Science.gov

Sample records for clinically relevant species

  1. Identification of clinically relevant Trichosporon species.

    PubMed

    Middelhoven, W J

    2003-02-01

    A dichotomous identification key to pathogenic species of the basisiomycetous genus Trichosporon Behrend is provided. It is based on growth tests with carbon sources not traditionally used in yeast taxonomy, viz. uric acid, ethylamine, L-4-hydroxyproline, tyramine and L-phenylalanine as sources of carbon and nitrogen, and polygalacturonate, quinate, 4-ethylphenol, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate and orcinol as sole carbon sources. Of the standard growth tests, assimilation of L-rhamnose and the maximum growth temperature proved to be useful. In addition to medically relevant species, other species able to grow at 37 degrees C were treated as well.

  2. Rasamsonia argillacea species complex: taxonomy, pathogenesis and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Sandrine; Favennec, Loïc; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Since 2010, colonizations/infections by Rasamsonia argillacea species complex, previously known as Geosmithia argillacea, have been regularly reported in literature. We reviewed all available cases focusing on pathogenesis and clinical relevance. The number of cases may be underestimated, as these fungi are frequently misidentified as Penicillium or Paecilomyces species. Major underlying conditions that predispose for infections by the R. argillacea species complex include cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). While the pathogenic role of the colonization of CF lungs is still under debate, these molds are the causative agent of pneumonia and/or invasive infections in CGD patients. Given their thermotolerance and their resistance to various antifungals, especially the azole drugs, a special attention should be paid to the chronic colonization of the airways by these fungi in CF and CGD patients.

  3. Assessment of relevant fungal species in clinical solid wastes.

    PubMed

    Noman, Efaq Ali; Al-Gheethi, A A; Rahman, Nik Norulaini Nik Ab; Nagao, H; Ab Kadir, M O

    2016-10-01

    The study aimed to determine the fungal diversity in clinical waste samples from a healthcare facility in Penang Malaysia. Different fungi species were detected in 83.75 % of the 92 clinical waste samples that were screened from different sections of the healthcare facility. One hundred fifty fungal isolates comprising of 8 genera and 36 species were obtained. They were purified by using single spore isolation technique. Subsequently, the isolates were identified by phenotypic method based on morphological and culture characteristics on different culture media. Among all fungal isolates, Aspergillus spp. in section Nigri 10.2 %, Aspergillus niger 9.5 %, Aspergillus fumigatus 8.8 %, Penicillium. simplicissium 8 %, Aspergillus tubingensis 7.3 %, Aspergillus terreus var. terreus 6.6 %, Penicillium waksmanii 5.9 % and Curvularia lunata 6.5 % were the most frequent. Among five sections of the Wellness Centre, the clinical wastes collected from the diagnostic labs of haematology section had the highest numbers of fungal species (29 species). Glove wastes had the highest numbers of fungal species (19 species) among 17 types of clinical wastes screened. Among all fungal species, Aspergillus spp. exhibited higher growth at 37 °C than at 28 °C, indicating the potential of these opportunistic fungi to cause diseases in human. These results indicated the potential of hospital wastes as reservoirs for fungal species.

  4. Influence of hyaluronic acid on bacterial and fungal species, including clinically relevant opportunistic pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ardizzoni, Andrea; Neglia, Rachele G; Baschieri, Maria C; Cermelli, Claudio; Caratozzolo, Manuela; Righi, Elena; Palmieri, Beniamino; Blasi, Elisabetta

    2011-10-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) has several clinical applications (aesthetic surgery, dermatology, orthopaedics and ophtalmology). Following recent evidence, suggesting antimicrobial and antiviral properties for HA, we investigated its effects on 15 ATCC strains, representative of clinically relevant bacterial and fungal species. The in vitro system employed allowed to assess optical density of broth cultures as a measure of microbial load in a time-dependent manner. The results showed that different microbial species and, sometimes, different strains belonging to the same species, are differently affected by HA. In particular, staphylococci, enterococci, Streptococcus mutans, two Escherichia coli strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida glabrata and C. parapsilosis displayed a HA dose-dependent growth inhibition; no HA effects were detected in E. coli ATCC 13768 and C. albicans; S. sanguinis was favoured by the highest HA dose. Therefore, the influence of HA on bacteria and fungi warrants further studies aimed at better establishing its relevance in clinical applications.

  5. Clinical relevance of infections with zoonotic and human oral species of Campylobacter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soomin; Lee, Jeeyeon; Ha, Jimyeong; Choi, Yukyung; Kim, Sejeong; Lee, Heeyoung; Yoon, Yohan; Choi, Kyoung-Hee

    2016-07-01

    Genus Campylobacter has been recognized as a causative bacterial agent of animal and human diseases. Human Campylobacter infections have caused more concern. Campylobacters can be classified into two groups in terms of their original host: zoonotic and human oral species. The major zoonotic species are Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, which mostly reside in the intestines of avian species and are transmitted to humans via consumption of contaminated poultry products, thus causing human gastroenteritis and other diseases as sequelae. The other campylobacters, human oral species, include C. concisus, C. showae, C. gracilis, C. ureolyticus, C. curvus, and C. rectus. These species are isolated from the oral cavity, natural colonization site, but have potential clinical relevance in the periodontal region to varying extent. Two species, C. jejuni and C. coli, are believed to be mainly associated with intestinal diseases, but recent studies suggested that oral Campylobacter species also play a significant role in intestinal diseases. This review offers an outline of the two Campylobacter groups (zoonotic and human oral), their virulence traits, and the associated illnesses including gastroenteritis.

  6. Species Recognition and Clinical Relevance of the Zygomycetous Genus Lichtheimia (syn. Absidia Pro Parte, Mycocladus) ▿

    PubMed Central

    Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Hoffmann, Kerstin; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Voigt, Kerstin; Bibashi, Evangelia; Walther, Grit

    2010-01-01

    The zygomycete genus Lichtheimia (syn. Absidia pro parte, Mycocladus) consists of saprotrophic fungi inhabiting soil or dead plant material. Lichtheimia corymbifera (syn. Absidia corymbifera, Mycocladus corymbifer) and Lichtheimia ramosa (syn. Absidia ramosa, Mycocladus ramosus) may cause fulminant infections in patients with impaired immunity. The present study investigated the species boundaries in Lichtheimia using genealogical concordance phylogenetic species recognition (by comparison of the genealogies of the internal transcribed spacer [ITS] sequence, the D1/D2 region of the large subunit [LSU], and actin), biological species recognition by mating tests, as well as morphological and physiological characteristics. The three molecular markers used were selected by evaluating the polymorphisms and paralogies of several loci, including those for β-tubulin, translation elongation factor 1α, the two largest subunits of the RNA polymerase II (RPB1 and RPB2), the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), and the mitochondrial small-subunit (mtSSU) rDNA, among four strains belonging to different putative species. Comparing the genealogies of the ITS, LSU, and actin genes, we recognized seven phylogenetic species. However, mating tests did not show intrinsic reproductive barriers for two pairs of the phylogenetic species. Therefore, we regard five species in Lichtheima to be confirmed: Lichtheimia corymbifera, L. ornata comb. nov., L. ramosa, L. hyalospora, and L. sphaerocystis sp. nov. Only the first three species seem to have clinical relevance. Lichtheimia blakesleeana is reduced to a synonym of Lichtheimia hyalospora. We provide a detailed description of Lichtheimia sphaerocystis sp. nov. and a key for the identification of all accepted species identified in the present study on the basis of their morphological traits and growth at different temperatures. PMID:20357218

  7. Silica Desiccant Packets for Storage and Transport of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Other Clinically Relevant Species

    PubMed Central

    Pell, Casey L.; Williams, Melanie J.; Dunne, Eileen M.; Porter, Barbara D.; Satzke, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial isolates are often transported between laboratories for research and diagnostic purposes. Silica desiccant packets (SDPs), which are inexpensive and do not require freezing, were evaluated for storage and recovery of bacterial isolates. Conditions such as inoculum size, swab type and temperature of storage were investigated using ten Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates. The optimized protocol was then tested using 49 additional S. pneumoniae isolates representing 40 serogroups. Overall, S. pneumoniae growth was considered satisfactory (>100 colony forming units) for 98/109 (89.9%) and 20/20 (100%) swabs after 14 days at room temperature or 28 days at 4° C, respectively. Storage in SDPs did not impact on the ability of S. pneumoniae isolates to be subsequently serotyped. When the survival of nine other clinically relevant bacterial species was tested, seven were viable after 28 days at room temperature, the exceptions being Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae. SDPs are suitable for transport and short-term storage of bacterial species including S. pneumoniae. PMID:23940811

  8. Silica desiccant packets for storage and transport of Streptococcus pneumoniae and other clinically relevant species.

    PubMed

    Pell, Casey L; Williams, Melanie J; Dunne, Eileen M; Porter, Barbara D; Satzke, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial isolates are often transported between laboratories for research and diagnostic purposes. Silica desiccant packets (SDPs), which are inexpensive and do not require freezing, were evaluated for storage and recovery of bacterial isolates. Conditions such as inoculum size, swab type and temperature of storage were investigated using ten Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates. The optimized protocol was then tested using 49 additional S. pneumoniae isolates representing 40 serogroups. Overall, S. pneumoniae growth was considered satisfactory (>100 colony forming units) for 98/109 (89.9%) and 20/20 (100%) swabs after 14 days at room temperature or 28 days at 4° C, respectively. Storage in SDPs did not impact on the ability of S. pneumoniae isolates to be subsequently serotyped. When the survival of nine other clinically relevant bacterial species was tested, seven were viable after 28 days at room temperature, the exceptions being Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae. SDPs are suitable for transport and short-term storage of bacterial species including S. pneumoniae.

  9. Phylogeny of the Clinically Relevant Species of the Emerging Fungus Trichoderma and Their Antifungal Susceptibilities

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval-Denis, Marcelo; Sutton, Deanna A.; Cano-Lira, José F.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Guarro, Josep

    2014-01-01

    A set of 73 isolates of the emerging fungus Trichoderma isolated from human and animal clinical specimens were characterized morphologically and molecularly using a multilocus sequence analysis that included the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear ribosomal DNA and fragments of the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (Tef1), endochitinase CHI18-5 (Chi18-5), and actin 1 (Act1) genes. The most frequent species was Trichoderma longibrachiatum (26%), followed by Trichoderma citrinoviride (18%), the Hypocrea lixii/Trichoderma harzianum species complex (15%), the newly described species Trichoderma bissettii (12%), and Trichoderma orientale (11%). The most common anatomical sites of isolation in human clinical specimens were the respiratory tract (40%), followed by deep tissue (30%) and superficial tissues (26%), while all the animal-associated isolates were obtained from superficial tissue samples. Susceptibilities of the isolates to eight antifungal drugs in vitro showed mostly high MICs, except for voriconazole and the echinocandins. PMID:24719448

  10. Phylogeny of the clinically relevant species of the emerging fungus Trichoderma and their antifungal susceptibilities.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Denis, Marcelo; Sutton, Deanna A; Cano-Lira, José F; Gené, Josepa; Fothergill, Annette W; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Guarro, Josep

    2014-06-01

    A set of 73 isolates of the emerging fungus Trichoderma isolated from human and animal clinical specimens were characterized morphologically and molecularly using a multilocus sequence analysis that included the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear ribosomal DNA and fragments of the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (Tef1), endochitinase CHI18-5 (Chi18-5), and actin 1 (Act1) genes. The most frequent species was Trichoderma longibrachiatum (26%), followed by Trichoderma citrinoviride (18%), the Hypocrea lixii/Trichoderma harzianum species complex (15%), the newly described species Trichoderma bissettii (12%), and Trichoderma orientale (11%). The most common anatomical sites of isolation in human clinical specimens were the respiratory tract (40%), followed by deep tissue (30%) and superficial tissues (26%), while all the animal-associated isolates were obtained from superficial tissue samples. Susceptibilities of the isolates to eight antifungal drugs in vitro showed mostly high MICs, except for voriconazole and the echinocandins.

  11. Description of Enterobacter ludwigii sp. nov., a novel Enterobacter species of clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Harald; Stindl, Sibylle; Stumpf, Anita; Mehlen, Andre; Monget, Daniel; Heesemann, Jürgen; Schleifer, Karl H; Roggenkamp, Andreas

    2005-04-01

    A new species, Enterobacter ludwigii, is presented on the basis of the characteristics of 16 strains, which were isolated from clinical specimens. These bacteria form a distinct genetic cluster in phylogenetic analyses of the population structure of the Enterobacter cloacae complex. As determined by DNA-DNA cross-hybridization experiments in microplates, this genetic cluster can be delineated from the other species of the E. cloacae complex with deltaTm values equal to or above 5 degrees C with Enterobacter hormaechei being the closest relative. The bacteria are gram-negative, fermentative, motile rods with the general characteristics of the genus Enterobacter and the E. cloacae complex in particular. E. ludwigii can be differentiated from the other Enterobacter species by its growth on myo-inositol and 3-0-methyl-D-glucopyranose. The type strain is EN-119 (= DSM 16688T = CIP 108491T).

  12. The 'species complex' issue in clinically relevant fungi: A case study in Scedosporium apiospermum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Zeng, Jingsi; De Hoog, G Sybren; Stielow, Benjamin; Gerrits Van Den Ende, A H G; Liao, Wanqing; Lackner, Michaela

    2016-02-01

    The genus Scedosporium currently comprises six species, Scedosporium apiospermum, Scedosporium boydii, Pseudallescheria angusta, Scedosporium minutisporum, Scedosporium dehoogii, and Scedosporium aurantiacum, most of which can be distinguished with the primary fungal DNA barcode, the ITS1/2 region of the rDNA gene cluster. In the present study, four additional genetic loci were explored from a phylogenetic point of view enabling a barcoding approach based on K2P pairwise distances to resolve the taxa Scedosporium. We included partial γ-actin (ACT), β-tubulin (BT2), elongation factor 1α (TEF1), and the small ribosomal protein 60S L10 (L1) (RP60S). Phylogenetic inference of each marker individually showed that four out of six species within Scedosporium can be distinguished unambiguously, while strains of S. apiospermum, S. boydii, and P. angusta showed occasional recombination, and accordingly, no genealogical concordance between markers was obtainable. We defined S. apiospermum, S. boydii, and P. angusta as the 'S. apiospermum species complex' since observed differences were not consistent between lineages, and no clinical differences are known between entities within the complex. While BT2 revealed the best performance among the genetic loci tested at the lineage level, barcoding of the ITS region is sufficient for distinction of all entities in Scedosporium at the species or 'complex' level.

  13. Microbiological features and clinical relevance of new species of the genus Mycobacterium.

    PubMed

    Tortoli, Enrico

    2014-10-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are present in the environment, mainly in water, and are occasionally responsible for opportunistic infections in humans. Despite the fact that NTM are characterized by a moderate pathogenicity, the diseases caused by NTM at various body sites are increasing on a worldwide level. Among over 150 officially recognized NTM species, only two or three dozen are familiar to clinicians, and even to most microbiologists. In this paper, approximately 50 new species described in the last 8 years are reviewed, and their role in human infections is assessed on the basis of reported clinical cases. The small number of reports concerning most of the "new" mycobacterial species is responsible for the widespread conviction that they are very rare. Their role is actually largely underestimated, mainly because they often remain unrecognized and misidentified. Aiming to minimize such bias, emphasis has been placed on more common identification pitfalls. Together with new NTM, new members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex described in the last few years are also an object of the present review.

  14. Microbiological Features and Clinical Relevance of New Species of the Genus Mycobacterium

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are present in the environment, mainly in water, and are occasionally responsible for opportunistic infections in humans. Despite the fact that NTM are characterized by a moderate pathogenicity, the diseases caused by NTM at various body sites are increasing on a worldwide level. Among over 150 officially recognized NTM species, only two or three dozen are familiar to clinicians, and even to most microbiologists. In this paper, approximately 50 new species described in the last 8 years are reviewed, and their role in human infections is assessed on the basis of reported clinical cases. The small number of reports concerning most of the “new” mycobacterial species is responsible for the widespread conviction that they are very rare. Their role is actually largely underestimated, mainly because they often remain unrecognized and misidentified. Aiming to minimize such bias, emphasis has been placed on more common identification pitfalls. Together with new NTM, new members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex described in the last few years are also an object of the present review. PMID:25278573

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Etest, EUCAST, and CLSI Methods for Amphotericin B, Voriconazole, and Posaconazole against Clinically Relevant Fusarium Species

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M. S.; Normand, Anne-Cécile; Piarroux, Renaud; Meletiadis, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We compared EUCAST and CLSI methods versus Etest for antifungal susceptibility testing of 20 clinically relevant Fusarium species against amphotericin B, posaconazole, and voriconazole. The median Etest amphotericin B and posaconazole MICs were 1 dilution higher than the median EUCAST and the CLSI MICs. The essential agreement (within ±1/±2 dilutions) was 60/90%, 80/95%, and 70/85% between the Etest and EUCAST methods and 80/95%, 75/95%, and 45/100% between the Etest and CLSI methods for amphotericin B, voriconazole, and posaconazole, respectively. The categorical agreement was >85%. Etest can be used for antifungal susceptibility testing of Fusarium species. PMID:27795379

  16. Isolation of clinically relevant fungal species from solid waste and environment of dental health services.

    PubMed

    Vieira, C D; de Carvalho, M A R; de Resende, M A; de Menezes Cussiol, N A; Alvarez-Leite, M E; dos Santos, S G; de Oliveira, M B; de Magalhães, T F F; Silva, M X; Nicoli, J R; de Macêdo Farias, L

    2010-10-01

    This study was undertaken to detect, identify and determine antifungal susceptibility of yeast strains isolated from dental solid waste and to evaluate airborne fungi in the Brazilian dental health care environment and in the waste storage room. A group of 17 yeast strains were identified by macroscopic and microscopic characteristics, API 20C Aux system and Multiplex PCR. All 104 airborne fungal colonies were identified by macroscopic and microscopic morphology. The CLSI broth microdilution method was utilized as the susceptibility test. Candida parapsilosis was the prevailing yeast species recovered from waste, followed by Rhodotorula glutinis. Three strains of Candida guilliermondii presented minimal inhibitory concentration values considered to be susceptible dose dependent (2 μg ml(-1)) to voriconazole. Of all airborne fungal species, 69% were recovered from the waste storage room and 31% were recovered from the clinical/surgical environment. Most of them were identified as Cladosporium spp. These findings reinforce the potential risk of waste handling and point out the need for safe management to minimize the spread of these agents to the environment. Filamentous fungi isolation in almost all sampled environments indicates that a periodic monitoring of airborne microbiota in the dental health care service environment is required. The survival of yeast strains for 48 h suggests that dental waste should be carefully controlled and monitored. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Phylogeny and evolution of the aspartyl protease family from clinically relevant Candida species.

    PubMed

    Parra-Ortega, B; Cruz-Torres, H; Villa-Tanaca, L; Hernández-Rodríguez, C

    2009-05-01

    Aspartyl proteases are a class of enzymes that include the yeast aspartyl proteases and secreted aspartyl protease (Sap) superfamilies. Several Sap superfamily members have been demonstrated or suggested as virulence factors in opportunistic pathogens of the genus Candida. Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida dubliniensis and Candida parapsilosis harbour 10, four, eight and three SAP genes, respectively. In this work, genome mining and phylogenetic analyses revealed the presence of new members of the Sap superfamily in C. tropicalis (8), Candida guilliermondii (8), C. parapsilosis(11) and Candida lusitaniae (3). A total of 12 Sap families, containing proteins with at least 50% similarity, were discovered in opportunistic, pathogenic Candida spp. In several Sap families, at least two subfamilies or orthologous groups were identified, each defined by > 90% sequence similitude, functional similarity and synteny among its members. No new members of previously described Sap families were found in a Candida spp. clinical strain collection; however, the universality of SAPT gene distribution among C. tropicalis strains was demonstrated. In addition, several features of opportunistic pathogenic Candida species, such as gene duplications and inversions, similitude, synteny, putative transcription factor binding sites and genome traits of SAP gene superfamily were described in a molecular evolutionary context.

  18. Evaluation of Pyrosequencing® Technology for the Identification of Clinically Relevant Non-Dematiaceous Yeasts and Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Montero, C.I.; Shea, Y.R.; Jones, P.A.; Harrington, S.M.; Tooke, N.E; Witebsky, F.G; Murray, P.R.

    2008-01-01

    Pyrosequencing was used to identify 133 isolates of clinically relevant non-dematiaceous yeasts. These included 97 ATCC strains (42 type strains), 7 UAMH strains, and 29 clinical isolates. Isolates belonged to the following genera: Candida (18 species), Trichosporon (10), Cryptococcus (7), Malassezia (3), Rhodotorula (2), Geotrichum (1), Blastoschizomyces (1) and Kodamaea (1). Amplicons were obtained of a hypervariable ITS region and analyzed using Pyrosequencing technology. The data were evaluated by a BLAST search against the GenBank database and correlated with data obtained by conventional cycle sequencing of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region. Cycle sequencing identified (78.9%) if the isolates to the species level. Pyrosequencing technology identified 69.1%. In 90.1% of all the strains tested, identification results of both sequencing methods were identical. Most Candida isolates can be identified to the species level by pyrosequencing. Trichosporon species and some Cryptococcus cannot be differentiated at the species level. Pyrosequencing can be used for the reliable identification of most commonly isolated non-dematiaceous yeasts, with a reduction of cost per identification compared to conventional sequencing. PMID:18421488

  19. Rapid Identification of Clinically Relevant Nocardia Species to Genus Level by 16S rRNA Gene PCR

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Frederic J.; Provost, Frederique; Boiron, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Two regions of the gene coding for 16S rRNA in Nocardia species were selected as genus-specific primer sequences for a PCR assay. The PCR protocol was tested with 60 strains of clinically relevant Nocardia isolates and type strains. It gave positive results for all strains tested. Conversely, the PCR assay was negative for all tested species belonging to the most closely related genera, including Dietzia, Gordona, Mycobacterium, Rhodococcus, Streptomyces, and Tsukamurella. Besides, unlike the latter group of isolates, all Nocardia strains exhibited one MlnI recognition site but no SacI restriction site. This assay offers a specific and rapid alternative to chemotaxonomic methods for the identification of Nocardia spp. isolated from pathogenic samples. PMID:9854071

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Etest, EUCAST, and CLSI Methods for Amphotericin B, Voriconazole, and Posaconazole against Clinically Relevant Fusarium Species.

    PubMed

    Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; Normand, Anne-Cécile; Ranque, Stephane; Piarroux, Renaud; de Hoog, G Sybren; Meletiadis, Joseph; Meis, Jacques F

    2017-01-01

    We compared EUCAST and CLSI methods versus Etest for antifungal susceptibility testing of 20 clinically relevant Fusarium species against amphotericin B, posaconazole, and voriconazole. The median Etest amphotericin B and posaconazole MICs were 1 dilution higher than the median EUCAST and the CLSI MICs. The essential agreement (within ±1/±2 dilutions) was 60/90%, 80/95%, and 70/85% between the Etest and EUCAST methods and 80/95%, 75/95%, and 45/100% between the Etest and CLSI methods for amphotericin B, voriconazole, and posaconazole, respectively. The categorical agreement was >85%. Etest can be used for antifungal susceptibility testing of Fusarium species. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Exploring internal features of 16S rRNA gene for identification of clinically relevant species of the genus Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus is an economically important genus as a number of species belonging to this genus are human and animal pathogens. The genus has been divided into different groups based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The variability observed among the members of these groups is low and it is difficult to distinguish them. The present study was taken up to explore 16S rRNA gene sequence to develop methods that can be used for preliminary identification and can supplement the existing methods for identification of clinically-relevant isolates of the genus Streptococcus. Methods 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the isolates of S. dysgalactiae, S. equi, S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, S. bovis, S. gallolyticus, S. mutans, S. sobrinus, S. mitis, S. pneumoniae, S. thermophilus and S. anginosus were analyzed with the purpose to define genetic variability within each species to generate a phylogenetic framework, to identify species-specific signatures and in-silico restriction enzyme analysis. Results The framework based analysis was used to segregate Streptococcus spp. previously identified upto genus level. This segregation was validated using species-specific signatures and in-silico restriction enzyme analysis. 43 uncharacterized Streptococcus spp. could be identified using this approach. Conclusions The markers generated exploring 16S rRNA gene sequences provided useful tool that can be further used for identification of different species of the genus Streptococcus. PMID:21702978

  2. Use of the VITEK 2 system to identify and test the antifungal susceptibility of clinically relevant yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Melhem, MSC; Bertoletti, A; Lucca, HRL; Silva, RBO; Meneghin, FA; Szeszs, MW

    2013-01-01

    Eleven quality control isolates (Candida albicans ATCC 64548, C. tropicalis ATCC 200956, C. glabrata ATCC 90030, C. lusitaniae ATCC 200951, C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019, C. krusei ATCC 6258, C. dubliniensis ATCC 6330, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 9763, Cryptococcus neoformans ATCC 90012, C. gattii FIOCRUZ-CPF 60, and Trichosporon mucoides ATCC 204094) and 32 bloodstream isolates, including C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. guilliermondii, C. pelliculosa (Pichia anomala), C. haemulonii, C. lusitaniae, and C. kefyr were identified at the species level by the VITEK 2 system. A set of clinical isolates (32 total) were used as challenge strains to evaluate the ability of the VITEK 2 system to determine the antifungal susceptibility of yeasts compared with the CLSI and EUCAST BMD reference standards. The VITEK 2 system correctly identified 100% of the challenge strains. The identification of yeast species and the evaluation of their susceptibility profiles were performed in an automated manner by the VITEK 2 system after approximately 15 h of growth for most species of Candida. The VITEK 2 system ensures that each test is performed in a standardized manner and provides quantitative MIC results that are reproducible and accurate when compared with the BMD reference methods. This system was able to determine the MICs of amphotericin B, flucytosine, voriconazole, and fluconazole in 15 h or less for the most common clinically relevant Candida species. In addition, the VITEK 2 system could reliably identify resistance to flucytosine, voriconazole, and fluconazole and exhibits excellent quantitative and qualitative agreement with the CLSI or EUCAST broth microdilution reference methods. PMID:24688520

  3. Rapid identification of biothreat and other clinically relevant bacterial species by use of universal PCR coupled with high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Samuel; Ramachandran, Padmini; Rothman, Richard; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Hardick, Andrew; Won, Helen; Kecojevic, Aleksandar; Jackman, Joany; Gaydos, Charlotte

    2009-07-01

    A rapid assay for eubacterial species identification is described using high-resolution melt analysis to characterize PCR products. Unique melt profiles generated from multiple hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene for 100 clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, including category A and B biothreat agents and their surrogates, allowed highly specific species identification.

  4. Point-of-care salivary microbial tests for detection of cariogenic species--clinical relevance thereof--review.

    PubMed

    Lenčová, E; Broukal, Z; Spížek, J

    2010-11-01

    Dental caries is a highly prevalent multifactorial disease that can result in serious health impairment. It was shown that oral bacteria play a significant role in caries development. Point-of-care (POC) salivary microbial tests for detection of cariogenic species have been investigated as a potential tool for caries risk assessment. This review aims to evaluate clinical relevance of these tests in the light of recent scientific evidence. Methodology involved PubMed search using key words salivary microbial tests, cariogenic bacteria and caries risk prediction. Articles obtained by the search were cross-referenced to obtain further sources. Specificity and negative-predictive value of these tests are higher than their sensitivity and positive value. Predictive power of the POC salivary microbial tests as a single predictor is generally weak, although it increases when included in multifactorial models for caries prediction. Literature findings support the use of these tests for screening of at-risk individuals in a population of young preschool children without visible caries and for motivation of subjects on individual level. POC salivary microbial tests are simple and inexpensive and, therefore, may be advantageous from public health perspective.

  5. Enterobacter and Klebsiella species isolated from fresh vegetables marketed in Valencia (Spain) and their clinically relevant resistances to chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Falomir, María Pilar; Rico, Hortensia; Gozalbo, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Occurrence of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic or commensal enterobacteria in marketed agricultural foodstuffs may contribute to their incorporation into the food chain and constitutes an additional food safety concern. In this work, we have determined the clinically relevant resistances to 11 common chemotherapeutic agents in Enterobacter and Klebsiella isolates from fresh vegetables from various sources (supermarkets and greengrocers' shops in Valencia, Spain). A total of 96 isolates were obtained from 160 vegetables analyzed (50% positive samples): 68 Enterobacter isolates (59 E. cloacae, two E. aerogenes, two E. cancerogenus, one E. gergoviae, and four E. sakazakii, currently Cronobacter spp.), and 28 Klebsiella isolates (19 K. oxytoca and 9 K. pneumoniae). Only seven isolates were susceptible to all agents tested, and no resistances to ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol were detected. Most isolates were resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (74 [58 Enterobacter and 16 Klebsiella]) or to ampicillin (80 [55/25]). Other resistances were less frequent: nitrofurantoin (13 isolates [12/1]), tetracycline (6 [5/1]), co-trimoxazole (3 [3/0]), cefotaxime (1 [1/0]), and streptomycin (2 [1/1]). Multiresistant isolates to two (56 [41/15]), three (10 E. cloacae isolates), four (one E. cloacae and one K. pneumoniae isolate), and five (two E. cloacae isolates) chemotherapeutic agents were also detected. The presence of potential pathogens points to marketed fresh produce, which often is eaten raw, as a risk factor for consumer health. In addition, these results support the usefulness of these bacterial species as indicators of the spreading of antibiotic resistances into the environment, particularly in the food chain, and suggest their role as carriers of resistance determinants from farms to consumers, which may constitute an additional "silent" food safety concern. Therefore, there is a need to improve the hygienic quality of marketed fresh

  6. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for fast and accurate identification of clinically relevant Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Alanio, A; Beretti, J-L; Dauphin, B; Mellado, E; Quesne, G; Lacroix, C; Amara, A; Berche, P; Nassif, X; Bougnoux, M-E

    2011-05-01

    New Aspergillus species have recently been described with the use of multilocus sequencing in refractory cases of invasive aspergillosis. The classical phenotypic identification methods routinely used in clinical laboratories failed to identify them adequately. Some of these Aspergillus species have specific patterns of susceptibility to antifungal agents, and misidentification may lead to inappropriate therapy. We developed a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS)-based strategy to adequately identify Aspergillus species to the species level. A database including the reference spectra of 28 clinically relevant species from seven Aspergillus sections (five common and 23 unusual species) was engineered. The profiles of young and mature colonies were analysed for each reference strain, and species-specific spectral fingerprints were identified. The performance of the database was then tested on 124 clinical and 16 environmental isolates previously characterized by partial sequencing of the β-tubulin and calmodulin genes. One hundred and thirty-eight isolates of 140 (98.6%) were correctly identified. Two atypical isolates could not be identified, but no isolate was misidentified (specificity: 100%). The database, including species-specific spectral fingerprints of young and mature colonies of the reference strains, allowed identification regardless of the maturity of the clinical isolate. These results indicate that MALDI-TOF MS is a powerful tool for rapid and accurate identification of both common and unusual species of Aspergillus. It can give better results than morphological identification in clinical laboratories.

  7. Development of Two Molecular Approaches for Differentiation of Clinically Relevant Yeast Species Closely Related to Candida guilliermondii and Candida famata

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaobo; Wu, Jingsong; Ling, Bo; Yang, Xianwei; Liao, Wanqing

    2014-01-01

    The emerging pathogens Candida palmioleophila, Candida fermentati, and Debaryomyces nepalensis are often misidentified as Candida guilliermondii or Candida famata in the clinical laboratory. Due to the significant differences in antifungal susceptibilities and epidemiologies among these closely related species, a lot of studies have focused on the identification of these emerging yeast species in clinical specimens. Nevertheless, limited tools are currently available for their discrimination. Here, two new molecular approaches were established to distinguish these closely related species. The first approach differentiates these species by use of restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of partial internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) and large subunit ribosomal DNA with the enzymes BsaHI and XbaI in a double digestion. The second method involves a multiplex PCR based on the intron size differences of RPL18, a gene coding for a protein component of the large (60S) ribosomal subunit, and species-specific amplification. These two methods worked well in differentiation of these closely related yeast species and have the potential to serve as effective molecular tools suitable for laboratory diagnoses and epidemiological studies. PMID:24951804

  8. Development of two molecular approaches for differentiation of clinically relevant yeast species closely related to Candida guilliermondii and Candida famata.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaobo; Wu, Jingsong; Ling, Bo; Yang, Xianwei; Liao, Wanqing; Pan, Weihua; Yao, Zhirong

    2014-09-01

    The emerging pathogens Candida palmioleophila, Candida fermentati, and Debaryomyces nepalensis are often misidentified as Candida guilliermondii or Candida famata in the clinical laboratory. Due to the significant differences in antifungal susceptibilities and epidemiologies among these closely related species, a lot of studies have focused on the identification of these emerging yeast species in clinical specimens. Nevertheless, limited tools are currently available for their discrimination. Here, two new molecular approaches were established to distinguish these closely related species. The first approach differentiates these species by use of restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of partial internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) and large subunit ribosomal DNA with the enzymes BsaHI and XbaI in a double digestion. The second method involves a multiplex PCR based on the intron size differences of RPL18, a gene coding for a protein component of the large (60S) ribosomal subunit, and species-specific amplification. These two methods worked well in differentiation of these closely related yeast species and have the potential to serve as effective molecular tools suitable for laboratory diagnoses and epidemiological studies.

  9. Evaluating and Improving Vitek MS for Identification of Clinically Relevant Species of Trichosporon and the Closely Related Genera Cutaneotrichosporon and Apiotrichum.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, João N; Favero Gimenes, Viviane M; Francisco, Elaine C; Machado Siqueira, Lumena P; Gonçalves de Almeida, Renato K; Guitard, Juliette; Hennequin, Christophe; Colombo, Arnaldo L; Benard, Gil; Rossi, Flavia

    2017-08-01

    Trichosporon species are relevant etiologic agents of hospital-acquired infections. High mortality rates are attributed to Trichosporon deep-seated infections in immunocompromised individuals, making fast and accurate species identification relevant for hastening the discovery of best-targeted therapy. Recently, Trichosporon taxonomy has been reassessed, and three genera have been proposed for the pathogenic species: Trichosporon, Cutaneotrichosporon, and Apiotrichum Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has replaced old phenotypic methods for microorganism identification in clinical laboratories, but spectral profile databases have to be evaluated and improved for optimal species identification performance. Vitek MS (bioMérieux) is one of the commercially available MALDI-TOF MS platforms for pathogen identification, and its spectral profile databases remain poorly evaluated for Trichosporon, Cutaneotrichosporon, and Apiotrichum species identification. We herein evaluated and improved Vitek MS for the identification of the main clinical relevant species of Trichosporon, Cutaneotrichosporon, and Apiotrichum using a large set of strains and isolates belonging to different yeast collections in Brazil and France. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Vacuum phenomenon: Clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Ishan; Vilensky, Joel A; Weber, Edward C

    2014-04-01

    Vacuum phenomenon (VP) is an anatomical entity of potential confusion in the diagnosis and evaluation of joint pathology. Observation of this phenomenon has been demonstrated on basic radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Although VP is most often associated with degenerative joint disease, it is observed with other pathologies. Two problematic scenarios can occur: a false-positive diagnosis of serious pathology instead of benign VP and a false-negative diagnosis of benign VP with a more serious underlying process Despite this potential for confusion, criteria for distinguishing VP from other causes of joint pain and for evaluating a suspected case of VP have not been fully established. We reviewed the literature to determine underlying mechanism, symptomology, associated pathologies, and clinical importance of VP. The formation of VP can be explained by gas solubility, pressure-volume relationships, and human physiology. CT, GRE-MRI, and multipositional views are the best imaging studies to view VP. Although most cases of VP are benign, it can be associated with clinical signs and symptoms. VP outside the spine is an underreported finding on imaging studies. VP should be on the differential diagnosis for joint pain, especially in the elderly. We have proposed criteria for diagnosing VP and generated a basic algorithm for its workup. Underreporting of this phenomenon shows a lack of awareness of VP on the part of physicians. By identifying true anatomic VP, we can prevent harm from suboptimal treatment of patients.

  11. [Clinical research VI. Clinical relevance].

    PubMed

    Talavera, Juan O; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Usually, in clinical practice the maneuver selected is the one that achieves a favorable outcome with a direct percentage of superiority of at least 10 %, or when the number needed to treat is approximately equal to 10. While this percentage difference is practical for estimating the magnitude of an association, we need to differentiate the impact measures (attributable risk, preventable fraction), measures of association (RR, OR, HR), and frequency measures (incidence and prevalence) applicable when the outcome is nominal. And we must identify ways to measure the strength of association and the magnitude of the association when the outcome variable is quantitative. It is not uncommon to interpret the measures of association as if they were impact measures. For example, for a RR of 0.68, it is common to assume a 32 % reduction of the outcome, but we must consider that this is a relative reduction, which comes from relations of 0.4/0.6, 0.04/0.06, or 0.00004/0.00006. However the direct reduction is 20 % (60 % - 40 %), 2 %, and 2 per 100,000, respectively. Therefore, to estimate the impact of a maneuver it is important to have the direct difference and/or NNT.

  12. Mycobacteria in Municipal Wastewater Treatment and Reuse: Microbial Diversity for Screening the Occurrence of Clinically and Environmentally Relevant Species in Arid Regions.

    PubMed

    Amha, Yamrot M; Anwar, M Zohaib; Kumaraswamy, Rajkumari; Henschel, Andreas; Ahmad, Farrukh

    2017-03-07

    With accumulating evidence of pulmonary infection via aerosolized nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), it is important to characterize their persistence in wastewater treatment, especially in arid regions where treated municipal wastewater is extensively reused. To achieve this goal, microbial diversity of the genus Mycobacterium was screened for clinically and environmentally relevant species using pyrosequencing. Analysis of the postdisinfected treated wastewater showed the presence of clinically relevant slow growers like M. kansasii, M. szulgai, M. gordonae, and M. asiaticum; however, in these samples, rapid growers like M. mageritense occurred at much higher relative abundance. M. asiaticum and M. mageritense have been isolated in pulmonary samples from NTM-infected patients in the region. Diversity analysis along the treatment train found environmentally relevant organisms like M. poriferae and M. insubricum to increase in relative abundance across the chlorine disinfection step. A comparison to qPCR results across the chlorine disinfection step saw no significant change in slow grower counts at CT disinfection values ≤90 mg·min/L; only an increase to 180 mg·min/L in late May brought slow growers to below detection levels. The study confirms the occurrence of clinically and environmentally relevant mycobacteria in treated municipal wastewater, suggesting the need for vigilant monitoring of treated wastewater quality and disinfection effectiveness prior to reuse.

  13. [Pharmacogenetics. Clinical relevance in anesthsiology].

    PubMed

    Zeidler, E M; Goetz, A E; Zöllner, C

    2013-11-01

    Pharmacogenetics deals with hereditary factors which influence the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs leading to individual diverse reactions. Also in anesthesiology differences in the pharmacogenetics of patients can lead to relevant alterations in the pharmacodynamics of drugs. This article provides a summary of polymorphisms relevant to commonly used anesthetic agents and the clinical relevance in patients treated with these compounds. It describes the possibilities, the problems and limits of pharmacogenetic diagnostics and therapy and explains how this follows the target of individualized medicine. This article describes in detail the alterations in pharmacodynamics and pharmakokinetics relevant for anesthesia and their clinical significance. Based on the results of current studies, an overview of the most important drugs in anesthesiology with significant polymorphisms is given. These include opioids, muscle relaxants, volatile anesthetic agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), benzodiazepines, antiemetics and cardiovascular drugs as well as platelet aggregation inhibitors, anticoagulants and the so-called new oral anticoagulants. Genetic alterations can lead to substantial modifications in the effectiveness of drugs. Genetic alterations of opioid receptors and the enzyme cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 can result in a failure of analgesia after administration of opioids. Alterations in plasma cholinesterase activity are associated with a prolonged effectiveness of muscle relaxants. Polymorphisms in ryanodine receptors can contribute to the development of the feared MH in patients after administration of volatile anesthetics or succinylcholine. The study results presented here emphasize that these days knowledge on pharmacogenetics should not be missing in modern induction of anesthesia. In the future a blood sample could enable physicians to identify pharmacologically relevant markers. And these could guide the decision on the

  14. Efficient Identification of Clinically Relevant Candida Yeast Species by Use of an Assay Combining Panfungal Loop-Mediated Isothermal DNA Amplification with Hybridization to Species-Specific Oligonucleotide Probes▿

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, João; Flores, Orfeu; Spencer-Martins, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of invasive mycoses has progressively increased in recent years. Yeasts of the genus Candida remain the leading etiologic agents of those infections. Early identification of opportunistic yeasts may contribute significantly to improved disease management and the selection of appropriate antifungal therapy. We developed a rapid and reliable molecular identification system for clinically relevant yeasts that makes use of nonspecific primers to amplify a region of the 26S rRNA gene, followed by reverse hybridization of the digoxigenin-labeled products to a panel of species-specific oligonucleotide probes arranged on a nylon membrane macroarray format. DNA amplification was achieved by the recently developed loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification technology, a promising option for the development of improved laboratory diagnostic kits. The newly developed method was successful in distinguishing among the major clinically relevant yeasts associated with bloodstream infections by using simple, rapid, and cost-effective procedures and equipment. PMID:18077626

  15. Statistical significance versus clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Marieke H C; Bech, Anneke; Bouyer, Jean; van den Brand, Jan A J G

    2017-04-01

    In March this year, the American Statistical Association (ASA) posted a statement on the correct use of P-values, in response to a growing concern that the P-value is commonly misused and misinterpreted. We aim to translate these warnings given by the ASA into a language more easily understood by clinicians and researchers without a deep background in statistics. Moreover, we intend to illustrate the limitations of P-values, even when used and interpreted correctly, and bring more attention to the clinical relevance of study findings using two recently reported studies as examples. We argue that P-values are often misinterpreted. A common mistake is saying that P < 0.05 means that the null hypothesis is false, and P ≥0.05 means that the null hypothesis is true. The correct interpretation of a P-value of 0.05 is that if the null hypothesis were indeed true, a similar or more extreme result would occur 5% of the times upon repeating the study in a similar sample. In other words, the P-value informs about the likelihood of the data given the null hypothesis and not the other way around. A possible alternative related to the P-value is the confidence interval (CI). It provides more information on the magnitude of an effect and the imprecision with which that effect was estimated. However, there is no magic bullet to replace P-values and stop erroneous interpretation of scientific results. Scientists and readers alike should make themselves familiar with the correct, nuanced interpretation of statistical tests, P-values and CIs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  16. [Profilins: allergens with clinical relevance].

    PubMed

    Landa-Pineda, César Manuel; Guidos-Fogelbach, Guillermo; Marchat-Marchau, Laurence; López-Hidalgo, Marisol; Arroyo-Becerra, Analilia; Sandino Reyes-López, César Augusto

    2013-01-01

    Profilins are small ubiquitous proteins of 12-19 kDa involved in actin dynamics. These proteins are found in all eukaryotic organisms studied to date. Profilins have aminoacid sequences and tridimensional structure highly conserved. Allergy patients to pollen frequently have symptoms of allergy when ingestion of plant-derived foods like fruits, vegetables, seeds, among others. This phenomenon is known as latex-pollen-fruit allergy and it's the main cause of oral allergy syndrome (OAS) which is attributed to the cross-reactivity. Allergens shared between different sources theses are called panallergens for example are profilins which representing at least 20% of all pollen allergic patients. This cross-reactivity is results from the high amino acid sequence identity of profilin from plants, which is between 70% and 85%, this may explain the exacerbation symptoms of allergic patients to profilins from plants. We described some characteristics which show us the important participation of the profilins in the sensitization of people allergic, especially to plants, fruits and pollen. We looked research aminoacid sequences of all allergenic profilins reported to date and these were analyzed. Profilins are important allergens that are underrated in clinical practice and contribute to cross-reactivity in sensitized individuals by profilins from other sources.

  17. Multicenter evaluation of MIC distributions for epidemiologic cutoff value definition to detect amphotericin B, posaconazole, and itraconazole resistance among the most clinically relevant species of Mucorales.

    PubMed

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; Chakrabarti, A; Chowdhary, A; Cordoba, S; Dannaoui, E; Dufresne, P; Fothergill, A; Ghannoum, M; Gonzalez, G M; Guarro, J; Kidd, S; Lass-Flörl, C; Meis, J F; Pelaez, T; Tortorano, A M; Turnidge, J

    2015-03-01

    Clinical breakpoints (CBPs) have not been established for the Mucorales and any antifungal agent. In lieu of CBPs, epidemiologic cutoff values (ECVs) are proposed for amphotericin B, posaconazole, and itraconazole and four Mucorales species. Wild-type (WT) MIC distributions (organisms in a species-drug combination with no detectable acquired resistance mechanisms) were defined with available pooled CLSI MICs from 14 laboratories (Argentina, Australia, Canada, Europe, India, Mexico, and the United States) as follows: 10 Apophysomyces variabilis, 32 Cunninghamella bertholletiae, 136 Lichtheimia corymbifera, 10 Mucor indicus, 123 M. circinelloides, 19 M. ramosissimus, 349 Rhizopus arrhizus, 146 R. microsporus, 33 Rhizomucor pusillus, and 36 Syncephalastrum racemosum isolates. CLSI broth microdilution MICs were aggregated for the analyses. ECVs comprising ≥95% and ≥97.5% of the modeled populations were as follows: amphotericin B ECVs for L. corymbifera were 1 and 2 μg/ml, those for M. circinelloides were 1 and 2 μg/ml, those for R. arrhizus were 2 and 4 μg/ml, and those for R. microsporus were 2 and 2 μg/ml, respectively; posaconazole ECVs for L. corymbifera were 1 and 2, those for M. circinelloides were 4 and 4, those for R. arrhizus were 1 and 2, and those for R. microsporus were 1 and 2, respectively; both itraconazole ECVs for R. arrhizus were 2 μg/ml. ECVs may aid in detecting emerging resistance or isolates with reduced susceptibility (non-WT MICs) to the agents evaluated. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Clinical Relevance of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria, Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mahruqi, Sara H.; Al-Busaidy, Suleiman; Boeree, Martin J.; Al-Zadjali, Samiya; Patel, Arti; Dekhuijzen, P.N. Richard; van Soolingen, Dick

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the clinical relevance of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in the Arabian Peninsula. We assessed the prevalence and studied a random sample of isolates at a reference laboratory in Muscat, Oman. NTM cause disease in this region, and their prevalence has increased. PMID:19193276

  19. Valerian: No Evidence for Clinically Relevant Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nieber, Karen; Kraft, Karin

    2014-01-01

    In recent popular publications as well as in widely used information websites directed to cancer patients, valerian is claimed to have a potential of adverse interactions with anticancer drugs. This questions its use as a safe replacement for, for example, benzodiazepines. A review on the interaction potential of preparations from valerian root (Valeriana officinalis L. root) was therefore conducted. A data base search and search in a clinical drug interaction data base were conducted. Thereafter, a systematic assessment of publications was performed. Seven in vitro studies on six CYP 450 isoenzymes, on p-glycoprotein, and on two UGT isoenzymes were identified. However, the methodological assessment of these studies did not support their suitability for the prediction of clinically relevant interactions. In addition, clinical studies on various valerian preparations did not reveal any relevant interaction potential concerning CYP 1A2, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4. Available animal and human pharmacodynamic studies did not verify any interaction potential. The interaction potential of valerian preparations therefore seems to be low and thereby without clinical relevance. We conclude that there is no specific evidence questioning their safety, also in cancer patients. PMID:25093031

  20. Translating orthopaedic basic science into clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning

    2014-12-01

    In orthopaedic and trauma surgery, the rapid evolution of biomedical research has fundamentally changed the perception of the musculoskeletal system. Here, the rigor of basic science and the art of musculoskeletal surgery have come together to create a new discipline -experimental orthopaedics- that holds great promise for the causative cure of many orthopaedic conditions. The Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics intends to bridge the gap between orthopaedic basic science and clinical relevance, to allow for a fruitful clinical translation of excellent and important investigations in the field of the entire musculoskeletal system.

