110T>C (p.Cys2704Arg), in a severely affected patient. Comprehensive clinical data are presented for all patients described here along with data on ATM function generated by analysis of cell lines established from a subset of the patients.

  16. Music's relevance for children with cancer: music therapists' qualitative clinical data-mining research.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Clare; Dun, Beth; Baron, Annette; Barry, Philippa

    2013-01-01

    Music is central in most children's lives. Understanding its relevance will advance efficacious pediatric supportive cancer care. Qualitative clinical data-mining uncovered four music therapists' perspectives about music and music therapy's relevance for pediatric oncology patients up to 14 years old. Inductive and comparative thematic analysis was performed on focus group transcripts and qualitative interrater reliability integrated. Music can offer children a safe haven for internalizing a healthy self-image alongside patient identity. Music therapy can calm, relieve distress, promote supportive relationships, enable self-care, and inspire playful creativity, associated with "normalcy" and hope. Preferred music and music therapy should be available in pediatric oncology.

  17. Novel SCN9A mutations underlying extreme pain phenotypes: unexpected electrophysiological and clinical phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Emery, Edward C; Habib, Abdella M; Cox, James J; Nicholas, Adeline K; Gribble, Fiona M; Woods, C Geoffrey; Reimann, Frank

    2015-05-20

    The importance of NaV1.7 (encoded by SCN9A) in the regulation of pain sensing is exemplified by the heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes associated with its mutation. Gain-of-function mutations are typically pain-causing and have been associated with inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD). IEM is usually caused by enhanced NaV1.7 channel activation, whereas mutations that alter steady-state fast inactivation often lead to PEPD. In contrast, nonfunctional mutations in SCN9A are known to underlie congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP). Although well documented, the correlation between SCN9A genotypes and clinical phenotypes is still unclear. Here we report three families with novel SCN9A mutations. In a multiaffected dominant family with IEM, we found the heterozygous change L245 V. Electrophysiological characterization showed that this mutation did not affect channel activation but instead resulted in incomplete fast inactivation and a small hyperpolarizing shift in steady-state slow inactivation, characteristics more commonly associated with PEPD. In two compound heterozygous CIP patients, we found mutations that still retained functionality of the channels, with two C-terminal mutations (W1775R and L1831X) exhibiting a depolarizing shift in channel activation. Two mutations (A1236E and L1831X) resulted in a hyperpolarizing shift in steady-state fast inactivation. To our knowledge, these are the first descriptions of mutations with some retained channel function causing CIP. This study emphasizes the complex genotype-phenotype correlations that exist for SCN9A and highlights the C-terminal cytoplasmic region of NaV1.7 as a critical region for channel function, potentially facilitating analgesic drug development studies.

  18. Mitochondrial tRNAMet mutation is associated with clinical and biochemical characteristics in primary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Jin-Ying; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhang, Juang-Juang; Li, Dan-Dan; Fu, Xin; Guo, Jing; Xu, Qin-Fu

    2013-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations have been increasingly associated with various diseases. An association between the mitochondrial tRNA gene mutation, tRNAMet, and primary hypertension has been suggested. In the present study, the association between the tRNAMet mutation and the development of primary hypertension was investigated by assessing clinical and biological indicators in 800 patients with primary hypertension. General [gender, age, age of onset, body mass index (BMI) and family history] and clinical data (routine blood counts, blood biochemistry profiles and color Doppler echocardiography) were obtained. Venous blood samples were drawn from all the subjects for the separation of white blood cells (WBCs) and DNA extraction. Mitochondrial tRNAMet was amplified using PCR, purified and sequenced; samples identified to have a mutation were sequenced in triplicate for validation. Comparisons were made between 7 hypertensive patients with mutations (0.875%) and 10 age-, gender- and medication‑matched hypertensive patients without mutations (controls). A maternal history of hypertension was present in 57.1% of patients with tRNAMet mutations and only 20.0% of patients without mutations. Notably, tRNAMet mutations were associated with a significantly earlier age of hypertension onset, decreased red blood cell (RBC) counts and hemoglobin (Hb) levels and increased total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerol (TG), high‑density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and glucose levels (all P<0.05). Heart structure and function differences were also assessed between the two groups. In conclusion, mitochondrial tRNAMet mutations may induce changes in tRNA structure and function, which contributes to the pathogenesis of primary hypertension by disturbing blood lipid metabolism, the steady state of blood cells and cardiac structure and function.

  19. Claudin-19 Mutations and Clinical Phenotype in Spanish Patients with Familial Hypomagnesemia with Hypercalciuria and Nephrocalcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Claverie-Martín, Félix; García-Nieto, Víctor; Loris, Cesar; Ariceta, Gema; Nadal, Inmaculada; Espinosa, Laura; Fernández-Maseda, Ángeles; Antón-Gamero, Montserrat; Avila, África; Madrid, Álvaro; González-Acosta, Hilaria; Córdoba-Lanus, Elizabeth; Santos, Fernando; Gil-Calvo, Marta; Espino, Mar; García-Martinez, Elena; Sanchez, Ana; Muley, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis is an autosomal recessive tubular disorder characterized by excessive renal magnesium and calcium excretion and chronic kidney failure. This rare disease is caused by mutations in the CLDN16 and CLDN19 genes. These genes encode the tight junction proteins claudin-16 and claudin-19, respectively, which regulate the paracellular ion reabsortion in the kidney. Patients with mutations in the CLDN19 gene also present severe visual impairment. Our goals in this study were to examine the clinical characteristics of a large cohort of Spanish patients with this disorder and to identify the disease causing mutations. We included a total of 31 patients belonging to 27 unrelated families and studied renal and ocular manifestations. We then analyzed by direct DNA sequencing the coding regions of CLDN16 and CLDN19 genes in these patients. Bioinformatic tools were used to predict the consequences of mutations. Clinical evaluation showed ocular defects in 87% of patients, including mainly myopia, nystagmus and macular colobomata. Twenty two percent of patients underwent renal transplantation and impaired renal function was observed in another 61% of patients. Results of the genetic analysis revealed CLDN19 mutations in all patients confirming the clinical diagnosis. The majority of patients exhibited the previously described p.G20D mutation. Haplotype analysis using three microsatellite markers showed a founder effect for this recurrent mutation in our cohort. We also identified four new pathogenic mutations in CLDN19, p.G122R, p.I41T, p.G75C and p.G75S. A strategy based on microsequencing was designed to facilitate the genetic diagnosis of this disease. Our data indicate that patients with CLDN19 mutations have a high risk of progression to chronic renal disease. PMID:23301036

  20. Relationship Between Patients with Clinical Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder and Mutations in Gjb2 Gene.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Guilherme M; Z Ramos, Priscila; M Castilho, Arthur; C Guimarães, Alexandre; L Sartorato, Edi

    2016-01-01

    The auditory neuropathy is a condition which there is a dyssynchrony in the nerve conduction of the auditory nerve fibers. There is no evidence about the relationship between patients with clinical auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder and mutations in GJB2 gene. There are only two studies about this topic in the medical literature. Connexin 26 (GJB2 gene) mutations are common causes of genetic deafness in many populations and we also being reported in subjects with auditory neuropathy.

  1. Clinical, Pathologic, and Genetic Features of Wilms Tumors With WTX Gene Mutation.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Sanda; Akhavanfard, Sara; Harris, Marian H; Vargas, Sara O

    2017-01-01

    Clinical and pathologic features of patients with WTX-mutated Wilms tumor (WT) have not been studied in detail. We characterize the clinical and pathologic findings in WT with WTX abnormalities and provide comparison with WT without WTX mutation. Clinical, gross, and microscopic features in 35 patients with WT were examined. Karyotype was examined in a subset of cases. All cases had been previously analyzed for WTX, WT1, and CTNNB1 aberrations via array comparative genomic hybridization; OncoMap 4 high throughput genotyping was performed on 18 cases. Eleven tumors had WTX abnormality. No significant differences were identified between patients with mutated versus nonmutated WTX with respect to gender (45% versus 33% male), age (mean 3.9 versus 4.1 years), tumor size (mean 12.7 cm versus 12.8 cm), anaplasia (9% versus 12%), rhabdomyoblastic differentiation (18% versus 8%), cartilage differentiation (9% versus 4%), mucinous epithelial differentiation (9% versus 4%), nephrogenic rests (28% versus 21%), or relapse rate (11% versus 25%). Mutations in KRAS, MYC, and PIK3R1 were restricted to WTX-mutated WT, mutations in AKT, CKDN2A, EFGR, HRAS, MET, and RET were restricted to WT without WTX mutation, and mutations in BRAF, CTTNB1, NRAS, PDGFRA, and STK11 were seen in both groups. Our study revealed no clinical or pathologic distinctions between WT with and without WTX abnormality. This similarity lends support to the concept of a common tumorigenic pathway between WT with aberrant WTX and those without.

  2. Clinical characterization and mutation spectrum in Caribbean Hispanic families with Lynch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Pérez-Mayoral, Julyann; Suleiman-Suleiman, Wasilah; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria del Mar; Bertrán, Carlos; Casellas, Nicolás; Rodríguez, Natalia; Pardo, Sherly; Rivera, Keyla; Mosquera, Rafael; Rodriguez-Quilichini, Segundo

    2015-01-01

    Lynch Syndrome (LS) is an inherited form of colorectal cancer caused by germline mutations in the Mismatch Repair (MMR) genes. It accounts for approximately 5% of all colorectal cancers. The prevalence of Lynch Syndrome among US Hispanics is unknown. The objective of this study was to describe the germline mutations of Lynch Syndrome in Caribbean Hispanics from Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic. A total of 89 subjects were recruited through the Puerto Rico Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry and were classified according to Amsterdam and Bethesda clinical guidelines. For those tumors with lack of expression of MMR protein, gene sequencing was ordered. A total of 35 individuals with deficient MMR system were identified: 22 had MMR mutations and 13 had tumors with absent MMR protein expression. Our results show that the mutation spectrum of Caribbean Hispanic LS patients was composed mostly of MSH2 (66.7 %) mutations, followed by MLH1 (25.0 %). One mutation was identified in MSH6 (8.3 %). A previously unidentified mutation in MLH1 gene c.2044_2045del was found in one Caribbean Hispanic family. MMR mutation-positive individuals were found to be more likely to have a prominent family history of CRC and tumors located at the proximal colon. Compared to MSH2 mutation carriers, MLH1 mutation-positive individuals were more likely to have a strong family history of CRC and LS associated cancers. Furthermore, insurance coverage for genetic testing was found to be limited in the study population with 65.1% of the individuals recruited were denied coverage. This report presents the first description of the mutation spectrum and clinicopathologic characteristics of LS Caribbean Hispanics patients. PMID:25782445

  3. Clinical characterization and mutation spectrum in Caribbean Hispanic families with Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Pérez-Mayoral, Julyann; Suleiman-Suleiman, Wasilah; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria del Mar; Bertrán, Carlos; Casellas, Nicolás; Rodríguez, Natalia; Pardo, Sherly; Rivera, Keyla; Mosquera, Rafael; Rodriguez-Quilichini, Segundo

    2015-09-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited form of colorectal cancer (CRC) caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes. It accounts for approximately 5% of all CRCs. The prevalence of LS among US Hispanics is unknown. The objective of this study was to describe the germline mutations of LS in Caribbean Hispanics from Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic. A total of 89 subjects were recruited through the Puerto Rico Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry and were classified according to Amsterdam and Bethesda clinical guidelines. For those tumors with lack of expression of MMR protein, gene sequencing was ordered. A total of 35 individuals with deficient MMR system were identified: 22 had MMR mutations and 13 had tumors with absent MMR protein expression. Our results show that the mutation spectrum of Caribbean Hispanic LS patients was composed mostly of MSH2 (66.7%) mutations, followed by MLH1 (25.0%). One mutation was identified in MSH6 (8.3%). A previously unidentified mutation in MLH1 gene c.2044_2045del was found in one Caribbean Hispanic family. MMR mutation-positive individuals were found to be more likely to have a prominent family history of CRC and tumors located at the proximal colon. Compared to MSH2 mutation carriers, MLH1 mutation-positive individuals were more likely to have a strong family history of CRC and LS associated cancers. Furthermore, insurance coverage for genetic testing was found to be limited in the study population with 65.1% of the individuals recruited were denied coverage. This report presents the first description of the mutation spectrum and clinicopathologic characteristics of LS Caribbean Hispanics patients.

  4. Characteristics, clinical outcome, and prognostic significance of IDH mutations in AML.

    PubMed

    DiNardo, Courtney D; Ravandi, Farhad; Agresta, Sam; Konopleva, Marina; Takahashi, Koichi; Kadia, Tapan; Routbort, Mark; Patel, Keyur P; Mark Brandt; Pierce, Sherry; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2015-08-01

    The pathophysiology of IDH mutations in tumorigenesis is increasingly described, yet the prognostic significance of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in AML remains controversial. The primary objective of this study was to define the natural history and prognosis of patients with AML and IDH1 or IDH2 mutations and provide historical survival expectations. A total of 826 patients treated from 2010 to 2014 at a single institution were evaluated, including 167 patients (20%) with AML and IDH1 or IDH2 mutations. Median age was 62 years (range 18-92). There were 59 IDH1-R132, 83 IDH2-R140, and 23 IDH2-R172 mutations. Clinicopathologic characteristics associated with IDH-mutations included older age, less frequent therapy-related status, and increased incidence of intermediate-risk cytogenetics, FLT3-ITD mutations, and NPM1 mutations. Remission rates (CR/CRi) by AML treatment status were: induction, 68%; Salvage-1 (S1), 42%; and Salvage-2 and beyond (S2+), 27%. No difference in response was identified by IDH mutation status. Similarly, overall survival (OS) was not dependent on IDH status within any cohort. The median OS was 15.4 months in induction, 8.7 months in S1, and 4.8 months in S2+. This analysis defines the clinical outcome associated with IDH-mutations in both the front-line and salvage AML treatment settings, and confirms that response rate and OS for both IDH-mutated and IDH wild-type AML patients is comparable. This provides contemporary data to be used for comparison with results of novel investigational (e.g., selective IDH inhibitor) strategies.

  5. NF1-mutated melanoma tumors harbor distinct clinical and biological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cirenajwis, Helena; Lauss, Martin; Ekedahl, Henrik; Törngren, Therese; Kvist, Anders; Saal, Lao H; Olsson, Håkan; Staaf, Johan; Carneiro, Ana; Ingvar, Christian; Harbst, Katja; Hayward, Nicholas K; Jönsson, Göran

    2017-03-07

    In general, melanoma can be considered as a UV-driven disease with an aggressive metastatic course and high mutational load, with only few tumors (acral, mucosal, and uveal melanomas) not induced by sunlight and possessing a lower mutational load. The most commonly activated pathway in melanoma is the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. However, the prognostic significance of mutational stratification is unclear and needs further investigation. Here, in silico we combined mutation data from 162 melanomas subjected to targeted deep sequencing with mutation data from three published studies. Tumors from 870 patients were grouped according to BRAF, RAS, NF1 mutation or triple-wild-type status and correlated with tumor and patient characteristics. We found that the NF1-mutated subtype had a higher mutational burden and strongest UV mutation signature. Searching for co-occurring mutated genes revealed the RASopathy genes PTPN11 and RASA2, as well as another RAS domain-containing gene RASSF2 enriched in the NF1 subtype after adjustment for mutational burden. We found that a larger proportion of the NF1-mutant tumors were from males and with older age at diagnosis. Importantly, we found an increased risk of death from melanoma (disease-specific survival, DSS; HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.21-3.10; P = 0.046) and poor overall survival (OS; HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.28-2.98; P = 0.01) in the NF1 subtype, which remained significant after adjustment for age, gender, and lesion type (DSS P = 0.03, OS P = 0.06, respectively). Melanoma genomic subtypes display different biological and clinical characteristics. The poor outcome observed in the NF1 subtype highlights the need for improved characterization of this group.

  6. Correlation of IL36RN mutation with different clinical features of pustular psoriasis in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-Shun; Chiu, Hsien-Yi; Hong, Jin-Bong; Chan, Chih-Chieh; Lin, Sung-Jan; Tsai, Tsen-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Different studies have reported various values for the percentage of patients with IL36RN mutations, and it has also been reported that the sites of these mutations differ among different ethnicities. The current study was a cross-sectional study conducted to investigate the risk factors predicting IL36RN mutation in Chinese patients with different clinical features of pustular psoriasis. 57 Han Chinese patients, including 32 with generalized pustular psoriasis, 14 with palmoplantar pustulosis, 9 with plaque-type psoriasis with pustules, and 2 with erythrodermic psoriasis, were enrolled between March 2013 and July 2014. Blood samples were collected, genomic DNA was extracted from leukocytes, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based Sanger sequencing was used to analyze the coding exons and flanking introns of the IL36RN gene. The patients with generalized pustular psoriasis exhibited the highest IL36RN mutation rate (75 %) among the aforementioned patient types, with the subgroup consisting of those patients who had features of acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau exhibiting the highest c.115+6T>C mutation rate (93.8 %). In addition, early onset, ever generalized pustular psoriasis (more than two attacks), ever acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau, inverse psoriasis, and a family history of pustular psoriasis were associated with IL36RN mutation. The c.115+6T>C mutation was the most common and the most important variant in all subtypes of pustular psoriasis with IL36RN mutations among our sample of Chinese patients.

  7. The prevalence of CTNNB1 mutations in primary aldosteronism and consequences for clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Vin-Cent; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Chueh, Shih-Chieh Jeff; Yang, Shao-Yu; Huang, Kuo-How; Lin, Yen-Hung; Wang, Jian-Jhong; Connolly, Rory; Hu, Ya-Hui; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.; Peng, Kang-Yung; Wu, Kwan-Dun

    2017-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the Wnt pathway/β-catenin signaling may be important in aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). However, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the prevalence and clinical outcomes after adrenalectomy in APA patients harboring CTNNB1 mutations. The molecular expression of CYP11B2 and gonadal receptors in adenomas were also explored. Adenomas from 219 APA patients (95 men; 44.2%; aged 50.5 ± 11.9 years) showed a high rate of somatic mutations (n = 128, 58.4%). The majority of them harbored KCNJ5 mutations (n = 116, 52.9%); 8 patients (3.7%, 6 women) had CTNNB1 mutations. Patients with APAs harboring CTNNB1 mutations were older and had shorter duration of hypertension. After adrenalectomy, CTNNB1 mutation carriers had a higher possibility (87.5%) of residual hypertension than other APA patients. APAs harboring CTNNB1 mutations have heterogeneous staining of β-catenin and variable expression of gonadal receptors and both CYP11B1 and CYP11B2. This suggests that CTNNB1 mutations may be more related to tumorigenesis rather than excessive aldosterone production. PMID:28102204

  8. Association of SMAD4 mutation with patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and clinical outcomes in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarshekeh, Amir Mehrvarz; Advani, Shailesh; Overman, Michael J.; Manyam, Ganiraju; Kee, Bryan K.; Fogelman, David R.; Dasari, Arvind; Raghav, Kanwal; Vilar, Eduardo; Manuel, Shanequa; Shureiqi, Imad; Wolff, Robert A.; Patel, Keyur P.; Luthra, Raja; Shaw, Kenna; Eng, Cathy; Maru, Dipen M.; Routbort, Mark J.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2017-01-01

    SMAD4 is an essential mediator in the transforming growth factor-β pathway. Sporadic mutations of SMAD4 are present in 2.1–20.0% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) but data are limited. In this study, we aimed to evaluate clinicopathologic characteristics, prognosis, and clinical outcome associated with this mutation in CRC cases. Data for patients with metastatic or unresectable CRC who underwent genotyping for SMAD4 mutation and received treatment at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center from 2000 to 2014 were reviewed. Their tumors were sequenced using a hotspot panel predicted to cover 80% of the reported SMAD4 mutations, and further targeted resequencing that included full-length SMAD4 was performed on mutated tumors using a HiSeq sequencing system. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas data on CRC, the characteristics of SMAD4 and transforming growth factor-β pathway mutations were evaluated according to different consensus molecular subtypes of CRC. Among 734 patients with CRC, 90 (12%) had SMAD4 mutations according to hotspot testing. SMAD4 mutation was associated with colon cancer more so than with rectal cancer (odds ratio 2.85; p<0.001), female sex (odds ratio 1.71; p = 0.02), and shorter overall survival than in wild-type SMAD4 cases (median, 29 months versus 56 months; hazard ratio 2.08; p<0.001 [log-rank test]). SMAD4 mutation was not associated with age, stage at presentation, colonic location, distant metastasis, or tumor grade. A subset of patients with metastatic CRC (n = 44) wild-type for KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF who received anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy with mutated SMAD4 (n = 13) had shorter progression-free survival duration than did patients wild-type for SMAD4 (n = 31) (median, 111 days versus 180 days; p = 0.003 [log-rank test]). Full-length sequencing confirmed that missense mutations at R361 and P356 in the MH2 domain were the most common SMAD4 alterations. In The Cancer Genome Atlas data, SMAD4 mutation frequently occurred

  9. Clinically Relevant Transmitted Drug Resistance to First Line Antiretroviral Drugs and Implications for Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Monge, Susana; Guillot, Vicente; Alvarez, Marta; Chueca, Natalia; Stella, Natalia; Peña, Alejandro; Delgado, Rafael; Córdoba, Juan; Aguilera, Antonio; Vidal, Carmen; García, Federico; CoRIS

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim was to analyse trends in clinically relevant resistance to first-line antiretroviral drugs in Spain, applying the Stanford algorithm, and to compare these results with reported Transmitted Drug Resistance (TDR) defined by the 2009 update of the WHO SDRM list. Methods We analysed 2781 sequences from ARV naive patients of the CoRIS cohort (Spain) between 2007–2011. Using the Stanford algorithm “Low-level resistance”, “Intermediate resistance” and “High-level resistance” categories were considered as “Resistant”. Results 70% of the TDR found using the WHO list were relevant for first-line treatment according to the Stanford algorithm. A total of 188 patients showed clinically relevant resistance to first-line ARVs [6.8% (95%Confidence Interval: 5.8–7.7)], and 221 harbored TDR using the WHO list [7.9% (6.9–9.0)]. Differences were due to a lower prevalence in clinically relevant resistance for NRTIs [2.3% (1.8–2.9) vs. 3.6% (2.9–4.3) by the WHO list] and PIs [0.8% (0.4–1.1) vs. 1.7% (1.2–2.2)], while it was higher for NNRTIs [4.6% (3.8–5.3) vs. 3.7% (3.0–4.7)]. While TDR remained stable throughout the study period, clinically relevant resistance to first line drugs showed a significant trend to a decline (p = 0.02). Conclusions Prevalence of clinically relevant resistance to first line ARVs in Spain is decreasing, and lower than the one expected looking at TDR using the WHO list. Resistance to first-line PIs falls below 1%, so the recommendation of screening for TDR in the protease gene should be questioned in our setting. Cost-effectiveness studies need to be carried out to inform evidence-based recommendations. PMID:24637804

  10. Clinical manipulation of mineral trioxide aggregate: lessons from the construction industry and their relevance to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ha, William N; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence J

    2015-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is based on ordinary Portland cement (with added radiopaque agents) and, thus, shares many of its features. Although MTA is reported to be difficult to handle clinically, concrete materials made using Portland cement are the foundation of the construction industry. In this paper, we summarize important lessons from the construction literature that are relevant to the successful use of MTA in clinical practice, including behaviour during storage, susceptibility to acidic environments, the effects of exposure of the setting material to moisture and interactions with substances that may interfere with the speed of setting and the quality of the end product.

  11. Distal arthrogryposis with variable clinical expression caused by TNNI2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Čulić, Vida; Miyake, Noriko; Janković, Sunčana; Petrović, Davor; Šimunović, Marko; Đapić, Tomislav; Shiina, Masaaki; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-01-01

    Distal arthrogryposis (DA) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder with multiple joint contractures. We describe a female DA patient with hand and foot deformities, and right-sided torticollis. Using exome sequencing, we identified a novel TNNI2 mutation (c.485>A, p.Arg162Lys) in the patient and her father. The father has no typical DA but hip dysplasia. This may explain the clinical features of DA2B in this family, but with variable clinical expression. PMID:27790376

  12. High throughput estimation of functional cell activities reveals disease mechanisms and predicts relevant clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Marta R; Cubuk, Cankut; Amadoz, Alicia; Salavert, Francisco; Carbonell-Caballero, José; Dopazo, Joaquin

    2017-01-17

    Understanding the aspects of the cell functionality that account for disease or drug action mechanisms is a main challenge for precision medicine. Here we propose a new method that models cell signaling using biological knowledge on signal transduction. The method recodes individual gene expression values (and/or gene mutations) into accurate measurements of changes in the activity of signaling circuits, which ultimately constitute high-throughput estimations of cell functionalities caused by gene activity within the pathway. Moreover, such estimations can be obtained either at cohort-level, in case/control comparisons, or personalized for individual patients. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated in an extensive analysis involving 5640 patients from 12 different cancer types. Circuit activity measurements not only have a high diagnostic value but also can be related to relevant disease outcomes such as survival, and can be used to assess therapeutic interventions.

  13. Minimal residual disease detection in mantle cell lymphoma: technical aspects and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Pott, Christiane

    2011-07-01

    The prognostic impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) has been demonstrated for several hematologic malignancies. While in acute lymphoblastic leukemias MRD assessment by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods has been established as an important tool for clinical risk assessment and is part of clinical management, data demonstrating a prognostic value of MRD in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) were sparse and results from randomized trials have been published only recently. In the present review technical aspects of different MRD detection methods are discussed, as well as the prognostic relevance of MRD in the context of clinical trials in patients with MCL. Furthermore, recommendations are given for workflow and useful implication of MRD in future clinical trials design.

  14. Clinically Relevant Physical Benefits of Exercise Interventions in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Amy A; Bland, Kelcey A; Sayyari, Sarah; Campbell, Kristin L; Davis, Margot K

    2016-02-01

    Evidence is currently limited for the effect of exercise on breast cancer clinical outcomes. However, several of the reported physical benefits of exercise, including peak oxygen consumption, functional capacity, muscle strength and lean mass, cardiovascular risk factors, and bone health, have established associations with disability, cardiovascular disease risk, morbidity, and mortality. This review will summarize the clinically relevant physical benefits of exercise interventions in breast cancer survivors and discuss recommendations for achieving these benefits. It will also describe potential differences in intervention delivery that may impact outcomes and, lastly, describe current physical activity guidelines for cancer survivors.

  15. Taijin Kyofusho and Social Anxiety and Their Clinical Relevance in Indonesia and Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Vriends, N.; Pfaltz, M. C.; Novianti, P.; Hadiyono, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Taijin Kyofusho Scale (TKS) is an interpersonal fear to offend others and is defined by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) as a culturally bound syndrome that occurs in Japan and Korea. Recently, cases with TKS have also been recognized in other cultures. The present questionnaire study investigated self-report TKS symptoms and social anxiety symptoms, and their clinical relevance in an Indonesian and Swiss sample. It also investigated whether self-construal is associated with TKS and social anxiety, and if self-construal is a mediator of the expected association between cultural background and social anxiety and TKS symptoms. Method: 311 Indonesian and 349 Swiss university students filled out the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, the Taijin Kyofusho Scale, the Self-Construal Scale, self-report social phobia DSM-IV criteria, and rated their wish for professional help to deal with social fears. Results: TKS and social anxiety symptoms were higher in the Indonesian than the Swiss sample. TKS symptoms were associated with clinical relevance in Indonesia, whereas in Switzerland only social anxiety symptoms were associated with clinical relevance. Independent self-construal was negatively associated and interdependent self-construal was positively associated with TKS and social anxiety symptoms. Interdependent self-construal mediated the association between cultural background and these symptoms. Discussion: TKS might be a clinically relevant syndrome in all individuals or cultures with an interdependent self-construal or less independent self-construal. The proposal to include the fear of offending others in the DSM-V criteria of social phobia is supported by the present findings. PMID:23382720

  16. Clinical relevance of cyclic GMP modulators: A translational success story of network pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Oettrich, J M; Dao, V T; Frijhoff, J; Kleikers, Pwm; Casas, A I; Hobbs, A J; Schmidt, H H H W

    2016-04-01

    Therapies that modulate cyclic guanosine-3'-5'-monophosphate (cGMP) have emerged as one of the most successful areas in recent drug discovery and clinical pharmacology. Historically, their focus has been on cardiovascular disease phenotypes; however, cGMP's relevance is likely to go beyond this rather limited organ-based set of indications. Moreover, the multitude of targets and their apparent interchangeability is a proof-of-concept of network pharmacology.

  17. Germline TP53 Mutation and Clinical Characteristics of Korean Patients With Li-Fraumeni Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoung-Jin; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known of the mutation and tumor spectrum of Korean patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). Owing to the rarity of LFS, few cases have been reported in Korea thus far. This study aimed to retrospectively review the mutations and clinical characteristics of Korean patients with LFS. Methods TP53 mutation was screened in 89 unrelated individuals at the Samsung Medical Center in Korea, from 2004 to 2015. Six additional mutation carriers were obtained from the literature. Results We identified nine different mutations in 14 Korean patients (male to female ratio=0.3:1). Two such frameshift mutations (p.Pro98Leufs*25, p.Pro27Leufs*17) were novel. The recurrent mutations were located at codons 31 (n=2; p.Val31Ile), 175 (n=3; p.Arg175His), and 273 (n=4; p.Arg273His and p.Arg273Cys). The median age at the first tumor onset was 25 yr. Ten patients (71%) developed multiple primary tumors. A diverse spectrum of tumors was observed, including breast (n=6), osteosarcoma (n=4), brain (n=4), leukemia (n=2), stomach (n=2), thyroid (n=2), lung (n=2), skin (n=2), bladder (n=1), nasal cavity cancer (n=1), and adrenocortical carcinoma (n=1). Conclusions There was considerable heterogeneity in the TP53 mutations and tumor spectrum in Korean patients with LFS. Our results suggest shared and different LFS characteristics between Caucasian and Korean patients. This is the first report on the mutation spectrum and clinical characteristics from the largest series of Korean LFS patients. PMID:27374712

  18. Mutations in chromatin regulators functionally link Cornelia de Lange syndrome and clinically overlapping phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Parenti, Ilaria; Teresa-Rodrigo, María E; Pozojevic, Jelena; Ruiz Gil, Sara; Bader, Ingrid; Braunholz, Diana; Bramswig, Nuria C; Gervasini, Cristina; Larizza, Lidia; Pfeiffer, Lutz; Ozkinay, Ferda; Ramos, Feliciano; Reiz, Benedikt; Rittinger, Olaf; Strom, Tim M; Watrin, Erwan; Wendt, Kerstin; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wollnik, Bernd; Baquero-Montoya, Carolina; Pié, Juan; Deardorff, Matthew A; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Kaiser, Frank J

    2017-03-01

    The coordinated tissue-specific regulation of gene expression is essential for the proper development of all organisms. Mutations in multiple transcriptional regulators cause a group of neurodevelopmental disorders termed "transcriptomopathies" that share core phenotypical features including growth retardation, developmental delay, intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism. Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) belongs to this class of disorders and is caused by mutations in different subunits or regulators of the cohesin complex. Herein, we report on the clinical and molecular characterization of seven patients with features overlapping with CdLS who were found to carry mutations in chromatin regulators previously associated to other neurodevelopmental disorders that are frequently considered in the differential diagnosis of CdLS. The identified mutations affect the methyltransferase-encoding genes KMT2A and SETD5 and different subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. Complementary to this, a patient with Coffin-Siris syndrome was found to carry a missense substitution in NIPBL. Our findings indicate that mutations in a variety of chromatin-associated factors result in overlapping clinical phenotypes, underscoring the genetic heterogeneity that should be considered when assessing the clinical and molecular diagnosis of neurodevelopmental syndromes. It is clear that emerging molecular mechanisms of chromatin dysregulation are central to understanding the pathogenesis of these clinically overlapping genetic disorders.

  19. Interference of cationic polymeric nanoparticles with clinical chemistry tests--clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Shcharbin, Dzmitry; Shcharbina, Natallia; Milowska, Katarzyna; de la Mata, Francisco Javier; Muñoz-Fernandez, Maria Angeles; Mignani, Serge; Gomez-Ramirez, Rafael; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Bryszewska, Maria

    2014-10-01

    The development of medical nanosystems requires knowledge of their behavior in vivo. Clinical chemistry tests are widely used to estimate the systemic toxicity of nanoparticles. In this paper we have explored the impact of small positively charged nanoparticles-poly(amidoamine), phosphorous and carbosilane dendrimers - on biochemical parameters of standardized serum in vitro. All the dendrimers could shift the main biochemical parameters. Thus, in the case of patients having the normal, but 'boundary', values of biochemical parameters, nanoparticle-induced changes can be wrongly interpreted as evidence of some dysfunctions (hepatic, renal, etc.). Moreover, the effects of nanoparticles of metals, carbon nanotubes, quantum dots, fullerenes, dendrimers having been sized up to 4000 nm and the hundreds of reactive groups, can be significantly higher. Thus, preliminary evaluation of any nanomaterial in vitro is required in clinical chemistry tests before its application in vivo to draw the correct conclusions and benefit animals.

  20. Using mixed methods to identify and answer clinically relevant research questions.

    PubMed

    Shneerson, Catherine L; Gale, Nicola K

    2015-06-01

    The need for mixed methods research in answering health care questions is becoming increasingly recognized because of the complexity of factors that affect health outcomes. In this article, we argue for the value of using a qualitatively driven mixed method approach for identifying and answering clinically relevant research questions. This argument is illustrated by findings from a study on the self-management practices of cancer survivors and the exploration of one particular clinically relevant finding about higher uptake of self-management in cancer survivors who had received chemotherapy treatment compared with those who have not. A cross-sectional study generated findings that formed the basis for the qualitative study, by informing the purposive sampling strategy and generating new qualitative research questions. Using a quantitative research component to supplement a qualitative study can enhance the generalizability and clinical relevance of the findings and produce detailed, contextualized, and rich answers to research questions that would be unachievable through quantitative or qualitative methods alone.

  1. Establishing a clinically relevant cutoff to the Dependency Scale from the dimensional clinical personality inventory.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Lucas de F; Pianowski, Giselle; Filho, Nelson H

    2017-02-03

    The Clinical Dimensional Personality Inventory (IDCP) is a 163-item self-report tool developed for the assessment of 12 dimensions of personality pathology. One of the scales comprising the instrument-the Dependency scale-is intended to provide psychometric information on traits closely related to the Dependent Personality Disorder (DPD). In the present study, we used both Item Response Theory modeling and Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis to establishing a clinically meaningful cutoff for the IDCP Dependency Scale. Participants were 2.481 adults, comprised by outpatients diagnosed with DPD, outpatients diagnosed with other PDs, and adults from the general population. The Wright's item map graphing technique revealed that outpatients were located at the very high levels in the latent scale continuum of the Dependency Scale, with a very large effect size for the mean difference between patients and non-patients. The ROC curve analysis supported a cutoff at 2.3 points in the Dependency Scale, which yielded 0.86 of sensitivity and 0.79 of specificity. Findings from the present investigation suggest the IDCP Dependency Scale is useful as a screening tool of the core features of the DPD. We address potential clinical applications for the instrument, and discuss limitations from the present study.

  2. Advanced Multi-Axis Spine Testing: Clinical Relevance and Research Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Holsgrove, Timothy P.; Nayak, Nikhil R.; Welch, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Back pain and spinal degeneration affect a large proportion of the general population. The economic burden of spinal degeneration is significant, and the treatment of spinal degeneration represents a large proportion of healthcare costs. However, spinal surgery does not always provide improved clinical outcomes compared to non-surgical alternatives, and modern interventions, such as total disc replacement, may not offer clinically relevant improvements over more established procedures. Although psychological and socioeconomic factors play an important role in the development and response to back pain, the variation in clinical success is also related to the complexity of the spine, and the multi-faceted manner by which spinal degeneration often occurs. The successful surgical treatment of degenerative spinal conditions requires collaboration between surgeons, engineers, and scientists in order to provide a multi-disciplinary approach to managing the complete condition. In this review, we provide relevant background from both the clinical and the basic research perspectives, which is synthesized into several examples and recommendations for consideration in increasing translational research between communities with the goal of providing improved knowledge and care. Current clinical imaging, and multi-axis testing machines, offer great promise for future research by combining invivo kinematics and loading with in-vitro testing in six degrees of freedom to offer more accurate predictions of the performance of new spinal instrumentation. Upon synthesis of the literature, it is recommended that in-vitro tests strive to recreate as many aspects of the in-vivo environment as possible, and that a physiological preload is a critical factor in assessing spinal biomechanics in the laboratory. A greater link between surgical procedures, and the outcomes in all three anatomical planes should be considered in both the in-vivo and in-vitro settings, to provide data relevant to

  3. Mutations in the UL97 ORF of ganciclovir-resistant clinical cytomegalovirus isolates differentially affect GCV phosphorylation as determined in a recombinant vaccinia virus system.

    PubMed

    Baldanti, Fausto; Michel, Detlef; Simoncini, Lavinia; Heuschmid, Maria; Zimmermann, Albert; Minisini, Rosalba; Schaarschmidt, Peter; Schmid, Thomas; Gerna, Giuseppe; Mertens, Thomas

    2002-04-01

    Mutations in the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL97 phosphotransferase have been associated with ganciclovir (GCV) resistance due to an impairment of GCV monophosphorylation. Vaccinia virus recombinants (rVV) were generated that encoded different HCMV UL97 proteins (pUL97) with mutations previously detected in resistant HCMV clinical isolates at codons 460, 520, 592, 594, 595, 598 and 607. These rVVs allowed quantification of GCV phosphorylation catalyzed by the different mutated pUL97s. When compared to rVV-UL97 wild type, mean levels of residual intracellular GCV phosphorylation differed by a factor of 10 for the mutated UL97 proteins ranging from 5.2 to 51.8%. Mutations M460V (located in a UL97 region homologous to domain VIb of protein kinases) and H520Q (located in a cytomegalovirus-specific, functionally critical domain) were responsible for the lowest levels of residual GCV phosphorylation (9.3 and 5.2%). Mutations in a region homologous to the domain IX had a lower impact on GCV phosphorylation (15.8-51.8%). The relevance of pUL97 mutation G598S in inducing GCV resistance was demonstrated for the first time.