  1. Clinical embryology teaching: is it relevant anymore?

    PubMed

    Scott, Karen M; Charles, Antony Robert; Holland, Andrew J A

    2013-10-01

    Embryology finds itself jostling for precious space in the crowded medical curriculum, yet remains important for helping students understand birth defects. It has been suggested that teaching embryology through clinical scenarios can increase its relevance and interest. The aim of this research was to determine the attitudes of final-year medical students to learning embryology and whether clinical scenarios aid understanding. Final-year medical students undertaking their paediatric rotation in 2009 and 2010 were invited to attend an optional lecture on clinical embryology and participate in the research. In the lecture, three clinical scenarios were presented, in which the lecturer traced the normal development of a foetus and the abnormal development that resulted in a birth defect. Outcomes were assessed quantitatively using a paper-based survey. The vast majority of students who valued embryology teaching in their medical programme thought it would assist them with clinical management, and believed learning through case scenarios helped their understanding. Students were divided in their beliefs about when embryology should be taught in the medical programme and whether it would increase their workload. Embryology teaching appears to be a valuable part of the medical curriculum. Embryology teaching was valued when taught in the clinical environment in later years of the medical programme. Students, clinicians and medical educators should be proactive in finding clinical learning opportunities for embryology teaching. © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  2. Clinically relevant drug interactions with antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Perucca, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    Some patients with difficult-to-treat epilepsy benefit from combination therapy with two or more antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Additionally, virtually all epilepsy patients will receive, at some time in their lives, other medications for the management of associated conditions. In these situations, clinically important drug interactions may occur. Carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and primidone induce many cytochrome P450 (CYP) and glucuronyl transferase (GT) enzymes, and can reduce drastically the serum concentration of associated drugs which are substrates of the same enzymes. Examples of agents whose serum levels are decreased markedly by enzyme-inducing AEDs, include lamotrigine, tiagabine, several steroidal drugs, cyclosporin A, oral anticoagulants and many cardiovascular, antineoplastic and psychotropic drugs. Valproic acid is not enzyme inducer, but it may cause clinically relevant drug interactions by inhibiting the metabolism of selected substrates, most notably phenobarbital and lamotrigine. Compared with older generation agents, most of the recently developed AEDs are less likely to induce or inhibit the activity of CYP or GT enzymes. However, they may be a target for metabolically mediated drug interactions, and oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, felbamate and, at high dosages, topiramate may stimulate the metabolism of oral contraceptive steroids. Levetiracetam, gabapentin and pregabalin have not been reported to cause or be a target for clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions. Pharmacodynamic interactions involving AEDs have not been well characterized, but their understanding is important for a more rational approach to combination therapy. In particular, neurotoxic effects appear to be more likely with coprescription of AEDs sharing the same primary mechanism of action. PMID:16487217

  3. [Clinical relevance of cardiopulmonary reflexes in anesthesiology].

    PubMed

    Guerri-Guttenberg, R A; Siaba-Serrate, F; Cacheiro, F J

    2013-10-01

    The baroreflex, chemoreflex, pulmonary reflexes, Bezold-Jarisch and Bainbridge reflexes and their interaction with local mechanisms, are a demonstration of the richness of cardiovascular responses that occur in human beings. As well as these, the anesthesiologist must contend with other variables that interact by attenuating or accentuating cardiopulmonary reflexes such as, anesthetic drugs, surgical manipulation, and patient positioning. In the present article we review these reflexes and their clinical relevance in anesthesiology. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Women with epilepsy: clinically relevant issues

    PubMed Central

    Bangar, Santosh; Shastri, Abhishek; El-Sayeh, Hany; Cavanna, Andrea E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Women with epilepsy (WWE) face specific challenges throughout their lifespan due to the effects of seizures and antiepileptic drugs on hormonal function, potentially affecting both sexual and reproductive health. This review article addresses the most common issues of practical relevance to clinicians treating WWE: epidemiology and clinical presentations (including catamenial epilepsy), contraception, reproductive and sexual dysfunction, pregnancy, lactation, menopause-related issues (including bone health), and mental health aspects. Awareness of these gender-specific issues and implementation/adaptation of effective interventions for WWE results in significantly improved health-related quality of life in this patient population. PMID:27678205

  5. Clinical relevance of the ESKAPE pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Jack N; Gorman, Sean P; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, the Infectious Diseases Society of America has highlighted a faction of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter spp.) - acronymically dubbed 'the ESKAPE pathogens' - capable of 'escaping' the biocidal action of antibiotics and mutually representing new paradigms in pathogenesis, transmission and resistance. This review aims to consolidate clinically relevant background information on the ESKAPE pathogens and provide a contemporary summary of bacterial resistance, alongside pertinent microbiological considerations necessary to face the mounting threat of antimicrobial resistance.

  6. A Systematic Approach for Discovering Novel, Clinically Relevant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Simmon, Keith E.; Fisher, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (16S) is a reference method for bacterial identification. Its expanded use has led to increased recognition of novel bacterial species. In most clinical laboratories, novel species are infrequently encountered, and their pathogenic potential is often difficult to assess. We reviewed partial 16S sequences from >26,000 clinical isolates, analyzed during February 2006–June 2010, and identified 673 that have <99% sequence identity with valid reference sequences and are thus possibly novel species. Of these 673 isolates, 111 may represent novel genera (<95% identity). Isolates from 95 novel taxa were recovered from multiple patients, indicating possible clinical relevance. Most repeatedly encountered novel taxa belonged to the genera Nocardia (14 novel taxa, 42 isolates) and Actinomyces (12 novel taxa, 52 isolates). This systematic approach for recognition of novel species with potential diagnostic or therapeutic relevance provides a basis for epidemiologic surveys and improvement of sequence databases and may lead to identification of new clinical entities. PMID:22377371

  7. Annotation and retrieval of clinically relevant images.

    PubMed

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Antani, Sameer; Simpson, Matthew; Thoma, George R

    2009-12-01

    Medical images are a significant information source for clinical decision-making. Currently available information retrieval and decision support systems rely primarily on the text of scientific publications to find evidence in support of clinical information needs. The images and illustrations are available only within the full text of a scientific publication and do not directly contribute evidence to such systems. Our first goal is to explore whether image features facilitate finding relevant images that appear in publications. Our second goal is to find promising approaches for providing clinical evidence at the point of service, leveraging information contained in the text and images. We studied two approaches to finding illustrative evidence: a supervised machine-learning approach, in which images are classified as being relevant to an information need or not, and a pipeline information retrieval approach, in which images were retrieved using associated text and then re-ranked using content-based image retrieval (CBIR) techniques. Our information retrieval approach did not benefit from combining textual and image information. However, given sufficient training data for the machine-learning approach, we achieved 56% average precision at 94% recall using textual features, and 27% average precision at 86% recall using image features. Combining these classifiers resulted in improvement up to 81% precision at 96% recall (74% recall at 85% precision, on average) for the requests with over 180 positive training examples. Our supervised machine-learning methods that combine information from image and text are capable of achieving image annotation and retrieval accuracy acceptable for providing clinical evidence, given sufficient training data.

  8. Annotation and retrieval of clinically relevant images

    PubMed Central

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Antani, Sameer; Simpson, Matthew; Thoma, George R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Medical images are a significant information source for clinical decision making. Currently available information retrieval and decision support systems rely primarily on the text of scientific publications to find evidence in support of clinical information needs. The images and illustrations are available only within the full text of a scientific publication and do not directly contribute evidence to such systems. Our first goal is to explore whether image features facilitate finding relevant images that appear in publications. Our second goal is to find promising approaches for providing clinical evidence at the point of service, leveraging information contained in the text and images. Methods We studied two approaches to finding illustrative evidence: a supervised machine learning approach, in which images are classified as being relevant to an information need or not, and a pipeline information retrieval approach, in which images were retrieved using associated text and then re-ranked using content-based image retrieval (CBIR) techniques. Results Our information retrieval approach did not benefit from combining textual and image information. However, given sufficient training data for the machine learning approach, we achieved 56% average precision at 94% recall using textual features, and 27% average precision at 86% recall using image features. Combining these classifiers resulted in improvement up to 81% precision at 96% recall (74% recall at 85% precision, on average) for the requests with over 180 positive training examples. Conclusions Our supervised machine learning methods that combine information from image and text are capable of achieving image annotation and retrieval accuracy acceptable for providing clinical evidence, given sufficient training data. PMID:19546026

  9. The clinical relevance of Tarlov cysts.

    PubMed

    Langdown, Andrew John; Grundy, Julian R B; Birch, Nicholas C

    2005-02-01

    The sacral perineural cyst was first described by Tarlov in 1938 as an incidental finding at autopsy. There are very few data in the literature regarding the role of Tarlov cysts in causing symptoms, however. Most studies report low numbers, and consequently, the recommendations for treatment are vague. Our aim, therefore, is to present further detail regarding the clinical relevance of Tarlov cysts and to identify whether or not they are a cause of lumbosacral spinal canal stenosis symptoms. Over a 5-year period, 3535 patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan for lumbosacral symptoms. Fifty-four patients were identified as having Tarlov cysts, and their clinical picture was correlated with the findings on MRI. The majority of Tarlov cysts (n = 38) cannot be held responsible for patients' symptoms and are clinically unimportant. However, we encountered several patients in whom Tarlov cysts (n = 9) occurred at the same level as another pathology. In these cases, the cyst itself did not require any specific therapy; treatment was directed at the other pathology, and uneventful symptom resolution occurred. A smaller subgroup of cysts (n = 7) are the main cause of patients' symptoms and may require specific treatment to facilitate local decompression. The majority of Tarlov cysts are incidental findings on MRI. Where confusion exists as to the clinical relevance of a Tarlov cyst, treatment of the primary pathology (ie, non-Tarlov lesion) is usually sufficient. Tarlov cysts may, however, be responsible for a patient's symptoms; possible mechanisms by which this may occur and treatment strategies are discussed.

  10. Fetal magnetocardiography: clinical relevance and feasibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ter Brake, H. J. M.; Rijpma, A. P.; Stinstra, J. G.; Borgmann, J.; Holland, H. J.; Krooshoop, H. J. G.; Peters, M. J.; Flokstra, J.; Quartero, H. W. P.; Rogalla, H.

    2002-03-01

    We investigated the feasibility of a high- Tc SQUID system for fetal magnetocardiography (fetal MCG) aiming at a system without a magnetically shielded room and cooled by a cryocooler. The targeted SQUID resolution was 50 fT/√Hz (1-100 Hz). The research was performed along three lines: environmental noise suppression, cooling and low- Tc experiments. Environmental noise can be suppressed by forming second-order gradiometers from individual magnetometers. Concerning cooling, we investigated the applicability of commercially available coolers. In the low- Tc experiments, the medical relevance of fetal MCG was clearly shown. However, they also indicated that, in order to fully exploit the medical potential, the targeted resolution has to be 10 fT/√Hz. This increased resolution, in combination with the required high reliability of the sensors, will be hard to realize in high- Tc technology. This paper describes the results of the project and discusses the feasibility of a clinical system.

  11. Mirror neurons and their clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Fabbri-Destro, Maddalena; Cattaneo, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    One of the most exciting events in neurosciences over the past few years has been the discovery of a mechanism that unifies action perception and action execution. The essence of this 'mirror' mechanism is as follows: whenever individuals observe an action being done by someone else, a set of neurons that code for that action is activated in the observers' motor system. Since the observers are aware of the outcome of their motor acts, they also understand what the other individual is doing without the need for intermediate cognitive mediation. In this Review, after discussing the most pertinent data concerning the mirror mechanism, we examine the clinical relevance of this mechanism. We first discuss the relationship between mirror mechanism impairment and some core symptoms of autism. We then outline the theoretical principles of neurorehabilitation strategies based on the mirror mechanism. We conclude by examining the relationship between the mirror mechanism and some features of the environmental dependency syndromes.

  12. [Sports cardiology : Overview of relevant clinical topics].

    PubMed

    Laszlo, R; Scharhag, J; Burgstahler, C; Striegel, H; Steinacker, J M

    2017-01-23

    Physical activity is nowadays an established therapeutic principle concerning primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases; therefore, in internal sports medicine various aspects go beyond basic cardiological knowledge and require special medical expertise (sports cardiology). Acute cardiac risk is increased during physical activity; therefore, physical activity should be individually phased under consideration of the whole clinical situation. Physical training results in a functional adaptation of the cardiovascular system. Moreover, a structural adaptation can also be observed in competitive athletes but a differentiation between athlete's heart and cardiomyopathy is sometimes challenging. Preparticipation screening verifiably reduces the incidence of sudden cardiac death in athletes. Respective recommendations for the required diagnostics have been published and statutory health insurances are increasingly more willing to bear the incurred costs. Statistically, doping is more frequent in performance-orientated leisure time sports than in competitive sports. Drugs which are relevant for doping have partially irreversible cardiac side effects.

  13. HUPO initiatives relevant to clinical proteomics.

    PubMed

    Hanash, Sam

    2004-04-01

    The past few years have seen a tremendous interest in the potential of proteomics to address unmet needs in biomedicine. Such unmet needs include more effective strategies for early disease detection and monitoring and more effective therapies, in addition to developing a better understanding of disease pathogenesis. Proteomics is particularly suited for investigating biological fluids to identify disease-related alterations and to develop molecular signatures for disease processes. However, much of the effort undertaken in clinical proteomics to date represents either demonstrations of principles or relatively small-scale studies when compared with genomics effort and accomplishments or more pertinently when contrasted with the tremendous untapped potential of clinical proteomics. Clearly, we are in the early stages. What seems to be urgently needed is an organized effort to build a solid foundation for proteomics that includes developing a much needed infrastructure with adequate resources. The Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) is fostering an organized international effort in proteomics that includes initiatives around organ systems and biological fluids that have disease relevance as well as development of proteomics resources.

  14. Clinically relevant diaphragmatic dysfunction after cardiac operations.

    PubMed

    Diehl, J L; Lofaso, F; Deleuze, P; Similowski, T; Lemaire, F; Brochard, L

    1994-02-01

    Phrenic nerve injury and diaphragmatic dysfunction can be induced by cardiac operation. The clinical consequences are not well-established. We evaluated 13 consecutive patients over a 2-year period with unexplained and prolonged difficulties in weaning from mechanical ventilation. The mean time of measurement from the operation day was 31 +/- 19 days (range 8 to 78). With the same technique we also evaluated 12 control patients: four patients at day 1 after cardiac operation while they were still intubated; four normally convalescing patients at day 7 or 8 after cardiac operation; and four patients who required prolonged mechanical ventilation because of another identified cause after cardiac operation. Diaphragmatic function was evaluated at the bedside from esophageal and gastric pressure measurements. A low or negative ratio of gastric pressure swing to transdiaphragmatic pressure swing, indicative of diaphragm dysfunction, was found in all 13 patients (mean -0.39 +/- 0.64). The difference between the 13 patients and all control groups was found to be highly significant. Transdiaphragmatic pressure measured during a maximal voluntary inspiratory effort and transdiaphragmatic pressure measured during a short, sharp sniff were markedly diminished (28 +/- 18 cm H2O and 13 +/- 15 cm H2O, respectively) in the 13 patients, significantly different from values in the four control patients studied at day 7 or 8. Transdiaphragmatic pressure measured after magnetic stimulation in four patients was also markedly reduced (7 +/- 5 cm H2O) as compared with normal theoretic values. Aminophylline infusion had no effect on any of these parameters. In one of two patients evaluated a second time, about 5 weeks later, a marked improvement was observed. Estimating the prevalence of clinically relevant diaphragmatic dysfunction, we found it to be 0.5% when no topical cooling was used and 2.1% when iced slush with no insulation pad was added for myocardial protection (p < 0.005). The

  15. Clinically Relevant Pharmacokinetic Herb-drug Interactions in Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fasinu, Pius S; Gurley, Bill J; Walker, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In this review, the bases for potential interaction of medicinal herbs with specific antiretroviral drugs are presented, and several botanicals are discussed for which clinically relevant interactions in humans are established. Such studies have provided, in most cases, sufficient ground to warrant the avoidance of concurrent administration of antiretroviral (ARVs) drugs with St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), black pepper (Piper species) and grapefruit juice. Other botanicals that require caution in the use with antiretrovirals include African potato (Hypoxis hemerocallidea), ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), ginseng (Panax species), garlic (Allium sativum), goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and kava kava (Piper methysticum). The knowledge of clinically significant herb-drug interaction will be important in order to avoid herb-induced risk of sub-therapeutic exposure to ARVs (which can lead to viral resistance) or the precipitation of toxicity (which may lead to poor compliance and/or discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy).

  16. Walnut allergens: molecular characterization, detection and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Costa, J; Carrapatoso, I; Oliveira, M B P P; Mafra, I

    2014-03-01

    Food-induced allergies have been regarded as an emergent problem of public health. Classified as important allergenic ingredients, the presence of walnut and other nuts as hidden allergens in processed foods constitutes a risk for sensitized individuals, being a real problem of allergen management. Attending to the increasing importance dedicated to walnut allergy, this review intends to provide the relevant and up-to-date information on main issues such as the prevalence of walnut allergy, the clinical threshold levels, the molecular characterization of walnut allergens and their clinical relevance, as well as the methodologies for walnut allergen detection in foods. As the walnut used in human diet comes from Juglans regia and Juglans nigra, the molecular characterization of the allergens from both species included in the prolamins (Jug r 1, Jug n 1 and Jug r 3), cupins (Jug r 2, Jug n 2 and Jug r 4) and profilins (Jug r 5), together with respective clinical relevance, were compiled in this review. The most recent progresses on walnut allergen detection techniques (protein- and DNA-based) are described and critically compared, including the emergent multitarget approaches.

  17. [The relevance of clinical risk management].

    PubMed

    Gulino, Matteo; Vergallo, Gianluca Montanari; Frati, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Medical activity includes a risk of possible injury or complications for the patients, that should drive the Health Care Institutions to introduce and/ or improve clinical Risk management instruments. Although Italy is still lacking a National project of Clinical Risk Management, a number of efforts have been made by different Italian Regions to introduce instruments of risk management. In addition, most of National Health Care Institutions include actually a Department specifically in charge to manage the clinical risk. Despite the practical difficulties, the results obtained until now suggest that the risk management may represent a useful instrument to contribute to the reduction of errors in clinical conduct. Indeed, the introduction of adequate instruments of prevention and management of clinical risk may help to ameliorate the quality of health care Institution services.

  18. Comparison of sequencing the D2 region of the large subunit ribosomal RNA gene (MicroSEQ®) versus the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions using two public databases for identification of common and uncommon clinically relevant fungal species.

    PubMed

    Arbefeville, S; Harris, A; Ferrieri, P

    2017-09-01

    Fungal infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Rapid and accurate identification of fungi is essential to guide accurately targeted antifungal therapy. With the advent of molecular methods, clinical laboratories can use new technologies to supplement traditional phenotypic identification of fungi. The aims of the study were to evaluate the sole commercially available MicroSEQ® D2 LSU rDNA Fungal Identification Kit compared to the in-house developed internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions assay in identifying moulds, using two well-known online public databases to analyze sequenced data. 85 common and uncommon clinically relevant fungi isolated from clinical specimens were sequenced for the D2 region of the large subunit (LSU) of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene with the MicroSEQ® Kit and the ITS regions with the in house developed assay. The generated sequenced data were analyzed with the online GenBank and MycoBank public databases. The D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene identified 89.4% or 92.9% of the 85 isolates to the genus level and the full ITS region (f-ITS) 96.5% or 100%, using GenBank or MycoBank, respectively, when compared to the consensus ID. When comparing species-level designations to the consensus ID, D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene aligned with 44.7% (38/85) or 52.9% (45/85) of these isolates in GenBank or MycoBank, respectively. By comparison, f-ITS possessed greater specificity, followed by ITS1, then ITS2 regions using GenBank or MycoBank. Using GenBank or MycoBank, D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene outperformed phenotypic based ID at the genus level. Comparing rates of ID between D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene and the ITS regions in GenBank or MycoBank at the species level against the consensus ID, f-ITS and ITS2 exceeded performance of the D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene, but ITS1 had similar performance to the D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene using MycoBank. Our results indicated that the MicroSEQ® D2 LSU r

  19. Streptococcus pyogenes biofilms-formation, biology, and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Tomas; Köller, Thomas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS) is an exclusive human bacterial pathogen. The virulence potential of this species is tremendous. Interactions with humans range from asymptomatic carriage over mild and superficial infections of skin and mucosal membranes up to systemic purulent toxic-invasive disease manifestations. Particularly the latter are a severe threat for predisposed patients and lead to significant death tolls worldwide. This places GAS among the most important Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. Many recent reviews have highlighted the GAS repertoire of virulence factors, regulators and regulatory circuits/networks that enable GAS to colonize the host and to deal with all levels of the host immune defense. This covers in vitro and in vivo studies, including animal infection studies based on mice and more relevant, macaque monkeys. It is now appreciated that GAS, like many other bacterial species, do not necessarily exclusively live in a planktonic lifestyle. GAS is capable of microcolony and biofilm formation on host cells and tissues. We are now beginning to understand that this feature significantly contributes to GAS pathogenesis. In this review we will discuss the current knowledge on GAS biofilm formation, the biofilm-phenotype associated virulence factors, regulatory aspects of biofilm formation, the clinical relevance, and finally contemporary treatment regimens and future treatment options.

  20. Streptococcus pyogenes biofilms—formation, biology, and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Tomas; Köller, Thomas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS) is an exclusive human bacterial pathogen. The virulence potential of this species is tremendous. Interactions with humans range from asymptomatic carriage over mild and superficial infections of skin and mucosal membranes up to systemic purulent toxic-invasive disease manifestations. Particularly the latter are a severe threat for predisposed patients and lead to significant death tolls worldwide. This places GAS among the most important Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. Many recent reviews have highlighted the GAS repertoire of virulence factors, regulators and regulatory circuits/networks that enable GAS to colonize the host and to deal with all levels of the host immune defense. This covers in vitro and in vivo studies, including animal infection studies based on mice and more relevant, macaque monkeys. It is now appreciated that GAS, like many other bacterial species, do not necessarily exclusively live in a planktonic lifestyle. GAS is capable of microcolony and biofilm formation on host cells and tissues. We are now beginning to understand that this feature significantly contributes to GAS pathogenesis. In this review we will discuss the current knowledge on GAS biofilm formation, the biofilm-phenotype associated virulence factors, regulatory aspects of biofilm formation, the clinical relevance, and finally contemporary treatment regimens and future treatment options. PMID:25717441

  1. Pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics of thienopyridines: clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    Close, Sandra L

    2012-02-01

    Pharmacogenetics have been touted as the future of personalized medicine where genetic biomarkers will guide therapeutic approach. The currently approved thienopyridines, prasugrel and clopidogrel, are prodrugs requiring conversion to active metabolite through the cytochrome P450 system. Genetic variation has been associated with the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and clinical response to clopidogrel, but not to prasugrel. This review aims to summarize the recent pharmacogenetic findings associated with the response to thienopyridine treatment. Additionally, considerations for the incorporation of genetic biomarkers into clinical practice will be discussed in the context of thienopyridines. © 2011 The Author Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  2. DENDRITIC CELLS: ARE THEY CLINICALLY RELEVANT?

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Roberts, Lee; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Cancer vaccines have undergone a renaissance due to recent clinical trials showing promising immunological data and some clinical benefit to patients. Current trials exploiting dendritic cells (DCs) as vaccines have shown durable tumor regressions in a fraction of patients. Clinical efficacy of current vaccines is hampered by myeloid-derived suppressor cells, inflammatory type 2 T cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs), all of which prevent the generation of effector cells. To improve the clinical efficacy of DC vaccines, we need to design novel and improved strategies that can boost adaptive immunity to cancer, help overcome Tregs and allow the breakdown of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. This can be achieved by exploiting the fast increasing knowledge about the DC system, including the existence of distinct DC subsets. Critical to the design of better vaccines is the concept of distinct DC subsets and distinct DC activation pathways, all contributing to the generation of unique adaptive immune responses. Such novel DC vaccines will be used as monotherapy in patients with resected disease and in combination with antibodies and/or drugs targeting suppressor pathways and modulation of the tumor environment in patients with metastatic disease. PMID:20693842

  3. Clinical Relevance of Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Frijhoff, Jeroen; Winyard, Paul G.; Zarkovic, Neven; Davies, Sean S.; Stocker, Roland; Cheng, David; Knight, Annie R.; Taylor, Emma Louise; Oettrich, Jeannette; Ruskovska, Tatjana; Gasparovic, Ana Cipak; Cuadrado, Antonio; Weber, Daniela; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Grune, Tilman; Schmidt, Harald H.H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative stress is considered to be an important component of various diseases. A vast number of methods have been developed and used in virtually all diseases to measure the extent and nature of oxidative stress, ranging from oxidation of DNA to proteins, lipids, and free amino acids. Recent Advances: An increased understanding of the biology behind diseases and redox biology has led to more specific and sensitive tools to measure oxidative stress markers, which are very diverse and sometimes very low in abundance. Critical Issues: The literature is very heterogeneous. It is often difficult to draw general conclusions on the significance of oxidative stress biomarkers, as only in a limited proportion of diseases have a range of different biomarkers been used, and different biomarkers have been used to study different diseases. In addition, biomarkers are often measured using nonspecific methods, while specific methodologies are often too sophisticated or laborious for routine clinical use. Future Directions: Several markers of oxidative stress still represent a viable biomarker opportunity for clinical use. However, positive findings with currently used biomarkers still need to be validated in larger sample sizes and compared with current clinical standards to establish them as clinical diagnostics. It is important to realize that oxidative stress is a nuanced phenomenon that is difficult to characterize, and one biomarker is not necessarily better than others. The vast diversity in oxidative stress between diseases and conditions has to be taken into account when selecting the most appropriate biomarker. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1144–1170. PMID:26415143

  4. Engineering clinically relevant volumes of vascularized bone

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Brianna M; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Brey, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Vascularization remains one of the most important challenges that must be overcome for tissue engineering to be consistently implemented for reconstruction of large volume bone defects. An extensive vascular network is needed for transport of nutrients, waste and progenitor cells required for remodelling and repair. A variety of tissue engineering strategies have been investigated in an attempt to vascularize tissues, including those applying cells, soluble factor delivery strategies, novel design and optimization of bio-active materials, vascular assembly pre-implantation and surgical techniques. However, many of these strategies face substantial barriers that must be overcome prior to their ultimate translation into clinical application. In this review recent progress in engineering vascularized bone will be presented with an emphasis on clinical feasibility. PMID:25877690

  5. Transitional Hemodynamics in Preterm Neonates: Clinical Relevance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tai-Wei; Azhibekov, Timur; Seri, Istvan

    2016-02-01

    Each newborn enters this world facing tremendous respiratory, hemodynamic and neuroendocrine challenges while going through drastic physiological changes during the process of adaption from fetal to postnatal life. Even though the vast majority of term infants transition smoothly without apparent consequences, this task becomes increasingly arduous for the extremely preterm infant. This article reviews the physiology and pathophysiology of cardiovascular adaptation of the very preterm neonate. In particular it describes the physiology of fetal circulation, summarizes the hemodynamic changes occurring during preterm births and discusses the impact of the most frequently seen clinical scenarios that place additional burden on the premature infant during immediate transition. Finally an emphasis is placed on discussing common clinical dilemmas and practical aspects of developmental hemodynamics such as neonatal hypotension and patent ductus arteriosus; clinical presentations the neonatologist encounters on a daily basis. The review provides a physiology-based view on the hemodynamics of the immediate postnatal transitional period. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Melatonin and glucose metabolism: clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Lardone, P J; Alvarez-Sanchez, Sanchez N; Guerrero, J M; Carrillo-Vico, A

    2014-01-01

    The role of melatonin in glucose homeostasis is an active area of investigation. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting a link between disturbances in melatonin production and impaired insulin, glucose, lipid metabolism, and antioxidant capacity. Furthermore, melatonin has been found to influence insulin secretion both in vivo and in vitro, and night-time melatonin levels are related to night-time insulin concentrations in patients with diabetes. In several recent studies, a single nucleotide polymorphism of the human melatonin receptor 1B has been described as being causally linked to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Taken together, these data suggest that endogenous as well as exogenous melatonin may play a role in diabetes and associated metabolic disturbances not only by regulating insulin secretion but also by providing protection against reactive oxygen species, considering pancreatic β-cells are particularly susceptible to oxidative stress because they possess only low-antioxidative capacity.

  7. [Fragmented QRS. Relevance in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Steger, Alexander; Sinnecker, Daniel; Berkefeld, Anna; Müller, Alexander; Gebhardt, Josef; Dommasch, Michael; Huster, Katharina M; Barthel, Petra; Schmidt, Georg

    2015-09-01

    The QRS complex represents the electrical depolarization of ventricular myocardium. In the case of an undisturbed depolarization, the QRS complex has a normal configuration and duration, but abnormal electrical conduction leads to widening of the QRS complex. The block of one of the Tawara branches results in a typical bundle branch block pattern. A QRS complex that cannot be classified as bundle branch block due to an atypical configuration and contains notched R or S waves is called a fragmented QRS. The underlying pathophysiologies are manifold and include myocardial scars induced by ischemic heart disease, myocardial fibrosis due to other diseases, primary cardiac pathologies as well as systemic diseases with cardiac involvement. Pathologies on the cellular level, such as ion channel dysfunctions, also correlate with fragmented QRS. Besides the diagnostic relevance, fragmented QRS is known to have prognostic properties, for example in identifying high risk patients with coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, Brugada syndrome and acquired long QT syndrome; however, fragmented QRS may also be detected in ECGs of healthy individuals.

  8. Clinical Relevance Of Systematic CRT Device Optimization.

    PubMed

    Lunati, Maurizio; Magenta, Giovanni; Cattafi, Giuseppe; Moreo, Antonella; Falaschi, Giacomo; Contardi, Danilo; Locati, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) is known as a highly effective therapy in advanced heart failure patients with cardiac dyssynchrony. However, still one third of patients do not respond (or sub-optimally respond) to CRT. Among the many contributors for the high rate of non-responders, the lack of procedures dedicated to CRT device settings optimization (parameters to regulate AV synchrony and VV synchrony) is known as one of the most frequent. The most recent HF/CRT Guidelines do not recommend to carry-out optimization procedures in every CRT patient; they simply state those procedures "could be useful in selected patients", even though their role in improving response has not been proven. Echocardiography techniques still remain the gold-standard reference method to the purpose of CRT settings optimization. However, due to its severe limitations in the routine of CRT patients management (time and resource consuming, scarce reproducibility, inter and intra-operator dependency), echocardiography optimization is widely under-utilized in the real-world of CRT follow-up visits. As a consequence, device-based techniques have been developed to by-pass the need for repeated echo examinations to optimize CRT settings. In this report the available device-based optimization techniques onboard on CRT devices are shortly reviewed, with a specific focus on clinical outcomes observed in trials comparing these methods vs. clinical practice or echo-guided optimization methods. Particular emphasis is dedicated to hemodynamic methods and automaticity of optimization algorithms (making real the concept of "ambulatory CRT optimization"). In fact a hemodynamic-based approach combined with a concept of frequent re-optimization has been associated - although retrospectively - with a better clinical outcome on the long-term follow-up of CRT patients. Large randomized trials are ongoing to prospectively clarify the impact of automatic optimization procedures.

  9. Clinically relevant pharmacogenomic testing in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Korbel, Lindsey; George, Mathew; Kitzmiller, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    Clinicians and patients continue to convey interest in personalized medicine. The objective of personalized medicine is to improve healthcare by tailoring disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment strategies for individuals based on their unique clinical history and genetic composition. This article offers an overview of pharmacogenomics, discusses caveats specific to pharmacogenomics in pediatric populations, provides evidence-based recommendations for pediatric clinicians, and offers insight regarding the future role of pharmacogenomics testing in pediatric medicine. Reviews of the current literature and thoughtful discussions are presented regarding the pharmacogenomics of antidepressants, codeine and oncologic, asthma, and immunomodulatory pharmacotherapies.

  10. Clinically relevant advances in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Neumann, Elena; Tarner, Ingo H

    2009-09-14

    Owing to the success of biologics in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), several novel drugs have been introduced in the therapeutic armamentarium, although not all of them have been approved in all countries worldwide. Among the drugs are tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors such as certolizumab pegol and golimumab (the latter of which was the first TNF blocker shown to be effective in patients who had been unsuccessfully treated with other TNF blockers and which can be applied only once a month), and the interleukin-6 receptor antagonist tocilizumab, which not only opens up a completely new field of anti-inflammatory modulation of RA pathophysiology, but also highlights the challenge of novel potential side effects. Moreover, aside from clinical studies showing efficacy in the inhibition of osteoclast activation by the anti-RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand) antibody denosumab, an improved form of steroid application known as slow-release 'tempus tablet' for treatment of RA and several developments in the small-molecule area have been addressed by clinical trials.

  11. Clinical relevance of fascial tissue and dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Klingler, W; Velders, M; Hoppe, K; Pedro, M; Schleip, R

    2014-01-01

    Fascia is composed of collagenous connective tissue surrounding and interpenetrating skeletal muscle, joints, organs, nerves, and vascular beds. Fascial tissue forms a whole-body, continuous three-dimensional viscoelastic matrix of structural support. The classical concept of its mere passive role in force transmission has recently been disproven. Fascial tissue contains contractile elements enabling a modulating role in force generation and also mechanosensory fine-tuning. This hypothesis is supported by in vitro studies demonstrating an autonomous contraction of human lumbar fascia and a pharmacological induction of temporary contraction in rat fascial tissue. The ability of spontaneous regulation of fascial stiffness over a time period ranging from minutes to hours contributes more actively to musculoskeletal dynamics. Imbalance of this regulatory mechanism results in increased or decreased myofascial tonus, or diminished neuromuscular coordination, which are key contributors to the pathomechanisms of several musculoskeletal pathologies and pain syndromes. Here, we summarize anatomical and biomechanical properties of fascial tissue with a special focus on fascial dysfunctions and resulting clinical manifestations. Finally, we discuss current and future potential treatment options that can influence clinical manifestations of pain syndromes associated with fascial tissues.

  12. Biofilms: Survival Mechanisms of Clinically Relevant Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Donlan, Rodney M.; Costerton, J. William

    2002-01-01

    Though biofilms were first described by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the theory describing the biofilm process was not developed until 1978. We now understand that biofilms are universal, occurring in aquatic and industrial water systems as well as a large number of environments and medical devices relevant for public health. Using tools such as the scanning electron microscope and, more recently, the confocal laser scanning microscope, biofilm researchers now understand that biofilms are not unstructured, homogeneous deposits of cells and accumulated slime, but complex communities of surface-associated cells enclosed in a polymer matrix containing open water channels. Further studies have shown that the biofilm phenotype can be described in terms of the genes expressed by biofilm-associated cells. Microorganisms growing in a biofilm are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents by one or more mechanisms. Biofilm-associated microorganisms have been shown to be associated with several human diseases, such as native valve endocarditis and cystic fibrosis, and to colonize a wide variety of medical devices. Though epidemiologic evidence points to biofilms as a source of several infectious diseases, the exact mechanisms by which biofilm-associated microorganisms elicit disease are poorly understood. Detachment of cells or cell aggregates, production of endotoxin, increased resistance to the host immune system, and provision of a niche for the generation of resistant organisms are all biofilm processes which could initiate the disease process. Effective strategies to prevent or control biofilms on medical devices must take into consideration the unique and tenacious nature of biofilms. Current intervention strategies are designed to prevent initial device colonization, minimize microbial cell attachment to the device, penetrate the biofilm matrix and kill the associated cells, or remove the device from the patient. In the future, treatments may be based on inhibition of genes

  13. Bed bugs: clinical relevance and control options.

    PubMed

    Doggett, Stephen L; Dwyer, Dominic E; Peñas, Pablo F; Russell, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Since the late 1990s, bed bugs of the species Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus have undergone a worldwide resurgence. These bed bugs are blood-sucking insects that readily bite humans. Cutaneous reactions may occur and can start out as small macular lesions that can develop into distinctive wheals of around 5 cm in diameter, which are accompanied by intense itching. Occasionally, bullous eruptions may result. If bed bugs are numerous, the patient can present with widespread urticaria or eythematous rashes. Often, bites occur in lines along the limbs. Over 40 pathogens have been detected in bed bugs, but there is no definitive evidence that they transmit any disease-causing organisms to humans. Anemia may result when bed bugs are numerous, and their allergens can trigger asthmatic reactions. The misuse of chemicals and other technologies for controlling bed bugs has the potential to have a deleterious impact on human health, while the insect itself can be the cause of significant psychological trauma. The control of bed bugs is challenging and should encompass a multidisciplinary approach utilizing nonchemical means of control and the judicious use of insecticides. For accommodation providers, risk management procedures should be implemented to reduce the potential of bed bug infestations.

  14. Bed Bugs: Clinical Relevance and Control Options

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Dominic E.; Peñas, Pablo F.; Russell, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Since the late 1990s, bed bugs of the species Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus have undergone a worldwide resurgence. These bed bugs are blood-sucking insects that readily bite humans. Cutaneous reactions may occur and can start out as small macular lesions that can develop into distinctive wheals of around 5 cm in diameter, which are accompanied by intense itching. Occasionally, bullous eruptions may result. If bed bugs are numerous, the patient can present with widespread urticaria or eythematous rashes. Often, bites occur in lines along the limbs. Over 40 pathogens have been detected in bed bugs, but there is no definitive evidence that they transmit any disease-causing organisms to humans. Anemia may result when bed bugs are numerous, and their allergens can trigger asthmatic reactions. The misuse of chemicals and other technologies for controlling bed bugs has the potential to have a deleterious impact on human health, while the insect itself can be the cause of significant psychological trauma. The control of bed bugs is challenging and should encompass a multidisciplinary approach utilizing nonchemical means of control and the judicious use of insecticides. For accommodation providers, risk management procedures should be implemented to reduce the potential of bed bug infestations. PMID:22232375

  15. HDL cholesterol: reappraisal of its clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    März, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Scharnagl, Hubert; Speer, Timotheus; Zewinger, Stephen; Ritsch, Andreas; Parhofer, Klaus G; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Landmesser, Ulf; Laufs, Ulrich

    2017-03-24

    While several lines of evidence prove that elevated concentrations of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) causally contribute to the development of atherosclerosis and its clinical consequences, high-density lipoproteins are still widely believed to exert atheroprotective effects. Hence, HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) is in general still considered as "good cholesterol". Recent research, however, suggests that this might not always be the case and that a fundamental reassessment of the clinical significance of HDL-C is warranted. This review article is based on a selective literature review. In individuals without a history of cardiovascular events, low concentrations of HDL-C are inversely associated with the risk of future cardiovascular events. This relationship may, however, not apply to patients with metabolic disorders or manifest cardiovascular disease. The classical function of HDL is to mobilise cholesterol from extrahepatic tissues for delivery to the liver for excretion. These roles in cholesterol metabolism as well as many other biological functions of HDL particles are dependent on the number as well as protein and lipid composition of HDL particles. They are poorly reflected by the HDL-C concentration. HDL can even exert negative vascular effects, if its composition is pathologically altered. High serum HDL-C is therefore no longer regarded protective. In line with this, recent pharmacological approaches to raise HDL-C concentration have not been able to show reductions of cardiovascular outcomes. In contrast to LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL-C correlates with cardiovascular risk only in healthy individuals. The calculation of the ratio of LDL-C to HDL-C is not useful for all patients. Low HDL-C should prompt examination of additional metabolic and inflammatory pathologies. An increase in HDL-C through lifestyle change (smoking cessation, physical exercise) has positive effects and is recommended. However, HDL-C is currently not a valid target for drug therapy.

  16. Clinically relevant molecular subtypes in leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiangqian; Jo, Vickie Young; Mills, Anne M.; Zhu, Shirley X.; Lee, Cheng-Han; Espinosa, Inigo; Nucci, Marisa Rose; Varma, Sushama; Forgó, Erna; Hastie, Trevor; Anderson, Sharon; Ganjoo, Kristen; Beck, Andrew H.; West, Robert B.; Fletcher, Christopher; van de Rijn, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leiomyosarcoma (LMS) is a malignant neoplasm with smooth muscle differentiation. Little is known about its molecular heterogeneity and no targeted therapy currently exists for LMS. Recognition of different molecular subtypes is necessary to evaluate novel therapeutic options. In a previous study on 51 LMS, we identified three molecular subtypes in LMS. The current study was performed to determine whether the existence of these subtypes could be confirmed in independent cohorts. Experimental Design 99 cases of LMS were expression profiled with 3′end RNA-Sequencing (3SEQ). Consensus Clustering was conducted to determine the optimal number of subtypes. Results We identified 3 LMS molecular subtypes and confirmed this finding by analyzing publically available data on 82 LMS from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We identified two new FFPE tissue-compatible diagnostic immunohistochemical markers; LMOD1 for subtype I LMS and ARL4C for subtype II LMS. An LMS tissue microarray with known clinical outcome was used to show that subtype I LMS is associated with good outcome in extrauterine LMS while subtype II LMS is associated with poor prognosis in both uterine and extrauterine LMS. The LMS subtypes showed significant differences in expression levels for genes for which novel targeted therapies are being developed, suggesting that LMS subtypes may respond differentially to these targeted therapies. Conclusion We confirm the existence of 3 molecular subtypes in LMS using two independent datasets and show that the different molecular subtypes are associated with distinct clinical outcomes. The findings offer an opportunity for treating LMS in a subtype-specific targeted approach. PMID:25896974

  17. Trustworthiness and relevance in web-based clinical question answering.

    PubMed

    Cruchet, Sarah; Boyer, Célia; van der Plas, Lonneke

    2012-01-01

    Question answering systems try to give precise answers to a user's question posed in natural language. It is of utmost importance that the answers returned are relevant to the user's question. For clinical QA, the trustworthiness of answers is another important issue. Limiting the document collection to certified websites helps to improve the trustworthiness of answers. On the other hand, limited document collections are known to harm the relevancy of answers. We show, however, in a comparative evaluation, that promoting trustworthiness has no negative effect on the relevance of the retrieved answers in our clinical QA system. On the contrary, the answers found are in general more relevant.

  18. Chronic HCV infection: epidemiological and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Zaltron, S; Spinetti, A; Biasi, L; Baiguera, C; Castelli, F

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), first recognized as a cause of transfusion-associated acute and chronic hepatitis in 1989, plays a major role as a cause of chronic liver injury, with potential for neoplastic degeneration. It is mainly transmitted by the parenteral route. However, although with lower efficiency, it may be also transmitted by sexual intercourses and by the mother-to-child route. Epidemiological evidence shows that a wave of infection occurred in the 1945-65 period (baby boomers) in western countries. After acute infection, as many as 50-85% of the patients fail to clear the virus resulting in chronic liver infection and/or disease. It is estimated that, on a global scale, about 170 million people are chronically infected with HCV, leading to about 350.000 deaths yearly. Among western countries southern Europe, and particularly Italy, is among the most affected areas. The impact on the public health systems is noteworthy, with high number of hospitalizations due to chronic liver disease, cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. While waiting for a safe and effective vaccine to be made available, new promising direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs offer a better therapeutic scenario than in the past even for the poor responder genotypes 1 and 4, provided that effective screening and care is offered. However, the long and aspecific prodromic period before clinical symptoms develop is a major obstacle to early detection and treatment. Effective screening strategies may target at-risk groups or age specific groups, as recently recommended by the CDC.

  19. Chronic HCV infection: epidemiological and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), first recognized as a cause of transfusion-associated acute and chronic hepatitis in 1989, plays a major role as a cause of chronic liver injury, with potential for neoplastic degeneration. It is mainly transmitted by the parenteral route. However, although with lower efficiency, it may be also transmitted by sexual intercourses and by the mother-to-child route. Epidemiological evidence shows that a wave of infection occurred in the 1945-65 period (baby boomers) in western countries. After acute infection, as many as 50-85% of the patients fail to clear the virus resulting in chronic liver infection and/or disease. It is estimated that, on a global scale, about 170 million people are chronically infected with HCV, leading to about 350.000 deaths yearly. Among western countries southern Europe, and particularly Italy, is among the most affected areas. The impact on the public health systems is noteworthy, with high number of hospitalizations due to chronic liver disease, cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. While waiting for a safe and effective vaccine to be made available, new promising direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs offer a better therapeutic scenario than in the past even for the poor responder genotypes 1 and 4, provided that effective screening and care is offered. However, the long and aspecific prodromic period before clinical symptoms develop is a major obstacle to early detection and treatment. Effective screening strategies may target at-risk groups or age specific groups, as recently recommended by the CDC. PMID:23173556

  20. Quantifying the clinical relevance of a laboratory observer performance paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, D P; Haygood, T M; Ryan, J; Marom, E M; Evanoff, M; Mcentee, M F; Brennan, P C

    2012-01-01

    Objective Laboratory observer performance measurements, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and free-response ROC (FROC) differ from actual clinical interpretations in several respects, which could compromise their clinical relevance. The objective of this study was to develop a method for quantifying the clinical relevance of a laboratory paradigm and apply it to compare the ROC and FROC paradigms in a nodule detection task. Methods The original prospective interpretations of 80 digital chest radiographs were classified by the truth panel as correct (C=1) or incorrect (C=0), depending on correlation with additional imaging, and the average of C was interpreted as the clinical figure of merit. FROC data were acquired for 21 radiologists and ROC data were inferred using the highest ratings. The areas under the ROC and alternative FROC curves were used as laboratory figures of merit. Bootstrap analysis was conducted to estimate conventional agreement measures between laboratory and clinical figures of merit. Also computed was a pseudovalue-based image-level correctness measure of the laboratory interpretations, whose association with C as measured by the area (rAUC) under an appropriately defined relevance ROC curve, is as a measure of the clinical relevance of a laboratory paradigm. Results Low correlations (e.g. κ=0.244) and near chance level rAUC values (e.g. 0.598), attributable to differences between the clinical and laboratory paradigms, were observed. The absolute width of the confidence interval was 0.38 for the interparadigm differences of the conventional measures and 0.14 for the difference of the rAUCs. Conclusion The rAUC measure was consistent with the traditional measures but was more sensitive to the differences in clinical relevance. A new relevance ROC method for quantifying the clinical relevance of a laboratory paradigm is proposed. PMID:22573296

  1. Quantifying the clinical relevance of a laboratory observer performance paradigm.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, D P; Haygood, T M; Ryan, J; Marom, E M; Evanoff, M; McEntee, M F; Brennan, P C

    2012-09-01

    Laboratory observer performance measurements, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and free-response ROC (FROC) differ from actual clinical interpretations in several respects, which could compromise their clinical relevance. The objective of this study was to develop a method for quantifying the clinical relevance of a laboratory paradigm and apply it to compare the ROC and FROC paradigms in a nodule detection task. The original prospective interpretations of 80 digital chest radiographs were classified by the truth panel as correct (C=1) or incorrect (C=0), depending on correlation with additional imaging, and the average of C was interpreted as the clinical figure of merit. FROC data were acquired for 21 radiologists and ROC data were inferred using the highest ratings. The areas under the ROC and alternative FROC curves were used as laboratory figures of merit. Bootstrap analysis was conducted to estimate conventional agreement measures between laboratory and clinical figures of merit. Also computed was a pseudovalue-based image-level correctness measure of the laboratory interpretations, whose association with C as measured by the area (rAUC) under an appropriately defined relevance ROC curve, is as a measure of the clinical relevance of a laboratory paradigm. Low correlations (e.g. κ=0.244) and near chance level rAUC values (e.g. 0.598), attributable to differences between the clinical and laboratory paradigms, were observed. The absolute width of the confidence interval was 0.38 for the interparadigm differences of the conventional measures and 0.14 for the difference of the rAUCs. The rAUC measure was consistent with the traditional measures but was more sensitive to the differences in clinical relevance. A new relevance ROC method for quantifying the clinical relevance of a laboratory paradigm is proposed.

  2. Use of Microelectronic Array Technology for Rapid Identification of Clinically Relevant Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Novarese, Linda; Posteraro, Brunella; Ranno, Stefania; De Carolis, Elena; Pecorini, Giovanni; Lucignano, Barbara; Ardito, Fausta; Fadda, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    We developed a new method based on the Nanochip microelectronic array technology for identification of various clinically relevant mycobacterial species. PCR-amplified rRNA genes obtained from 270 positive Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube cultures were successfully tested by hybridizing them with species-selective probes, and the results agreed with those of conventional identification methods. The system is rapid and accurate and opens new perspectives in clinical diagnostics. PMID:16333127

  3. Use of microelectronic array technology for rapid identification of clinically relevant mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Novarese, Linda; Posteraro, Brunella; Ranno, Stefania; De Carolis, Elena; Pecorini, Giovanni; Lucignano, Barbara; Ardito, Fausta; Fadda, Giovanni

    2005-12-01

    We developed a new method based on the Nanochip microelectronic array technology for identification of various clinically relevant mycobacterial species. PCR-amplified rRNA genes obtained from 270 positive Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube cultures were successfully tested by hybridizing them with species-selective probes, and the results agreed with those of conventional identification methods. The system is rapid and accurate and opens new perspectives in clinical diagnostics.

  4. Clinical Relevance of Discourse Characteristics after Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Margaret Lehman

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Discourse characteristics of adults with right hemisphere brain damage are similar to those reported for healthy older adults, prompting the question of whether changes are due to neurological lesions or normal aging processes. The clinical relevance of potential differences across groups was examined through ratings by speech-language…

  5. Clinical Relevance of Discourse Characteristics after Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Margaret Lehman

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Discourse characteristics of adults with right hemisphere brain damage are similar to those reported for healthy older adults, prompting the question of whether changes are due to neurological lesions or normal aging processes. The clinical relevance of potential differences across groups was examined through ratings by speech-language…

  6. Clinically relevant pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions in antiretroviral therapy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In t...

  7. Clinical relevance of pharmacist intervention in an emergency department.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Moreno, Maria Antonia; Rodríguez-Camacho, Juan Manuel; Calderón-Hernanz, Beatriz; Comas-Díaz, Bernardino; Tarradas-Torras, Jordi

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical relevance of pharmacist intervention on patient care in emergencies, to determine the severity of detected errors. Second, to analyse the most frequent types of interventions and type of drugs involved and to evaluate the clinical pharmacist's activity. A 6-month observational prospective study of pharmacist intervention in the Emergency Department (ED) at a 400-bed hospital in Spain was performed to record interventions carried out by the clinical pharmacists. We determined whether the intervention occurred in the process of medication reconciliation or another activity, and whether the drug involved belonged to the High-Alert Medications Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) list. To evaluate the severity of the errors detected and clinical relevance of the pharmacist intervention, a modified assessment scale of Overhage and Lukes was used. Relationship between clinical relevance of pharmacist intervention and the severity of medication errors was assessed using ORs and Spearman's correlation coefficient. During the observation period, pharmacists reviewed the pharmacotherapy history and medication orders of 2984 patients. A total of 991 interventions were recorded in 557 patients; 67.2% of the errors were detected during medication reconciliation. Medication errors were considered severe in 57.2% of cases and 64.9% of pharmacist intervention were considered relevant. About 10.9% of the drugs involved are in the High-Alert Medications ISMP list. The severity of the medication error and the clinical significance of the pharmacist intervention were correlated (Spearman's ρ=0.728/p<0.001). In this single centre study, the clinical pharmacists identified and intervened on a high number of severe medication errors. This suggests that emergency services will benefit from pharmacist-provided drug therapy services. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go

  8. Identification of medically relevant Nocardia species with an abbreviated battery of tests.

    PubMed

    Kiska, Deanna L; Hicks, Karen; Pettit, David J

    2002-04-01

    Identification of Nocardia to the species level is useful for predicting antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and defining the pathogenicity and geographic distribution of these organisms. We sought to develop an identification method which was accurate, timely, and employed tests which would be readily available in most clinical laboratories. We evaluated the API 20C AUX yeast identification system as well as several biochemical tests and Kirby-Bauer susceptibility patterns for the identification of 75 isolates encompassing the 8 medically relevant Nocardia species. There were few biochemical reactions that were sufficiently unique for species identification; of note, N. nova were positive for arylsulfatase, N. farcinica were positive for opacification of Middlebrook 7H11 agar, and N. brasiliensis and N. pseudobrasiliensis were the only species capable of liquefying gelatin. API 20C sugar assimilation patterns were unique for N. transvalensis, N. asteroides IV, and N. brevicatena. There was overlap among the assimilation patterns for the other species. Species-specific patterns of susceptibility to gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, and erythromycin were obtained for N. nova, N. farcinica, and N. brevicatena, while there was overlap among the susceptibility patterns for the other isolates. No single method could identify all Nocardia isolates to the species level; therefore, a combination of methods was necessary. An algorithm utilizing antibiotic susceptibility patterns, citrate utilization, acetamide utilization, and assimilation of inositol and adonitol accurately identified all isolates. The algorithm was expanded to include infrequent drug susceptibility patterns which have been reported in the literature but which were not seen in this study.

  9. Assay Platform for Clinically Relevant Metallo-β-lactamases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) are a growing threat to the use of almost all clinically used β-lactam antibiotics. The identification of broad-spectrum MBL inhibitors is hampered by the lack of a suitable screening platform, consisting of appropriate substrates and a set of clinically relevant MBLs. We report procedures for the preparation of a set of clinically relevant metallo-β-lactamases (i.e., NDM-1 (New Delhi MBL), IMP-1 (Imipenemase), SPM-1 (São Paulo MBL), and VIM-2 (Verona integron-encoded MBL)) and the identification of suitable fluorogenic substrates (umbelliferone-derived cephalosporins). The fluorogenic substrates were compared to chromogenic substrates (CENTA, nitrocefin, and imipenem), showing improved sensitivity and kinetic parameters. The efficiency of the fluorogenic substrates was exemplified by inhibitor screening, identifying 4-chloroisoquinolinols as potential pan MBL inhibitors. PMID:23898798

  10. Antidrug Antibody Formation in Oncology: Clinical Relevance and Challenges.

    PubMed

    van Brummelen, Emilie M J; Ros, Willeke; Wolbink, Gertjan; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M

    2016-10-01

    : In oncology, an increasing number of targeted anticancer agents and immunotherapies are of biological origin. These biological drugs may trigger immune responses that lead to the formation of antidrug antibodies (ADAs). ADAs are directed against immunogenic parts of the drug and may affect efficacy and safety. In other medical fields, such as rheumatology and hematology, the relevance of ADA formation is well established. However, the relevance of ADAs in oncology is just starting to be recognized, and literature on this topic is scarce. In an attempt to fill this gap in the literature, we provide an up-to-date status of ADA formation in oncology. In this focused review, data on ADAs was extracted from 81 clinical trials with biological anticancer agents. We found that most biological anticancer drugs in these trials are immunogenic and induce ADAs (63%). However, it is difficult to establish the clinical relevance of these ADAs. In order to determine this relevance, the possible effects of ADAs on pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety parameters need to be investigated. Our data show that this was done in fewer than 50% of the trials. In addition, we describe the incidence and consequences of ADAs for registered agents. We highlight the challenges in ADA detection and argue for the importance of validating, standardizing, and describing well the used assays. Finally, we discuss prevention strategies such as immunosuppression and regimen adaptations. We encourage the launch of clinical trials that explore these strategies in oncology.

  11. Mycobacterium xenopi Clinical Relevance and Determinants, the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Boeree, Martin J.; de Lange, Wiel C.M.; Hoefsloot, Wouter; Bendien, Saar A.; Magis-Escurra, Cecile; Dekhuijzen, Richard; van Soolingen, Dick

    2008-01-01

    In the Netherlands, isolation of Mycobacterium xenopi is infrequent, and its clinical relevance is often uncertain. To determine clinical relevance and determinants, we retrospectively reviewed medical files of all patients in the Netherlands in whom M. xenopi was isolated from January 1999 through March 2005 by using diagnostic criteria for nontuberculous mycobacterial infection published by the American Thoracic Society. We found 49 patients, mostly white men, with an average age of 60 years and pre-existing pulmonary disease; of these patients, 25 (51%) met the diagnostic criteria. Mycobacterial genotype, based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, was associated with true infection. Most infections were pulmonary, but pleural and spinal infections (spinal in HIV-infected patients) were also noted. Treatment regimens varied in content and duration; some patients were overtreated and some were undertreated. PMID:18325251

  12. Juxtaposed atrial appendages: A curiosity with some clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Singhi, Anil Kumar; Pradhan, Priya; Agarwal, Ravi; Sivakumar, Kothandum

    2016-01-01

    If the atrial appendages lie adjacent to each other on same side of the great arteries, instead of encircling their roots, they are referred as juxtaposed. Right juxtaposition of atrial appendages is less common than left juxtaposition. The images demonstrate the classical radiological, echocardiographic, and surgical images of juxtaposed atrial appendages. Their clinical incidence, associations, and relevance during interventional and surgical procedures are discussed. PMID:27212860

  13. Symptoms and clinical relevance: a dilemma for clinical trials on prevention of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Bounameaux, Henri; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2013-04-01

    The outcomes of thromboprophylactic trials have been debated for decades. Recently, the 9th edition of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) evidence-based clinical practice guidelines based their strong recommendations only on patient-important outcomes. Practically, symptoms were considered the crucial element. Consequently, studies that primarily aimed at reducing venographic thrombi were considered less pertinent than studies that focused on symptomatic thrombosis. In the present viewpoint, we challenge the argument that "symptomatic" and "clinically relevant" are interchangeable. In particular, the case is made that asymptomatic events may be clinically relevant and that asymptomatic venographically detected thrombosis is a clinically relevant surrogate outcome for fatal pulmonary embolism.

  14. Microbial Transformations of Selenium Species of Relevance to Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Eswayah, Abdurrahman S.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Selenium species, particularly the oxyanions selenite (SeO32−) and selenate (SeO42−), are significant pollutants in the environment that leach from rocks and are released by anthropogenic activities. Selenium is also an essential micronutrient for organisms across the tree of life, including microorganisms and human beings, particularly because of its presence in the 21st genetically encoded amino acid, selenocysteine. Environmental microorganisms are known to be capable of a range of transformations of selenium species, including reduction, methylation, oxidation, and demethylation. Assimilatory reduction of selenium species is necessary for the synthesis of selenoproteins. Dissimilatory reduction of selenate is known to support the anaerobic respiration of a number of microorganisms, and the dissimilatory reduction of soluble selenate and selenite to nanoparticulate elemental selenium greatly reduces the toxicity and bioavailability of selenium and has a major role in bioremediation and potentially in the production of selenium nanospheres for technological applications. Also, microbial methylation after reduction of Se oxyanions is another potentially effective detoxification process if limitations with low reaction rates and capture of the volatile methylated selenium species can be overcome. This review discusses microbial transformations of different forms of Se in an environmental context, with special emphasis on bioremediation of Se pollution. PMID:27260359

  15. SELECTING RELEVANT TEST SPECIES FOR ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In many countries, numerous tests are required prior to chemical registration for the protection of human health and the environment from the unintended effects of chemical releases. The species used in these tests are quite often familiar to scientists, have an extensive histor...

  16. Microbial Transformations of Selenium Species of Relevance to Bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Eswayah, Abdurrahman S; Smith, Thomas J; Gardiner, Philip H E

    2016-08-15

    Selenium species, particularly the oxyanions selenite (SeO3 (2-)) and selenate (SeO4 (2-)), are significant pollutants in the environment that leach from rocks and are released by anthropogenic activities. Selenium is also an essential micronutrient for organisms across the tree of life, including microorganisms and human beings, particularly because of its presence in the 21st genetically encoded amino acid, selenocysteine. Environmental microorganisms are known to be capable of a range of transformations of selenium species, including reduction, methylation, oxidation, and demethylation. Assimilatory reduction of selenium species is necessary for the synthesis of selenoproteins. Dissimilatory reduction of selenate is known to support the anaerobic respiration of a number of microorganisms, and the dissimilatory reduction of soluble selenate and selenite to nanoparticulate elemental selenium greatly reduces the toxicity and bioavailability of selenium and has a major role in bioremediation and potentially in the production of selenium nanospheres for technological applications. Also, microbial methylation after reduction of Se oxyanions is another potentially effective detoxification process if limitations with low reaction rates and capture of the volatile methylated selenium species can be overcome. This review discusses microbial transformations of different forms of Se in an environmental context, with special emphasis on bioremediation of Se pollution. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Clinically relevant drug–drug interactions in oncology

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Howard L

    1998-01-01

    Although anticancer agents are one of the most toxic classes of medication prescribed today, there is relatively little information available about clinically relevant drug–drug interactions. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions have been described, including alterations in absorption, catabolism, and excretion. For example, an increased bioavailability of 6-mercaptopurine has been observed when combined with either allopurinol or methotrexate, leading to increased toxicity in some patients. Induction of etoposide or teniposide clearance by anticonvulsants has also been described, resulting in a lower systemic exposure and risk for lower anticancer activity. Alterations in elimination of methotrexate has been observed with probenecid, presumably through competition for renal secretion. There are also several examples of pharmacodynamic interactions. The combination of 5-fluorouracil plus folinic acid results in more efficient inhibition of thymidylate synthase, a finding which is now utilized routinely in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Improvements in the in vitro and early clinical testing now allow a relatively high degree of prediction of potential clinical drug interactions, prior to observations of untoward drug effects. In conclusion, drug interactions among commonly used anticancer agents have been identified. Their clinical significance can have more impact than many other classes of medications due to the narrow therapeutic index of antineoplastic agents and the potential for lethal side-effects. It is only through prospective, preclinical and early clinical evaluation that the presence of clinically significant drug interactions can be identified and the information used to provide better therapy for this significant health problem. PMID:9663808

  18. Metabolism of psilocybin and psilocin: clinical and forensic toxicological relevance.

    PubMed

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge

    2017-02-01

    Psilocybin and psilocin are controlled substances in many countries. These are the two main hallucinogenic compounds of the "magic mushrooms" and both act as agonists or partial agonists at 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A subtype receptors. During the last few years, psilocybin and psilocin have gained therapeutic relevance but considerable physiological variability between individuals that can influence dose-response and toxicological profile has been reported. This review aims to discuss metabolism of psilocybin and psilocin, by presenting all major and minor psychoactive metabolites. Psilocybin is primarily a pro-drug that is dephosphorylated by alkaline phosphatase to active metabolite psilocin. This last is then further metabolized, psilocin-O-glucuronide being the main urinary metabolite with clinical and forensic relevance in diagnosis.

  19. Clinically-Relevant Cell Sources for TMJ Disc Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Johns, D.E.; Wong, M. E.; Athanasiou, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue-engineering of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc aims to provide patients with TMJ disorders an option to replace diseased tissue with autologous, functional tissue. This study examined clinically-relevant cell sources by comparing costal chondrocytes, dermal fibroblasts, a mixture of the two, and TMJ disc cells in a scaffoldless tissue-engineering approach. It was hypothesized that all constructs would produce matrix relevant to the TMJ disc, but the mixture constructs were expected to appear most like the TMJ disc constructs. Costal chondrocyte and mixture constructs were morphologically and biochemically superior to the TMJ disc and dermal fibroblast constructs, and their compressive properties were not significantly different. Costal chondrocyte constructs produced almost 40 times more collagen and 800 times more glycosaminoglycans than TMJ constructs. This study demonstrates the ability of costal chondrocytes to produce extracellular matrix that may function in a TMJ disc replacement. PMID:18502963

  20. Real time and label free profiling of clinically relevant exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sina, Abu Ali Ibn; Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Dey, Shuvashis; Carrascosa, Laura G.; Shiddiky, Muhammad J. A.; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-derived exosomes possess significant clinical relevance due to their unique composition of genetic and protein material that is representative of the parent tumor. Specific isolation as well as identification of proportions of these clinically relevant exosomes (CREs) from biological samples could help to better understand their clinical significance as cancer biomarkers. Herein, we present a simple approach for quantification of the proportion of CREs within the bulk exosome population isolated from patient serum. This proportion of CREs can potentially inform on the disease stage and enable non-invasive monitoring of inter-individual variations in tumor-receptor expression levels. Our approach utilises a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) platform to quantify the proportion of CREs in a two-step strategy that involves (i) initial isolation of bulk exosome population using tetraspanin biomarkers (i.e., CD9, CD63), and (ii) subsequent detection of CREs within the captured bulk exosomes using tumor-specific markers (e.g., human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)). We demonstrate the isolation of bulk exosome population and detection of as low as 10% HER2(+) exosomes from samples containing designated proportions of HER2(+) BT474 and HER2(−) MDA-MB-231 cell derived exosomes. We also demonstrate the successful isolation of exosomes from a small cohort of breast cancer patient samples and identified that approximately 14–35% of their bulk population express HER2. PMID:27464736

  1. Real time and label free profiling of clinically relevant exosomes.

    PubMed

    Sina, Abu Ali Ibn; Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Dey, Shuvashis; Carrascosa, Laura G; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Trau, Matt

    2016-07-28

    Tumor-derived exosomes possess significant clinical relevance due to their unique composition of genetic and protein material that is representative of the parent tumor. Specific isolation as well as identification of proportions of these clinically relevant exosomes (CREs) from biological samples could help to better understand their clinical significance as cancer biomarkers. Herein, we present a simple approach for quantification of the proportion of CREs within the bulk exosome population isolated from patient serum. This proportion of CREs can potentially inform on the disease stage and enable non-invasive monitoring of inter-individual variations in tumor-receptor expression levels. Our approach utilises a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) platform to quantify the proportion of CREs in a two-step strategy that involves (i) initial isolation of bulk exosome population using tetraspanin biomarkers (i.e., CD9, CD63), and (ii) subsequent detection of CREs within the captured bulk exosomes using tumor-specific markers (e.g., human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)). We demonstrate the isolation of bulk exosome population and detection of as low as 10% HER2(+) exosomes from samples containing designated proportions of HER2(+) BT474 and HER2(-) MDA-MB-231 cell derived exosomes. We also demonstrate the successful isolation of exosomes from a small cohort of breast cancer patient samples and identified that approximately 14-35% of their bulk population express HER2.

  2. Hazelnut Allergens: Molecular Characterization, Detection, and Clinical Relevance.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Mafra, Isabel; Carrapatoso, Isabel; Oliveira, Maria Beatriz P P

    2016-11-17

    In last few years, special attention has been given to food-induced allergies, in which hazelnut allergy is highlighted. Hazelnut is one of the most commonly consumed tree nuts, being largely used by the food industry in a variety of processed foods. It has been regarded as a food with potential health benefits, but also as a source of allergens capable of inducing mild to severe allergic reactions in sensitized individuals. Considering the great number of reports addressing hazelnut allergens, with an estimated increasing trend, this review intends to assemble all the relevant information available so far on the following main issues: prevalence of tree nut allergy, clinical threshold levels, molecular characterization of hazelnut allergens (Cor a 1, Cor a 2, Cor a 8, Cor a 9, Cor a 10, Cor a 11, Cor a 12, Cor a 14, and Cor a TLP) and their clinical relevance, and methodologies for detection of hazelnut allergens in foods. A comprehensive overview of the current data about the molecular characterization of hazelnut allergens is presented, relating to biochemical classification and biological function with clinical importance. Recent advances in hazelnut allergen detection methodologies are summarized and compared, including all the novel protein-based and DNA-based approaches.

  3. Cervical ribs: identification on MRI and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Walden, Michael J; Adin, Mehmet E; Visagan, Ravindran; Viertel, Valentina G; Intrapiromkul, Jarunee; Maluf, Fernando; Patel, Neil V; Alluwaimi, Fatma; Lin, Doris; Yousem, David M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of cervical ribs on cervical spine MRI and clinical relevance, we reviewed 2500 studies for cervical ribs and compression of neurovascular structures and compared to CT, when available. Brachial plexus or subclavian artery contact by cervical rib was identified on MRI and/or CT in 12 cases with diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome in one. Cervical ribs were identified on 1.2% (25/2083) of examinations, lower than on CT (2%), but MRI may offer equivalent anatomic explanation for patient symptoms.

  4. Nonmotor Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease in 2012: Relevant Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Anne Marie; Jutras, Marie France; Czernecki, Virginie; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Vidailhet, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) of Parkinson's disease (PD) are common, but they are often underrecognized in clinical practice, because of the lack of spontaneous complaints by the patients, and partly because of the absence of systematic questioning by the consulting physician. However, valid specific instruments for identification and assessment of these symptoms are available in 2012. The administration of the self-completed screening tool, NMSQuest, associated with questioning during the consultation, improves the diagnosis of NMSs. NMSs play a large role in degradation of quality of life. More relevant NMSs are described in this review, mood disorders, impulse control disorders, cognitive deficits, hallucinations, pain, sleep disorders, and dysautonomia. PMID:22888466

  5. Clinical relevance and biology of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Most breast cancer patients die due to metastases, and the early onset of this multistep process is usually missed by current tumor staging modalities. Therefore, ultrasensitive techniques have been developed to enable the enrichment, detection, isolation and characterization of disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow and circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. There is increasing evidence that the presence of these cells is associated with an unfavorable prognosis related to metastatic progression in the bone and other organs. This review focuses on investigations regarding the biology and clinical relevance of circulating tumor cells in breast cancer. PMID:22114869

  6. [FeLV infection in the cat: clinically relevant aspects].

    PubMed

    Boretti, F S; Lutz, H; Hofmann-Lehmann, R

    2011-11-01

    The feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a retrovirus of the domestic cat that was described almost 50 years ago. The FeLV-infection may lead to fatal diseases in domestic and small wild cats. The use of efficacious diagnostics assays and vaccines led to a reduction of the FeLV prevalence; however, FeLV still poses a problem for the cat presented with the infection. This article aims to describe recent developments in diagnostics and findings in the infection pathogenesis that are clinically relevant.

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in diabetes: New insights of clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy; Lenin, Raji; Monickaraj, Finny

    2010-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a cellular compartment responsible for multiple important cellular functions including the biosynthesis and folding of newly synthesized proteins destined for secretion, such as insulin. A myriad of pathological and physiological factors perturb ER function and cause dysregulation of ER homeostasis, leading to ER stress. Accumulating evidence suggests that ER stress plays a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes, contributing to pancreatic β-cell loss and insulin resistance. ER stress may also link obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. In this review, we address the transition from physiology to pathology, namely how and why the physiological UPR evolves to a proapoptotic ER stress response in diabetes and its complications. Special attention was given to elucidate how ER stress could explain some of the 'clinical paradoxes' such as secondary sulfonylurea failure, initial worsening of retinopathy during tight glycemic control, insulin resistance induced by protease inhibitors and other clinically relevant observations.

  8. Clinically Relevant Drug Interactions with Anti-Alzheimer's Drugs.

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Sultana, Janet; Drago, Filippo; Spina, Edoardo

    2017-01-01

    The aging world population had led to an increase in the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The drugs used to slow down the onset of AD, galantamine, donepezil, rivastigmine and memantine, are generally well-tolerated. However, drug interactions between these drugs and other drugs are an important aspect of patient safety that should be borne in mind, particularly given the high burden of polypharmacy in the elderly. The aim of this review is to provide an updated review of clinically significant drug-drug interactions concerning drugs approved for AD. PubMed was searched for relevant keywords. No time limit was imposed but only articles in English published in peer-reviewed journals were selected. Relevant literature was also identified from the references of identified articles. Further information was obtained from drug summary of product characteristics. The major pharmacokinetic interactions identified concerned fluoxetine, paroxetine and ketoconazole when used with galantamine or donepezil. On the other hand, the major potential pharmacodynamic interactions concerned anti-dementia drugs and general anesthesia agents, anti-cholinergic drugs, conventional antipsychotics and bradycardia-inducing drugs. In clinical practice memantine shows a lower potential for pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) compared to other drug classes. The concomitant use of anti-dementia drugs with other drugs can have variable clinical effects, making appropriate prescribing of these drugs very challenging. A simple and coherent way of presenting evidence on complex drug interaction information from heterogenous sources to clinicians is needed in order for the voluminous data available to have an impact on clinical practice. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Quantifying Clinical Relevance in the Treatment of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Correll, Christoph U.; Kishimoto, Taishiro; Nielsen, Jimmi; Kane, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Background To optimize the management of patients with schizophrenia, quantification of treatment effects is crucial. While in research studies, the use of quantitative assessments is ubiquitous; this is not the case in routine clinical practice, creating an important translational practice gap. Objective To examine the relevance, methodology, reporting and application of measurement based approaches in the management of schizophrenia. Methods We summarize methodological aspects in the assessment of therapeutic and adverse antipsychotic effects in schizophrenia, including definitions and methods of measurement based assessments and factors that can interfere with the valid quantification of treatment effects. Finally, we propose pragmatic and clinically meaningful ways to measure and report treatment outcomes. Results While rating scales are ubiquitous in schizophrenia research and provide the evidence base for treatment guidelines, time constraints, lack of familiarity with and/or training in validated assessment tools limits their routine clinical use. Simple, but valid assessment instruments need to be developed and implemented to bridge this research-practice gap. Moreover, results from research trials need to be communicated in clinically meaningful ways. This includes the reporting of effect sizes, numbers-needed-to-treat and -harm, confidence intervals and absolute risk differences. Some important outcomes, such as treatment response, should be reported in escalating intervals using incrementally more stringent psychopathology improvements. Nevertheless, even with quantification, it remains challenging to weigh individual efficacy and adverse effect outcomes against each other and to decide on the targeted/desired improvement or outcome, while also incorporating that in patient-centered and shared decision methods. Conclusions Quantification of treatment effects in schizophrenia is relevant for patient management, research, and the evaluation of health care

  10. Clinical relevance of dissolution testing in quality by design.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Paul A; Lee, Wang Wang; Stott, Paul W; Townsend, Andy I; Smart, John P; Ghahramani, Parviz; Hammett, Tracey; Billett, Linda; Behn, Sheena; Gibb, Ryan C; Abrahamsson, Bertil

    2008-06-01

    Quality by design (QbD) has recently been introduced in pharmaceutical product development in a regulatory context and the process of implementing such concepts in the drug approval process is presently on-going. This has the potential to allow for a more flexible regulatory approach based on understanding and optimisation of how design of a product and its manufacturing process may affect product quality. Thus, adding restrictions to manufacturing beyond what can be motivated by clinical quality brings no benefits but only additional costs. This leads to a challenge for biopharmaceutical scientists to link clinical product performance to critical manufacturing attributes. In vitro dissolution testing is clearly a key tool for this purpose and the present bioequivalence guidelines and biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) provides a platform for regulatory applications of in vitro dissolution as a marker for consistency in clinical outcomes. However, the application of these concepts might need to be further developed in the context of QbD to take advantage of the higher level of understanding that is implied and displayed in regulatory documentation utilising QbD concepts. Aspects that should be considered include identification of rate limiting steps in the absorption process that can be linked to pharmacokinetic variables and used for prediction of bioavailability variables, in vivo relevance of in vitro dissolution test conditions and performance/interpretation of specific bioavailability studies on critical formulation/process variables. This article will give some examples and suggestions how clinical relevance of dissolution testing can be achieved in the context of QbD derived from a specific case study for a BCS II compound.

  11. Sensitization to lupine flour: is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    de Jong, N W; van Maaren, M S; Vlieg-Boersta, B J; Dubois, A E J; de Groot, H; Gerth van Wijk, R

    2010-10-01

    Lupinus angustifolius (blue lupine) is used for human and animal consumption. Currently, the lupine content in bread varies from 0% to 10% and from 0.5% to 3% in pastry. Although lupine flour is present in many products, anaphylaxis on lupine flour is rarely seen. The aim of our study was to determine the clinical relevance of sensitization to lupine flour. From October 2004 until October 2005, we performed skin prick tests (SPT) with lupine flour, peanut and soy extracts in consecutive patients attending our allergy clinic with a suspected food allergy. In patients sensitized to lupine flour, double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFC) were performed and specific IgE was measured. We tested 372 patients. SPTs with peanut, soy and lupine flour were positive in 135, 58 and 22 patients, respectively. Nine patients with sensitization to lupine flour underwent DBPCFC, which was negative in eight cases. In contrast, one patient experienced significant symptoms. Four of these nine patients suspected lupine by history. Two other patients with a positive history to lupine declined from challenges. In these patients, a 3-day dietary record showed that they could consume lupine without symptoms. Specific IgE in the serum was positive for L. angustifolius, peanut and soy in all nine patients. These results demonstrate that clinical lupine allergy is very uncommon, even in the presence of sensitization to lupine flour. The estimated prevalence of lupine allergy, among patients with a suspected food allergy, referred to a tertiary allergy centre in the Netherlands is 0.27-0.81%. In most, although not all cases, sensitization is not clinically relevant and is most likely caused by cross-sensitization to peanut. In selected cases, eliciting doses are low, making significant reactions possible. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. [The concept of aspirin "resistance": mechanisms and clinical relevance].

    PubMed

    Reny, J-L; Bonvini, R F; Barazer, I; Berdagué, P; de Moerloose, P; Schved, J-F; Gris, J-C; Fontana, P

    2009-12-01

    Aspirin, a 110-year-old molecule, is a cornerstone in the treatment of atherothrombotic patients. The concept of aspirin "resistance" emerged approximately 15 years ago and is of growing interest. Aspirin resistance, defined as a lack of inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-1 (COX-1), is a rare phenomenon and its clinical relevance can hardly be studied. On the contrary, residual platelet hyperactivity is more common and affects 20 to 30% of aspirin-treated patients. This latter phenomenon corresponds to sustained platelet reactivity despite a proper inhibition of COX-1 by aspirin. Several meta-analyses suggest that residual platelet hyperactivity could be a risk factor for the recurrence of ischemic events in aspirin-treated patients. Causes of biological non-responsiveness to aspirin are discussed, including the role of compliance, drug-drug interactions, genetic polymorphisms and diabetes mellitus. Ongoing studies are designed to find out the mechanisms of residual platelet hyperactivity, determine its potential clinical relevance and delineate the more appropriate assays in order to identify patients who may benefit of a tailored antiplatelet therapy.

  13. Laboratory Exercises to Teach Clinically Relevant Chemistry of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Chelette, Candace T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To design, implement, and evaluate student performance on clinically relevant chemical and spectral laboratory exercises on antibiotics. Design. In the first of 2 exercises, second-year pharmacy students enrolled in an integrated laboratory sequence course studied the aqueous stability of ß-lactam antibiotics using a spectral visual approach. In a second exercise, students studied the tendency of tetracycline, rifamycins, and fluoroquinolones to form insoluble chelate complexes (turbidity) with polyvalent metals. Assessment. On a survey to assess achievement of class learning objectives, students agreed the laboratory activities helped them better retain important information concerning antibiotic stability and interactions. A significant improvement was observed in performance on examination questions related to the laboratory topics for 2012 and 2013 students compared to 2011 students who did not complete the laboratory. A 1-year follow-up examination question administered in a separate course showed >75% of the students were able to identify rifamycins-food interactions compared with <25% of students who had not completed the laboratory exercises. Conclusion. The use of spectral visual approaches allowed students to investigate antibiotic stability and interactions, thus reinforcing the clinical relevance of medicinal chemistry. Students’ performance on questions at the 1-year follow-up suggested increased retention of the concepts learned as a result of completing the exercises. PMID:24672070

  14. Clinical relevance of discourse characteristics after right hemisphere brain damage.

    PubMed

    Lehman Blake, Margaret

    2006-08-01

    Discourse characteristics of adults with right hemisphere brain damage are similar to those reported for healthy older adults, prompting the question of whether changes are due to neurological lesions or normal aging processes. The clinical relevance of potential differences across groups was examined through ratings by speech-language pathologists. A thinking-out-loud task was used to elicit discourse from 8 individuals with right brain damage and 8 healthy older adults. Speech-language pathologists rated discourse transcripts on content and quantity variables and then classified them as belonging to a participant with or without brain damage. Subjective ratings were validated against corroborating measures. Discourse produced by adults with right brain damage was rated as more tangential and egocentric than that from healthy older adults. Extreme verbosity or paucity of speech was attributed to people with right brain damage. One third of the speech-language pathologists accurately classified discourse samples according to group, whereas the others displayed biases toward one group or the other. Tangentiality, egocentrism, and extremes of quantity are clinically relevant characteristics of discourse produced by adults with right brain damage. Speech-language pathologists must be aware of potential biases that influence their perception of "normal" discourse production.

  15. Selective IgG subclass deficiency: quantification and clinical relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Jefferis, R; Kumararatne, D S

    1990-01-01

    Each of the four human IgG subclasses exhibits a unique profile of effector functions relevant to the clearance and elimination of infecting microorganisms. The quantitative response within each IgG subclass varies with the nature of the antigen, its route of entry and, presumably, the form in which it is presented to the immune system. This results in antibody responses to certain antigens being predominantly or exclusively of a single IgG subclass. An inability to produce antibody of the optimally protective isotype can result in a selective immunodeficiency state. This is particularly apparent for responses to certain bacterial carbohydrate antigens that are normally of IgG2 isotype. A failure to produce the appropriate specific antibody response may result in recurrent upper and/or lower respiratory tract infection. Careful patient investigation can identify such deficiencies and suggest appropriate clinical management. In this review we outline the biology and clinical relevance of the IgG subclasses and summarize current rational treatment approaches. PMID:2204502

  16. Animal models of alcoholic liver disease: Pathogenesis and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bin; Xu, Ming-Jiang; Bertola, Adeline; Wang, Hua; Zhou, Zhou; Liangpunsakul, Suthat

    2017-04-14

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD), a leading cause of chronic liver injury worldwide, comprises a range of disorders including simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Over the last five decades, many animal models that have been useful for the study of ALD pathogenesis have been developed. Recently, a chronic-plus-binge ethanol feeding model was reported. This model induces significant steatosis, hepatic neutrophil infiltration, and liver injury. A clinically relevant model of high-fat diet feeding plus binge ethanol was also developed, which highlights the risk of excessive binge drinking in obese/overweight individuals. All of these models recapitulate some features of the different stages of ALD and have been widely used by many investigators to study the pathogenesis of ALD and test therapeutic drugs/components. However, these models are somewhat variable, depending on mouse genetic background, ethanol dose, and animal facility environment. This review focuses on these models and discusses these variations and some methods to improve the feeding protocol. The pathogenesis, clinical relevance, and translational studies of these models are also discussed.

  17. Clinical relevance of central blood pressure - a critical review.

    PubMed

    Kostapanos, Michael; McEniery, Carmel M; Wilkinson, Ian B

    2016-11-01

    Vital organs are exposed to the central rather than the brachial blood pressure. To date, central blood pressure can be assessed noninvasively through the use of several devices. In this review, we critically discuss the clinical relevance of central blood pressure assessment. Considerable evidence suggests that central blood pressure is a better predictor of end-organ damage than brachial blood pressure. However, there is still uncertainty concerning the value of central pressure for predicting cardiovascular outcomes, as the existing studies are underpowered to address this issue. A full synthesis of the available data is needed in this regard. Among the different antihypertensive drug classes, beta-blockers appear to lower central blood pressure less than brachial blood pressure. This difference may, at least in part, explain the reduced efficacy of beta-blockers in the prevention of cardiovascular outcomes compared with the other antihypertensive drug classes, which may lower central and brachial blood pressure to a similar extent. Nevertheless, this differential effect might not be relevant to the newer beta-blockers with vasodilating properties, including nebivolol, celliprolol and carvedilol. However, whether a preferential reduction of central blood pressure results in better outcomes should be further assessed by appropriately powered clinical trials. Other emerging challenges include the assessment of the potential predictive value of central blood pressure variability and the development of new antihypertensive medications based on central blood pressure rather than brachial blood pressure.

  18. Pathobiology of human cerebrovascular malformations: basic mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gault, Judith; Sarin, Hemant; Awadallah, Nabil A; Shenkar, Robert; Awad, Issam A

    2004-07-01

    Cerebrovascular malformations affect more than 3% of the population, exposing them to a lifetime risk of hemorrhagic stroke, seizures, and focal neurological deficits. Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) exhibit an immature vessel wall, a brittle hemorrhagic tendency, and epileptogenesis, whereas arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) lack capillary beds and manifest apoplectic bleeding under high-flow conditions. There are also more benign venous anomalies, capillary malformations, and lesions with mixed and transitional features. Advances have been made toward understanding the natural history, radiological and pathological correlates, and clinical management. Yet, mechanisms of lesion genesis and clinical manifestations remain largely unknown, and the clinical behavior in individual patients is highly unpredictable. Lesion pathogenesis likely involves abnormal assembly or maintenance of blood vessels, resulting in dysmorphic vessel phenotypes. Familial CCM disease is in part caused by mutations in a cytoskeletal-related protein that is likely integral to interendothelial cell connectivity and maturation of the vascular wall. Rare familial forms of AVM disease have been correlated with two different transforming growth factor-beta receptor components, possibly causing disturbance in signaling during vascular assembly. Relevance of these mechanisms to the more common and otherwise identical sporadic CCM and AVM lesions is being explored. In this report, basic mechanisms of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and how they possibly relate to the common cerebrovascular malformation lesions are reviewed. Novel concepts are discussed related to the cellular, molecular, and genetic substrates in CCM and AVM as well as to how this knowledge can be applied to predict, explain, and possibly modify clinical disease manifestations.

  19. Clinical relevance of abnormal scintigraphic findings of adult equine ribs.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Jessica A; Ross, Michael W; Martin, Benson B; Davidson, Elizabeth J; Leitch, Midge

    2011-01-01

    Horses with cranial rib abnormalities may exhibit severe acute lameness and may have unusual gait deficits characterized by forelimb abduction during protraction at the walk. Horses with caudal rib abnormalities may resent being saddled and ridden. In a retrospective evaluation of 20 horses with a documented rib lesion, 25 sites of increased radiopharmaceutical uptake were found in one or more ribs. Thirteen (52%) scintigraphic lesions involved the first rib; four were located immediately dorsal to the sternal articulation, eight were near the costochondral junction and one was at the costovertebral junction. Six (24%) scintigraphic rib lesions involved ribs 2-8; one was located immediately dorsal to the sternal articulation, three were at the costovertebral junction and two were near the costochondral junction. Six (24%) scintigraphic rib lesions involved the mid-portion (five) or costovertebral junction (one) of ribs 9-18. The 20 horses were divided into three groups based on the clinical relevance of the scintigraphic findings. Group 1 (n=3) horses had clinical signs attributed to a rib abnormality; Group 2 (n=6) horses had a rib abnormality that was a plausible explanation for clinical signs; Group 3 (n=11) horses had clinical signs that could not be attributed to a rib abnormality. For horses with cranial rib abnormalities, a modified lateral scintigraphic image with the ipsilateral limb pulled caudally and a left (right) 45° caudal-right (left) radiograph facilitated the diagnosis.

  20. Epileptic activity in Alzheimer's disease: causes and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Vossel, Keith A; Tartaglia, Maria C; Nygaard, Haakon B; Zeman, Adam Z; Miller, Bruce L

    2017-04-01

    Epileptic activity is frequently associated with Alzheimer's disease; this association has therapeutic implications, because epileptic activity can occur at early disease stages and might contribute to pathogenesis. In clinical practice, seizures in patients with Alzheimer's disease can easily go unrecognised because they usually present as non-motor seizures, and can overlap with other symptoms of the disease. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, seizures can hasten cognitive decline, highlighting the clinical relevance of early recognition and treatment. Some evidence indicates that subclinical epileptiform activity in patients with Alzheimer's disease, detected by extended neurophysiological monitoring, can also lead to accelerated cognitive decline. Treatment of clinical seizures in patients with Alzheimer's disease with select antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), in low doses, is usually well tolerated and efficacious. Moreover, studies in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease suggest that certain classes of AEDs that reduce network hyperexcitability have disease-modifying properties. These AEDs target mechanisms of epileptogenesis involving amyloid β and tau. Clinical trials targeting network hyperexcitability in patients with Alzheimer's disease will identify whether AEDs or related strategies could improve their cognitive symptoms or slow decline.

  1. Reactive oxygen species as mediators of cardiac injury and protection: the relevance to anesthesia practice.

    PubMed

    Kevin, Leo G; Novalija, Enis; Stowe, David F

    2005-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are central to cardiac ischemic and reperfusion injury. They contribute to myocardial stunning, infarction and apoptosis, and possibly to the genesis of arrhythmias. Multiple laboratory studies and clinical trials have evaluated the use of scavengers of ROS to protect the heart from the effects of ischemia and reperfusion. Generally, studies in animal models have shown such effects. Clinical trials have also shown protective effects of scavengers, but whether this protection confers meaningful clinical benefits is uncertain. Several IV anesthetic drugs act as ROS scavengers. In contrast, volatile anesthetics have recently been demonstrated to generate ROS in the heart, most likely because of inhibitory effects on cardiac mitochondria. ROS are involved in the signaling cascade for cardioprotection induced by brief exposure to a volatile anesthetic (termed "anesthetic preconditioning"). ROS, therefore, although injurious in large quantities, can have a paradoxical protective effect within the heart. In this review we provide background information on ROS formation and elimination relevant to anesthetic and adjuvant drugs with particular reference to the heart. The sources of ROS, the means by which they induce cardiac injury or activate protective signaling pathways, the results of clinical studies evaluating ROS scavengers, and the effects of anesthetic drugs on ROS are each discussed.

  2. Taxonomy, Epidemiology, and Clinical Relevance of the Genus Arcobacter

    PubMed Central

    Collado, Luis; Figueras, Maria José

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The genus Arcobacter, defined almost 20 years ago from members of the genus Campylobacter, has become increasingly important because its members are being considered emergent enteropathogens and/or potential zoonotic agents. Over recent years information that is relevant for microbiologists, especially those working in the medical and veterinary fields and in the food safety sector, has accumulated. Recently, the genus has been enlarged with several new species. The complete genomes of Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter nitrofigilis are available, with the former revealing diverse pathways characteristic of free-living microbes and virulence genes homologous to those of Campylobacter. The first multilocus sequence typing analysis showed a great diversity of sequence types, with no association with specific hosts or geographical regions. Advances in detection and identification techniques, mostly based on molecular methods, have been made. These microbes have been associated with water outbreaks and with indicators of fecal pollution, with food products and water as the suspected routes of transmission. This review updates this knowledge and provides the most recent data on the taxonomy, species diversity, methods of detection, and identification of these microbes as well as on their virulence potential and implication in human and animal diseases. PMID:21233511

  3. Renal involvement in cystic fibrosis: diseases spectrum and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Yahiaoui, Yasmina; Jablonski, Mathieu; Hubert, Dominique; Mosnier-Pudar, Helen; Noël, Laure-Hélène; Stern, Marc; Grenet, Dominique; Grünfeld, Jean-Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Fakhouri, Fadi

    2009-05-01

    Clinically relevant kidney involvement is uncommonly described in adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We sought to report on a series of patients with CF and kidney biopsy-documented renal involvement. A retrospective study was undertaken in two referral centers for adult patients with CF in Paris, France. Patients who had undergone a biopsy of native kidneys between 1992 and 2008 were identified, and their medical records were reviewed. We identified 13 adult patients with CF and renal disease. Proteinuria was present in all but two cases and was associated with progressive renal impairment in four patients (median serum creatinine 85 micromol/L; range 53 to 144 micromol/L). Renal biopsy disclosed a heterogeneous spectrum of nephropathies including AA amyloidosis (n = 3), diabetic glomerulopathy (n = 3), FSGS (n = 2), minimal-change disease (n = 1), postinfectious glomerulonephritis (n = 1), IgA nephropathy related to Henoch-Schönlein purpura (n = 1), membranous nephropathy (n = 1), and chronic interstitial nephropathy (n = 1). Chronic renal failure occurred in five patients, and one patient reached ESRD. Although rare, clinically significant renal disease may arise in young adult patients with CF. Given the wide spectrum of diseases that may be encountered, definite diagnosis by kidney biopsy is mandatory to optimize clinical treatment of these complex patients, particularly in the perspective of organ transplantation.

  4. Sundowning in Dementia: Clinical Relevance, Pathophysiological Determinants, and Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Canevelli, Marco; Valletta, Martina; Trebbastoni, Alessandro; Sarli, Giuseppe; D’Antonio, Fabrizia; Tariciotti, Leonardo; de Lena, Carlo; Bruno, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Sundowning means the emergence or worsening of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in the late afternoon or early evening. This syndrome has been recognized since a long time in the field of dementing illnesses and is well known among most of health-care providers involved in the assistance of people with dementia. Indeed, it represents a common manifestation among persons with dementia and is associated with several adverse outcomes (such as institutionalization, faster cognitive worsening, and greater caregiver burden). Its occurrence and phenotypic characteristics may be influenced by diverse neurobiological, psychosocial, and environmental determinants. Moreover, it may pose diagnostic challenges in relation to other common causes of behavioral disruptions. Beside these considerations, this phenomenon has so far drawn limited clinical and scientific interest compared to other specific NPS occurring in dementias, as indicated by the lack of commonly agreed definitions, specific screening/assessment tools, and robust estimates on its prevalence. Accordingly, no randomized controlled trial specifically investigating the effectiveness of pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies in managing this condition among demented patients has been yet conducted. In the present narrative review, we present and discuss available evidence concerning sundowning occurring in people with dementia. A special focus is given to its definitions, pathophysiological determinants, and clinical relevance, as well as to the clinical and therapeutic approaches required for its management in the daily practice. PMID:28083535

  5. Sundowning in Dementia: Clinical Relevance, Pathophysiological Determinants, and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Canevelli, Marco; Valletta, Martina; Trebbastoni, Alessandro; Sarli, Giuseppe; D'Antonio, Fabrizia; Tariciotti, Leonardo; de Lena, Carlo; Bruno, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Sundowning means the emergence or worsening of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in the late afternoon or early evening. This syndrome has been recognized since a long time in the field of dementing illnesses and is well known among most of health-care providers involved in the assistance of people with dementia. Indeed, it represents a common manifestation among persons with dementia and is associated with several adverse outcomes (such as institutionalization, faster cognitive worsening, and greater caregiver burden). Its occurrence and phenotypic characteristics may be influenced by diverse neurobiological, psychosocial, and environmental determinants. Moreover, it may pose diagnostic challenges in relation to other common causes of behavioral disruptions. Beside these considerations, this phenomenon has so far drawn limited clinical and scientific interest compared to other specific NPS occurring in dementias, as indicated by the lack of commonly agreed definitions, specific screening/assessment tools, and robust estimates on its prevalence. Accordingly, no randomized controlled trial specifically investigating the effectiveness of pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies in managing this condition among demented patients has been yet conducted. In the present narrative review, we present and discuss available evidence concerning sundowning occurring in people with dementia. A special focus is given to its definitions, pathophysiological determinants, and clinical relevance, as well as to the clinical and therapeutic approaches required for its management in the daily practice.

  6. Development of Clinically Relevant Implantable Pressure Sensors: Perspectives and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Ingelin; Glott, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This review describes different aspects to consider when developing implantable pressure sensor systems. Measurement of pressure is in general highly important in clinical practice and medical research. Due to the small size, light weight and low energy consumption Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology represents new possibilities for monitoring of physiological parameters inside the human body. Development of clinical relevant sensors requires close collaboration between technological experts and medical clinicians. Site of operation, size restrictions, patient safety, and required measurement range and resolution, are only some conditions that must be taken into account. An implantable device has to operate under very hostile conditions. Long-term in vivo pressure measurements are particularly demanding because the pressure sensitive part of the sensor must be in direct or indirect physical contact with the medium for which we want to detect the pressure. New sensor packaging concepts are demanded and must be developed through combined effort between scientists in MEMS technology, material science, and biology. Before launching a new medical device on the market, clinical studies must be performed. Regulatory documents and international standards set the premises for how such studies shall be conducted and reported. PMID:25248071

  7. Development of clinically relevant implantable pressure sensors: perspectives and challenges.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Ingelin; Glott, Thomas

    2014-09-22

    This review describes different aspects to consider when developing implantable pressure sensor systems. Measurement of pressure is in general highly important in clinical practice and medical research. Due to the small size, light weight and low energy consumption Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology represents new possibilities for monitoring of physiological parameters inside the human body. Development of clinical relevant sensors requires close collaboration between technological experts and medical clinicians.  Site of operation, size restrictions, patient safety, and required measurement range and resolution, are only some conditions that must be taken into account. An implantable device has to operate under very hostile conditions. Long-term in vivo pressure measurements are particularly demanding because the pressure sensitive part of the sensor must be in direct or indirect physical contact with the medium for which we want to detect the pressure. New sensor packaging concepts are demanded and must be developed through combined effort between scientists in MEMS technology, material science, and biology. Before launching a new medical device on the market, clinical studies must be performed. Regulatory documents and international standards set the premises for how such studies shall be conducted and reported.

  8. Making the history of psychology clinically and philosophically relevant.

    PubMed

    Vande Kemp, Hendrika

    2002-08-01

    The author discusses ways to make the history of psychology course relevant for a clinical psychology doctoral program within a multidenominational Protestant theological seminary. She uses a personalist orientation to emphasize the need to integrate psychology, philosophy, and theology. She differentiates among the intrapersonal, interpersonal, impersonal, and transpersonal dimensions of experience. She illustrates the rich multidisciplinary historical roots of contemporary psychology by tracing the the history of the term psychology and examining its meanings in the existential psychology of Søren Kierkegaard and in the 19th-century novel. She includes brief histories of the "new psychology" and of the unconscious. She describes how she uses the field of psychotheological integration to illustrate principles of historiography and summarizes resources used to supplement traditional textbooks.

  9. Clinical relevance of advanced glycation endproducts for vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, R; van der Vaart, M G; van Dam, G M; Tio, R A; Hillebrands, J-L; Smit, A J; Zeebregts, C J

    2008-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is the main contributor to cardiovascular disease and leads to intimal plaque formation, which may progress to plaque rupture with subsequent thromboembolic events and/or occlusion of the arterial lumen. There is increasing evidence that the development or progression of atherosclerosis is associated with advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). AGEs are a heterogeneous group of compounds formed by the non-enzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. An increased understanding of the mechanisms of formation and interaction of AGEs has allowed the development of several potential anti-AGE strategies. This review summarizes AGE formation and biochemistry, the pathogeneic role of AGEs in cardiovascular disease, anti-AGE therapies and clinical relevance to vascular surgery.

  10. A map of human circular RNAs in clinically relevant tissues.

    PubMed

    Maass, Philipp G; Glažar, Petar; Memczak, Sebastian; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hollfinger, Irene; Schreyer, Luisa; Sauer, Aisha V; Toka, Okan; Aiuti, Alessandro; Luft, Friedrich C; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2017-08-25

    Cellular circular RNAs (circRNAs) are generated by head-to-tail splicing and are present in all multicellular organisms studied so far. Recently, circRNAs have emerged as a large class of RNA which can function as post-transcriptional regulators. It has also been shown that many circRNAs are tissue- and stage-specifically expressed. Moreover, the unusual stability and expression specificity make circRNAs important candidates for clinical biomarker research. Here, we present a circRNA expression resource of 20 human tissues highly relevant to disease-related research: vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), human umbilical vein cells (HUVECs), artery endothelial cells (HUAECs), atrium, vena cava, neutrophils, platelets, cerebral cortex, placenta, and samples from mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. In eight different samples from a single donor, we found highly tissue-specific circRNA expression. Circular-to-linear RNA ratios revealed that many circRNAs were expressed higher than their linear host transcripts. Among the 71 validated circRNAs, we noticed potential biomarkers. In adenosine deaminase-deficient, severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID) patients and in Wiskott-Aldrich-Syndrome (WAS) patients' samples, we found evidence for differential circRNA expression of genes that are involved in the molecular pathogenesis of both phenotypes. Our findings underscore the need to assess circRNAs in mechanisms of human disease. KEY MESSAGES: circRNA resource catalog of 20 clinically relevant tissues. circRNA expression is highly tissue-specific. circRNA transcripts are often more abundant than their linear host RNAs. circRNAs can be differentially expressed in disease-associated genes.

  11. [Relevance of nutrition knowledge on clinical practice: medical opinion survey].