  4. Clinical and genetic analyses reveal novel pathogenic ABCA4 mutations in Stargardt disease families

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bing; Cai, Xue-Bi; Zheng, Zhi-Li; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Qu, Jia; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1) is a juvenile macular degeneration predominantly inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, characterized by decreased central vision in the first 2 decades of life. The condition has a genetic basis due to mutation in the ABCA4 gene, and arises from the deposition of lipofuscin-like substance in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) with secondary photoreceptor cell death. In this study, we describe the clinical and genetic features of Stargardt patients from four unrelated Chinese cohorts. The targeted exome sequencing (TES) was carried out in four clinically confirmed patients and their family members using a gene panel comprising 164 known causative inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD) genes. Genetic analysis revealed eight ABCA4 mutations in all of the four pedigrees, including six mutations in coding exons and two mutations in adjacent intronic areas. All the affected individuals showed typical manifestations consistent with the disease phenotype. We disclose two novel ABCA4 mutations in Chinese patients with STGD disease, which will expand the existing spectrum of disease-causing variants and will further aid in the future mutation screening and genetic counseling, as well as in the understanding of phenotypic and genotypic correlations. PMID:27739528

  5. Clinical features and a mutation with late onset of limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Aoki, Masashi; Suzuki, Naoki; Tateyama, Maki; Yaginuma, Chikako; Sato, Hitomi; Hayasaka, Miho; Sugawara, Hitomi; Ito, Mariko; Abe-Kondo, Emi; Shimakura, Naoko; Ibi, Tohru; Kuru, Satoshi; Wakayama, Tadashi; Sobue, Gen; Fujii, Naoki; Saito, Toshio; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Funakawa, Itaru; Mukai, Eiichiro; Kawanami, Toru; Morita, Mitsuya; Yamazaki, Mineo; Hasegawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji; Kuzuhara, Shigeki; Tanaka, Hiroyasu; Yoshioka, Masaru; Konno, Hidehiko; Onodera, Hiroshi; Itoyama, Yasuto

    2013-01-01

    Objective and methods Dysferlin encoded by DYSF deficiency leads to two main phenotypes, limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2B and Miyoshi myopathy. To reveal in detail the mutational and clinical features of LGMD2B in Japan, we observed 40 Japanese patients in 36 families with LGMD2B in whom dysferlin mutations were confirmed. Results and conclusions Three mutations (c.1566C>G, c.2997G>T and c.4497delT) were relatively more prevalent. The c.2997G>T mutation was associated with late onset, proximal dominant forms of dysferlinopathy, a high probability that muscle weakness started in an upper limb and lower serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. The clinical features of LGMD2B are as follows: (1) onset in the late teens or early adulthood, except patients homozygous for the c.2997G>T mutation; (2) lower limb weakness at onset; (3) distal change of lower limbs on muscle CT at an early stage; (4) impairment of lumbar erector spinal muscles on muscle CT at an early stage; (5) predominant involvement of proximal upper limbs; (6) preservation of function of the hands at late stage; (7) preservation of strength in neck muscles at late stage; (8) lack of facial weakness or dysphagia; (9) avoidance of scoliosis; (10) hyper-Ckaemia; (11) preservation of cardiac function; and (12) a tendency for respiratory function to decline with disease duration. It is important that the late onset phenotype is found with prevalent mutations. PMID:23243261

  6. Breast cancer risk and clinical implications for germline PTEN mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ngeow, Joanne; Sesock, Kaitlin; Eng, Charis

    2015-12-23

    PTEN Hamartoma Tumor syndrome (PHTS) encompasses a clinical spectrum of heritable disorders including Cowden syndrome (CS), Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, and Proteus and Proteus-like syndrome that are associated with germline mutations in the PTEN tumor suppressor gene. Breast cancer risk estimates (67-85 %) for women with germline PTEN mutations are similar to those quoted for patients with germline mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes. With PTEN on several germline gene testing panels, finding PTEN mutations and variants have increased exponentially. PHTS can be differentiated from other hereditary cancer syndromes including Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, and hamartomatous polyposis syndromes based on personal as well as family history. However, many of the benign features of CS are common in the general population, making the diagnosis of CS challenging. Breast cancer patients with an identified germline PTEN mutation are at increased risk of endometrial, thyroid, renal, and colorectal cancers as well as a second breast cancer. Increased screening for the various component cancers as well as predictive testing in first-degree relatives is recommended. Prophylactic mastectomy may be considered especially if breast tissue is dense or if repeated breast biopsies have been necessary. Management of women with breast cancer suspected of CS who test negative for germline PTEN mutations should be managed as per a mutation carrier if she meets CS diagnostic criteria, and should be offered enrollment in research to identify other predisposition genes.

  7. Deep intronic KRIT1 mutation in a family with clinically silent multiple cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Riant, F; Odent, S; Cecillon, M; Pasquier, L; de Baracé, C; Carney, M P; Tournier-Lasserve, E

    2014-12-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607 and CCM3/PDCD10 genes are identified in the vast majority of familial cases with multiple cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). However, genomic DNA sequencing combined to large rearrangement screening fails to detect a mutation in 5% of those cases. We report a family in which CCM lesions were discovered fortuitously because of the investigation of a developmental delay in a boy. Three members of the family on three generations had typical multiple CCM lesions and no clinical signs related to CCM. No mutation was detected using genomic DNA sequencing and quantitative multiplex PCR of short fluorescent fragments (QMPSF). cDNA sequencing showed a 99-nucleotide insertion between exons 5 and 6 of CCM1, resulting from a mutation located deep into intron 5 (c.262+132_262+133del) that activates a cryptic splice site. This pseudoexon leads to a premature stop codon. These data highly suggest that deep intronic mutations explain part of the incomplete mutation detection rate in CCM patients and underline the importance of analyzing the cDNA to provide comprehensive CCM diagnostic tests. This kind of mutation may be responsible for apparent sporadic presentations due to a reduced penetrance.

  8. Beyond BRAF(V600): clinical mutation panel testing by next-generation sequencing in advanced melanoma.

    PubMed

    Siroy, Alan E; Boland, Genevieve M; Milton, Denái R; Roszik, Jason; Frankian, Silva; Malke, Jared; Haydu, Lauren; Prieto, Victor G; Tetzlaff, Michael; Ivan, Doina; Wang, Wei-Lien; Torres-Cabala, Carlos; Curry, Jonathan; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Broaddus, Russell; Rashid, Asif; Stewart, John; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Amaria, Rodabe N; Patel, Sapna P; Papadopoulos, Nicholas E; Bedikian, Agop; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Hwu, Patrick; Diab, Adi; Woodman, Scott E; Aldape, Kenneth D; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Patel, Keyur P; Shaw, Kenna R; Mills, Gordon B; Mendelsohn, John; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Kim, Kevin B; Routbort, Mark J; Lazar, Alexander J; Davies, Michael A

    2015-02-01

    The management of melanoma has evolved owing to improved understanding of its molecular drivers. To augment the current understanding of the prevalence, patterns, and associations of mutations in this disease, the results of clinical testing of 699 advanced melanoma patients using a pan-cancer next-generation sequencing (NGS) panel of hotspot regions in 46 genes were reviewed. Mutations were identified in 43 of the 46 genes on the panel. The most common mutations were BRAFV600 (36%), NRAS (21%), TP53 (16%), BRAFNon-V600 (6%), and KIT (4%). Approximately one-third of melanomas had >1 mutation detected, and the number of mutations per tumor was associated with melanoma subtype. Concurrent TP53 mutations were the most frequent events in tumors with BRAFV600 and NRAS mutations. Melanomas with BRAFNon-V600mutations frequently harbored concurrent NRAS mutations (18%), which were rare in tumors with BRAFV600 mutations (1.6%). The prevalence of BRAFV600 and KIT mutations were significantly associated with melanoma subtypes, and BRAFV600 and TP53 mutations were significantly associated with cutaneous primary tumor location. Multiple potential therapeutic targets were identified in metastatic unknown primary and cutaneous melanomas that lacked BRAFV600 and NRAS mutations. These results enrich our understanding of the patterns and clinical associations of oncogenic mutations in melanoma.

  9. Impairment of cocaine-mediated behaviours in mice by clinically relevant Ras-ERK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Papale, Alessandro; Morella, Ilaria Maria; Indrigo, Marzia Tina; Bernardi, Rick Eugene; Marrone, Livia; Marchisella, Francesca; Brancale, Andrea; Spanagel, Rainer; Brambilla, Riccardo; Fasano, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Ras-ERK signalling in the brain plays a central role in drug addiction. However, to date, no clinically relevant inhibitor of this cascade has been tested in experimental models of addiction, a necessary step toward clinical trials. We designed two new cell-penetrating peptides - RB1 and RB3 - that penetrate the brain and, in the micromolar range, inhibit phosphorylation of ERK, histone H3 and S6 ribosomal protein in striatal slices. Furthermore, a screening of small therapeutics currently in clinical trials for cancer therapy revealed PD325901 as a brain-penetrating drug that blocks ERK signalling in the nanomolar range. All three compounds have an inhibitory effect on cocaine-induced ERK activation and reward in mice. In particular, PD325901 persistently blocks cocaine-induced place preference and accelerates extinction following cocaine self-administration. Thus, clinically relevant, systemically administered drugs that attenuate Ras-ERK signalling in the brain may be valuable tools for the treatment of cocaine addiction. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17111.001 PMID:27557444

  10. Clinical significance of acquired somatic mutations in aplastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J C W; Mufti, G J

    2016-08-01

    Aplastic anaemia (AA) is frequently associated with other disorders of clonal haemopoiesis such as paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and T-large granular lymphocytosis. Certain clones may escape the immune attack within the bone marrow environment and proliferate and attain a survival advantage over normal haemopoietic stem cells, such as trisomy 8, loss of heterozygosity of short arm of chromosome 6 and del13q clones. Recently acquired somatic mutations (SM), excluding PNH clones, have been reported in around 20-25 % of patients with AA, which predispose to a higher risk of later malignant transformation to MDS/acute myeloid leukaemia. Furthermore, certain SM, such as ASXL1 and DNMT3A are associated with poor survival following immunosuppressive therapy, whereas PIGA, BCOR/BCORL1 predict for good response and survival. Further detailed and serial analysis of the immune signature in AA is needed to understand the pathogenetic basis for the presence of clones with SM in a significant proportion of patients.

  11. Clinical and Pathological Heterogeneity of Korean Patients with CAPN3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyung Jun; Jang, Hoon; Lee, Jung Hwan; Shin, Ha Young; Cho, Sung-Rae; Park, Kee Duk; Bang, Duhee; Lee, Min Goo; Kim, Seung Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to investigate the characteristics of Korean patients with calpainopathy. Materials and Methods Thirteen patients from ten unrelated families were diagnosed with calpainopathy via direct or targeted sequencing of the CAPN3 gene. Clinical, mutational, and pathological spectra were then analyzed. Results Nine different mutations, including four novel mutations (NM_000070: c.1524+1G>T, c.1789_1790inA, c.2184+1G>T, and c.2384C>T) were identified. The median age at symptom onset was 22 (interquartile range: 15-28). Common clinical findings were joint contracture in nine patients, winged scapula in four, and lordosis in one. However, we also found highly variable clinical features including early onset joint contractures, asymptomatic hyperCKemia, and heterogeneous clinical severity in three members of the same family. Four of nine muscle specimens revealed lobulated fibers, but three showed normal skeletal muscle histology. Conclusion We identified four novel CAPN3 mutations and demonstrated clinical and pathological heterogeneity in Korean patients with calpainopathy. PMID:26632398

  12. Clinical, neuropathological, and biochemical characterization of the novel tau mutation P332S.

    PubMed

    Deramecourt, Vincent; Lebert, Florence; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-Jose; Dujardin, Simon; Colin, Morvane; Sergeant, Nicolas; Buée-Scherrer, Valérie; Clot, Fabienne; Ber, Isabelle Le; Brice, Alexis; Pasquier, Florence; Buée, Luc

    2012-01-01

    MAPT mutations cause autosomal dominant frontotemporal lobar degeneration. These diseases are characterized by considerable heterogeneity in their clinical, neuropathological, and biochemical presentations. We describe the full characterization of a family with autosomal dominant frontotemporal lobar degeneration caused by a novel MAPT mutation. Clinical, imaging, neuropathological, and biochemical data are presented. The proband was a woman who died at 85 years old, 25 years after the onset of a slowly progressive and isolated anarthria and opercular syndrome. The pathological examination of her brain showed marked atrophy of primary motor and premotor cortices, associated with predominant neuronal tau-positive lesions mimicking Pick bodies. At the biochemical level, the six tau isoforms aggregate to display a pathological triplet at 60, 64, and 69 kDa. Two of her sons presented at 48 and 50 years old with a right temporal variant of frontotemporal degeneration characterized by severe prosopagnosia, semantic impairment, and behavioral modifications. In these three patients, the molecular analysis of MAPT showed the c.1945C>T mutation on exon 11 resulting in the P332S substitution in tau sequence. This mutation changes the PGGG motif of the third repeat domain of the protein and therefore reduces the ability of tau to bind microtubule. From a clinical point of view, this mutation is associated with considerable intrafamilial phenotypic variation.

  13. Retrieving clinically relevant diabetic retinopathy images using a multi-class multiple-instance framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandakkar, Parag S.; Venkatesan, Ragav; Li, Baoxin

    2013-02-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a vision-threatening complication from diabetes mellitus, a medical condition that is rising globally. Unfortunately, many patients are unaware of this complication because of absence of symptoms. Regular screening of DR is necessary to detect the condition for timely treatment. Content-based image retrieval, using archived and diagnosed fundus (retinal) camera DR images can improve screening efficiency of DR. This content-based image retrieval study focuses on two DR clinical findings, microaneurysm and neovascularization, which are clinical signs of non-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The authors propose a multi-class multiple-instance image retrieval framework which deploys a modified color correlogram and statistics of steerable Gaussian Filter responses, for retrieving clinically relevant images from a database of DR fundus image database.

  14. Current strategies and findings in clinically relevant post-translational modification-specific proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, Oliver; Loroch, Stefan; Sickmann, Albert; Zahedi, René P

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has considerably extended our knowledge about the occurrence and dynamics of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). So far, quantitative proteomics has been mainly used to study PTM regulation in cell culture models, providing new insights into the role of aberrant PTM patterns in human disease. However, continuous technological and methodical developments have paved the way for an increasing number of PTM-specific proteomic studies using clinical samples, often limited in sample amount. Thus, quantitative proteomics holds a great potential to discover, validate and accurately quantify biomarkers in body fluids and primary tissues. A major effort will be to improve the complete integration of robust but sensitive proteomics technology to clinical environments. Here, we discuss PTMs that are relevant for clinical research, with a focus on phosphorylation, glycosylation and proteolytic cleavage; furthermore, we give an overview on the current developments and novel findings in mass spectrometry-based PTM research. PMID:25955281

  15. Mutations in the gene for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in patients with different clinical phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.; Ambach, H.; Kammerer, S.; Rolinski, B.; Roscher, A.; Rabl, W.; Stoeckler, S.; Gaertner, J.; Zierz, S.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, the gene for the most common peroxisomal disorder, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), has been described encoding a peroxisomal membrane transporter protein. We analyzed the entire protein-coding sequence of this gene by reverse-transcription PCR, SSCP, and DNA sequencing in five patients with different clinical expressions were cerebral childhood ALD, adrenomyecloneuropathy (AMN), and {open_quotes}Addison disease only{close_quotes} (AD) phenotype. In the three patients exhibiting the classical picture of severe childhood ALD we identified in the 5{prime} portion of the X-ALD gene a 38-bp deletion that causes a frameshift mutation, a 3-bp deletion leading to a deletion of an amino acid in the ATP-binding domain of the ALD protein, and a missense mutation. In the patient with the clinical phenotype of AMN, a nonsense mutation in codon 212, along with a second site mutation at codon 178, was observed. Analysis of the patient with the ADO phenotype revealed a further missense mutation at a highly conserved position in the ALDP/PMP70 comparison. The disruptive nature of two mutations (i.e., the frameshift and the nonsense mutation) in patients with biochemically proved childhood ALD and AMN further strongly supports the hypothesis that alterations in this gene play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of X-ALD. Since the current biochemical techniques for X-ALD carrier detection in affected families lack sufficient reliability, our procedure described for systematic mutation scanning is also capable of improving genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. 19 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Relevance of BRAFV600E Mutation Testing Versus RAS Point Mutations and RET/PTC Rearrangements Evaluation in the Diagnosis of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Martina; Buratto, Mattia; Tagliati, Federico; Rossi, Roberta; Lupo, Sabrina; Trasforini, Giorgio; Lanza, Giovanni; Franceschetti, Paola; Bruni, Stefania; degli Uberti, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    Background: A molecular profile including BRAF and RAS mutations as well as RET/PTC rearrangement evaluation has been proposed to provide an accurate presurgical assessment of thyroid nodules and to reduce the number of unnecessary diagnostic surgeries, sparing patients' health and saving healthcare resources. However, the application of such molecular analyses may provide different results among different centers and populations in real-life settings. Our aims were to evaluate the diagnostic utility of assessing the presence of BRAF and RAS mutations and RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 rearrangements in all cytological categories in an Italian group of thyroid nodule patients assessed prospectively, and to understand whether and which mutation testing might be helpful in cytologically indeterminate nodules. Methods: A total of 911 patients were submitted to ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration biopsy examination. Cytological evaluation was performed in parallel with molecular testing and compared to pathological results in 940 thyroid nodules, including 140 indeterminate lesions. Results: BRAF mutation testing provided the best contribution to cancer diagnosis, allowing the disease to be detected at an early stage, and identifying indeterminate nodules in which diagnostic lobectomy could be spared. On the contrary, RAS and RET/PTC analysis did not further increase diagnostic sensitivity for thyroid cancer. In addition, we found RET/PTC rearrangements in benign lesions, indicating that this molecular marker might not be useful for the detection of thyroid cancer. Conclusion: BRAFV600E mutation analysis is superior to RAS point mutations and evaluation of RET/PTC rearrangements in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer, even in indeterminate lesions. PMID:25333496

  17. Correlation between connexin 32 gene mutations and clinical phenotype in X-linked dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Ionasescu, V.; Ionasescu, R.; Searby, C.

    1996-06-14

    We studied the relationship between the genotype and clinical phenotype in 27 families with dominant X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMTX1) neuropathy. Twenty-two families showed mutations in the coding region of the connexin32 (cx32) gene. The mutations include four nonsense mutations, eight missense mutations, two medium size deletions, and one insertion. Most missense mutations showed a mild clinical phenotype (five out of eight), whereas all nonsense mutations, the larger of the two deletions, and the insertion that produced frameshifts showed severe phenotypes. Five CMTX1 families with mild clinical phenotype showed no point mutations of the cx32 gene coding region. Three of these families showed positive genetic linkage with the markers of the Xq13.1 region. The genetic linkage of the remaining two families could not be evaluated because of their small size. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. The MEFV mutations and their clinical correlations in children with familial Mediterranean fever in southeast Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ece, Aydın; Çakmak, Erdal; Uluca, Ünal; Kelekçi, Selvi; Yolbaş, İlyas; Güneş, Ali; Yel, Servet; Tan, İlhan; Şen, Velat

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene mutations and their clinical correlations in children with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) in southeast Turkey. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of 147 (65 males, 82 females) consecutive children with FMF having a positive MEFV gene mutation were prospectively investigated. Patients with negative MEFV gene mutations or atypical FMF presentations and those from other regions of the country were excluded. Clinical manifestations and disease severity scores were recorded. The six most frequent MEFV mutations including M694V, V726A, R726H, P369S, E148Q and P369S were investigated by a reverse hybridization test method. The median age of study group was 9.0 years, median age at diagnosis was 7.8 years, median age at disease onset was 5.0 years, and median follow-up duration was 4.0 years. A positive family history of FMF and parent-to-offspring transmission was found in 58.5 and 42.2 % of families, respectively. The frequencies of independent alleles, with decreasing order, were E148Q (30.7 %), M694V (26.0 %), R761H (13.5 %), V726A (13.0 %), P369S (10.5 %) and M680I (6.3 %) in FMF patients. The M694V subgroup had higher mean disease severity score and longer attack duration compared with E148Q and other mutations subgroups (p < 0.05). Two patients with amyloidosis had the M694V homozygote genotype. In conclusion contrast to other regions and many other ethnicities of the world, the most frequent MEFV gene mutation was E148Q in southeast Turkey. The M694V mutation frequency was lower, and disease severity was relatively mild in FMF children of this region.

  19. Alternating hemiplegia of childhood in Denmark: clinical manifestations and ATP1A3 mutation status.

    PubMed

    Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Dali, Christine Í; Lyngbye, Troels J B; Duno, Morten; Uldall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by early-onset recurrent distinctive hemiplegic episodes commonly accompanied by other paroxysmal features and developmental impairment. De novo mutations in ATP1A3 were recently identified as a genetic cause of AHC. To describe the entire Danish cohort of paediatric AHC patients we approached neuropaediatricians nationwide. All currently acknowledged Danish patients ≤16 years with AHC were genetically tested and seen by the same child neurologist (PU). Ten patients; seven girls and three boys were identified. Mean present age was 10.0 years (range 1-16). Mean age at presentation was 7.4 months (range 1-18 months). Sequencing of ATP1A3 in all ten patients revealed a pathogenic mutation in seven. Two females with moderate psychomotor impairment were heterozygous for the known p.G947R mutation, whereas one severely retarded boy was heterozygous for the common p.E815K mutation. The prevalent p.D801N mutation was identified in two moderate to severely retarded children. Interestingly, in a set of monochorionic male twins a novel p.D801E mutation was identified, underscoring that the asparagine at position 801 is a mutation hotspot. Three girls aged 5-13 years did not reveal any ATP1A3 mutations. They were rather mildly clinically affected and displayed a normal or near-normal psychomotor development. This is the first study of AHC in the Danish paediatric population. The patients harboured a wide range of psychomotor difficulties. Patients with no mutation detected tended to be less severely affected. Prevalence was approximately 1 per 100,000 children.

  20. Detection of Clinically Relevant Exonic Copy-Number Changes by Array CGH

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Shaw, Chad A.; Eng, Patricia A.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Pursley, Amber N.; Kang, Sung-Hae L.; Yang, Yaping; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Nowakowska, Beata A.; Gaudio, Daniela del; Xia, Zhilian; Simpson-Patel, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna L.; Gibson, James B.; Tsai, Anne C.-H.; Bowers, Jennifer A.; Reimschisel, Tyler E.; Schaaf, Christian P.; Potocki, Lorraine; Scaglia, Fernando; Gambin, Tomasz; Sykulski, Maciej; Bartnik, Magdalena; Derwinska, Katarzyna; Wisniowiecka-Kowalnik, Barbara; Lalani, Seema R.; Probst, Frank J.; Bi, Weimin; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Patel, Ankita; Lupski, James R.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Stankiewicz, Pawel

    2011-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful tool for the molecular elucidation and diagnosis of disorders resulting from genomic copy-number variation (CNV). However, intragenic deletions or duplications—those including genomic intervals of a size smaller than a gene—have remained beyond the detection limit of most clinical aCGH analyses. Increasing array probe number improves genomic resolution, although higher cost may limit implementation, and enhanced detection of benign CNV can confound clinical interpretation. We designed an array with exonic coverage of selected disease and candidate genes and used it clinically to identify losses or gains throughout the genome involving at least one exon and as small as several hundred base pairs in size. In some patients, the detected copy-number change occurs within a gene known to be causative of the observed clinical phenotype, demonstrating the ability of this array to detect clinically relevant CNVs with subkilobase resolution. In summary, we demonstrate the utility of a custom-designed, exon-targeted oligonucleotide array to detect intragenic copy-number changes in patients with various clinical phenotypes. PMID:20848651

  1. Familial isolated pituitary adenomas experience at a single center: clinical importance of AIP mutation screening.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Leandro Kasuki Jomori de; Vieira Neto, Leonardo; Wildemberg, Luiz Eduardo Armondi; Moraes, Aline Barbosa; Takiya, Christina M; Frohman, Lawrence A; Korbonits, Márta; Gadelha, Mônica R

    2010-11-01

    We present four FIPA kindred discussing clinical and molecular data and emphasizing the differences regarding AIP status, as well as the importance of genetic screening. Family 1 consists of five patients harboring somatotropinomas with germline E24X mutation in AIP. In one of the patients, acromegaly was diagnosed through active screening, being cured by surgery. Families 2 and 3 are composed of two patients with non-functioning pituitary adenomas. Family 4 comprises patients harboring a prolactinoma and a somatotropinoma. No mutations in AIP were found in these families. No patient in Family 1 was controlled with octreotide treatment, while the acromegalic patient in Family 4 was controlled with octreotide LAR. In conclusion, FIPA is a heterogeneous condition, which may be associated with AIP mutation. Genomic and clinical screening is recommended in families with two or more members harboring pituitary adenomas, allowing early diagnosis and better outcome.

  2. Clinical Relevance of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolated from Sputum in a Gold Mining Workforce in South Africa: An Observational, Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    van Halsema, Clare L.; Chihota, Violet N.; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.; Fielding, Katherine L.; Lewis, James J.; van Helden, Paul D.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Grant, Alison D.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The clinical relevance of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), detected by liquid more than solid culture in sputum specimens from a South African mining workforce, is uncertain. We aimed to describe the current spectrum and relevance of NTM in this population. Methods. An observational study including individuals with sputum NTM isolates, recruited at workforce tuberculosis screening and routine clinics. Symptom questionnaires were administered at the time of sputum collection and clinical records and chest radiographs reviewed retrospectively. Results. Of 232 individuals included (228 (98%) male, median age 44 years), M. gordonae (60 individuals), M. kansasii (50), and M. avium complex (MAC: 38) were the commonest species. Of 38 MAC isolates, only 2 (5.3%) were from smear-positive sputum specimens and 30/38 grew in liquid but not solid culture. MAC was especially prevalent among symptomatic, HIV-positive individuals. HIV prevalence was high: 57/74 (77%) among those tested. No differences were found in probability of death or medical separation by NTM species. Conclusions. M. gordonae, M. kansasii, and MAC were the commonest NTM among miners with suspected tuberculosis, with most MAC from smear-negative specimens in liquid culture only. HIV testing and identification of key pathogenic NTM in this setting are essential to ensure optimal treatment. PMID:26180817

  3. Identification of syncytial mutations in a clinical isolate of herpes simplex virus 2

    SciTech Connect

    Muggeridge, Martin I. . E-mail: mmugge@lsuhsc.edu; Grantham, Michael L.; Johnson, F. Brent

    2004-10-25

    Small polykaryocytes resulting from cell fusion are found in herpes simplex virus (HSV) lesions in patients, but their significance for viral spread and pathogenesis is unclear. Although syncytial variants causing extensive fusion in tissue culture can be readily isolated from laboratory strains, they are rarely found in clinical isolates, suggesting that extensive cell fusion may be deleterious in vivo. Syncytial mutations have previously been identified for several laboratory strains, but not for clinical isolates of HSV type 2. To address this deficiency, we studied a recent syncytial clinical isolate, finding it to be a mixture of two syncytial and one nonsyncytial strain. The two syncytial strains have novel mutations in glycoprotein B, and in vitro cell fusion assays confirmed that they are responsible for syncytium formation. This panel of clinical strains may be ideal for examining the effect of increased cell fusion on pathogenesis.

  4. E-cadherin germline mutation carriers: clinical management and genetic implications.

    PubMed

    Corso, Giovanni; Figueiredo, Joana; Biffi, Roberto; Trentin, Chiara; Bonanni, Bernardo; Feroce, Irene; Serrano, Davide; Cassano, Enrico; Annibale, Bruno; Melo, Soraia; Seruca, Raquel; De Lorenzi, Francesca; Ferrara, Francesco; Piagnerelli, Riccardo; Roviello, Franco; Galimberti, Viviana

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is an autosomic dominant syndrome associated with E-cadherin protein (CDH1) gene germline mutations. Clinical criteria for genetic screening were revised in 2010 by the International Gastric Cancer Linkage Consortium at the Cambridge meeting. About 40 % of families fulfilling clinical criteria for this inherited disease present deleterious CDH1 germline mutations. Lobular breast cancer is a neoplastic condition associated with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer syndrome. E-cadherin constitutional mutations have been described in both settings, in gastric and breast cancers. The management of CDH1 asymptomatic mutation carriers requires a multidisciplinary approach; the only life-saving procedure is the prophylactic total gastrectomy after thorough genetic counselling. Several prophylactic gastrectomies have been performed to date; conversely, no prophylactic mastectomies have been described in CDH1 mutant carriers. However, the recent discovery of novel germline alterations in pedigree clustering only for lobular breast cancer opens up a new debate in the management of these individuals. In this critical review, we describe the clinical management of CDH1 germline mutant carriers providing specific recommendations for genetic counselling, clinical criteria, surveillance and/ or prophylactic surgery.

  5. Isolated fat pad sign in acute elbow injury: is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    Jie, Kim E; van Dam, Lisette F; Hammacher, Eric R

    2016-06-01

    An isolated fat pad sign (i.e. joint effusion without a visible fracture), commonly seen in acute elbow injury, is associated with occult fracture and treated as such. However, the clinical relevance of an isolated fat pad is unclear, thereby questioning the need for specialized follow-up. In this study, 111 patients (median age 15 years, interquartile range 9-27 years) with an isolated fat pad sign after acute elbow injury were included. The clinical relevance of an isolated fat pad sign was derived from descriptives on pain, elbow function, treatment change, number of revisits and recovery time after 1 week follow-up and long-term follow-up. Treatment alterations were rarely made and none of the patients needed an operative intervention; also, none of the patients had persistent symptoms. The median recovery time was 3 weeks (interquartile range 2-12 weeks). This study shows that, unless symptoms persist or worsen, regular follow-up at a specialized outpatient clinic is not needed.

  6. Prioritizing Clinically Relevant Copy Number Variation from Genetic Interactions and Gene Function Data

    PubMed Central

    Foong, Justin; Girdea, Marta; Stavropoulos, James; Brudno, Michael

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly necessary to develop computerized methods for identifying the few disease-causing variants from hundreds discovered in each individual patient. This problem is especially relevant for Copy Number Variants (CNVs), which can be cheaply interrogated via low-cost hybridization arrays commonly used in clinical practice. We present a method to predict the disease relevance of CNVs that combines functional context and clinical phenotype to discover clinically harmful CNVs (and likely causative genes) in patients with a variety of phenotypes. We compare several feature and gene weighing systems for classifying both genes and CNVs. We combined the best performing methodologies and parameters on over 2,500 Agilent CGH 180k Microarray CNVs derived from 140 patients. Our method achieved an F-score of 91.59%, with 87.08% precision and 97.00% recall. Our methods are freely available at https://github.com/compbio-UofT/cnv-prioritization. Our dataset is included with the supplementary information. PMID:26437450

  7. Implementation of In Vitro Drug Resistance Assays: Maximizing the Potential for Uncovering Clinically Relevant Resistance Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Korpal, Manav; Feala, Jacob; Puyang, Xiaoling; Zou, Jian; Ramos, Alex H.; Wu, Jeremy; Baumeister, Timm; Yu, Lihua; Warmuth, Markus; Zhu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Although targeted therapies are initially effective, resistance inevitably emerges. Several methods, such as genetic analysis of resistant clinical specimens, have been applied to uncover these resistance mechanisms to facilitate follow-up care. Although these approaches have led to clinically relevant discoveries, difficulties in attaining the relevant patient material or in deconvoluting the genomic data collected from these specimens have severely hampered the path towards a cure. To this end, we here describe a tool for expeditious discovery that may guide improvement in first-line therapies and alternative clinical management strategies. By coupling preclinical in vitro or in vivo drug selection with next-generation sequencing, it is possible to identify genomic structural variations and/or gene expression alterations that may serve as functional drivers of resistance. This approach facilitates the spontaneous emergence of alterations, enhancing the probability that these mechanisms may be observed in the patients. In this protocol we provide guidelines to maximize the potential for uncovering single nucleotide variants that drive resistance using adherent lines. PMID:26710000

  8. MDMA, methamphetamine, and CYP2D6 pharmacogenetics: what is clinically relevant?

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Rafael; Yubero-Lahoz, Samanta; Pardo-Lozano, Ricardo; Farré, Magí

    2012-01-01

    In vitro human studies show that the metabolism of most amphetamine-like psychostimulants is regulated by the polymorphic cytochrome P450 isozyme CYP2D6. Two compounds, methamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), were selected as archetypes to discuss the translation and clinical significance of in vitro to in vivo findings. Both compounds were chosen based on their differential interaction with CYP2D6 and their high abuse prevalence in society. Methamphetamine behaves as both a weak substrate and competitive inhibitor of CYP2D6, while MDMA acts as a high affinity substrate and potent mechanism-based inhibitor (MBI) of the enzyme. The MBI behavior of MDMA on CYP2D6 implies that subjects, irrespective of their genotype/phenotype, are phenocopied to the poor metabolizer (PM) phenotype. The fraction of metabolic clearance regulated by CYP2D6 for both drugs is substantially lower than expected from in vitro studies. Other isoenzymes of cytochrome P450 and a relevant contribution of renal excretion play a part in their clearance. These facts tune down the potential contribution of CYP2D6 polymorphism in the clinical outcomes of both substances. Globally, the clinical relevance of CYP2D6 polymorphism is lower than that predicted by in vitro studies. PMID:23162568

  9. Determination of clinically relevant content for a musculoskeletal anatomy curriculum for physical medicine and rehabilitation residents.

    PubMed

    Lisk, Kristina; Flannery, John F; Loh, Eldon Y; Richardson, Denyse; Agur, Anne M R; Woods, Nicole N

    2014-01-01

    To address the need for more clinical anatomy training in residency education, many postgraduate programs have implemented structured anatomy courses into their curriculum. Consensus often does not exist on specific content and level of detail of the content that should be included in such curricula. This article describes the use of the Delphi method to identify clinically relevant content to incorporate in a musculoskeletal anatomy curriculum for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) residents. A two round modified Delphi involving PM&R experts was used to establish the curricular content. The anatomical structures and clinical conditions presented to the expert group were compiled using multiple sources: clinical musculoskeletal anatomy cases from the PM&R residency program at the University of Toronto; consultation with PM&R experts; and textbooks. In each round, experts rated the importance of each curricular item to PM&R residency education using a five-point Likert scale. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was used to determine consensus at the end of each round and agreement scores were used as an outcome measure to determine the content to include in the curriculum. The overall internal consistency in both rounds was 0.99. A total of 37 physiatrists from across Canada participated and the overall response rate over two rounds was 97%. The initial curricular list consisted of 361 items. After the second iteration, the list was reduced by 44%. By using a national consensus method we were able to objectively determine the relevant anatomical structures and clinical musculoskeletal conditions important in daily PM&R practice.

  10. Clinical features, spectrum of causal genetic mutations and outcome of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in South Africans

    PubMed Central

    Ntusi, Ntobeko AB; Shaboodien, Gasnat; Badri, Motasim; Mayosi, Bongani M; Badri, Motasim; Gumedze, Freedom

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Little is known about the clinical characteristics, spectrum of causal genetic mutations and outcome of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in Africans. The objective of this study was to delineate the clinical and genetic features and outcome of HCM in African patients. Methods Information on clinical presentation, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic findings, and outcome of cases with HCM was collected from the Cardiac Clinic at Groote Schuur Hospital over a mean duration of follow up of 9.1 ± 3.4 years. Genomic DNA was screened for mutations in 15 genes that cause HCM, i.e. cardiac myosinbinding protein C (MYBPC3), cardiac β-myosin heavy chain (MYH7), cardiac troponin T2 (TNNT2), cardiac troponin I (TNNI3), regulatory light chain of myosin (MYL2), essential light chain of myosin (MYL3), tropomyosin 1 (TPM1), phospholamban (PLN), α-actin (ACTC1), cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3 (CSRP3), AMP-activated protein kinase (PRKAG2), α-galactosidase (GLA), four-and-a-half LIM domains 1 (FHL1), lamin A/C (LMNA) and lysosomeassociated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2). Survival and its predictors were analysed using the Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression methods, respectively. Results Forty-three consecutive patients [mean age 38.5 ± 14.3 years; 25 (58.1%) male; and 13 (30.2%) black African] were prospectively enrolled in the study from January 1996 to December 2012. Clinical presentation was similar to that reported in other studies. The South African founder mutations that cause HCM were not found in the 42 probands. Ten of 35 index cases (28.6%) tested for mutations in 15 genes had disease-causing mutations in MYH7 (six cases or 60%) and MYBPC3 (four cases or 40%). No disease-causing mutation was found in the other 13 genes screened. The annual mortality rate was 2.9% per annum and overall survival was 74% at 10 years, which was similar to the general South African population. Cox’s proportional hazards regression showed

  11. Current HER2 Testing Recommendations and Clinical Relevance as a Predictor of Response to Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, Tarah J; Sanders, Melinda E; Abramson, Vandana G

    2015-06-01

    Clinical decision-making in the treatment of breast cancer depends on an accurate determination and understanding of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status. The guidelines for HER2 testing were recently updated in late 2013, but limitations continue to exist in the interpretation and clinical application of results when the tumor specimens do not fall neatly into positive or negative categories with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization testing. The issues, including discordance between pathologists or laboratories, polysomy, and genetic heterogeneity, present challenging situations that are difficult to translate into clinical significance. The present review discussed the changes in the updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guidelines, the clinical relevance of complex issues in HER2 testing, and the implications of the results on the response to HER2-targeted therapies. Great advances have been made in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer; however, the challenge remains to determine the best testing analysis that will identify patients who will benefit the most from these therapies.

  12. Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass: pathophysiology, measure and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Ranucci, Marco; Carboni, Giovanni; Cotza, Mauro; de Somer, Filip

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass derives from both the aerobic metabolism and the buffering of lactic acid produced by tissues under anaerobic conditions. Therefore, carbon dioxide removal monitoring is an important measure of the adequacy of perfusion and oxygen delivery. However, routine monitoring of carbon dioxide removal is not widely applied. The present article reviews the main physiological and pathophysiological sources of carbon dioxide, the available techniques to assess carbon dioxide production and removal and the clinically relevant applications of carbon dioxide-related variables as markers of the adequacy of perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  13. The clinical relevance of assessing advanced glycation endproducts accumulation in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Links, Thera; Zeebregts, Clark; Tio, Rene; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Smit, Andries

    2008-10-07

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes. There is increasing evidence that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis, in particular in diabetes. AGE accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic and oxidative stress, and may so represent the "metabolic memory". Furthermore, increased AGE accumulation is closely related to the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetes. This review article will focus on the clinical relevance of measuring AGE accumulation in diabetic patients by focusing on AGE formation, AGEs as predictors of long-term complications, and interventions against AGEs.