    PubMed

    Alvares, Luísa; Moreira, Isabel; Oliveira, António

    2007-01-01

    Although previous studies show that physicians generally agree that nutrition knowledge is important for their daily clinical practice, several other studies report their poor knowledge of the subject. One of the strongest reasons given for this is the non-incorporation of Nutrition as a compulsory subject for the medical sciences degree. Dietary counselling and assessment of the patients' nutritional status don't seem to be systematic. The aim of this study is to asses how relevant physicians consider Nutrition to be in the successful running of a good practice. The study was undertaken at the general hospital of Vila Real/Peso da Régua (CHVR/PR) by distribution of a self- administered questionnaire to 153 of the physicians of the clinical body. Mean values were compared with the Student's t test and proportions with the Chi-square test. Of the 153 physicians, 108 replies were received (70,6%). Of these 108 replies, 53,3% consider nutrition knowledge important although 29,6% state their knowledge is poor. More than half say that Clinical Nutrition should be a compulsory subject of the Medical Sciences syllabus, and 99,1% deem it important to assess the patient's nutritional status. About 95% stated they provided written or verbal nutritional guidance, and most of the physicians had already sought the assistance of a nutritionist. This study shows that the clinical body of the CHVR/PR is aware of the importance nutrition knowledge has in their daily practice. It must be noted, though, that although almost one third of the physicians rate their nutrition knowledge poor, most of them provide nutritional guidance to their patients.

  12. Hydrodynamic consequences of glycolysis: thermodynamic basis and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Hans Peter

    2004-09-01

    Since Warburg's original description of aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis in 1924, the biochemical and molecular bases of glucose metabolism in cells have been characterized. However, its thermodynamic implications have found little attention. Van't Hoff's law of thermodynamics was applied here to describe how glucose metabolism affects intracellular osmotic pressure, hence revealing how glucose metabolism provides cells with osmotic energy as well as chemical energy. Ensuing osmosis-driven movement of free water across membranes affects cell volume and shape, hydration of intracellular components, and interactions of cells with their environment. Comparative analysis of extant data revealed strong evidence for clinically relevant glycolysis-driven effects under hypoxic conditions known to occur in cancer, vascular disease as well as intensive care, including critical and preventable ones affecting treatment effectiveness and thus, clinical outcome. These findings provide the first evidence confirming the existence of glycolysis-driven hydrodynamic effects and suggest that high levels of aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis provide a common biophysical basis in seemingly unrelated medical conditions.

  13. Dissociative absorption: An empirically unique, clinically relevant, dissociative factor.

    PubMed

    Soffer-Dudek, Nirit; Lassri, Dana; Soffer-Dudek, Nir; Shahar, Golan

    2015-11-01

    Research of dissociative absorption has raised two questions: (a) Is absorption a unique dissociative factor within a three-factor structure, or a part of one general dissociative factor? Even when three factors are found, the specificity of the absorption factor is questionable. (b) Is absorption implicated in psychopathology? Although commonly viewed as "non-clinical" dissociation, absorption was recently hypothesized to be specifically associated with obsessive-compulsive symptoms. To address these questions, we conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses on 679 undergraduates. Analyses supported the three-factor model, and a "purified" absorption scale was extracted from the original inclusive absorption factor. The purified scale predicted several psychopathology scales. As hypothesized, absorption was a stronger predictor of obsessive-compulsive symptoms than of general psychopathology. In addition, absorption was the only dissociative scale that longitudinally predicted obsessive-compulsive symptoms. We conclude that absorption is a unique and clinically relevant dissociative tendency that is particularly meaningful to obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. New Clinically Relevant Findings about Violence by People with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hodgins, Sheilagh; Klein, Sanja

    2017-02-01

    To review findings with clinical relevance that add to knowledge about antisocial and aggressive behaviour among persons with schizophrenia. Nonsystematic literature review. Recent evidence shows that individuals who develop schizophrenia present cognitive deficits, psychotic-like experiences, and internalizing and externalizing problems from childhood onwards. Many of their relatives present not only schizophrenia-related disorders but also antisocial behaviour. While the increased risk of aggressive behaviour among persons with schizophrenia has been robustly established, recent findings show that by first contact with clinical services for psychosis, most people with schizophrenia who will engage in aggressive behaviour may be identified. At first episode, 2 distinct types are distinguishable: those who present a history of antisocial and aggressive behaviour since childhood and those who began engaging in aggressive behaviour as illness onsets. Antipsychotic medications and other treatments shown to be effective for schizophrenia are needed by both types of patients. Additionally, those with a history of antisocial and aggressive behaviour since childhood require cognitive-behavioural programs aimed at reducing these behaviours and promoting prosocial behaviour. Reducing physical victimisation and cannabis use will likely reduce aggressive behaviour. Evidence suggests that threats to hurt others often precede assaults. At first contact with services, patients with schizophrenia who have engaged in aggressive behaviour should be identified and treated for schizophrenia and for aggression. Research is needed to identify interactions between genotypes and environmental factors, from conception onwards, that promote and that protect against the development of aggressive behaviour among persons with schizophrenia.

  15. Clinically relevant interpretation of solid phase assays for HLA antibody

    PubMed Central

    Bettinotti, Maria P.; Zachary, Andrea A.; Leffell, Mary S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Accurate and timely detection and characterization of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies are critical for pre-transplant and post-transplant immunological risk assessment. Solid phase immunoassays have provided increased sensitivity and specificity, but test interpretation is not always straightforward. This review will discuss the result interpretation considering technical limitations; assessment of relative antibody strength; and the integration of data for risk stratification from complementary testing and the patient's immunological history. Recent findings Laboratory and clinical studies have provided insight into causes of test failures – false positive reactions because of antibodies to denatured HLA antigens and false negative reactions resulting from test interference and/or loss of native epitopes. Test modifications permit detection of complement-binding antibodies and determination of the IgG subclasses. The high degree of specificity of single antigen solid phase immunoassays has revealed the complexity and clinical relevance of antibodies to HLA-C, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DP antigens. Determination of antibody specificity for HLA epitopes enables identification of incompatible antigens not included in test kits. Summary Detection and characterization of HLA antibodies with solid phase immunoassays has led to increased understanding of the role of those antibodies in graft rejection, improved treatment of antibody-mediated rejection, and increased opportunities for transplantation. However, realization of these benefits requires careful and accurate interpretation of test results. PMID:27200498

  16. Relevance of current guidelines for organizing an anticoagulation clinic.

    PubMed

    Rose, Adam J; Hylek, Elaine M; Ozonoff, Al; Ash, Arlene S; Reisman, Joel I; Callahan, Patricia P; Gordon, Margaret M; Berlowitz, Dan R

    2011-04-01

    To describe variations in the structure of anticoagulation clinic (ACC) care within the Veterans Health Administration (VA) and to identify structures of care that are associated with better site-level anticoagulation control. Questionnaire correlated with automated clinical data. We characterized 90 VA ACCs using a questionnaire administered by the VA Central Office. Site descriptors included staffing levels, provider training, visit modalities, quality improvement programs, documentation, and care coordination. Patient outcomes were measured by site mean risk-adjusted percentage time in therapeutic range, a measure of anticoagulation control over time. Our study was powered to detect a 3% difference in risk-adjusted percentage time in therapeutic range, a small-to-moderate effect size, between sites with and without a certain characteristic. We observed considerable variation in the structure of ACC care. For example, 48 sites had fewer than 400 patients per provider, 25 sites had 400 to 599 patients per provider, and 17 sites had 600 patients or more per provider. However, none of the site characteristics measured were significantly related to anticoagulation control. We found substantial variation in guideline-targeted organizational and management features of ACC care within the VA. However, no single feature was associated with better anticoagulation control. Current guidelines for organizing an ACC may have limited relevance for improving patient outcomes.

  17. Clinically relevant fungi in water and on surfaces in an indoor swimming pool facility.

    PubMed

    Ekowati, Yuli; van Diepeningen, Anne D; Ferrero, Giuliana; Kennedy, Maria D; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria; Schets, Franciska M

    2017-10-01

    The density of fungal contamination and the fungal diversity in an indoor swimming pool facility were assessed. A total of 16 surface samples and 6 water samples were analysed by using a combination of different (semi-) selective culture media. Isolated fungal colonies were identified to the genus or species level by sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS). The highest fungal counts in water and on surfaces were in the recreational pool (17CFU/100mL) and on a flexibeam (5.8CFU/cm(2)), respectively as compared with low counts (<0.1CFU/cm(2)) on the diving platform, bench tops and walls. The 357 obtained isolates belonged to 79 species and species complexes, 42 of which known as clinically relevant. Phialophora oxyspora (13.7%) and Phoma spp. (12.3%) were the most frequently identified groups. We demonstrated that despite chlorine treatment and regular cleaning of surfaces both water and surfaces were commonly infested with fungi, including many clinically relevant species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical relevance for lowering C-reactive protein with statins.

    PubMed

    Arévalo-Lorido, José Carlos

    2016-11-01

    The role of statins in the protection of atherosclerosis and reducting cardiovascular (CV) events is well established. On the other hand, the role of inflammation in the propagation and propensity to CV events has also been demonstrated. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) which is involved in the immunologic process of inflammation has received the interest for its use in screening and risk reclassification. However, evidence for its causal relationship with atherothrombosis is lacking, and even more, knowing that statins influence on the reduction of CRP levels, a relevant evidence of their clinical benefits in this regard is also lacking. This article reviews four different key points regarding the issue, to better understand the current state and application of the treatment with statins in order to achieve benefits from lowering CRP's levels regarding CV diseases: (1) the mechanisms of reduction of CRP levels by statins; (2) the role of statin-mediated CRP reduction in the atherosclerotic plaque regression; (3) the role in the prevention of CV diseases; and (4) the role in case of secondary prevention. With this basis, the reduction of CRP levels should be interpreted as a reduction of inflammatory burden thus its clinical benefits could be more interesting in secondary prevention. KEY MESSAGES It could be admitted a role of statin-mediated CRP diminution to reduce the rate of progression in atherosclerotic plaque. In general, and in the absence of specific clinical trials, the role of statins by lowering CRP and consequently, preventing cardiovascular events may be superior in case of secondary prevention because a more pronounced state of inflammation and regardless of its levels at baseline.

  19. Population distribution models: species distributions are better modeled using biologically relevant data partitions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Predicting the geographic distribution of widespread species through modeling is problematic for several reasons including high rates of omission errors. One potential source of error for modeling widespread species is that subspecies and/or races of species are frequently pooled for analyses, which may mask biologically relevant spatial variation within the distribution of a single widespread species. We contrast a presence-only maximum entropy model for the widely distributed oldfield mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) that includes all available presence locations for this species, with two composite maximum entropy models. The composite models either subdivided the total species distribution into four geographic quadrants or by fifteen subspecies to capture spatially relevant variation in P. polionotus distributions. Results Despite high Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) values for all models, the composite species distribution model of P. polionotus generated from individual subspecies models represented the known distribution of the species much better than did the models produced by partitioning data into geographic quadrants or modeling the whole species as a single unit. Conclusions Because the AUC values failed to describe the differences in the predictability of the three modeling strategies, we suggest using omission curves in addition to AUC values to assess model performance. Dividing the data of a widespread species into biologically relevant partitions greatly increased the performance of our distribution model; therefore, this approach may prove to be quite practical and informative for a wide range of modeling applications. PMID:21929792

  20. Population distribution models: species distributions are better modeled using biologically relevant data partitions.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Sergio C; Soto-Centeno, J Angel; Reed, David L

    2011-09-19

    Predicting the geographic distribution of widespread species through modeling is problematic for several reasons including high rates of omission errors. One potential source of error for modeling widespread species is that subspecies and/or races of species are frequently pooled for analyses, which may mask biologically relevant spatial variation within the distribution of a single widespread species. We contrast a presence-only maximum entropy model for the widely distributed oldfield mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) that includes all available presence locations for this species, with two composite maximum entropy models. The composite models either subdivided the total species distribution into four geographic quadrants or by fifteen subspecies to capture spatially relevant variation in P. polionotus distributions. Despite high Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) values for all models, the composite species distribution model of P. polionotus generated from individual subspecies models represented the known distribution of the species much better than did the models produced by partitioning data into geographic quadrants or modeling the whole species as a single unit. Because the AUC values failed to describe the differences in the predictability of the three modeling strategies, we suggest using omission curves in addition to AUC values to assess model performance. Dividing the data of a widespread species into biologically relevant partitions greatly increased the performance of our distribution model; therefore, this approach may prove to be quite practical and informative for a wide range of modeling applications.

  1. Cashew Nut Allergy: Clinical Relevance and Allergen Characterisation.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Cíntia; Costa, Joana; Vicente, António A; Oliveira, Maria Beatriz P P; Mafra, Isabel

    2016-09-01

    Cashew plant (Anacardium occidentale L.) is the most relevant species of the Anacardium genus. It presents high economic value since it is widely used in human nutrition and in several industrial applications. Cashew nut is a well-appreciated food (belongs to the tree nut group), being widely consumed as snacks and in processed foods by the majority of world's population. However, cashew nut is also classified as a potent allergenic food known to be responsible for triggering severe and systemic immune reactions (e.g. anaphylaxis) in sensitised/allergic individuals that often demand epinephrine treatment and hospitalisation. So far, three groups of allergenic proteins have been identified and characterised in cashew nut: Ana o 1 and Ana o 2 (cupin superfamily) and Ana o 3 (prolamin superfamily), which are all classified as major allergens. The prevalence of cashew nut allergy seems to be rising in industrialised countries with the increasing consumption of this nut. There is still no cure for cashew nut allergy, as well as for other food allergies; thus, the allergic patients are advised to eliminate it from their diets. Accordingly, when carefully choosing processed foods that are commercially available, the allergic consumers have to rely on proper food labelling. In this sense, the control of labelling compliance is much needed, which has prompted the development of proficient analytical methods for allergen analysis. In the recent years, significant research advances in cashew nut allergy have been accomplished, which are highlighted and discussed in this review.

  2. Predicting the presence and cover of management relevant invasive plant species on protected areas.

    PubMed

    Iacona, Gwenllian; Price, Franklin D; Armsworth, Paul R

    2016-01-15

    Invasive species are a management concern on protected areas worldwide. Conservation managers need to predict infestations of invasive plants they aim to treat if they want to plan for long term management. Many studies predict the presence of invasive species, but predictions of cover are more relevant for management. Here we examined how predictors of invasive plant presence and cover differ across species that vary in their management priority. To do so, we used data on management effort and cover of invasive plant species on central Florida protected areas. Using a zero-inflated multiple regression framework, we showed that protected area features can predict the presence and cover of the focal species but the same features rarely explain both. There were several predictors of either presence or cover that were important across multiple species. Protected areas with three days of frost per year or fewer were more likely to have occurrences of four of the six focal species. When invasive plants were present, their proportional cover was greater on small preserves for all species, and varied with surrounding household density for three species. None of the predictive features were clearly related to whether species were prioritized for management or not. Our results suggest that predictors of cover and presence can differ both within and across species but do not covary with management priority. We conclude that conservation managers need to select predictors of invasion with care as species identity can determine the relationship between predictors of presence and the more management relevant predictors of cover.

  3. The clinical relevance of orthostatic hypotension in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Laura; Kleefstra, Nanne; Luigies, Rene; de Rooij, Sophia; Bilo, Henk; van Hateren, Kornelis

    2017-02-22

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is highly prevalent in old age. The impact of OH on orthostatic complaints and falling is questionable. We wondered if the consensus definition of OH plays an essential role in the accuracy and direction of the prediction of these endpoints. We aimed to explore the relation between different definitions of OH, including relative decrease of blood pressure, and orthostatic complaints and falling. A cross-sectional study was performed with 1415 participants aged ≥65 years visiting a mobile fall-prevention team. The CAREFALL Triage Instrument and data on blood pressure, orthostatic complaints and previous fall incidents were collected. Multivariate binary logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association of different definitions of OH and orthostatic complaints or falling. Ten different definitions of OH based on different relative declines of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were defined. The 2011 consensus definition of OH was not related to orthostatic complaints (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.07 (95 % Confidence Interval (CI) 0.68-1.69)) or previous fall incidents (OR 1.08 (95%CI 0.83-1.41)). A ≥ 25 % SBP decrease was significantly related to orthostatic complaints (OR 2.81 (95%CI 1.31-6.05)) and a ≥ 25 % DBP decrease was related to previous fall incidents (OR 2.56 (95%CI 1.08-6.09)). With the exception of a decrease of ≥25 % SBP or DBP, the clinical relevance of incidental OH blood pressure measurements seems very limited with respect to orthostatic complaints or fall incidents in elderly patients. Using relative decreases may be more appropriate in clinical practice. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; ••: ••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  4. Epileptic Neuronal Networks: Methods of Identification and Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Stefan, Hermann; Lopes da Silva, Fernando H.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to examine evidence for the concept that epileptic activity should be envisaged in terms of functional connectivity and dynamics of neuronal networks. Basic concepts regarding structure and dynamics of neuronal networks are briefly described. Particular attention is given to approaches that are derived, or related, to the concept of causality, as formulated by Granger. Linear and non-linear methodologies aiming at characterizing the dynamics of neuronal networks applied to EEG/MEG and combined EEG/fMRI signals in epilepsy are critically reviewed. The relevance of functional dynamical analysis of neuronal networks with respect to clinical queries in focal cortical dysplasias, temporal lobe epilepsies, and “generalized” epilepsies is emphasized. In the light of the concepts of epileptic neuronal networks, and recent experimental findings, the dichotomic classification in focal and generalized epilepsy is re-evaluated. It is proposed that so-called “generalized epilepsies,” such as absence seizures, are actually fast spreading epilepsies, the onset of which can be tracked down to particular neuronal networks using appropriate network analysis. Finally new approaches to delineate epileptogenic networks are discussed. PMID:23532203

  5. Clinical Relevance of Microparticles from Platelets and Megakaryocytes

    PubMed Central

    Italiano, Joseph E.; Mairuhu, Albert T.A.; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Platelet microparticles were identified more than forty years ago and are the most abundant circulating microparticle subtype. Yet fundamental questions about their formation and role in human disease are just beginning to be understood at the cellular and molecular level. This review will address mechanisms of platelet microparticle generation and evaluate our current understanding of their clinical relevance. Recent findings New evidence indicates that the majority of CD41+ microparticles circulating in healthy individuals derive directly from megakaryocytes. CD41+ microparticles also form from activated platelets upon loss of cytoskeleton-membrane adhesion, which occurs in a multitude of disease states characterized by elevated platelet microparticle levels. More recent studies have demonstrated that platelet microparticles function as a transport and delivery system for bioactive molecules, participating in hemostasis and thrombosis, inflammation, malignancy infection transfer, angiogenesis, and immunity. The mechanism of platelet microparticle participation in specific disease entities such as rheumatoid arthritis has been elucidated. Summary Continued research into how platelet microparticles are generated and function as a transcellular delivery system will advance our basic understanding of microparticle physiology and may enable new strategies for treatment of select disease entities. PMID:20739880

  6. Almond allergens: molecular characterization, detection, and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Mafra, Isabel; Carrapatoso, Isabel; Oliveira, Maria Beatriz P P

    2012-02-15

    Almond ( Prunus dulcis ) has been widely used in all sorts of food products (bakery, pastry, snacks), mostly due to its pleasant flavor and health benefits. However, it is also classified as a potential allergenic seed known to be responsible for triggering several mild to life-threatening immune reactions in sensitized and allergic individuals. Presently, eight groups of allergenic proteins have been identified and characterized in almond, namely, PR-10 (Pru du 1), TLP (Pru du 2), prolamins (Pru du 2S albumin, Pru du 3), profilins (Pru du 4), 60sRP (Pru du 5), and cupin (Pru du 6, Pru du γ-conglutin), although only a few of them have been tested for reactivity with almond-allergic sera. To protect sensitized individuals, labeling regulations have been implemented for foods containing potential allergenic ingredients, impelling the development of adequate analytical methods. This work aims to present an updated and critical overview of the molecular characterization and clinical relevance of almond allergens, as well as review the main methodologies used to detect and quantitate food allergens with special emphasis on almond.

  7. Clinically and pharmacologically relevant interactions of antidiabetic drugs

    PubMed Central

    May, Marcus; Schindler, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus often require multifactorial pharmacological treatment due to different comorbidities. An increasing number of concomitantly taken medications elevate the risk of the patient experiencing adverse drug effects or drug interactions. Drug interactions can be divided into pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions affecting cytochrome (CYP) enzymes, absorption properties, transporter activities and receptor affinities. Furthermore, nutrition, herbal supplements, patient’s age and gender are of clinical importance. Relevant drug interactions are predominantly related to sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones and glinides. Although metformin has a very low interaction potential, caution is advised when drugs that impair renal function are used concomitantly. With the exception of saxagliptin, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors also show a low interaction potential, but all drugs affecting the drug transporter P-glycoprotein should be used with caution. Incretin mimetics and sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors comprise a very low interaction potential and are therefore recommended as an ideal combination partner from the clinical–pharmacologic point of view. PMID:27092232

  8. Biology and Clinical Relevance of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinisch, Andreas; Chan, Steven M.; Thomas, Daniel; Majeti, Ravindra

    2017-01-01

    Evidence for the cancer stem cell model was first demonstrated in xenotransplanted blood and bone marrow samples from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) almost two decades ago, supporting the concept that a rare clonal and mutated leukemic stem cell (LSC) population is sufficient to drive leukemic growth. The inability to eliminate LSCs with conventional therapies is thought to be the primary cause of disease relapse in AML patients, and as such, novel therapies with the ability to target this population are required to improve patient outcomes. An important step towards this goal is the identification of common immunophenotypic surface markers and biological properties that distinguish LSCs from normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) across AML patients. This work has resulted in the development of a large number of potential LSC-selective therapies that target cell-surface molecules, intracellular signaling pathways, and the bone marrow microenvironment. Here, we will review the basic biology, immunophenotypic detection, and clinical relevance of LSCs, as well as emerging biological and small-molecule strategies that either directly target LSCs or indirectly target these cells through modulation of their microenvironment. PMID:26111462

  9. Epileptic neuronal networks: methods of identification and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Hermann; Lopes da Silva, Fernando H

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to examine evidence for the concept that epileptic activity should be envisaged in terms of functional connectivity and dynamics of neuronal networks. Basic concepts regarding structure and dynamics of neuronal networks are briefly described. Particular attention is given to approaches that are derived, or related, to the concept of causality, as formulated by Granger. Linear and non-linear methodologies aiming at characterizing the dynamics of neuronal networks applied to EEG/MEG and combined EEG/fMRI signals in epilepsy are critically reviewed. The relevance of functional dynamical analysis of neuronal networks with respect to clinical queries in focal cortical dysplasias, temporal lobe epilepsies, and "generalized" epilepsies is emphasized. In the light of the concepts of epileptic neuronal networks, and recent experimental findings, the dichotomic classification in focal and generalized epilepsy is re-evaluated. It is proposed that so-called "generalized epilepsies," such as absence seizures, are actually fast spreading epilepsies, the onset of which can be tracked down to particular neuronal networks using appropriate network analysis. Finally new approaches to delineate epileptogenic networks are discussed.

  10. Clinical Relevance of HLA Gene Variants in HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Zou, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Host gene variants may influence the natural history of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans, is one of the most important host factors that are correlated with the clinical course of HBV infection. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near certain HLA gene loci are strongly associated with not only persistent HBV infection but also spontaneous HBV clearance and seroconversion, disease progression, and the development of liver cirrhosis and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB). These variations also influence the efficacy of interferon (IFN) and nucleot(s)ide analogue (NA) treatment and response to HBV vaccines. Meanwhile, discrepant conclusions were reached with different patient cohorts. It is therefore essential to identify the associations of specific HLA allele variants with disease progression and viral clearance in chronic HBV infection among different ethnic populations. A better understanding of HLA polymorphism relevance in HBV infection outcome would enable us to elucidate the roles of HLA SNPs in the pathogenesis and clearance of HBV in different areas and ethnic groups, to improve strategies for the prevention and treatment of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27243039

  11. Clinical Psychologists' Judgments of the Scientific Merit and Clinical-Relevance of Psychotherapy Outcome Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Lawrence H.

    1979-01-01

    Result of this study indicated psychologists' judgments of scientific merit were influenced by patient assignment and follow-up but not by therapists' experience. Judgments of clinical relevance were influenced by patient population, the findings' applicability, and nature of therapy. Psychologists were more critical of methodology of studies…

  12. [Nitrofurantoin--clinical relevance in uncomplicated urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2014-07-01

    The nitrofuran derivative nitrofurantoin has been used for more than 60 years for the antibacterial therapy of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). Despite its long application, this antibiotic retained good activity against Escherichia coli and some other pathogens of uncomplicated urinary tract infections such as Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterococcus species. Nitrofurantoin therapy has been shown to be accompanied by numerous adverse drug effects. Among these, there are also serious side effects such as pulmonary reactions and polyneuropathy, which mainly occur in long-term use. Recent studies, however, have shown a good efficacy and tolerability of short-term nitrofurantoin therapy comparable to previous established standard therapeutic regimens applying cotrimoxazole or quinolones. Because of these data and the alarming resistance rates of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to cotrimoxazole and quinolones that have been increased markedly in several countries, the clinical significance ofnitrofurantoin has been raised again. In many current treatment guidelines, e. g., the international clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, nitrofurantoin has been recommended as one first-line antibiotic of empiric antibacterial treatment of uncomplicated cystitis in otherwise healthy women. In Germany, however, nitrofurantoin should only be applied if more effective and less risky antibiotics cannot be used. Nitrofurantoin is contraindicated in the last three months of pregnancy and in patients suffering from renal impairment of each degree. Despite compatibility concerns, nitrofurantoin has also been recommended for the re-infection prophylaxis of recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in Germany and several other countries.

  13. Clinical Relevance of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolated from Sputum in a Gold Mining Workforce in South Africa: An Observational, Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    van Halsema, Clare L.; Chihota, Violet N.; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.; Fielding, Katherine L.; Lewis, James J.; van Helden, Paul D.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Grant, Alison D.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The clinical relevance of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), detected by liquid more than solid culture in sputum specimens from a South African mining workforce, is uncertain. We aimed to describe the current spectrum and relevance of NTM in this population. Methods. An observational study including individuals with sputum NTM isolates, recruited at workforce tuberculosis screening and routine clinics. Symptom questionnaires were administered at the time of sputum collection and clinical records and chest radiographs reviewed retrospectively. Results. Of 232 individuals included (228 (98%) male, median age 44 years), M. gordonae (60 individuals), M. kansasii (50), and M. avium complex (MAC: 38) were the commonest species. Of 38 MAC isolates, only 2 (5.3%) were from smear-positive sputum specimens and 30/38 grew in liquid but not solid culture. MAC was especially prevalent among symptomatic, HIV-positive individuals. HIV prevalence was high: 57/74 (77%) among those tested. No differences were found in probability of death or medical separation by NTM species. Conclusions. M. gordonae, M. kansasii, and MAC were the commonest NTM among miners with suspected tuberculosis, with most MAC from smear-negative specimens in liquid culture only. HIV testing and identification of key pathogenic NTM in this setting are essential to ensure optimal treatment. PMID:26180817

  14. HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL GENE THERAPY: ASSESSING THE RELEVANCE OF PRE-CLINICAL MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Larochelle, Andre; Dunbar, Cynthia E.

    2013-01-01

    The modern laboratory mouse has become a central tool for biomedical research with a notable influence in the field of hematopoiesis. Application of retroviral-based gene transfer approaches to mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has led to a sophisticated understanding of the hematopoietic hierarchy in this model. However, the assumption that gene transfer methodologies developed in the mouse could be similarly applied to human HSCs for the treatment of human diseases left the field of gene therapy in a decade-long quandary. It is not until more relevant humanized xenograft mouse models and phylogenetically related large animal species were used to optimize gene transfer methodologies that unequivocal clinical successes were achieved. However, the subsequent reporting of severe adverse events in these clinical trials casted doubts on the predictive value of conventional pre-clinical testing, and encouraged the development of new assays for assessing the relative genotoxicity of various vector designs. PMID:24014892

  15. Clinically relevant investigation of flattening filter-free skin dose.

    PubMed

    Guy, Christopher L; Karki, Kishor; Sharma, Manju; Kim, Siyong

    2016-11-08

    As flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beams become readily available for treat-ment delivery in techniques such as SBRT, thorough investigation of skin dose from FFF photon beams is necessary under clinically relevant conditions. Using a parallel-plate PTW Markus chamber placed in a custom water-equivalent phantom, surface-dose measurements were taken at 2 × 2, 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 6 × 6, 8 × 8, 10 × 10, 20 × 20, and 30 × 30 cm2 field sizes, at 80, 90, and 100 cm source-to-surface distances (SSDs), and with fields defined by jaws and multileaf collimator (MLC) using multiple beam energies (6X, 6XFFF, 10X, and 10XFFF). The same set of measurements was repeated with the chamber at a reference depth of 10cm. Each surface measurement was normalized by its corresponding reference depth measurement for analysis. The FFF surface doses at 100 cm SSD were higher than flattened surface doses by 45% at 2 × 2 cm2 to 13% at 20 × 20 cm2 for 6MV energy. These surface dose differences varied to a greater degree as energy increased, ranging from +63% at 2 × 2 cm2 to -2% at 20 × 20 cm2 for 10 MV. At small field sizes, higher energy increased FFF surface dose relative to flattened surface dose; while at larger field sizes, relative FFF surface dose was higher for lower energies. At both energies investigated, decreasing SSD caused a decrease in the ratios of FFF-to-flattened surface dose. Variability with SSD of FFF-to-flattened surface dose differences increased with field size and ranged from 0% to 6%. The field size at which FFF and flattened beams gave the same skin dose increased with decreasing beam energy. Surface dose was higher with MLC fields compared to jaw fields under most conditions, with the difference reaching its maximum at a field size between 4 × 4 cm2 and 6 × 6 cm2 for a given energy and SSD. This study conveyed the magnitude of surface dose in a clinically meaning-ful manner by reporting results normalized to 10 cm depth dose instead of depth of dose

  16. The nocebo effect and its relevance for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Luana; Miller, Franklin G.

    2011-01-01

    Negative expectations deriving from the clinical encounter can produce negative outcomes, known as nocebo effects. Specifically, research on the nocebo effect indicates that information disclosure about potential side effects can itself contribute to producing adverse effects. Neurobiological processes play a role in the nocebo effect and this paper provides a selective review of mechanistic research on the nocebo effect. Comparatively little attention has been directed to clinical studies and their implications for daily clinical practice. The nocebo response is influenced by the content and the way information is presented to patients in clinical trials in both the placebo as well as active treatment conditions. Nocebo effect adversely influences quality of life and therapy adherence, emphasizing the need for minimizing these responses to the extent possible. Evidence further indicates that the informed consent process in clinical trials may induce nocebo effects. This paper concludes with ethical directions for future patient-oriented research and routine practice. PMID:21862825

  17. Decaying relevance of clinical data towards future decisions in data-driven inpatient clinical order sets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jonathan H; Alagappan, Muthuraman; Goldstein, Mary K; Asch, Steven M; Altman, Russ B

    2017-06-01

    Determine how varying longitudinal historical training data can impact prediction of future clinical decisions. Estimate the "decay rate" of clinical data source relevance. We trained a clinical order recommender system, analogous to Netflix or Amazon's "Customers who bought A also bought B..." product recommenders, based on a tertiary academic hospital's structured electronic health record data. We used this system to predict future (2013) admission orders based on different subsets of historical training data (2009 through 2012), relative to existing human-authored order sets. Predicting future (2013) inpatient orders is more accurate with models trained on just one month of recent (2012) data than with 12 months of older (2009) data (ROC AUC 0.91 vs. 0.88, precision 27% vs. 22%, recall 52% vs. 43%, all P<10(-10)). Algorithmically learned models from even the older (2009) data was still more effective than existing human-authored order sets (ROC AUC 0.81, precision 16% recall 35%). Training with more longitudinal data (2009-2012) was no better than using only the most recent (2012) data, unless applying a decaying weighting scheme with a "half-life" of data relevance about 4 months. Clinical practice patterns (automatically) learned from electronic health record data can vary substantially across years. Gold standards for clinical decision support are elusive moving targets, reinforcing the need for automated methods that can adapt to evolving information. Prioritizing small amounts of recent data is more effective than using larger amounts of older data towards future clinical predictions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The effects of triclosan on uropathogen susceptibility to clinically relevant antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Wignall, Geoffrey R; Goneau, Lee W; Chew, Ben H; Denstedt, John D; Cadieux, Peter A

    2008-10-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent currently used in numerous products including surgical scrubs and ureteral stents. Unfortunately, studies have shown triclosan resistance among several bacterial species. Our objective was to characterize resistance patterns of common uropathogens to triclosan and determine whether triclosan exposure would alter their susceptibility to common antibiotics. We hypothesized that triclosan exposure induces a metabolic stress rendering some bacterial strains more susceptible to other antibiotics. Using largely clinical isolates comprising seven uropathogenic species, we conducted 24 hour growth experiments to determine triclosan minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for each strain. Based upon these MICs, triclosan was added to agar plates at escalating sublethal concentrations and antibiotic disk diffusion assays were conducted using a range of clinically-relevant antibiotics. Varying susceptibility patterns were observed across all antibiotics studied. Several antibiotics demonstrated increased efficacy in conjunction with triclosan. The combined effect of triclosan with amoxicillin and gentamicin was superior when considering significant increases in susceptibility, with 6 (86%) and 5 (71%) of the 7 bacterial strains displaying enhanced sensitivity, respectively. The antimicrobial effects of nitrofurantoin and the fluoroquinolones were significantly enhanced for 4 (57%), 4 and 3 (42%) of the 7 pathogens, respectively. The two fluoroquinolones were the only antibiotics where susceptibility was negatively impacted (in one strain each) in combination with triclosan. The synergistic effects of triclosan and several antibiotics are consistent with a triclosan-dependent metabolic strain and/or membrane disruptive effect, and offers important insight into the combined use of antimicrobial compounds in clinical practice.

  19. Clinical relevance of host immunity in breast cancer: from TILs to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Savas, Peter; Salgado, Roberto; Denkert, Carsten; Sotiriou, Christos; Darcy, Phillip K; Smyth, Mark J; Loi, Sherene

    2016-04-01

    The clinical relevance of the host immune system in breast cancer has long been unexplored. Studies developed over the past decade have highlighted the biological heterogeneity of breast cancer, prompting researchers to investigate whether the role of the immune system in this malignancy is similar across different molecular subtypes of the disease. The presence of high levels of lymphocytic infiltration has been consistently associated with a more-favourable prognosis in patients with early stage triple-negative and HER2-positive breast cancer. These infiltrates seem to reflect favourable host antitumour immune responses, suggesting that immune activation is important for improving survival outcomes. In this Review, we discuss the composition of the immune infiltrates observed in breast cancers, as well as data supporting the clinical relevance of host antitumour immunity, as represented by lymphocytic infiltration, and how this biomarker could be used in the clinical setting. We also discuss the rationale for enhancing immunity in breast cancer, including early data on the efficacy of T-cell checkpoint inhibition in this setting.

  20. Clinical reappraisal of vasculobiliary anatomy relevant to laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kuldip; Singh, Ranbir; Kaur, Manjot

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) has many advantages as compared to open cholecystectomy. However, vasculobiliary injuries still continue to be a matter of concern despite advances in laparoscopic techniques. Misidentification and misperception of vasculobiliary structures is considered to be a pivotal factor leading to injuries. Although many studies since time immemorial have stressed on the importance of anatomy, an insight into laparoscopic anatomy is what essentially constitutes the need of the hour. To assess the frequency and the relevance of anatomical variations of extrahepatic biliary system in patients undergoing LC. The present study is an observational study performed for a period of 2 years from August 2014 to August 2016. It included all diagnosed patients of cholelithiasis undergoing routine LC performed by a single surgeon by achieving a critical view of safety. During dissection, vascular and ductal anomalies were noted and assessed for their relevance in LC. Seven hundred forty cases of cholelithiasis, irrespective of pathology, comprising 280 (37.83%) men and 460 (62.16%) females with a mean age of 39.85 ± 18.82 years were included in the study. Photodocumentation and operative recordings were available in 93% of cases. Operative findings revealed 197 (26.62%) vascular anomalies and 90 (12.16%) ductal anomalies. A single cystic artery was seen in 340 cases, and a normal cystic duct was seen in 650 cases. Variations in ductal anatomy were fewer than variations in vascular anatomy. Extra-biliary anatomy relevant to LC is unpredictable and varies from patient to patient. Vascular anomalies are more frequent than the ductal anomalies, and surgeon should be alert regarding their presence.

  1. MRI phenotype in renal cancer: is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    Campbell, Naomi; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2014-04-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is most commonly diagnosed as an incidental finding on cross-sectional imaging and represents a significant clinical challenge. Although most patients have a surgically curable lesion at the time of diagnosis, the variability in the biologic behavior of the different histologic subtypes and tumor grade of RCC, together with the increasing array of management options, creates uncertainty for the optimal clinical approach to individual patients. State-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a comprehensive assessment of renal lesions that includes multiple forms of tissue contrast as well as functional parameters, which in turn provides information that helps to address this dilemma. In this article, we review this evolving and increasingly comprehensive role of MRI in the detection, characterization, perioperative evaluation, and assessment of the treatment response of renal neoplasms. We emphasize the ability of the imaging "phenotype" of renal masses on MRI to help predict the histologic subtype, grade, and clinical behavior of RCC.

  2. [Dose-response relation: relevance for clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Klinkhardt, U; Harder, S

    1998-12-15

    Dose-finding studies are performed routinely in patients and--if appropriate surrogate models exist--also in healthy volunteers. Such studies aim at establishing the optimal dose range for further clinical studies on the efficacy and the risk-benefit ratio of a new drug. The dose-response relationship of a drug is most often described by a sigmoidal curve. Its parameters include the mean effective dose, the maximal effect and the steepness. Interpretation of such curves should be done in the context of the intended clinical indications of the drug. The risk-benefit ratio of a drug can be assessed by overlapping the dose-response curve of wanted and unwanted clinical effects, again, any overlapping (which can be described e.g. by the therapeutic index) should be seen in the context of the indication and available therapeutic alternatives.

  3. Brain white matter tracts: functional anatomy and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gerrish, Amy C; Thomas, Adam G; Dineen, Robert A

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is increasingly available on clinical magnetic resonance scanners and can be acquired in a relatively short time. There has been an explosion of applications in the research field but the use to the practicing radiologist may seem obscure. This paper aims to highlight how diffusion tensor imaging can be used to prompt a dedicated neuroanatomical search for white matter lesions in clinical presentations relating to motor, sensory, language, and visuospatial deficits. The enhanced depiction of white matter tracts in the temporal stem is also highlighted, which is a region of importance in epilepsy surgery planning.

  4. Clinical relevance of sonographically estimated amniotic fluid volume: polyhydramnios.

    PubMed

    Sandlin, Adam T; Chauhan, Suneet P; Magann, Everett F

    2013-05-01

    Polyhydramnios is an excessive amount of amniotic fluid within the amniotic cavity. The etiology of polyhydramnios may be idiopathic, the consequence of fetal structural anomalies, or the consequence of various fetal and maternal conditions. The clinical importance of polyhydramnios is found in its association with adverse pregnancy outcomes and the risk of perinatal mortality. The antenatal management of polyhydramnios can be challenging as there are no formalized guidelines on the topic. The purpose of this review is to provide a literature-based overview on the subject of polyhydramnios in singleton pregnancies, demonstrate its clinical implications, and describe a practical approach to its management.

  5. Anomalous course of the extensor pollicis longus: clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Guy; Wolovelsky, Alejandro; Rinott, Micha; Rozen, Nimrod

    2011-11-01

    The extensor pollicis longus (EPL) is a consistent structure with rare anomalies, the most common being a group of different tendon duplications passing through the fourth compartment without symptoms. The second form comprises anomalies in the course of the EPL having significant clinical importance due to the predisposition for creating tenosynovitis of the EPL mimicking other types of tendon tenosynovitis. Clinical symptoms of radial dorsal wrist pain mimicking intersection syndrome or de-Quervain disease with the "absent snuff box" sign should raise suspicions for an anomaly in the course of the EPL.

  6. A Laboratory Course in Clinical Biochemistry Emphasizing Interest and Relevance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Peter L.

    1975-01-01

    Ten laboratory experiments are described which are used in a successful clinical biochemistry laboratory course (e.g. blood alcohol, glucose tolerance, plasma triglycerides, coronary risk index, gastric analysis, vitamin C and E). Most of the experiments are performed on the students themselves using simple equipment with emphasis on useful…

  7. A Laboratory Course in Clinical Biochemistry Emphasizing Interest and Relevance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Peter L.

    1975-01-01

    Ten laboratory experiments are described which are used in a successful clinical biochemistry laboratory course (e.g. blood alcohol, glucose tolerance, plasma triglycerides, coronary risk index, gastric analysis, vitamin C and E). Most of the experiments are performed on the students themselves using simple equipment with emphasis on useful…

  8. A clinically relevant frailty index for aging rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Frailty is a clinical syndrome that is increasingly prevalent during aging. Frailty involves the confluence of reduced strength, speed, physical activity, and endurance, and it is associated with adverse health outcomes. Frailty indices have been developed to diagnose frailty in older adult populati...

  9. A clinically relevant frailty index for aging rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Frailty is a clinical syndrome that is increasingly prevalent during aging. Frailty involves the confluence of reduced strength, speed, physical activity, and endurance, and it is associated with adverse health outcomes. Frailty indices have been developed to diagnose frailty in older adult populati...

  10. Hepatitis B virus genotypes: epidemiological and clinical relevance in Asia.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiuju; Jia, Jidong

    2016-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is characterized by a high genetic heterogeneity since it replicates via a reverse transcriptase that lacks proofreading ability. Up to now, ten genotypes (A-J) have been described, with genotype A and D being ubiquitous but most prevalent in Europe and Africa, genotype B and C being confined to Asia and Oceania. Infections with other genotypes such as E, F, G and H are also occasionally observed in Asia. Genotype I is rare and can be found in Laos, Vietnam, India and China, whereas genotype J has been described in Japan and Ryukyu. Novel variants generated by recombination and co-infection with other genotypes have gradually gotten worldwide attention and may be correlated with certain clinical features. There are substantial differences in HBV infection regarding prevalence, clinical manifestation, disease progression and response to antiviral therapy. Due to the complex interplay among viral, host and environmental factors, the relationship between HBV genotypes and clinical profiles remains incompletely revealed. In general, genotype A is associated with better response to interferon therapy; genotype C, and to lesser extent B, usually represent a risk factor for perinatal infection and are associated with advanced liver diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma; genotype D may be linked with poor response to interferon therapy. Future studies with better design and larger sample size are warranted to further clarify the controversial issues and guide the day-to-day clinical practice.

  11. Clinical relevance of negative initial angiogram in spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Moscovici, Samuel; Fraifeld, Shifra; Ramirez-de-Noriega, Fernando; Rosenthal, Guy; Leker, Ronen R; Itshayek, Eyal; Cohen, José E

    2013-03-01

    We aimed to compare the presentation, management, and clinical course in patients with perimesencephalic and nonperimesencephalic (aneurysmal) bleeding patterns on noncontrast CT, but negative initial 4-vessel digital subtraction angiography (DSA). We retrospectively reviewed clinical and imaging data for 280 patients presenting with spontaneous SAH admitted between 2005 and 2011. We identified 56 patients (20%) with SAH diagnosed on high resolution head CT performed within 48 hours of admission, and negative initial DSA, and divided them into perimesencephalic and non-perimesencephalic groups based on hemorrhage patterns. Patients with traumatic subarachnoid bleeding and those with initial positive DSA were excluded from this analysis. Perimesencephalic SAH was seen in 25 patients (45%); non-perimesencephalic bleeding patterns were seen in 31 (55%). All patients with perimesencephalic SAH presented with Hunt and Hess (HH) I, versus 45% HH I and 55% HH II-IV in those with non-perimecenphalic SAH. All patients with perimesencephalic SAH achieved modified Rankin score (mRS) 0 at discharge and 6-month follow-up, compared with 45% mRS 0 at discharge and 68% at 6-month follow-up in non-perimesencephalic SAH. Patients with perimesencephalic SAH presented a uniformly uncomplicated clinical course. Among non-perimesencephalic SAH patients there were 19 neurological/neurosurgical and 10 medical complications, two small aneurysms diagnosed at follow-up DSA, and one death. In this series, perimesencephalic SAH was associated with good clinical grades, consistently negative initial and follow-up angiograms, and an excellent prognosis. In contrast, non-perimesencephalic SAH was associated with a worse clinical presentation, higher complication rates, higher rates of true aneurysm detection on follow-up angiogram, and a poorer outcome.

  12. The potential clinical relevance of visible particles in parenteral drugs.

    PubMed

    Doessegger, Lucette; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Szczesny, Piotr; Rockstroh, Helmut; Kallmeyer, Georg; Langenkamp, Anja; Herrmann, Joerg; Famulare, Joseph

    2012-08-01

    Visible particulates (VP) are one subclass of defects seen during the final visual inspection of parenteral products and are currently one of the top ten reasons for recalls 1,2. The risk posed by particles is still unclear with limited experience reported in humans but remains an important consideration during the manufacture and use of parenteral products. From the experimental and clinical knowledge of the distribution of particulate matter in the body, clinical complications would include events occurring around parenteral administration e.g., as a result of mechanical pulmonary artery obstruction and injection site reaction, or sub-acute or chronic events e.g., granuloma. The challenge is to better understand the implication for patients of single vials with VP and align the risk with the probabilistic detection process used by manufacturers for accept/reject decisions of individual units of product.

  13. Phylogenetic Relationships Matter: Antifungal Susceptibility among Clinically Relevant Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Schmalreck, A. F.; Becker, K.; Fegeler, W.; Czaika, V.; Ulmer, H.; Lass-Flörl, C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was 2-fold: to evaluate whether phylogenetically closely related yeasts share common antifungal susceptibility profiles (ASPs) and whether these ASPs can be predicted from phylogeny. To address this question, 9,627 yeast strains were collected and tested for their antifungal susceptibility. Isolates were reidentified by considering recent changes in taxonomy and nomenclature. A phylogenetic (PHYLO) code based on the results of multilocus sequence analyses (large-subunit rRNA, small-subunit rRNA, translation elongation factor 1α, RNA polymerase II subunits 1 and 2) and the classification of the cellular neutral sugar composition of coenzyme Q and 18S ribosomal DNA was created to group related yeasts into PHYLO groups. The ASPs were determined for fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole in each PHYLO group. The majority (95%) of the yeast strains were Ascomycetes. After reclassification, a total of 23 genera and 54 species were identified, resulting in an increase of 64% of genera and a decrease of 5% of species compared with the initial identification. These taxa were assigned to 17 distinct PHYLO groups (Ascomycota, n = 13; Basidiomycota, n = 4). ASPs for azoles were similar among members of the same PHYLO group and different between the various PHYLO groups. Yeast phylogeny may be an additional tool to significantly enhance the assessment of MIC values and to predict antifungal susceptibility, thereby more rapidly initiating appropriate patient management. PMID:24366735

  14. Clinical Toxicology and Its Relevance to Asthma and Atopy.

    PubMed

    Joks, Rauno; Bluth, Martin H

    2016-12-01

    Although both the prevalence of asthma and the prescription drug use, notably the opiate analgesic class, epidemics are increasing, there is a complex interplay between both disorders, with both protective and exacerbating factors involved in the effect of opiates on asthma pathogenesis and clinical severity. This review examines the airway effects, both immunologic and neurologic, of opiates, which may interact and result in protection or exacerbation of asthma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tolerance in liver transplantation: Biomarkers and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Revilla-Nuin, Beatriz; Parrilla, Pascual; Martínez-Alarcón, Laura; Ramírez, Pablo; Pons, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation is the optimal treatment for end-stage organ failure, and modern immunosuppression has allowed important progress in short-term outcomes. However, immunosuppression poorly influences chronic rejection and elicits chronic toxicity in current clinical practice. Thus, a major goal in transplantation is to understand and induce tolerance. It is well established that human regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3 play important roles in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. The major regulatory T cell subsets and mechanisms of expansion that are critical for induction and long-term maintenance of graft tolerance and survival are being actively investigated. Likewise, other immune cells, such as dendritic cells, monocyte/macrophages or natural killer cells, have been described as part of the process known as “operational tolerance”. However, translation of these results towards clinical practice needs solid tools to identify accurately and reliably patients who are going to be tolerant. In this way, a plethora of genetic and cellular biomarkers is raising and being validated worldwide in large multi-center clinical trials. Few of the studies performed so far have provided a detailed analysis of the impact of immunosuppression withdrawal on pre-existing complications derived from the long-term administration of immunosuppressive drugs and the side effects associated with them. The future of liver transplantation is aimed to develop new therapies which increase the actual low tolerant vs non-tolerant recipients ratio. PMID:27678350

  16. The assessment of schizotypy and its clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Mason, Oliver J

    2015-03-01

    This article reviews several approaches to assessing schizotypal traits using a wide variety of self-report and interview measures. It makes a distinction between clinical approaches largely based on syndrome and symptom definitions, and psychometric approaches to measuring personality traits. The review presents a brief description of the content and psychometric properties of both sets of measures; these cover both the broad rubric of schizotypy often, but not exclusively based on DSM conceptions, as well as measures with a more specific focus. Measurement of schizotypy has taken place within clinical and nonclinical research utilizing a range of designs and methodologies. Several of these are elucidated with respect to the assessment choices open to researchers, and the implications of the measures chosen. These paradigms include the case-control study, "high risk"/"ultra-high risk" groups, a variety of nonclinical groups and other groups of interest, large scale epidemiology and "in vivo" designs. Evidence from a wide variety of designs continues to provide evidence of the validity of both clinical and personality approaches to schizotypal assessment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. [Clinical relevance of immunotyping of oncologic and hematologic diseases].

    PubMed

    Diehl, V; Pfreundschuh, M

    1987-06-01

    Progress in immunology and molecular biology have provided a better understanding of etiology, pathogenesis and biology of many oncological and hematological diseases. In clinical practice, certain new methods of immunotyping (IT) are of diagnostic importance in assigning undifferentiated tumors to lymphoid, epithelial or mesenchymal origin and in defining subgroups of leukemias and lymphomas. The demonstration of rearrangements of gene coding for immunoglobulins or T-cell receptors assigns hematological malignancies of early differentiation to the B- or T-cell lineage, discriminates between reactive lymphoid changes and clonal lymphoid expansion and detects persistent clonal growth after therapy. In certain clinical entities (e.g. ALL) the immunological subtypes are of importance for differential therapy. By means of IT new clinical entities have been defined (Ki-1-lymphoma, T gamma-lymphoproliferative, LFA-1-deficiency) and the pathomechanisms of others have been elucidated (Bernard-Soulier-disease Syndrome, Glanzmann-Nägeli thrombasthenia). Of immediate therapeutic importance is the identification by IT of receptors for specific hormones or biological response modifiers on malignant cells. In-vivo diagnosis by monoclonal antibodies opens a way to define more exactly the extent of malignant disease by scintigrams or NMR.

  18. The Clinical Relevance of Beta Blockers in Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hefner, J.; Csef, H.

    2016-01-01

    The last ten years have seen hardly any improvement in the prognosis of ovarian carcinoma. There is a great need for new treatment strategies, and a recent retrospective study showing a survival advantage with the use of beta blockers met with a very positive response. This systematic review summarizes the current state of knowledge and research on the topic: A database analysis identified six clinical studies showing inconsistent results with respect to the administration of beta blockers and disease course. The 13 preclinical studies identified showed almost without exception both that catecholamines had detrimental effects on tumour progression, and that these effects could be influenced by pharmacological blockade. Overall the available evidence does not justify the use of beta blockers in clinical practice for ovarian carcinoma at the present time. This article also outlines details of research design required for further studies needed on the subject. Preclinical research findings are however very impressive: They not only form an important basis for the development of future clinical studies but also, through revealing new pathomechanisms, they already make an important contribution towards the development of new treatment strategies for ovarian carcinoma. PMID:27761025

  19. The Assessment of Schizotypy and Its Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Oliver J.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews several approaches to assessing schizotypal traits using a wide variety of self-report and interview measures. It makes a distinction between clinical approaches largely based on syndrome and symptom definitions, and psychometric approaches to measuring personality traits. The review presents a brief description of the content and psychometric properties of both sets of measures; these cover both the broad rubric of schizotypy often, but not exclusively based on DSM conceptions, as well as measures with a more specific focus. Measurement of schizotypy has taken place within clinical and nonclinical research utilizing a range of designs and methodologies. Several of these are elucidated with respect to the assessment choices open to researchers, and the implications of the measures chosen. These paradigms include the case–control study, “high risk”/“ultra-high risk” groups, a variety of nonclinical groups and other groups of interest, large scale epidemiology and “in vivo” designs. Evidence from a wide variety of designs continues to provide evidence of the validity of both clinical and personality approaches to schizotypal assessment. PMID:25810054

  20. Pharmacogenetics and ethnicity: relevance for clinical implementation, clinical trials, pharmacovigilance and drug regulation in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Macías, Martha; Teran, Enrique; Waters, William; Fors, Martha M; Altamirano, Catalina; Jung-Cook, Helgi; Galaviz-Hernández, Carlos; López-López, Marisol; Remírez, Diadelis; Moya, Graciela E; Hernández, Francisco; Fariñas, Humberto; Ramírez, Ronald; Céspedes-Garro, Carolina; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo; LLerena, Adrián

    2016-10-28

    Congress of Pharmacogenetics and Personalized Medicine. Ethnicity, clinical implementation and regulatory environment (MESTIFAR 2016 Quito). Quito, Ecuador, 19-21 May 2016. The Ibero-American Network of Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics (RIBEF) was created in 2006 with the main aim of promoting personalized medicine and collaborative pharmacogenetics research in Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking countries in America and the Iberian Peninsula. The final goal of this initiative was the inclusion of Latin American populations that may benefit from the implementation of personalized medicine in drug therapy. Several initiatives have been promoted including the MESTIFAR project, which aimed to analyze the ethnicity, genotype and/or metabolic phenotype in Ibero-American populations. To date, 6060 healthy volunteers have been analyzed; among them, 2571 were admixed, 1824 were Caucasians, 1395 were Native Americans, 174 were Jews and 96 were Afro-descendants. Due to the large genetic variability within Latin Americans, ethnicity may be a relevant factor for the clinical implementation of personalized medicine. Moreover, the present status of clinical implementation and the future perspectives of pharmacogenetics, pharmacovigilance and clinical trials for drug regulation in Latin America compared with the EMA-Pharmacogenomics Working Party and the US FDA initiatives were analyzed.

  1. Comparative Genomics of Bacillus species and its Relevance in Industrial Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Archana; Satyanarayana, T

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of high throughput sequencing platforms and relevant analytical tools, the rate of microbial genome sequencing has accelerated which has in turn led to better understanding of microbial molecular biology and genetics. The complete genome sequences of important industrial organisms provide opportunities for human health, industry, and the environment. Bacillus species are the dominant workhorses in industrial fermentations. Today, genome sequences of several Bacillus species are available, and comparative genomics of this genus helps in understanding their physiology, biochemistry, and genetics. The genomes of these bacterial species are the sources of many industrially important enzymes and antibiotics and, therefore, provide an opportunity to tailor enzymes with desired properties to suit a wide range of applications. A comparative account of strengths and weaknesses of the different sequencing platforms are also highlighted in the review. PMID:26217108

  2. Characterization and identification of clinically relevant microorganisms using rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Nicole; Rebec, Monica; Jones, Emrys A; Golf, Ottmar; Abdolrasouli, Alireza; Balog, Julia; Behrends, Volker; Veselkov, Kirill A; Takats, Zoltan

    2014-07-01

    Rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry (REIMS) was investigated for its suitability as a general identification system for bacteria and fungi. Strains of 28 clinically relevant bacterial species were analyzed in negative ion mode, and corresponding data was subjected to unsupervised and supervised multivariate statistical analyses. The created supervised model yielded correct cross-validation results of 95.9%, 97.8%, and 100% on species, genus, and Gram-stain level, respectively. These results were not affected by the resolution of the mass spectral data. Blind identification tests were performed for strains cultured on different culture media and analyzed using different instrumental platforms which led to 97.8-100% correct identification. Seven different Escherichia coli strains were subjected to different culture conditions and were distinguishable with 88% accuracy. In addition, the technique proved suitable to distinguish five pathogenic Candida species with 98.8% accuracy without any further modification to the experimental workflow. These results prove that REIMS is sufficiently specific to serve as a culture condition-independent tool for the identification and characterization of microorganisms.

  3. Update on the Human Broad Tapeworm (Genus Diphyllobothrium), Including Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Tomáš; Garcia, Hector H.; Kuchta, Roman; Wicht, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Tapeworms (Cestoda) continue to be an important cause of morbidity in humans worldwide. Diphyllobothriosis, a human disease caused by tapeworms of the genus Diphyllobothrium, is the most important fish-borne zoonosis caused by a cestode parasite. Up to 20 million humans are estimated to be infected worldwide. Besides humans, definitive hosts of Diphyllobothrium include piscivorous birds and mammals, which represent a significant zoonotic reservoir. The second intermediate hosts include both freshwater and marine fish, especially anadromous species such as salmonids. The zoonosis occurs most commonly in countries where the consumption of raw or marinated fish is a frequent practice. Due to the increasing popularity of dishes utilizing uncooked fish, numerous cases of human infections have appeared recently, even in the most developed countries. As many as 14 valid species of Diphyllobothrium can cause human diphyllobothriosis, with D. latum and D. nihonkaiense being the most important pathogens. In this paper, all taxa from humans reported are reviewed, with brief information on their life history and their current distribution. Data on diagnostics, epidemiology, clinical relevance, and control of the disease are also summarized. The importance of reliable identification of human-infecting species with molecular tools (sequences of mitochondrial genes) as well as the necessity of epidemiological studies aimed at determining the sources of infections are pointed out. PMID:19136438

  4. [Clinical research IV. Relevancy of the statistical test chosen].

    PubMed

    Talavera, Juan O; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    When we look at the difference between two therapies or the association of a risk factor or prognostic indicator with its outcome, we need to evaluate the accuracy of the result. This assessment is based on a judgment that uses information about the study design and statistical management of the information. This paper specifically mentions the relevance of the statistical test selected. Statistical tests are chosen mainly from two characteristics: the objective of the study and type of variables. The objective can be divided into three test groups: a) those in which you want to show differences between groups or inside a group before and after a maneuver, b) those that seek to show the relationship (correlation) between variables, and c) those that aim to predict an outcome. The types of variables are divided in two: quantitative (continuous and discontinuous) and qualitative (ordinal and dichotomous). For example, if we seek to demonstrate differences in age (quantitative variable) among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with and without neurological disease (two groups), the appropriate test is the "Student t test for independent samples." But if the comparison is about the frequency of females (binomial variable), then the appropriate statistical test is the χ(2).

  5. Vitamin E-drug interactions: molecular basis and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Podszun, Maren; Frank, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Vitamin E (α-, β-, γ- and δ-tocopherol and -tocotrienol) is an essential factor in the human diet and regularly taken as a dietary supplement by many people, who act under the assumption that it may be good for their health and can do no harm. With the publication of meta-analyses reporting increased mortality in persons taking vitamin E supplements, the safety of the micronutrient was questioned and interactions with prescription drugs were suggested as one potentially underlying mechanism. Here, we review the evidence in the scientific literature for adverse vitamin E-drug interactions and discuss the potential of each of the eight vitamin E congeners to alter the activity of drugs. In summary, there is no evidence from animal models or randomised controlled human trials to suggest that the intake of tocopherols and tocotrienols at nutritionally relevant doses may cause adverse nutrient-drug interactions. Consumption of high-dose vitamin E supplements ( ≥  300 mg/d), however, may lead to interactions with the drugs aspirin, warfarin, tamoxifen and cyclosporine A that may alter their activities. For the majority of drugs, however, interactions with vitamin E, even at high doses, have not been observed and are thus unlikely.

  6. Functional and clinical relevance of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4.

    PubMed

    Campoli, Michael; Ferrone, Soldano; Wang, Xinhui

    2010-01-01

    The lack of effective conventional therapies for the treatment of advanced stage melanoma has stimulated interest in the development of novel strategies for the management of patients with malignant melanoma. Among them, immunotherapy has attracted much attention because of the potential role played by immunological events in the clinical course of melanoma. For many years, T cell-based immunotherapy has been emphasized in part because of the disappointing results of the monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based clinical trials conducted in the early 1980s and in part because of the postulated major role played by T cells in tumor growth control. More recently, mAb-based therapies have gained in popularity given their clinical and commercial success for a variety of malignant diseases. As a result, there has been increased interest in identifying and characterizing antibody-defined melanoma antigens. Among them, the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4), also known as high molecular weight-melanoma associated antigen (HMW-MAA) or melanoma chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP), has attracted much attention in recent years because of the growing experimental evidence that it fulfills two requirements for immunotherapy to be therapeutically effective: (1) targeting of cancer stem cells (CSC) and (2) development of combinatorial therapies to counteract the escape mechanisms driven by the genetic instability of tumor cells. With this in mind, in this chapter, we have reviewed recent information related to the distribution of CSPG4 on various types of tumors, including CSC, its expression on pericytes in the tumor microenvironment, its recognition by T cells, its role in cell biology as well as the potential mechanisms underlying the ability of CSPG4-specific immunity to control malignant cell growth.

  7. Time to Clinically Relevant Fracture Risk Scores in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Gourlay, Margaret L; Overman, Robert A; Fine, Jason P; Crandall, Carolyn J; Robbins, John; Schousboe, John T; Ensrud, Kristine E; LeBlanc, Erin S; Gass, Margery L; Johnson, Karen C; Womack, Catherine R; LaCroix, Andrea Z

    2017-07-01

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend use of fracture risk scores for screening and pharmacologic treatment decisions. The timing of occurrence of treatment-level (according to 2014 National Osteoporosis Foundation guidelines) or screening-level (according to 2011 US Preventive Services Task Force guidelines) fracture risk scores has not been estimated in postmenopausal women. We conducted a retrospective competing risk analysis of new occurrence of treatment-level and screening-level fracture risk scores in postmenopausal women aged 50 years and older, prior to receipt of pharmacologic treatment and prior to first hip or clinical vertebral fracture. In 54,280 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 64 years without a bone mineral density test, the time for 10% to develop a treatment-level FRAX score could not be estimated accurately because of rare incidence of treatment-level scores. In 6096 women who had FRAX scores calculated with bone mineral density, the estimated unadjusted time to treatment-level FRAX ranged from 7.6 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.6-8.7) for those aged 65 to 69, to 5.1 years (95% CI, 3.5-7.5) for those aged 75 to 79 at baseline. Of 17,967 women aged 50 to 64 with a screening-level FRAX at baseline, 100 (0.6%) experienced a hip or clinical vertebral fracture by age 65 years. Postmenopausal women with sub-threshold fracture risk scores at baseline were unlikely to develop a treatment-level FRAX score between ages 50 and 64 years. After age 65, the increased incidence of treatment-level fracture risk scores, osteoporosis, and major osteoporotic fracture supports more frequent consideration of FRAX and bone mineral density testing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The clinical relevance of sexual dysfunction in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bruni, C; Raja, J; Denton, C P; Matucci-Cerinic, M

    2015-12-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a chronic multi-organ autoimmune disease, leading to important clinical and psychological implications. Among organ complications, sexual dysfunction is a major issue for both male and female gender, with high prevalence and great impact on quality of life, although frequently not addressed by both clinicians and patients. While erectile dysfunction is the most common cause of sexual problems in males, genital tract and general physical changes are major contributors to sexual impairment in females. This review presents current state of the art on this topic, discussing published data on presentation, evaluation and therapeutic options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Patent foramen ovale: echocardiographic detection and clinical relevance in stroke.

    PubMed

    Di Tullio, Marco R

    2010-02-01

    This article reviews the main clinical aspects of patent foramen ovale (PFO), such as its prevalence in the population, the diagnostic techniques to detect its presence, its role as a risk factor for ischemic stroke of otherwise unexplained origin, and its controversial association with migraine. Some cofactors possibly involved in the association between PFO and stroke are discussed, along with the various therapeutic options to prevent recurrent cerebral ischemic events in stroke patients with a PFO. Copyright 2010 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Exercise blood pressure: clinical relevance and correct measurement.

    PubMed

    Sharman, J E; LaGerche, A

    2015-06-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a mandatory safety measure during graded intensity clinical exercise stress testing. While it is generally accepted that exercise hypotension is a poor prognostic sign linked to severe cardiac dysfunction, recent meta-analysis data also implicate excessive rises in submaximal exercise BP with adverse cardiovascular events and mortality, irrespective of resting BP. Although more data is needed to derive submaximal normative BP thresholds, the association of a hypertensive response to exercise with increased cardiovascular risk may be due to underlying hypertension that has gone unnoticed by conventional resting BP screening methods. Delayed BP decline during recovery is also associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Thus, above and beyond being used as a routine safety measure during stress testing, exercise (and recovery) BP may be useful for identifying high-risk individuals and also as an aid to optimise care through appropriate follow-up after exercise stress testing. Accordingly, careful attention should be paid to correct measurement of exercise stress test BP (before, during and after exercise) using a standardised approach with trained operators and validated BP monitoring equipment (manual or automated). Recommendations for exercise BP measurement based on consolidated international guidelines and expert consensus are presented in this review.

  11. Enabling Anyone to Translate Clinically Relevant Ideas to Therapies.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Diaz, Natalie; Chung, Julia; Mathews, Paul; McMurtray, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    How do we inspire new ideas that could lead to potential treatments for rare or neglected diseases, and allow for serendipity that could help to catalyze them? How many potentially good ideas are lost because they are never tested? What if those ideas could have lead to new therapeutic approaches and major healthcare advances? If a clinician or anyone for that matter, has a new idea they want to test to develop a molecule or therapeutic that they could translate to the clinic, how would they do it without a laboratory or funding? These are not idle theoretical questions but addressing them could have potentially huge economic implications for nations. If we fail to capture the diversity of ideas and test them we may also lose out on the next blockbuster treatments. Many of those involved in the process of ideation may be discouraged and simply not know where to go. We try to address these questions and describe how there are options to raising funding, how even small scale investments can foster preclinical or clinical translation, and how there are several approaches to outsourcing the experiments, whether to collaborators or commercial enterprises. While these are not new or far from complete solutions, they are first steps that can be taken by virtually anyone while we work on other solutions to build a more concrete structure for the "idea-hypothesis testing-proof of concept-translation-breakthrough pathway".

  12. Clinical relevance of molecular diagnosis in pet allergy.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, S A; Sastre, J

    2016-07-01

    We describe the pattern of sensitisation to pet IgE components and its association with clinical symptoms. Hundred and fifty nine consecutive patients with rhinitis/asthma sensitised to dog, cat, and horse were recruited. Specific IgE to whole extracts and to pet recombinant allergens were performed. Only 5% of patients were monosensitised to animal allergens. Specific IgE to Can f 1 was significantly associated with persistent rhinitis, Can f 2 with asthma diagnosis, Can f 3 with moderate/severe rhinitis (M/S-R) and asthma diagnosis (AD), and Can f 5 with persistent and M/S-R. Positive IgE to Fel d 2 was significantly associated with M/S-R and AD, Equ c 1 with M/S-R and Equ c 3 with persistent rhinitis, AD and severe asthma. Sensitisation to ≥2 molecules or to pet albumins was associated with more severe respiratory symptoms. Molecular diagnosis in patients with pet allergy may also help clinicians to predict clinical symptoms and their severity.

  13. A Clinically Relevant Frailty Index for Aging Rats.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marshall G; Thangthaeng, Nopporn; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2017-07-01

    Frailty is a clinical syndrome that is increasingly prevalent during aging. Frailty involves the confluence of reduced strength, speed, physical activity, and endurance and is associated with adverse health outcomes. The present study adapts existing clinical and preclinical indices of frailty to the Fischer (F344) rat. Male F344 rats (n = 133; 17 mo) completed a battery of behavioral tasks, including forelimb wire suspension (strength), rotarod (speed), open field (physical activity), and inclined screen (endurance). Rats that performed poorly (lowest quintile) on two tasks were considered mildly frail (17.29%, n = 23), and rats that performed poorly on 3-4 tasks were considered frail (2.26%, n = 3). Logistic regression of 100-day survival revealed that mildly frail rats were 3.8 times and frail rats were 27.5 times more likely to die during that period than nonfrail rats (p = .038; 95% confidence interval: 2.030, 372.564). The selected criterion tests, cutoff points, and index provide a potential tool for identifying frailty in aged F344 rats, which is consistent with existing frailty indices for humans and mice. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Anesthesia and neurotoxicity to the developing brain: the clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Andrew J

    2011-07-01

    Laboratory work has confirmed that general anesthetics cause increased neuronal apoptosis and changes to the morphology of dendritic spines in the developing brains of animals. It is an effect seen with most volatile anesthetics as well as with ketamine and propofol. The effects are dose dependent and seen over particular periods of early development. There is some evidence that rodents exposed to anesthesia during infancy have delayed neurobehavioral development. There are inherent limitations in translating the preclinical data to human practice but the data cannot be ignored. Some human clinical studies have found evidence for an association between major surgery and changes in neurobehavioral outcome, although the evidence is less clear for minor surgery. These associations are certainly at least partly because of factors apart from anesthesia, such as coexisting pathology or the effect of surgery itself. Other clinical studies have found no evidence for an association between surgery and outcome. These studies are also not without limitations. Thus it remains unclear what role anesthesia exposure in infancy actually plays in determining neurobehavioral outcome. To date studies can neither confirm that anesthesia plays a role nor rule it out. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Clinically relevant study end points in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Martos, Carlos; Guerrero, Angel; Minsky, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    In rectal cancer currently there are no clearly validated early end points which can serve as surrogates for long-term clinical outcome such as local control and survival. However, the use of a variety of response rates (i.e. pathological complete response, downsizing the primary tumor, tumor regression grade (TRG), radiological response) as endpoints in early (phase II) clinical trials is common since objective response to therapy is an early indication of activity. Disease-free survival (DFS) has been proposed as the most appropriate end point in adjuvant trials and is one of the most frequently used in newer rectal cancer trials. Due to the devastating nature of local recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer, local control (which is itself a subset of the overall DFS endpoint) is still considered an important endpoint. Recently, circumferential resection margin (CRM) has been proposed as novel early end point because the CRM status can account for effects on DFS and overall survival after chemoradiation, radiation (RT), or surgery alone. Consensus is needed to define the most appropriate end points in both early and phase III trials in locally advanced cancer.

  16. Update on Eosinophilic Meningoencephalitis and Its Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; da Silva, Ana Cristina Arámburu; Yoshimura, Kentaro

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis is caused by a variety of helminthic infections. These worm-specific infections are named after the causative worm genera, the most common being angiostrongyliasis, gnathostomiasis, toxocariasis, cysticercosis, schistosomiasis, baylisascariasis, and paragonimiasis. Worm parasites enter an organism through ingestion of contaminated water or an intermediate host and can eventually affect the central nervous system (CNS). These infections are potentially serious events leading to sequelae or death, and diagnosis depends on currently limited molecular methods. Identification of parasites in fluids and tissues is rarely possible, while images and clinical examinations do not lead to a definitive diagnosis. Treatment usually requires the concomitant administration of corticoids and anthelminthic drugs, yet new compounds and their extensive and detailed clinical evaluation are much needed. Eosinophilia in fluids may be detected in other infectious and noninfectious conditions, such as neoplastic disease, drug use, and prosthesis reactions. Thus, distinctive identification of eosinophils in fluids is a necessary component in the etiologic diagnosis of CNS infections. PMID:19366917

  17. The Clinical Relevance of Anti-DFS70 Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Karsten; Röber, Nadja; Andrade, Luis E C; Mahler, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Despite all the progress in the establishment of specific autoantibody assays, screening for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells for quality-oriented laboratory diagnosis of ANA associated rheumatic diseases (AARD) remains indispensable but is not without limitations. Recent data on the relevance of the dense fine speckled (DFS) pattern and anti-DFS70 antibodies disclosed novel possibilities to optimize the serological stepwise diagnostics of AARD. The DFS pattern on HEp-2 cells is well differentiated from the classic "homogeneous" ANA pattern associated with dsDNA antibodies. This is the most frequent pattern in high titer ANA-positive healthy persons. The most characteristic ANA specificity associated with DFS pattern is the anti-DFS70 antibody (synonym LEDGF antibody). The prevalence of anti-DFS70 antibodies in AARD patients is significantly lower compared with the prevalence in ANA-positive healthy persons. There is a negative association between anti-DFS70 antibodies and AARD, especially if no concomitant AARD-specific autoantibodies are found. Isolated anti-DFS70 antibodies are detectable in less than 1 % of AARD but are detectable in 2-22 % of healthy persons. In the presence of an isolated anti-DFS70 antibody, the posttest probability for AARD is reduced significantly. The significance of anti-DFS70 antibodies as a criterion that helps to exclude AARD is also confirmed by follow-up studies on anti-DFS70 antibodies of positive, healthy individuals, who did not develop any AARD during a 4 year observation period. Consequently, anti-DFS70 antibodies are valuable novel biomarkers for better interpretation of positive ANA in cases of negative AARD-associated autoantibodies and should be integrated in modified test algorithms to avoid unnecessary referrals and examinations of ANA-positive persons.

  18. [Research training in nutrition: relevance for medical clinical pratice].

    PubMed

    Coronha, Ana Lúcia; Lourenço, Cláudia; Ferreira, Marlene; Reis, Nélia; Almeida, Raquel; Boléo-Tomé, Carolina; Monteiro-Grillo, Isabel; Camilo, Maria Ermelinda; Ravasco, Paula

    2011-01-01

    In oncology, early and individualized nutritional intervention for each patient is essential to improve nutritional intake and status, to reduce morbidity during treatment, enhance tolerance to treatment and improve Quality of Life. For medical students to evaluate nutritional risk and status, analyse the prevalence of undernutrition in a population of patients with diverse types of tumours. We aimed to identify difficulties regarding the use of the MUST tool (Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool) for nutritional risk by the students. This study included 35 cancer patients consecutively referenced for Radiotherapy (RT) in the Radiotherapy Department of the University Hospital of Santa Maria. Nutritional risk was evaluated by MUST; nutritional status by Patient Generated-Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) validated and specific for oncology. Students identified 13 patients (36%) at moderate/high risk of undernutrition. According to PG-SGA, 31,5% (11/35) of patients presented moderate or severe undernutrition, of which 77% of patients needed individualized nutritional counselling. Students successfully detected undernourished patients using these specific methods. Risk of undernutrition and undernutrition are common in oncology, therefore indicating the critical need to educate all health professionals for risk screening and for the relevance of nutritional intervention in the multidisciplinary context. MUST is a simple and quick tool, that demonstrated to be adequate when applied by medical students, well accepted by these health professionals and effectively used. Nutritional risk evaluation can and must be performed by health professionals such as the medical team, as long as they are involved in patient's treatment. Our methodology may be used as a model allowing for early guidance to individualized intervention, human resources' optimization and education for the importance of nutrition care.

  19. Intramuscular preparations of antipsychotics: uses and relevance in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Altamura, A Cario; Sassella, Francesca; Santini, Annalisa; Montresor, Clauno; Fumagalli, Sara; Mundo, Emanuela

    2003-01-01

    Intramuscular formulations of antipsychotics can be sub-divided into two groups on the basis of their pharmacokinetic features: short-acting preparations and long-acting or depot preparations. Short-acting intramuscular formulations are used to manage acute psychotic episodes. On the other hand, long-acting compounds, also called "depot", are administered as antipsychotic maintenance treatment to ensure compliance and to eliminate bioavailability problems related to absorption and first pass metabolism. Adverse effects of antipsychotics have been studied with particular respect to oral versus short- and long-acting intramuscular formulations of the different compounds. For short-term intramuscular preparations the main risk with classical compounds are hypotension and extrapyramidal side effects (EPS). Data on the incidence of EPS with depot formulations are controversial: some studies point out that the incidence of EPS is significantly higher in patients receiving depot preparations, whereas others show no difference between oral and depot antipsychotics. Studies on the strategies for switching patients from oral to depot treatment suggest that this procedure is reasonably well tolerated, so that in clinical practice depot antipsychotic therapy is usually begun while the oral treatment is still being administered, with gradual tapering of the oral dose. Efficacy, pharmacodynamics and clinical pharmacokinetics of haloperidol decanoate, fluphenazine enanthate and decanoate, clopenthixol decanoate, zuclopenthixol decanoate and acutard, flupenthixol decanoate, perphenazine enanthate, pipothiazine palmitate and undecylenate, and fluspirilene are reviewed. In addition, the intramuscular preparations of atypical antipsychotics and clinical uses are reviewed. Olanzapine and ziprasidone are available only as short-acting preparations, while risperidone is to date the only novel antipsychotic available as depot formulation. To date, acutely ill, agitated psychotic patients

  20. Myocardial ischaemia in systemic lupus erythematosus: detection and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Płazak, Wojciech; Gryga, Krzysztof; Sznajd, Jan; Pasowicz, Mieczysław; Musiał, Jacek; Podolec, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Severe cardiovascular complications are among the most important causes of mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. To assess the usefulness of echocardiography, ECG, and coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) in the detection of myocardial ischaemia in SLE patients compared to single photon emission computerised tomography (SPECT) and to assess their five-year follow-up. In 50 consecutive SLE patients (mean age 39.2 ± 12.9 years, 90% female), clinical assessment, resting and exercise ECG and echocardiography, multidetector computed tomography - based CACS and SPECT studies (Tc-99m sestamibi) were performed. Patients were then followed for five years. SPECT revealed perfusion defects in 25 (50%) patients; persistent defects in 18 (36%) and exercise-induced defects in seven (14%) subjects. No typical ischaemic heart disease clinical symptoms, signs of ischaemia in resting ECG, or left ventricular contractility impairment in echocardiography were observed. Signs of ischaemia in exercise ECG were found in 17 (34%) patients. The CACS ranged from 1 to 843.2 (median 23.15), and coronary calcifications were observed in 12 (24%) patients. Compared to the SPECT study, exercise ECG had 68% sensitivity and 100% specificity in detecting myocardial ischaemia, while CACS had only 28% sensitivity and 58% specificity. During follow-up, one patient who showed myocardial perfusion defects and the highest calcium score (843.2) at baseline, developed CCS II class symptoms of myocardial ischaemia. Coronary angiography was not performed because of severe anaemia; the patient died three months later. In two other patients with perfusion defects and calcium deposits at baseline, CCS I class symptoms were observed; coronary angiography showed only thin calcified coronary plaques that were haemodynamically insignificant. In about half of relatively young, mostly female, SLE patients, SPECT shows myocardial perfusion defects, with coronary calcifications present in one

  1. Adipose Tissue Dysfunction: Clinical Relevance and Diagnostic Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Schrover, I M; Spiering, W; Leiner, T; Visseren, F L J

    2016-04-01

    Adipose tissue dysfunction is defined as an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines, causing insulin resistance, systemic low-grade inflammation, hypercoagulability, and elevated blood pressure. These can lead to cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus type 2. Although quantity of adipose tissue is an important determinant of adipose tissue dysfunction, it can be diagnosed in both obese and lean individuals. This implies that not only quantity of adipose tissue should be used as a measure for adipose tissue dysfunction. Instead, focus should be on measuring quality of adipose tissue, which can be done with diagnostic modalities ranging from anthropometric measurements to tissue biopsies and advanced imaging techniques. In daily clinical practice, high quantity of visceral adipose tissue (reflected in high waist circumference or adipose tissue imaging), insulin resistance, or presence of the metabolic syndrome are easy and low-cost diagnostic modalities to evaluate presence or absence of adipose tissue dysfunction.

  2. MicroRNAs: Clinical Relevance in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joe; Ohtsuka, Masahisa; Pichler, Martin; Ling, Hui

    2015-11-25

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancer diagnoses and causes of mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs are a class of small, non-coding regulatory RNAs that have shown strong associations with colorectal cancer. Through the repression of target messenger RNAs, microRNAs modulate many cellular pathways, such as those involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. The utilization of microRNAs has shown significant promise in the diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer, owing to their unique expression profile associations with cancer types and malignancies. Moreover, microRNA therapeutics with mimics or antagonists show great promise in preclinical studies, which encourages further development of their clinical use for colorectal cancer patients. The unique ability of microRNAs to affect multiple downstream pathways represents a novel approach for cancer therapy. Although still early in its development, we believe that microRNAs can be used in the near future as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for colorectal cancer.

  3. Imaging of a clinically relevant stroke model: glucose hypermetabolism revisited.

    PubMed

    Arnberg, Fabian; Grafström, Jonas; Lundberg, Johan; Nikkhou-Aski, Sahar; Little, Philip; Damberg, Peter; Mitsios, Nicholas; Mulder, Jan; Lu, Li; Söderman, Michael; Stone-Elander, Sharon; Holmin, Staffan

    2015-03-01

    Ischemic stroke has been shown to cause hypermetabolism of glucose in the ischemic penumbra. Experimental and clinical data indicate that infarct-related systemic hyperglycemia is a potential therapeutic target in acute stroke. However, clinical studies aiming for glucose control in acute stroke have neither improved functional outcome nor reduced mortality. Thus, further studies on glucose metabolism in the ischemic brain are warranted. We used a rat model of stroke that preserves collateral flow. The animals were analyzed by [2-(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography or magnetic resonance imaging during 90-minute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and during 60 minutes after reperfusion. Results were correlated to magnetic resonance imaging of cerebral blood flow, diffusion of water, lactate formation, and histological data on cell death and blood-brain barrier breakdown. We detected an increased [2-(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose uptake within ischemic regions succumbing to infarction and in the peri-infarct region. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed impairment of blood flow to ischemic levels in the infarct and a reduction of cerebral blood flow in the peri-infarct region. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed lactate in the ischemic region and absence of lactate in the peri-infarct region. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed apoptosis and blood-brain barrier breakdown within the infarct. The increased uptake of [2-(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose in cerebral ischemia most likely reflects hypermetabolism of glucose meeting increased energy needs of ischemic and hypoperfused brain tissue, and it occurs under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions measured by local lactate production. Infarct-related systemic hyperglycemia could serve to facilitate glucose supply to the ischemic brain. Glycemic control by insulin treatment could negatively influence this mechanism. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Nocebo phenomena in medicine: their relevance in everyday clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Häuser, Winfried; Hansen, Ernil; Enck, Paul

    2012-06-01

    Nocebo phenomena are common in clinical practice and have recently become a popular topic of research and discussion among basic scientists, clinicians, and ethicists. We selectively searched the PubMed database for articles published up to December 2011 that contained the key words "nocebo" or "nocebo effect." By definition, a nocebo effect is the induction of a symptom perceived as negative by sham treatment and/or by the suggestion of negative expectations. A nocebo response is a negative symptom induced by the patient's own negative expectations and/or by negative suggestions from clinical staff in the absence of any treatment. The underlying mechanisms include learning by Pavlovian conditioning and reaction to expectations induced by verbal information or suggestion. Nocebo responses may come about through unintentional negative suggestion on the part of physicians and nurses. Information about possible complications and negative expectations on the patient's part increases the likelihood of adverse effects. Adverse events under treatment with medications sometimes come about by a nocebo effect. Physicians face an ethical dilemma, as they are required not just to inform patients of the potential complications of treatment, but also to minimize the likelihood of these complications, i.e., to avoid inducing them through the potential nocebo effect of thorough patient information. Possible ways out of the dilemma include emphasizing the fact that the proposed treatment is usually well tolerated, or else getting the patient's permission to inform less than fully about its possible side effects. Communication training in medical school, residency training, and continuing medical education would be desirable so that physicians can better exploit the power of words to patients' benefit, rather than their detriment.

  5. Achromobacter xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis: prevalence and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    De Baets, Frans; Schelstraete, Petra; Van Daele, Sabine; Haerynck, Filomeen; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is increasingly cultured in sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients; nevertheless, there are few published data on the clinical impact of this infection or chronic colonisation. Relying on DNA fingerprinting techniques we studied the prevalence of A. xylosoxidans in our CF population. In a retrospective case control study the clinical status of patients with at least 3 sputum cultures positive for A. xylosoxidans over at least 9 months, at the moment of the first positive culture and during the period of colonisation were compared to age (+/-1 year), gender and to Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonisation controlled CF patients who had never A. xylosoxidans positive sputum cultures. The prevalence of patients with at least one positive A. xylosoxidans culture was 17.9%. 5.3% of the patients fulfilled the criteria of our definition of colonisation. Colonised patients had a median age of 20 years (range 11-27 years) and a mean colonisation period of 1.5 (+/-0.9) years. At the moment of the first positive culture we found significantly lower Bhalla scores on HRCT scans of the lungs (11+/-3 versus 16+/-3, p<0.002), lower Brasfield chest X-ray scores (14+/-3 versus 18+/-3, p<0.019), lower FVC values (70%+/-22 versus 94%+/-12, p<0.017) and lower FEV(1) values (55%+/-32 versus 78%+/-23, p=0.123), although the latter did not reach significance. There was no significant difference in body mass index (BMI) (18.7+/-3 kg/m2 versus 19.6+/-3 kg/m2, p=0.8). Over the study period A. xylosoxidans-colonised patients did have more need for intravenous antibiotic treatment courses (19 versus 5, p<0.001); nevertheless, there was no significant difference in lung function decline over the study period (FVC: -6.25+/-12.34% versus -5.62+/-8.30%, p 0.77, FEV1: -5.62+/-8.30% versus -1.87+/-11.58%, p<0.47). The prevalence of A. xylosoxidans infection or colonisation is probably underestimated. Colonised patients are mostly older, with more pronounced lung damage and

  6. Complementary feeding: clinically relevant factors affecting timing and composition.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Nancy F; Hambidge, K Michael

    2007-02-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 mo of life followed by optimal complementary feeding are critical public health measures for reducing and preventing morbidity and mortality in young children. Clinical factors, such as birth weight, prematurity, and illness, that affect the iron and zinc requirements of younger infants are discussed. Maternal diet and nutritional status do not have a strong effect on the mineral content of human milk, but physiologic changes in milk and the infants' status determine the dependence of the infant on complementary foods in addition to human milk to meet iron and zinc requirements after 6 mo. The nature of zinc absorption, which is suitably characterized by saturation response modeling, dictates that plant-based diets, which are low in zinc, are associated with low absolute daily absorbed zinc, which is inadequate to meet requirements. Foods with a higher zinc content, such as meats, are much more likely to be sufficient to meet dietary requirements. Current plant-based complementary feeding patterns for older fully breastfed infants in both developed and developing countries pose a risk of zinc deficiency. The strong rationale for the potential benefits of providing meat as an early complementary food, and the examples of successful intervention programs, provide potent incentives to pursue broader implementation programs, with concurrent rigorous evaluation of both efficacy and effectiveness.

  7. Clinical relevance of FASII bypass in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Gloux, Karine; Guillemet, Mélanie; Soler, Charles; Morvan, Claire; Halpern, David; Pourcel, Christine; Vu Thien, Hoang; Lamberet, Gilles; Gruss, Alexandra

    2017-02-13

    The need for new antimicrobials to treat bacterial infections has led to the use of fatty acid synthesis (FASII) enzymes as front-line targets. However, recent studies suggest that FASII inhibitors may not work against the opportunist pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, as environmental fatty acids favor emergence of multi-anti-FASII resistance. As fatty acids are abundant in the host, and one FASII inhibitor, triclosan, is widespread, we investigated whether fatty acid pools impact resistance in clinical and veterinary S. aureus isolates. Simple addition of fatty acids to screening medium led to a 50% increase in triclosan resistance, as tested in 700 isolates. Moreover, non-culturable triclosan-resistant fatty acid auxotrophs, which escape detection under routine conditions, were uncovered in primary patient samples. FASII bypass in selected isolates correlated with polymorphisms in acc and fabD loci. We conclude that fatty-acid-dependent strategies to escape FASII inhibition are common among S. aureus isolates and correlate with anti-FASII resistance and emergence of non-culturable variants.

  8. Longitudinal Metagenomic Analysis of Hospital Air Identifies Clinically Relevant Microbes

    PubMed Central

    King, Paula; Pham, Long K.; Waltz, Shannon; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T.; Conrad, Douglas; Taplitz, Randy; Torriani, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    We describe the sampling of sixty-three uncultured hospital air samples collected over a six-month period and analysis using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Our primary goals were to determine the longitudinal metagenomic variability of this environment, identify and characterize genomes of potential pathogens and determine whether they are atypical to the hospital airborne metagenome. Air samples were collected from eight locations which included patient wards, the main lobby and outside. The resulting DNA libraries produced 972 million sequences representing 51 gigabases. Hierarchical clustering of samples by the most abundant 50 microbial orders generated three major nodes which primarily clustered by type of location. Because the indoor locations were longitudinally consistent, episodic relative increases in microbial genomic signatures related to the opportunistic pathogens Aspergillus, Penicillium and Stenotrophomonas were identified as outliers at specific locations. Further analysis of microbial reads specific for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia indicated homology to a sequenced multi-drug resistant clinical strain and we observed broad sequence coverage of resistance genes. We demonstrate that a shotgun metagenomic sequencing approach can be used to characterize the resistance determinants of pathogen genomes that are uncharacteristic for an otherwise consistent hospital air microbial metagenomic profile. PMID:27482891

  9. Anaphylaxis: epidemiology, aetiology and relevance for the clinic.

    PubMed

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Sheikh, Aziz

    2017-09-01

    Anaphylaxis is responsible for considerable morbidity and may in some cases prove fatal. Areas covered: This review summarises the findings from recent studies on the epidemiology and aetiology of anaphylaxis and draws on the insights from this work and recent international guidelines to consider the implications for clinical care. Acute management of anaphylaxis is centred on early recognition, treatment with adrenaline (epinephrine) and other essential life-support measures. The importance of longer-term care of patients with a history of or at risk of anaphylaxis are also considered with a view to minimising the risk of further reactions. Tailored individual anaphylaxis management plans should be a routine component of this longer-term care with provision of adrenaline auto-injectors to those at risk of further episodes of anaphylaxis. More generally, there is a need to ensure that there are standard protocols in place to ensure that risks of triggering anaphylaxis are minimised and appropriate acute and long-term care are provided if reactions occur. Expert commentary: It is important to be aware that anaphylaxis may occur in patients of any age, sex or ethnicity. Early recognition and prompt treatment with adrenaline are potentially life-saving. Careful assessment of risk and appropriate long-term management are key to improving long-term outcomes in those at risk of repeat episodes of anaphylaxis.

  10. [Neurodermatitis and food allergy. Clinical relevance of testing procedures].

    PubMed

    Stiening, H; Szczepanski, R; von Mühlendahl, K E; Kalveram, C

    1990-12-01

    In 132 children with neurodermitis, we measured specific IgG and IgE antibodies against components of cow's milk, soy milk, and egg. In addition we performed epidermal tests by rubbing the nutrients onto the intact skin. The results were compared to the effect of complete omission of milk, egg, and soy during four weeks and with the outcome of subsequent reexposition. We used standardized scales to evaluate the neurodermitis and the skin reactions and for the clinical response to the oral challenge. The best prediction for the outcome of the oral challenge was obtained by the epidermal test which had to be done with whole milk, soy milk and egg white; there was no further advantage in testing egg yolk or soy oil. IgE antibodies followed next in their predictive value. No further precision was gained by the combination of epidermal testing with IgE results, by the measurement of IgE antibodies to the constituents of cow's milk, of IgG antibodies, and of the platelet count during oral challenging. Positive reactions to oral administration after four weeks' omission of allergenic food were relatively frequent in the age group below three years, but rare in school children and adolescents.

  11. A clinically relevant wound assessment method to monitor healing progression.

    PubMed

    Barber, Sharon

    2008-03-01

    One of the most important principles of wound management is periodic assessment and documentation of wound healing. Documentation of healing progress over time allows providers to assess the effectiveness of care to maximize healing. Several methods to determine wound healing progress currently exist and include dimensional, visual, and physiological assessments. However, because existing tools often require correlation of subjective assessments, are time-consuming, and may not consider that wound healing occurs from the "bottom up," a more objective and quicker approach to monitor healing progression was pursued. The purpose of this case study is to describe a once pen-and-paper tool that has now been computerized (the Barber Measuring Tool) that builds a graphical representation of a patient's individual wound healing progress to facilitate clinical decisions regarding the patient's plan of care. The tool, which is currently used for all wound patients in the author's facility, calculates wound volume using a simple formula and tracks this measurement as a percent of baseline over time in the patient's chart. Although formal research to establish validity and reliability of this tool has yet to be conducted, the tool has been used with more than 400 patients and has provided an accurate representation of healing progress. Studies to support proliferating use of this tool are warranted.

  12. Clinically relevant copy number variations detected in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Oskoui, Maryam; Gazzellone, Matthew J.; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Zarrei, Mehdi; Andersen, John; Wei, John; Wang, Zhuozhi; Wintle, Richard F.; Marshall, Christian R.; Cohn, Ronald D.; Weksberg, Rosanna; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J.; Fehlings, Darcy; Shevell, Michael I.; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) represents a group of non-progressive clinically heterogeneous disorders that are characterized by motor impairment and early age of onset, frequently accompanied by co-morbidities. The cause of CP has historically been attributed to environmental stressors resulting in brain damage. While genetic risk factors are also implicated, guidelines for diagnostic assessment of CP do not recommend for routine genetic testing. Given numerous reports of aetiologic copy number variations (CNVs) in other neurodevelopmental disorders, we used microarrays to genotype a population-based prospective cohort of children with CP and their parents. Here we identify de novo CNVs in 8/115 (7.0%) CP patients (∼1% rate in controls). In four children, large chromosomal abnormalities deemed likely pathogenic were found, and they were significantly more likely to have severe neuromotor impairments than those CP subjects without such alterations. Overall, the CNV data would have impacted our diagnosis or classification of CP in 11/115 (9.6%) families. PMID:26236009

  13. Osteoarthritis: an update with relevance for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Berenbaum, Francis; Lafeber, Floris P J G

    2011-06-18

    Osteoarthritis is thought to be the most prevalent chronic joint disease. The incidence of osteoarthritis is rising because of the ageing population and the epidemic of obesity. Pain and loss of function are the main clinical features that lead to treatment, including non-pharmacological, pharmacological, and surgical approaches. Clinicians recognise that the diagnosis of osteoarthritis is established late in the disease process, maybe too late to expect much help from disease-modifying drugs. Despite efforts over the past decades to develop markers of disease, still-imaging procedures and biochemical marker analyses need to be improved and possibly extended with more specific and sensitive methods to reliably describe disease processes, to diagnose the disease at an early stage, to classify patients according to their prognosis, and to follow the course of disease and treatment effectiveness. In the coming years, a better definition of osteoarthritis is expected by delineating different phenotypes of the disease. Treatment targeted more specifically at these phenotypes might lead to improved outcomes.

  14. MicroRNAs: Clinical Relevance in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Joe; Ohtsuka, Masahisa; Pichler, Martin; Ling, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancer diagnoses and causes of mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs are a class of small, non-coding regulatory RNAs that have shown strong associations with colorectal cancer. Through the repression of target messenger RNAs, microRNAs modulate many cellular pathways, such as those involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. The utilization of microRNAs has shown significant promise in the diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer, owing to their unique expression profile associations with cancer types and malignancies. Moreover, microRNA therapeutics with mimics or antagonists show great promise in preclinical studies, which encourages further development of their clinical use for colorectal cancer patients. The unique ability of microRNAs to affect multiple downstream pathways represents a novel approach for cancer therapy. Although still early in its development, we believe that microRNAs can be used in the near future as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for colorectal cancer. PMID:26602923

  15. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Patel, Mitesh; Paturi, Durga K; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Complete delineation of the HIV-1 life cycle has resulted in the development of several antiretroviral drugs. Twenty-five therapeutic agents belonging to five different classes are currently available for the treatment of HIV-1 infections. Advent of triple combination antiretroviral therapy has significantly lowered the mortality rate in HIV patients. However, fungal infections still represent major opportunistic diseases in immunocompromised patients worldwide. Areas covered Antiretroviral drugs that target enzymes and/or proteins indispensable for viral replication are discussed in this article. Fungal infections, causative organisms, epidemiology and preferred treatment modalities are also outlined. Finally, observed/predicted drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals are summarized along with clinical recommendations. Expert opinion Concomitant use of amphotericin B and tenofovir must be closely monitored for renal functioning. Due to relatively weak interactive potential with the CYP450 system, fluconazole is the preferred antifungal drug. High itraconazole doses (> 200 mg/day) are not advised in patients receiving booster protease inhibitor (PI) regimen. Posaconazole is contraindicated in combination with either efavirenz or fosamprenavir. Moreover, voriconazole is contraindicated with high-dose ritonavir-boosted PI. Echino-candins may aid in overcoming the limitations of existing antifungal therapy. An increasing number of documented or predicted drug-drug interactions and therapeutic drug monitoring may aid in the management of HIV-associated opportunistic fungal infections. PMID:24521092

  16. The Emergence of Clinically Relevant Babesiosis in Southwestern Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Todd J; Jobe, Dean A; Dolan, Emily C; Kessler, Anne; Lovrich, Steven D; Callister, Steven M

    2015-08-01

    To determine the frequency and characteristics of babesiosis cases, and to assess the impact of the introduction of a tick-borne infection diagnostic panel on babesiosis diagnosis in the region surrounding La Crosse, Wisconsin, where babesiosis in non-travelers was previously rare. In the spring of 2013, we conducted a point-in-time survey of Ixodes scopuloris ticks for the presence of Babesia microti. We also conducted a retrospective study of all babesiosis cases diagnosed in our health system between January 1, 2004, and November 1, 2013. Finally, we compared the number of babesiosis cases diagnosed during the study period before and after the June 1, 2012, introduction of a tick-borne infection diagnostic panel in our organization. Babesia microti was present in 5% of ticks surveyed in our region. Twenty-two cases. of babesiosis were diagnosed in our organization during the study period-19 since 2010. The tick-borne infection diagnostic panel was used widely by clinicians, with an attendant increase in babesiosis diagnoses. Babesiosis should be considered endemic in southwestern Wisconsin, and testing should be considered for patients with compatible clinical and laboratory features.