  14. The clinical relevance of assessing advanced glycation endproducts accumulation in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Links, Thera; Zeebregts, Clark; Tio, Rene; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Smit, Andries

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes. There is increasing evidence that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis, in particular in diabetes. AGE accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic and oxidative stress, and may so represent the "metabolic memory". Furthermore, increased AGE accumulation is closely related to the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetes. This review article will focus on the clinical relevance of measuring AGE accumulation in diabetic patients by focusing on AGE formation, AGEs as predictors of long-term complications, and interventions against AGEs. PMID:18840258

  15. Clinically Relevant Cognitive Impairment in Middle-Aged Adults With Childhood-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nunley, Karen A.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Jennings, J. Richard; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Zgibor, Janice C.; Costacou, Tina; Boudreau, Robert M.; Miller, Rachel; Orchard, Trevor J.; Saxton, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the presence and correlates of clinically relevant cognitive impairment in middle-aged adults with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS During 2010–2013, 97 adults diagnosed with T1D and aged <18 years (age and duration 49 ± 7 and 41 ± 6 years, respectively; 51% female) and 138 similarly aged adults without T1D (age 49 ± 7 years; 55% female) completed extensive neuropsychological testing. Biomedical data on participants with T1D were collected periodically since 1986–1988. Cognitive impairment status was based on the number of test scores ≥1.5 SD worse than demographically appropriate published norms: none, mild (only one test), or clinically relevant (two or more tests). RESULTS The prevalence of clinically relevant cognitive impairment was five times higher among participants with than without T1D (28% vs. 5%; P < 0.0001), independent of education, age, or blood pressure. Effect sizes were large (Cohen d 0.6–0.9; P < 0.0001) for psychomotor speed and visuoconstruction tasks and were modest (d 0.3–0.6; P < 0.05) for measures of executive function. Among participants with T1D, prevalent cognitive impairment was related to 14-year average A1c >7.5% (58 mmol/mol) (odds ratio [OR] 3.0; P = 0.009), proliferative retinopathy (OR 2.8; P = 0.01), and distal symmetric polyneuropathy (OR 2.6; P = 0.03) measured 5 years earlier; higher BMI (OR 1.1; P = 0.03); and ankle-brachial index ≥1.3 (OR 4.2; P = 0.01) measured 20 years earlier, independent of education. CONCLUSIONS Clinically relevant cognitive impairment is highly prevalent among these middle-aged adults with childhood-onset T1D. In this aging cohort, chronic hyperglycemia and prevalent microvascular disease were associated with cognitive impairment, relationships shown previously in younger populations with T1D. Two additional potentially modifiable risk factors for T1D-related cognitive impairment, vascular health and BMI

  16. Blood lactate concentration after exposure to conducted energy weapons (including TASER® devices): is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    Jauchem, James R

    2013-09-01

    In previous studies, blood lactate concentration (BLac) consistently increased in anesthetized animals and in human subjects after exposures to TASER(®) conducted energy weapons (CEWs). Some have suggested the increased BLac would have detrimental consequences. In the current review, the following are evaluated: (a) the nature of muscle contractions due to CEWs, (b) general aspects of increased BLac, (c) previous studies of conventional neuromuscular electrical stimulation and CEW exposures, and (d) BLac in disease states. On the basis of these analyses, one can conclude that BLac, per se (independent of acidemia), would not be clinically relevant immediately after short-duration CEW applications, due to the short time course of any increase.

  17. Promoting culturally competent chronic pain management using the clinically relevant continuum model.

    PubMed

    Monsivais, Diane B

    2011-06-01

    This article reviews the culture of biomedicine and current practices in pain management education, which often merge to create a hostile environment for effective chronic pain care. Areas of cultural tensions in chronic pain frequently involve the struggle to achieve credibility regarding one's complaints of pain (or being believed that the pain is real) and complying with pain medication protocols. The clinically relevant continuum model is presented as a framework allowing providers to approach care from an evidence-based, culturally appropriate (patient centered) perspective that takes into account the highest level of evidence available, provider expertise, and patient preferences and values.

  18. Impact of IDH1 mutation status on outcome in clinical trials for recurrent glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Jacob J; Cachia, David; Liu, Diane; Wilson, Charmaine; Aldape, Ken; Fuller, Greg; de Groot, John F

    2016-08-01

    IDH1 mutated glioblastoma (GB) has a better prognosis than IDH1 wildtype GB. However, it remains unknown whether patients (pts) with IDH1 mutated GB have a higher 6-month progression free survival (PFS6) or radiographic response (RR) rate on clinical trials for recurrence. Retrospective review of GB pts at MDACC between 2006 and 2012 identified 330 patients in recurrent GB trials. 93 patients (28 %) had either PFS6 or a complete/partial RR per RANO criteria. 49/93 (53 %) patients with PFS6 or a complete/partial RR had tumor tissue for IDH1 testing. A matched cohort of 49 patients on recurrent GB clinical trials that failed to achieve PFS6 or RR (also with tissue for IDH1 testing) was identified for comparison. IDH1 status was obtained in 92/98 (94 %) patients of which 17 (18 %) had an IDH1 mutation. PFS6 was seen in 26/49 (53 %) patients. IDH status was unknown in two of these patients. 5/24 (21 %) were IDH1 mutated compared to 5/24 (21 %) of their matched cohort without PFS6. RR was found in 47/49 (94 %) patients. IDH status was unknown in four of these patients. IDH1 mutation was present in 7/43 (16 %) patients with RR compared to 10/43 (23 %) in the matched cohort without RR (p = 0.48). Median OS for trials at first recurrence was 9.8 months for IDH1 wildtype GB vs. 19.32 months for IDH1 mutated GB (p = 0.14). IDH1 mutation status was not predictive of PFS6 or RR in recurrent GB trials for this data set. However, further examination in larger randomized prospective studies is needed.

  19. Molecular and clinical studies in five index cases with novel mutations in the GLA gene.

    PubMed

    Zizzo, Carmela; Monte, Ines; Pisani, Antonio; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Riccio, Eleonora; Rodolico, Margherita Stefania; Colomba, Paolo; Uva, Maurizio; Cammarata, Giuseppe; Alessandro, Riccardo; Iemolo, Francesco; Duro, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    Fabry disease is a metabolic and lysosomal storage disorder caused by the functional defect of the α-galactosidase A enzyme; this defect is due to mutations in the GLA gene, that is composed of seven exons and is located on the long arm of the X-chromosome (Xq21-22). The enzymatic deficit is responsible for the accumulation of glycosphingolipids in lysosomes of different cellular types, mainly in those ones of vascular endothelium. It consequently causes a cellular and microvascular dysfunction. In this paper, we described five novel mutations in the GLA gene, related to absent enzymatic activity and typical manifestations of Fabry disease. We identified three mutations (c.846_847delTC, p.E341X and p.C382X) that lead to the introduction of a stop codon in positions 297, 341 and 382. Moreover we found a missense mutation (p.R227P) in the exon 5 of the GLA gene and a single point mutation (c.639+5 G>T) occurring five base pairs beyond the end of the exon 4. These mutations have never been found in our group of healthy control subjects >2300. The studied patients presented some clinical manifestations, such as cornea verticillata, hypo-anhidrosis, left ventricular hypertrophy, cerebrovascular disorders and renal failure, that, considering the null enzymatic activity, suggest that the new mutations reported here are related to the classic form of Fabry disease. The identification of novel mutations in patients with symptomatology referable to FD increases the molecular knowledge of the GLA gene and it gives clinicians an important support for the proper diagnosis of the disease.

  20. Mutations, Clinical Findings and Survival Estimates in South American Patients with X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Fernanda dos Santos; Matte, Ursula; Habekost, Clarissa Troller; de Castilhos, Raphael Machado; El Husny, Antonette Souto; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M.; Giuliani, Liane; Galera, Marcial Francis; Honjo, Rachel; Kim, Chong Ae; Politei, Juan; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the ABCD1 gene in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) patients and relatives from 38 unrelated families from South America, as well as phenotypic proportions, survival estimates, and the potential effect of geographical origin in clinical characteristics. Methods X- ALD patients from Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay were invited to participate in molecular studies to determine their genetic status, characterize the mutations and improve the genetic counseling of their families. All samples were screened by SSCP analysis of PCR fragments, followed by automated DNA sequencing to establish the specific mutation in each family. Age at onset and at death, male phenotypes, genetic status of women, and the effect of family and of latitude of origin were also studied. Results We identified thirty-six different mutations (twelve novel). This population had an important allelic heterogeneity, as only p.Arg518Gln was repeatedly found (three families). Four cases carried de novo mutations. Intra-familiar phenotype variability was observed in all families. Out of 87 affected males identified, 65% had the cerebral phenotype (CALD). The mean (95% CI) ages at onset and at death of the CALD were 10.9 (9.1–12.7) and 24.7 (19.8–29.6) years. No association was found between phenotypic manifestations and latitude of origin. One index-case was a girl with CALD who carried an ABCD1 mutation, and had completely skewed X inactivation. Conclusions This study extends the spectrum of mutations in X-ALD, confirms the high rates of de novo mutations and the absence of common mutations, and suggests a possible high frequency of cerebral forms in our population. PMID:22479560

  1. Nurses in the clinical area: relevance of a PhD.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Lesley M; Mohan, Shantala

    2008-01-01

    This project aimed to explore the application and relevance of a PhD to nurses working in the clinical area. The complexity of nursing practice requires clinical nurses to be competent as investigators and professional leaders who could help structure nursing practice in more efficient ways. Research proposes that a PhD offers Limited employment opportunities, is mainly research oriented and tends to direct a nurse away from the clinical field. A mixed method study design utilising surveys and interviews was chosen to collect data for this study. Participants were nurses with a doctoral degree working/having worked in a clinical area after obtaining their PhD Nurses were recruited through student databases from Australian universities that offer doctoral degrees in nursing and also by using a snowball sampling technique. The majority of the 19 nurses who participated in the study had: varied expectation of doing a PhD; maintained their clinical positions after obtaining their doctoral degree, considered that the degree helped them to obtain better jobs/promotions and acknowledged the value of the PhD in patient care, in improving research and informing health policy. This study has exposed the positive aspects of completing a PhD and identifies its constructive application in the clinical area. It is essential to provide support and opportunities for nurses working in the clinical area to pursue doctoral degrees in order to enable them to enhance knowledge and build confidence and leadership skills and contribute to the improvement of nursing practice and the continued development of the profession.

  2. [Clinical significance and distribution of BRCA genes mutation in sporadic high grade serous ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Liu, W L; Wang, Z Z; Zhao, J Z; Hou, Y Y; Wu, X X; Li, W; Dong, B; Tong, T T; Guo, Y J

    2017-01-25

    Objective: To investigate the mutations of BRCA genes in sporadic high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) and study its clinical significance. Methods: Sixty-eight patients between January 2015 and January 2016 from the Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University were collected who were based on pathological diagnosis of ovarian cancer and had no reported family history, and all patients firstly hospitalized were untreated in other hospitals before. (1) The BRCA genes were detected by next-generation sequencing (NGS) method. (2) The serum tumor markers included carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CA(125), CA(199), and human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) were detected by the chemiluminescence methods, and their correlation was analyzed by Pearson linear correlation. Descriptive statistics and comparisons were performed using two-tailed t-tests, Pearson's chi square test, Fisher's exact tests or logistic regression analysis as appropriate to research the clinicopathologic features associated with BRCA mutations, including age, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, platinum-based chemotherapy sensitivity, distant metastases, serum tumor markers (STM) . Results: (1) Fifteen cases (22%, 15/68) BRCA mutations were identified (BRCA1: 11 cases; BRCA2: 4 cases), and four novel mutations were observed. (2) The levels of CEA, CA(199), and HE4 were lower in BRCA mutations compared to that in control group, while no significant differences were found (P>0.05), but the level of CA(125) was much higher in BRCA mutation group than that in controls (t=-3.536, P=0.003). Further linear regression analysis found that there was a significant linear correlation between CA(125) and HE4 group (r=0.494, P<0.01), and the same correlation as CEA and CA(199) group (r=0.897, P<0.01). (3) Single factor analysis showed that no significant differences were observed in onset age, FIGO stage, distant metastasis, and STM between BRCA(+) and BRCA(-) group (P>0

  3. Clinical empathy and narrative competence: the relevance of reading talmudic legends as literary fiction.

    PubMed

    Davidson, John H

    2015-04-01

    The "curative potential" in almost any clinical setting depends on a caregiver establishing and maintaining an empathic connection with patients so as to achieve "narrative competence" in discerning and acting in accord with their preferences and best interests. The "narrative medicine" model of shared "close reading of literature and reflective writing" among clinicians as a means of fostering a capacity for clinical empathy has gained validation with recent empirical studies demonstrating the enhancement of theory of mind (ToM), broadly conceived as empathy, in readers of literary fiction. Talmudic legends, like that of Rabbi Judah's death, are under-appreciated, relevant sources of literary fiction for these efforts. The limitations of narrative medicine are readily counterbalanced by simultaneously practiced attention to traditional bioethical principles, including-especially-beneficence, non-maleficence, and autonomy.

  4. Clinical Empathy and Narrative Competence: The Relevance of Reading Talmudic Legends as Literary Fiction

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The “curative potential” in almost any clinical setting depends on a caregiver establishing and maintaining an empathic connection with patients so as to achieve “narrative competence” in discerning and acting in accord with their preferences and best interests. The “narrative medicine” model of shared “close reading of literature and reflective writing” among clinicians as a means of fostering a capacity for clinical empathy has gained validation with recent empirical studies demonstrating the enhancement of theory of mind (ToM), broadly conceived as empathy, in readers of literary fiction. Talmudic legends, like that of Rabbi Judah’s death, are under-appreciated, relevant sources of literary fiction for these efforts. The limitations of narrative medicine are readily counterbalanced by simultaneously practiced attention to traditional bioethical principles, including—especially—beneficence, non-maleficence, and autonomy. PMID:25973266

  5. The association between clinically relevant anxiety and other non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Si-Ming; Yuan, Yong-Sheng; Tong, Qing; Zhang, Li; Xu, Qin-Rong; Ding, Jian; Zhang, Ke-Zhong

    2015-11-01

    Anxiety disorders in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are often missed due to an overlap with other non-motor symptoms. The relationships between anxiety and other non-motor symptoms in PD still remain unclear. We used the Hamilton anxiety rating scale and the Non-motor Symptoms Questionnaire to measure anxiety and the complex range of non-motor symptoms in 99 PD patients. The relationships between anxiety and other PD-related non-motor symptoms were examined through regression analyses. 25 % of PD patients were diagnosed with clinically relevant anxiety. Non-motor symptoms were more prominent in patients with anxiety. Depression, urinary disorders, and sleep disruption were the factors most likely to influence anxiety in PD. Our findings have revealed a strong interplay between anxiety and other non-motor symptoms of PD and have highlighted the need for a holistic approach towards the clinical treatment of this disabling condition.

  6. Less than meets the eye: reappraising the clinical relevance of attentional bias in addiction.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Paul; Schoenmakers, Tim M; Field, Matt

    2015-05-01

    Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in attentional bias in addiction, particularly its clinical relevance. Specifically, numerous articles claimed to demonstrate either that (1) attentional bias measured in treatment settings could predict subsequent relapse to substance use, or (2) direct modification of attentional bias reduced substance use and improved treatment outcomes. In this paper, we critically evaluate empirical studies that investigated these issues. We show that the evidence regarding both of these claims is decidedly mixed, and that many of the studies that appear to yield positive findings have serious methodological and statistical limitations. We contend that the available literature suggests that attentional bias for drug cues fluctuates within individuals because it is an output of the underlying motivational state at that moment in time, but there is no convincing evidence that it exerts a causal influence on substance use. Future research should make use of experience sampling methodology to characterise the clinical significance of fluctuations in attentional bias over time.

  7. The clinical spectrum of mutations in L1, a neuronal cell adhesion molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Fransen, E.; Vits, L.; Van Camp, G.; Willems, P.J.

    1996-07-12

    Mutations in the gene encoding the neuronal cell adhesion molecule L1 are responsible for several syndromes with clinical overlap, including X-linked hydrocephalus (XLH, HSAS), MASA (mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, adducted thumbs) syndrome, complicated X-linked spastic paraplegia (SP 1), X-linked mental retardation-clasped thumb (MR-CT) syndrome, and some forms of X-linked agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). We review 34 L1 mutations in patients with these phenotypes. 22 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Clinical Sensitivity of Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Panels in a Diverse Population.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Erin E; Stevens, Colleen F; Saavedra-Matiz, Carlos A; Tavakoli, Norma P; Krein, Lea M; Parker, April; Zhang, Zhen; Maloney, Breanne; Vogel, Beth; DeCelie-Germana, Joan; Kier, Catherine; Anbar, Ran D; Berdella, Maria N; Comber, Paul G; Dozor, Allen J; Goetz, Danielle M; Guida, Louis; Kattan, Meyer; Ting, Andrew; Voter, Karen Z; van Roey, Patrick; Caggana, Michele; Kay, Denise M

    2016-02-01

    Infants are screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) in New York State (NYS) using an IRT-DNA algorithm. The purpose of this study was to validate and assess clinical validity of the US FDA-cleared Illumina MiSeqDx CF 139-Variant Assay (139-VA) in the diverse NYS CF population. The study included 439 infants with CF identified via newborn screening (NBS) from 2002 to 2012. All had been screened using the Abbott Molecular CF Genotyping Assay or the Hologic InPlex CF Molecular Test. All with CF and zero or one mutation were tested using the 139-VA. DNA extracted from dried blood spots was reliably and accurately genotyped using the 139-VA. Sixty-three additional mutations were identified. Clinical sensitivity of three panels ranged from 76.2% (23 mutations recommended for screening by ACMG/ACOG) to 79.7% (current NYS 39-mutation InPlex panel), up to 86.0% for the 139-VA. For all, sensitivity was highest in Whites and lowest in the Black population. Although the sample size was small, there was a nearly 20% increase in sensitivity for the Black CF population using the 139-VA (68.2%) over the ACMG/ACOG and InPlex panels (both 50.0%). Overall, the 139-VA is more sensitive than other commercially available panels, and could be considered for NBS, clinical, or research laboratories conducting CF screening.

  9. Relevance of biallelic versus monoallelic TNFRSF13B mutations in distinguishing disease-causing from risk-increasing TNFRSF13B variants in antibody deficiency syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Salzer, Ulrich; Bacchelli, Chiara; Buckridge, Sylvie; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Jennings, Stephanie; Lougaris, Vassilis; Bergbreiter, Astrid; Hagena, Tina; Birmelin, Jennifer; Plebani, Alessandro; Webster, A. David B.; Peter, Hans-Hartmut; Suez, Daniel; Chapel, Helen; McLean-Tooke, Andrew; Spickett, Gavin P.; Anover-Sombke, Stephanie; Ochs, Hans D.; Urschel, Simon; Belohradsky, Bernd H.; Ugrinovic, Sanja; Kumararatne, Dinakantha S.; Lawrence, Tatiana C.; Holm, Are M.; Franco, Jose L.; Schulze, Ilka; Schneider, Pascal; Gertz, E. Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Hammarström, Lennart; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Gaspar, H. Bobby

    2009-01-01

    TNFRSF13B encodes transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI), a B cell– specific tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily member. Both biallelic and monoallelic TNFRSF13B mutations were identified in patients with common variable immunodeficiency disorders. The genetic complexity and variable clinical presentation of TACI deficiency prompted us to evaluate the genetic, immunologic, and clinical condition in 50 individuals with TNFRSF13B alterations, following screening of 564 unrelated patients with hypogammaglobulinemia. We identified 13 new sequence variants. The most frequent TNFRSF13B variants (C104R and A181E; n = 39; 6.9%) were also present in a heterozygous state in 2% of 675 controls. All patients with biallelic mutations had hypogammaglobulinemia and nearly all showed impaired binding to a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL). However, the majority (n = 41; 82%) of the pa-tients carried monoallelic changes in TNFRSF13B. Presence of a heterozygous mutation was associated with antibody deficiency (P <.001, relative risk 3.6). Heterozygosity for the most common mutation, C104R, was associated with disease (P < .001, relative risk 4.2). Furthermore, heterozygosity for C104R was associated with low numbers of IgD−CD27+ B cells (P = .019), benign lymphoproliferation (P < .001), and autoimmune complications (P = .001). These associations indicate that C104R heterozygosity increases the risk for common variable immunodeficiency disorders and influences clinical presentation. PMID:18981294

  10. Epidermal growth factor receptor exon 20 p.S768I mutation in non-small cell lung carcinoma: A case report combined with a review of the literature and investigation of clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Improta, Giuseppina; Pettinato, Angela; Gieri, Stefania; Scandurra, Giuseppa; Skovrider-Ruminski, Wojciech; Høgdall, Estrid; Fraggetta, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a significant role in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most prevalent form of lung cancer worldwide. Therefore, EGFR may be a useful molecular target for personalized therapy utilizing tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Somatic activating EGFR mutations may be used to identify tumors sensitive to the effects of small-molecule EGFR-TKIs (gefitinib and erlotinib), and alternative, less frequently observed mutations, including the majority of mutations identified within exon 20, may be associated with a lack of response to TKIs. However, due to the comparative rarity of EGFR exon 20 mutations, clinical information concerning the association between EGFR exon 20 mutations and responsiveness to TKIs has been limited within the relevant literature, particularly for certain rare mutations, including p.S768I. The current study reports the case of a patient with NSCLC harboring a p.S768I mutation in the EGFR gene [a substitution at codon 768 of exon 20 (c.2303G>T, p.S768I)], as well as a mutation at codon 719, exon 18 (p.G719A). The relevant literature concerning this rare EGFR somatic mutation is also reviewed.

  11. Clinically relevant concentrations of di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) uncouple cardiac syncytium

    SciTech Connect

    Gillum, Nikki; Karabekian, Zaruhi; Swift, Luther M.; Brown, Ronald P.; Kay, Matthew W.; Sarvazyan, Narine

    2009-04-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a widely used plasticizer found in a variety of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) medical products. The results of studies in experimental animals suggest that DEHP leached from flexible PVC tubing may cause health problems in some patient populations. While the cancerogenic and reproductive effects of DEHP are well recognized, little is known about the potential adverse impact of phthalates on the heart. This study examined the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of DEHP on neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. It was found that application of DEHP to a confluent, synchronously beating cardiac cell network, leads to a marked, concentration-dependent decrease in conduction velocity and asynchronous cell beating. The mechanism behind these changes was a loss of gap junctional connexin-43, documented using Western blot analysis, dye-transfer assay and immunofluorescence. In addition to its effect on electrical coupling, DEHP treatment also affected the mechanical movement of myocyte layers. The latter was linked to the decreased stiffness of the underlying fibroblasts, as the amount of triton-insoluble vimentin was significantly decreased in DEHP-treated samples. The data indicate that DEHP, in clinically relevant concentrations, can impair the electrical and mechanical behavior of a cardiac cell network. Applicability of these findings to human patients remains to be established.

  12. Impact analysis studies of clinical prediction rules relevant to primary care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Emma; Uijen, Maike J M; Clyne, Barbara; Zarabzadeh, Atieh; Keogh, Claire; Galvin, Rose; Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Following appropriate validation, clinical prediction rules (CPRs) should undergo impact analysis to evaluate their effect on patient care. The aim of this systematic review is to narratively review and critically appraise CPR impact analysis studies relevant to primary care. Setting Primary care. Participants Adults and children. Intervention Studies that implemented the CPR compared to usual care were included. Study design Randomised controlled trial (RCT), controlled before–after, and interrupted time series. Primary outcome Physician behaviour and/or patient outcomes. Results A total of 18 studies, incorporating 14 unique CPRs, were included. The main study design was RCT (n=13). Overall, 10 studies reported an improvement in primary outcome with CPR implementation. Of 6 musculoskeletal studies, 5 were effective in altering targeted physician behaviour in ordering imaging for patients presenting with ankle, knee and neck musculoskeletal injuries. Of 6 cardiovascular studies, 4 implemented cardiovascular risk scores, and 3 reported no impact on physician behaviour outcomes, such as prescribing and referral, or patient outcomes, such as reduction in serum lipid levels. 2 studies examined CPRs in decision-making for patients presenting with chest pain and reduced inappropriate admissions. Of 5 respiratory studies, 2 were effective in reducing antibiotic prescribing for sore throat following CPR implementation. Overall, study methodological quality was often unclear due to incomplete reporting. Conclusions Despite increasing interest in developing and validating CPRs relevant to primary care, relatively few have gone through impact analysis. To date, research has focused on a small number of CPRs across few clinical domains only. PMID:27008685

  13. Antibiofilm Activity of the Brown Alga Halidrys siliquosa against Clinically Relevant Human Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Busetti, Alessandro; Thompson, Thomas P.; Tegazzini, Diana; Megaw, Julianne; Maggs, Christine A.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2015-01-01

    The marine brown alga Halidrys siliquosa is known to produce compounds with antifouling activity against several marine bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of organic extracts obtained from the marine brown alga H. siliquosa against a focused panel of clinically relevant human pathogens commonly associated with biofilm-related infections. The partially fractionated methanolic extract obtained from H. siliquosa collected along the shores of Co. Donegal; Ireland; displayed antimicrobial activity against bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus; Streptococcus; Enterococcus; Pseudomonas; Stenotrophomonas; and Chromobacterium with MIC and MBC values ranging from 0.0391 to 5 mg/mL. Biofilms of S. aureus MRSA were found to be susceptible to the algal methanolic extract with MBEC values ranging from 1.25 mg/mL to 5 mg/mL respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy using LIVE/DEAD staining confirmed the antimicrobial nature of the antibiofilm activity observed using the MBEC assay. A bioassay-guided fractionation method was developed yielding 10 active fractions from which to perform purification and structural elucidation of clinically-relevant antibiofilm compounds. PMID:26058011

  14. Isoflurane and desflurane at clinically relevant concentrations induce amyloid {beta}-peptide oligomerization: An NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Pravat K Fodale, Vincenzo

    2009-02-13

    Current understanding on Alzheimer's disease (AD) reveals that soluble amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}) oligomeric formation plays an important role in AD pathophysiology. A potential role for several inhaled anesthetics in promoting A{beta} oligomer formation has been suggested. Using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study, we previously demonstrated that at a high concentration (higher than clinically relevant concentrations), the inhaled anesthetics halothane and isoflurane, interact with specific amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31) and induce A{beta} oligomerization. The present study confirms this is true at a clinically relevant concentration. Isoflurane and desflurane induce A{beta} oligomerization by inducing chemical shift changes of the critical amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31), reinforcing the evidence that perturbation of these three crucial residues indeed plays an important role in oligomerization. These findings support the emerging hypothesis that several commonly used inhaled anesthetics could be involved in neurodegeneration, as well as risk factor for accelerating the onset of AD.

  15. Testing small molecule analogues of the Acanthocheilonema viteae immunomodulator ES-62 against clinically relevant allergens.

    PubMed

    Janicova, L; Rzepecka, J; Rodgers, D T; Doonan, J; Bell, K S; Lumb, F E; Suckling, C J; Harnett, M M; Harnett, W

    2016-06-01

    ES-62 is a glycoprotein secreted by the filarial nematode Acanthocheilonema viteae that protects against ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyper-responsiveness in mice by virtue of covalently attached anti-inflammatory phosphorylcholine (PC) residues. We have recently generated a library of small molecule analogues (SMAs) of ES-62 based around its active PC moiety as a starting point in novel drug development for asthma and identified two compounds - termed 11a and 12b - that mirror ES-62's protective effects. In this study, we have moved away from OVA, a model allergen, to test the SMAs against two clinically relevant allergens - house dust mite (HDM) and cockroach allergen (CR) extract. We show that both SMAs offer some protection against development of lung allergic responses to CR, in particular reducing eosinophil infiltration, whereas only SMA 12b is effective in protecting against eosinophil-dependent HDM-induced allergy. These data therefore suggest that helminth molecule-induced protection against model allergens may not necessarily translate to clinically relevant allergens. Nevertheless, in this study, we have managed to demonstrate that it is possible to produce synthetic drug-like molecules based on a parasitic worm product that show therapeutic potential with respect to asthma resulting from known triggers in humans.

  16. Colonization, pathogenicity, host susceptibility, and therapeutics for Staphylococcus aureus: what is the clinical relevance?

    PubMed

    Tong, Steven Y C; Chen, Luke F; Fowler, Vance G

    2012-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal that can also cause a broad spectrum of clinical disease. Factors associated with clinical disease are myriad and dynamic and include pathogen virulence, antimicrobial resistance, and host susceptibility. Additionally, infection control measures aimed at the environmental niches of S. aureus and therapeutic advances continue to impact upon the incidence and outcomes of staphylococcal infections. This review article focuses on the clinical relevance of advances in our understanding of staphylococcal colonization, virulence, host susceptibility, and therapeutics. Over the past decade key developments have arisen. First, rates of nosocomial methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections have significantly declined in many countries. Second, we have made great strides in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of S. aureus in general and community-associated MRSA in particular. Third, host risk factors for invasive staphylococcal infections, such as advancing age, increasing numbers of invasive medical interventions, and a growing proportion of patients with healthcare contact, remain dynamic. Finally, several new antimicrobial agents active against MRSA have become available for clinical use. Humans and S. aureus co-exist, and the dynamic interface between host, pathogen, and our attempts to influence these interactions will continue to rapidly change. Although progress has been made in the past decade, we are likely to face further surprises such as the recent waves of community-associated MRSA.

  17. Covariate pharmacokinetic model building in oncology and its potential clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Joerger, Markus

    2012-03-01

    When modeling pharmacokinetic (PK) data, identifying covariates is important in explaining interindividual variability, and thus increasing the predictive value of the model. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling with stepwise covariate modeling is frequently used to build structural covariate models, and the most commonly used software-NONMEM-provides estimations for the fixed-effect parameters (e.g., drug clearance), interindividual and residual unidentified random effects. The aim of covariate modeling is not only to find covariates that significantly influence the population PK parameters, but also to provide dosing recommendations for a certain drug under different conditions, e.g., organ dysfunction, combination chemotherapy. A true covariate is usually seen as one that carries unique information on a structural model parameter. Covariate models have improved our understanding of the pharmacology of many anticancer drugs, including busulfan or melphalan that are part of high-dose pretransplant treatments, the antifolate methotrexate whose elimination is strongly dependent on GFR and comedication, the taxanes and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, the latter being subject of cytochrome p450 3A4 (CYP3A4) associated metabolism. The purpose of this review article is to provide a tool to help understand population covariate analysis and their potential implications for the clinic. Accordingly, several population covariate models are listed, and their clinical relevance is discussed. The target audience of this article are clinical oncologists with a special interest in clinical and mathematical pharmacology.

  18. Nicotine at clinically relevant concentrations affects atrial inward rectifier potassium current sensitive to acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Bébarová, Markéta; Matejovič, Peter; Švecová, Olga; Kula, Roman; Šimurdová, Milena; Šimurda, Jiří

    2017-02-03

    Nicotine abuse is associated with variety of diseases including arrhythmias, most often atrial fibrillation (AF). Altered inward rectifier potassium currents including acetylcholine-sensitive current I K(Ach) are known to be related to AF pathogenesis. Since relevant data are missing, we aimed to investigate I K(Ach) changes at clinically relevant concentrations of nicotine. Experiments were performed by the whole cell patch clamp technique at 23 ± 1 °C on isolated rat atrial myocytes. Nicotine was applied at following concentrations: 4, 40 and 400 nM; ethanol at 20 mM (∼0.09%). Nicotine at 40 and 400 nM significantly activated constitutively active component of I K(Ach) with the maximum effect at 40 nM (an increase by ∼100%); similar effect was observed at -110 and -50 mV. Changes at 4 nM nicotine were negligible on average. Coapplication of 40 nM nicotine and 20 mM ethanol (which is also known to activate this current) did not show cumulative effect. In the case of acetylcholine-induced component of I K(Ach), a dual effect of nicotine and its correlation with the current magnitude in control were apparent: the current was increased by nicotine in the cells showing small current in control and vice versa. The effect of 40 and 400 nM nicotine on acetylcholine-induced component of I K(Ach) was significantly different at -110 and -50 mV. We conclude that nicotine at clinically relevant concentrations significantly increased constitutively active component of I K(Ach) and showed a dual effect on its acetylcholine-induced component, similarly as ethanol. Synchronous application of nicotine and ethanol did not cause additive effect.

  19. Kinetic Mechanisms of Mutation-dependent Harvey Ras Activation and Their Relevance for Development of Costello Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wey, Michael; Lee, Jungwoon; Jeong, Soon Seog; Kim, Jungho; Heo, Jongyun

    2013-01-01

    Costello syndrome is linked to activating mutations of a residue in the p-loop or the NKCD/SAK motifs of Harvey Ras (HRas). More than 10 HRas mutants that induce Costello syndrome have been identified; G12S HRas is the most prevalent of these. However, certain HRas p-loop mutations also are linked to cancer formation that are exemplified with G12V HRas. Despite these relations, specific links between types of HRas mutations and diseases evade definition because some Costello syndrome HRas p-loop mutations, such as G12S HRas, also often cause cancer. This study established novel kinetic parameter-based equations that estimate the value of the cellular fractions of the GTP-bound active form of HRas mutant proteins. Such calculations differentiate between two basic kinetic mechanisms that populate the GTP-bound form of Ras in cells. (i) The increase in GTP-bound Ras by the HRas mutation-mediated perturbation of the intrinsic kinetic characteristics of Ras. This generates a broad spectrum of the population of the GTP-bound form of HRas that typically causes Costello syndrome. The upper end of this spectrum of HRas mutants, as exemplified by G12S HRas, can also cause cancer. (ii) The increase in GTP-bound Ras because the HRas mutations perturb the p120GAP action on Ras. This causes production of a significantly high population of the only GTP-bound form of HRas linked merely to cancer formation. The HRas mutant G12V belongs to this category. PMID:24224811

  20. Evidence, Mechanism, and Clinical Relevance of the Transdifferentiation from Lung Adenocarcinoma to Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shenda; Zhou, Shiyu; Qin, Zhen; Yang, Liu; Han, Xiangkun; Yao, Shun; Ji, Hongbin

    2017-03-08

    Lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are two distinct subtypes of non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Interestingly, approximately 4% to 9% of human non-small-cell lung carcinoma tumors contain mixed adenomatous and squamous pathologies in a single lesion, clinically termed adenosquamous cell carcinoma. More important, these two different pathological components frequently share identical oncogenic mutations, indicative of a potential transition. Indeed, recent data have provided convincing evidence in supporting the ADC to SCC transdifferentiation in lungs. In the liver kinase B1 (official name STK11)-deficient mouse model, lung ADC can progressively transdifferentiate to SCC through pathologically mixed adenosquamous cell carcinoma as the intermediate status. Mechanistic studies further identify essential roles of extracellular matrix remodeling and metabolic reprogramming during this phenotypic transition. Small molecular compounds, including lysyl oxidase inhibitors and reactive oxygen species-inducing reagents such as phenformin, significantly accelerate the transition from lung ADC to SCC and thus confer lung tumors with drug resistance. Consistent with these findings, recent clinical studies have shown that epidermal growth factor receptor-mutant lung ADC can transdifferentiate to SCC in relapsed cancer patients. Together, these data support that this phenotypic transition from lung ADC to SCC might represent a novel mechanism for drug resistance. This review will summarize our current understanding of the transdifferentiation from lung ADC to SCC.

  1. Mutational profiling in patients with MDS: ready for every-day use in the clinic?

    PubMed

    Bacher, Ulrike; Kohlmann, Alexander; Haferlach, Torsten

    2015-03-01

    Multiple recurrent somatic mutations were identified in the majority of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), but investigating the broad spectrum of molecular markers in MDS exceeds many laboratories' capacity when traditional molecular techniques are used. High-throughput second generation sequencing (=next-generation sequencing, NGS) has proven to be applicable for comprehensive biomarker mutation analyses allowing to increase diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy and to improve risk stratification and prognostication in addition to cytomorphology and cytogenetic analysis in patients with MDS. Amplicon deep-sequencing enables comprehensive biomarker analysis in a multitude of patients per investigation in an acceptable turn-around time and at affordable costs. Comprehensive myeloid marker panels were successfully introduced into diagnostic practice. Therefore, molecular mutation analysis is ready for use in all patients with suspected MDS, may contribute to risk stratification in possible candidates for allogeneic stem cell transplantation, and should become an integral part of clinical research studies in MDS patients.

  2. Photoactivated disinfection of Streptococcus intermedius through dentin disc at clinically relevant intervals: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bonstein, Tammy; Mikulski, Lynn M; Bush, Mary A; Bush, Peter J

    2010-10-01

    In this present study we have tested the impact of porfimer sodium (Photofrin, AXCAN PHARMA Inc., Quebec, Canada) photoactivated disinfection (PD) on cells of Streptococcus intermedius in suspension. In order to provide basic data to support future clinical studies of PD in dentistry the study used exposure to Quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) dental curing light for clinically relevant time periods to activate Photofrin and measured its effectiveness under a variety of conditions including activation through dentin hard tissue. S. intermedius was grown in planktonic suspension for 48h. Nine groups were formed: three control groups (1-3) and six experimental groups (4-9). Groups 4-6 tested the use of Photofrin treatment combined with QTH light at various intervals of irradiation (5, 15 and 60s). Groups 7-9 were similar to groups 4-6 with the exception that irradiation commenced through a dentin disc. Following treatment, bacteria were plated. Colony counts were measured following 72h incubation at 37 degrees C. Statistical analysis was carried out by one-way ANOVA at a 95% confidence level. A significant reduction in S. intermedius colony counts was observed for all experimental groups and one control group. The reduction in numbers of colonies in the experimental groups varied from 79.28 to 99.40% with an average of 94.61%. Reduction in viable bacterial cells indicated a strong relationship between power density and irradiation interval. When curing light energy density was lower due to the irradiation through the 1mm dentin disc, prolonged irradiation interval enhanced bacterial kill. In conclusion, where direct irradiation is not possible for PD treatment, irradiation through dentin may still be done successfully within a clinically relevant interval.