  17. [Drug interactions and clinical relevance: it all began with cheese].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Norte, Juan Antonio

    2012-04-01

    In a drug interaction, the effects of one drug can be increased or decreased or a quite new effect produced by the previous, concurrent or subsequent administration of another substance, including prescription and nonprescription drugs, food, tobacco or alcohol. The effect of the interaction can be desirable, inconsequential, or adverse. The increasing number of drugs available and the increasing use of multidrug therapeutic regimens enhance the potential for drug interactions. However, in clinical practice, most interactions are not significant or rarely of significance. It is when the interaction leads to adverse consequences that it comes to the attention of the patient and physician. Interactions may occur by pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamics mechanisms. Pharmacokinetic interactions represent the modification of one substance (the interacting substance) on the ADME processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism or excretion of a drug (the index drug). Subsequently, it may lead to changes in the concentration of the index drug at the receptor sites. Drug interactions with a pharmacodynamic basis involve actions on the same receptor or physiological systems through either synergism or antagonism. Many drug interactions can be predicted if the pharmacodynamics effects, pharmacokinetic properties and mechanisms of action of the interacting agents are known. The most obvious interactions are those producing altered pharmacokinetic of drugs with a low therapeutic index (oral anticoagulants, antidiabetic drugs, digoxin, benzodiazepines and immunosuppressant and cytotoxic drugs).

  18. The genetic basis of myelodysplasia and its clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Della Porta, Matteo G.; Malcovati, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplasia is a diagnostic feature of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) but is also found in other myeloid neoplasms. Its molecular basis has been recently elucidated by means of massive parallel sequencing studies. About 90% of MDS patients carry ≥1 oncogenic mutations, and two thirds of them are found in individuals with a normal karyotype. Driver mutant genes include those of RNA splicing (SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1, and ZRSR2), DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, and IDH1/2), chromatin modification (ASXL1 and EZH2), transcription regulation (RUNX1), DNA repair (TP53), signal transduction (CBL, NRAS, and KRAS), and cohesin complex (STAG2). Only 4 to 6 genes are consistently mutated in ≥10% MDS patients, whereas a long tail of ∼50 genes are mutated less frequently. At presentation, most patients typically have 2 or 3 driver oncogenic mutations and hundreds of background mutations. MDS driver genes are also frequently mutated in other myeloid neoplasms. Reliable genotype/phenotype relationships include the association of the SF3B1 mutation with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts, TET2/SRSF2 comutation with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, and activating CSF3R mutation with chronic neutrophilic leukemia. Although both founding and subclonal driver mutations have been shown to have prognostic significance, prospective clinical trials that include the molecular characterization of the patient’s genome are now needed. PMID:24136165

  19. Differential colorectal carcinogenesis: Molecular basis and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Morán, Alberto; Ortega, Paloma; de Juan, Carmen; Fernández-Marcelo, Tamara; Frías, Cristina; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Torres, Antonio José; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Iniesta, Pilar; Benito, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CCR) is one of the most frequent cancers in developed countries. It poses a major public health problem and there is renewed interest in understanding the basic principles of the molecular biology of colorectal cancer. It has been established that sporadic CCRs can arise from at least two different carcinogenic pathways. The traditional pathway, also called the suppressor or chromosomal instability pathway, follows the Fearon and Vogelstein model and shows mutation in classical oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes, such as K-ras, adenomatous polyposis coli, deleted in colorectal cancer, or p53. Alterations in the Wnt pathway are also very common in this type of tumour. The second main colorectal carcinogenesis pathway is the mutator pathway. This pathway is present in nearly 15% of all cases of sporadic colorectal cancer. It is characterized by the presence of mutations in the microsatellite sequences caused by a defect in the DNA mismatch repair genes, mostly in hMLH1 or hMSH2. These two pathways have clear molecular differences, which will be reviewed in this article, but they also present distinct histopathological features. More strikingly, their clinical behaviours are completely different, having the “mutator” tumours a better outcome than the “suppressor” tumours. PMID:21160823

  20. Longitudinal Metagenomic Analysis of Hospital Air Identifies Clinically Relevant Microbes.

    PubMed

    King, Paula; Pham, Long K; Waltz, Shannon; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T; Conrad, Douglas; Taplitz, Randy; Torriani, Francesca; Forsyth, R Allyn

    2016-01-01

    We describe the sampling of sixty-three uncultured hospital air samples collected over a six-month period and analysis using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Our primary goals were to determine the longitudinal metagenomic variability of this environment, identify and characterize genomes of potential pathogens and determine whether they are atypical to the hospital airborne metagenome. Air samples were collected from eight locations which included patient wards, the main lobby and outside. The resulting DNA libraries produced 972 million sequences representing 51 gigabases. Hierarchical clustering of samples by the most abundant 50 microbial orders generated three major nodes which primarily clustered by type of location. Because the indoor locations were longitudinally consistent, episodic relative increases in microbial genomic signatures related to the opportunistic pathogens Aspergillus, Penicillium and Stenotrophomonas were identified as outliers at specific locations. Further analysis of microbial reads specific for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia indicated homology to a sequenced multi-drug resistant clinical strain and we observed broad sequence coverage of resistance genes. We demonstrate that a shotgun metagenomic sequencing approach can be used to characterize the resistance determinants of pathogen genomes that are uncharacteristic for an otherwise consistent hospital air microbial metagenomic profile.

  1. Uterine fibroid vascularization and clinical relevance to uterine fibroid embolization.

    PubMed

    Pelage, Jean-Pierre; Cazejust, Julien; Pluot, Etienne; Le Dref, Olivier; Laurent, Alexandre; Spies, James B; Chagnon, Sophie; Lacombe, Pascal

    2005-10-01

    Embolization has become a first-line treatment for symptomatic uterine fibroid tumors. Selective catheterization and embolization of both uterine arteries, which are the predominant source of blood flow to fibroid tumors in most cases, is the cornerstone of treatment. Although embolization for treatment of uterine fibroid tumors is widely accepted, great familiarity with the normal and variant pelvic arterial anatomy is needed to ensure the safety and success of the procedure. The uterine artery classically arises as a first or second branch of the anterior division of the internal iliac artery and is usually dilated in the presence of a uterine fibroid tumor. Angiography is used for comprehensive pretreatment assessment of the pelvic arterial anatomy; for noninvasive evaluation, Doppler ultrasonography, contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR angiography also may be used. After the uterine artery is identified, selective catheterization should be performed distal to its cervicovaginal branch. For targeted embolization of the perifibroid arterial plexus, injection of particles with diameters larger than 500 mum is generally recommended. Excessive embolization may injure normal myometrium, ovaries, or fallopian tubes and lead to uterine necrosis or infection or to ovarian failure. Incomplete treatment or additional blood supply to the tumor (eg, via an ovarian artery) may result in clinical failure. The common postembolization angiographic end point is occlusion of the uterine arterial branches to the fibroid tumor while antegrade flow is maintained in the main uterine artery.

  2. Clinically Relevant Genetic Variations in Drug Metabolizing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Navin; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2011-01-01

    In the field of pharmacogenetics, we currently have a few markers to guide physicians as to the best course of therapy for patients. For the most part, these genetic variants are within a drug metabolizing enzyme that has a large effect on the degree or rate at which a drug is converted to its metabolites. For many drugs, response and toxicity are multi-genic traits and understanding relationships between a patient's genetic variation in drug metabolizing enzymes and the efficacy and/or toxicity of a medication offers the potential to optimize therapies. This review will focus on variants in drug metabolizing enzymes with predictable and relatively large impacts on drug efficacy and/or toxicity; some of these drug/gene variant pairs have impacted drug labels by the United States Food and Drug Administration. The challenges in identifying genetic markers and implementing clinical changes based on known markers will be discussed. In addition, the impact of next generation sequencing in identifying rare variants will be addressed. PMID:21453273

  3. [Ibogaine - structure, influence on human body, clinical relevance].

    PubMed

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmunt; Kuszczak, Bartłomiej; Olszak, Natalia

    2016-07-29

    Ibogaine is a natural chemical compound, which belongs to the indole alkaloid family. It can be naturally found within the root bark of african plant Tabernanthe iboga. Ibogaine plays a significant role among tribal cultures. Ibogaine, in small amount, causes reduction of hunger, thirst and exhaustion. In bigger amount, however, it can cause intensive visions. Other effects include reduction or complete disappearance of absitnence symptoms visible in people addicted to the nicotine, alcohol, methamphetamine, cocaine or opioids, what has been scientifically proven after the tests on animals and small groups of people. After oral application, 80% of ibogaine is subjected to the Odemethylation into noribogaine; main catalyzing enzyme is cytochrome CYP2D6. Research suggests, that ibogaine acts in many places within central nervous system. NMDA receptors seem to play main role in its anti-addiction properties. It is important to mention the side effects of the compound, which are cardiotoxicity and neurotoxicity, what makes it harder to use its beneficial properties. Because of this, Ibogaine is included among the dangerous substance. However, there are a few clinics in the world which specializes in the use of the compound in order to interrupt the sypmtoms acute opioid withdrawal syndrome as well as a substance benficial in curing other addictions. There is more hope with synthetic derivatives of ibogaine, which although are less toxic still keep their anti-addiction properties. The aim is to collect the available knowledge related to the structure and effects on human body of alkaloid Tabernanthe iboga and consider the possibility of commercial medical use.

  4. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Receptor Antibodies in Pregnancy: Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Ines; Giuliani, Cesidio; Napolitano, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Graves’ disease is the most common cause of thyrotoxicosis in women of childbearing age. Approximately 1% of pregnant women been treated before, or are being treated during pregnancy for Graves’ hyperthyroidism. In pregnancy, as in not pregnant state, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TSHR) antibodies (TRAbs) are the pathogenetic hallmark of Graves’ disease. TRAbs are heterogeneous for molecular and functional properties and are subdivided into activating (TSAbs), blocking (TBAbs), or neutral (N-TRAbs) depending on their effect on TSHR. The typical clinical features of Graves’ disease (goiter, hyperthyroidism, ophthalmopathy, dermopathy) occur when TSAbs predominate. Graves’ disease shows some peculiarities in pregnancy. The TRAbs disturb the maternal as well as the fetal thyroid function given their ability to cross the placental barrier. The pregnancy-related immunosuppression reduces the levels of TRAbs in most cases although they persist in women with active disease as well as in women who received definitive therapy (radioiodine or surgery) before pregnancy. Changes of functional properties from stimulating to blocking the TSHR could occur during gestation. Drug therapy is the treatment of choice for hyperthyroidism during gestation. Antithyroid drugs also cross the placenta and therefore decrease both the maternal and the fetal thyroid hormone production. The management of Graves’ disease in pregnancy should be aimed at maintaining euthyroidism in the mother as well as in the fetus. Maternal and fetal thyroid dysfunction (hyperthyroidism as well as hypothyroidism) are in fact associated with several morbidities. Monitoring of the maternal thyroid function, TRAbs measurement, and fetal surveillance are the mainstay for the management of Graves’ disease in pregnancy. This review summarizes the biochemical, immunological, and therapeutic aspects of Graves’ disease in pregnancy focusing on the role of the TRAbs in maternal and fetal

  5. Does the dawn phenomenon have clinical relevance in normal pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Mandujano, Alicia; Thomas, Alicia; Presley, Larraine Huston; Amini, Saeid B.; de Mouzon, Sylvie Hauguel; Catalano, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The dawn phenomenon is a transient rise in blood glucose between 4 and 6 AM that is attributed to the pulsatile release of pituitary growth hormone (GH). In pregnancy, GH is suppressed by placental GH. Hence, we hypothesize that there is no evidence for the dawn phenomenon in late pregnancy in healthy women. STUDY DESIGN Twenty glucose-tolerant women with singleton gestations between 28 weeks and 36 weeks 6 days’ gestation were recruited. The women were admitted overnight to the Clinical Research Unit and had continuous glucose monitoring. Insulin and GH were measured at 2-hour intervals from 8 PM to 8 AM. GH was grouped into times 1A (8–10 PM), 2A (12–2 AM), and 3A (4–8 AM) for changes over time. Further analysis was performed with time 1B (8 PM to 2 AM) and 2B (4–8 AM). Insulin was measured between 4 and 8 AM. RESULTS Plasma glucose decreased over time (P < .001). There were no significant changes in GH among times 1A, 2A, and 3A (P = .45) or times 1B and 2B (P = .12). Insulin concentrations increased after meals, but there were no changes from 4 AM (8.5 ± 1.4 μU/mL) through 8 AM (8.6 ± 1.1 μU/mL; P = .98). CONCLUSION Glucose and insulin concentrations show no increase from 4–8 AM; although there is variability in GH, there is no evidence for the dawn phenomenon in late pregnancy in healthy women. PMID:23583837

  6. Clinical relevance of sarcopenia in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Montano-Loza, Aldo J

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly recognized complications in cirrhotic patients include ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, variceal bleeding, susceptibility for infections, kidney dysfunction, and hepatocellular carcinoma; however, severe muscle wasting or sarcopenia are the most common and frequently unseen complications which negatively impact survival, quality of life, and response to stressor, such as infections and surgeries. At present, D’Amico stage classification, Child-Pugh, and MELD scores constitute the best tools to predict mortality in patients with cirrhosis; however, one of their main limitations is the lack of assessing the nutritional and functional status. Currently, numerous methods are available to evaluate the nutrition status of the cirrhotic patient; nevertheless, most of these techniques have limitations primarily because lack of objectivity, reproducibility, and prognosis discrimination. In this regard, an objective and reproducible technique, such as muscle mass quantification with cross-sectional imaging studies (computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging) constitute an attractive index of nutritional status in cirrhosis. Sarcopenia is part of the frailty complex present in cirrhotic patients, resulting from cumulative declines across multiple physiologic systems and characterized by impaired functional capacity, decreased reserve, resistance to stressors, and predisposition to poor outcomes. In this review, we discuss the current accepted and new methods to evaluate prognosis in cirrhosis. Also, we analyze the current knowledge regarding incidence and clinical impact of malnutrition and sarcopenia in patients with cirrhosis and their impact after liver transplantation. Finally, we discuss existing and potential novel therapeutic approaches for malnutrition in cirrhosis, emphasizing the recognition of sarcopenia in an effort to reduced morbidity related and improved survival in cirrhosis. PMID:25009378

  7. Clinical relevance of sarcopenia in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Montano-Loza, Aldo J

    2014-07-07

    The most commonly recognized complications in cirrhotic patients include ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, variceal bleeding, susceptibility for infections, kidney dysfunction, and hepatocellular carcinoma; however, severe muscle wasting or sarcopenia are the most common and frequently unseen complications which negatively impact survival, quality of life, and response to stressor, such as infections and surgeries. At present, D'Amico stage classification, Child-Pugh, and MELD scores constitute the best tools to predict mortality in patients with cirrhosis; however, one of their main limitations is the lack of assessing the nutritional and functional status. Currently, numerous methods are available to evaluate the nutrition status of the cirrhotic patient; nevertheless, most of these techniques have limitations primarily because lack of objectivity, reproducibility, and prognosis discrimination. In this regard, an objective and reproducible technique, such as muscle mass quantification with cross-sectional imaging studies (computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging) constitute an attractive index of nutritional status in cirrhosis. Sarcopenia is part of the frailty complex present in cirrhotic patients, resulting from cumulative declines across multiple physiologic systems and characterized by impaired functional capacity, decreased reserve, resistance to stressors, and predisposition to poor outcomes. In this review, we discuss the current accepted and new methods to evaluate prognosis in cirrhosis. Also, we analyze the current knowledge regarding incidence and clinical impact of malnutrition and sarcopenia in patients with cirrhosis and their impact after liver transplantation. Finally, we discuss existing and potential novel therapeutic approaches for malnutrition in cirrhosis, emphasizing the recognition of sarcopenia in an effort to reduced morbidity related and improved survival in cirrhosis.

  8. Clinical Relevance of Cranial Nerve Injury following Carotid Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fokkema, M.; de Borst, G.J.; Nolan, B.W.; Indes, J.; Buck, D.B.; Lo, R.C.; Moll, F.L.; Schermerhorn, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The benefit of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) may be diminished by cranial nerve injury (CNI). Using a quality improvement registry, we aimed to identify the nerves affected, duration of symptoms (transient vs. persistent), and clinical predictors of CNI. Methods We identified all patients undergoing CEA in the Vascular Study Group of New England (VSGNE) between 2003 and 2011. Surgeon-observed CNI rate was determined at discharge (postoperative CNI) and at follow-up to determine persistent CNI (CNIs that persisted at routine follow-up visit). Hierarchical multivariable model controlling for surgeon and hospital was used to assess independent predictors for postoperative CNI. Results A total of 6,878 patients (33.8% symptomatic) were included for analyses. CNI rate at discharge was 5.6% (n = 382). Sixty patients (0.7%) had more than one nerve affected. The hypoglossal nerve was most frequently involved (n = 185, 2.7%), followed by the facial (n = 128, 1.9%), the vagus (n = 49, 0.7%), and the glossopharyngeal (n = 33, 0.5%) nerve. The vast majority of these CNIs were transient; only 47 patients (0.7%) had a persistent CNI at their follow-up visit (median 10.0 months, range 0.3–15.6 months). Patients with perioperative stroke (0.9%, n = 64) had significantly higher risk of CNI (n = 15, CNI risk 23.4%, p < .01). Predictors for CNI were urgent procedures (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2–2.1, p < .01), immediate re-exploration after closure under the same anesthetic (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.3–3.0, p < .01), and return to the operating room for a neurologic event or bleeding (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4–3.8, p < .01), but not redo CEA (OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.5–1.9, p = .90) or prior cervical radiation (OR 0.9, 95% CI 0.3–2.5, p = .80). Conclusions As patients are currently selected in the VSGNE, persistent CNI after CEA is rare. While conditions of urgency and (sub)acute reintervention carried increased risk for postoperative CNI, a history of prior ipsilateral CEA or cervical

  9. Xylem transcription profiles indicate potential metabolic responses for economically relevant characteristics of Eucalyptus species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Eucalyptus is one of the most important sources of industrial cellulose. Three species of this botanical group are intensively used in breeding programs: E. globulus, E. grandis and E. urophylla. E. globulus is adapted to subtropical/temperate areas and is considered a source of high-quality cellulose; E. grandis grows rapidly and is adapted to tropical/subtropical climates; and E. urophylla, though less productive, is considered a source of genes related to robustness. Wood, or secondary xylem, results from cambium vascular differentiation and is mostly composed of cellulose, lignin and hemicelluloses. In this study, the xylem transcriptomes of the three Eucalyptus species were investigated in order to provide insights on the particularities presented by each of these species. Results Data analysis showed that (1) most Eucalyptus genes are expressed in xylem; (2) most genes expressed in species-specific way constitutes genes with unknown functions and are interesting targets for future studies; (3) relevant differences were observed in the phenylpropanoid pathway: E. grandis xylem presents higher expression of genes involved in lignin formation whereas E. urophylla seems to deviates the pathway towards flavonoid formation; (4) stress-related genes are considerably more expressed in E. urophylla, suggesting that these genes may contribute to its robustness. Conclusions The comparison of these three transcriptomes indicates the molecular signatures underlying some of their distinct wood characteristics. This information may contribute to the understanding of xylogenesis, thus increasing the potential of genetic engineering approaches aiming at the improvement of Eucalyptus forest plantations productivity. PMID:23521840

  10. Xylem transcription profiles indicate potential metabolic responses for economically relevant characteristics of Eucalyptus species.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Marcela Mendes; Nascimento, Leandro Costa; Camargo, Eduardo Leal Oliveira; Gonçalves, Danieli Cristina; Lepikson Neto, Jorge; Marques, Wesley Leoricy; Teixeira, Paulo José Pereira Lima; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Mondego, Jorge Maurício Costa; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Deckmann, Ana Carolina; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2013-03-22

    Eucalyptus is one of the most important sources of industrial cellulose. Three species of this botanical group are intensively used in breeding programs: E. globulus, E. grandis and E. urophylla. E. globulus is adapted to subtropical/temperate areas and is considered a source of high-quality cellulose; E. grandis grows rapidly and is adapted to tropical/subtropical climates; and E. urophylla, though less productive, is considered a source of genes related to robustness. Wood, or secondary xylem, results from cambium vascular differentiation and is mostly composed of cellulose, lignin and hemicelluloses. In this study, the xylem transcriptomes of the three Eucalyptus species were investigated in order to provide insights on the particularities presented by each of these species. Data analysis showed that (1) most Eucalyptus genes are expressed in xylem; (2) most genes expressed in species-specific way constitutes genes with unknown functions and are interesting targets for future studies; (3) relevant differences were observed in the phenylpropanoid pathway: E. grandis xylem presents higher expression of genes involved in lignin formation whereas E. urophylla seems to deviates the pathway towards flavonoid formation; (4) stress-related genes are considerably more expressed in E. urophylla, suggesting that these genes may contribute to its robustness. The comparison of these three transcriptomes indicates the molecular signatures underlying some of their distinct wood characteristics. This information may contribute to the understanding of xylogenesis, thus increasing the potential of genetic engineering approaches aiming at the improvement of Eucalyptus forest plantations productivity.

  11. Frankincense Revisited, Part I: Comparative Analysis of Volatiles in Commercially Relevant Boswellia Species.

    PubMed

    Niebler, Johannes; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    The genus Boswellia comprises many species which are famous for their production of frankincense, a fragrant gum resin. In the published literature, manifold studies on the volatiles and semivolatiles in individual samples of these gum resins exist, yet very few studies have investigated multiple samples. Contradictory results with regard to the volatile composition exist in literature. In this first part of the study, a large sample set (n = 46) of mostly commercially obtained gum resins and essential oils was investigated by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A total of 216 compounds were identified or tentatively identified from the four commercially relevant species, namely B. sacra, B. serrata, B. papyrifera, and B. frereana, and the statistical evaluation of the resulting chemical profiles allowed a clear distinction between the species by their volatile profile. With only few exceptions, the designated species was found to be in accordance with the composition reported in reliable literature sources and detected in botanically identified samples. Chemotaxonomic marker substances were suggested to facilitate the differentiation of commercial gum resins or essential oils based on their volatile profile.

  12. Mobile phone interference with medical equipment and its clinical relevance: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Bolton, Damien M

    2004-08-02

    To conduct a systematic review of studies on clinically relevant digital mobile phone electromagnetic interference with medical equipment. MEDLINE and SUMSEARCH were searched for the period 1966-2004. The Cochrane Library and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects were also searched for systematic reviews. Studies were eligible if published in a peer-reviewed journal in English, and if they included testing of digital mobile phones for clinically relevant interference with medical equipment used to monitor or treat patients, but not implantable medical devices. As there was considerable heterogeneity in medical equipment studied and the conduct of testing, results were summarised rather than subjected to meta-analysis. Clinically relevant electromagnetic interference (EMI) secondary to mobile phones potentially endangering patients occurred in 45 of 479 devices tested at 900 MHz and 14 of 457 devices tested at 1800 MHz. However, in the largest studies, the prevalence of clinically relevant EMI was low. Most clinically relevant EMI occurred when mobile phones were used within 1 m of medical equipment. Although testing was not standardised between studies and equipment tested was not identical, it is of concern that at least 4% of devices tested in any study were susceptible to clinically relevant EMI. All studies recommend some type of restriction of mobile phone use in hospitals, with use greater than 1 m from equipment and restrictions in clinical areas being the most common.

  13. Expression, regulation and clinical relevance of the ATPase inhibitory factor 1 in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Aragó, M; Formentini, L; Martínez-Reyes, I; García-Bermudez, J; Santacatterina, F; Sánchez-Cenizo, L; Willers, I M; Aldea, M; Nájera, L; Juarránz, Á; López, E C; Clofent, J; Navarro, C; Espinosa, E; Cuezva, J M

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings in colon cancer cells indicate that inhibition of the mitochondrial H+-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase by the ATPase inhibitory factor 1 (IF1) promotes aerobic glycolysis and a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signal that enhances proliferation and cell survival. Herein, we have studied the expression, biological relevance, mechanism of regulation and potential clinical impact of IF1 in some prevalent human carcinomas. We show that IF1 is highly overexpressed in most (>90%) of the colon (n=64), lung (n=30), breast (n=129) and ovarian (n=10) carcinomas studied as assessed by different approaches in independent cohorts of cancer patients. The expression of IF1 in the corresponding normal tissues is negligible. By contrast, the endometrium, stomach and kidney show high expression of IF1 in the normal tissue revealing subtle differences by carcinogenesis. The overexpression of IF1 also promotes the activation of aerobic glycolysis and a concurrent ROS signal in mitochondria of the lung, breast and ovarian cancer cells mimicking the activity of oligomycin. IF1-mediated ROS signaling activates cell-type specific adaptive responses aimed at preventing death in these cell lines. Remarkably, regulation of IF1 expression in the colon, lung, breast and ovarian carcinomas is exerted at post-transcriptional levels. We demonstrate that IF1 is a short-lived protein (t1/2 ∼100 min) strongly implicating translation and/or protein stabilization as main drivers of metabolic reprogramming and cell survival in these human cancers. Analysis of tumor expression of IF1 in cohorts of breast and colon cancer patients revealed its relevance as a predictive marker for clinical outcome, emphasizing the high potential of IF1 as therapeutic target. PMID:23608753

  14. Understanding and Discrimination of Biofilms of Clinically Relevant Microorganisms Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    PubMed

    Keleştemur, Seda; Çulha, Mustafa

    2017-06-01

    Biofilm formation is a defense mechanism for microorganisms to survive under both natural and stress conditions. Clinically relevant microorganisms threaten patient health through biofilm formation on medical devices and implants. It is very important to identify biofilm formation in order to suppress their pathogenic activities in early stages. With the aim for better understanding biofilm formation and possibility of detection, in this study, biofilm formation of clinically important microorganisms, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Candida albicans are monitored with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The SERS spectra were collected by mapping a dried droplet area where a volume of colloidal silver nanoparticle (AgNP) suspension is placed on microorganism culture plate. The spectral changes on the SERS spectra with increasing incubation time of the model microorganisms from 4 to 120 h are monitored. The unique spectra originating from the biofilms of three pathogenic microorganisms and the spectral changes as a result of time-dependent concentration fluctuations of biomolecular species in their biofilms including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and genetic materials allow not only identification but also discrimination of biofilms using principal component analysis.

  15. Germination of Spores of Astrobiologically Relevant Bacillus Species in High-Salinity Environments.

    PubMed

    Nagler, Katja; Julius, Christina; Moeller, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    In times of increasing space exploration and search for extraterrestrial life, new questions and challenges for planetary protection, aiming to avoid forward contamination of different planets or moons with terrestrial life, are emerging. Spore-forming bacteria such as Bacillus species have a high contamination potential due to their spores' extreme resistance, enabling them to withstand space conditions. Spores require liquid water for their conversion into a growing cell (i.e., spore germination and subsequent growth). If present, water on extraterrestrial planets or moons is likely to be closely associated with salts (e.g., in salty oceans or brines), thus constituting high-salinity environments. Spores of Bacillus subtilis can germinate despite very high salt concentrations, although salt stress does exert negative effects on this process. In this study, germination and metabolic reactivation ("outgrowth") of spores of five astrobiologically relevant Bacillus species (B. megaterium, B. pumilus SAFR-032, B. nealsonii, B. mojavensis, and B. vallismortis) in high salinity (≤3.6 M NaCl) were investigated. Spores of different species exhibited different germination and outgrowth capabilities in high salinity, which strongly depended on germination conditions, especially the exact composition of the medium. In this context, a new "universal" germination trigger for Bacillus spores, named KAGE (KCl, L-alanine, D-glucose, ectoine), was identified, which will be very useful for future comparative germination and outgrowth studies on different Bacillus species. Overall, this study yielded interesting new insights on salt stress effects on spore germination and points out the difficulty of predicting the potential of spores to contaminate salty environments on extraterrestrial celestial bodies. Bacillus species-Spores-Germination-High salinity-Salt stress-NaCl-Inhibition. Astrobiology 16, 500-512.

  16. Multiple system organ response induced by hyperoxia in a clinically relevant animal model of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-González, Raquel; Martín-Barrasa, José Luis; Ramos-Nuez, Ángela; Cañas-Pedrosa, Ana María; Martínez-Saavedra, María Teresa; García-Bello, Miguel Ángel; López-Aguilar, Josefina; Baluja, Aurora; Álvarez, Julián; Slutsky, Arthur S; Villar, Jesús

    2014-08-01

    Oxygen therapy is currently used as a supportive treatment in septic patients to improve tissue oxygenation. However, oxygen can exert deleterious effects on the inflammatory response triggered by infection. We postulated that the use of high oxygen concentrations may be partially responsible for the worsening of sepsis-induced multiple system organ dysfunction in an experimental clinically relevant model of sepsis. We used Sprague-Dawley rats. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Sham-septic controls (n = 16) and septic animals (n = 32) were randomly assigned to four groups and placed in a sealed Plexiglas cage continuously flushed for 24 h with medical air (group 1), 40% oxygen (group 2), 60% oxygen (group 3), or 100% oxygen (group 4). We examined the effects of these oxygen concentrations on the spread of infection in blood, urine, peritoneal fluid, bronchoalveolar lavage, and meninges; serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers and reactive oxygen species production; and hematological parameters in all experimental groups. In cecal ligation and puncture animals, the use of higher oxygen concentrations was associated with a greater number of infected biological samples (P < 0.0001), higher serum levels of interleukin-6 (P < 0.0001), interleukin-10 (P = 0.033), and tumor necrosis factor-α (P = 0.034), a marked decrease in platelet counts (P < 0.001), and a marked elevation of reactive oxygen species serum levels (P = 0.0006) after 24 h of oxygen exposure. Oxygen therapy greatly influences the progression and clinical manifestation of multiple system organ dysfunction in experimental sepsis. If these results are extrapolated to humans, they suggest that oxygen therapy should be carefully managed in septic patients to minimize its deleterious effects.

  17. Prognostic Factors Toward Clinically Relevant Radiographic Progression in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Tomohiro; Okada, Akitomo; Fukuda, Takaaki; Hidaka, Toshihiko; Ishii, Tomonori; Ueki, Yukitaka; Kodera, Takao; Nakashima, Munetoshi; Takahashi, Yuichi; Honda, Seiyo; Horai, Yoshiro; Watanabe, Ryu; Okuno, Hiroshi; Aramaki, Toshiyuki; Izumiyama, Tomomasa; Takai, Osamu; Miyashita, Taiichiro; Sato, Shuntaro; Kawashiri, Shin-ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Tamai, Mami; Origuchi, Tomoki; Nakamura, Hideki; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Eguchi, Katsumi; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine prognostic factors of clinically relevant radiographic progression (CRRP) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice. We performed a multicenter prospective study in Japan of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD)-naive RA patients with moderate to high disease activity treated with conventional synthetic DMARDs (csDMARDs) at study entry. We longitudinally observed 408 patients for 1 year and assessed disease activity every 3 months. CRRP was defined as yearly progression of modified total Sharp score (mTSS) > 3.0 U. We also divided the cohort into 2 groups based on disease duration (<3 vs ≥3 years) and performed a subgroup analysis. CRRP was found in 10.3% of the patients. A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the independent variables to predict the development of CRRP were: CRP at baseline (0.30 mg/dL increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.11), time-integrated Disease Activity Score in 28 joints-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR) during the 1 year postbaseline (12.4-unit increase, 95%CI 1.17–2.59), RA typical erosion at baseline (95%CI 1.56–21.1), and the introduction of bDMARDs (95%CI 0.06–0.38). The subgroup analysis revealed that time-integrated DAS28-ESR is not a predictor whereas the introduction of bDMARDs is a significant protective factor for CRRP in RA patients with disease duration <3 years. We identified factors that could be used to predict the development of CRRP in RA patients treated with DMARDs. These variables appear to be different based on the RA patients’ disease durations. PMID:27124044

  18. Caldora penicillata gen. nov., comb. nov. (Cyanobacteria), a pantropical marine species with biomedical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Engene, Niclas; Tronholm, Ana; Salvador-Reyes, Lilibeth A.; Luesch, Hendrik; Paul, Valerie J.

    2015-01-01

    Many tropical marine cyanobacteria are prolific producers of bioactive secondary metabolites with ecological relevance and promising pharmaceutical applications. One species of chemically rich, tropical marine cyanobacteria that was previously identified as Symploca hydnoides or Symploca sp. corresponds to the traditional taxonomic definition of Phormidium penicillatum. In this study, we clarified the taxonomy of this biomedically and ecologically important cyanobacterium by comparing recently collected specimens with the original type material and the taxonomic description of P. penicillatum. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S ITS regions showed that P. penicillatum formed an independent clade sister to the genus Symploca, and distantly related to Phormidium and Lyngbya. We propose the new genus Caldora for this clade, with Caldora penicillata comb. nov. as the type species and designate as the epitype the recently collected strain FK13-1. Furthermore, the production of bioactive secondary metabolites among various geographically dispersed collections of C. penicillata showed that this species consistently produced the metabolite dolastatin 10 and/or the related compound symplostatin 1, which appear to be robust autapomorphic characters and chemotaxonomic markers for this taxon. PMID:26327714

  19. Germination of Spores of Astrobiologically Relevant Bacillus Species in High-Salinity Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, Katja; Julius, Christina; Moeller, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    In times of increasing space exploration and search for extraterrestrial life, new questions and challenges for planetary protection, aiming to avoid forward contamination of different planets or moons with terrestrial life, are emerging. Spore-forming bacteria such as Bacillus species have a high contamination potential due to their spores' extreme resistance, enabling them to withstand space conditions. Spores require liquid water for their conversion into a growing cell (i.e., spore germination and subsequent growth). If present, water on extraterrestrial planets or moons is likely to be closely associated with salts (e.g., in salty oceans or brines), thus constituting high-salinity environments. Spores of Bacillus subtilis can germinate despite very high salt concentrations, although salt stress does exert negative effects on this process. In this study, germination and metabolic reactivation ("outgrowth") of spores of five astrobiologically relevant Bacillus species (B. megaterium, B. pumilus SAFR-032, B. nealsonii, B. mojavensis, and B. vallismortis) in high salinity (≤3.6 M NaCl) were investigated. Spores of different species exhibited different germination and outgrowth capabilities in high salinity, which strongly depended on germination conditions, especially the exact composition of the medium. In this context, a new "universal" germination trigger for Bacillus spores, named KAGE (KCl, L-alanine, D-glucose, ectoine), was identified, which will be very useful for future comparative germination and outgrowth studies on different Bacillus species. Overall, this study yielded interesting new insights on salt stress effects on spore germination and points out the difficulty of predicting the potential of spores to contaminate salty environments on extraterrestrial celestial bodies.

  20. Self-Esteem and Dimensions of Clinically Relevant Behavior Among Ten Year Olds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Philip; Pearman, William A.

    Although self-concept has been linked with many behavioral variables, most studies do not deal with dependent variables which would provide an understanding of such clinically relevant behaviors as sociability, aggression, activity level, somatization, inhibition, and sleep disturbance. The relationship between self-esteem and clinically relevant…

  1. Self-Esteem and Dimensions of Clinically Relevant Behavior Among Ten Year Olds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Philip; Pearman, William A.

    Although self-concept has been linked with many behavioral variables, most studies do not deal with dependent variables which would provide an understanding of such clinically relevant behaviors as sociability, aggression, activity level, somatization, inhibition, and sleep disturbance. The relationship between self-esteem and clinically relevant…

  2. Campylobacter species in animal, food, and environmental sources, and relevant testing programs in Canada.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongsheng; Brooks, Brian W; Lowman, Ruff; Carrillo, Catherine D

    2015-10-01

    Campylobacter species, particularly thermophilic campylobacters, have emerged as a leading cause of human foodborne gastroenteritis worldwide, with Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, and Campylobacter lari responsible for the majority of human infections. Although most cases of campylobacteriosis are self-limiting, campylobacteriosis represents a significant public health burden. Human illness caused by infection with campylobacters has been reported across Canada since the early 1970s. Many studies have shown that dietary sources, including food, particularly raw poultry and other meat products, raw milk, and contaminated water, have contributed to outbreaks of campylobacteriosis in Canada. Campylobacter spp. have also been detected in a wide range of animal and environmental sources, including water, in Canada. The purpose of this article is to review (i) the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in animals, food, and the environment, and (ii) the relevant testing programs in Canada with a focus on the potential links between campylobacters and human health in Canada.

  3. Intestinal microbiota in metabolic diseases: from bacterial community structure and functions to species of pathophysiological relevance.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Thomas; Desmarchelier, Charles; Haller, Dirk; Gérard, Philippe; Rohn, Sascha; Lepage, Patricia; Daniel, Hannelore

    2014-07-01

    The trillions of bacterial cells that colonize the mammalian digestive tract influence both host physiology and the fate of dietary compounds. Gnotobionts and fecal transplantation have been instrumental in revealing the causal role of intestinal bacteria in energy homeostasis and metabolic dysfunctions such as type-2 diabetes. However, the exact contribution of gut bacterial metabolism to host energy balance is still unclear and knowledge about underlying molecular mechanisms is scant. We have previously characterized cecal bacterial community functions and host responses in diet-induced obese mice using omics approaches. Based on these studies, we here discuss issues on the relevance of mouse models, give evidence that the metabolism of cholesterol-derived compounds by gut bacteria is of particular importance in the context of metabolic disorders and that dominant species of the family Coriobacteriaceae are good models to study these functions.

  4. The Effects of Clinically Relevant Multiple-Choice Items on the Statistical Discrimination of Physician Clinical Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downing, Steven M.; Maatsch, Jack L.

    To test the effect of clinically relevant multiple-choice item content on the validity of statistical discriminations of physicians' clinical competence, data were collected from a field test of the Emergency Medicine Examination, test items for the certification of specialists in emergency medicine. Two 91-item multiple-choice subscales were…

  5. Contact allergy to colophony. Clinical and experimental studies with emphasis on clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Färm, G

    1998-01-01

    Colophony--also called rosin--is a material obtained from coniferous trees. It is used widely in many products, particularly because of its good tackifying properties. Colophony is also used in paper sizing to increase water resistance. Colophony may cause contact allergy, and around 5% of Swedish dermatitis patients show allergic reactions to colophony at patch testing. There are many case reports of colophony in different products causing contact dermatitis. Often, however, the clinical relevance of a positive patch-test reaction to colophony is difficult to evaluate. The principal aims of the present thesis were to study the prevalence of contact allergy to colophony and of skin disease in individuals with an occupational exposure to colophony; to study the prognosis of dermatitis in colophony-sensitive subjects, and to investigate the outcome of repeated open applications of colophony, thereby trying to elucidate the clinical relevance of contact allergy to colophony. Employees of a tall-oil rosin (colophony) factory (n = 180), and of an opera company where colophony was used in dancers' rosin, mascara and wig glues (n = 132), were interviewed, examined and patch tested. 3.9% and 2% of these two groups respectively had a positive patch test to colophony. More than every fourth participant showed some kind of skin disease, but only few cases were related to work. Eighty-three patients with previously diagnosed contact allergy to colophony were followed-up 72% showed a positive patch-test reaction to colophony at re-testing. Around one third had hand eczema. There was no significant correlation between colophony exposure and current hand eczema. Adhesive bandages containing colophony and zinc oxide (ZnO), colophony and mixes of colophony and ZnO, were tested in 7 colophony-sensitive subjects to see whether addition of zinc oxide inhibited elicitation of allergic dermatitis to colophony, which has been proposed. No difference in reactivity between colophony and

  6. Presence and Persistence of Viable, Clinically Relevant Legionella pneumophila Bacteria in Garden Soil in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van Heijnsbergen, E.; van Deursen, A.; Bouwknegt, M.; Bruin, J. P.; Schalk, J. A. C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Garden soils were investigated as reservoirs and potential sources of pathogenic Legionella bacteria. Legionella bacteria were detected in 22 of 177 garden soil samples (12%) by amoebal coculture. Of these 22 Legionella-positive soil samples, seven contained Legionella pneumophila. Several other species were found, including the pathogenic Legionella longbeachae (4 gardens) and Legionella sainthelensi (9 gardens). The L. pneumophila isolates comprised 15 different sequence types (STs), and eight of these STs were previously isolated from patients according to the European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI) database. Six gardens that were found to be positive for L. pneumophila were resampled after several months, and in three gardens, L. pneumophila was again isolated. One of these gardens was resampled four times throughout the year and was found to be positive for L. pneumophila on all occasions. IMPORTANCE Tracking the source of infection for sporadic cases of Legionnaires' disease (LD) has proven to be hard. L. pneumophila ST47, the sequence type that is most frequently isolated from LD patients in the Netherlands, is rarely found in potential environmental sources. As L. pneumophila ST47 was previously isolated from a garden soil sample during an outbreak investigation, garden soils were investigated as reservoirs and potential sources of pathogenic Legionella bacteria. The detection of viable, clinically relevant Legionella strains indicates that garden soil is a potential source of Legionella bacteria, and future research should assess the public health implication of the presence of L. pneumophila in garden soil. PMID:27316958

  7. [Preliminary identification of clinically significant Clostridium species].

    PubMed

    Balejová, Magda

    2010-06-01

    Preliminary identification of clinically significant Clostridium spp. is based on evaluating their microscopic and macroscopic morphology, Gram staining (Gram stain-positive structure of the bacterial wall), positive production of lecithinase, lipase and proteolytic activity on egg yolk agar, and simple chemical tests. If this preliminary identification is not sufficient, biochemical identification is performed, along with 16S-rRNA sequencing of the bacterial genome. The article comments on options of preliminary identification of clinically significant Clostridium spp.

  8. Clinically relevant heterotopic ossification after elbow fracture surgery: a risk factors study.

    PubMed

    Hong, C C; Nashi, N; Hey, H W; Chee, Y H; Murphy, D

    2015-04-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a common complication of elbow fracture surgery that can significantly impair function and range of motion (ROM). Whereas numerous studies have assessed HO after hip trauma or replacement surgery, few data have been reported on the prevalence and risk factors of HO after elbow fractures. Our objective was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of clinically relevant HO after elbow fracture surgery under the hypothesis that the ability to identify high-risk patients would improve treatment tailoring and assist in meeting patient expectations. We retrospectively included consecutive patients who had surgery for elbow injuries between January 2007 and December 2011. Patient demographics, operative details, and radiographs were reviewed. Of 124 elbows in 122 patients, 38 (30.6%) had HO and 26 (21%) clinically relevant HO. The prevalence of clinically relevant HO was highest in floating elbow injury, followed by combined olecranon and radial head fractures, types A and B distal humerus fractures, and terrible triad injury. By multiple logistic regression, factors that independently predicted clinically relevant HO were fracture-dislocation (OR, 4.87; 95%CI, 1.78-13.29; P=0.002) and longer time to surgery (P<0.05). Of the 26 patients with clinically relevant HO, 6 (23%) eventually required revision elbow surgery to improve ROM. HO of the elbow occurred in almost one-third of our patients with surgically treated elbow fractures. Fracture-dislocation of the elbow and longer time to surgery independently predicted HO responsible for ROM loss. Clinically relevant HO was associated with significant morbidity. Level IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Spectroscopic Properties of Tc(I) Tricarbonyl Species Relevant to the Hanford Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Andersen, Amity; Chatterjee, Sayandev; Hall, Gabriel B.; Walter, Eric D.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2015-12-04

    Technetium-99 (Tc) exists predominately in soluble forms in the liquid supernatant and salt cake fractions of the nuclear tank waste stored at the U.S. DOE Hanford Site. In the strongly alkaline environments prevalent in the tank waste, its dominant chemical form is pertechnetate (TcO4-, oxidation state +7). However, attempts to remove Tc from the Hanford tank waste using ion-exchange processes specific to TcO4- only met with limited success, particularly processing tank waste samples containing elevated concentrations of organic complexants. This suggests that a significant fraction of the soluble Tc can be present as non-pertechnetate low-valent Tc (oxidation state < +7) (non-pertechnetate). The chemical identities of these non-pertechnetate species are poorly understood. Previous analysis of the SY-101 and SY-103 tank waste samples provided strong evidence that non-pertechnetate can be comprised of [Tc(CO)3]+ complexes containing Tc in oxidation state +1 (Lukens et al. 2004). During the last two years, our team has expanded this work and demonstrated that high-ionic-strength solutions typifying tank waste supernatants promote oxidative stability of the [Tc(CO)3]+ species (Rapko et al. 2013; Levitskaia et al. 2014). It also was observed that high-ionic-strength alkaline matrices stabilize Tc(VI) and potentially Tc(IV) oxidation states, particularly in presence organic chelators, suggesting that the relevant Tc compounds can serve as important redox intermediates facilitating the reduction of Tc(VII) to Tc(I). Designing strategies for effective Tc processing, including separation and immobilization, necessitates understanding the molecular structure of these non-pertechnetate species and their identification in the actual tank waste samples. To-date, only limited information exists regarding the nature and characterization of the Tc(I), Tc(IV), and Tc(VI) species. One objective of this project is to

  10. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: reporting clinically relevant features.

    PubMed

    Del Chiaro, Marco; Verbeke, Caroline

    2016-11-22

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas can exhibit a wide spectrum of macroscopic and microscopic appearances. This not only causes occasional difficulties for the reporting pathologist in distinguishing these tumours from other lesions, but is also relevant clinically. As evidence accumulates, it becomes clear that multiple macroscopic and histological features of these neoplasms are relevant to the risk for malignant transformation and, consequently, of prime importance for clinical patient management. The need for detailed reporting is therefore increasing. This review discusses the panoply of gross and microscopic features of IPMN as well as the recommendations from recent consensus meetings regarding the pathology reporting on this tumour entity.

  11. Prevalence and clinical relevance of helminth co-infections among tuberculosis patients in urban Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Hella, Jerry; Said, Khadija; Kamwela, Lujeko; Sasamalo, Mohamed; Maroa, Thomas; Chiryamkubi, Magreth; Mhalu, Grace; Schindler, Christian; Reither, Klaus; Knopp, Stefanie; Utzinger, Jürg; Gagneux, Sébastien; Fenner, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    Background Helminth infections can negatively affect the immunologic host control, which may increase the risk of progression from latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to tuberculosis (TB) disease and alter the clinical presentation of TB. We assessed the prevalence and determined the clinical relevance of helminth co-infection among TB patients and household contact controls in urban Tanzania. Methodology Between November 2013 and October 2015, we enrolled adult (≥18 years) sputum smear-positive TB patients and household contact controls without TB during an ongoing TB cohort study in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We used Baermann, FLOTAC, Kato-Katz, point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen, and urine filtration to diagnose helminth infections. Multivariable logistic regression models with and without random effects for households were used to assess for associations between helminth infection and TB. Principal findings A total of 597 TB patients and 375 household contact controls were included. The median age was 33 years and 60.2% (585/972) were men. The prevalence of any helminth infection among TB patients was 31.8% (190/597) and 25.9% (97/375) among controls. Strongyloides stercoralis was the predominant helminth species (16.6%, 161), followed by hookworm (9.0%, 87) and Schistosoma mansoni (5.7%, 55). An infection with any helminth was not associated with TB (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88–1.80, p = 0.22), but S. mansoni infection was (aOR 2.15, 95% CI: 1.03–4.45, p = 0.040). Moreover, S. mansoni infection was associated with lower sputum bacterial load (aOR 2.63, 95% CI: 1.38–5.26, p = 0.004) and tended to have fewer lung cavitations (aOR 0.41, 95% CI: 0.12–1.16, p = 0.088). Conclusions/Significance S. mansoni infection was an independent risk factor for active TB and altered the clinical presentation in TB patients. These findings suggest a role for schistosomiasis in modulating the pathogenesis of human TB

  12. FAST Real Time PCR for control of intra-species recycling in aquaculture feed, focused to the most relevant fish species farmed in Europe.

    PubMed

    Espiñeira, Montserrat; Vieites, Juan M

    2016-08-01

    Recent regulations in animal feed composition prohibit intra-species recycling, the recycling of one given animal species to the same species, in order to avoid potential safety risks to human and animal health. These regulations have generated the need of their control in aquaculture by effective and specific analytical techniques. To date, most studies of species identification and detection in feedstuffs are focused on land species, but few studies are focused on species composition in fish feed. The present work describes five methodologies based in Real Time PCR for detection of the most relevant fish species farmed in Europe: gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata); sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax); turbot (Scophthalmus maximus); rainbow trout (Onchorynchus mykiss); and salmon (Salmo salar), in order to guarantee the intra-species recycling regulation in aquaculture feedstuffs.

  13. Clinically relevant transmitted drug resistance to first line antiretroviral drugs and implications for recommendations.

    PubMed

    Monge, Susana; Guillot, Vicente; Alvarez, Marta; Chueca, Natalia; Stella, Natalia; Peña, Alejandro; Delgado, Rafael; Córdoba, Juan; Aguilera, Antonio; Vidal, Carmen; García, Federico

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to analyse trends in clinically relevant resistance to first-line antiretroviral drugs in Spain, applying the Stanford algorithm, and to compare these results with reported Transmitted Drug Resistance (TDR) defined by the 2009 update of the WHO SDRM list. We analysed 2781 sequences from ARV naive patients of the CoRIS cohort (Spain) between 2007-2011. Using the Stanford algorithm "Low-level resistance", "Intermediate resistance" and "High-level resistance" categories were considered as "Resistant". 70% of the TDR found using the WHO list were relevant for first-line treatment according to the Stanford algorithm. A total of 188 patients showed clinically relevant resistance to first-line ARVs [6.8% (95%Confidence Interval: 5.8-7.7)], and 221 harbored TDR using the WHO list [7.9% (6.9-9.0)]. Differences were due to a lower prevalence in clinically relevant resistance for NRTIs [2.3% (1.8-2.9) vs. 3.6% (2.9-4.3) by the WHO list] and PIs [0.8% (0.4-1.1) vs. 1.7% (1.2-2.2)], while it was higher for NNRTIs [4.6% (3.8-5.3) vs. 3.7% (3.0-4.7)]. While TDR remained stable throughout the study period, clinically relevant resistance to first line drugs showed a significant trend to a decline (p = 0.02). Prevalence of clinically relevant resistance to first line ARVs in Spain is decreasing, and lower than the one expected looking at TDR using the WHO list. Resistance to first-line PIs falls below 1%, so the recommendation of screening for TDR in the protease gene should be questioned in our setting. Cost-effectiveness studies need to be carried out to inform evidence-based recommendations.

  14. Review: development of clinically relevant scaffolds for vascularised bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuchun; Lim, Jing; Teoh, Swee-Hin

    2013-01-01

    Clinical translation of scaffold-based bone tissue engineering (BTE) therapy still faces many challenges despite intense investigations and advancement over the years. To address these clinical barriers, it is important to analyse the current technical challenges in constructing a clinically relevant scaffold and subsequent clinical issues relating to bone repair. This review highlights the key challenges hampering widespread clinical translation of scaffold-based vascularised BTE, with a focus on the repair of large non-union defects. The main limitations of current scaffolds include the lack of sufficient vascularisation, insufficient mechanical strength as well as issues relating to the osseointegration of the bioresorbable scaffold and bone infection management. Critical insights on the current trends of scaffold technologies and future directions for advancing next-generation BTE scaffolds into the clinical realm are discussed. Considerations concerning regulatory approval and the route towards commercialisation of the scaffolds for widespread clinical utility will also be introduced. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. How relevant is undergraduate medical law teaching to clinical practice? A graduates' perspective.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Nicole; McMenamin, Christine

    2012-12-01

    The Monash University medical law tutorial program was implemented in 2002. A major aim of this program is to enable medical students to recognise and understand their legal obligations in clinical practice, thereby improving clinical standards and contributing to better patient outcomes. The present study examined whether, from a graduate perspective, the medical law tutorial program provides adequate legal information of relevance for a clinical context. Monash University medical graduates from 2007 to 2009 who were working at a Victorian hospital or who were members of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners were invited to participate in the study. Fifty-six participants completed the survey. Overall, participants had positive perceptions of the medical law program. The medical law program is an essential component of students' medical education and provides information relevant to future clinical practice.

  16. Photoinactivation of Eight Health-Relevant Bacterial Species: Determining the Importance of the Exogenous Indirect Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Maraccini, Peter A; Wenk, Jannis; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2016-05-17

    It is presently unknown to what extent the endogenous direct, endogenous indirect, and exogenous indirect mechanisms contribute to bacterial photoinactivation in natural surface waters. In this study, we investigated the importance of the exogenous indirect mechanism by conducting photoinactivation experiments with eight health-relevant bacterial species (Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Campylobacter jejuni, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli K12, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus bovis). We used three synthetic photosensitizers (methylene blue, rose bengal, and nitrite) and two model natural photosensitizers (Suwannee River natural organic matter and dissolved organic matter isolated from a wastewater treatment wetland) that generated singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical. B. thetaiotaomicron had larger first order rate constants than all other organisms under all conditions tested. The presence of the synthetic photosensitizers generally enhanced photoinactivation of Gram-positive facultative anaerobes (Ent. faecalis, Staph. aureus, and Strep. bovis). Among Gram-negative bacteria, only methylene blue with E. coli K12 and rose bengal with C. jejuni showed an enhancing effect. The presence of model natural photosensitizers either reduced or did not affect photoinactivation rate constants. Our findings highlight the importance of the cellular membrane and photosensitizer properties in modulating the contribution of the exogenous indirect mechanism to the overall bacterial photoinactivation.

  17. MICS-Asia II: Model intercomparison and evaluation of ozone and relevant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z.; Sakurai, T.; Ueda, H.; Carmichael, G. R.; Streets, D.; Hayami, H.; Wang, Z.; Holloway, T.; Engardt, M.; Hozumi, Y.; Park, S. U.; Kajino, M.; Sartelet, K.; Fung, C.; Bennet, C.; Thongboonchoo, N.; Tang, Y.; Chang, A.; Matsuda, K.; Amann, M.

    Eight regional Eulerian chemical transport models (CTMs) are compared with each other and with an extensive set of observations including ground-level concentrations from EANET, ozone soundings from JMA and vertical profiles from the TRACE-P experiment to evaluate the models' abilities in simulating O 3 and relevant species (SO 2, NO, NO 2, HNO 3 and PAN) in the troposphere of East Asia and to look for similarities and differences among model performances. Statistical analysis is conducted to help estimate the consistency and discrepancy between model simulation and observation in terms of various species, seasons, locations, as well as altitude ranges. In general, all models show a good skill of simulating SO 2 for both ground level and the lower troposphere, although two of the eight models systematically overpredict SO 2 concentration. The model skills for O 3 vary largely with region and season. For ground-level O 3, model results are best correlated with observations in July 2001. Comparing with O 3 soundings measured in the afternoon reveals the best consistency among models in March 2001 and the largest disparity in O 3 magnitude in July 2001, although most models produce the best correlation in July as well. In terms of the statistics for the four flights of TRACE-P experiment, most models appear to be able to accurately capture the variability in the lower troposphere. The model performances for NO x are relatively poor, with lower correlation and with almost all models tending to underpredict NO x levels, due to larger uncertainties in either emission estimates or complex chemical mechanism represented. All models exhibit larger RMSE at altitudes <2 km than 2-5.5 km, mainly due to a consistent tendency of these models towards underprediction of the magnitude of intense plumes that often originate from near surface. Relatively lower correlation at altitudes 2-5.5 km may be attributed to the models' limitation in representing convection or potential

  18. Clinically Relevant Changes in Emotional Expression in Children with ADHD Treated with Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katic, Alain; Ginsberg, Lawrence; Jain, Rakesh; Adeyi, Ben; Dirks, Bryan; Babcock, Thomas; Scheckner, Brian; Richards, Cynthia; Lasser, Robert; Turgay, Atilla; Findling, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe clinically relevant effects of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) on emotional expression (EE) in children with ADHD. Method: Children with ADHD participated in a 7-week, open-label, LDX dose-optimization study. Expression and Emotion Scale for Children (EESC) change scores were analyzed post hoc using two methods to…

  19. A Bridge between Two Cultures: Uncovering the Chemistry Concepts Relevant to the Nursing Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Corina E.; Henry, Melissa L. M.; Barbera, Jack; Hyslop, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the undergraduate course that covers basic topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry at a mid-sized state university in the western United States. The central objective of the research was to identify the main topics of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was…

  20. Preterm piglets are a clinically relevant model of pediatric GI disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The goal of our research is to establish how nutritional support, enteral versus parenteral, affects gut function and susceptibility to disease in early development. We and others have used the neonatal pig to establish unique models of clinically relevant problems in pediatric gastroenterology, esp...

  1. Interaction of human serum albumin and its clinically relevant modification with oligoribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, Yuliya V; Erchenko, Irina A; Shakirov, Makhmut M; Godovikova, Tatyana S

    2008-08-15

    Human serum albumin (HSA) was shown to mediate oligoribonucleotide cleavage. Nonenzymatic glycation of HSA decreased the ribonuclease-like activity of the protein. According to (31)P NMR data, both native and glycated albumins induced hydrolysis of RNA molecule through 2',3'-cyclophosphate intermediates. A feasible mechanism of RNA hydrolysis by native albumin and its clinically relevant modification was discussed.

  2. A Bridge between Two Cultures: Uncovering the Chemistry Concepts Relevant to the Nursing Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Corina E.; Henry, Melissa L. M.; Barbera, Jack; Hyslop, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the undergraduate course that covers basic topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry at a mid-sized state university in the western United States. The central objective of the research was to identify the main topics of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was…

  3. There's an App for That? Highlighting the Difficulty in Finding Clinically Relevant Smartphone Applications.

    PubMed

    Wiechmann, Warren; Kwan, Daniel; Bokarius, Andrew; Toohey, Shannon L

    2016-03-01

    The use of personal mobile devices in the medical field has grown quickly, and a large proportion of physicians use their mobile devices as an immediate resource for clinical decision-making, prescription information and other medical information. The iTunes App Store (Apple, Inc.) contains approximately 20,000 apps in its "Medical" category, providing a robust repository of resources for clinicians; however, this represents only 2% of the entire App Store. The App Store does not have strict criteria for identifying content specific to practicing physicians, making the identification of clinically relevant content difficult. The objective of this study is to quantify the characteristics of existing medical applications in the iTunes App Store that could be used by emergency physicians, residents, or medical students. We found applications related to emergency medicine (EM) by searching the iTunes App Store for 21 terms representing core content areas of EM, such as "emergency medicine," "critical care," "orthopedics," and "procedures." Two physicians independently reviewed descriptions of these applications in the App Store and categorized each as the following: Clinically Relevant, Book/Published Source, Non-English, Study Tools, or Not Relevant. A third physician reviewer resolved disagreements about categorization. Descriptive statistics were calculated. We found a total of 7,699 apps from the 21 search terms, of which 17.8% were clinical, 9.6% were based on a book or published source, 1.6% were non-English, 0.7% were clinically relevant patient education resources, and 4.8% were study tools. Most significantly, 64.9% were considered not relevant to medical professionals. Clinically relevant apps make up approximately 6.9% of the App Store's "Medical" Category and 0.1% of the overall App Store. Clinically relevant apps represent only a small percentage (6.9%) of the total App volume within the Medical section of the App Store. Without a structured search

  4. There’s an App for That? Highlighting the Difficulty in Finding Clinically Relevant Smartphone Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wiechmann, Warren; Kwan, Daniel; Bokarius, Andrew; Toohey, Shannon L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The use of personal mobile devices in the medical field has grown quickly, and a large proportion of physicians use their mobile devices as an immediate resource for clinical decision-making, prescription information and other medical information. The iTunes App Store (Apple, Inc.) contains approximately 20,000 apps in its “Medical” category, providing a robust repository of resources for clinicians; however, this represents only 2% of the entire App Store. The App Store does not have strict criteria for identifying content specific to practicing physicians, making the identification of clinically relevant content difficult. The objective of this study is to quantify the characteristics of existing medical applications in the iTunes App Store that could be used by emergency physicians, residents, or medical students. Methods We found applications related to emergency medicine (EM) by searching the iTunes App Store for 21 terms representing core content areas of EM, such as “emergency medicine,” “critical care,” “orthopedics,” and “procedures.” Two physicians independently reviewed descriptions of these applications in the App Store and categorized each as the following: Clinically Relevant, Book/Published Source, Non-English, Study Tools, or Not Relevant. A third physician reviewer resolved disagreements about categorization. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results We found a total of 7,699 apps from the 21 search terms, of which 17.8% were clinical, 9.6% were based on a book or published source, 1.6% were non-English, 0.7% were clinically relevant patient education resources, and 4.8% were study tools. Most significantly, 64.9% were considered not relevant to medical professionals. Clinically relevant apps make up approximately 6.9% of the App Store’s “Medical” Category and 0.1% of the overall App Store. Conclusion Clinically relevant apps represent only a small percentage (6.9%) of the total App volume within the

  5. A software system to collect expert relevance ratings of medical record items for specific clinical tasks.

    PubMed

    Harvey, H Benjamin; Krishnaraj, Arun; Alkasab, Tarik K

    2014-02-28

    Development of task-specific electronic medical record (EMR) searches and user interfaces has the potential to improve the efficiency and safety of health care while curbing rising costs. The development of such tools must be data-driven and guided by a strong understanding of practitioner information requirements with respect to specific clinical tasks or scenarios. To acquire this important data, this paper describes a model by which expert practitioners are leveraged to identify which components of the medical record are most relevant to a specific clinical task. We also describe the computer system that was created to efficiently implement this model of data gathering. The system extracts medical record data from the EMR of patients matching a given clinical scenario, de-identifies the data, breaks the data up into separate medical record items (eg, radiology reports, operative notes, laboratory results, etc), presents each individual medical record item to experts under the hypothetical of the given clinical scenario, and records the experts' ratings regarding the relevance of each medical record item to that specific clinical scenario or task. After an iterative process of data collection, these expert relevance ratings can then be pooled and used to design point-of-care EMR searches and user interfaces tailored to the task-specific needs of practitioners.

  6. Predicting clinical relevance of grapefruit-drug interactions: a complicated process.

    PubMed

    Bailey, D G

    2017-04-01

    Grapefruit juice interacts with a number of drugs. This commentary provides feedback on a previously proposed approach for predicting clinically relevant interactions with grapefruit juice based on the average inherent oral bioavailability (F) and magnitude of increase in bioavailability with other CYP3A inhibitors of the drug. Additional factors such as variability of the magnitude of the pharmacokinetic interaction among individuals, product monograph cautionary statements and vulnerability of the patient population should be considered. A flow diagram is provided that should improve prediction of the pharmacokinetic interaction and clinical relevance for affected drugs and that recommends different courses of action for patient management. Forecasting the clinical importance of a particular drug interaction with grapefruit can be improved through consideration of additional readily available drug regulatory information. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Mercury methylation rates for geochemically relevant Hg(II) species in sediments.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Sofi; Skyllberg, Ulf; Nilsson, Mats B; Westlund, Per-Olof; Shchukarev, Andrey; Lundberg, Erik; Björn, Erik

    2012-11-06

    Monomethylmercury (MeHg) in fish from freshwater, estuarine, and marine environments is a major global environmental issue. Mercury levels in biota are mainly controlled by the methylation of inorganic mercuric mercury (Hg(II)) to MeHg in water, sediments, and soils. There is, however, a knowledge gap concerning the mechanisms and rates of methylation of specific geochemical Hg(II) species. Such information is crucial for a better understanding of variations in MeHg concentrations among ecosystems and, in particular, for predicting the outcome of currently proposed measures to mitigate mercury emissions and reduce MeHg concentrations in fish. To fill this knowledge gap we propose an experimental approach using Hg(II) isotope tracers, with defined and geochemically important adsorbed and solid Hg(II) forms in sediments, to study MeHg formation. We report Hg(II) methylation rate constants, k(m), in estuarine sediments which span over 2 orders of magnitude depending on chemical form of added tracer: metacinnabar (β-(201)HgS(s)) < cinnabar (α-(199)HgS(s)) < Hg(II) reacted with mackinawite (≡FeS-(202)Hg(II)) < Hg(II) bonded to natural organic matter (NOM-(196)Hg(II)) < a typical aqueous tracer ((198)Hg(NO(3))(2)(aq)). We conclude that a combination of thermodynamic and kinetic effects of Hg(II) solid-phase dissolution and surface desorption control the Hg(II) methylation rate in sediments and cause the large observed differences in k(m)-values. The selection of relevant solid-phase and surface-adsorbed Hg(II) tracers will therefore be crucial to achieving biogeochemically accurate estimates of ambient Hg(II) methylation rates.

  8. Rapid Identification of Candida Species and Other Clinically Important Yeast Species by Flow Cytometry†

    PubMed Central

    Page, Brent T.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.

    2005-01-01

    Two rapid diagnostic assays, utilizing two different Luminex flow cytometry methods, were developed for identification of clinically important ascomycetous yeast species. Direct hybridization and allele-specific primer extension methods were both successful in establishing a DNA-based assay that can rapidly and accurately identify Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, and Candida tropicalis as well as other clinical species. The direct hybridization assay was designed to identify a total of 19 ascomycetous yeast species, and the allele-specific primer extension assay was designed to identify a total of 34 species. Probes were validated against 438 strains representing 303 species. From culture to identification, the allele-specific primer extension method takes 8 h and the direct hybridization method takes less than 5 h to complete. These assays represent comprehensive, rapid tests that are well suited for the clinical laboratory. PMID:16145099

  9. Music's relevance for children with cancer: music therapists' qualitative clinical data-mining research.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Clare; Dun, Beth; Baron, Annette; Barry, Philippa

    2013-01-01

    Music is central in most children's lives. Understanding its relevance will advance efficacious pediatric supportive cancer care. Qualitative clinical data-mining uncovered four music therapists' perspectives about music and music therapy's relevance for pediatric oncology patients up to 14 years old. Inductive and comparative thematic analysis was performed on focus group transcripts and qualitative interrater reliability integrated. Music can offer children a safe haven for internalizing a healthy self-image alongside patient identity. Music therapy can calm, relieve distress, promote supportive relationships, enable self-care, and inspire playful creativity, associated with "normalcy" and hope. Preferred music and music therapy should be available in pediatric oncology.

  10. Polymicrobial infections involving clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Qu, Yue; Peleg, Anton Y

    2016-12-01

    Interactions between fungi and bacteria and their relevance to human health and disease have recently attracted increased attention in biomedical fields. Emerging evidence shows that bacteria and fungi can have synergistic or antagonistic interactions, each with important implications for human colonization and disease. It is now appreciated that some of these interactions may be strategic and helps promote the survival of one or both microorganisms within the host. This review will shed light on clinically relevant interactions between fungi and Gram-negative bacteria. Mechanism of interaction, host immune responses, and preventive measures will also be reviewed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Empathy and alteration: the ethical relevance of a phenomenological species concept.

    PubMed

    Meacham, Darian

    2014-10-01

    The debate over the ethics of radically, technologically altering the capacities and traditional form of the human body is rife with appeals to and dismissals of the importance of the integrity of the human species. Species-integrist arguments can be found in authors as varied as Annas, Fukuyama, Habermas, and Agar. However, the ethical salience of species integrity is widely contested by authors such as Buchanan, Daniels, Fenton, and Juengst. This article proposes a Phenomenological approach to the question of species-integrity, arguing in favor of a phenomenon of species-recognition that carries an ethical pull. Building on Husserl's Phenomenological account of empathy and the lived-body, as well as Schopenhauer's concept of compassion as an ethical urphenomenon, I develop a "Phenomenological species concept" (PSC), which I argue has the ethical significance that biological species concepts do not. The PSC reorients the debate over human alteration and species integrity.

  12. Species complexes within epiphytic diatoms and their relevance for the bioindication of trophic status.

    PubMed

    Poulíčková, Aloisie; Letáková, Markéta; Hašler, Petr; Cox, Eileen; Duchoslav, Martin

    2017-12-01

    The popularity of aquatic bioassessments has increased in Europe and worldwide, with a considerable number of methods being based on benthic diatoms. Recent evidence from molecular data and mating experiments has shown that some traditional diatom morphospecies represent species complexes, containing several to many cryptic species. This case study is based on epiphytic diatom and environmental data from shallow fishponds, investigating whether the recognition and use of fine taxonomic resolution (cryptic species) can improve assessment of community response to environmental drivers and increase sharpness of classification, compared to coarse taxonomic resolution (genus level and species level with unresolved species complexes). Secondly, trophy bioindication based on a species matrix divided into two compartments (species complexes and remaining species) was evaluated against the expectation that species complexes would be poor trophy indicators, due to their expected wide ecological amplitude. Finally, the response of species complexes and their members (cryptic species) to a trophic gradient (phosphorus) were compared. Multivariate analyses showed similar efficiency of all three taxonomic resolutions in depicting community patterns and their environmental correlates, suggesting that even genus level resolution is sufficient for routine bioassessment of shallow fishponds with a wide trophic range. However, after controlling for coarse taxonomic matrices, fine taxonomic resolution (with resolved cryptic species) still showed sufficient variance related to the environmental variable (habitat groups), and increased the sharpness of classification, number of indicator species for habitat categories, and gave better separation of habitat categories in the ordination space. Regression analysis of trophic bioindication and phosphorus concentration showed a weak relationship for species complexes but a close relationship for the remaining taxa. GLM models also showed

  13. [Evaluation of API Coryne System, version 2.0, for diphteroid gram-positive rods identification with clinical relevance].

    PubMed

    Almuzara, M N; De Mier, C; Rodríguez, C R; Famiglietti, A M R; Vay, C A

    2006-01-01

    The ability of the API Coryne system, version 2.0, to identify 178 strains of gram-positive rods was evaluated. Seventy eight isolates belonged to genus Corynebacterium and one hundred to related genera, all strains were isolated from clinical samples at the Laboratory of Bacteriology, Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martin (UBA) between 1995 and 2004. The isolates were identified according to von Graevenitz and Funke's scheme. One hundred and sixty two out of 178 strains (91%) were correctly identified at genus and species level (IC95 = 85.6-94.6), in 44 of them (24.7%) additional tests were needed to final identification. Sixteen strains (9%) were not correctly identified (IC95 = 5.4-14.4); none of the 178 strains remained unidentified. The API Coryne system, version 2.0, is useful to identify the majority of Cory-nebacterium species with clinical relevance: Corynebacterium jeikeium, Corynebacterium urealyticum, Corynebacterium striatum, Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum, Corynebacterium amycolatum and related species such as Arcanobacterium haemolyticum, Dermabacter hominis, Listeria monocytogenes, among others. Nevertheless for yellow-pigmented diphteroid gram-positive rods (Aureobacterium spp., Leifsonia aquatica, Microbacterium spp. and Cellulomonas spp.) and for acid fast gram-positive rods (Rhodococcus, Gordonia, Tsukamurella and Nocardia) the identification usefulness the system is limited.

  14. A head and neck lymph node classification using an anatomical grid system while maintaining clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Benninger, Brion; Barrett, Richard

    2011-10-01

    The current classification of head and neck lymph nodes lacks a standardized system that integrates basic anatomy and clinical relevance. Currently, anatomy texts, atlases, and journals used to educate future health care professionals use a classification system that differs from the commonly used clinical nomenclature. As a result, student trainees entering the professional world are confused by lymph node terminology. The purpose of this study was to suggest a lymph node classification system that accurately reflected anatomy and clinical applications. A literature search was conducted on anatomic and clinical texts, atlases, journals, and Web sites. Two recurring classification themes were found from anatomic texts and atlases: superficial and deep chains, and local anatomic structures. Since 1988 the clinical specialties have used a Roman numeral "level" system. The differences between anatomic and clinical classification systems have led to academic frustration. After analysis, a functional classification system was developed that integrated anatomic and clinical terminology from the current classification systems. This suggested system revised the clinically accepted level system approved in 1988 and replaced the terminology with an anatomically derived naming system. This system satisfies the need for a classification that unifies anatomic and clinical applications. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of light on food relevant fungi with emphasis on ochratoxin producing species.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Heydt, Markus; Rüfer, Corinna; Raupp, Frank; Bruchmann, Anja; Perrone, Giancarlo; Geisen, Rolf

    2011-01-31

    The influence of light of varying wavelength on growth and ochratoxin A biosynthesis of Aspergillus carbonarius, A. niger, A. steynii and on Penicillium nordicum and P. verrucosum was analysed. For comparison the influence of light on various other food relevant fungi, including citrinin producers, was also tested. Generally the Aspergilli seem to be more resistant to light treatment than the Penicillia. Interestingly wavelengths from both sides of the spectrum, e. g. red (long wavelength, 627 nm) and blue (short wavelength 470-455 nm) had the strongest inhibitory effects on growth and ochratoxin A biosynthesis. Blue light generally had a stronger effect. Light of moderate wavelength, 590 to 530 nm, (yellow to green) had more a positive than a negative influence on growth or ochratoxin A biosynthesis compared to the control (dark incubation). The light effect on growth and ochratoxin A biosynthesis was dependent on the growth medium. In contrast to malt extract medium (MEA), YES medium, as an especially nutrient rich medium, had an attenuating effect on the reactivity against light. However the tendency of the response in both media was the same. Moreover, the light intensity strongly influences how the fungus reacts. Depending on the intensity and the resistance of the species a complete cessation of growth and/or inhibition of ochratoxin A biosynthesis could be achieved. Light irradiation has the opposite effect on ochratoxin A than citrinin, two mycotoxins which can be produced simultaneously in P. verrucosum. Citrinin was produced essentially under light conditions which inhibited ochratoxin A biosynthesis. The same was true for a derivative of ochratoxin, in particular a derivative of ochratoxin β in A. carbonarius. A. carbonarius produced high amounts of the ochratoxin β derivative under blue light when the production of ochratoxin A was ceased at the most inhibiting conditions used (MEA, royal blue light, 455 nm, 1700 lx). Light has a growth stalling but

  16. Clinically Relevant Transmitted Drug Resistance to First Line Antiretroviral Drugs and Implications for Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Monge, Susana; Guillot, Vicente; Alvarez, Marta; Chueca, Natalia; Stella, Natalia; Peña, Alejandro; Delgado, Rafael; Córdoba, Juan; Aguilera, Antonio; Vidal, Carmen; García, Federico; CoRIS

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim was to analyse trends in clinically relevant resistance to first-line antiretroviral drugs in Spain, applying the Stanford algorithm, and to compare these results with reported Transmitted Drug Resistance (TDR) defined by the 2009 update of the WHO SDRM list. Methods We analysed 2781 sequences from ARV naive patients of the CoRIS cohort (Spain) between 2007–2011. Using the Stanford algorithm “Low-level resistance”, “Intermediate resistance” and “High-level resistance” categories were considered as “Resistant”. Results 70% of the TDR found using the WHO list were relevant for first-line treatment according to the Stanford algorithm. A total of 188 patients showed clinically relevant resistance to first-line ARVs [6.8% (95%Confidence Interval: 5.8–7.7)], and 221 harbored TDR using the WHO list [7.9% (6.9–9.0)]. Differences were due to a lower prevalence in clinically relevant resistance for NRTIs [2.3% (1.8–2.9) vs. 3.6% (2.9–4.3) by the WHO list] and PIs [0.8% (0.4–1.1) vs. 1.7% (1.2–2.2)], while it was higher for NNRTIs [4.6% (3.8–5.3) vs. 3.7% (3.0–4.7)]. While TDR remained stable throughout the study period, clinically relevant resistance to first line drugs showed a significant trend to a decline (p = 0.02). Conclusions Prevalence of clinically relevant resistance to first line ARVs in Spain is decreasing, and lower than the one expected looking at TDR using the WHO list. Resistance to first-line PIs falls below 1%, so the recommendation of screening for TDR in the protease gene should be questioned in our setting. Cost-effectiveness studies need to be carried out to inform evidence-based recommendations. PMID:24637804

  17. Opportunities for Cancer-relevant Innovative Technologies with Transformative Potential | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is seeking input from the community on identifying priorities with regards to supporting innovative technology development for cancer-relevant research. While the NCI provides support for technology development through a variety of mechanisms, it is important to understand whether or not these are sufficient for catalyzing and supporting the development of tools with significant potential for advancing important fields of cancer research or clinical care.

  18. Taijin Kyofusho and Social Anxiety and Their Clinical Relevance in Indonesia and Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Vriends, N.; Pfaltz, M. C.; Novianti, P.; Hadiyono, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Taijin Kyofusho Scale (TKS) is an interpersonal fear to offend others and is defined by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) as a culturally bound syndrome that occurs in Japan and Korea. Recently, cases with TKS have also been recognized in other cultures. The present questionnaire study investigated self-report TKS symptoms and social anxiety symptoms, and their clinical relevance in an Indonesian and Swiss sample. It also investigated whether self-construal is associated with TKS and social anxiety, and if self-construal is a mediator of the expected association between cultural background and social anxiety and TKS symptoms. Method: 311 Indonesian and 349 Swiss university students filled out the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, the Taijin Kyofusho Scale, the Self-Construal Scale, self-report social phobia DSM-IV criteria, and rated their wish for professional help to deal with social fears. Results: TKS and social anxiety symptoms were higher in the Indonesian than the Swiss sample. TKS symptoms were associated with clinical relevance in Indonesia, whereas in Switzerland only social anxiety symptoms were associated with clinical relevance. Independent self-construal was negatively associated and interdependent self-construal was positively associated with TKS and social anxiety symptoms. Interdependent self-construal mediated the association between cultural background and these symptoms. Discussion: TKS might be a clinically relevant syndrome in all individuals or cultures with an interdependent self-construal or less independent self-construal. The proposal to include the fear of offending others in the DSM-V criteria of social phobia is supported by the present findings. PMID:23382720

  19. Clinical relevance of cyclic GMP modulators: A translational success story of network pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Oettrich, J M; Dao, V T; Frijhoff, J; Kleikers, Pwm; Casas, A I; Hobbs, A J; Schmidt, H H H W

    2016-04-01

    Therapies that modulate cyclic guanosine-3'-5'-monophosphate (cGMP) have emerged as one of the most successful areas in recent drug discovery and clinical pharmacology. Historically, their focus has been on cardiovascular disease phenotypes; however, cGMP's relevance is likely to go beyond this rather limited organ-based set of indications. Moreover, the multitude of targets and their apparent interchangeability is a proof-of-concept of network pharmacology.

  20. Prevalence of Potential and Clinically Relevant Statin-Drug Interactions in Frail and Robust Older Inpatients.

    PubMed

    Thai, Michele; Hilmer, Sarah; Pearson, Sallie-Anne; Reeve, Emily; Gnjidic, Danijela

    2015-10-01

    A significant proportion of older people are prescribed statins and are also exposed to polypharmacy, placing them at increased risk of statin-drug interactions. To describe the prevalence rates of potential and clinically relevant statin-drug interactions in older inpatients according to frailty status. A cross-sectional study of patients aged ≥65 years who were prescribed a statin and were admitted to a teaching hospital between 30 July and 10 October 2014 in Sydney, Australia, was conducted. Data on socio-demographics, comorbidities and medications were collected using a standardized questionnaire. Potential statin-drug interactions were defined if listed in the Australian Medicines Handbook and three international drug information sources: the British National Formulary, Drug Interaction Facts and Drug-Reax(®). Clinically relevant statin-drug interactions were defined as interactions with the highest severity rating in at least two of the three international drug information sources. Frailty was assessed using the Reported Edmonton Frail Scale. A total of 180 participants were recruited (median age 78 years, interquartile range 14), 35.0% frail and 65.0% robust. Potential statin-drug interactions were identified in 10% of participants, 12.7% of frail participants and 8.5% of robust participants. Clinically relevant statin-drug interactions were identified in 7.8% of participants, 9.5% of frail participants and 6.8% of robust participants. Depending on the drug information source used, the prevalence rates of potential and clinically relevant statin-drug interactions ranged between 14.4 and 35.6% and between 14.4 and 20.6%, respectively. In our study of frail and robust older inpatients taking statins, the overall prevalence of potential statin-drug interactions was low and varied significantly according to the drug information source used.

  1. Evaluation of Luminex xTAG fungal analyte-specific reagents for rapid identification of clinically relevant fungi.

    PubMed

    Babady, N Esther; Miranda, Edwin; Gilhuley, Kathleen A

    2011-11-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFI) remain a serious threat to immunocompromised hosts. Current diagnostic methods, including fungal culture and antigen detection, are slow and often lack specificity. Rapid diagnostic tools with increased sensitivity and specificity could improve the care of patients with IFI. Recently, Luminex Molecular Diagnostics (Toronto, Canada) developed 23 analyte-specific reagents (ASRs) for the detection of the most common clinically relevant fungi. This study's objective was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of a subset of these ASRs for fungal isolates and clinical specimens. Previously characterized fungal and bacterial isolates (n = 110), blood culture specimens (n = 34), and respiratory specimens (n = 44) were tested using either a Candida 7-plex panel (Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Candida lusitaniae, Candida guilliermondii, and Candida krusei) or a mold 11-plex panel (Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus, Scedosporium prolificans, Scedosporium apiospermum, Fusarium oxysporum/Fusarium solani, Rhizopus arrhizus, Rhizopus microsporus, Mucor indicus, and Cunninghamella bertholletiae). The Candida 7-plex panel correctly identified all Candida isolates as confirmed by fungal culture and biochemical tests, for a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. The mold 11-plex panel correctly identified all mold isolates tested except for A. niger. Fungal isolates of Rhizopus and Mucor species were not detected, either, although they could represent species other than those targeted by the ASRs. Further evaluation will be necessary to confirm the sensitivities of some of the mold ASRs. Implementation of these ASRs will allow same-day detection of fungal DNA in clinical specimens.

  2. Clinically Relevant Physical Benefits of Exercise Interventions in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Amy A; Bland, Kelcey A; Sayyari, Sarah; Campbell, Kristin L; Davis, Margot K

    2016-02-01

    Evidence is currently limited for the effect of exercise on breast cancer clinical outcomes. However, several of the reported physical benefits of exercise, including peak oxygen consumption, functional capacity, muscle strength and lean mass, cardiovascular risk factors, and bone health, have established associations with disability, cardiovascular disease risk, morbidity, and mortality. This review will summarize the clinically relevant physical benefits of exercise interventions in breast cancer survivors and discuss recommendations for achieving these benefits. It will also describe potential differences in intervention delivery that may impact outcomes and, lastly, describe current physical activity guidelines for cancer survivors.

  3. Molecular weight and galloylation affect grape seed extract constituents’ ability to cross-link dentin collagen in clinically relevant time

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Bai, Xinyan; Li, Shaohua; Liu, Ying; Keightley, Andrew; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the structures of polyphenolic compounds found in grape seed extract (GSE) and their activity in cross-linking dentin collagen in clinically relevant settings. Methods Representative monomeric and dimeric GSE constituents including (+)-catechin (pCT), (−)-catechin (CT), (−)-epicatechin (EC), (−)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (−)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), procyanidin B2 and a pCT-pCT dimer were purchased or synthesized. GSE was separated into low (PALM) and high molecular weight (PAHM) fractions. Human molars were processed into dentin films and beams. After demineralization, 11 groups of films (n=5) were treated for 1 min with the aforementioned reagents (1 wt% in 50/50 ethanol/water) and 1 group remained untreated. The films were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) followed by a quantitative mass spectroscopy-based digestion assay. Tensile properties of demineralized dentin beams were evaluated (n=7) after treatments (2h and 24h) with selective GSE species that were found to protect dentin collagen from collagenase. Results Efficacy of GSE constituents in cross-linking dentin collagen was dependent on molecular size and galloylation. Non-galloylated species with degree of polymerization up to two, including pCT, CT, EC, EGC, procyanidin B2 and pCT-pCT dimer were not active. Galloylated species were active starting from monomeric form, including ECG, EGCG, PALM, GSE and PAHM. PALM induced the best overall improvement in tensile properties of dentin collagen. Significance Identification under clinically relevant settings of structural features that contribute to GSE constituents’ efficacy in stabilizing demineralized dentin matrix has immediate impact on optimizing GSE’s use in dentin bonding. PMID:25958268

  4. Minimal residual disease detection in mantle cell lymphoma: technical aspects and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Pott, Christiane

    2011-07-01

    The prognostic impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) has been demonstrated for several hematologic malignancies. While in acute lymphoblastic leukemias MRD assessment by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods has been established as an important tool for clinical risk assessment and is part of clinical management, data demonstrating a prognostic value of MRD in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) were sparse and results from randomized trials have been published only recently. In the present review technical aspects of different MRD detection methods are discussed, as well as the prognostic relevance of MRD in the context of clinical trials in patients with MCL. Furthermore, recommendations are given for workflow and useful implication of MRD in future clinical trials design.

  5. Clinical manipulation of mineral trioxide aggregate: lessons from the construction industry and their relevance to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ha, William N; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence J

    2015-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is based on ordinary Portland cement (with added radiopaque agents) and, thus, shares many of its features. Although MTA is reported to be difficult to handle clinically, concrete materials made using Portland cement are the foundation of the construction industry. In this paper, we summarize important lessons from the construction literature that are relevant to the successful use of MTA in clinical practice, including behaviour during storage, susceptibility to acidic environments, the effects of exposure of the setting material to moisture and interactions with substances that may interfere with the speed of setting and the quality of the end product.

  6. Cefoperazone-treated Mouse Model of Clinically-relevant Clostridium difficile Strain R20291

    PubMed Central

    Winston, Jenessa A.; Thanissery, Rajani; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Theriot, Casey M.

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, gram-positive, spore-forming enteric pathogen that is associated with increasing morbidity and mortality and consequently poses an urgent threat to public health. Recurrence of a C. difficile infection (CDI) after successful treatment with antibiotics is high, occurring in 20–30% of patients, thus necessitating the discovery of novel therapeutics against this pathogen. Current animal models of CDI result in high mortality rates and thus do not approximate the chronic, insidious disease manifestations seen in humans with CDI. To evaluate therapeutics against C. difficile, a mouse model approximating human disease utilizing a clinically-relevant strain is needed. This protocol outlines the cefoperazone mouse model of CDI using a clinically-relevant and genetically-tractable strain, R20291. Techniques for clinical disease monitoring, C. difficile bacterial enumeration, toxin cytotoxicity, and histopathological changes throughout CDI in a mouse model are detailed in the protocol. Compared to other mouse models of CDI, this model is not uniformly lethal at the dose administered, allowing for the observation of a prolonged clinical course of infection concordant with the human disease. Therefore, this cefoperazone mouse model of CDI proves a valuable experimental platform to assess the effects of novel therapeutics on the amelioration of clinical disease and on the restoration of colonization resistance against C. difficile. PMID:28060346

  7. Emergence of Rare Species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria as Potential Pathogens in Saudi Arabian Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Bright; Enani, Mushira; Shoukri, Mohammed; AlThawadi, Sahar; AlJohani, Sameera; Al- Hajoj, Sahal

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinical relevance of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing worldwide including in Saudi Arabia. A high species diversity of NTM’s has been noticed in a recent study. However, the identification in diagnostic laboratories is mostly limited to common species. The impact of NTM species diversity on clinical outcome is so far neglected in most of the clinical settings. Methodology/Principal Findings During April 2014 to September 2015, a nationwide collection of suspected NTM clinical isolates with clinical and demographical data were carried out. Primary identification was performed by commercial line probe assays. Isolates identified up to Mycobacterium species level by line probe assays only were included and subjected to sequencing of 16S rRNA, rpoB, hsp65 and 16S-23S ITS region genes. The sequence data were subjected to BLAST analysis in GenBank and Ez-Taxon databases. Male Saudi nationals were dominated in the study population and falling majorly into the 46–59 years age group. Pulmonary cases were 59.3% with a surprising clinical relevance of 75% based on American Thoracic Society guidelines. Among the 40.7% extra-pulmonary cases, 50% of them were skin infections. The identification revealed 16 species and all of them are reporting for the first time in Saudi Arabia. The major species obtained were Mycobacterium monascence (18.5%), M. cosmeticum (11.1%), M. kubicae (11.1%), M. duvalli (7.4%), M.terrae (7.4%) and M. triplex (7.4%). This is the first report on clinical relevance of M. kubicae, M. tusciae, M.yongonense, M. arupense and M.iranicum causing pulmonary disease and M. monascence, M. duvalli, M. perigrinum, M. insubricum, M. holsaticum and M. kyorinense causing various extra-pulmonary diseases in Saudi Arabia. Ascites caused by M. monascence and cecum infection by M. holsaticum were the rarest incidents. Conclusions/Significance To the first time in the country, clinical significance of various rare NTM’s are well explored and

  8. Interference of cationic polymeric nanoparticles with clinical chemistry tests--clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Shcharbin, Dzmitry; Shcharbina, Natallia; Milowska, Katarzyna; de la Mata, Francisco Javier; Muñoz-Fernandez, Maria Angeles; Mignani, Serge; Gomez-Ramirez, Rafael; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Bryszewska, Maria

    2014-10-01

    The development of medical nanosystems requires knowledge of their behavior in vivo. Clinical chemistry tests are widely used to estimate the systemic toxicity of nanoparticles. In this paper we have explored the impact of small positively charged nanoparticles-poly(amidoamine), phosphorous and carbosilane dendrimers - on biochemical parameters of standardized serum in vitro. All the dendrimers could shift the main biochemical parameters. Thus, in the case of patients having the normal, but 'boundary', values of biochemical parameters, nanoparticle-induced changes can be wrongly interpreted as evidence of some dysfunctions (hepatic, renal, etc.). Moreover, the effects of nanoparticles of metals, carbon nanotubes, quantum dots, fullerenes, dendrimers having been sized up to 4000 nm and the hundreds of reactive groups, can be significantly higher. Thus, preliminary evaluation of any nanomaterial in vitro is required in clinical chemistry tests before its application in vivo to draw the correct conclusions and benefit animals.

  9. Using mixed methods to identify and answer clinically relevant research questions.

    PubMed

    Shneerson, Catherine L; Gale, Nicola K

    2015-06-01

    The need for mixed methods research in answering health care questions is becoming increasingly recognized because of the complexity of factors that affect health outcomes. In this article, we argue for the value of using a qualitatively driven mixed method approach for identifying and answering clinically relevant research questions. This argument is illustrated by findings from a study on the self-management practices of cancer survivors and the exploration of one particular clinically relevant finding about higher uptake of self-management in cancer survivors who had received chemotherapy treatment compared with those who have not. A cross-sectional study generated findings that formed the basis for the qualitative study, by informing the purposive sampling strategy and generating new qualitative research questions. Using a quantitative research component to supplement a qualitative study can enhance the generalizability and clinical relevance of the findings and produce detailed, contextualized, and rich answers to research questions that would be unachievable through quantitative or qualitative methods alone.

  10. Young individuals with atopic disease and asthma or rhinoconjunctivitis may have clinically relevant contact allergies.

    PubMed

    Netterlid, Eva; Hindsén, Monica; Ekqvist, Susanne; Henricson, Kent Ake; Bruze, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents with atopic disease who have allergic asthma and/or rhinitis with and without atopic dermatitis may have hidden, clinically relevant contact allergies. The objective of this study was to survey contact allergies in children and adolescents who had been offered allergen-specific immunotherapy and accepted (exposed)/not accepted (unexposed) such treatment. Thirty-seven exposed and 24 unexposed individuals with atopic disease were patch tested with a standard series supplemented with aluminum chloride hexahydrate, an empty Finn Chamber, and 8 antigen preparations. In the exposed group, 18 allergies were detected in 13 individuals with atopic disease when excluding reactions to aluminum and antigen preparations, whereas the corresponding figures for the unexposed group were 9 and 6, respectively (non-significant difference). Independent of the allergen-specific immunotherapy, significantly more (P = 0.013) individuals with atopic dermatitis had at least 1 contact allergy. Clinically relevant allergies were represented by sesquiterpene lactone mix, para-tertiary butylphenol-formaldehyde resin, tixocortol pivalate, and colophony. Clinically relevant contact allergies are not uncommon in children and adolescents with atopic disease, which is why patch testing always should be considered in the management of dermatitis in individuals with atopic disease.

  11. [Clinical relevance of drug interactions between nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antihypertensives].

    PubMed

    Villa, Juan; Cano, Alejandra; Franco, David; Monsalve, Mauricio; Hincapié, Jaime; Amariles, Pedro

    2014-11-01

    To establish the clinical relevance of drug interactions between nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antihypertensives, based on the interaction severity and probability of occurrence. Systematic review. A PubMed/Medline search was made using the MeSH terms: NSAIDs, Antihypertensive drugs, and Drug interactions. Articles between 2002 and 2012, human studies, in Spanish and English and full text access were included. Found articles were included and some of the references used in this works. Studies with in vitro methods, effects on ocular hypertension and those who do not consider the interaction NSAIDs, antihypertensives were excluded. For the selection of the papers included three independent reviewers were involved. We used a tool for data extraction and for assess of the interaction clinical relevance. Nineteen of 50 papers found were included. There were identified 21 interactions with pharmacodynamic mechanism, classified by their clinical relevance in level-2 high risk (76.2%) and level-3 medium risk (23.8%). In addition, evidence of 16 combinations of no interaction were found. Some NSAIDs may attenuate the effectiveness of antihypertensive drugs when used concurrently, especially with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, diuretics, beta blockers and angiotensin receptorsii blockers. There was no evidence of effect modification of calcium channel antagonists, especially dihydropyridine, by concurrent use of NSAIDs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. The pulsed light inactivation of veterinary relevant microbial biofilms and the use of a RTPCR assay to detect parasite species within biofilm structures

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, M.; Coughlan, G.; Murphy, N.; Rowan, N.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of pathogenic organisms namely parasite species and bacteria in biofilms in veterinary settings, is a public health concern in relation to human and animal exposure. Veterinary clinics represent a significant risk factor for the transfer of pathogens from housed animals to humans, especially in cases of wound infection and the shedding of faecal matter. This study aims to provide a means of detecting veterinary relevant parasite species in bacterial biofilms, and to provide a means of disinfecting these biofilms. A real time PCR assay was utilized to detect parasite DNA in Bacillus cereus biofilms on stainless steel and PVC surfaces. Results show that both Cryptosporidium and Giardia attach to biofilms in large numbers (100-1000 oo/cysts) in as little as 72 hours. Pulsed light successfully inactivated all test species (Listeria, Salmonella, Bacillus, Escherichia) in planktonic and biofilm form with an increase in inactivation for every increase in UV dose. PMID:26862516

  13. Establishing a clinically relevant cutoff to the Dependency Scale from the dimensional clinical personality inventory.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Lucas de F; Pianowski, Giselle; Filho, Nelson H

    2017-05-01

    The Clinical Dimensional Personality Inventory (IDCP) is a 163-item self-report tool developed for the assessment of 12 dimensions of personality pathology. One of the scales comprising the instrument-the Dependency scale-is intended to provide psychometric information on traits closely related to the Dependent Personality Disorder (DPD). In the present study, we used both Item Response Theory modeling and Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis to establishing a clinically meaningful cutoff for the IDCP Dependency Scale. Participants were 2.481 adults, comprised by outpatients diagnosed with DPD, outpatients diagnosed with other PDs, and adults from the general population. The Wright's item map graphing technique revealed that outpatients were located at the very high levels in the latent scale continuum of the Dependency Scale, with a very large effect size for the mean difference between patients and non-patients. The ROC curve analysis supported a cutoff at 2.3 points in the Dependency Scale, which yielded 0.86 of sensitivity and 0.79 of specificity. Findings from the present investigation suggest the IDCP Dependency Scale is useful as a screening tool of the core features of the DPD. We address potential clinical applications for the instrument, and discuss limitations from the present study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Antifungal drug resistance among Candida species: mechanisms and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2015-06-01

    The epidemiology of Candida infections has changed in recent years. Although Candida albicans is still the main cause of invasive candidiasis in most clinical settings, a substantial proportion of patients is now infected with non-albicans Candida species. The various Candida species vary in their susceptibility to the most commonly used antifungal agents, and the intrinsic resistance to antifungal therapy seen in some species, along with the development of acquired resistance during treatment in others, is becoming a major problem in the management of Candida infection. A better understanding of the mechanisms and clinical impact of antifungal drug resistance is essential for the efficient treatment of patients with Candida infection and for improving treatment outcomes. Herein, we report resistance to the azoles and echinocandins among Candida species.

  15. Affective Dysregulation and Reality Distortion: A 10-Year Prospective Study of Their Association and Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    van Rossum, Inge; Dominguez, Maria-de-Gracia; Lieb, Roselind; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; van Os, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from clinical patient populations indicates that affective dysregulation is strongly associated with reality distortion, suggesting that a process of misassignment of emotional salience may underlie this connection. To examine this in more detail without clinical confounds, affective regulation-reality distortion relationships, and their clinical relevance, were examined in a German prospective cohort community study. A cohort of 2524 adolescents and young adults aged 14–24 years at baseline was examined by experienced psychologists. Presence of psychotic experiences and (hypo)manic and depressive symptoms was assessed at 2 time points (3.5 and up to 10 years after baseline) using the Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Associations were tested between level of affective dysregulation on the one hand and incidence of psychotic experiences, persistence of these experiences, and psychotic Impairment on the other. Most psychotic experiences occurred in a context of affective dysregulation, and bidirectional dose-response was apparent with greater level of both affective dysregulation and psychotic experiences. Persistence of psychotic experiences was progressively more likely with greater level of (hypo)manic symptoms (odds ratio [OR] trend = 1.51, P < .001) and depressive symptoms (OR trend = 1.15, P = .012). Similarly, psychotic experiences of clinical relevance were progressively more likely to occur with greater level of affective dysregulation (depressive symptoms: OR trend = 1.28, P = .002; (hypo)manic symptoms: OR trend = 1.37, P = .036). Correlated genetic liabilities underlying affective and nonaffective psychotic syndromes may be expressed as correlated dimensions in the general population. Also, affective dysregulation may contribute causally to the persistence and clinical relevance of reality distortion, possibly by facilitating a mechanism of aberrant salience attribution. PMID:19793794

  16. Advanced Multi-Axis Spine Testing: Clinical Relevance and Research Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Holsgrove, Timothy P.; Nayak, Nikhil R.; Welch, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Back pain and spinal degeneration affect a large proportion of the general population. The economic burden of spinal degeneration is significant, and the treatment of spinal degeneration represents a large proportion of healthcare costs. However, spinal surgery does not always provide improved clinical outcomes compared to non-surgical alternatives, and modern interventions, such as total disc replacement, may not offer clinically relevant improvements over more established procedures. Although psychological and socioeconomic factors play an important role in the development and response to back pain, the variation in clinical success is also related to the complexity of the spine, and the multi-faceted manner by which spinal degeneration often occurs. The successful surgical treatment of degenerative spinal conditions requires collaboration between surgeons, engineers, and scientists in order to provide a multi-disciplinary approach to managing the complete condition. In this review, we provide relevant background from both the clinical and the basic research perspectives, which is synthesized into several examples and recommendations for consideration in increasing translational research between communities with the goal of providing improved knowledge and care. Current clinical imaging, and multi-axis testing machines, offer great promise for future research by combining invivo kinematics and loading with in-vitro testing in six degrees of freedom to offer more accurate predictions of the performance of new spinal instrumentation. Upon synthesis of the literature, it is recommended that in-vitro tests strive to recreate as many aspects of the in-vivo environment as possible, and that a physiological preload is a critical factor in assessing spinal biomechanics in the laboratory. A greater link between surgical procedures, and the outcomes in all three anatomical planes should be considered in both the in-vivo and in-vitro settings, to provide data relevant to

  17. Developing students' clinical reasoning skills: correlates of perceived relevance of two teaching and learning approaches.