  3. Gene expression in BMPR2 mutation carriers with and without evidence of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension suggests pathways relevant to disease penetrance

    PubMed Central

    West, James; Cogan, Joy; Geraci, Mark; Robinson, Linda; Newman, John; Phillips, John A; Lane, Kirk; Meyrick, Barbara; Loyd, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Background While BMPR2 mutation strongly predisposes to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), only 20% of mutation carriers develop clinical disease. This finding suggests that modifier genes contribute to FPAH clinical expression. Since modifiers are likely to be common alleles, this problem is not tractable by traditional genetic approaches. Furthermore, examination of gene expression is complicated by confounding effects attributable to drugs and the disease process itself. Methods To resolve these problems, B-cells were isolated, EBV-immortalized, and cultured from familial PAH patients with BMPR2 mutations, mutation positive but disease-free family members, and family members without mutation. This allows examination of differences in gene expression without drug or disease-related effects. These differences were assayed by Affymetrix array, with follow-up by quantitative RT-PCR and additional statistical analyses. Results By gene array, we found consistent alterations in multiple pathways with known relationship to PAH, including actin organization, immune function, calcium balance, growth, and apoptosis. Selected genes were verified by quantitative RT-PCR using a larger sample set. One of these, CYP1B1, had tenfold lower expression than control groups in female but not male PAH patients. Analysis of overrepresented gene ontology groups suggests that risk of disease correlates with alterations in pathways more strongly than with any specific gene within those pathways. Conclusion Disease status in BMPR2 mutation carriers was correlated with alterations in proliferation, GTP signaling, and stress response pathway expression. The estrogen metabolizing gene CYP1B1 is a strong candidate as a modifier gene in female PAH patients. PMID:18823550

  4. Wilson disease: novel mutations in the ATP7B gene and clinical correlation in Brazilian patients.

    PubMed

    Deguti, Marta M; Genschel, Janine; Cancado, Eduardo L R; Barbosa, Egberto R; Bochow, Bettina; Mucenic, Marcos; Porta, Gilda; Lochs, Herbert; Carrilho, Flair J; Schmidt, Hartmut H-J

    2004-04-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is a rare inherited autosomal recessive disorder caused by a defect in a metal transporting P-type ATPase, resulting in copper overload in various tissues and cells. The aim was to assess both the phenotype in Brazilian WD patients and the corresponding ATP7B genotype. Sixty subjects belonging to 46 pedigrees diagnosed as WD were included in this study. Direct sequencing of all 21 exons within ATP7B and their flanking introns was performed. Demographic, clinical, laboratory and histopathological data at the time of diagnosis were obtained. We identified twenty-five mutations, twelve of them reported for the first time. The c.3402delC mutation had the highest allelic frequency (30.8%), followed by the c.2123T>C (p.L708P) (16.7%). Exons 8 and 15 were the site of 62.5% of the mutations. The common European mutation c.3207C>A (p.H1069Q) was not present at all. Phenotype varied greatly among individuals with the same ATP7B genotype. Our data confirm the heterogeneity of ATP7B genotype in Brazilian WD patients. The mutational spectrum is compatible with the Brazilian history of Mediterranean immigration; however, new mutations, and different frequencies and phenotype associated with the previously known mutations characterize this population. Exons 8 and 15 should be preferentially screened in WD cases from Brazil. Phenotype variation among subjects with the same ATP7B genotype suggests that modifying factors play an additional role in the pathogenesis of WD.

  5. Molecular-clinical correlations in males with an expanded FMR1 mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Merenstein, S.A.; Sobesky, W.E.; Tran, H.X.

    1996-08-09

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by an expansion of a CGG repeat in the FMR1 gene. The CGG repeat number of the FMR1 mutation and the percentage of cells with methylation of the gene were studied in 218 male patients. Physical and cognitive measurements were also performed. Patients were divided into three groups; those with full mutation and complete methylation (n = 160), those with full mutation and partial methylation (n = 12), and those with a mosaic pattern (n = 46). Statistical comparisons were made between males with the fully methylated full mutation and those with a mosaic pattern. Males having full mutation with complete methylation had the lowest IQ scores and greatest physical involvement. These significant differences were seen only in ages after puberty. CGG repeat length did not correlate with IQ or the physical index score in any group. These findings suggest that a partial production of FMR1 protein may predict milder clinical involvement in some males with fragile X syndrome. 39 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum: a clinical, pathophysiological and genetic update including 11 novel ABCC6 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Chassaing, N; Martin, L; Calvas, P; Le Bert, M; Hovnanian, A

    2005-01-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is an inherited systemic disease of connective tissue primarily affecting the skin, retina, and cardiovascular system. It is characterised pathologically by elastic fibre mineralisation and fragmentation (so called "elastorrhexia"), and clinically by high heterogeneity in age of onset and the extent and severity of organ system involvement. PXE was recently associated with mutations in the ABCC6 (ATP binding cassette subtype C number 6) gene. At least one ABCC6 mutation is found in about 80% of patients. These mutations are identifiable in most of the 31 ABCC6 exons and consist of missense, nonsense, frameshift mutations, or large deletions. No correlation between the nature or location of the mutations and phenotype severity has yet been established. Recent findings support exclusive recessive inheritance. The proposed prevalence of PXE is 1/25 000, but this is probably an underestimate. ABCC6 encodes the protein ABCC6 (also known as MRP6), a member of the large ATP dependent transmembrane transporter family that is expressed predominantly in the liver and kidneys, and only to a lesser extent in tissues affected by PXE. The physiological substrates of ABCC6 remain to be determined, but the current hypothesis is that PXE should be considered to be a metabolic disease with undetermined circulating molecules interacting with the synthesis, turnover, or maintenance of elastic fibres. PMID:15894595

  7. Identification of a Heterozygous SPG11 Mutation by Clinical Exome Sequencing in a Patient With Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing, such as whole-genome sequencing, whole-exome sequencing, and targeted panel sequencing have been applied for diagnosis of many genetic diseases, and are in the process of replacing the traditional methods of genetic analysis. Clinical exome sequencing (CES), which provides not only sequence variation data but also clinical interpretation, aids in reaching a final conclusion with regards to genetic diagnosis. Sequencing of genes with clinical relevance rather than whole exome sequencing might be more suitable for the diagnosis of known hereditary disease with genetic heterogeneity. Here, we present the clinical usefulness of CES for the diagnosis of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We report a case of patient who was strongly suspected of having HSP based on her clinical manifestations. HSP is one of the diseases with high genetic heterogeneity, the 72 different loci and 59 discovered genes identified so far. Therefore, traditional approach for diagnosis of HSP with genetic analysis is very challenging and time-consuming. CES with TruSight One Sequencing Panel, which enriches about 4,800 genes with clinical relevance, revealed compound heterozygous mutations in SPG11. One workflow and one procedure can provide the results of genetic analysis, and CES with enrichment of clinically relevant genes is a cost-effective and time-saving diagnostic tool for diseases with genetic heterogeneity, including HSP. PMID:28119845

  8. From Whole Gene Deletion to Point Mutations of EP300-Positive Rubinstein-Taybi Patients: New Insights into the Mutational Spectrum and Peculiar Clinical Hallmarks.

    PubMed

    Negri, Gloria; Magini, Pamela; Milani, Donatella; Colapietro, Patrizia; Rusconi, Daniela; Scarano, Emanuela; Bonati, Maria Teresa; Priolo, Manuela; Crippa, Milena; Mazzanti, Laura; Wischmeijer, Anita; Tamburrino, Federica; Pippucci, Tommaso; Finelli, Palma; Larizza, Lidia; Gervasini, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a rare congenital neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by growth deficiency, skeletal abnormalities, dysmorphic features, and intellectual disability. Causative mutations in CREBBP and EP300 genes have been identified in ∼55% and ∼8% of affected individuals. To date, only 28 EP300 alterations in 29 RSTS clinically described patients have been reported. EP300 analysis of 22 CREBBP-negative RSTS patients from our cohort led us to identify six novel mutations: a 376-kb deletion depleting EP300 gene; an exons 17-19 deletion (c.(3141+1_3142-1)_(3590+1_3591-1)del/p.(Ile1047Serfs*30)); two stop mutations, (c.3829A>T/p.(Lys1277*) and c.4585C>T/p.(Arg1529*)); a splicing mutation (c.1878-12A>G/p.(Ala627Glnfs*11)), and a duplication (c.4640dupA/p.(Asn1547Lysfs*3)). All EP300-mutated individuals show a mild RSTS phenotype and peculiar findings including maternal gestosis, skin manifestation, especially nevi or keloids, back malformations, and a behavior predisposing to anxiety. Furthermore, the patient carrying the complete EP300 deletion does not show a markedly severe clinical picture, even if a more composite phenotype was noticed. By characterizing six novel EP300-mutated patients, this study provides further insights into the EP300-specific clinical presentation and expands the mutational repertoire including the first case of a whole gene deletion. These new data will enhance EP300-mutated cases identification highlighting distinctive features and will improve the clinical practice allowing a better genotype-phenotype correlation.

  9. Relevance of different cellular models in determining the effects of mutations on SLC16A2/MCT8 thyroid hormone transporter function and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Capri, Yline; Friesema, Edith C H; Kersseboom, Simone; Touraine, Renaud; Monnier, Aurélie; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Des Portes, Vincent; De Michele, Giusseppe; Brady, Angela F; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Visser, Theo J; Vaurs-Barriere, Catherine

    2013-07-01

    SLC 16A2, the gene for the second member of the solute carrier family 16 (monocarboxylic acid transporter), located on chromosome Xq13.2, encodes a very efficient thyroid hormone transporter: monocarboxylate transporter 8, MCT8. Its loss of function is responsible in males for a continuum of psychomotor retardation ranging from severe (no motor acquisition, no speech) to mild (ability to walk with help and a few words of speech). Triiodothyronine uptake measurement in transfected cells and, more recently, patient fibroblasts, has been described to study the functional consequences of MCT8 mutations. Here, we describe three novel MCT8 mutations, including one missense variation not clearly predicted to be damaging but found in a severely affected patient. Functional studies in fibroblasts and JEG3 cells demonstrate the usefulness of both cellular models in validating the deleterious effects of a new MCT8 mutation if there is still a doubt as to its pathogenicity. Moreover, the screening of fibroblasts from a large number of patient fibroblasts and of transfected mutations has allowed us to demonstrate that JEG3 transfected cells are more relevant than fibroblasts in revealing a genotype-phenotype correlation.

  10. Update on cardiovascular safety of PPARgamma agonists and relevance to medicinal chemistry and clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Ciudin, Andreea; Hernandez, Cristina; Simó, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activator receptors (PPARs) are now known as members of the nuclear hormonereceptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate gene expression in response to nutritional and physiological stimuli. PPARγ plays a crucial role in glucose homeostasis and it is involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism and adipocyte differentiation and function. From all the PAARγ ligands, the thiazolidindiones (TZDs) are of most clinical importance. Rosiglitazone and pioglitazone have been largely used so far in the clinical practice. They provide similar effects on glycemic control, as well as a range of similar adverse effects, such as weight gain, fluid retention, and increased risk of hearth failure, which seem to be PPARγ mediated. Interestingly, they differ on their effect on lipid and cardiovascular safety profile, indicating a PPARγ-independent mechanism. Indeed, rosiglitazone was recently withdrawn in Europe and its use has been restricted in USA as a consequence of increased risk of cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetic patients. This review is focused on the cardiovascular effects of rosiglitazone and pioglitazone as representative members of PPARγ ligands, because they were widely evaluated in many clinical trials and experimental studies and data obtained from these studies are relevant from medicinal chemistry and clinical pharmacology point of view. Finally, an overview on the development of selective PPARγ modulators and/or dual PPARα/γ agonists will be given. These new approaches might provide anti-hyperglycemic efficacy without the associated undesirable side-effects. However, further experimental and clinical studies evaluating the theoretical benefit and safety of this therapeutic strategy are needed.

  11. Clinical Implications of ESR1 Mutations in Hormone Receptor-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Tomas; Saad, Everardo D.; Barrios, Carlos H.; Bines, José

    2017-01-01

    Hormone receptor-positive breast cancer is the most frequent breast cancer subtype. Endocrine therapy (ET) targeting the estrogen receptor (ER) pathway represents the main initial therapeutic approach. The major strategies include estrogen deprivation and the use of selective estrogen modulators or degraders, which show efficacy in the management of metastatic and early-stage disease. However, clinical resistance associated with progression of disease remains a significant therapeutic challenge. Mutations of the ESR1 gene, which encodes the ER, have been increasingly recognized as an important mechanism of ET resistance, with a prevalence that ranges from 11 to 39%. The majority of these mutations are located within the ligand-binding domain and result in an estrogen-independent constitutive activation of the ER and, therefore, resistance to estrogen deprivation therapy such as aromatase inhibition. ESR1 mutations, most often detected from liquid biopsies, have been consistently associated with a worse outcome and are being currently evaluated as a potential biomarker to guide therapeutic decisions. At the same time, targeted therapy directed to ESR1-mutated clones is an appealing concept with preclinical and clinical work in progress. PMID:28361033

  12. Clinical applications and implications of common and founder mutations in Indian subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Ankala, Arunkanth; Tamhankar, Parag M; Valencia, C Alexander; Rayam, Krishna K; Kumar, Manisha M; Hegde, Madhuri R

    2015-01-01

    South Asian Indians represent a sixth of the world's population and are a racially, geographically, and genetically diverse people. Their unique anthropological structure, prevailing caste system, and ancient religious practices have all impacted the genetic composition of most of the current-day Indian population. With the evolving socio-religious and economic activities of the subsects and castes, endogamous and consanguineous marriages became a commonplace. Consequently, the frequency of founder mutations and the burden of heritable genetic disorders rose significantly. Specifically, the incidence of certain autosomal-recessive disorders is relatively high in select Indian subpopulations and communities that share common recent ancestry. Although today clinical genetics and molecular diagnostic services are making inroads in India, the high costs associated with the technology and the tests often keep patients from an exact molecular diagnosis, making more customized and tailored tests, such as those interrogating the most common and founder mutations or those that cater to select sects within the population, highly attractive. These tests offer a quick first-hand affordable diagnostic and carrier screening tool. Here, we provide a comprehensive catalog of known common mutations and founder mutations in the Indian population and discuss them from a molecular, clinical, and historical perspective.

  13. Clinical and Mutational Features of Three Chinese Children with Congenital Generalized Lipodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xueying; Lin, Ruizhu; Huang, Yonglan; Sheng, Huiying; Li, Xiaofei; Ting, Tzer Hwu; Liu, Li; Li, Xiuzhen

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical and molecular features of congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) in three Chinese patients with various typical manifestations. Methods: Data on clinical symptoms, results of laboratory analyses, and previous treatments in three Chinese patients were collected by a retrospective review of medical records. All coding regions and adjacent exon–intron junction regions of AGPAT2 and BSCL2 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. Results: Generalized lipodystrophy, acanthosis nigricans, muscular hypertrophy, severe hypertriglyceridemia, and hepatomegaly were features in all three patients. Patient 1 developed diabetes mellitus at the early age of 2 months and he was the youngest CGL patient reported with overt diabetes. Patient 2 was found to have cardiomyopathy when she was aged 6 months. All of the patients were found to have mutations in the BSCL2 gene, but none of these was a novel mutation. We did not find any AGPAT2 mutation in our patients. Conclusion: All of our patients exhibited characteristic features of CGL due to mutations in the BSCL2 gene. PMID:27612026

  14. Mutations in RIT1 cause Noonan syndrome – additional functional evidence and expanding the clinical phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Koenighofer, Martin; Hung, Christina Y.; McCauley, Jacob L.; Dallman, Julia; Back, Emma J.; Mihalek, Ivana; Gripp, Karen W.; Sol-Church, Katia; Rusconi, Paolo; Zhang, Zhaiyi; Shi, Geng-Xian; Andres, Douglas A.; Bodamer, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    RASopathies are a clinically heterogeneous group of conditions caused by mutations in one of sixteen proteins in the RAS-MAPK pathway. Recently, mutations in RIT1 were identified as a novel cause for Noonan syndrome. Here we provide additional functional evidence for a causal role of RIT1 mutations and expand the associated phenotypic spectrum. We identified two de novo missense variants p.Met90Ile and, p.Ala57Gly. Both variants resulted in increased MEK-ERK signaling compared to wild-type, underscoring gain-of-function as the primary functional mechanism. Introduction of p.Met90Ile and p.Ala57Gly into zebrafish embryos reproduced not only aspects of the human phenotype but also revealed abnormalities of eye development, emphasizing the importance of RIT1 for spatial and temporal organization of the growing organism. In addition, we observed severe lymphedema of the lower extremity and genitalia in one patient. We provide additional evidence for a causal relationship between pathogenic mutations in RIT1, increased RAS-MAPK/MEK-ERK signaling and the clinical phenotype. The mutant RIT1 protein may possess reduced GTPase activity or a diminished ability to interact with cellular GTPase activating proteins, however the precise mechanism remains unknown. The phenotypic spectrum is likely to expand and includes lymphedema of the lower extremities in addition to nuchal hygroma. PMID:25959749

  15. Prophage carriage and diversity within clinically relevant strains of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jinyu; Patel, Krusha V; Hickenbotham, Peter T; Nale, Janet Y; Hargreaves, Katherine R; Clokie, Martha R J

    2012-09-01

    Prophages are encoded in most genomes of sequenced Clostridium difficile strains. They are key components of the mobile genetic elements and, as such, are likely to influence the biology of their host strains. The majority of these phages are not amenable to propagation, and therefore the development of a molecular marker is a useful tool with which to establish the extent and diversity of C. difficile prophage carriage within clinical strains. To design markers, several candidate genes were analyzed including structural and holin genes. The holin gene is the only gene present in all sequenced phage genomes, conserved at both terminals, with a variable mid-section. This allowed us to design two sets of degenerate PCR primers specific to C. difficile myoviruses and siphoviruses. Subsequent PCR analysis of 16 clinical C. difficile ribotypes showed that 15 of them are myovirus positive, and 2 of them are also siphovirus positive. Antibiotic induction and transmission electron microscope analysis confirmed the molecular prediction of myoviruses and/or siphovirus presence. Phylogenetic analysis of the holin sequences identified three groups of C. difficile phages, two within the myoviruses and a divergent siphovirus group. The marker also produced tight groups within temperate phages that infect other taxa, including Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, and Bacillus spp., which suggests the potential application of the holin gene to study prophage carriage in other bacteria. This study reveals the high incidence of prophage carriage in clinically relevant strains of C. difficile and correlates the molecular data to the morphological observation.

  16. Prophage Carriage and Diversity within Clinically Relevant Strains of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jinyu; Patel, Krusha V.; Hickenbotham, Peter T.; Nale, Janet Y.; Hargreaves, Katherine R.

    2012-01-01

    Prophages are encoded in most genomes of sequenced Clostridium difficile strains. They are key components of the mobile genetic elements and, as such, are likely to influence the biology of their host strains. The majority of these phages are not amenable to propagation, and therefore the development of a molecular marker is a useful tool with which to establish the extent and diversity of C. difficile prophage carriage within clinical strains. To design markers, several candidate genes were analyzed including structural and holin genes. The holin gene is the only gene present in all sequenced phage genomes, conserved at both terminals, with a variable mid-section. This allowed us to design two sets of degenerate PCR primers specific to C. difficile myoviruses and siphoviruses. Subsequent PCR analysis of 16 clinical C. difficile ribotypes showed that 15 of them are myovirus positive, and 2 of them are also siphovirus positive. Antibiotic induction and transmission electron microscope analysis confirmed the molecular prediction of myoviruses and/or siphovirus presence. Phylogenetic analysis of the holin sequences identified three groups of C. difficile phages, two within the myoviruses and a divergent siphovirus group. The marker also produced tight groups within temperate phages that infect other taxa, including Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, and Bacillus spp., which suggests the potential application of the holin gene to study prophage carriage in other bacteria. This study reveals the high incidence of prophage carriage in clinically relevant strains of C. difficile and correlates the molecular data to the morphological observation. PMID:22706062

  17. Histological subtypes of solitary pulmonary nodules of adenocarcinoma and their clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hui-Di; Wan, Ming-Yue; Xu, Chun-Hua; Zhan, Ping; Zou, Jue; Zhang, Qian-Qian

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the histological subtypes of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) of invasive adenocarcinoma and their clinical relevance. Methods A total of 188 patients with pathologically confirmed invasive adenocarcinoma in our hospital from January 2007 to December 2011 were enrolled in this study. In accordance with the new classification of lung adenocarcinoma, all the histological sections were reviewed and classified, and the clinical data were collected and analyzed. Results Of these 188 patients who had been initially diagnosed as SPNs of adenocarcinoma, there were 6 cases of lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma (LPA), 71 cases of acinar predominant adenocarcinoma (APA), 74 cases of papillary predominant adenocarcinoma (PPA), 15 cases of micorpapillary predominant adenocarcinoma (MPA), and 22 cases of solid predominant adenocarcinoma (SPA) with mucin production. The incidence of lymph node metastasis was 80.0% and 81.8% in MPA and SPA, respectively, which was significantly higher than those in LPA, APA, and PPA (all P<0.01). The incidence of LPA was 83.3% (5/6) in women, which was significantly higher than that in men (P=0.037). Conclusions According to the new classification, MPA and SPA have high incidence of lymph node metastasis. LPA is more likely to occur in women. Sub-typing of the lung adenocarcinoma based on the newest international classification criteria is helpful to identify the clinical features of this disease. PMID:24409363

  18. The Clinical Relevance of Force Platform Measures in Multiple Sclerosis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Prosperini, Luca; Pozzilli, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Balance impairment and falls are frequent in patients with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), and they may occur even at the earliest stage of the disease and in minimally impaired patients. The introduction of computer-based force platform measures (i.e., static and dynamic posturography) has provided an objective and sensitive tool to document both deficits and improvements in balance. By using more challenging test conditions, force platform measures can also reveal subtle balance disorders undetectable by common clinical scales. Furthermore, posturographic techniques may also allow to reliably identify PwMS who are at risk of accidental falls. Although force platform measures offer several theoretical advantages, only few studies extensively investigated their role in better managing PwMS. Standardised procedures, as well as clinical relevance of changes detected by static or dynamic posturography, are still lacking. In this review, we summarized studies which investigated balance deficit by means of force platform measures, focusing on their ability in detecting patients at high risk of falls and in estimating rehabilitation-induced changes, highlighting the pros and the cons with respect to clinical scales. PMID:23766910

  19. Polanyi's tacit knowing and the relevance of epistemology to clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Henry, Stephen G

    2010-04-01

    Most clinicians take for granted a simple, reductionist understanding of medical knowledge that is at odds with how they actually practice medicine; routine medical decisions incorporate more complicated kinds of information than most standard accounts of medical reasoning suggest. A better understanding of the structure and function of knowledge in medicine can lead to practical improvements in clinical medicine. This understanding requires some familiarity with epistemology, the study of knowledge and its structure, in medicine. Michael Polanyi's theory of tacit knowing is advanced as the basis for developing a more accurate understanding of medical knowledge. Tacit knowing, which explores the taken-for-granted background knowledge that underlies all human knowing, is explained in detail with a focus on its relevance for clinical medicine. The implications of recognizing tacit knowing in medicine and medical decisions are discussed. These include the ability to explain the importance of the clinical encounter in medical practice, mechanisms for analysing patient and doctor as persons, and the need for humility given the uncertainty that the tacit dimension injects into all medical decisions. This more robust medical epistemology allows clinicians to better articulate the nature and importance of patient-centred care, to avoid pitfalls inherent in reductionist approaches to medical knowledge, and to think more clearly about the relationships between medicine and health care at the individual and population levels.

  20. The Spectrum of CHM Gene Mutations in Choroideremia and Their Relationship to Clinical Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Simunovic, Matthew P.; Jolly, Jasleen K.; Xue, Kanmin; Edwards, Thomas L.; Groppe, Markus; Downes, Susan M.; MacLaren, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We report the underlying genotype and explore possible genotypic-phenotypic correlations in a large cohort of choroideremia patients. Methods We studied prospectively a cohort of 79 patients diagnosed within a tertiary referral service for patients with retinal dystrophies. Phenotypic evaluation consisted of clinical examination, including visual acuity and residual retinal area by fundus autofluorescence (FAF). Genotype was established by sequencing. We also investigated whether particular genotypes were associated with more severe phenotypes by performing analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), with visual acuity and FAF as the dependent variables and age as the covariant. Results A total of 74 (94%) of patients in our cohort had causative mutations by sequencing, the majority of which were anticipated to be null. Of these, 35 (47%) had insertions and deletions, 13 (18%) had mutations predicted to affect splicing, and 26 (35%) had single point mutations. In the latter case, 13 of 21 (62%) pedigrees with single point mutations were C to T transitions at C-phosphate-G (CpG) dinucleotides. These mutations were spread across 5 of only 24 CpG dinucleotides in the entire CHM cDNA. Furthermore, these 5 locations are the only sites at which C to T transitions result in a stop codon. No clear evidence was found for genotype–phenotype correlation except in the instance of a patient with a large deletion involving neighbouring sequences. Conclusions In patients with a diagnosis of choroideremia made by a specialty service, there is a high likelihood of establishing a genetic diagnosis. The majority of causative mutations appear to be null and, therefore, may benefit from gene replacement therapy. A disproportionate number of single point mutations observed were C to T transitions, consistent with the evolutionary decay of CpG dinucleotides through methylation and subsequent deamination. Hence, the development of choroideremia in such patients may represent the unwanted

  1. Clinical features reflect exon sites of EGFR mutations in patients with resected non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Na, Im Il; Rho, Jin Kyung; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Koh, Jae Soo; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Yang, Sung Hyun; Lee, Jae Cheol

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the clinical significance according to the subtypes of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and presence of KRAS mutations in operable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We sequenced exons 18-21 of the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain and examined mutations in codons 12 and 13 of KRAS in tissues of patients with NSCLC who had undergone surgical resection. EGFR mutations were more frequent in never-smokers than smokers (33% vs. 14%, respectively; p=0.009) and in females than in males (31% vs. 16%, respectively; p=0.036). Mutations in exon 18-19 and 20-21 were found in 10 and 22 patients, respectively. Never-smokers and broncho-alveolar cell carcinoma features were positively associated with a mutation in exon 18-19 (p=0.027 and 0.016, respectively). The five-year survival rate in patients with a mutation in exons 18-19 (100%) was higher than that in patients without such mutation (47%; p=0.021). KRAS mutations were found in 16 patients (12%) and were not related to the overall survival (p=0.742). Patients with an EGFR mutation in exons 18-19 had better survival than patients without such mutation. Subtypes of EGFR mutations may be prognostic factors in patients undergoing curative resection.

  2. JAK2 or CALR mutation status defines subtypes of essential thrombocythemia with substantially different clinical course and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rumi, Elisa; Pietra, Daniela; Ferretti, Virginia; Klampfl, Thorsten; Harutyunyan, Ashot S; Milosevic, Jelena D; Them, Nicole C C; Berg, Tiina; Elena, Chiara; Casetti, Ilaria C; Milanesi, Chiara; Sant'antonio, Emanuela; Bellini, Marta; Fugazza, Elena; Renna, Maria C; Boveri, Emanuela; Astori, Cesare; Pascutto, Cristiana; Kralovics, Robert; Cazzola, Mario

    2014-03-06

    Patients with essential thrombocythemia may carry JAK2 (V617F), an MPL substitution, or a calreticulin gene (CALR) mutation. We studied biologic and clinical features of essential thrombocythemia according to JAK2 or CALR mutation status and in relation to those of polycythemia vera. The mutant allele burden was lower in JAK2-mutated than in CALR-mutated essential thrombocythemia. Patients with JAK2 (V617F) were older, had a higher hemoglobin level and white blood cell count, and lower platelet count and serum erythropoietin than those with CALR mutation. Hematologic parameters of patients with JAK2-mutated essential thrombocythemia or polycythemia vera were related to the mutant allele burden. While no polycythemic transformation was observed in CALR-mutated patients, the cumulative risk was 29% at 15 years in those with JAK2-mutated essential thrombocythemia. There was no significant difference in myelofibrotic transformation between the 2 subtypes of essential thrombocythemia. Patients with JAK2-mutated essential thrombocythemia and those with polycythemia vera had a similar risk of thrombosis, which was twice that of patients with the CALR mutation. These observations are consistent with the notion that JAK2-mutated essential thrombocythemia and polycythemia vera represent different phenotypes of a single myeloproliferative neoplasm, whereas CALR-mutated essential thrombocythemia is a distinct disease entity.

  3. JAK2 or CALR mutation status defines subtypes of essential thrombocythemia with substantially different clinical course and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rumi, Elisa; Pietra, Daniela; Ferretti, Virginia; Klampfl, Thorsten; Harutyunyan, Ashot S.; Milosevic, Jelena D.; Them, Nicole C. C.; Berg, Tiina; Elena, Chiara; Casetti, Ilaria C.; Milanesi, Chiara; Sant’Antonio, Emanuela; Bellini, Marta; Fugazza, Elena; Renna, Maria C.; Boveri, Emanuela; Astori, Cesare; Pascutto, Cristiana; Kralovics, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Patients with essential thrombocythemia may carry JAK2 (V617F), an MPL substitution, or a calreticulin gene (CALR) mutation. We studied biologic and clinical features of essential thrombocythemia according to JAK2 or CALR mutation status and in relation to those of polycythemia vera. The mutant allele burden was lower in JAK2-mutated than in CALR-mutated essential thrombocythemia. Patients with JAK2 (V617F) were older, had a higher hemoglobin level and white blood cell count, and lower platelet count and serum erythropoietin than those with CALR mutation. Hematologic parameters of patients with JAK2-mutated essential thrombocythemia or polycythemia vera were related to the mutant allele burden. While no polycythemic transformation was observed in CALR-mutated patients, the cumulative risk was 29% at 15 years in those with JAK2-mutated essential thrombocythemia. There was no significant difference in myelofibrotic transformation between the 2 subtypes of essential thrombocythemia. Patients with JAK2-mutated essential thrombocythemia and those with polycythemia vera had a similar risk of thrombosis, which was twice that of patients with the CALR mutation. These observations are consistent with the notion that JAK2-mutated essential thrombocythemia and polycythemia vera represent different phenotypes of a single myeloproliferative neoplasm, whereas CALR-mutated essential thrombocythemia is a distinct disease entity. PMID:24366362

  4. Skin autofluorescence, a non-invasive marker of advanced glycation end products: clinical relevance and limitations.

    PubMed

    Da Moura Semedo, Cidila; Webb, M'Balu; Waller, Helen; Khunti, Kamlesh; Davies, Melanie

    2017-01-31

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are protein-bound compounds derived from glycaemic and oxidative stress that contain fluorescent properties, which can be non-invasively measured as skin autofluorescence (SAF) by the AGE Reader. SAF has been demonstrated to be a biomarker of cumulative skin AGEs and potentially may be a better predictor for the development of chronic complications and mortality in diabetes than glycated haemoglobin A1c. However, there are several confounding factors that should be assessed prior to its broader application: these include presence of other fluorescent compounds in the skin that might be measured (eg, fluorophores), skin pigmentation and use of skin creams. The aim of this article is to provide a theoretical background of this newly developed method, evaluate its clinical relevance and discuss the potential confounding factors that need further analysis.

  5. Clinical relevance associated to the analysis of circulating tumour cells in patients with solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Serrano Fernádez, María José; Alvarez Merino, Juan Carlos; Martínez Zubiaurre, Iñigo; Fernández García, Ana; Sánchez Rovira, Pedro; Lorente Acosta, José Antonio

    2009-10-01

    The distant growth of tumour cells escaping from primary tumours, a process termed metastasis, represents the leading cause of death among patients affected by malignant neoplasias from breast and colon. During the metastasis process, cancer cells liberated from primary tumour tissue, also termed circulating tumour cells (CTCs), travel through the circulatory and/or lymphatic systems to reach distant organs. The early detection and the genotypic and phenotypic characterisation of such CTCs could represent a powerful diagnostic tool of the disease, and could also be considered an important predictive and prognostic marker of disease progression and treatment response. In this article we discuss the potential relevance in the clinic of monitoring CTCs from patients suffering from solid epithelial tumours, with emphasis on the impact of such analyses as a predictive marker for treatment response.

  6. In vivo photoacoustic and fluorescence cystography using clinically relevant dual modal indocyanine green.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungjo; Kim, Jeesu; Jeon, Mansik; Song, Jaewon; Kim, Chulhong

    2014-10-21

    Conventional X-ray-based cystography uses radio-opaque materials, but this method uses harmful ionizing radiation and is not sensitive. In this study, we demonstrate nonionizing and noninvasive photoacoustic (PA) and fluorescence (FL) cystography using clinically relevant indocyanine green (ICG) in vivo. After transurethral injection of ICG into rats through a catheter, their bladders were photoacoustically and fluorescently visualized. A deeply positioned bladder below the skin surface (i.e., ~1.5-5 mm) was clearly visible in the PA and FL image using a laser pulse energy of less than 2 mJ/cm2 (1/15 of the safety limit). Then, the in vivo imaging results were validated through in situ studies. Our results suggest that dual modal cystography can provide a nonionizing and noninvasive imaging tool for bladder mapping.

  7. Fungal-bacterial interactions and their relevance to oral health: linking the clinic and the bench.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Patricia I; Strausbaugh, Linda D; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing has accelerated knowledge on the oral microbiome. While the bacterial component of oral communities has been extensively characterized, the role of the fungal microbiota in the oral cavity is largely unknown. Interactions among fungi and bacteria are likely to influence oral health as exemplified by the synergistic relationship between Candida albicans and oral streptococci. In this perspective, we discuss the current state of the field of fungal-bacterial interactions in the context of the oral cavity. We highlight the need to conduct longitudinal clinical studies to simultaneously characterize the bacterial and fungal components of the human oral microbiome in health and during disease progression. Such studies need to be coupled with investigations using disease-relevant models to mechanistically test the associations observed in humans and eventually identify fungal-bacterial interactions that could serve as preventive or therapeutic targets for oral diseases.

  8. Fungal-bacterial interactions and their relevance to oral health: linking the clinic and the bench

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Patricia I.; Strausbaugh, Linda D.; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing has accelerated knowledge on the oral microbiome. While the bacterial component of oral communities has been extensively characterized, the role of the fungal microbiota in the oral cavity is largely unknown. Interactions among fungi and bacteria are likely to influence oral health as exemplified by the synergistic relationship between Candida albicans and oral streptococci. In this perspective, we discuss the current state of the field of fungal-bacterial interactions in the context of the oral cavity. We highlight the need to conduct longitudinal clinical studies to simultaneously characterize the bacterial and fungal components of the human oral microbiome in health and during disease progression. Such studies need to be coupled with investigations using disease-relevant models to mechanistically test the associations observed in humans and eventually identify fungal-bacterial interactions that could serve as preventive or therapeutic targets for oral diseases. PMID:25120959

  9. Expanding the scope and relevance of health interventions: Moving beyond clinical trials and behavior change models

    PubMed Central

    Rigg, Khary K.; Cook, Hilary H.; Murphy, John W.

    2014-01-01

    An overemphasis on clinical trials and behavior change models has narrowed the knowledge base that can be used to design interventions. The overarching point is that the process of overanalyzing variables is impeding the process of gaining insight into the everyday experiences that shape how people define health and seek treatment. This claim is especially important to health decision-making and behavior change because subtle interpretations often influence the decisions that people make. This manuscript provides a critique of traditional approaches to developing health interventions, and theoretically justifies what and why changes are warranted. The limited scope of these models is also discussed, and an argument is made to adopt a strategy that includes the perceptions of people as necessary for understanding health and health-related decision-making. Three practical strategies are suggested to be used with the more standard approaches to assessing the effectiveness and relevance of health interventions. PMID:25053530

  10. Clinical, histological and genetic characterization of reducing body myopathy caused by mutations in FHL1

    PubMed Central

    Schessl, Joachim; Taratuto, Ana L.; Sewry, Caroline; Battini, Roberta; Chin, Steven S.; Maiti, Baijayanta; Dubrovsky, Alberto L.; Erro, Marcela G.; Espada, Graciela; Robertella, Monica; Saccoliti, Maria; Olmos, Patricia; Bridges, Leslie R.; Standring, Peter; Hu, Ying; Zou, Yaqun; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Scavina, Mena; Goebel, Hans-Hilmar; Mitchell, Christina A.; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Muntoni, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    We recently identified the X-chromosomal four and a half LIM domain gene FHL1 as the causative gene for reducing body myopathy, a disorder characterized by progressive weakness and intracytoplasmic aggregates in muscle that exert reducing activity on menadione nitro-blue-tetrazolium (NBT). The mutations detected in FHL1 affected highly conserved zinc coordinating residues within the second LIM domain and lead to the formation of aggregates when transfected into cells. Our aim was to define the clinical and morphological phenotype of this myopathy and to assess the mutational spectrum of FHL1 mutations in reducing body myopathy in a larger cohort of patients. Patients were ascertained via the detection of reducing bodies in muscle biopsy sections stained with menadione-NBT followed by clinical, histological, ultrastructural and molecular genetic analysis. A total of 11 patients from nine families were included in this study, including seven sporadic patients with early childhood onset disease and four familial cases with later onset. Weakness in all patients was progressive, sometimes rapidly so. Respiratory failure was common and scoliosis and spinal rigidity were significant in some of the patients. Analysis of muscle biopsies confirmed the presence of aggregates of FHL1 positive material in all biopsies. In two patients in whom sequential biopsies were available the aggregate load in muscle sections appeared to increase over time. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that cytoplasmic bodies were regularly seen in conjunction with the reducing bodies. The mutations detected were exclusive to the second LIM domain of FHL1 and were found in both sporadic as well as familial cases of reducing body myopathy. Six of the nine mutations affected the crucial zinc coordinating residue histidine 123. All mutations in this residue were de novo and were associated with a severe clinical course, in particular in one male patient (H123Q). Mutations in the zinc coordinating residue

  11. Per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates do not predict clinically relevant patient dose errors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Zhen Heming; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to determine the statistical correlation between per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates and several clinically relevant, anatomy-based dose errors for per-patient IMRT QA. The intent is to assess the predictive power of a common conventional IMRT QA performance metric, the Gamma passing rate per beam. Methods: Ninety-six unique data sets were created by inducing four types of dose errors in 24 clinical head and neck IMRT plans, each planned with 6 MV Varian 120-leaf MLC linear accelerators using a commercial treatment planning system and step-and-shoot delivery. The error-free beams/plans were used as ''simulated measurements'' (for generating the IMRT QA dose planes and the anatomy dose metrics) to compare to the corresponding data calculated by the error-induced plans. The degree of the induced errors was tuned to mimic IMRT QA passing rates that are commonly achieved using conventional methods. Results: Analysis of clinical metrics (parotid mean doses, spinal cord max and D1cc, CTV D95, and larynx mean) vs IMRT QA Gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 2/2, 1/1) showed that in all cases, there were only weak to moderate correlations (range of Pearson's r-values: -0.295 to 0.653). Moreover, the moderate correlations actually had positive Pearson's r-values (i.e., clinically relevant metric differences increased with increasing IMRT QA passing rate), indicating that some of the largest anatomy-based dose differences occurred in the cases of high IMRT QA passing rates, which may be called ''false negatives.'' The results also show numerous instances of false positives or cases where low IMRT QA passing rates do not imply large errors in anatomy dose metrics. In none of the cases was there correlation consistent with high predictive power of planar IMRT passing rates, i.e., in none of the cases did high IMRT QA Gamma passing rates predict low errors in anatomy dose metrics or vice versa. Conclusions: There is a lack of correlation between

  12. Chromosomal patterns of gene expression from microarray data: methodology, validation and clinical relevance in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Turkheimer, Federico E; Roncaroli, Federico; Hennuy, Benoit; Herens, Christian; Nguyen, Minh; Martin, Didier; Evrard, Annick; Bours, Vincent; Boniver, Jacques; Deprez, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression microarrays represent a powerful technique for the simultaneous investigation of thousands of genes. The evidence that genes are not randomly distributed in the genome and that their coordinated expression depends on their position on chromosomes has highlighted the need for mathematical approaches to exploit this dependency for the analysis of expression data-sets. Results We have devised a novel mathematical technique (CHROMOWAVE) based on the Haar wavelet transform and applied it to a dataset obtained with the Affymetrix® HG-U133_Plus_2 array in 27 gliomas. CHROMOWAVE generated multi-chromosomal pattern featuring low expression in chromosomes 1p, 4, 9q, 13, 18, and 19q. This pattern was not only statistically robust but also clinically relevant as it was predictive of favourable outcome. This finding was replicated on a data-set independently acquired by another laboratory. FISH analysis indicated that monosomy 1p and 19q was a frequent feature of tumours displaying the CHROMOWAVE pattern but that allelic loss on chromosomes 4, 9q, 13 and 18 was much less common. Conclusion The ability to detect expression changes of spatially related genes and to map their position on chromosomes makes CHROMOWAVE a valuable screening method for the identification and display of regional gene expression changes of clinical relevance. In this study, FISH data showed that monosomy was frequently associated with diffuse low gene expression on chromosome 1p and 19q but not on chromosomes 4, 9q, 13 and 18. Comparative genomic hybridisation, allelic polymorphism analysis and methylation studies are in progress in order to identify the various mechanisms involved in this multi-chromosomal expression pattern. PMID:17140431

  13. Expression, regulation and clinical relevance of the ATPase inhibitory factor 1 in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Aragó, M; Formentini, L; Martínez-Reyes, I; García-Bermudez, J; Santacatterina, F; Sánchez-Cenizo, L; Willers, I M; Aldea, M; Nájera, L; Juarránz, Á; López, E C; Clofent, J; Navarro, C; Espinosa, E; Cuezva, J M

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings in colon cancer cells indicate that inhibition of the mitochondrial H+-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase by the ATPase inhibitory factor 1 (IF1) promotes aerobic glycolysis and a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signal that enhances proliferation and cell survival. Herein, we have studied the expression, biological relevance, mechanism of regulation and potential clinical impact of IF1 in some prevalent human carcinomas. We show that IF1 is highly overexpressed in most (>90%) of the colon (n=64), lung (n=30), breast (n=129) and ovarian (n=10) carcinomas studied as assessed by different approaches in independent cohorts of cancer patients. The expression of IF1 in the corresponding normal tissues is negligible. By contrast, the endometrium, stomach and kidney show high expression of IF1 in the normal tissue revealing subtle differences by carcinogenesis. The overexpression of IF1 also promotes the activation of aerobic glycolysis and a concurrent ROS signal in mitochondria of the lung, breast and ovarian cancer cells mimicking the activity of oligomycin. IF1-mediated ROS signaling activates cell-type specific adaptive responses aimed at preventing death in these cell lines. Remarkably, regulation of IF1 expression in the colon, lung, breast and ovarian carcinomas is exerted at post-transcriptional levels. We demonstrate that IF1 is a short-lived protein (t1/2 ∼100 min) strongly implicating translation and/or protein stabilization as main drivers of metabolic reprogramming and cell survival in these human cancers. Analysis of tumor expression of IF1 in cohorts of breast and colon cancer patients revealed its relevance as a predictive marker for clinical outcome, emphasizing the high potential of IF1 as therapeutic target. PMID:23608753

  14. Power to detect clinically relevant carry-over in a series of cross-over studies.

    PubMed

    Putt, Mary E

    2006-08-15

    The potential for carry-over effects is an important consideration in the design of any cross-over study, and can cause an investigator to abandon the design altogether. In cross-over studies, carry-over is the lingering effect of a treatment into the subsequent period. Carry-over effects are differences in the extent of the carry-over between the treatments under consideration. It is well known that the test for carry-over effects in individual studies has low power. Empirical evidence of carry-over effects, or the absence of carry-over effects, could be useful for investigators considering the design. Here we develop methods for expressing the power to detect carry-over as a function of the power to detect a clinically relevant treatment effect. Our results suggest that for two-treatment, two-period cross-over studies the power to detect clinically relevant carry-over effects is often less than 15 per cent, and the number of studies needed to differentiate this effect from the type I error rate of 10 per cent is prohibitive. For the three-treatment three-period cross-over design, the power to detect carry-over effects was larger than for the two-period study, but still approached the type I error rate in a number of cases. Unequivocal conclusions about the absence of carry-over effects based on collections of hypothesis tests appear unlikely. Similar findings are presented for bioequivalence studies. For bioequivalence studies, small carry-over effects (e.g. 12.5 per cent of the treatment effect) can seriously inflate the type I error rate, particularly when the power to detect equivalence is high.

  15. Clinical relevance of the ROC and free-response paradigms for comparing imaging system efficacies.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, D P

    2010-01-01

    Observer performance studies are widely used to assess medical imaging systems. Unlike technical/engineering measurements observer performance include the entire imaging chain and the radiologist. However, the widely used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method ignores lesion localisation information. The free-response ROC (FROC) method uses the location information to appropriately reward or penalise correct or incorrect localisations, respectively. This paper describes a method for improving the clinical relevance of FROC studies. The method consists of assigning appropriate risk values to the different lesions that may be present on a single image. A high-risk lesion is one that is critical to detect and act upon, and is assigned a higher risk value than a low-risk lesion, one that is relatively innocuous. Instead of simply counting the number of lesions that are detected, as is done in conventional FROC analysis, a risk-weighted count is used. This has the advantage of rewarding detections of high-risk lesions commensurately more than detections of lower risk lesions. Simulations were used to demonstrate that the new method, termed case-based analysis, results in a higher figure of merit for an expert who detects more high-risk lesions than a naive observer who detects more low-risk lesions, even though both detect the same total number of lesions. Conventional free-response analysis is unable to distinguish between the two types of observers. This paper also comments on the issue of clinical relevance of ROC analysis vs. FROC for tasks that involve lesion localisation.

  16. Direct toxic effects of aqueous extract of cigarette smoke on cardiac myocytes at clinically relevant concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Shigeyuki; Zhang Xiuquan; Kadono, Toshie; Matsuoka, Nobuhiro; Rollins, Douglas; Badger, Troy; Rodesch, Christopher K.; Barry, William H.

    2009-04-01

    Aims: Our goal was to determine if clinically relevant concentrations of aqueous extract of cigarette smoke (CSE) have direct deleterious effects on ventricular myocytes during simulated ischemia, and to investigate the mechanisms involved. Methods: CSE was prepared with a smoking chamber. Ischemia was simulated by metabolic inhibition (MI) with cyanide (CN) and 0 glucose. Adult rabbit and mouse ventricular myocyte [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was measured by flow cytometry using fluo-3. Mitochondrial [Ca{sup 2+}] was measured with confocal microscopy, and Rhod-2 fluorescence. The mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) was detected by TMRM fluorescence and myocyte contracture. Myocyte oxidative stress was quantified by dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence with confocal microscopy. Results: CSE 0.1% increased myocyte contracture caused by MI. The nicotine concentration (HPLC) in 0.1% CSE was 15 ng/ml, similar to that in humans after smoking cigarettes. CSE 0.1% increased mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uptake, and increased the susceptibility of mitochondria to the MPT. CSE 0.1% increased DCF fluorescence in isolated myocytes, and increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in paced myocytes exposed to 2.0 mM CN, 0 glucose (P-MI). These effects were inhibited by the superoxide scavenger Tiron. The effect of CSE on [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} during P-MI was also prevented by ranolazine. Conclusions: CSE in clinically relevant concentrations increases myocyte [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} during simulated ischemia, and increases myocyte susceptibility to the MPT. These effects appear to be mediated at least in part by oxidative radicals in CSE, and likely contribute to the effects of cigarette smoke to increase myocardial infarct size, and to decrease angina threshold.

  17. Clinically-Relevant Measures Associated with Altered Contact Forces in Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background Knee joint contact forces are altered after anterior cruciate ligament injury during walking and may be related to clinically-relevant measures of impairments or self-reported function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of several clinically-relevant measures with altered knee contact forces in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Methods Data for this study represent a cross-sectional observational analysis of thirty-seven (23 M, 14 F) patients with complete unilateral anterior cruciate ligament injury. Gait analysis with electromyography was used to obtain estimates of tibiofemoral joint contact force using an electromyography-driven musculoskeletal model. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify measures associated with tibiofemoral joint contact force. Findings Involved knee extensor muscle strength and patient-reported knee function on the Global Rating Scale of Perceived Function were significantly associated with peak tibiofemoral contact force for the involved limb. Patients who were stronger and who perceived higher knee function walked with greater contact forces on their involved knees. After controlling for walking speed, involved extensor strength explained 8.9% of the variance in involved peak tibiofemoral contact force and score on the Global Rating Scale explained an additional 9.4% of the variance. Interpretation Improvements in involved quadriceps strength and overall function as measured by patient self-report may be important for increasing involved limb contact forces, thereby restoring loading symmetry in these patients who demonstrate decreased involved limb loading after injury. These results highlight the potential value of studying the recovery of strength, self-reported function and joint loading symmetry in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury. PMID:24746854

  18. Gene expression profiling identifies distinct molecular subgroups of leiomyosarcoma with clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yin-Fai; Roe, Toby; Mangham, D Chas; Fisher, Cyril; Grimer, Robert J; Judson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Soft tissue sarcomas are heterogeneous and a major complication in their management is that the existing classification scheme is not definitive and is still evolving. Leiomyosarcomas, a major histologic category of soft tissue sarcomas, are malignant tumours displaying smooth muscle differentiation. Although defined as a single group, they exhibit a wide range of clinical behaviour. We aimed to carry out molecular classification to identify new molecular subgroups with clinical relevance. Methods: We used gene expression profiling on 20 extra-uterine leiomyosarcomas and cross-study analyses for molecular classification of leiomyosarcomas. Clinical significance of the subgroupings was investigated. Results: We have identified two distinct molecular subgroups of leiomyosarcomas. One group was characterised by high expression of 26 genes that included many genes from the sub-classification gene cluster proposed by Nielsen et al. These sub-classification genes include genes that have importance structurally, as well as in cell signalling. Notably, we found a statistically significant association of the subgroupings with tumour grade. Further refinement led to a group of 15 genes that could recapitulate the tumour subgroupings in our data set and in a second independent sarcoma set. Remarkably, cross-study analyses suggested that these molecular subgroups could be found in four independent data sets, providing strong support for their existence. Conclusions: Our study strongly supported the existence of distinct leiomyosarcoma molecular subgroups, which have clinical association with tumour grade. Our findings will aid in advancing the classification of leiomyosarcomas and lead to more individualised and better management of the disease. PMID:27607470

  19. Lack of Association between Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression and Clinically Relevant Molecular or Morphologic Tumor Characteristics at the Leading Edge of Invasive Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Annette; Kraft, Klaus; Wardelmann, Eva; Steinestel, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of death from cancer in the western world, but tumor biology and clinical course show great interindividual variation. Molecular and morphologic tumor characteristics, such as KRAS/BRAF mutation status, mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression, tumor growth pattern, and tumor cell budding, have been shown to be of key therapeutic and/or prognostic relevance in CRC. Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-anchored zinc-binding endopeptidase that is expressed at the leading edge of various invasive carcinomas and promotes tumor cell invasion through degradation of the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between MT1-MMP expression and molecular tumor characteristics as well as morphologic features of tumor aggressiveness in a consecutive series of 79 CRC tissue samples. However, although MT1-MMP was expressed in 41/79 samples (52%), there was no significant association between MT1-MMP expression and KRAS/BRAF mutation status, MMR protein expression, presence of lymphovascular invasion, tumor growth pattern, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, or tumor cell budding in our sample cohort (P > 0.05). Thus, we conclude that although MT1-MMP may play a role in CRC invasion, it is not of key relevance to the current models of CRC invasion and aggressiveness. PMID:26106602

  20. Endoscopic Pancreas Fluid Collection: Methods and Relevance for Clinical Care and Translational Science.

    PubMed

    Hart, Phil A; Topazian, Mark; Raimondo, Massimo; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Fisher, William E; Lesinski, Gregory B; Steen, Hanno; Conwell, Darwin L

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic secretions have an important role in the regulation of a normal nutritional state but can be altered owing to a variety of pathophysiological mechanisms in the context of exocrine pancreatic disease. The development of an endoscopic technique for collection of pancreatic fluid, termed endoscopic pancreatic function testing, has led to improved understanding of these alterations and is particularly helpful to characterize chronic pancreatitis. In addition, investigators have found endoscopically collected pancreatic fluid to be a valuable biofluid for the purposes of translational science. Techniques such as proteomic, cytokine, genetic mutation, DNA methylation, and microRNA analyses, among others, can be utilized to gain a better understanding of the molecular characteristics of chronic pancreatitis and other pancreatic diseases. Endoscopic collection of pancreatic fluid is safe and relatively straightforward, permitting opportunities for longitudinal analysis of these translational markers throughout the course of disease. This manuscript summarizes our current knowledge of pancreatic fluid, with an emphasis on proper techniques for sample collection and handling, its clinical utility, and preliminary observations in translational science.

  1. The evolution and clinical relevance of prognostic classification systems in myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bose, Prithviraj; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2016-03-01

    Primary myelofibrosis, the most aggressive of the classic Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), is a clonal disorder characterized by often debilitating constitutional symptoms and splenomegaly, bone marrow fibrosis and resultant cytopenias, extramedullary hematopoiesis, risk of leukemic transformation, and shortened survival. Post-polycythemia vera and post-essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis represent similar entities, although some differences are being recognized. Attempts to classify patients with myelofibrosis into prognostic categories have been made since the late 1980s, and these scoring systems continue to evolve as new information becomes available. Over the last decade, the molecular pathogenesis of MPNs has been elucidated considerably, and the Janus kinase (JAK) 1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib is the first drug specifically approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat patients with intermediate-risk and high-risk myelofibrosis. This article reviews the evolution of prognostic criteria in myelofibrosis, emphasizing the major systems widely in use today, as well as recently described, novel systems that incorporate emerging data regarding somatic mutations. Risk factors for thrombosis and conversion to MPN blast phase also are discussed. Finally, the practical usefulness of the current prognostic classification systems in terms of clinical decision making is discussed, particularly within the context of some of their inherent weaknesses. Cancer 2016;122:681-692. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  2. Psychosis and Hallucinations in FTD with C9ORF72 mutation: A detailed clinical cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Andrew; Ang, Lee Cyn; Jesso, Sarah; MacKinley, Julia; Baker, Matt; Brown, Patricia; Shoesmith, Christen; Rademakers, Rosa; Finger, Elizabeth C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe in detail the presenting symptoms and clinical course of a cohort of patients with Frontotemporal dementia and the recently described C9ORF72 repeat expansion. BACKGROUND Recent discovery of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion linked to familial frontotemporal dementia and ALS has permitted retrospective evaluation of potential defining clinical characteristics that may distinguish C9ORF72 mutation carriers from other patients with FTD. Prior reports have identified a subset of patients with an increased incidence of psychosis, specifically delusions, though the detailed nature of these symptoms is not yet well described. METHODS We conducted a retrospective chart review of to report the detailed case histories of 7 patients with C9ORF72 mutations from a cohort of 61 patients with FTD. Results Detailed histories available from these patients reveal an increased incidence of psychosis, including visual and auditory hallucinations and delusions compared to sporadic FTD patients in our cohort. CONCLUSIONS This cohort confirms and adds symptom-related details to prior reports of increased incidence of psychotic phenomenon in FTD and ALS patients with C9ORF72 mutations, to enhance future clinical identification and diagnosis of patients presenting with these symptoms. PMID:24077574

  3. Whole-exome sequencing in relapsing chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical impact of recurrent RPS15 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ljungström, Viktor; Cortese, Diego; Young, Emma; Pandzic, Tatjana; Mansouri, Larry; Plevova, Karla; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Clifford, Ruth; Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Blakemore, Stuart J.; Stavroyianni, Niki; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Rossi, Davide; Höglund, Martin; Kotaskova, Jana; Juliusson, Gunnar; Belessi, Chrysoula; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Langerak, Anton W.; Smedby, Karin E.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Schuh, Anna; Davi, Frederic; Pott, Christiane; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Trentin, Livio; Pospisilova, Sarka; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) is first-line treatment of medically fit chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients; however, despite good response rates, many patients eventually relapse. Although recent high-throughput studies have identified novel recurrent genetic lesions in adverse prognostic CLL, the mechanisms leading to relapse after FCR therapy are not completely understood. To gain insight into this issue, we performed whole-exome sequencing of sequential samples from 41 CLL patients who were uniformly treated with FCR but relapsed after a median of 2 years. In addition to mutations with known adverse-prognostic impact (TP53, NOTCH1, ATM, SF3B1, NFKBIE, and BIRC3), a large proportion of cases (19.5%) harbored mutations in RPS15, a gene encoding a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. Extended screening, totaling 1119 patients, supported a role for RPS15 mutations in aggressive CLL, with one-third of RPS15-mutant cases also carrying TP53 aberrations. In most cases, selection of dominant, relapse-specific subclones was observed over time. However, RPS15 mutations were clonal before treatment and remained stable at relapse. Notably, all RPS15 mutations represented somatic missense variants and resided within a 7 amino-acid, evolutionarily conserved region. We confirmed the recently postulated direct interaction between RPS15 and MDM2/MDMX and transient expression of mutant RPS15 revealed defective regulation of endogenous p53 compared with wild-type RPS15. In summary, we provide novel insights into the heterogeneous genetic landscape of CLL relapsing after FCR treatment and highlight a novel mechanism underlying clinical aggressiveness involving a mutated ribosomal protein, potentially representing an early genetic lesion in CLL pathobiology. PMID:26675346

  4. Functional characterization of novel ABCB6 mutations and their clinical implications in familial pseudohyperkalemia

    PubMed Central

    Andolfo, Immacolata; Russo, Roberta; Manna, Francesco; De Rosa, Gianluca; Gambale, Antonella; Zouwail, Soha; Detta, Nicola; Pardo, Catia Lo; Alper, Seth L.; Brugnara, Carlo; Sharma, Alok K.; De Franceschi, Lucia; Iolascon, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Isolated familial pseudohyperkalemia is a dominant red cell trait characterized by cold-induced ‘passive leak’ of red cell potassium ions into plasma. The causative gene of this condition is ABCB6, which encodes an erythrocyte membrane ABC transporter protein bearing the Langereis blood group antigen system. In this study analyzing three new families, we report the first functional characterization of ABCB6 mutants, including the homozygous mutation V454A, heterozygous mutation R276W, and compound heterozygous mutations R276W and R723Q (in trans). All these mutations are annotated in public databases, suggesting that familial pseudohyperkalemia could be common in the general population. Indeed, we identified variant R276W in one of 327 random blood donors (0.3%). Four weeks’ storage of heterozygous R276W blood cells resulted in massive loss of potassium compared to that from healthy control red blood cells. Moreover, measurement of cation flux demonstrated greater loss of potassium or rubidium ions from HEK-293 cells expressing ABCB6 mutants than from cells expressing wild-type ABCB6. The R276W/R723Q mutations elicited greater cellular potassium ion efflux than did the other mutants tested. In conclusion, ABCB6 missense mutations in red blood cells from subjects with familial pseudohyperkalemia show elevated potassium ion efflux. The prevalence of such individuals in the blood donor population is moderate. The fact that storage of blood from these subjects leads to significantly increased levels of potassium in the plasma could have serious clinical implications for neonates and infants receiving large-volume transfusions of whole blood. Genetic tests for familial pseudohyperkalemia could be added to blood donor pre-screening. Further study of ABCB6 function and trafficking could be informative for the study of other pathologies of red blood cell hydration. PMID:27151991

  5. Clinical Heterogeneity in Patients With FOXP3 Mutations Presenting With Permanent Neonatal Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Minton, Jayne A.L.; Caswell, Richard; Shield, Julian P.; Deiss, Dorothee; Sumnik, Zdenek; Cayssials, Amely; Herr, Mathias; Loew, Anja; Lewis, Vaughan; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome is caused by FOXP3 mutations. We aimed to determine the prevalence, genetics, and clinical phenotype of FOXP3 mutations in a large cohort with permanent neonatal diabetes (PNDM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The 11 coding exons and the polyadenylation region of FOXP3 were sequenced in 26 male subjects with diabetes diagnosed before 6 months of age in whom common genetic causes of PNDM had been excluded. Ten subjects had at least one additional immune-related disorder, and the remaining 16 had isolated diabetes. RESULTS—We identified four hemizygous FOXP3 mutations in 6 of 10 patients with associated immune-related disorders and in 0 of 16 patients with isolated diabetes (P = 0.002). Three patients with two novel mutations (R337Q and P339A) and the previously reported L76QfsX53 developed classic IPEX syndrome and died within the first 13 months. The novel mutation V408M was found in three patients from two unrelated families and had a mild phenotype with hypothyroidism and autoimmune enteropathy (n = 2) or nephrotic syndrome (n = 1) and survival to 12–15 years. CONCLUSIONS—FOXP3 mutations result in ∼4% of cases of male patients with permanent diabetes diagnosed before 6 months. Patients not only have classic IPEX syndrome but, unexpectedly, may have a more benign phenotype. FOXP3 sequencing should be performed in any male patient with the diagnosis of diabetes in the first 6 months who develops other possible autoimmune-associated conditions, even in the absence of full IPEX syndrome. PMID:18931102

  6. The Clinical Relevance of Antifibrillarin (anti-U3-RNP) Autoantibodies in Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tall, F; Dechomet, M; Riviere, S; Cottin, V; Ballot, E; Tiev, K P; Montin, R; Morin, C; Chantran, Y; Grange, C; Jullien, D; Ninet, J; Chretien, P; Cabane, J; Fabien, N; Johanet, C

    2017-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease associated with several antinuclear autoantibodies useful to diagnosis and prognosis. The aim of the present multicentric study was to determine the clinical relevance of antifibrillarin autoantibodies (AFA) in patients with SSc. The clinical features of 37 patients with SSc positive for AFA (AFA+) and 139 SSc patients without AFA (AFA-) were collected retrospectively from medical records to enable a comparison between AFA- and AFA+ patients. Antifibrillarin autoantibodies were screened by an indirect immunofluorescence technique using HEp2 cells and identified by an in-house Western blot technique and/or an EliA test. Comparing AFA+ and AFA- patients, AFA+ patients were significantly younger at disease onset (36.9 versus 42.9; P = 0.02), more frequently male (P = 0.02) and of Afro-Caribbean descent (65% versus 7.7%; P < 0.001). At diagnosis, the Rodnan skin score evaluating the cutaneous manifestations was higher (13.3 versus 8.7; P = 0.01) and myositis was also more common in the AFA+ group (31.4% versus 12.2%; P < 0.01). Patients with AFA+ were not associated with diffuse cutaneous SSc or with lung involvement and no difference in survival was observed. Antifibrillarin autoantibodies are associated with patients of Afro-Caribbean origin and can identify patients with SSc who are younger at disease onset and display a higher prevalence of myositis.

  7. Serology and clinical relevance of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in native Korean goats (Capra hircus coreanae).

    PubMed

    Jung, Byeong Yeal; Lee, Seung-Hun; Kim, Ha-Young; Byun, Jae-Won; Shin, Dong-Ho; Kim, Daekeun; Kwak, Dongmi

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to assess the seroprevalence and clinical relevance of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, which is the causative agent of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA), in native Korean goats (Capra hircus coreanae). A total of 466 native Korean goats from 40 herds (11 to 12 samples per herd) were randomly selected throughout the nation and evaluated by direct palpation, bacterial isolation, ELISA, and PCR. In serological examinations, 267 (57.3 %) of the goats tested were positive against C. pseudotuberculosis. When seroprevalence was analyzed according to age, region, and season, statistically significant differences were observed in relation to all three parameters (P < 0.05). For clinical examination, the superficial lymph nodes of all goats were palpated to diagnose CLA. Pus samples taken from superficial abscesses were used for bacterial isolation. Among the 466 goats tested, 34 (7.3 %) were presumptively diagnosed with CLA, and C. pseudotuberculosis was isolated from 24 goats (70.6 % of goats with CLA lesions) whose infections were confirmed by PCR. Considering the high seroprevalence and bacterial isolation rate from most of the superficial CLA lesions, it is suspected that many internal CLA lesions exist in this goat population. These results suggest that C. pseudotuberculosis infection is widespread in native Korean goats, and appropriate control programs need to be established.

  8. In vivo radiosensitization efficacy of KU-2285 and etanidazole at clinically relevant low radiation doses

    SciTech Connect

    Oya, Natsuo; Shibamoto, Yuta; Sasai, Keisuke; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Sugiyama, Taketoshi )

    1993-12-01

    The in vivo radiosensitization efficacy of KU-2285 (a fluorinated nitroimidazole derivative) at clinically relevant low radiation doses (2-4 Gy) was compared with that of etanidazole using four types of assays with EMT6, SCCVII, and C[sup 3]H mammary tumors. The in vivo-in vitro cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay and the chromosomal aberration assay were used to assess the sensitizing effect at single doses of 2-4 Gy. After in vivo treatment for tumors, tumor cells were cultured in the presence of cytochalasin B for the former assay or demecolcine for the latter assay, and the micronucleus frequency in binucleate cells and the chromosomal frequency in metaphase cells were evaluated after 42 hr and 3 hr of culture. In addition, an in vivo-in vitro colony assay and a growth delay assay were performed using fractionated irradiation regimens (4 Gy [times] 5). The sensitizer enhancement ratio for 100-400 mg/kg of KU-2285 was between 1.12 and 1.42. KU-2285 was a more efficient sensitizer than etanidazole in 3 of 9 experiments and as efficient as etanidazole in the remaining six experiments. Both the micronucleus assay and the chromosomal aberration assay appeared to be very useful in evaluating the in vivo sensitizing effect at low radiation doses. KU-2285 had a definite radiosensitizing effect even at low radiation doses, and clinical trials of KU-2285 may be warranted. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Education in the clinical context: establishing a strategic framework to ensure relevance.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Amanda; Fox, Robyn; Armit, Lyn

    2008-01-01

    Quality contemporary practice relies on nurses to provide health care within an embedded nexus of clinical, professional and organisational learning that leads them through a career trajectory that encourages lifelong development. Within complex health service environments this is fraught with difficulties. Enhancing practice is multifaceted requiring not just education for the acquisition of skills and abilities but time and space for reflection on experience within the clinical context. This ultimately leads to professional knowledge development. Queensland Health has developed a Nursing and Midwifery Staff Development Framework to assist nurses in structuring their experiences in the practice setting to enable their professional goals. Learning is guided within this framework through its collective modus operandi, that is, the development of teams that overlap to identify and progress the educational agenda; resources to develop consistent relevant learning material that incorporates evidence obtained through practices and the literature; and educator and clinician networks across health services throughout the state, and furthermore, links with the tertiary sector to assist in marketing, applicability and synergy with further education.

  10. Detection of Adriamycin-DNA adducts by accelerator mass spectrometry at clinically relevant Adriamycin concentrations.

    PubMed

    Coldwell, Kate E; Cutts, Suzanne M; Ognibene, Ted J; Henderson, Paul T; Phillips, Don R

    2008-09-01

    Limited sensitivity of existing assays has prevented investigation of whether Adriamycin-DNA adducts are involved in the anti-tumour potential of Adriamycin. Previous detection has achieved a sensitivity of a few Adriamycin-DNA adducts/10(4) bp DNA, but has required the use of supra-clinical drug concentrations. This work sought to measure Adriamycin-DNA adducts at sub-micromolar doses using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique with origins in geochemistry for radiocarbon dating. We have used conditions previously validated (by less sensitive decay counting) to extract [(14)C]Adriamycin-DNA adducts from cells and adapted the methodology to AMS detection. Here we show the first direct evidence of Adriamycin-DNA adducts at clinically-relevant Adriamycin concentrations. [(14)C]Adriamycin treatment (25 nM) resulted in 4.4 +/- 1.0 adducts/10(7) bp ( approximately 1300 adducts/cell) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, representing the best sensitivity and precision reported to date for the covalent binding of Adriamycin to DNA. The exceedingly sensitive nature of AMS has enabled over three orders of magnitude increased sensitivity of Adriamycin-DNA adduct detection and revealed adduct formation within an hour of drug treatment. This method has been shown to be highly reproducible for the measurement of Adriamycin-DNA adducts in tumour cells in culture and can now be applied to the detection of these adducts in human tissues.

  11. The Taccalonolides: Microtubule Stabilizers that Circumvent Clinically Relevant Taxane Resistance Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Risinger, April L.; Jackson, Evelyn M.; Polin, Lisa A.; Helms, Gregory L.; LeBoeuf, Desiree A.; Joe, Patrick A.; Hopper-Borge, Elizabeth; Ludueña, Richard F.; Kruh, Gary D.; Mooberry, Susan L.

    2009-01-01

    The taccalonolides are a class of structurally and mechanistically distinct microtubule-stabilizing agents isolated from Tacca chantrieri. A crucial feature of the taxane family of microtubule stabilizers is their susceptibility to cellular resistance mechanisms including overexpression of P-glycoprotein, MRP7 and the βIII isotype of tubulin. The ability of four taccalonolides, A, E, B and N, to circumvent these multidrug resistance mechanisms was studied. Taccalonolides A, E, B and N were effective in vitro against cell lines that overexpress P-glycoprotein and MRP7. In addition, taccalonolides A and E were highly active in vivo against a doxorubicin- and paclitaxel- resistant Pgp-expressing tumor, Mam17/ADR. An isogenic HeLa-derived cell line that expresses the βIII isotype of tubulin was generated to evaluate the effect of βIII-tubulin on drug sensitivity. When compared with parental HeLa cells, the βIII-tubulin overexpressing cell line was less sensitive to paclitaxel, docetaxel, epothilone B and vinblastine. In striking contrast, the βIII-tubulin overexpressing cell line showed greater sensitivity to all four taccalonolides. These data cumulatively suggest that the taccalonolides have advantages over the taxanes in their ability to circumvent multiple drug resistance mechanisms. The ability of the taccalonolides to overcome clinically relevant mechanisms of drug resistance in vitro and in vivo confirms that the taccalonolides represent a valuable addition to the family of microtubule-stabilizing compounds with clinical potential. PMID:18974132

  12. Integrative Analysis of Cellular Morphometric Context Reveals Clinically Relevant Signatures in Lower Grade Glioma⋆

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ju; Wang, Yunfu; Cai, Weidong; Borowsky, Alexander; Parvin, Bahram; Chang, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Integrative analysis based on quantitative representation of whole slide images (WSIs) in a large histology cohort may provide predictive models of clinical outcome. On one hand, the efficiency and effectiveness of such representation is hindered as a result of large technical variations (e.g., fixation, staining) and biological heterogeneities (e.g., cell type, cell state) that are always present in a large cohort. On the other hand, perceptual interpretation/validation of important multivariate phenotypic signatures are often difficult due to the loss of visual information during feature transformation in hyperspace. To address these issues, we propose a novel approach for integrative analysis based on cellular morphometric context, which is a robust representation of WSI, with the emphasis on tumor architecture and tumor heterogeneity, built upon cellular level morphometric features within the spatial pyramid matching (SPM) framework. The proposed approach is applied to The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) lower grade glioma (LGG) cohort, where experimental results (i) reveal several clinically relevant cellular morphometric types, which enables both perceptual interpretation/validation and further investigation through gene set enrichment analysis; and (ii) indicate the significantly increased survival rates in one of the cellular morphometric context subtypes derived from the cellular morphometric context. PMID:28018994

  13. Cell death and cell death responses in liver disease: mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Luedde, Tom; Kaplowitz, Neil; Schwabe, Robert F

    2014-10-01

    Hepatocellular death is present in almost all types of human liver disease and is used as a sensitive parameter for the detection of acute and chronic liver disease of viral, toxic, metabolic, or autoimmune origin. Clinical data and animal models suggest that hepatocyte death is the key trigger of liver disease progression, manifested by the subsequent development of inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Modes of hepatocellular death differ substantially between liver diseases. Different modes of cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis, and necroptosis trigger specific cell death responses and promote progression of liver disease through distinct mechanisms. In this review, we first discuss molecular mechanisms by which different modes of cell death, damage-associated molecular patterns, and specific cell death responses contribute to the development of liver disease. We then review the clinical relevance of cell death, focusing on biomarkers; the contribution of cell death to drug-induced, viral, and fatty liver disease and liver cancer; and evidence for cell death pathways as therapeutic targets.

  14. Enhancement in dentin collagen’s biological stability after proanthocyanidins treatment in clinically relevant time periods

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Chen, Mingsheng; Yao, Xiaomei; Xu, Changqi; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether proanthocyanidins (PA) is capable of improving dentin collagen’s biological stability through cross-linking within time periods that are clinically relevant. Materials and methods Demineralized dentin collagen slabs were treated with 3.75 wt% PA solution for 10 s, 1 min, 30 min, 60 min, 120 min, 360 min, and 720 min, respectively. The resultant cross-linked collagen samples were subject to digestion with 0.1% collagenase at 37 °C for 2 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 36 h, and 48 h. The percentage of weight loss after digestion was calculated to evaluate PA-treated collagen’s resistance toward enzymatic degradation. Fourier-Transformed Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to probe evidences of PA-collagen interactions after various periods of PA treatment. Results The collagenase digestion assay suggests that PA treatment as short as 10 s can enhance collagen’s resistance toward enzymatic challenge. The FTIR spectroscopy further verifies that PA is indeed incorporated into collagen regardless of treatment time, possibly via a mechanism involving the chemical interactions between PA and collagen. Significance This study confirmed that PA can effectively cross-link collagen and improve its biological stability in time periods as short as 10 s. The use of PA as a priming agent is therefore clinically feasible and is a promising approach to improving the durability of current dentin bonding systems. PMID:23434233

  15. Standardizing Analysis of Circulating MicroRNA: Clinical and Biological Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Nicholas H.; Wood, Marie E.; Perrapato, Scott D.; Francklyn, Christopher S.; Stein, Gary S.; Stein, Janet L.; Lian, Jane B.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs (c-miRNAs) provide a new dimension as clinical biomarkers for disease diagnosis, progression, and response to treatment. However, the discovery of individual miRNAs from biofluids that reliably reflect disease states is in its infancy. The highly variable nature of published studies exemplifies a need to standardize the analysis of miRNA in circulation. Here, we show that differential sample handling of serum leads to inconsistent and incomparable results. We present a standardized method of RNA isolation from serum that eliminates multiple freeze/thaw cycles, provides at least 3 normalization mechanisms, and can be utilized in studies that compare both archived and prospectively collected samples. It is anticipated that serum processed as described here can be profiled, either globally or on a gene by gene basis, for c-miRNAs and other non-coding RNA in the circulation to reveal novel, clinically relevant epigenetic signatures for a wide range of diseases. PMID:24357537

  16. Clinical and Neurobiological Relevance of Current Animal Models of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Chan; Gonzales, Edson Luck; Lázaro, María T.; Choi, Chang Soon; Bahn, Geon Ho; Yoo, Hee Jeong; Shin, Chan Young

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social and communication impairments, as well as repetitive and restrictive behaviors. The phenotypic heterogeneity of ASD has made it overwhelmingly difficult to determine the exact etiology and pathophysiology underlying the core symptoms, which are often accompanied by comorbidities such as hyperactivity, seizures, and sensorimotor abnormalities. To our benefit, the advent of animal models has allowed us to assess and test diverse risk factors of ASD, both genetic and environmental, and measure their contribution to the manifestation of autistic symptoms. At a broader scale, rodent models have helped consolidate molecular pathways and unify the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying each one of the various etiologies. This approach will potentially enable the stratification of ASD into clinical, molecular, and neurophenotypic subgroups, further proving their translational utility. It is henceforth paramount to establish a common ground of mechanistic theories from complementing results in preclinical research. In this review, we cluster the ASD animal models into lesion and genetic models and further classify them based on the corresponding environmental, epigenetic and genetic factors. Finally, we summarize the symptoms and neuropathological highlights for each model and make critical comparisons that elucidate their clinical and neurobiological relevance. PMID:27133257

  17. Clinical Relevance of Sleep Duration: Results from a Cross-Sectional Analysis Using NHANES

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, M. Soledad; Stang, Paul; Blacketer, Clair; Kent, Justine M.; Wittenberg, Gayle M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess the clinical relevance of sleep duration, hours slept were compared by health status, presence of insomnia, and presence of depression, and the association of sleep duration with BMI and cardiovascular risk was quantified. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of subjects in the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys using adjusted linear and logistic regressions. Results: A total of 22,281 adults were included, 37% slept ≤ 6 hours, 36% were obese, and 45% reported cardiovascular conditions. Mean sleep duration was 6.87 hours. Better health was associated with more hours of sleep. Subjects with poor health reported sleeping 46 min, (95% CI −56.85 to −35.67) less than subjects with excellent health. Individuals with depression (vs. not depressed) reported 40 min less sleep, (95% CI −47.14 to −32.85). Individuals with insomnia (vs. without insomnia) reported 39 min less sleep, (95% CI −56.24 to −22.45). Duration of sleep was inversely related to BMI; for every additional hour of sleep, there was a decrease of 0.18 kg/m2 in BMI, (95% CI −0.30 to −0.06). The odds of reporting cardiovascular problems were 6.0% lower for every hour of sleep (odds ratio = 0.94, 95% CI [0.91 to 0.97]). Compared with subjects who slept ≤ 6 h, subjects who slept more had lower odds of reporting cardiovascular problems, with the exception of subjects ≥ 55 years old who slept ≥ 9 hours. Conclusions: Long sleep duration is associated with better health. The fewer the hours of sleep, the greater the BMI and reported cardiovascular disease. A difference of 30 minutes of sleep is associated with substantive impact on clinical well-being. Citation: Cepeda MS, Stang P, Blacketer C, Kent JM, Wittenberg GM. Clinical relevance of sleep duration: results from a cross-sectional analysis using NHANES. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(6):813–819. PMID:26951419

  18. Development of Microcomputer Methods for Analysis and Simulation of Clinical Pharmacokinetic Data Relevant to New Drug Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-02

    interpretation, and simulation of pharmacokinetic data, dose - response kinetic data, and other data relevant to new drug development, for use with the Tektronix...Statistical Programs for Clinical Pharmacological Problems; Keywords: Clinical Pharmacokinetics, Dose - Response Relations, Pharmakinetic Simulation, Non-Parametric Statistics, Mefloquine, Microcomputer Graphics, Tektronix 4052.

  19. Parkinson's disease and LRRK2: frequency of a common mutation in U.S. movement disorder clinics.

    PubMed

    Kay, Denise M; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Factor, Stewart A; Nutt, John G; Samii, Ali; Griffith, Alida; Bird, Tom D; Kramer, Patricia; Higgins, Donald S; Payami, Haydeh

    2006-04-01

    The G2019S mutation in the LRRK2 gene is reportedly a common cause of familial Parkinson's disease (PD) and may also have a significant role in nonfamilial PD. The objective of this study was to assess mutation carrier frequency in PD patients from movement disorder clinics in the United States, stratified by family history, age at onset, and geography; to determine carrier frequency in a large and well-characterized control population; to examine segregation of mutation in families of patients; and to correlate genotype with clinical phenotype. One thousand four hundred twenty-five unrelated PD patients from movement disorder clinics in Oregon, Washington, and New York and 1,647 unrelated controls were studied. The G2019S mutation was detected using a TaqMan assay and verified by sequencing. Eighteen of 1,425 patients and one of 1,647 controls had the mutation. Carrier frequency (+/- 2SE) in patients was 0.013 +/- 0.006 overall, 0.030 +/- 0.019 in familial PD, 0.007 +/- 0.005 in nonfamilial PD, 0.016 +/- 0.013 in early-onset PD, and 0.012 +/- 0.007 in late-onset PD. Geographic differences were insignificant. Age at onset of mutation carriers ranged from 28 to 71 years. Mutation carriers were clinically indistinguishable from idiopathic PD. LRRK2 G2019S is the single most common pathogenic mutation linked to neurodegenerative disease to date.

  20. Vasopressin in preeclampsia: a novel very early human pregnancy biomarker and clinically relevant mouse model.

    PubMed

    Santillan, Mark K; Santillan, Donna A; Scroggins, Sabrina M; Min, James Y; Sandgren, Jeremy A; Pearson, Nicole A; Leslie, Kimberly K; Hunter, Stephen K; Zamba, Gideon K D; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Grobe, Justin L

    2014-10-01

    Preeclampsia, a cardiovascular disorder of late pregnancy, is characterized as a low-renin hypertensive state relative to normotensive pregnancy. Because other nonpregnant low-renin hypertensive disorders often exhibit and are occasionally dependent on elevated arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion, we hypothesized a possible use for plasma AVP measurements in the prediction of preeclampsia. Copeptin is an inert prosegment of AVP that is secreted in a 1:1 molar ratio and exhibits a substantially longer biological half-life compared with AVP, rendering it a clinically useful biomarker of AVP secretion. Copeptin was measured throughout pregnancy in maternal plasma from preeclamptic and control women. Maternal plasma copeptin was significantly higher throughout preeclamptic pregnancies versus control pregnancies. While controlling for clinically significant confounders (age, body mass index, chronic essential hypertension, twin gestation, diabetes mellitus, and history of preeclampsia) using multivariate regression, the association of higher copeptin concentration and the development of preeclampsia remained significant. Receiver operating characteristic analyses reveal that as early as the sixth week of gestation, elevated maternal plasma copeptin concentration is a highly significant predictor of preeclampsia throughout pregnancy. Finally, chronic infusion of AVP during pregnancy (24 ng per hour) is sufficient to phenocopy preeclampsia in C57BL/6J mice, causing pregnancy-specific hypertension, renal glomerular endotheliosis, proteinuria, and intrauterine growth restriction. These data implicate AVP release as a novel predictive biomarker for preeclampsia very early in pregnancy, identify chronic AVP infusion as a novel and clinically relevant model of preeclampsia in mice, and are consistent with a potential causative role for AVP in preeclampsia in humans.

  1. Leigh Syndrome and the Mitochondrial m.13513G>A Mutation: Expanding the Clinical Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Monlleo-Neila, Laura; Toro, Mireia Del; Bornstein, Belen; Garcia-Arumi, Elena; Sarrias, Axel; Roig-Quilis, Manuel; Munell, Francina

    2013-11-01

    The mitochondrial DNA m.13513G>A mutation in the ND5 subunit gene is a frequent cause of Leigh syndrome. Patients harboring this mutation typically present with ptosis and cardiac conduction abnormalities, particularly Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and have a late clinical onset, which contrasts with the typical infantile form. The authors describe a patient presenting with intrauterine growth retardation and visual impairment at 3 months of age, followed by infantile spasms, severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, and neurological regression. The patient had hyperlactacidemia and bilateral basal ganglia and brainstem lesions on MRI. Although he did not present cardiac conduction abnormalities, his mother had been diagnosed with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. The m.13513G>A mutation was found in the patient's muscle and in several tissues of his mother. The present results expand the phenotype of Leigh syndrome associated with the m.13513G>A mutation, which should be suspected in patients with early-onset mitochondrial encephalopathy with infantile spasms or prominent gastrointestinal smooth muscle involvement.

  2. Clinical and mutational features of Vietnamese children with X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immune deficiency characterized by recurrent bacterial infections and profoundly depressed serum immunoglobulin levels and circulating mature B cells. It is caused by mutations of the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene and is the most common form of inherited antibody deficiency. To our knowledge, this is the first report of XLA from Vietnam. Methods We investigated the BTK gene mutations and clinical features of four unrelated Vietnamese children. Results The mean ages at onset and at diagnosis were 2.5 and 8 years, respectively. All patients had a medical history of otitis media, pneumonia, and septicemia at the time of diagnosis. Other infections reported included sinusitis, bronchiectasis, arthritis, skin infections, meningitis, and recurrent diarrhea. We identified one previously reported mutation (c.441G >A) and three novel mutations: two frameshifts (c.1770delG and c.1742 delG), and one nonsense (c.1249A >T). Conclusions The delayed diagnosis may be attributable to insufficient awareness of this rare disease on the background of frequent infections even in the immunocompetent pediatric population in Vietnam. Our results further support the importance of molecular genetic testing in diagnosis of XLA. PMID:24885015

  3. Does the choice of display system influence perception and visibility of clinically relevant features in digital pathology images?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimpe, Tom; Rostang, Johan; Avanaki, Ali; Espig, Kathryn; Xthona, Albert; Cocuranu, Ioan; Parwani, Anil V.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-03-01

    Digital pathology systems typically consist of a slide scanner, processing software, visualization software, and finally a workstation with display for visualization of the digital slide images. This paper studies whether digital pathology images can look different when presenting them on different display systems, and whether these visual differences can result in different perceived contrast of clinically relevant features. By analyzing a set of four digital pathology images of different subspecialties on three different display systems, it was concluded that pathology images look different when visualized on different display systems. The importance of these visual differences is elucidated when they are located in areas of the digital slide that contain clinically relevant features. Based on a calculation of dE2000 differences between background and clinically relevant features, it was clear that perceived contrast of clinically relevant features is influenced by the choice of display system. Furthermore, it seems that the specific calibration target chosen for the display system has an important effect on the perceived contrast of clinically relevant features. Preliminary results suggest that calibrating to DICOM GSDF calibration performed slightly worse than sRGB, while a new experimental calibration target CSDF performed better than both DICOM GSDF and sRGB. This result is promising as it suggests that further research work could lead to better definition of an optimized calibration target for digital pathology images resulting in a positive effect on clinical performance.

  4. [Clinical features and gene mutations in epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures].

    PubMed

    Shang, K W; Zhang, Y H; Yang, X L; Liu, A J; Yang, Z X; Liu, X Y; Jiang, Y W; Wu, X R

    2016-10-02

    Objective: To summarize the clinical features and gene mutations of epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS). Method: Clinical features and electroencephalograms(EEG)of 9 patients with EIMFS of Peking University First Hospital from May 2015 to January 2016 were analyzed. Candidate gene mutations were screened by next generation sequencing. Result: Among the 9 patients, 3 were males and 6 were females. Two patients had family history. Seizure onset age was 2 days to 3 months after birth (median age 35 days). Migrating focal seizure was presented. Seizures manifested as eyes and(or)head deviation, involuntary blinking, swallowing, trembling or stiffness of limbs, hand clenching, flushing and cyanosis of lips, etc. Four patients had a history of status epilepticus. All 9 patients had psychomotor delay. EEG of all patients presented relatively slow background; during interictal phase, there were multi-focal epileptic discharges, which dominated one hemisphere or brain region; seizures were recorded in all 9 cases, which manifested eyes or(and)head deviation, stiffening or trembling of limbs, lip smacking, etc. Corresponding EEG showed low-medium-amplitude fast waves that originated from some brain regions and migrated to other regions. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was abnormal in 4 cases, which predominantly showed white matter dysplasia and enlargement of subarachnoid spaces. Two cases carried heterozygous missense mutations of SCN1A gene, while 3 cases carried heterozygous missense mutations of KCNT1 gene, all of which were de novo. One case carried compound heterozygous mutation of TBC1D24 gene(p.Gln207*, p. Ala289Va). Gene mutation was not found in 3 cases. All patients used multiple antiepileptic drugs (AED) and their seizures were not controlled. Follow-up ranged from 2 months to 5 years and 8 months, during which 4 were found dead. Two were lost to follow-up. Conclusion: EIMFS is clinically characterized by early onset, which is

  5. Macronodular Adrenal Hyperplasia due to Mutations in an Armadillo Repeat Containing 5 (ARMC5) Gene: A Clinical and Genetic Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Faucz, Fabio R.; Zilbermint, Mihail; Lodish, Maya B.; Szarek, Eva; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Sinaii, Ninet; Berthon, Annabel; Libé, Rossella; Assié, Guillaume; Espiard, Stéphanie; Drougat, Ludivine; Ragazzon, Bruno; Bertherat, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Context: Inactivating germline mutations of the probable tumor suppressor gene, armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5), have recently been identified as a genetic cause of macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (MAH). Objective: We searched for ARMC5 mutations in a large cohort of patients with MAH. The clinical phenotype of patients with and without ARMC5 mutations was compared. Methods: Blood DNA from 34 MAH patients was genotyped using Sanger sequencing. Diurnal serum cortisol measurements, plasma ACTH levels, urinary steroids, 6-day Liddle's test, adrenal computed tomography, and weight of adrenal glands at adrenalectomy were assessed. Results: Germline ARMC5 mutations were found in 15 of 34 patients (44.1%). In silico analysis of the mutations indicated that seven (20.6%) predicted major implications for gene function. Late-night cortisol levels were higher in patients with ARMC5-damaging mutations compared with those without and/or with nonpathogenic mutations (14.5 ± 5.6 vs 6.7 ± 4.3, P < .001). All patients carrying a pathogenic ARMC5 mutation had clinical Cushing's syndrome (seven of seven, 100%) compared with 14 of 27 (52%) of those without or with mutations that were predicted to be benign (P = .029). Repeated-measures analysis showed overall higher urinary 17-hydroxycorticosteroids and free cortisol values in the patients with ARMC5-damaging mutations during the 6-day Liddle's test (P = .0002). Conclusions: ARMC5 mutations are implicated in clinically severe Cushing's syndrome associated with MAH. Knowledge of a patient's ARMC5 status has important clinical implications for the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome and genetic counseling of patients and their families. PMID:24601692

  6. Structural, Functional, and Clinical Characterization of a Novel PTPN11 Mutation Cluster Underlying Noonan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pannone, Luca; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Flex, Elisabetta; Rossi, Cesare; Baldassarre, Giuseppina; Lissewski, Christina; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Consoli, Federica; Lepri, Francesca; Magliozzi, Monia; Anselmi, Massimiliano; Delle Vigne, Silvia; Sorge, Giovanni; Karaer, Kadri; Cuturilo, Goran; Sartorio, Alessandro; Tinschert, Sigrid; Accadia, Maria; Digilio, Maria C; Zampino, Giuseppe; De Luca, Alessandro; Cavé, Hélène; Zenker, Martin; Gelb, Bruce D; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Stella, Lorenzo; Ferrero, Giovanni B; Martinelli, Simone; Tartaglia, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Germline mutations in PTPN11, the gene encoding the Src-homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2), cause Noonan syndrome (NS), a relatively common, clinically variable, multisystem disorder. Here, we report on the identification of five different PTPN11 missense changes affecting residues Leu(261) , Leu(262) , and Arg(265) in 16 unrelated individuals with clinical diagnosis of NS or with features suggestive for this disorder, specifying a novel disease-causing mutation cluster. Expression of the mutant proteins in HEK293T cells documented their activating role on MAPK signaling. Structural data predicted a gain-of-function role of substitutions at residues Leu(262) and Arg(265) exerted by disruption of the N-SH2/PTP autoinhibitory interaction. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested a more complex behavior for changes affecting Leu(261) , with possible impact on SHP2's catalytic activity/selectivity and proper interaction of the PTP domain with the regulatory SH2 domains. Consistent with that, biochemical data indicated that substitutions at codons 262 and 265 increased the catalytic activity of the phosphatase, while those affecting codon 261 were only moderately activating but impacted substrate specificity. Remarkably, these mutations underlie a relatively mild form of NS characterized by low prevalence of cardiac defects, short stature, and cognitive and behavioral issues, as well as less evident typical facial features.

  7. Clinical and mutation analysis of 24 Chinese patients with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shao, Y; Jiang, M; Lin, Y; Mei, H; Zhang, W; Cai, Y; Su, X; Hu, H; Li, X; Liu, L

    2017-03-07

    The principal aim of this study was to examine the clinical manifestations, biochemical features, and molecular genetic characteristics of Chinese patients with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) at a single medical center. We retrospectively analyzed 24 patients (17 males and 7 females) diagnosed with OTCD between 2006 and 2015. Five male patients had a neonatal presentation; 12 male patients had late onset disease and 7 female patients presented as symptomatic. Patients with a neonatal presentation had the highest peak plasma ammonia and glutamine levels at diagnosis with a high mortality (80% vs 16% in late onset disease). Most of the male late onset disease cases displayed neurologic damage with a mild elevation in plasma ammonia, and a significant increase in serum glutamine, which was commonly misdiagnosed as intracranial infection. In the symptomatic female group, mortality was abnormally high in China with some patients dying at the time of presentation during the first episode of hyperammonemia. Refractory hyperammonemia, serious hepatic function damage, recurrent infection and lethal mutation are the main reasons for poor clinical outcomes of the symptomatic females. Molecular analyses identified 19 different mutations, including 3 novel mutations (c.103insA, c.591C>A and c.805G>A).

  8. Molecular, clinical and neuropsychological study in 31 patients with Kabuki syndrome and KMT2D mutations.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Natacha; Mazery, Anne Claire; Visier, Antoine; Baumann, Clarisse; Lachesnais, Dominique; Capri, Yline; Toutain, Annick; Odent, Sylvie; Mikaty, Myriam; Goizet, Cyril; Taupiac, Emmanuelle; Jacquemont, Marie Line; Sanchez, Elodie; Schaefer, Elise; Gatinois, Vincent; Faivre, Laurence; Minot, Delphine; Kayirangwa, Honorine; Le Qang Sang, Kim-Hanh; Boddaert, Nathalie; Bayard, Sophie; Lacombe, Didier; Moutton, Sébastien; Touitou, Isabelle; Rio, Marlène; Amiel, Jeanne; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Sanlaville, Damien; Picot, Marie Christine; Geneviève, David

    2017-03-14

    Kabuki syndrome (KS - OMIM 147920) is a rare developmental disease characterized by the association of multiple congenital anomalies and intellectual disability. This study aimed to investigate intellectual performance in children with Kabuki syndrome and link the performance to several clinical features and molecular data. We recruited 31 children with KMT2D mutations who were 6 to 16 years old. They all completed the Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children, fourth edition. We calculated all indexes: the Full Scale Intellectual Quotient (FSIQ), Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI), Perceptive Reasoning Index (PRI), Processing Speed Index (PSI), and Working Memory Index (WMI). In addition, molecular data and several clinical symptoms were studied. FSIQ and VCI scores were 10 points lower for patients with a truncating mutation than other types of mutations. In addition, scores for FSIQ, VCI and PRI were lower for children with visual impairment than normal vision. We also identified a discrepancy in indexes characterized by high WMI and VCI and low PRI and PSI. We emphasize the importance of early identification and intensive care of visual disorders in patients with Kabuki syndrome and recommend individual assessment of intellectual profile.

  9. X region mutations of hepatitis B virus related to clinical severity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong; Lee, Seoung-Ae; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem, with more than 240 million people chronically infected worldwide and potentially 650000 deaths per year due to advanced liver diseases including liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBV-X protein (HBx) contributes to the biology and pathogenesis of HBV via stimulating virus replication or altering host gene expression related to HCC. The HBV X region contains only 465 bp encoding the 16.5 kDa HBx protein, which also contains several critical cis-elements such as enhancer II, the core promoter and the microRNA-binding region. Thus, mutations in this region may affect not only the HBx open reading frame but also the overlapped cis-elements. Recently, several types of HBx mutations significantly associated with clinical severity have been described, although the functional mechanism in most of these cases remains unsolved. This review article will mainly focus on the HBx mutations proven to be significantly related to clinical severity via epidemiological studies. PMID:27350725

  10. Consensus on the use and interpretation of cystic fibrosis mutation analysis in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, C.; Cuppens, H.; Macek, M.; Cassiman, J.J.; Kerem, E.; Durie, P.; Tullis, E.; Assael, B.M.; Bombieri, C.; Brown, A.; Casals, T.; Claustres, M.; Cutting, G.R.; Dequeker, E.; Dodge, J.; Doull, I.; Farrell, P.; Ferec, C.; Girodon, E.; Johannesson, M.; Kerem, B.; Knowles, M.; Munck, A.; Pignatti, P.F.; Radojkovic, D.; Rizzotti, P.; Schwarz, M.; Stuhrmann, M.; Tzetis, M.; Zielenski, J.; Elborn, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    It is often challenging for the clinician interested in cystic fibrosis (CF) to interpret molecular genetic results, and to integrate them in the diagnostic process. The limitations of genotyping technology, the choice of mutations to be tested, and the clinical context in which the test is administered can all influence how genetic information is interpreted. This paper describes the conclusions of a consensus conference to address the use and interpretation of CF mutation analysis in clinical settings. Although the diagnosis of CF is usually straightforward, care needs to be exercised in the use and interpretation of genetic tests: genotype information is not the final arbiter of a clinical diagnosis of CF or CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein related disorders. The diagnosis of these conditions is primarily based on the clinical presentation, and is supported by evaluation of CFTR function (sweat testing, nasal potential difference) and genetic analysis. None of these features are sufficient on their own to make a diagnosis of CF or CFTR-related disorders. Broad genotype/phenotype associations are useful in epidemiological studies, but CFTR genotype does not accurately predict individual outcome. The use of CFTR genotype for prediction of prognosis in people with CF at the time of their diagnosis is not recommended. The importance of communication between clinicians and medical genetic laboratories is emphasized. The results of testing and their implications should be reported in a manner understandable to the clinicians caring for CF patients. PMID:18456578

  11. Prevalence and clinical relevance of helminth co-infections among tuberculosis patients in urban Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Hella, Jerry; Said, Khadija; Kamwela, Lujeko; Sasamalo, Mohamed; Maroa, Thomas; Chiryamkubi, Magreth; Mhalu, Grace; Schindler, Christian; Reither, Klaus; Knopp, Stefanie; Utzinger, Jürg; Gagneux, Sébastien; Fenner, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    Background Helminth infections can negatively affect the immunologic host control, which may increase the risk of progression from latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to tuberculosis (TB) disease and alter the clinical presentation of TB. We assessed the prevalence and determined the clinical relevance of helminth co-infection among TB patients and household contact controls in urban Tanzania. Methodology Between November 2013 and October 2015, we enrolled adult (≥18 years) sputum smear-positive TB patients and household contact controls without TB during an ongoing TB cohort study in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We used Baermann, FLOTAC, Kato-Katz, point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen, and urine filtration to diagnose helminth infections. Multivariable logistic regression models with and without random effects for households were used to assess for associations between helminth infection and TB. Principal findings A total of 597 TB patients and 375 household contact controls were included. The median age was 33 years and 60.2% (585/972) were men. The prevalence of any helminth infection among TB patients was 31.8% (190/597) and 25.9% (97/375) among controls. Strongyloides stercoralis was the predominant helminth species (16.6%, 161), followed by hookworm (9.0%, 87) and Schistosoma mansoni (5.7%, 55). An infection with any helminth was not associated with TB (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88–1.80, p = 0.22), but S. mansoni infection was (aOR 2.15, 95% CI: 1.03–4.45, p = 0.040). Moreover, S. mansoni infection was associated with lower sputum bacterial load (aOR 2.63, 95% CI: 1.38–5.26, p = 0.004) and tended to have fewer lung cavitations (aOR 0.41, 95% CI: 0.12–1.16, p = 0.088). Conclusions/Significance S. mansoni infection was an independent risk factor for active TB and altered the clinical presentation in TB patients. These findings suggest a role for schistosomiasis in modulating the pathogenesis of human TB

  12. UV fingerprints predominate in the PTCH mutation spectra of basal cell carcinomas independent of clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Heitzer, Ellen; Lassacher, Anita; Quehenberger, Franz; Kerl, Helmut; Wolf, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) shows a wide interpatient variation in lesion accrual. To determine whether certain tumorigenic fingerprints and potentially predisposing patched (PTCH) tumor suppressor single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are distributed differently among sporadic BCC patients, we compared the PTCH mutation spectra in early-onset BCC (first lesion at age < 35 years), regular BCC (first lesion at age > or = 35 years and < 10 lesions), and multiple BCC (> or = 10 lesions). The PTCH gene was mutated in 29 of 60 cases (48%). Most of the PTCH mutations bore the UV fingerprint (i.e., C --> T or tandem CC --> TT transitions at dipyrimidine sites). However, neither the proportion nor the spectra of exonic PTCH mutations differed significantly among the three groups. A large number of SNPs (IVS10+99C/T, IVS11-51G/C, 1665T/C, 1686C/T, IVS15+9G/C, IVS16-80G/C, IVS17+21G/A, and 3944C/T or its combinations) were also detected, but again their incidence did not differ significantly among the groups. Interestingly, expression of the IVS16-80G/C and the IVS17+21G/A genotype did not achieve the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in patients with regular and/or early-onset BCC. These data suggest that a (UV-) mutated PTCH gene is important for sporadic BCC formation independent of clinical phenotype and that the IVS16-80G/C and/or IVS17+21G/A SNP site might be important for tumorigenesis in certain BCC patients.

  13. EAST syndrome: Clinical, pathophysiological, and genetic aspects of mutations in KCNJ10

    PubMed Central

    Iancu, Daniela; Stanescu, Horia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT EAST syndrome is a recently described autosomal recessive disorder secondary to mutations in KCNJ10 (Kir4.1), a gene encoding a potassium channel expressed in the brain, eye, ear and kidney. This condition is characterized by 4 cardinal features; Epilepsy, Ataxia, Sensorineural deafness, and (a renal salt-wasting) Tubulopathy, hence the acronym EAST syndrome. Here we review reported clinical manifestations, in particular the neurological signs and symptoms which typically have the most impact on the quality of life of patients. In addition we review the pathophysiology and genetic aspects of the disease. So far 14 different KCNJ10 mutations have been published which either directly affect channel function or may lead to mislocalisation. Investigations of the pathophysiology may provide clues to potential treatments. PMID:27500072

  14. Cancer-Specific Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT) Promoter Mutations: Biological and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tiantian; Yuan, Xiaotian; Xu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    The accumulated evidence has pointed to a key role of telomerase in carcinogenesis. As a RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, telomerase synthesizes telomeric DNA at the end of linear chromosomes, and attenuates or prevents telomere erosion associated with cell divisions. By lengthening telomeres, telomerase extends cellular life-span or even induces immortalization. Consistent with its functional activity, telomerase is silent in most human normal somatic cells while active only in germ-line, stem and other highly proliferative cells. In contrast, telomerase activation widely occurs in human cancer and the enzymatic activity is detectable in up to 90% of malignancies. Recently, hotspot point mutations in the regulatory region of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene, encoding the core catalytic component of telomerase, was identified as a novel mechanism to activate telomerase in cancer. This review discusses the cancer-specific TERT promoter mutations and potential biological and clinical significances. PMID:27438857

  15. Quick Detection of FKS1 Mutations Responsible for Clinical Echinocandin Resistance in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Dudiuk, Catiana; Gamarra, Soledad; Jimenez-Ortigosa, Cristina; Leonardelli, Florencia; Macedo, Daiana; Perlin, David S.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid molecular-based assay for the detection of the Candida albicans FKS1 gene mutations responsible for resistance to echinocandin drugs was designed and evaluated. The assay consisted of a multiplexed PCR set of 5 tubes able to detect the most commonly described resistance mechanism, including FKS1 hot spot 1 and hot spot 2 mutations. The performance and specificity of the assay was evaluated using a double-blinded panel of 50 C. albicans strains. The assay showed a sensitivity of 96% and was able to detect all homozygous mutants included in the collection of strains, demonstrating that it is a robust, quick, and labor-saving method that is suitable for a routine clinical diagnostic laboratory. PMID:25878347

  16. Heterogeneity and clinical significance of ESR1 mutations in ER-positive metastatic breast cancer patients receiving fulvestrant

    PubMed Central

    Spoerke, Jill M.; Gendreau, Steven; Walter, Kimberly; Qiu, Jiaheng; Wilson, Timothy R.; Savage, Heidi; Aimi, Junko; Derynck, Mika K.; Chen, Meng; Chan, Iris T.; Amler, Lukas C.; Hampton, Garret M.; Johnston, Stephen; Krop, Ian; Schmid, Peter; Lackner, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in ESR1 have been associated with resistance to aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy in patients with ER+ metastatic breast cancer. Little is known of the impact of these mutations in patients receiving selective oestrogen receptor degrader (SERD) therapy. In this study, hotspot mutations in ESR1 and PIK3CA from ctDNA were assayed in clinical trial samples from ER+ metastatic breast cancer patients randomized either to the SERD fulvestrant or fulvestrant plus a pan-PI3K inhibitor. ESR1 mutations are present in 37% of baseline samples and are enriched in patients with luminal A and PIK3CA-mutated tumours. ESR1 mutations are often polyclonal and longitudinal analysis shows distinct clones exhibiting divergent behaviour over time. ESR1 mutation allele frequency does not show a consistent pattern of increases during fulvestrant treatment, and progression-free survival is not different in patients with ESR1 mutations compared with wild-type patients. ESR1 mutations are not associated with clinical resistance to fulvestrant in this study. PMID:27174596

  17. Constructional apraxia in frontotemporal dementia associated with the C9orf72 mutation: broadening the clinical and neuropsychological phenotype.

    PubMed

    Floris, Gianluca; Borghero, Giuseppe; Cannas, Antonino; Di Stefano, Francesca; Ruiu, Elisa; Murru, Maria R; Corongiu, Daniela; Cuccu, Stefania; Tranquilli, Stefania; Sardu, Claudia; Marrosu, Maria G; Chiò, Adriano; Marrosu, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    In our study we analysed clinical and neuropsychological data in a cohort of 57 Sardinian patients with FTD (55 apparently unrelated and two belonging to the same family), who underwent genetic screening for the C9orf72 mutation. Eight out of 56 patients were found positive for the C9orf72 mutation representing 14% of the entire cohort and 31.6% of the familial cases (6/19). C9orf72 mutated patients differed from the other FTD cases of the cohort for a younger age of onset, higher frequency of familial history for FTD and higher prevalence of delusional psychotic symptoms and hallucinations. In the neuropsychological assessment, C9orf72 mutated patients differed from non-mutated for the high frequency of visuospatial dysfunction regarding constructional apraxia (p = 0.02). In conclusion, our study confirms that Sardinian FTD patients have peculiar genetic characteristics and that C9orf72 mutated patients have a distinctive clinical and neuropsychological profile that could help differentiate them from other FTD patients. In our cohort we found that constructional apraxia, rarely reported in FTD, can properly discriminate between C9orf72 mutated and non-mutated patients and contribute to broaden the neuropsychological profile in frontotemporal dementia associated with this mutation.

  18. Evaluation and clinically relevant applications of a fluorescent imaging analog to fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Rahul A.; Josephson, Lee; Mahmood, Umar

    2009-11-01

    A fluorescent analog to 2-deoxy-2 [18F] fluoro-D-glucose position emission tomography (FDG-PET) would allow for the introduction of metabolic imaging into intraoperative and minimally invasive settings. We present through in vitro and in vivo experimentation an evaluation of 2-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-2-deoxyglucose (2-NBDG), a fluorescently labeled glucose molecule, as a molecular beacon of glucose utilization. The competitive inhibition of 2-NBDG uptake by excess free glucose is directly compared against FDG uptake inhibition in cultured cells. 2-NBDG uptake in the brain of a mouse experiencing a generalized seizure is measured, as well as in subcutaneously implanted tumors in mice during fed and fasting states. Localization of 2-NBDG into malignant tissues is studied by laser scanning microscopy. The clinical relevance of 2-NBDG imaging is examined by performing fluorescence colonoscopy, and by correlating preoperative FDG-PET with intraoperative fluorescence imaging. 2-NBDG exhibits a similar uptake inhibition to FDG by excess glucose in the growth media. Uptake is significantly increased in the brain of an animal experiencing seizures versus control, and in subcutaneous tumors after the animals are kept nil per os (NPO) for 24 h versus ad libidum feeding. The clinical utility of 2-NBDG is confirmed by the demonstration of very high target-to-background ratios in minimally invasive and intraoperative imaging of malignant lesions. We present an optical analog of FDG-PET to extend the applicability of metabolic imaging to minimally invasive and intraoperative settings.

  19. Marine omega-3 fatty acids and inflammatory processes: Effects, mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Calder, Philip C

    2015-04-01

    Inflammation is a condition which contributes to a range of human diseases. It involves a multitude of cell types, chemical mediators, and interactions. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids found in oily fish and fish oil supplements. These fatty acids are able to partly inhibit a number of aspects of inflammation including leukocyte chemotaxis, adhesion molecule expression and leukocyte-endothelial adhesive interactions, production of eicosanoids like prostaglandins and leukotrienes from the n-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid, production of inflammatory cytokines, and T-helper 1 lymphocyte reactivity. In addition, EPA gives rise to eicosanoids that often have lower biological potency than those produced from arachidonic acid and EPA and DHA give rise to anti-inflammatory and inflammation resolving mediators called resolvins, protectins and maresins. Mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory actions of marine n-3 fatty acids include altered cell membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition, disruption of lipid rafts, inhibition of activation of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B so reducing expression of inflammatory genes, activation of the anti-inflammatory transcription factor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ and binding to the G protein coupled receptor GPR120. These mechanisms are interlinked, although the full extent of this is not yet elucidated. Animal experiments demonstrate benefit from marine n-3 fatty acids in models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and asthma. Clinical trials of fish oil in RA demonstrate benefit, but clinical trials of fish oil in IBD and asthma are inconsistent with no overall clear evidence of efficacy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Oxygenated metabolism of PUFA: analysis and biological relevance".

  20. Social and clinically-relevant cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Americans adults: NHANES 2011-2014.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Sandra E; Mustafa, Mehnaz; Pentakota, Sri Ram; Kim, Soyeon; Hastings, Katherine G; Amadi, Chioma; Palaniappan, Latha

    2017-02-17

    Little evidence exists examining cardiovascular risk factors among Asian Americans and how social determinants such as nativity status and education pattern risk in the United States (U.S.) context. We used the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which purposely oversampled Asian Americans from 2011 to 2014, and examined prevalence of Type II diabetes, smoking and obesity for Asian Americans (n=1363) and non-Latino Whites (n=4121). We classified Asian Americans as U.S. or foreign-born and by years in the U.S. Obesity status was based on standard body mass index (BMI) cut points of ≥30kg/m(2) and Asian-specific cut points (BMI≥25kg/m(2)) that may be more clinically relevant for this population. We fit separate logistic regression models for each outcome using complex survey design methods and tested for the joint effect of race, nativity and education on each outcome. Diabetes and obesity prevalence (applying Asian-specific BMI cut points) were higher among Asian Americans when compared to non-Latino Whites but smoking prevalence was lower. These patterns remained in fully adjusted models and showed small increases with longer duration in the U.S. Joint effects models showed higher odds of prevalent Type II diabetes and obesity (Asian-specific) for foreign-born Asians, regardless of years in the U.S. and slightly higher risk for lowe ducation, when compared to non-Latino Whites with high education. Smoking models showed significant interaction effects between race and education for non-Latino Whites only. Our study supports the premise that social as well as clinical factors should be considered when developing health initiatives for Asian Americans.

  1. Multiple system organ response induced by hyperoxia in a clinically relevant animal model of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-González, Raquel; Martín-Barrasa, José Luis; Ramos-Nuez, Ángela; Cañas-Pedrosa, Ana María; Martínez-Saavedra, María Teresa; García-Bello, Miguel Ángel; López-Aguilar, Josefina; Baluja, Aurora; Álvarez, Julián; Slutsky, Arthur S; Villar, Jesús

    2014-08-01

    Oxygen therapy is currently used as a supportive treatment in septic patients to improve tissue oxygenation. However, oxygen can exert deleterious effects on the inflammatory response triggered by infection. We postulated that the use of high oxygen concentrations may be partially responsible for the worsening of sepsis-induced multiple system organ dysfunction in an experimental clinically relevant model of sepsis. We used Sprague-Dawley rats. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Sham-septic controls (n = 16) and septic animals (n = 32) were randomly assigned to four groups and placed in a sealed Plexiglas cage continuously flushed for 24 h with medical air (group 1), 40% oxygen (group 2), 60% oxygen (group 3), or 100% oxygen (group 4). We examined the effects of these oxygen concentrations on the spread of infection in blood, urine, peritoneal fluid, bronchoalveolar lavage, and meninges; serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers and reactive oxygen species production; and hematological parameters in all experimental groups. In cecal ligation and puncture animals, the use of higher oxygen concentrations was associated with a greater number of infected biological samples (P < 0.0001), higher serum levels of interleukin-6 (P < 0.0001), interleukin-10 (P = 0.033), and tumor necrosis factor-α (P = 0.034), a marked decrease in platelet counts (P < 0.001), and a marked elevation of reactive oxygen species serum levels (P = 0.0006) after 24 h of oxygen exposure. Oxygen therapy greatly influences the progression and clinical manifestation of multiple system organ dysfunction in experimental sepsis. If these results are extrapolated to humans, they suggest that oxygen therapy should be carefully managed in septic patients to minimize its deleterious effects.

  2. Clinical relevance of multiple respiratory virus detection in adult patients with acute respiratory illness.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong-Ho; Chung, Jin-Won; Kim, Hye Ryoun

    2015-04-01

    Because increasing numbers of nasopharyngeal swab specimens from adult patients with acute respiratory illness (ARI) are being tested by respiratory virus (RV) multiplex reverse transcriptase PCR (RVM-RT-PCR), multiple RV detection (MRVD) is being encountered more frequently. However, the clinical relevance of MRVD in adult patients has rarely been evaluated. The clinical characteristics of hospitalized adult patients with ARI and MRVD by RVM-RT-PCR tests were compared to those of patients with single RV detection (SRVD) during a single year at a tertiary care center. MRVD was observed in 26 of the 190 adult patients (13.7%). The patients with MRVD had a higher incidence of chronic lung disease than the patients with SRVD (34.6% versus 15.9%, crude odds ratio [OR]=2.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.13 to 6.98, P=0.03). Although the former were more likely than the latter to receive mechanical ventilation (19.2% versus 6.7%, crude OR=3.31, 95% CI=1.05 to 10.47, P=0.049), the length of hospital stay (median, 7 versus 6.5 days; P=0.66), and the in-hospital mortality rate (7.7% versus 4.3%, crude OR=1.87, 95% CI=0.37 to 9.53, P=0.35) were not different between the two groups. In multivariate analysis, chronic lung disease was associated with MRVD (adjusted OR=3.08, 95% CI=1.12 to 8.46, P=0.03). In summary, it was not uncommon to encounter adult patients with ARI and MRVD by RVM-RT-PCR tests of nasopharyngeal swab specimens. MRVD was associated with chronic lung disease rather than the severity of the ARI.

  3. A clinically relevant model of perinatal global ischemic brain damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Zhuang, Lei; Terrando, Niccolò; Wu, Xinmin; Jonhson, Mark R; Maze, Mervyn; Ma, Daqing

    2011-04-06

    We have designed a clinically relevant model of perinatal asphyxia providing intrapartum hypoxia in rats. On gestation day 22 SD rats were anesthetized and the uterine horns were exteriorized and placed in a water bath at 37°C for up to 20min. After this, pups were delivered from the uterus and manually stimulated to initiate breathing in an incubator at 37°C for 1 h in air. Brains were harvested and stained with cresyl violet, caspase-3, and TUNEL to detect morphological and apoptotic changes on postnatal days (PND) 1, 3, and 7. Separate cohorts were maintained until PND 50 and tested for learning and memory using Morris water maze (WM). Survival rate was decreased with longer hypoxic time, and 100% mortality was noted when hypoxia time was beyond 18min. Apoptosis was increased with the duration of hypoxia with neuronal loss and cell shrinkage in the CA1 of hippocampus. The time taken for the juveniles to locate the hidden platform during WM was increased in animals subjected to hypoxia. These data demonstrate that perinatal ischemic injury leads to neuronal death in the hippocampus and long-lasting cognitive dysfunction. This model mimics hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in humans and may be appropriate for investigating therapeutic interventions.

  4. A Model of Auditory-Cognitive Processing and Relevance to Clinical Applicability.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss and cognitive function interact in both a bottom-up and top-down relationship. Listening effort is tied to these interactions, and models have been developed to explain their relationship. The Ease of Language Understanding model in particular has gained considerable attention in its explanation of the effect of signal distortion on speech understanding. Signal distortion can also affect auditory scene analysis ability, however, resulting in a distorted auditory scene that can affect cognitive function, listening effort, and the allocation of cognitive resources. These effects are explained through an addition to the Ease of Language Understanding model. This model can be generalized to apply to all sounds, not only speech, representing the increased effort required for auditory environmental awareness and other nonspeech auditory tasks. While the authors have measures of speech understanding and cognitive load to quantify these interactions, they are lacking measures of the effect of hearing aid technology on auditory scene analysis ability and how effort and attention varies with the quality of an auditory scene. Additionally, the clinical relevance of hearing aid technology on cognitive function and the application of cognitive measures in hearing aid fittings will be limited until effectiveness is demonstrated in real-world situations.

  5. Clinically-relevant chemotherapy interactions with complementary and alternative medicines in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Yap, Kevin Yi-Lwern; See, Cheng Shang; Chan, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs), in particular herbal medicines, are commonly used by cancer patients in conjunction with chemotherapy treatment for their anticancer properties and supportive care. However, the effects of many of these herbs are not well-documented due to limited studies done on them. Severe herb-drug interactions (HDIs) have been recorded in some cases, and failure to recognize these harmful HDIs can lead to dire consequences in cancer patients. This study discusses clinically-relevant interactions between anticancer drugs (ACDs) and herbs classified into 7 categories: cancer treatment and prevention, immune-system-related, alopecia, nausea and vomiting, peripheral neuropathy and pain, inflammation, and fatigue. Some promising patents which contain these herbs and thus may manifest these interactions are also presented in this article. Pharmacokinetic interactions involved mainly induction or inhibition of the cytochrome P450 isozymes and p-glycoprotein, while pharmacodynamic interactions were related to increased risks of central nervous system-related effects, hepatotoxicity and bleeding, among others. Clinicians should be vigilant when treating cancer patients who take CAMs with concurrent chemotherapy since they face a high risk of HDIs. These HDIs can be minimized or avoided by selecting herb-drug pairs which are less likely to interact. Furthermore, close monitoring of pharmacological effects and plasma drug levels should be carried out to avoid toxicity and ensure adequate chemotherapeutic coverage in patients with cancer.

  6. 3D Culture as a Clinically Relevant Model for Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Fong, Eliza Li Shan; Toh, Tan Boon; Yu, Hanry; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-03-01

    Advances in understanding many of the fundamental mechanisms of cancer progression have led to the development of molecular targeted therapies. While molecular targeted therapeutics continue to improve the outcome for cancer patients, tumor heterogeneity among patients, as well as intratumoral heterogeneity, limits the efficacy of these drugs to specific patient subtypes, as well as contributes to relapse. Thus, there is a need for a more personalized approach toward drug development and diagnosis that takes into account the diversity of cancer patients, as well as the complex milieu of tumor cells within a single patient. Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems paired with patient-derived xenografts or patient-derived organoids may provide a more clinically relevant system to address issues presented by personalized or precision medical approaches. In this review, we cover the current methods available for applying 3D culture systems toward personalized cancer research and drug development, as well as key challenges that must be addressed in order to fully realize the potential of 3D patient-derived culture systems for cancer drug development. Greater implementation of 3D patient-derived culture systems in the cancer research field should accelerate the development of truly personalized medical therapies for cancer patients.

  7. Registered nurses' ideas of physical science concepts relevant to their clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Lesley M.; Batts, Judith E.

    1996-09-01

    Experience in teaching science to nurses has raised the question of whether nurses' expressions of their understanding of concepts in physical science are adequate for professional practice. Nurses' descriptions of physical science concepts relevant to their practice must be explicated before educators can develop strategies to enhance nurses' learning of science. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to establish registered nurses' conceptions of physical science in their clinical practice. Data were collected using a multiple choice question survey, field work and focused interviews. Six categories of conceptions emerged from data analysis. Of the three which related to complexity of understanding “association” and “definition” were predominant and related in the main, to two of the three contextual categories “instrumentation/equipment” and “procedure.” There were few examples of the other two categories of “elaboration” and “body processes.” We argue that the conceptions held by the nurses were not adequate to allow them to fulfil their roles as professional practitioners in health care.

  8. Characterization and identification of clinically relevant microorganisms using rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Nicole; Rebec, Monica; Jones, Emrys A; Golf, Ottmar; Abdolrasouli, Alireza; Balog, Julia; Behrends, Volker; Veselkov, Kirill A; Takats, Zoltan

    2014-07-01

    Rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry (REIMS) was investigated for its suitability as a general identification system for bacteria and fungi. Strains of 28 clinically relevant bacterial species were analyzed in negative ion mode, and corresponding data was subjected to unsupervised and supervised multivariate statistical analyses. The created supervised model yielded correct cross-validation results of 95.9%, 97.8%, and 100% on species, genus, and Gram-stain level, respectively. These results were not affected by the resolution of the mass spectral data. Blind identification tests were performed for strains cultured on different culture media and analyzed using different instrumental platforms which led to 97.8-100% correct identification. Seven different Escherichia coli strains were subjected to different culture conditions and were distinguishable with 88% accuracy. In addition, the technique proved suitable to distinguish five pathogenic Candida species with 98.8% accuracy without any further modification to the experimental workflow. These results prove that REIMS is sufficiently specific to serve as a culture condition-independent tool for the identification and characterization of microorganisms.

  9. Presence and Persistence of Viable, Clinically Relevant Legionella pneumophila Bacteria in Garden Soil in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van Heijnsbergen, E.; van Deursen, A.; Bouwknegt, M.; Bruin, J. P.; Schalk, J. A. C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Garden soils were investigated as reservoirs and potential sources of pathogenic Legionella bacteria. Legionella bacteria were detected in 22 of 177 garden soil samples (12%) by amoebal coculture. Of these 22 Legionella-positive soil samples, seven contained Legionella pneumophila. Several other species were found, including the pathogenic Legionella longbeachae (4 gardens) and Legionella sainthelensi (9 gardens). The L. pneumophila isolates comprised 15 different sequence types (STs), and eight of these STs were previously isolated from patients according to the European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI) database. Six gardens that were found to be positive for L. pneumophila were resampled after several months, and in three gardens, L. pneumophila was again isolated. One of these gardens was resampled four times throughout the year and was found to be positive for L. pneumophila on all occasions. IMPORTANCE Tracking the source of infection for sporadic cases of Legionnaires' disease (LD) has proven to be hard. L. pneumophila ST47, the sequence type that is most frequently isolated from LD patients in the Netherlands, is rarely found in potential environmental sources. As L. pneumophila ST47 was previously isolated from a garden soil sample during an outbreak investigation, garden soils were investigated as reservoirs and potential sources of pathogenic Legionella bacteria. The detection of viable, clinically relevant Legionella strains indicates that garden soil is a potential source of Legionella bacteria, and future research should assess the public health implication of the presence of L. pneumophila in garden soil. PMID:27316958

  10. Is the mouse a clinically relevant model for human fertilization failures?

    PubMed

    Neuber, E; Powers, R D

    2000-01-01

    This study compares failed fertilization oocytes from patients participating in an in-vitro fertilization (IVF) programme with failed fertilization oocytes from B6SJLF(1)/J mice, in order to characterize and describe the distribution of DNA in oocytes that do not undergo normal fertilization. Our goal is to evaluate the mouse IVF system as a model to gain insight into reasons for human fertilization failures. All oocytes were stained with the vital fluorescent dye, Hoechst 33342, which rapidly stains double-stranded DNA. Of the 237 human oocytes that had been scored as failed fertilization by brightfield microscopy, 61 (25.7%) showed the presence of at least one spermatozoon within the oocyte cytoplasm. In contrast, out of 69 failed fertilization mouse oocytes, only one oocyte showed the presence of a spermatozoon within its cytoplasm. Mouse failed fertilization oocytes exhibited a significantly lower internal sperm rate (P < 0.0001) than human failed fertilization oocytes. Human failed fertilization oocytes show a higher incidence of sperm penetration, but the cytoplasm fails to support pronuclear development, whereas, at least in this strain, mouse failed fertilization oocytes arise from an inability of the spermatozoa to penetrate the oocyte. This study suggests that the mouse is not a clinically relevant model for human fertilization failures.

  11. Polymorphisms in drug-metabolizing enzymes: What is their clinical relevance and why do they exist?

    SciTech Connect

    Nebert, D.W.

    1997-02-01

    The beautiful report by Sachse in this issue of the journal represents the culmination of 2 decades of increasingly exciting work on the {open_quotes}debrisoquine oxidation polymorphism,{close_quotes} one of dozens of pharmacogenetic or ecogenetic polymorphisms that have been shown to have an important impact on innumerable clinical diseases. Pharmacogenetics is the study of the hereditary basis of the differences in responses to drugs. Ecogenetics is the broader field of interindividual differences in response to all environmental chemical and physical agents (e.g., heavy metals, insecticides, compounds formed during combustion, and UV radiation). It is now clear that each of us has his or her own {open_quotes}individual fingerprint{close_quotes} of unique alleles encoding the so-called drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and the receptors that regulate these enzymes. In this invited editorial, I first introduce the current thinking in the field of DME (and DME-receptor) research and how DMEs have evolved from animal-plant interactions. I then describe the debrisoquine oxidation polymorphism, as well as two other relevant DME polymorphisms; show the relationship between these polymorphisms and human disease; provide examples of synergistic effects caused by the combination of two DME polymorphisms; and discuss the ethical considerations of such research. Last, I speculate on why these allelic frequencies of the DME genes might exist in human populations in the first place. 35 refs.

  12. Silica Desiccant Packets for Storage and Transport of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Other Clinically Relevant Species

    PubMed Central

    Pell, Casey L.; Williams, Melanie J.; Dunne, Eileen M.; Porter, Barbara D.; Satzke, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial isolates are often transported between laboratories for research and diagnostic purposes. Silica desiccant packets (SDPs), which are inexpensive and do not require freezing, were evaluated for storage and recovery of bacterial isolates. Conditions such as inoculum size, swab type and temperature of storage were investigated using ten Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates. The optimized protocol was then tested using 49 additional S. pneumoniae isolates representing 40 serogroups. Overall, S. pneumoniae growth was considered satisfactory (>100 colony forming units) for 98/109 (89.9%) and 20/20 (100%) swabs after 14 days at room temperature or 28 days at 4° C, respectively. Storage in SDPs did not impact on the ability of S. pneumoniae isolates to be subsequently serotyped. When the survival of nine other clinically relevant bacterial species was tested, seven were viable after 28 days at room temperature, the exceptions being Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae. SDPs are suitable for transport and short-term storage of bacterial species including S. pneumoniae. PMID:23940811

  13. Dose-dependent cytotoxicity of clinically relevant cobalt nanoparticles and ions on macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Min; Xia, Zhidao; Glyn-Jones, Sion; Beard, David; Gill, Harinderjit S; Murray, David W

    2009-04-01

    Despite the satisfactory short-term implant survivorship of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty, periprosthetic soft-tissue masses such as pseudotumours are being increasingly reported. Cytotoxic effects of cobalt or chromium have been suggested to play a role in its aetiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of clinically relevant metal nanoparticles and ions on the viability of macrophages in vitro. A RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line was cultured in the presence of either: (1) cobalt, chromium and titanium nanoparticles sized 30-35 nm; or (2) cobalt sulphate and chromium chloride. Two methods were used to quantify cell viability: Alamar Blue assay and Live/Dead assay. The cytotoxicity was observed only with cobalt. Cobalt nanoparticles and ions demonstrated dose-dependent cytotoxic effects on macrophages in vitro: the cytotoxic concentrations of nanoparticles and ions were 1 x 10(12) particles ml(-1) and 1000 microM, respectively. The high concentration of cobalt nanoparticles required for cytotoxicity of macrophages in vitro suggests that increased production of cobalt nanoparticles in vivo, due to excessive MoM implant wear, may lead to local adverse biological effects. Therefore, cytotoxicity of high concentrations of metal nanoparticles phagocytosed by macrophages located in the periprosthetic tissues may be an important factor in pathogenesis of pseudotumours.

  14. Development of a new microtiter plate format for clinically relevant assays.

    PubMed

    Piletska, Elena V; Piletsky, Stanislav S; Whitcombe, Michael J; Chianella, Iva; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2012-02-21

    A new format for the microtiter plate-based assays was proposed. The novelty involves the use of disk-shaped inserts for immobilization of biological and chemical reagents. The internal opening of the disks allows measurements of the reactions by standard microtiter plate readers without any additional steps involving liquid handling. Ideally the plate end-users just have to add the sample and take the measurement without any need of multiple reagent additions or transfer of the liquid to a different plate. The novel assay format also allows handling of reagents which are not soluble in an aqueous environment. As a proof of concept we describe here several model reactions which are compatible with microtiter plate format, such as monitoring enzymatic reactions catalyzed by glucose oxidase (GOx) and urease, measurements of proteins by BCA assay, analysis of pH, and concentration of antioxidants. The "mix and match" approach in the disk-shape format allows multiplexing and could be particularly useful for high throughput screening. One of the potential application areas for this novel assay format could be in a multianalyte system for measurement of clinically relevant analytes in primary care.

  15. A LINEAR ACTUATED TORSIONAL DEVICE TO REPLICATE CLINICALLY RELEVANT SPIRAL FRACTURES IN LONG BONES

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, W. Brent; Troy, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms underlying spiral fracture we would like to carry out biomechanical tests of long bones loaded in torsion to failure. A device was fabricated to perform torsional tests of long bones using a single-axis linear actuator. The principal operation of the device was to transform the vertical displacement of a material testing machine’s linear actuator into rotational movement using a spur gear and rack system. Accuracy and precision of the device were quantified using cast-acrylic rods with known torque-rotation behavior. Cadaveric experimentation was used to replicate a clinically relevant spiral fracture in eleven human proximal tibiae; strain gage data were recorded for a single specimen. The device had an experimental error less than 0.2 Nm and was repeatable to within 0.3%. Strain gage data were in line with those expected from pure torsion and the cadaveric tibiae illustrated spiral fractures at ultimate torque and rotation values of 130.6 ± 53.2 Nm and 8.3 ± 1.5°, respectively. Ultimate torque was highly correlated with DXA assessed bone mineral density (r = 0.87; p<0.001). The device presented is applicable to any torsional testing of long bone when only a single-axis linear actuator is available. PMID:23025174

  16. Clinical relevance of infections with zoonotic and human oral species of Campylobacter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soomin; Lee, Jeeyeon; Ha, Jimyeong; Choi, Yukyung; Kim, Sejeong; Lee, Heeyoung; Yoon, Yohan; Choi, Kyoung-Hee

    2016-07-01

    Genus Campylobacter has been recognized as a causative bacterial agent of animal and human diseases. Human Campylobacter infections have caused more concern. Campylobacters can be classified into two groups in terms of their original host: zoonotic and human oral species. The major zoonotic species are Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, which mostly reside in the intestines of avian species and are transmitted to humans via consumption of contaminated poultry products, thus causing human gastroenteritis and other diseases as sequelae. The other campylobacters, human oral species, include C. concisus, C. showae, C. gracilis, C. ureolyticus, C. curvus, and C. rectus. These species are isolated from the oral cavity, natural colonization site, but have potential clinical relevance in the periodontal region to varying extent. Two species, C. jejuni and C. coli, are believed to be mainly associated with intestinal diseases, but recent studies suggested that oral Campylobacter species also play a significant role in intestinal diseases. This review offers an outline of the two Campylobacter groups (zoonotic and human oral), their virulence traits, and the associated illnesses including gastroenteritis.

  17. A linear-actuated torsional device to replicate clinically relevant spiral fractures in long bones.

    PubMed

    Edwards, W Brent; Troy, Karen L

    2012-09-01

    To better understand the mechanisms underlying spiral fracture we would like to carry out biomechanical tests of long bones loaded in torsion to failure. A device was fabricated to perform torsional tests of long bones using a single-axis linear actuator. The principal operation of the device was to transform the vertical displacement of a material testing machine's linear actuator into rotational movement using a spur gear and rack system. Accuracy and precision of the device were quantified using cast-acrylic rods with known torque-rotation behavior. Cadaveric experimentation was used to replicate a clinically relevant spiral fracture in eleven human proximal tibiae; strain-gage data were recorded for a single specimen. The device had an experimental error of less than 0.2 Nm and was repeatable to within 0.3%. Strain gage data were in line with those expected from pure torsion and the cadaveric tibiae illustrated spiral fractures at ultimate torque and rotation values of 130.6 +/- 53.2 Nm and 8.3 +/- 1.5 degrees, respectively. Ultimate torque was highly correlated with DXA assessed bone mineral density (r = 0.87; p < 0.00 1). The device presented is applicable to any torsional testing of long bone when only a single-axis linear actuator is available.

  18. A clinically relevant model of osteoinduction: a process requiring calcium phosphate and BMP/Wnt signalling

    PubMed Central

    Eyckmans, J; Roberts, S J; Schrooten, J; Luyten, F P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we investigated a clinically relevant model of in vivo ectopic bone formation utilizing human periosteum derived cells (HPDCs) seeded in a Collagraft™ carrier and explored the mechanisms by which this process is driven. Bone formation occurred after eight weeks when a minimum of one million HPDCs was loaded on Collagraft™ carriers and implanted subcutaneously in NMRI nu/nu mice. De novo bone matrix, mainly secreted by the HPDCs, was found juxta-proximal of the calcium phosphate (CaP) granules suggesting that CaP may have triggered the ‘osteoinductive program’. Indeed, removal of the CaP granules by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid decalcification prior to cell seeding and implantation resulted in loss of bone formation. In addition, inhibition of endogenous bone morphogenetic protein and Wnt signalling by overexpression of the secreted antagonists Noggin and Frzb, respectively, also abrogated osteoinduction. Proliferation of the engrafted HPDCs was strongly reduced in the decalcified scaffolds or when seeded with adenovirus-Noggin/Frzb transduced HPDCs indicating that cell division of the engrafted HPDCs is required for the direct bone formation cascade. These data suggest that this model of bone formation is similar to that observed during physiological intramembranous bone development and may be of importance when investigating tissue engineering strategies. PMID:19538476

  19. Protein abundance of clinically relevant multidrug transporters along the entire length of the human intestine.

    PubMed

    Drozdzik, Marek; Gröer, Christian; Penski, Jette; Lapczuk, Joanna; Ostrowski, Marek; Lai, Yurong; Prasad, Bhagwat; Unadkat, Jashvant D; Siegmund, Werner; Oswald, Stefan

    2014-10-06

    Intestinal transporters are crucial determinants in the oral absorption of many drugs. We therefore studied the mRNA expression (N = 33) and absolute protein content (N = 10) of clinically relevant transporters in healthy epithelium of the duodenum, the proximal and distal jejunum and ileum, and the ascending, transversal, descending, and sigmoidal colon of six organ donors (24-54 years). In the small intestine, the abundance of nearly all studied proteins ranged between 0.2 and 1.6 pmol/mg with the exception of those of OCT3 (<0.1 pmol/mg) and PEPT1 (2.6-4.9 pmol/mg) that accounted for ∼50% of all measured transporters. OATP1A2 was not detected in any intestinal segment. ABCB1, ABCG2, PEPT1, and ASBT were significantly more abundant in jejunum and ileum than in colon. In contrast to this, the level of expression of ABCC2, ABCC3, and OCT3 was found to be highest in colon. Site-dependent differences in the levels of gene and protein expression were observed for ABCB1 and ASBT. Significant correlations between mRNA and protein levels have been found for ABCG2, ASBT, OCT3, and PEPT1 in the small intestine. Our data provide further physiological pieces of the puzzle required to predict intestinal drug absorption in humans.

  20. Update on the Human Broad Tapeworm (Genus Diphyllobothrium), Including Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Tomáš; Garcia, Hector H.; Kuchta, Roman; Wicht, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Tapeworms (Cestoda) continue to be an important cause of morbidity in humans worldwide. Diphyllobothriosis, a human disease caused by tapeworms of the genus Diphyllobothrium, is the most important fish-borne zoonosis caused by a cestode parasite. Up to 20 million humans are estimated to be infected worldwide. Besides humans, definitive hosts of Diphyllobothrium include piscivorous birds and mammals, which represent a significant zoonotic reservoir. The second intermediate hosts include both freshwater and marine fish, especially anadromous species such as salmonids. The zoonosis occurs most commonly in countries where the consumption of raw or marinated fish is a frequent practice. Due to the increasing popularity of dishes utilizing uncooked fish, numerous cases of human infections have appeared recently, even in the most developed countries. As many as 14 valid species of Diphyllobothrium can cause human diphyllobothriosis, with D. latum and D. nihonkaiense being the most important pathogens. In this paper, all taxa from humans reported are reviewed, with brief information on their life history and their current distribution. Data on diagnostics, epidemiology, clinical relevance, and control of the disease are also summarized. The importance of reliable identification of human-infecting species with molecular tools (sequences of mitochondrial genes) as well as the necessity of epidemiological studies aimed at determining the sources of infections are pointed out. PMID:19136438

  1. EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer: preclinical data and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Susumu; Costa, Daniel B

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death. The identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) somatic mutations defined a new, molecularly classified subgroup of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Classic EGFR activating mutations, such as inframe deletions in exon 19 or the Leu858Arg (L858R) point mutation in exon 21 are associated with sensitivity to first generation quinazoline reversible EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations, which are typically located after the C-helix of the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR, may account for up to 4% of all EGFR mutations. Preclinical models have shown that the most prevalent EGFR exon 20 insertion mutated proteins are resistant to clinically achievable doses of reversible (gefitinib, erlotinib) and irreversible (neratinib, afatinib, PF00299804) EGFR TKIs. Growing clinical experience with patients whose tumours harbour EGFR exon 20 insertions corresponds with the preclinical data; very few patients have had responses to EGFR TKIs. Despite the prevalence and biological importance of EEGFR exon 20 insertions, few reports have summarised all preclinical and clinical data on these mutations. Here, we review the literature and provide an update with an emphasis on the structural, molecular, and clinical implications of EGFR exon 20 insertions.

  2. A Genotypic-Oriented View of CFTR Genetics Highlights Specific Mutational Patterns Underlying Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina Maria; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Stamato, Antonella; Narzi, Fabiana; Amato, Annalisa; Cimino, Giuseppe; Bertasi, Serenella; Quattrucci, Serena; Strom, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic disease caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The genotype–phenotype relationship in this disease is still unclear, and diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic challenges persist. We enrolled 610 patients with different forms of CF and studied them from a clinical, biochemical, microbiological and genetic point of view. Overall, there were 125 different mutated alleles (11 with novel mutations and 10 with complex mutations) and 225 genotypes. A strong correlation between mutational patterns at the genotypic level and phenotypic macrocategories emerged. This specificity appears to largely depend on rare and individual mutations, as well as on the varying prevalence of common alleles in different clinical macrocategories. However, 19 genotypes appeared to underlie different clinical forms of the disease. The dissection of the pathway from the CFTR mutated genotype to the clinical phenotype allowed to identify at least two components of the variability usually found in the genotype–phenotype relationship. One component seems to depend on the genetic variation of CFTR, the other component on the cumulative effect of variations in other genes and cellular pathways independent from CFTR. The experimental dissection of the overall biological CFTR pathway appears to be a powerful approach for a better comprehension of the genotype–phenotype relationship. However, a change from an allele-oriented to a genotypic-oriented view of CFTR genetics is mandatory, as well as a better assessment of sources of variability within the CFTR pathway. PMID:25910067

  3. PLA2G6-associated neurodegeneration (PLAN): further expansion of the clinical, radiological and mutation spectrum associated with infantile and atypical childhood-onset disease.

    PubMed

    Illingworth, M A; Meyer, E; Chong, W K; Manzur, A Y; Carr, L J; Younis, R; Hardy, C; McDonald, F; Childs, A M; Stewart, B; Warren, D; Kneen, R; King, M D; Hayflick, S J; Kurian, M A

    2014-06-01

    Phospholipase A2 associated neurodegeneration (PLAN) is a major phenotype of autosomal recessive Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA). We describe the clinical phenotypes, neuroimaging features and PLA2G6 mutations in 5 children, of whom 4 presented with infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD). One other patient was diagnosed with the onset of PLAN in childhood, and our report highlights the diagnostic challenges associated with this atypical PLAN subtype. In this series, the neuroradiological relevance of classical PLAN features as well as apparent claval hypertrophy' is explored. Novel PLA2G6 mutations were identified in all patients. PLAN should be considered not only in patients presenting with a classic INAD phenotype but also in older patients presenting later in childhood with non-specific progressive neurological features including social communication difficulties, gait disturbance, dyspraxia, neuropsychiatric symptoms and extrapyramidal motor features.

  4. A comparison of the ability of rilpivirine (TMC278) and selected analogues to inhibit clinically relevant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase mutants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The recently approved anti-AIDS drug rilpivirine (TMC278, Edurant) is a nonnucleoside inhibitor (NNRTI) that binds to reverse transcriptase (RT) and allosterically blocks the chemical step of DNA synthesis. In contrast to earlier NNRTIs, rilpivirine retains potency against well-characterized, clinically relevant RT mutants. Many structural analogues of rilpivirine are described in the patent literature, but detailed analyses of their antiviral activities have not been published. This work addresses the ability of several of these analogues to inhibit the replication of wild-type (WT) and drug-resistant HIV-1. Results We used a combination of structure activity relationships and X-ray crystallography to examine NNRTIs that are structurally related to rilpivirine to determine their ability to inhibit WT RT and several clinically relevant RT mutants. Several analogues showed broad activity with only modest losses of potency when challenged with drug-resistant viruses. Structural analyses (crystallography or modeling) of several analogues whose potencies were reduced by RT mutations provide insight into why these compounds were less effective. Conclusions Subtle variations between compounds can lead to profound differences in their activities and resistance profiles. Compounds with larger substitutions replacing the pyrimidine and benzonitrile groups of rilpivirine, which reorient pocket residues, tend to lose more activity against the mutants we tested. These results provide a deeper understanding of how rilpivirine and related compounds interact with the NNRTI binding pocket and should facilitate development of novel inhibitors. PMID:23217210

  5. Lollipops in the Clinic: Information Dense Mutation Plots for Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Cory

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Concise visualization is critical to present large amounts of information in a minimal space that can be interpreted quickly. Clinical applications in precision medicine present an important use case due to the time dependent nature of the interpretations, although visualization is increasingly necessary across the life sciences. In this paper we describe the Lollipops software for the presentation of panel or exome sequencing results. Source code and binaries are freely available at https://github.com/pbnjay/lollipops. Although other software and web resources exist to produce lollipop diagrams, these packages are less suited to clinical applications. The demands of precision medicine require the ability to easily fit into a workflow and incorporate external information without manual intervention. Results The Lollipops software provides a simple command line interface that only requires an official gene symbol and mutation list making it easily scriptable. External information is integrated using the publicly available Uniprot and Pfam resources. Heuristics are used to select the most informative components and condense them for a concise plot. The output is a flexible Scalable Vector Graphic (SVG) diagram that can be displayed in a web page or graphic illustration tool. Conclusion The Lollipops software creates information-dense, publication-quality mutation plots for automated pipelines and high-throughput workflows in precision medicine. The automatic data integration enables clinical data security, and visualization heuristics concisely present knowledge with minimal user configuration. PMID:27490490

  6. Novel mutations expand the clinical spectrum of DYNC1H1-associated spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Scoto, Mariacristina; Rossor, Alexander M.; Harms, Matthew B.; Cirak, Sebahattin; Calissano, Mattia; Robb, Stephanie; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Martínez Arroyo, Amaia; Rodriguez Sanz, Aida; Mansour, Sahar; Fallon, Penny; Hadjikoumi, Irene; Klein, Andrea; Yang, Michele; De Visser, Marianne; Overweg-Plandsoen, W.C.G. (Truus); Baas, Frank; Taylor, J. Paul; Benatar, Michael; Connolly, Anne M.; Al-Lozi, Muhammad T.; Nixon, John; de Goede, Christian G.E.L.; Foley, A. Reghan; Mcwilliam, Catherine; Pitt, Matthew; Sewry, Caroline; Phadke, Rahul; Hafezparast, Majid; Chong, W.K. “Kling”; Mercuri, Eugenio; Baloh, Robert H.; Reilly, Mary M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To expand the clinical phenotype of autosomal dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMA-LED) due to mutations in the dynein, cytoplasmic 1, heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1) gene. Methods: Patients with a phenotype suggestive of a motor, non–length-dependent neuronopathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs were identified at participating neuromuscular centers and referred for targeted sequencing of DYNC1H1. Results: We report a cohort of 30 cases of SMA-LED from 16 families, carrying mutations in the tail and motor domains of DYNC1H1, including 10 novel mutations. These patients are characterized by congenital or childhood-onset lower limb wasting and weakness frequently associated with cognitive impairment. The clinical severity is variable, ranging from generalized arthrogryposis and inability to ambulate to exclusive and mild lower limb weakness. In many individuals with cognitive impairment (9/30 had cognitive impairment) who underwent brain MRI, there was an underlying structural malformation resulting in polymicrogyric appearance. The lower limb muscle MRI shows a distinctive pattern suggestive of denervation characterized by sparing and relative hypertrophy of the adductor longus and semitendinosus muscles at the thigh level, and diffuse involvement with relative sparing of the anterior-medial muscles at the calf level. Proximal muscle histopathology did not always show classic neurogenic features. Conclusion: Our report expands the clinical spectrum of DYNC1H1-related SMA-LED to include generalized arthrogryposis. In addition, we report that the neurogenic peripheral pathology and the CNS neuronal migration defects are often associated, reinforcing the importance of DYNC1H1 in both central and peripheral neuronal functions. PMID:25609763

  7. The Genomic Landscape and Clinical Relevance of A-to-I RNA Editing in Human Cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a widespread post-transcriptional mechanism, but its genomic landscape and clinical relevance in cancer have not been investigated systematically. We characterized the global A-to-I RNA editing profiles of 6,236 patient samples of 17 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas and revealed a striking diversity of altered RNA-editing patterns in tumors relative to normal tissues. We identified an appreciable number of clinically relevant editing events, many of which are in noncoding regions.

  8. Clinical and molecular implications of mosaicism in FMR1 full mutations

    PubMed Central

    Pretto, Dalyir; Yrigollen, Carolyn M.; Tang, Hiu-Tung; Williamson, John; Espinal, Glenda; Iwahashi, Chris K.; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Hagerman, Randi J.; Hagerman, Paul J.; Tassone, Flora

    2014-01-01

    Expansions of more than 200 CGG repeats (full mutation) in the FMR1 gene give rise to fragile X syndrome (FXS) through a process that generally involves hypermethylation of the FMR1 promoter region and gene silencing, resulting in absence of expression of the encoded protein, FMRP. However, mosaicism with alleles differing in size and extent of methylation often exist within or between tissues of individuals with FXS. In the current work, CGG-repeat lengths and methylation status were assessed for eighteen individuals with FXS, including 13 mosaics, for which peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) and primary fibroblast cells were available. Our results show that for both PBMCs and fibroblasts, FMR1 mRNA and FMRP expression are directly correlated with the percent of methylation of the FMR1 allele. In addition, Full Scale IQ scores were inversely correlated with the percent methylation and positively correlated with higher FMRP expression. These latter results point toward a positive impact on cognition for full mutation mosaics with lower methylation compared to individuals with fully methylated, full mutation alleles. However, we did not observe a significant reduction in the number of seizures, nor in the severity of hyperactivity or autism spectrum disorder, among individuals with mosaic genotypes in the presentation of FXS. These observations suggest that low, but non-zero expression of FMRP may be sufficient to positively impact cognitive function in individuals with FXS, with methylation mosaicism (lowered methylation fraction) contributing to a more positive clinical outcome. PMID:25278957

  9. Setleis syndrome: clinical, molecular and structural studies of the first TWIST2 missense mutation.

    PubMed

    Rosti, R O; Uyguner, Z O; Nazarenko, I; Bekerecioglu, M; Cadilla, C L; Ozgur, H; Lee, B H; Aggarwal, A K; Pehlivan, S; Desnick, R J

    2015-11-01

    Setleis syndrome is characterized by bitemporal scar-like lesions and other characteristic facial features. It results from recessive mutations that truncate critical functional domains in the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, TWIST2, which regulates expression of genes for facial development. To date, only four nonsense or small deletion mutations have been reported. In the current report, the clinical findings in a consanguineous Turkish family were characterized. Three affected siblings had the characteristic features of Setleis syndrome. Homozygosity for the first TWIST2 missense mutation, c.326T>C (p.Leu109Pro), was identified in the patients. In silico analyses predicted that the secondary structure of the mutant protein was sustained, but the empirical force field energy increased to an unfavorable level with the proline substitution (p.Leu109Pro). On a crystallographically generated dimer, p.Leu109 lies near the dimer interface, and the proline substitution is predicted to hinder dimer formation. Therefore, p.Leu109Pro-TWIST2 alters the three dimensional structure and is unable to dimerize, thereby hindering the binding of TWIST2 to its target genes involved in facial development.

  10. Mutation Profile of B-Raf Gene Analyzed by fully Automated System and Clinical Features in Japanese Melanoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Ide, Masaru; Koba, Shinichi; Sueoka-Aragane, Naoko; Sato, Akemi; Nagano, Yuri; Inoue, Takuya; Misago, Noriyuki; Narisawa, Yutaka; Kimura, Shinya; Sueoka, Eisaburo

    2017-01-01

    BRAF gene mutations have been observed in 30-50 % of malignant melanoma patients. Recent development of therapeutic intervention using BRAF inhibitors requires an accurate and rapid detection system for BRAF mutations. In addition, the clinical characteristics of the melanoma associated with BRAF mutations in Japanese patients have not been investigated on a large scale evaluation. We recently established quenching probe system (QP) for detection of an activating BRAF mutation, V600E and evaluated 113 melanoma samples diagnosed in Saga University Hospital from 1982 to 2011. The QP system includes fully automated genotyping, based on analysis of the probe DNA melting curve, which binds the target mutated site using a fluorescent guanine quenched probe. BRAF mutations were detected in 54 of 115 (47 %) including 51 of V600E and 3 of V600 K in Japanese melanoma cases. Among clinical subtypes of melanoma, nodular melanoma showed high frequency (12 of 15; 80 %) of mutation followed by superficial spreading melanoma (13 of 26; 50 %). The QP system is a simple and sensitive method to determine BRAF V600E mutation, and will be useful tool for patient-oriented therapy with BRAF inhibitors.

  11. Clinical characterization and mutation spectrum in Hispanic families with adenomatous polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Mendez, Vanessa; Vazquez, Pedro Juan; Lozada, Maria Eugenia; Freyre, Katerina; Lathroum, Liselle; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria; Hernandez-Marrero, Jessica; Giardiello, Francis; Rodriguez-Quilichini, Segundo

    2013-01-01

    Background Several genetically defined hereditary CRC syndromes are associated with colonic polyposis including familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and MUTYH adenomatous polyposis (MAP). Limited data exists on the clinical characterization and genotypic spectrum of polyposis syndromes among Hispanics. Purpose To describe the phenotype and genotype of Puerto Rican Hispanic patients with FAP and MUTYH and compare with other ethnic and racial groups. Methods Probands were identified from the Puerto Rico Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry (PURIFICAR). Recruited individuals completed risk factors, medical, and family history questionnaires and underwent genetic testing for genotype analysis. Frequency analysis, chi-square, Fisher’s exact test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test were used for statistical analysis methods. Results A total of 31 FAP (from 19 families) and 13 MAP (from 13 families) Hispanic patients recruited from the Puerto Rico Familiar Colorectal Cancer Registry were evaluated. Among the FAP cases, mean age at diagnosis was 27.6 (range 9–71 years); 67.7% cases had more than 100 polyps and 41.9% had upper gastrointestinal polyps. Among the 19 FAP families, there were 77 affected FAP individuals and 26 colorectal cancer cases. Genetic mutations were available for 42.2% of FAP families; all mutations identified were unique. Surgeries were reported in 31 cases; 14 (45.2%) prophylactic surgeries and 6 (19.4%) therapeutic surgeries for management of CRC. Among MAP cases, mean age at diagnosis was 53 (range 34–76 years) and genetic analysis revealed homozygous biallelic mutations (G382D) in 53.8%, compound heterozygous mutations (G382/Y165C) in 23%, and non-G382/Y165C monoallelic mutations in 23%. Conclusions Familial cancer registries should be promoted as vehicles for detection, education and follow up of families at-risk of acquiring familial cancers. PURIFICAR is the first and only familial cancer registry in Puerto Rico providing these services to families

  12. BRAF V600E mutation in metastatic colorectal cancer: Methods of detection and correlation with clinical and pathologic features.

    PubMed

    Roma, Cristin; Rachiglio, Anna Maria; Pasquale, Raffaella; Fenizia, Francesca; Iannaccone, Alessia; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Antinolfi, Giuseppe; Parrella, Paola; Graziano, Paolo; Sabatino, Lina; Colantuoni, Vittorio; Botti, Gerardo; Maiello, Evaristo; Normanno, Nicola

    2016-08-02

    The screening for BRAF V600E mutation is employed in clinical practice for its prognostic and potentially predictive role in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC). Little information is available on the sensitivity and specificity of the testing methods to detect this mutation in CRC. By using serial dilution of BRAF mutant DNA with wild type DNA, we found that the sensitivity of allelic discrimination-Real Time PCR was higher than PCR-Sequencing (10% vs 20%). In agreement, the Real Time PCR assay displayed increased analytical sensitivity in detecting the BRAF V600E mutation as compared with PCR-Sequencing in a cohort of 510 consecutive CRCs (21 vs 16 cases). Targeted resequencing demonstrated that all cases negative by PCR-Sequencing had an allelic frequency of the BRAF mutation <20%, thus suggesting tumor heterogeneity. The association of BRAF mutations with clinical and pathological features was assessed next in a cohort of 840 KRAS exon 2 wild type CRC patients screened with the Real Time PCR assay. The BRAF V600E mutation frequency in this cohort was 7.8% that increased to 33.4% in females over 70 y of age with right-sided tumor location. BRAF mutations were also detected in 4.4% of male patients with left-sided tumors and aged <70 y. Fourteen of 61 (22.9%) BRAF V600E mutation bearing patients exhibited microsatellite instability (MSI) as assessed by T17 mononucleotide sequence within intron 8 of HSP110. Our study indicates that Real Time PCR-based assays are more sensitive than PCR-Sequencing to detect the BRAF V600E mutation in CRC and that BRAF mutations screening should not be restricted to selected patients on the basis of the clinical-pathological characteristics.

  13. Clinical spectrum and molecular diagnosis of Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients with an imprinting mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, S.; Cassidy, S.B.; Conroy, J.M.

    1997-01-20

    Recent studies have identified a new class of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) patients who have biparental inheritance, but neither the typical deletion nor uniparental disomy (UPD) or translocation. However, these patients have uniparental DNA methylation throughout 15q11-q13, and thus appear to have a mutation in the imprinting process for this region. Here we describe detailed clinical findings of five AS imprinting mutation patients (three families) and two PWS imprinting mutation patients (one new family). All these patients have essentially the classical clinical phenotype for the respective syndrome, except that the incidence of microcephaly is lower in imprinting mutation AS patients than in deletion AS patients. Furthermore, imprinting mutation AS and PWS patients do not typically have hypopigmentation, which is commonly found in patients with the usual large deletion. Molecular diagnosis of these cases is initially achieved by DNA methylation analyses of the DN34/ZNF127, PW71 (D15S63), and SNRPN loci. The latter two probes have clear advantages in the simple molecular diagnostic analysis of PWS and AS patients with an imprinting mutation, as has been found for typical deletion or UPD PWS and AS cases. With the recent finding of inherited microdeletions in PWS and AS imprinting mutation families, our studies define a new class of these two syndromes. The clinical and molecular identification of these PWS and AS patients has important genetic counseling consequences. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Spectral dependencies of killing, mutation, and transformation in mammalian cells and their relevance to hazards caused by solar ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, F; Han, A; Lankas, G R; Utsumi, H; Elkind, M M

    1981-12-01

    Using germicidal lamps and Westinghouse sunlamps with and without filtration, the effectiveness of ultraviolet and near-ultraviolet light in inducing molecular and cellular changes was measured. Cell survival and the induction of resistance to 6-thioguanine or to ouabain were measured with V79 Chinese hamster cells, cell survival and neoplastic transformation were measured with C3H mouse 10 T 1/2 cells, and the induction of pyrimidine dimers containing thymine was measured in both cell lines. The short-wavelength cutoff of the sunlamp emission was shifted from approximately 290 nm (unfiltered) to approximately 300 and approximately 310 nm by appropriate filters. Although it was found that the efficiency with which all end points were induced progressively decreased as the short-wavelength cutoff was shifted to longer wavelengths, the rates of decrease differed appreciably. For example, doses of near-ultraviolet light longer than approximately 300 nm that were effective in mutating or in transforming cells were ineffective in killing them. In respect to pyrimidine dimer induction, several but not all cellular end points were induced by dose ratios of sunlamp light (short-wavelength cutoff, approximately 290 nm) to germicidal lamp light (254 nm) in fairly close accord with the doses required to produce equivalent proportions of dimers. However, for near-ultraviolet light having cutoffs at longer wavelengths, the biological action observed was appreciably greater than what would be predicted from the proportion of dimers induced. From the latter observation, it is inferred that increasing intensities of short-wavelength ultraviolet light, as would be expected from reductions in stratospheric ozone around the earth, would result in smaller increases in biological action, e.g., skin cancer, compared to current levels of action than would be predicted from an action spectrum completely corresponding to that of a pyrimidine dimer induction spectrum in DNA.

  15. Clinical and mutation analysis of 51 probands with anophthalmia and/or severe microphthalmia from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Gerth-Kahlert, Christina; Williamson, Kathleen; Ansari, Morad; Rainger, Jacqueline K; Hingst, Volker; Zimmermann, Theodor; Tech, Stefani; Guthoff, Rudolf F; van Heyningen, Veronica; FitzPatrick, David R

    2013-01-01

    Clinical evaluation and mutation analysis was performed in 51 consecutive probands with severe eye malformations – anophthalmia and/or severe microphthalmia – seen in a single specialist ophthalmology center. The mutation analysis consisted of bidirectional sequencing of the coding regions of SOX2, OTX2, PAX6 (paired domain), STRA6, BMP4, SMOC1, FOXE3, and RAX, and genome-wide array-based copy number assessment. Fifteen (29.4%) of the 51 probands had likely causative mutations affecting SOX2 (9/51), OTX2 (5/51), and STRA6 (1/51). Of the cases with bilateral anophthalmia, 9/12 (75%) were found to be mutation positive. Three of these mutations were large genomic deletions encompassing SOX2 (one case) or OTX2 (two cases). Familial inheritance of three intragenic, plausibly pathogenic, and heterozygous mutations was observed. An unaffected carrier parent of an affected child with an identified OTX2 mutation confirmed the previously reported nonpenetrance for this disorder. Two families with SOX2 mutations demonstrated a parent and child both with significant but highly variable eye malformations. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in SOX2 and OTX2 are the most common genetic pathology associated with severe eye malformations and bi-allelic loss-of-function in STRA6 is confirmed as an emerging cause of nonsyndromal eye malformations. PMID:24498598

  16. Cortical atrophy patterns in multiple sclerosis are non-random and clinically relevant.

    PubMed

    Steenwijk, Martijn D; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Daams, Marita; Tijms, Betty M; Wink, Alle Meije; Balk, Lisanne J; Tewarie, Prejaas K; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J; Barkhof, Frederik; Vrenken, Hugo; Pouwels, Petra J W

    2016-01-01

    of two cortical thickness patterns (bilateral sensorimotor cortex and bilateral insula), and global cortical thickness. The final model predicting average cognition (adjusted R(2) = 0.469; P < 0.001) consisted of age, the loadings of two cortical thickness patterns (bilateral posterior cingulate cortex and bilateral temporal pole), overall white matter lesion load and normal-appearing white matter integrity. Although white matter pathology measures were part of the final clinical regression models, they explained limited incremental variance (to a maximum of 4%). Several cortical atrophy patterns relevant for multiple sclerosis were found. This suggests that cortical atrophy in multiple sclerosis occurs largely in a non-random manner and develops (at least partly) according to distinct anatomical patterns. In addition, these cortical atrophy patterns showed stronger associations with clinical (especially cognitive) dysfunction than global cortical atrophy.

  17. Observed inter-camera variability of clinically relevant performance characteristics for Siemens Symbia gamma cameras.

    PubMed

    Kappadath, S Cheenu; Erwin, William D; Wendt, Richard E

    2006-11-28

    We conducted an evaluation of the intercamera (i.e., between cameras) variability in clinically relevant performance characteristics for Symbia gamma cameras (Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, PA) based on measurements made using nine separate systems. The significance of the observed intercamera variability was determined by comparing it to the intracamera (i.e., within a single camera) variability. Measurements of performance characteristics were based on the standards of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association and reports 6, 9, 22, and 52 from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. All measurements were performed using 99mTc (except 57Co used for extrinsic resolution) and low-energy, high-resolution collimation. Of the nine cameras, four have crystals 3/8 in. thick and five have crystals 5/8 in. thick. We evaluated intrinsic energy resolution, intrinsic and extrinsic spatial resolution, intrinsic integral and differential flood uniformity over the useful field-of-view, count rate at 20% count loss, planar sensitivity, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) resolution, and SPECT integral uniformity. The intracamera variability was estimated by repeated measurements of the performance characteristics on a single system. The significance of the observed intercamera variability was evaluated using the two-tailed F distribution. The planar sensitivity of the gamma cameras tested was found be variable at the 99.8% confidence level for both the 3/8-in. and 5/8-in. crystal systems. The integral uniformity and energy resolution were found to be variable only for the 5/8-in. crystal systems at the 98% and 90% confidence level, respectively. All other performance characteristics tested exhibited no significant variability between camera systems. The measured variability reported here could perhaps be used to define nominal performance values of Symbia gamma cameras for planar and SPECT imaging.

  18. New clinically relevant, orthotopic mouse models of human chondrosarcoma with spontaneous metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chondrosarcoma responds poorly to adjuvant therapy and new, clinically relevant animal models are required to test targeted therapy. Methods Two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and FS090, were evaluated for proliferation, colony formation, invasion, angiogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. Cell lines were also investigated for VEGF, MMP-2, MMP-9, and RECK expression. JJ012 and FS090 were injected separately into the mouse tibia intramedullary canal or tibial periosteum. Animal limbs were measured, and x-rayed for evidence of tumour take and progression. Tibias and lungs were harvested to determine the presence of tumour and lung metastases. Results JJ012 demonstrated significantly higher proliferative capacity, invasion, and colony formation in collagen I gel. JJ012 conditioned medium stimulated endothelial tube formation and osteoclastogenesis with a greater potency than FS090 conditioned medium, perhaps related to the effects of VEGF and MMP-9. In vivo, tumours formed in intratibial and periosteal groups injected with JJ012, however no mice injected with FS090 developed tumours. JJ012 periosteal tumours grew to 3 times the non-injected limb size by 7 weeks, whereas intratibial injected limbs required 10 weeks to achieve a similar tumour size. Sectioned tumour tissue demonstrated features of grade III chondrosarcoma. All JJ012 periosteal tumours (5/5) resulted in lung micro-metastases, while only 2/4 JJ012 intratibial tumours demonstrated metastases. Conclusions The established JJ012 models replicate the site, morphology, and many behavioural characteristics of human chondrosarcoma. Local tumour invasion of bone and spontaneous lung metastasis offer valuable assessment tools to test the potential of novel agents for future chondrosarcoma therapy. PMID:20584302

  19. Exercise hemorheology as a three acts play with metabolic actors: is it of clinical relevance?

    PubMed

    Brun, Jean-Frédéric

    2002-01-01

    Hemorheological effects of exercise are a triphasic phenomenon including: (a) short-term effects (hyperviscosity mostly due to fluid shifts and alterations of erythrocyte rigidity and aggregability); (b) middle-term effects (i.e., the reversal of acute effects due to plasma volume expansion (autohemodilution) that lowers both plasma viscosity and hematocrit; (c) long-term effects that further improve blood fluidity, parallel with the classical training-induced hormonal and metabolic alterations. Red cell rheology during these 3 stages is affected by white cells and oxidant stress. On the other hand, most metabolic and hormonal alterations play a role in exercise-induced hemorheological changes: among them, blood lactate appears to have opposite effects according to the training status, since it generally impairs erythrocyte fluidity while it improves it in some subgroups of highly trained athletes, a difference that could be related to membrane monocarboxylate transporter status. Body composition (mostly hydration status and the amount of fat mass) as well as its major hormonal regulating system (the growth-hormone-IGF-I axis) are both markedly modified by training and these modifications are correlated with hemorheology. Nutritional disturbances affecting caloric and proteic intake, lipids, iron, zinc, etc. also modulate the hemorheologic effects of exercise. The overtraining syndrome represents a situation of unbalance between body's possibilities, nutrition, and work load, and is associated with metabolic, hormonal, immunologic and hemorheologic disturbances. The clinical relevance of these data is underlined by studies showing that exercise training in patients suffering from metabolic and/or cardiovascular disorders (such as the insulin resistance syndrome) results in a parallel improvement of metabolism, risk factors, blood rheology and fitness. Hemorheological measurements require to be studied, at least as sensitive markers of training, and possibly as

  20. Automated detection of retinal landmarks for the identification of clinically relevant regions in fundus photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ometto, Giovanni; Calivá, Francesco; Al-Diri, Bashir; Bek, Toke; Hunter, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Automatic, quick and reliable identification of retinal landmarks from fundus photography is key for measurements used in research, diagnosis, screening and treating of common diseases affecting the eyes. This study presents a fast method for the detection of the centre of mass of the vascular arcades, optic nerve head (ONH) and fovea, used in the definition of five clinically relevant areas in use for screening programmes for diabetic retinopathy (DR). Thirty-eight fundus photographs showing 7203 DR lesions were analysed to find the landmarks manually by two retina-experts and automatically by the proposed method. The automatic identification of the ONH and fovea were performed using template matching based on normalised cross correlation. The centre of mass of the arcades was obtained by fitting an ellipse on sample coordinates of the main vessels. The coordinates were obtained by processing the image with hessian filtering followed by shape analyses and finally sampling the results. The regions obtained manually and automatically were used to count the retinal lesions falling within, and to evaluate the method. 92.7% of the lesions were falling within the same regions based on the landmarks selected by the two experts. 91.7% and 89.0% were counted in the same areas identified by the method and the first and second expert respectively. The inter-repeatability of the proposed method and the experts is comparable, while the 100% intra-repeatability makes the algorithm a valuable tool in tasks like analyses in real-time, of large datasets and of intra-patient variability.

  1. Pancreatic Steatosis Demonstrated at MR Imaging in the General Population: Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Berthold, Friederike; Mayerle, Julia; Völzke, Henry; Reeder, Scott B.; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Lerch, Markus M.; Hosten, Norbert; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Meffert, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between pancreatic fat content and type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. Materials and Methods From the prospective population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP), 1367 volunteers (563 men, 678 women; median age, 50 years) underwent whole-body magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 1.5 T, which included multiecho chemical shift–encoded acquisition of the abdomen. SHIP was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. The proton density fat fraction (PDFF) was calculated after correction for T1 bias, T2* bias, multipeak spectral complexity of fat, and noise bias. On the basis of oral glucose tolerance test results, participants were grouped into those with normal glucose tolerance (n = 740), those with prediabetes (n = 431), and those with confirmed type 2 diabetes but without medication (n = 70). PDFF was assessed in the pancreatic head, body, and tail. Multivariable regression analysis was conducted to investigate possible relationships of PDFF with demographic factors, behavioral factors, and laboratory data associated with the metabolic syndrome. Results In all subjects, the mean unadjusted pancreatic fat content was 4.4% (head, 4.6%; body, 4.9%; tail, 3.9%; being unequally distributed, P < .001). There was no significant difference in pancreatic PDFF among subjects with normal glucose tolerance, prediabetes, and type 2 diabetes (P = .980). Pancreatic PDFF showed a positive association with age and body mass index and a negative association with serum lipase activity (P < .001). Conclusion The presence of pancreatic fat is not related to prediabetes or diabetes, which suggests that it has little clinical relevance for an individual’s glycemic status. © RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:25658037

  2. Species Recognition and Clinical Relevance of the Zygomycetous Genus Lichtheimia (syn. Absidia Pro Parte, Mycocladus) ▿

    PubMed Central

    Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Hoffmann, Kerstin; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Voigt, Kerstin; Bibashi, Evangelia; Walther, Grit

    2010-01-01

    The zygomycete genus Lichtheimia (syn. Absidia pro parte, Mycocladus) consists of saprotrophic fungi inhabiting soil or dead plant material. Lichtheimia corymbifera (syn. Absidia corymbifera, Mycocladus corymbifer) and Lichtheimia ramosa (syn. Absidia ramosa, Mycocladus ramosus) may cause fulminant infections in patients with impaired immunity. The present study investigated the species boundaries in Lichtheimia using genealogical concordance phylogenetic species recognition (by comparison of the genealogies of the internal transcribed spacer [ITS] sequence, the D1/D2 region of the large subunit [LSU], and actin), biological species recognition by mating tests, as well as morphological and physiological characteristics. The three molecular markers used were selected by evaluating the polymorphisms and paralogies of several loci, including those for β-tubulin, translation elongation factor 1α, the two largest subunits of the RNA polymerase II (RPB1 and RPB2), the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), and the mitochondrial small-subunit (mtSSU) rDNA, among four strains belonging to different putative species. Comparing the genealogies of the ITS, LSU, and actin genes, we recognized seven phylogenetic species. However, mating tests did not show intrinsic reproductive barriers for two pairs of the phylogenetic species. Therefore, we regard five species in Lichtheima to be confirmed: Lichtheimia corymbifera, L. ornata comb. nov., L. ramosa, L. hyalospora, and L. sphaerocystis sp. nov. Only the first three species seem to have clinical relevance. Lichtheimia blakesleeana is reduced to a synonym of Lichtheimia hyalospora. We provide a detailed description of Lichtheimia sphaerocystis sp. nov. and a key for the identification of all accepted species identified in the present study on the basis of their morphological traits and growth at different temperatures. PMID:20357218

  3. Effect of ethanol at clinically relevant concentrations on atrial inward rectifier potassium current sensitive to acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Bébarová, Markéta; Matejovič, Peter; Pásek, Michal; Hořáková, Zuzana; Hošek, Jan; Šimurdová, Milena; Šimurda, Jiří

    2016-10-01

    Alcohol intoxication tends to induce arrhythmias, most often the atrial fibrillation. To elucidate arrhythmogenic mechanisms related to alcohol consumption, the effect of ethanol on main components of the ionic membrane current is investigated step by step. Considering limited knowledge, we aimed to examine the effect of clinically relevant concentrations of ethanol (0.8-80 mM) on acetylcholine-sensitive inward rectifier potassium current I K(Ach). Experiments were performed by the whole-cell patch clamp technique at 23 ± 1 °C on isolated rat and guinea-pig atrial myocytes, and on expressed human Kir3.1/3.4 channels. Ethanol induced changes of I K(Ach) in the whole range of concentrations applied; the effect was not voltage dependent. The constitutively active component of I K(Ach) was significantly increased by ethanol with the maximum effect (an increase by ∼100 %) between 8 and 20 mM. The changes were comparable in rat and guinea-pig atrial myocytes and also in expressed human Kir3.1/3.4 channels (i.e., structural correlate of I K(Ach)). In the case of the acetylcholine-induced component of I K(Ach), a dual ethanol effect was apparent with a striking heterogeneity of changes in individual cells. The effect correlated with the current magnitude in control: the current was increased by eth-anol in the cells showing small current in control and vice versa. The average effect peaked at 20 mM ethanol (an increase of the current by ∼20 %). Observed changes of action potential duration agreed well with the voltage clamp data. Ethanol significantly affected both components of I K(Ach) even in concentrations corresponding to light alcohol consumption.

  4. Quantity and clinical relevance of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in human ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Circulating bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been reported to participate in tumor angiogenesis and growth; however, the role of circulating EPCs in tumor progression is controversial. The role of circulating EPCs in ovarian cancer progression and angiogenesis has not yet been investigated. Methods The number of circulating EPCs in the peripheral blood in 25 healthy volunteers and 42 patients with ovarian cancer was determined by flow cytometry. EPCs were defined by co-expression of CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2). In addition, we determined CD34 and VEGFR2 mRNA levels by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Circulating levels of EPCs were significantly increased in ovarian cancer patients, correlating with tumor stage and residual tumor size. Higher levels of EPCs were detected in patients with stage III and IV ovarian cancer than in patients with stage I and II disease. After excision of the tumor, EPCs levels rapidly declined. Residual tumor size greater than 2 cm was associated with significantly higher levels of EPCs. In addition, high circulating EPCs correlated with poor overall survival. Pretreatment CD34 mRNA levels were not significantly increased in ovarian cancer patients compared with healthy controls; however, VEGFR2 expression was increased, and plasma levels of VEGF and MMP-9 were also elevated. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the clinical relevance of circulating EPCs in ovarian cancer. EPCs may be a potential biomarker to monitor ovarian cancer progression and angiogenesis and treatment response. PMID:20334653

  5. Clinical outcomes and the mutation spectrum of the OTC gene in patients with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Ho; Lee, Beom Hee; Kim, Ja Hye; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Kim, Yoo-Mi; Cho, Jahyang; Cheon, Chong-Kun; Ko, Jung Min; Lee, Jung Hyun; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2015-09-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is an X-linked inborn error of the urea cycle that leads to the accumulation of ammonia, resulting in neurological deficits. This study was performed to describe the clinical outcomes, biochemical features and molecular spectra of patients with OTC deficiency. A total of 49 patients from 47 unrelated Korean pedigrees were included who were diagnosed with OTC deficiency based on biochemical findings and molecular analyses. Patient clinical features,biochemical findings and molecular data were analyzed retrospectively. Males with neonatal-onset phenotype presented with seizure or altered mentality (n=20). Biochemical findings showed high blood ammonia (1132.5±851.6 μmol l (− 1)) and urineorotic acid (1840.7±1731.3 mmol mol(− 1) Cr) levels. There were also five males with late-onset disease who presented with vomiting, irritability and seizure at age 8.2±9.4 years old (range, 0.6–20 years). Symptomatic females presented with vomiting,seizure, and altered mentality at age 3.5±3.5 years (range, 0.2–12.8 years; n=24). More males with the late-onset form and symptomatic females displayed mild hyperammonemia and orotic aciduria compared with those showing a neonatal phenotype (P<0.05). Molecular analysis identified 37 different mutations (22 missense, 5 large deletions, 4 small deletions, 1 insertion,3 nonsense and 2 splice sites) from all 49 patients; the mutations were dispersed throughout all coding exons. In Korean patients with OTC deficiency, mutations in OTC are genetically heterogeneous. Male patients with the neonatal-onset phenotype showed poor outcomes because of severe hyperammonemia. Early diagnosis and interventions for hyperammonemia can provide more favorable prognosis.

  6. Clonal spread and interspecies transmission of clinically relevant ESBL-producing Escherichia coli of ST410--another successful pandemic clone?

    PubMed

    Schaufler, Katharina; Semmler, Torsten; Wieler, Lothar H; Wöhrmann, Michael; Baddam, Ramani; Ahmed, Niyaz; Müller, Kerstin; Kola, Axel; Fruth, Angelika; Ewers, Christa; Guenther, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Clinically relevant extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing multi-resistant Escherichia coli have been on the rise for years. Initially restricted to mostly a clinical context, recent findings prove their prevalence in extraclinical settings independent of the original occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in the environment. To get further insights into the complex ecology of potentially clinically relevant ESBL-producing E. coli, 24 isolates from wild birds in Berlin, Germany, and 40 ESBL-producing human clinical E. coli isolates were comparatively analyzed. Isolates of ST410 occurred in both sample groups (six). In addition, three ESBL-producing E. coli isolates of ST410 from environmental dog feces and one clinical dog isolate were included. All 10 isolates were clonally analyzed showing almost identical macrorestriction patterns. They were chosen for whole-genome sequencing revealing that the whole-genome content of these 10 E. coli isolates showed a very high genetic similarity, differing by low numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms only. This study gives initial evidence for a recent interspecies transmission of a new successful clone of ST410 E. coli between wildlife, humans, companion animals and the environment. The results underline the zoonotic potential of clinically relevant multi-resistant bacteria found in the environment as well as the mandatory nature of the 'One Health' approach.

  7. The presence of highly disruptive 16S rRNA mutations in clinical samples indicates a wider role for mutations of the mitochondrial ribosome in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Elson, Joanna L.; Smith, Paul M.; Greaves, Laura C.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M.A.; Taylor, Robert W.; Vila-Sanjurjo, Antón

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations are well recognized as an important cause of disease, with over two hundred variants in the protein encoding and mt-tRNA genes associated with human disorders. In contrast, the two genes encoding the mitochondrial rRNAs (mt-rRNAs) have been studied in far less detail. This is because establishing the pathogenicity of mt-rRNA mutations is a major diagnostic challenge. Only two disease causing mutations have been identified at these loci, both mapping to the small subunit (SSU). On the large subunit (LSU), however, the evidence for the presence of pathogenic LSU mt-rRNA changes is particularly sparse. We have previously expanded the list of deleterious SSU mt-rRNA mutations by identifying highly disruptive base changes capable of blocking the activity of the mitoribosomal SSU. To do this, we used a new methodology named heterologous inferential analysis (HIA). The recent arrival of near-atomic-resolution structures of the human mitoribosomal LSU, has enhanced the power of our approach by permitting the analysis of the corresponding sites of mutation within their natural structural context. Here, we have used these tools to determine whether LSU mt-rRNA mutations found in the context of human disease and/or ageing could disrupt the function of the mitoribosomal LSU. Our results clearly show that, much like the for SSU mt-rRNA, LSU mt-rRNAs mutations capable of compromising the function of the mitoribosomal LSU are indeed present in clinical samples. Thus, our work constitutes an important contribution to an emerging view of the mitoribosome as an important element in human health. PMID:26349026

  8. Osteogenesis imperfecta type V: clinical and radiographic manifestations in mutation confirmed patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ok-Hwa; Jin, Dong-Kyu; Kosaki, Keisuke; Kim, Jung-Wook; Cho, Sung Yoon; Yoo, Won Joon; Choi, In Ho; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2013-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type V is a specific OI phenotype with interosseous membrane calcification of the forearm and hyperplastic callus formation as typical features. The causative gene mutation for OI type V has been recently discovered. The purpose of this report is to review the clinical and radiographic characteristics of mutation confirmed OI type V in detail. Sixteen (nine familial and seven sporadic) patients were enrolled in the study. Blue sclera and dentinogenesis imperfecta were not evident in any patient. However, hypodontia in the permanent teeth, ectopic eruption, and short roots in molars were additionally observed in 11 patients. Of the radiographic abnormalities, cortical thickening and bony excrescence of interosseous margin of the ulna was the most common finding, followed by overgrowth of the olecranon and/or coronoid process of the ulna. Slender ribs and sloping of the posterior ribs with or without fractures were also a consistent finding. Hyperplastic callus was detected in 75% of patients and was commonly encountered at the femur. Heterotopic ossification in the muscles and tendon insertion sites were noted in four patients, which resulted in bony ankylosis or contracture of joints. The current study confirms common clinical and radiographic findings of OI type V and reports additional phenotypic information. These observations provide clues to recognize OI type V more promptly and guide to direct targeted molecular study. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A Nonsyndromic Autosomal Dominant Oligodontia with A Novel Mutation of PAX9-A Clinical and Genetic Report

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Praveen; Athimuthu, Anantharaj; Bhat, Prasanna Kumar; Puttashamachari, Yogish

    2015-01-01

    Oligodontia is congenital absence of one or more teeth which has familial abnormality and attributable to various mutations or polymorphisms of genes often associated with malformative syndromes. The present case reports a rare case of non syndromic oligodontia in an 8-year-old girl with missing 14 permanent teeth excluding third molars in mixed dentition. It is a rare finding which has not been frequently documented in Indian children. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 have been described in families in which inherited oligodontia characteristically involves permanent incisors, lateral incisors, premolars and molars. Our study analysed one large family with dominantly inherited oligodontia clinically and genetically. This phonotype is distinct from oligodontia phenotypes associated with mutations in PAX9. Sequencing of the PAX9 revealed a novel mutation in the paired domain of the molecule. The multiple sequence alignment and SNP analysis of the PAX9 exon 2 revealed two mutations. PMID:26266225

  10. Time-driven activity-based costing in an outpatient clinic environment: development, relevance and managerial impact.

    PubMed

    Demeere, Nathalie; Stouthuysen, Kristof; Roodhooft, Filip

    2009-10-01

    Healthcare managers are continuously urged to provide better patient services at a lower cost. To cope with these cost pressures, healthcare management needs to improve its understanding of the relevant cost drivers. Through a case study, we show how to perform a time-driven activity-based costing of five outpatient clinic's departments and provide evidence of the benefits of such an analysis.

  11. Clinically relevant depression in old age: An international study with populations from Canada, Latin America and Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Ylli, Alban; Miszkurka, Malgorzata; Phillips, Susan P; Guralnik, Jack; Deshpande, Nandini; Zunzunegui, Maria Victoria

    2016-07-30

    Our aim is to assess cross-national variations in prevalence of clinically relevant depression and to examine the relationships of social and health factors with depression in five diverse populations of older adults, from Canada, Brazil, Colombia and Albania. We used the data from the International Mobility in Aging Study. Clinically relevant depression was defined as a score of ≥16 on the Center for Epidemiologic Study Depression Scale (CES-D). Poisson regressions with robust covariance correction were used to estimate prevalence ratios associated with potential risk factors. Prevalence of clinically relevant depression across research sites varied widely, being consistently higher in women than in men. It was lowest in men from Brazil (6.3%) and highest in women from Albania (46.6%). Low education and insufficient income, living alone, multiple chronic conditions, and poor physical performance were all significantly associated with depression prevalence. Poor physical performance was more strongly associated with depression in men than in women. Similar factors are associated with clinically relevant depression among men and women and across research sites. The large variation in depression prevalence population rates is unexplained by the classical individual factors considered in the study suggesting the impact of country characteristics on depression among older populations.

  12. Centronuclear myopathy related to dynamin 2 mutations: Clinical, morphological, muscle imaging and genetic features of an Italian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Catteruccia, Michela; Fattori, Fabiana; Codemo, Valentina; Ruggiero, Lucia; Maggi, Lorenzo; Tasca, Giorgio; Fiorillo, Chiara; Pane, Marika; Berardinelli, Angela; Verardo, Margherita; Bragato, Cinzia; Mora, Marina; Morandi, Lucia; Bruno, Claudio; Santoro, Lucio; Pegoraro, Elena; Mercuri, Eugenio; Bertini, Enrico; D’Amico, Adele

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in dynamin 2 (DNM2) gene cause autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy and occur in around 50% of patients with centronuclear myopathy. We report clinical, morphological, muscle imaging and genetic data of 10 unrelated Italian patients with centronuclear myopathy related to DNM2 mutations. Our results confirm the clinical heterogeneity of this disease, underlining some peculiar clinical features, such as severe pulmonary impairment and jaw contracture that should be considered in the clinical follow-up of these patients. Muscle MRI showed a distinct pattern of involvement, with predominant involvement of soleus and tibialis anterior in the lower leg muscles, followed by hamstring muscles and adductor magnus at thigh level and gluteus maximus. The detection of three novel DNM2 mutations and the first case of somatic mosaicism further expand the genetic spectrum of the disease. PMID:23394783

  13. Clinically relevant variants - identifying, collecting, interpreting, and disseminating: the 2013 annual scientific meeting of the Human Genome Variation Society.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Christine M; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Greenblatt, Marc S; Oetting, William S

    2014-04-01

    The dramatic advances in genetic sequencing technologies used in research laboratories are now entering the clinic, and applications of whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing to disease diagnosis, predisposition, and treatment will soon be commonplace. However, the standards and methods for identifying clinically relevant variants are currently being debated and defined. Multiple agencies worldwide have recognized that we have reached an exciting and critical transition point into the clinic, and many important issues are being discussed that impact how genetic variation data in the clinic will be interpreted and used. The 2013 annual scientific meeting of the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) had as its main theme the discovery, interpretation, and dissemination of clinically relevant DNA variants. The meeting featured the continuously developing technology of databasing genetic variation and computational tools for allelic variant discovery. Attention was given to curating and integrating these data with clinical findings, including approaches to distinguish between functional alleles underlying clinical phenotypes and benign sequence variants and making data sources interoperable and functional for clinical diagnostic utility, citing examples in specific diseases.

  14. Spotlight on the relevance of mtDNA in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Bermúdez, A; Vicente-Blanco, R J; Gonzalez-Vioque, E; Provencio, M; Fernández-Moreno, M Á; Garesse, R

    2017-04-01

    The potential role of the mitochondrial genome has recently attracted interest because of its high mutation frequency in tumors. Different aspects of mtDNA make it relevant for cancer's biology, such as it encodes a limited but essential number of genes for OXPHOS biogenesis, it is particularly susceptible to mutations, and its copy number can vary. Moreover, most ROS in mitochondria are produced by the electron transport chain. These characteristics place the mtDNA in the center of multiple signaling pathways, known as mitochondrial retrograde signaling, which modifies numerous key processes in cancer. Cybrid studies support that mtDNA mutations are relevant and exert their effect through a modification of OXPHOS function and ROS production. However, there is still much controversy regarding the clinical relevance of mtDNA mutations. New studies should focus more on OXPHOS dysfunction associated with a specific mutational signature rather than the presence of mutations in the mtDNA.

  15. CYP24A1 loss of function: Clinical phenotype of monoallelic and biallelic mutations.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Thomas O

    2017-01-16

    CYP24A1, encoding the vitamin D-24-hydroxylase, is of major clinical and physiologic importance, serving to regulate the catabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D, the physiologically active vitamin D metabolite. In addition to facilitating catabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D, CYP24A1 also enhances the turnover and elimination of 25-OHD, the abundant precursor metabolite and storage form of the vitamin. CYP24A1 can be stimulated hormonally by 1,25-(OH)2D and by FGF23, whereas CYP27B1, encoding the vitamin D-1α-hydroxylase, is stimulated hormonally by parathyroid hormone (PTH) and downregulated by FGF23. Thus CYP24A1 and CYP27B1, together, provide for alternate and regulated fates of 25-OHD, and control the availability of the active metabolite, 1,25-(OH)2D, depending upon physiologic needs. These two enzymes, are therefore central to the homeostatic control of vitamin D metabolism, and as a result affect calcium metabolism in critical ways. Disruption of CYP24A1 in mice results in elevated circulating 1,25-(OH)2D, substantiating the importance of the enzyme in the maintenance of vitamin D metabolism. The consequential skeletal phenotype in these mice further demonstrates the biologic sequelae of the disruption of the vitamin D pathway, and illustrates a specific developmental pathology mediated largely by oversupply of 1,25-(OH)2D. More recent evidence has identified loss of function mutations in CYP24A1 in association with hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria and nephrolithiasis in humans. Initial reports described certain variant mutations in CYP24A1 as an unrecognized cause of "Idiopathic Infantile Hypercalcemia," and more recently older children and adults have been identified with a similar phenotype. Over 25 likely disease-causing variants are described. Homozygous and compound heterozygote mutations account for the overwhelming majority of cases, however the heterozygous loss-of-function mutations of CYP24A1 do not appear to consistently result in symptomatic hypercalcemia. Considerations

  16. SUMF1 mutations affecting stability and activity of formylglycine generating enzyme predict clinical outcome in multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schlotawa, Lars; Ennemann, Eva Charlotte; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Chakrapani, Anupam; Christen, Hans-Jürgen; Moser, Hugo; Steinmann, Beat; Dierks, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta

    2011-03-01

    Multiple Sulfatase Deficiency (MSD) is caused by mutations in the sulfatase-modifying factor 1 gene encoding the formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE). FGE post translationally activates all newly synthesized sulfatases by generating the catalytic residue formylglycine. Impaired FGE function leads to reduced sulfatase activities. Patients display combined clinical symptoms of single sulfatase deficiencies. For ten MSD patients, we determined the clinical phenotype, FGE expression, localization and stability, as well as residual FGE and sulfatase activities. A neonatal, very severe clinical phenotype resulted from a combination of two nonsense mutations leading to almost fully abrogated FGE activity, highly unstable FGE protein and nearly undetectable sulfatase activities. A late infantile mild phenotype resulted from FGE G263V leading to unstable protein but high residual FGE activity. Other missense mutations resulted in a late infantile severe phenotype because of unstable protein with low residual FGE activity. Patients with identical mutations displayed comparable clinical phenotypes. These data confirm the hypothesis that the phenotypic outcome in MSD depends on both residual FGE activity as well as protein stability. Predicting the clinical course in case of molecularly characterized mutations seems feasible, which will be helpful for genetic counseling and developing therapeutic strategies aiming at enhancement of FGE.

  17. Next-generation sequencing identifies high frequency of mutations in potentially clinically actionable genes in sebaceous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Michael T; Singh, Rajesh R; Seviour, Elena G; Curry, Jonathan L; Hudgens, Courtney W; Bell, Diana; Wimmer, Daniel A; Ning, Jing; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Zhang, Li; Davies, Michael A; Prieto, Victor G; Broaddus, Russell R; Ram, Prahlad; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Esmaeli, Bita

    2016-09-01

    Sebaceous carcinoma (SC) is a rare but aggressive malignancy with frequent recurrence and metastases. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy, but effective systemic therapies are lacking because the molecular alterations driving SC remain poorly understood. To identify these, we performed whole-exome next-generation sequencing of 409 cancer-associated genes on 27 SCs (18 primary/locally recurrent ocular, 5 paired metastatic ocular, and 4 primary extraocular) from 20 patients. In ocular SC, we identified 139 non-synonymous somatic mutations (median/lesion 3; range 0-23). Twenty-five of 139 mutations (18%) occurred in potentially clinically actionable genes in 6 of 16 patients. The most common mutations were mutations in TP53 (n = 9), RB1 (n = 6), PIK3CA (n = 2), PTEN (n = 2), ERBB2 (n = 2), and NF1 (n = 2). TP53 and RB1 mutations were restricted to ocular SC and correlated with aberrant TP53 and RB protein expression. Systematic pathway analyses demonstrated convergence of these mutations to activation of the PI3K signalling cascade, and PI3K pathway activation was confirmed in tumours with PTEN and/or PIK3CA mutations. Considerable inter-tumoural heterogeneity was observed between paired primary and metastatic ocular SCs. In primary extraocular SC, we identified 77 non-synonymous somatic mutations (median/lesion 22.5; range 3-29). This overall higher mutational load was attributed to a microsatellite instability phenotype in three of four patients and somatically acquired mutations in mismatch repair genes in two of four patients. Eighteen of 77 mutations (23%) were in potentially clinically actionable genes in three of four patients, including BTK, FGFR2, PDGFRB, HRAS, and NF1