    PubMed

    Postma, T C; White, J G

    2017-02-01

    'Relevance' is a key concept in adult learning. Hence, this study sought to examine students' perceptions of relevance of the teaching and learning in relation to different instructional designs employed in a Comprehensive Patient Care (CPC) course that aims to develop integrated clinical reasoning skills. Third to fifth year students (2009-2011) were asked to anonymously rate the relevance of the instructional design (RELID) they participated in by means of visual analogue scales at the School of Dentistry, University of Pretoria. They were also asked to rate their perceptions of the alignment between teaching and learning and outcomes (ATLO), assessments' contribution to learning (ACL), course organisation (CO) and teacher competence (TC). RELID served as the outcome measure in stepwise linear regression analyses. ATLO, ACL, CO, TC and the instructional design (case-based learning (CBL = 1) and the combination of discipline-based and lecture-based teaching in CPC (DB-LBT = 0)) served as the co-variables for each of the years of study. The analyses showed positive correlations between RELID and ATLO and between RELID and ACL for all the years of study. RELID was associated with TC in year three and four and CO was associated with RELID in year four and five. CBL outperformed DB-LBT in terms of perceived relevance of the teaching and learning. The results suggest that students' perceptions of the relevance of the instructional design may be enhanced when outcomes, teaching, learning and assessment are constructively aligned during the development of clinical reasoning skills. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Clostridium clostridioforme: a mixture of three clinically important species.

    PubMed

    Finegold, S M; Song, Y; Liu, C; Hecht, D W; Summanen, P; Könönen, E; Allen, S D

    2005-05-01

    Clostridium clostridioforme shows much variability in phenotypic and antimicrobial susceptibility tests, suggesting it may be more than a single species even though all strains share unique morphology. This study was designed to determine if there are multiple species and, if so, to demonstrate the differences that exist between them. A total of 107 strains of C. clostridioforme were investigated by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, phenotypic studies, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. In addition, clinical data from patients whose infections yielded an organism identified as C. clostridioforme was reviewed. Data from the above studies revealed three principal species in what has been called C. clostridioforme: Clostridium bolteae, C. clostridioforme, and Clostridium hathewayi. Each species may be distinguished by certain phenotypic tests. All three species were involved in infections, including bacteremia. C. clostridioforme appears to be associated with more serious or invasive human infections than the other two species in the group. Resistance to penicillin G is common and is due to beta-lactamase production. Resistance to clindamycin and moxifloxacin is also seen. The three species differ in terms of virulence and antimicrobial resistance. "C. clostridioforme" actually represents three distinct species that are different in terms of 16S rRNA sequences, phenotypic characteristics, and antimicrobial susceptibility. It is important for microbiology laboratories to distinguish between these species and for clinicians to be aware of the differences between them.

  19. Prevalence and Clinical Relevance of Exon 2 Deletion of COMMD1 in Bedlington Terriers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y G; Kim, S Y; Kim, J H; Lee, K K; Yun, Y M

    2016-11-01

    Deletion of exon 2 of copper metabolism domain containing 1 (COMMD1) results in copper toxicosis in Bedlington terriers (CT-BT). This study was conducted to identify the prevalence and clinical relevance of the COMMD1 mutation in Bedlington terriers in Korea. A total of 105 purebred Bedlington terriers (50 males, 55 females) from the kennels and pet dog clubs in Korea were examined during the period 2008-2013. A multiplex PCR was carried out to detect exon 2 deletion of COMMD1. Clinical analysis was performed on each genetic group, and clinical status of the dogs was followed up to estimate survival probability. Of the 105 samples, 52 (49%) were wild-type homozygote, 47 (45%) were heterozygote, and 6 (6%) were mutant-type homozygote. Plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity was increased in the mutant-type homozygous group >2 years of age (P < .0001). The survival probability of 6 mutant-type homozygotes surviving 2.5 years was 0.67, and 4 years was 0.5. Results show the prevalence and clinical relevance of exon 2 deletion of COMMD1 and could help establish a structured selective breeding program to prevent CT-BT in Korea. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  20. Impairment of cocaine-mediated behaviours in mice by clinically relevant Ras-ERK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Papale, Alessandro; Morella, Ilaria Maria; Indrigo, Marzia Tina; Bernardi, Rick Eugene; Marrone, Livia; Marchisella, Francesca; Brancale, Andrea; Spanagel, Rainer; Brambilla, Riccardo; Fasano, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Ras-ERK signalling in the brain plays a central role in drug addiction. However, to date, no clinically relevant inhibitor of this cascade has been tested in experimental models of addiction, a necessary step toward clinical trials. We designed two new cell-penetrating peptides - RB1 and RB3 - that penetrate the brain and, in the micromolar range, inhibit phosphorylation of ERK, histone H3 and S6 ribosomal protein in striatal slices. Furthermore, a screening of small therapeutics currently in clinical trials for cancer therapy revealed PD325901 as a brain-penetrating drug that blocks ERK signalling in the nanomolar range. All three compounds have an inhibitory effect on cocaine-induced ERK activation and reward in mice. In particular, PD325901 persistently blocks cocaine-induced place preference and accelerates extinction following cocaine self-administration. Thus, clinically relevant, systemically administered drugs that attenuate Ras-ERK signalling in the brain may be valuable tools for the treatment of cocaine addiction. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17111.001 PMID:27557444

  1. COMPLEMENTARY APPROACHES TO THE DETERMINATION OF ARSENIC SPECIES RELEVANT TO CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ion-exchange chromatography is the most often used analytical approach for arsenic

    speciation, due to the weak-acid nature of several of its species. However, no single

    technique can determine all potentially occurring arsenic species, especially in complex

    e...

  2. COMPLEMENTARY APPROACHES TO THE DETERMINATION OF ARSENIC SPECIES RELEVANT TO CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ion-exchange chromatography is the most often used analytical approach for arsenic

    speciation, due to the weak-acid nature of several of its species. However, no single

    technique can determine all potentially occurring arsenic species, especially in complex

    e...

  3. The Clinical and Socio-Economic Relevance of Increased IPMN Detection Rates and Management Choices.

    PubMed

    Budde, Christoph; Beyer, Georg; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia

    2015-02-01

    Increased usage of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has led to a large increase in identified pancreatic cysts of up to 25% in population-based studies. The clinical and economic relevance of identifying so many cystic lesions has not been established. Compared to other organs such as liver or kidney, dysontogenetic pancreatic cysts are rare. Pancreatic cysts comprise a variety of benign, premalignant or malignant lesions; however, precise diagnosis before resection has an accuracy of only 80%. The focus of recent research was the malignant potential of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) with the aim of establishing clinical pathways addressing risk of malignancy, age and comorbidity, treatment-related morbidity and mortality as well as cost-effectiveness of treatment and surveillance. The focus of this review is to analyze the clinical and socio-economic relevance as well as the cost-benefit relation for IPMNs. For analysis, the following MESH terms were used to identify original articles, reviews, and guidelines in PubMed: ('intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm' OR 'pancreatic cysts') and (incidence OR relevance OR socio-economic OR economic OR cost-effectiveness OR cost-benefit). The retrieved publications were reviewed with a focus on clinical and socio-economic relevance in relation to the increasing incidence of IPMN. Addressing the increasing prevalence of pancreatic cystic lesions, recent consensus guidelines suggested criteria for risk stratification according to 'worrisome features' and 'high-risk stigmata'. Recent prospective cohort studies evaluated whether these can be applied in clinical practice. Evaluation of three different clinical scenarios with regard to costs and quality-adjusted life years suggested a better effectiveness of surveillance after initial risk stratification by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration with cyst fluid analysis compared with immediate resection or follow-up without

  4. A clinically relevant mouse model of canine osteosarcoma with spontaneous metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chaffee, Beth K; Allen, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Many patients with osteosarcoma (OS) will succumb to distant metastasis, often involving the lungs. Effective therapies for treating lung metastases depend on the availability of a clinically relevant pre-clinical model. Mice were surgically implanted with OS tumor fragments. The time course of primary tumor growth and subsequent spread to the lung were determined. Following development of a lytic and proliferative primary bone lesion, tumor metastasized to the lung in the majority of mice. There was no evidence of tumor at three weeks, but 10 out of 11 mice ultimately developed secondary OS in the lung within 12 weeks. Implantation of OS tumor fragments leads to the development of primary bone tumors and secondary lung metastases, recapitulating the clinical behavior of OS. This model offers an advantage over cell suspension injection models by precluding initial seeding of the lung with tumor cells.

  5. Current strategies and findings in clinically relevant post-translational modification-specific proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, Oliver; Loroch, Stefan; Sickmann, Albert; Zahedi, René P

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has considerably extended our knowledge about the occurrence and dynamics of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). So far, quantitative proteomics has been mainly used to study PTM regulation in cell culture models, providing new insights into the role of aberrant PTM patterns in human disease. However, continuous technological and methodical developments have paved the way for an increasing number of PTM-specific proteomic studies using clinical samples, often limited in sample amount. Thus, quantitative proteomics holds a great potential to discover, validate and accurately quantify biomarkers in body fluids and primary tissues. A major effort will be to improve the complete integration of robust but sensitive proteomics technology to clinical environments. Here, we discuss PTMs that are relevant for clinical research, with a focus on phosphorylation, glycosylation and proteolytic cleavage; furthermore, we give an overview on the current developments and novel findings in mass spectrometry-based PTM research. PMID:25955281

  6. Clinical relevance of antigen spreading pattern induced by CHP-MAGE-A4 cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Kengo; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Wada, Masataka; Abiko, Takehiro; Kyogoku, Noriaki; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Miyahara, Yoshihiro; Kageyama, Shinichi; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shiku, Hiroshi; Hirano, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the antigen spreading pattern in the CHP-MAGE-A4-vaccinated patients and analyze the clinical relevance of antigen spreading pattern as a surrogate marker of patient survival. 12 patients who had been injected with 300 μg of CHP-MAGE-A4 and 0.5 Klinische Einheit of OK-432 in more than five vaccinations were analyzed. Increases in the anti-MAGE-A4-specific antibody response were observed in eight patients (66.7%), compared with six patients (50%) for anti-NY-ESO-1 and five patients (41.7%) for anti-MAGE-A3 after five vaccinations. We identified frequent antigen spreading following MAGE-A4 vaccinations without associations with the clinical response or patient prognosis. Antigen spreading pattern might reflect tumor shrinkage as a response to treatment and treatment history (clinical trial registration number: UMIN000001999).

  7. Retrieving clinically relevant diabetic retinopathy images using a multi-class multiple-instance framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandakkar, Parag S.; Venkatesan, Ragav; Li, Baoxin

    2013-02-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a vision-threatening complication from diabetes mellitus, a medical condition that is rising globally. Unfortunately, many patients are unaware of this complication because of absence of symptoms. Regular screening of DR is necessary to detect the condition for timely treatment. Content-based image retrieval, using archived and diagnosed fundus (retinal) camera DR images can improve screening efficiency of DR. This content-based image retrieval study focuses on two DR clinical findings, microaneurysm and neovascularization, which are clinical signs of non-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The authors propose a multi-class multiple-instance image retrieval framework which deploys a modified color correlogram and statistics of steerable Gaussian Filter responses, for retrieving clinically relevant images from a database of DR fundus image database.

  8. Clinical relevance of sensitization to lupine in peanut-sensitized adults.

    PubMed

    Peeters, K A B M; Koppelman, S J; Penninks, A H; Lebens, A; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C A F M; Hefle, S L; Taylor, S L; van Hoffen, E; Knulst, A C

    2009-04-01

    The use of lupine in food has been increasing during the last decade and allergic reactions to lupine have been reported, especially in peanut-allergic patients. The frequency and the degree of cross-reactivity to other legumes are not known. The aim of the study was to investigate the frequency of sensitization to lupine, and in addition to pea and soy, and its clinical relevance, in peanut-sensitized patients. Furthermore, to determine the eliciting dose (ED) for lupine using double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFC). Thirty-nine unselected peanut-sensitized patients were evaluated by skin prick tests (SPT) and ImmunoCAP to lupine, pea, and soy. Clinical reactivity was measured by DBPCFC for lupine, and by history for pea and soy. Eighty-two percent of the study population was sensitized to lupine, 55% to pea, and 87% to soy. Clinically relevant sensitization to lupine, pea, or soy occurred in 35%, 29%, and 33% respectively of the study population. None of the patients was aware of the use of lupine in food. The lowest ED for lupine, inducing mild subjective symptoms, was 0.5 mg, and the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) was 0.1 mg. No predictive factors for lupine allergy were found. In peanut-sensitized patients, clinically relevant sensitization to either lupine or to pea or soy occurs frequently. The ED for lupine is low (0.5 mg), which is only fivefold higher than for peanut. Patients are not aware of lupine allergy and the presence of lupine in food, indicating that education is important to build awareness.

  9. [Differential diagnosis of medically relevant flea species and their significance in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Beck, W; Clark, H H

    1997-10-01

    Different flea species may infest humans temporarily. Such arthropods should be considered as a possible cause of erythematous and pruritic papules and nodules of unclear origin. Bites from animal fleas can be seen in people with close contact to domestic or wild animals. This dermatosis may often be misdiagnosed. Several flea species including Pulex irritans, Ctenocephalides canis, Ctenocephalides felis, Ceratophyllus gallinae, Ceratophyllus columbae and Archaeopsylla erinacei may infest human skin, causing symptoms. Flea bite-allergy and the role of various flea species as disease vectors are also discussed.

  10. Relevance of pathologic classifications and diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia to clinical trials and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Tallman, Martin S

    2004-01-01

    Many new insights into the diagnosis, pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, treatment and prognosis of patients with AML reflect the heterogeneity of the disease. The initial descriptions of the various subtypes of AML, established by the FAB classification, were based on morphology and cytochemical stains. Although morphology remains the foundation for the diagnosis, additional diagnostic studies including immunophenotyping, cytogenetic evaluation, and molecular genetic studies have become critical, and in some specific cases, mandatory, complementary tools. Several specific subtypes of AML are now treated with directed or targeted therapy. Acute promyelocytic leukemia is currently the only example of a subtype of AML to which specific therapy targeted to a molecular genetic abnormality is available and this subtype now is highly curable. Future studies will address newly identified prognostic factors and gene mutations such as FLT3, Wilm's tumor (WTI), and CEBPA which will enable the further pathologic classification of patients with AML. Finally, microarray analysis will likely identify genes critically involved in the pathogenesis of specific pathologic subtypes.

  11. Detection of Clinically Relevant Exonic Copy-Number Changes by Array CGH

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Shaw, Chad A.; Eng, Patricia A.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Pursley, Amber N.; Kang, Sung-Hae L.; Yang, Yaping; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Nowakowska, Beata A.; Gaudio, Daniela del; Xia, Zhilian; Simpson-Patel, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna L.; Gibson, James B.; Tsai, Anne C.-H.; Bowers, Jennifer A.; Reimschisel, Tyler E.; Schaaf, Christian P.; Potocki, Lorraine; Scaglia, Fernando; Gambin, Tomasz; Sykulski, Maciej; Bartnik, Magdalena; Derwinska, Katarzyna; Wisniowiecka-Kowalnik, Barbara; Lalani, Seema R.; Probst, Frank J.; Bi, Weimin; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Patel, Ankita; Lupski, James R.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Stankiewicz, Pawel

    2011-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful tool for the molecular elucidation and diagnosis of disorders resulting from genomic copy-number variation (CNV). However, intragenic deletions or duplications—those including genomic intervals of a size smaller than a gene—have remained beyond the detection limit of most clinical aCGH analyses. Increasing array probe number improves genomic resolution, although higher cost may limit implementation, and enhanced detection of benign CNV can confound clinical interpretation. We designed an array with exonic coverage of selected disease and candidate genes and used it clinically to identify losses or gains throughout the genome involving at least one exon and as small as several hundred base pairs in size. In some patients, the detected copy-number change occurs within a gene known to be causative of the observed clinical phenotype, demonstrating the ability of this array to detect clinically relevant CNVs with subkilobase resolution. In summary, we demonstrate the utility of a custom-designed, exon-targeted oligonucleotide array to detect intragenic copy-number changes in patients with various clinical phenotypes. PMID:20848651

  12. Precision Oncology Medicine: The Clinical Relevance of Patient-Specific Biomarkers Used to Optimize Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Keith T; Chau, Cindy H; Price, Douglas K; Figg, William D

    2016-12-01

    Precision medicine in oncology is the result of an increasing awareness of patient-specific clinical features coupled with the development of genomic-based diagnostics and targeted therapeutics. Companion diagnostics designed for specific drug-target pairs were the first to widely utilize clinically applicable tumor biomarkers (eg, HER2, EGFR), directing treatment for patients whose tumors exhibit a mutation susceptible to an FDA-approved targeted therapy (eg, trastuzumab, erlotinib). Clinically relevant germline mutations in drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (eg, TPMT, DPYD) have been shown to impact drug response, providing a rationale for individualized dosing to optimize treatment. The use of multigene expression-based assays to analyze an array of prognostic biomarkers has been shown to help direct treatment decisions, especially in breast cancer (eg, Oncotype DX). More recently, the use of next-generation sequencing to detect many potential "actionable" cancer molecular alterations is further shifting the 1 gene-1 drug paradigm toward a more comprehensive, multigene approach. Currently, many clinical trials (eg, NCI-MATCH, NCI-MPACT) are assessing novel diagnostic tools with a combination of different targeted therapeutics while also examining tumor biomarkers that were previously unexplored in a variety of cancer histologies. Results from ongoing trials such as the NCI-MATCH will help determine the clinical utility and future development of the precision-medicine approach. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  13. Evidence-based practice for the busy nurse practitioner: part one: relevance to clinical practice and clinical inquiry process.

    PubMed

    Facchiano, Lynda; Snyder, Charlene Hoffman

    2012-10-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) continues to gain momentum within health care. The purpose of this four-part EBP series is to provide an introductory overview of the EBP process, emphasizing EBP steps one through three, in order to assist nurse practitioners (NPs) in building EBP skills that can be integrated into clinical practice. The relevance of EBP to the NP's clinical practice, an introduction to the EBP process steps, and clinical inquiry process begin the series. Scientific literature review, gray literature, and online evidence-based practice databases and resources. EBP has become increasingly important to NPs, yet there is evidence suggesting it is not being fully implemented in clinical practice. EBP is one way to keep the busy NP's knowledge up to date, enhance clinical judgment, and augment the existing provider-client decision-making process. The principles of EBP have become the cornerstone strategy for NPs to translate research findings into clinical practice. Practicing in an ever-changing healthcare environment, NPs have a responsibility to provide their clients with the best available evidence, while incorporating that evidence into the provider-client decision-making process. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  14. Complete Genome Sequences for 35 Biothreat Assay-Relevant Bacillus Species

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Shannon L.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Davenport, Karen W.; Jaissle, James; Frey, Kenneth G.; Ladner, Jason T.; Broomall, Stacey M.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Bruce, David C.; Gibbons, Henry S.; Coyne, Susan R.; Lo, Chien-Chi; Meincke, Linda; Munk, A. Christine; Koroleva, Galina I.; Rosenzweig, C. Nicole; Palacios, Gustavo F.; Redden, Cassie L.; Minogue, Timothy D.; Chain, Patrick S.

    2015-04-30

    In 2011, the Association of Analytical Communities (AOAC) International released a list of Bacillus strains relevant to biothreat molecular detection assays. Presented in this document are the complete and annotated genome assemblies for the 15 strains listed on the inclusivity panel, as well as the 20 strains listed on the exclusivity panel.

  15. Complete Genome Sequences for 35 Biothreat Assay-Relevant Bacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Davenport, Karen W.; Jaissle, James; Frey, Kenneth G.; Ladner, Jason T.; Broomall, Stacey M.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Bruce, David C.; Gibbons, Henry S.; Coyne, Susan R.; Lo, Chien-Chi; Meincke, Linda; Munk, A. Christine; Koroleva, Galina I.; Rosenzweig, C. Nicole; Palacios, Gustavo F.; Redden, Cassie L.; Minogue, Timothy D.; Chain, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the Association of Analytical Communities (AOAC) International released a list of Bacillus strains relevant to biothreat molecular detection assays. We present the complete and annotated genome assemblies for the 15 strains listed on the inclusivity panel, as well as the 20 strains listed on the exclusivity panel. PMID:25931591

  16. Complete Genome Sequences for 35 Biothreat Assay-Relevant Bacillus Species

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Shannon L.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Davenport, Karen W.; ...

    2015-04-30

    In 2011, the Association of Analytical Communities (AOAC) International released a list of Bacillus strains relevant to biothreat molecular detection assays. Presented in this document are the complete and annotated genome assemblies for the 15 strains listed on the inclusivity panel, as well as the 20 strains listed on the exclusivity panel.

  17. Emerging Bacterial Infection: Identification and Clinical Significance of Kocuria Species

    PubMed Central

    Palange, Padmavali; Vaish, Ritu; Bhatti, Adnan Bashir; Kale, Vinod; Kandi, Maheshwar Reddy; Bhoomagiri, Mohan Rao

    2016-01-01

    Recently there have been reports of gram-positive cocci which are morphologically similar to both Staphylococci and the Micrococci. These bacteria have been identified as Kocuria species with the help of automated identification system and other molecular methods including 16S rRNA (ribosomal ribonucleic acid) evaluation. Kocuria belongs to the family Micrococcaceae which also includes Staphylococcus species and Micrococcus species. Isolation and clinical significance of these bacteria from human specimens warrant great caution as it does not necessarily confirm infection due to their ubiquitous presence, and as a normal flora of skin and mucous membranes in human and animals. Most clinical microbiology laboratories ignore such bacteria as laboratory and specimen contaminants. With increasing reports of infections associated with these bacteria, it is now important for clinical microbiologists to identify and enumerate the virulence and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of such bacteria and assist clinicians in improving the patient care and management. We review the occurrence and clinical significance of Kocuria species. PMID:27630804

  18. Food authentication of commercially-relevant shrimp and prawn species: from classical methods to Foodomics.

    PubMed

    Ortea, Ignacio; Pascoal, Ananías; Cañas, Benito; Gallardo, José M; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge; Calo-Mata, Pilar

    2012-08-01

    Although seafood species identification has traditionally relied on morphological analysis, sometimes this is difficult to apply for the differentiation among penaeid shrimps owing to their phenotypic similarities and to the frequent removal of external carapace during processing. The objective of this review is to provide an updated and extensive overview on the molecular methods for shrimp and prawn species authentication, in which several omics approaches based on protein and DNA analysis are described. DNA-based methods include the amplification by PCR of different genes, commonly the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA and cytochrome oxidase I genes. A recently described method based on RFLP coupled to PCR turned out to be particularly interesting for species differentiation and origin identification. Protein analysis methods for the characterization and detection of species-specific peptides are also summarized, emphasizing some novel proteomics-based approaches, such as phyloproteomics, peptide fragmentation, and species-specific peptide detection by HPLC coupled to multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, the latter representing the fastest method described to date for species authentication in food.

  19. Molecular identification and susceptibility of clinically relevant Scedosporium spp. in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Wan, Zhe; Li, Ruoyu; Lu, Qiaoyun; Yu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    As various new sibling species within the Scedosporium spp. have been described recently, this study was conducted to investigate distribution and antifungal susceptibility profiles of the different species of Scedosporium spp. in China. Twenty-one clinical strains of Scedosporium from China and two strains from Japan were reidentified by MLSA. The analysis included BT2, CAL, RPB, SOD, and ACT and the combination of the five loci. Pseudallescheria boydii complex (17 strains) and S. apiospermum (6 strains) were identified. P. boydii complex included four closely related subgroups: P. boydii (9 strains), P. ellipsoidea (6 strains), P. fusoidea (1 strain), and P. angusta (1 strain). There were no significant differences in MICs for neither VOR, POS, nor AMB over all the five species in study. For itraconazole, intraspecific diversity was evident.

  20. Molecular Identification and Susceptibility of Clinically Relevant Scedosporium spp. in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Wan, Zhe; Li, Ruoyu; Lu, Qiaoyun

    2015-01-01

    As various new sibling species within the Scedosporium spp. have been described recently, this study was conducted to investigate distribution and antifungal susceptibility profiles of the different species of Scedosporium spp. in China. Twenty-one clinical strains of Scedosporium from China and two strains from Japan were reidentified by MLSA. The analysis included BT2, CAL, RPB, SOD, and ACT and the combination of the five loci. Pseudallescheria boydii complex (17 strains) and S. apiospermum (6 strains) were identified. P. boydii complex included four closely related subgroups: P. boydii (9 strains), P. ellipsoidea (6 strains), P. fusoidea (1 strain), and P. angusta (1 strain). There were no significant differences in MICs for neither VOR, POS, nor AMB over all the five species in study. For itraconazole, intraspecific diversity was evident. PMID:26550562

  1. Prioritizing Clinically Relevant Copy Number Variation from Genetic Interactions and Gene Function Data

    PubMed Central

    Foong, Justin; Girdea, Marta; Stavropoulos, James; Brudno, Michael

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly necessary to develop computerized methods for identifying the few disease-causing variants from hundreds discovered in each individual patient. This problem is especially relevant for Copy Number Variants (CNVs), which can be cheaply interrogated via low-cost hybridization arrays commonly used in clinical practice. We present a method to predict the disease relevance of CNVs that combines functional context and clinical phenotype to discover clinically harmful CNVs (and likely causative genes) in patients with a variety of phenotypes. We compare several feature and gene weighing systems for classifying both genes and CNVs. We combined the best performing methodologies and parameters on over 2,500 Agilent CGH 180k Microarray CNVs derived from 140 patients. Our method achieved an F-score of 91.59%, with 87.08% precision and 97.00% recall. Our methods are freely available at https://github.com/compbio-UofT/cnv-prioritization. Our dataset is included with the supplementary information. PMID:26437450

  2. Approaches for Establishing Clinically Relevant Dissolution Specifications for Immediate Release Solid Oral Dosage Forms.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Andre; Abend, Andreas M; Kesisoglou, Filippos; Flanagan, Talia; Cohen, Michael J; Diaz, Dorys A; Mao, Y; Zhang, Limin; Webster, Gregory K; Lin, Yiqing; Hahn, David A; Coutant, Carrie A; Grady, Haiyan

    2017-08-22

    This manuscript represents the perspective of the Dissolution Analytical Working Group of the IQ Consortium. The intent of this manuscript is to highlight the challenges of, and to provide a recommendation on, the development of clinically relevant dissolution specifications (CRS) for immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms. A roadmap toward the development of CRS for IR products containing active ingredients with a non-narrow therapeutic window is discussed, within the context of mechanistic dissolution understanding, supported by in-human pharmacokinetic (PK) data. Two case studies present potential outcomes of following the CRS roadmap and setting dissolution specifications. These cases reveal some benefits and challenges of pursuing CRS with additional PK data, in light of current regulatory positions, including that of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), who generally favor this approach, but with the understanding that both industry and regulatory agency perspectives are still evolving in this relatively new field. The CRS roadmap discussed in this manuscript also describes a way to develop clinically relevant dissolution specifications based primarily on dissolution data for batches used in pivotal clinical studies, acknowledging that not all IR product development efforts need to be supported by additional PK studies, albeit with the associated risk of potentially unnecessarily tight manufacturing controls. Recommendations are provided on what stages during the life cycle investment into in vivo studies may be valuable. Finally, the opportunities for CRS within the context of post-approval changes, Modeling and Simulation (M&S), and the application of biowaivers, are briefly discussed.

  3. MDMA, methamphetamine, and CYP2D6 pharmacogenetics: what is clinically relevant?

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Rafael; Yubero-Lahoz, Samanta; Pardo-Lozano, Ricardo; Farré, Magí

    2012-01-01

    In vitro human studies show that the metabolism of most amphetamine-like psychostimulants is regulated by the polymorphic cytochrome P450 isozyme CYP2D6. Two compounds, methamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), were selected as archetypes to discuss the translation and clinical significance of in vitro to in vivo findings. Both compounds were chosen based on their differential interaction with CYP2D6 and their high abuse prevalence in society. Methamphetamine behaves as both a weak substrate and competitive inhibitor of CYP2D6, while MDMA acts as a high affinity substrate and potent mechanism-based inhibitor (MBI) of the enzyme. The MBI behavior of MDMA on CYP2D6 implies that subjects, irrespective of their genotype/phenotype, are phenocopied to the poor metabolizer (PM) phenotype. The fraction of metabolic clearance regulated by CYP2D6 for both drugs is substantially lower than expected from in vitro studies. Other isoenzymes of cytochrome P450 and a relevant contribution of renal excretion play a part in their clearance. These facts tune down the potential contribution of CYP2D6 polymorphism in the clinical outcomes of both substances. Globally, the clinical relevance of CYP2D6 polymorphism is lower than that predicted by in vitro studies. PMID:23162568

  4. Implementation of In Vitro Drug Resistance Assays: Maximizing the Potential for Uncovering Clinically Relevant Resistance Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Korpal, Manav; Feala, Jacob; Puyang, Xiaoling; Zou, Jian; Ramos, Alex H.; Wu, Jeremy; Baumeister, Timm; Yu, Lihua; Warmuth, Markus; Zhu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Although targeted therapies are initially effective, resistance inevitably emerges. Several methods, such as genetic analysis of resistant clinical specimens, have been applied to uncover these resistance mechanisms to facilitate follow-up care. Although these approaches have led to clinically relevant discoveries, difficulties in attaining the relevant patient material or in deconvoluting the genomic data collected from these specimens have severely hampered the path towards a cure. To this end, we here describe a tool for expeditious discovery that may guide improvement in first-line therapies and alternative clinical management strategies. By coupling preclinical in vitro or in vivo drug selection with next-generation sequencing, it is possible to identify genomic structural variations and/or gene expression alterations that may serve as functional drivers of resistance. This approach facilitates the spontaneous emergence of alterations, enhancing the probability that these mechanisms may be observed in the patients. In this protocol we provide guidelines to maximize the potential for uncovering single nucleotide variants that drive resistance using adherent lines. PMID:26710000

  5. Creating clinically relevant knowledge from systematic reviews: the challenges of knowledge translation.

    PubMed

    Scott, N Ann; Moga, Carmen; Barton, Pamela; Rashiq, Saifudin; Schopflocher, Donald; Taenzer, Paul; Harstall, Christa

    2007-08-01

    A research translation strategy for chronic pain was developed that has significant potential to advance the usefulness of systematic reviews (SRs) in clinical practice. The strategy used interactive case-based workshops that summarize current evidence on treatments for chronic non-cancer pain. Health technology assessment researchers and clinicians collaborated to translate SR evidence into education aids, but this proved far from straightforward. Sourcing and selecting the SR evidence required maintaining a credible balance between the diametrical concepts of comprehensiveness and efficiency, and relevance and validity. On examination of the collated evidence base, further challenges were encountered in dealing with the lack of consistency among the SRs in the quality of execution, the scales used to rate the quality of the evidence, and the conclusions on common topic areas. Strategies for overcoming these difficulties are discussed. The key elements for creating clinically relevant knowledge from SRs are: a flexible, consistent and transparent methodology; credible research; involvement of renowned content experts to translate the evidence into clinically meaningful guidance; and an open, trusting relationship among all contributors.

  6. Isolated fat pad sign in acute elbow injury: is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    Jie, Kim E; van Dam, Lisette F; Hammacher, Eric R

    2016-06-01

    An isolated fat pad sign (i.e. joint effusion without a visible fracture), commonly seen in acute elbow injury, is associated with occult fracture and treated as such. However, the clinical relevance of an isolated fat pad is unclear, thereby questioning the need for specialized follow-up. In this study, 111 patients (median age 15 years, interquartile range 9-27 years) with an isolated fat pad sign after acute elbow injury were included. The clinical relevance of an isolated fat pad sign was derived from descriptives on pain, elbow function, treatment change, number of revisits and recovery time after 1 week follow-up and long-term follow-up. Treatment alterations were rarely made and none of the patients needed an operative intervention; also, none of the patients had persistent symptoms. The median recovery time was 3 weeks (interquartile range 2-12 weeks). This study shows that, unless symptoms persist or worsen, regular follow-up at a specialized outpatient clinic is not needed.

  7. Bioelectrical phase angle and impedance vector analysis--clinical relevance and applicability of impedance parameters.

    PubMed

    Norman, Kristina; Stobäus, Nicole; Pirlich, Matthias; Bosy-Westphal, Anja

    2012-12-01

    The use of phase angle (PhA) and raw parameters of bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) has gained attention as alternative to conventional error-prone calculation of body composition in disease. This review investigates the clinical relevance and applicability of PhA and Bioelectrical Impedance Vector Analysis (BIVA) which uses the plot of resistance and reactance normalized per height. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using Medline identifying studies relevant to this review until March 2011. We included studies on the use of PhA or BIVA derived from tetrapolar BIA in out- and in-patient settings or institutionalized elderly. Numerous studies have proven the prognostic impact of PhA regarding mortality or postoperative complications in different clinical settings. BIVA has been shown to provide information about hydration and body cell mass and therefore allows assessment of patients in whom calculation of body composition fails due to altered hydration. Reference values exist for PhA and BIVA facilitating interpretation of data. PhA, a superior prognostic marker, should be considered as a screening tool for the identification of risk patients with impaired nutritional and functional status, BIVA is recommended for further nutritional assessment and monitoring, in particular when calculation of body composition is not feasible. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  8. Completeness of Reporting of Patient-Relevant Clinical Trial Outcomes: Comparison of Unpublished Clinical Study Reports with Publicly Available Data

    PubMed Central

    Wieseler, Beate; Wolfram, Natalia; McGauran, Natalie; Kerekes, Michaela F.; Vervölgyi, Volker; Kohlepp, Petra; Kamphuis, Marloes; Grouven, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Background Access to unpublished clinical study reports (CSRs) is currently being discussed as a means to allow unbiased evaluation of clinical research. The Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) routinely requests CSRs from manufacturers for its drug assessments. Our objective was to determine the information gain from CSRs compared to publicly available sources (journal publications and registry reports) for patient-relevant outcomes included in IQWiG health technology assessments (HTAs) of drugs. Methods and Findings We used a sample of 101 trials with full CSRs received for 16 HTAs of drugs completed by IQWiG between 15 January 2006 and 14 February 2011, and analyzed the CSRs and the publicly available sources of these trials. For each document type we assessed the completeness of information on all patient-relevant outcomes included in the HTAs (benefit outcomes, e.g., mortality, symptoms, and health-related quality of life; harm outcomes, e.g., adverse events). We dichotomized the outcomes as “completely reported” or “incompletely reported.” For each document type, we calculated the proportion of outcomes with complete information per outcome category and overall. We analyzed 101 trials with CSRs; 86 had at least one publicly available source, 65 at least one journal publication, and 50 a registry report. The trials included 1,080 patient-relevant outcomes. The CSRs provided complete information on a considerably higher proportion of outcomes (86%) than the combined publicly available sources (39%). With the exception of health-related quality of life (57%), CSRs provided complete information on 78% to 100% of the various benefit outcomes (combined publicly available sources: 20% to 53%). CSRs also provided considerably more information on harms. The differences in completeness of information for patient-relevant outcomes between CSRs and journal publications or registry reports (or a combination of both) were statistically

  9. Determination of clinically relevant content for a musculoskeletal anatomy curriculum for physical medicine and rehabilitation residents.

    PubMed

    Lisk, Kristina; Flannery, John F; Loh, Eldon Y; Richardson, Denyse; Agur, Anne M R; Woods, Nicole N

    2014-01-01

    To address the need for more clinical anatomy training in residency education, many postgraduate programs have implemented structured anatomy courses into their curriculum. Consensus often does not exist on specific content and level of detail of the content that should be included in such curricula. This article describes the use of the Delphi method to identify clinically relevant content to incorporate in a musculoskeletal anatomy curriculum for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) residents. A two round modified Delphi involving PM&R experts was used to establish the curricular content. The anatomical structures and clinical conditions presented to the expert group were compiled using multiple sources: clinical musculoskeletal anatomy cases from the PM&R residency program at the University of Toronto; consultation with PM&R experts; and textbooks. In each round, experts rated the importance of each curricular item to PM&R residency education using a five-point Likert scale. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was used to determine consensus at the end of each round and agreement scores were used as an outcome measure to determine the content to include in the curriculum. The overall internal consistency in both rounds was 0.99. A total of 37 physiatrists from across Canada participated and the overall response rate over two rounds was 97%. The initial curricular list consisted of 361 items. After the second iteration, the list was reduced by 44%. By using a national consensus method we were able to objectively determine the relevant anatomical structures and clinical musculoskeletal conditions important in daily PM&R practice.

  10. Clinical relevance of metronidazole and peripheral neuropathy: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Goolsby, Tiffany A; Jakeman, Bernadette; Gaynes, Robert P

    2017-09-05

    The objective of this paper was to review and evaluate the literature on metronidazole-associated peripheral neuropathy and determine the relevance in clinical practice. MEDLINE/PubMed, EBSCO, and Google Scholar were searched through February 2017 using the search terms metronidazole and peripheral neuropathy, or polyneuropathy, or paresthesia, or neurotoxicity. Relevant case reports, retrospective studies, surveys, and review articles were included. Bibliographies of all relevant articles were reviewed for additional sources. Overall, metronidazole is generally well tolerated but serious neurotoxicity, including peripheral neuropathy, has been reported. The overall incidence of peripheral neuropathy associated with metronidazole is unknown. Our review found 36 case reports (40 unique patients) of metronidazole-associated peripheral neuropathy with the majority of cases receiving >42 total grams (>4 weeks) of therapy (31 out of 40). In addition, we reviewed 13 clinical studies and found varying rates of peripheral neuropathy from 0-50%. Within these clinical studies, we found a higher incidence of peripheral neuropathy in patients receiving >42 total grams (>4 weeks) of metronidazole compared to those patients receiving ≤ 42 total grams (17.9% vs 1.7%). Nearly all patients had complete resolution of symptoms. In conclusion, peripheral neuropathy is exceedingly rare in patients who receive ≤ 42 total grams of metronidazole. Patients who receive larger total doses may be at higher risk of peripheral neuropathy but most patients have resolution of symptoms after discontinuing therapy. Antimicrobial stewardship programs may consider use of antibiotic combinations that include metronidazole over broad-spectrum alternatives when treating with ≤42 grams of the drug (≤4 weeks). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Distribution and Metabolism of Lipocurc™ (Liposomal Curcumin) in Dog and Human Blood Cells: Species Selectivity and Pharmacokinetic Relevance.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Gordon T; Licollari, Albert; Tan, Aimin; Greil, Richard; Vcelar, Brigitta; Majeed, Muhammad; Helson, Lawrence

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of curcumin (in the form of Lipocurc™) and its major metabolite tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) in Beagle dog and human red blood cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and hepatocytes. Lipocurc™ was used as the source of curcumin for the cell distribution assays. In vitro findings with red blood cells were also compared to in vivo pharmacokinetic data available from preclinical studies in dogs and phase I clinical studies in humans. High levels of curcumin were measured in PBMCs (625.5 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 7,297 pg/10(6) cells in dog and 353.7 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 6,809 pg/10(6) cells in human) and in hepatocytes (414.5 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 14,005 pg/10(6) cells in dog and 813.5 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 13,780 pg/10(6) cells in human). Lower curcumin levels were measured in red blood cells (dog: 78.4 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 7.2 pg/10(6) cells, human: 201.5 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 18.6 pg/10(6) cells). A decrease in the medium concentration of curcumin was observed in red blood cells and hepatocytes, but not in PBMCs. Red blood cell levels of THC were ~5-fold higher in dog compared to human and similar between dog and human for hepatocytes and PBMCs. The ratio of THC to curcumin found in the red blood cell medium following incubation was 6.3 for dog compared to 0.006 for human, while for PBMCs and hepatocytes the ratio of THC to curcumin in the medium did not display such marked species differences. There was an excellent correlation between the in vitro disposition of curcumin and THC following incubation with red blood cells and in vivo plasma levels of curcumin and THC in dog and human following intravenous infusion. The disposition of curcumin in blood cells is, therefore, species-dependent and of pharmacokinetic relevance. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass: pathophysiology, measure and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Ranucci, Marco; Carboni, Giovanni; Cotza, Mauro; de Somer, Filip

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass derives from both the aerobic metabolism and the buffering of lactic acid produced by tissues under anaerobic conditions. Therefore, carbon dioxide removal monitoring is an important measure of the adequacy of perfusion and oxygen delivery. However, routine monitoring of carbon dioxide removal is not widely applied. The present article reviews the main physiological and pathophysiological sources of carbon dioxide, the available techniques to assess carbon dioxide production and removal and the clinically relevant applications of carbon dioxide-related variables as markers of the adequacy of perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  13. Promoting culturally competent chronic pain management using the clinically relevant continuum model.

    PubMed

    Monsivais, Diane B

    2011-06-01

    This article reviews the culture of biomedicine and current practices in pain management education, which often merge to create a hostile environment for effective chronic pain care. Areas of cultural tensions in chronic pain frequently involve the struggle to achieve credibility regarding one's complaints of pain (or being believed that the pain is real) and complying with pain medication protocols. The clinically relevant continuum model is presented as a framework allowing providers to approach care from an evidence-based, culturally appropriate (patient centered) perspective that takes into account the highest level of evidence available, provider expertise, and patient preferences and values. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinically relevant doses of chemotherapy agents reversibly block formation of glioblastoma neurospheres

    PubMed Central

    Mihaliak, Alicia M.; Gilbert, Candace A.; Li, Li; Daou, Marie-Claire; Moser, Richard P.; Reeves, Andrew; Cochran, Brent H.; Ross, Alonzo H.

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma patients have a poor prognosis, even after surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy with temozolomide or 1,3-bis(2-chloroethy)-1-nitrosourea. We developed an in vitro recovery model using neurosphere cultures to analyze the efficacy of chemotherapy treatments, and tested whether glioblastoma neurosphere initiating cells are resistant. Concentrations of chemotherapy drugs that inhibit neurosphere formation are similar to clinically relevant doses. Some lines underwent a transient cell cycle arrest and a robust recovery of neurosphere formation. These results indicate that glioblastoma neurospheres can regrow after treatment with chemotherapy drugs. This neurosphere recovery assay will facilitate studies of chemo-resistant subpopulations and methods to enhance glioblastoma therapy. PMID:20435409

  15. Clinically Relevant Cognitive Impairment in Middle-Aged Adults With Childhood-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nunley, Karen A.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Jennings, J. Richard; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Zgibor, Janice C.; Costacou, Tina; Boudreau, Robert M.; Miller, Rachel; Orchard, Trevor J.; Saxton, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the presence and correlates of clinically relevant cognitive impairment in middle-aged adults with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS During 2010–2013, 97 adults diagnosed with T1D and aged <18 years (age and duration 49 ± 7 and 41 ± 6 years, respectively; 51% female) and 138 similarly aged adults without T1D (age 49 ± 7 years; 55% female) completed extensive neuropsychological testing. Biomedical data on participants with T1D were collected periodically since 1986–1988. Cognitive impairment status was based on the number of test scores ≥1.5 SD worse than demographically appropriate published norms: none, mild (only one test), or clinically relevant (two or more tests). RESULTS The prevalence of clinically relevant cognitive impairment was five times higher among participants with than without T1D (28% vs. 5%; P < 0.0001), independent of education, age, or blood pressure. Effect sizes were large (Cohen d 0.6–0.9; P < 0.0001) for psychomotor speed and visuoconstruction tasks and were modest (d 0.3–0.6; P < 0.05) for measures of executive function. Among participants with T1D, prevalent cognitive impairment was related to 14-year average A1c >7.5% (58 mmol/mol) (odds ratio [OR] 3.0; P = 0.009), proliferative retinopathy (OR 2.8; P = 0.01), and distal symmetric polyneuropathy (OR 2.6; P = 0.03) measured 5 years earlier; higher BMI (OR 1.1; P = 0.03); and ankle-brachial index ≥1.3 (OR 4.2; P = 0.01) measured 20 years earlier, independent of education. CONCLUSIONS Clinically relevant cognitive impairment is highly prevalent among these middle-aged adults with childhood-onset T1D. In this aging cohort, chronic hyperglycemia and prevalent microvascular disease were associated with cognitive impairment, relationships shown previously in younger populations with T1D. Two additional potentially modifiable risk factors for T1D-related cognitive impairment, vascular health and BMI

  16. The clinical relevance of assessing advanced glycation endproducts accumulation in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Links, Thera; Zeebregts, Clark; Tio, Rene; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Smit, Andries

    2008-10-07

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes. There is increasing evidence that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis, in particular in diabetes. AGE accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic and oxidative stress, and may so represent the "metabolic memory". Furthermore, increased AGE accumulation is closely related to the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetes. This review article will focus on the clinical relevance of measuring AGE accumulation in diabetic patients by focusing on AGE formation, AGEs as predictors of long-term complications, and interventions against AGEs.

  17. The clinical relevance of assessing advanced glycation endproducts accumulation in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Links, Thera; Zeebregts, Clark; Tio, Rene; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Smit, Andries

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes. There is increasing evidence that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis, in particular in diabetes. AGE accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic and oxidative stress, and may so represent the "metabolic memory". Furthermore, increased AGE accumulation is closely related to the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetes. This review article will focus on the clinical relevance of measuring AGE accumulation in diabetic patients by focusing on AGE formation, AGEs as predictors of long-term complications, and interventions against AGEs. PMID:18840258

  18. Blood lactate concentration after exposure to conducted energy weapons (including TASER® devices): is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    Jauchem, James R

    2013-09-01

    In previous studies, blood lactate concentration (BLac) consistently increased in anesthetized animals and in human subjects after exposures to TASER(®) conducted energy weapons (CEWs). Some have suggested the increased BLac would have detrimental consequences. In the current review, the following are evaluated: (a) the nature of muscle contractions due to CEWs, (b) general aspects of increased BLac, (c) previous studies of conventional neuromuscular electrical stimulation and CEW exposures, and (d) BLac in disease states. On the basis of these analyses, one can conclude that BLac, per se (independent of acidemia), would not be clinically relevant immediately after short-duration CEW applications, due to the short time course of any increase.

  19. Studies of ion species separation in ICF-relevant plasmas at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinderknecht, Hans; Wilks, Scott; Amendt, Peter; Ross, Steve; Park, Hye-Sook; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Li, Chikang; Seguin, Fredrick; Sio, Hong; Petrasso, Richard; Rosenberg, Michael; Forrest, Chad; Glebov, Vladimir; Stoeckl, Christian; Sangster, Craig; Zylstra, Alex; Hoffman, Nelson; Kwan, Tom; Larroche, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Plasmas produced in high-energy density (HED) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments generally contain multiple ion species, which allows for multiple-ion species dynamics that are not simulated in typical single-ion fluid hydro codes. In implosions of D3He-gas filled thin-glass spheres on the OMEGA laser facility, comprehensive nuclear diagnostics were used to infer the composition of the fuel during nuclear production, demonstrating that the deuterium fraction was reduced during the implosion of the fuel. Hydrodynamic simulations including an ion diffusion model indicate that pressure, temperature, and potential gradients drive diffusive separation of the ion species, producing better agreement with the experiments than standard hydrodynamic codes. The results of fully kinetic (Vlasov-Fokker-Planck and PIC) simulations confirm the importance of multi-species dynamics to the evolution of these experiments. Implications for multi-species (DT) cryogenic implosions on the National Ignition Facility will be addressed. This work was partially supported by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE, and GA.

  20. Talaromyces atroroseus, a New Species Efficiently Producing Industrially Relevant Red Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Frisvad, Jens C.; Yilmaz, Neriman; Thrane, Ulf; Rasmussen, Kasper Bøwig; Houbraken, Jos; Samson, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Some species of Talaromyces secrete large amounts of red pigments. Literature has linked this character to species such as Talaromyces purpurogenus, T. albobiverticillius, T. marneffei, and T. minioluteus often under earlier Penicillium names. Isolates identified as T. purpurogenus have been reported to be interesting industrially and they can produce extracellular enzymes and red pigments, but they can also produce mycotoxins such as rubratoxin A and B and luteoskyrin. Production of mycotoxins limits the use of isolates of a particular species in biotechnology. Talaromyces atroroseus sp. nov., described in this study, produces the azaphilone biosynthetic families mitorubrins and Monascus pigments without any production of mycotoxins. Within the red pigment producing clade, T. atroroseus resolved in a distinct clade separate from all the other species in multigene phylogenies (ITS, β-tubulin and RPB1), which confirm its unique nature. Talaromyces atroroseus resembles T. purpurogenus and T. albobiverticillius in producing red diffusible pigments, but differs from the latter two species by the production of glauconic acid, purpuride and ZG–1494α and by the dull to dark green, thick walled ellipsoidal conidia produced. The type strain of Talaromyces atroroseus is CBS 133442 PMID:24367630

  1. Refining prognosis in lung cancer: A report on the quality and relevance of clinical prognostic tools

    PubMed Central

    Mahar, Alyson L.; Compton, Carolyn; McShane, Lisa M.; Halabi, Susan; Asamura, Hisao; Rami-Porta, Ramon; Groome, Patti A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Accurate, individualized prognostication for lung cancer patients requires the integration of standard patient and pathologic factors, biologic, genetic, and other molecular characteristics of the tumor. Clinical prognostic tools aim to aggregate information on an individual patient to predict disease outcomes such as overall survival, but little is known about their clinical utility and accuracy in lung cancer. Methods A systematic search of the scientific literature for clinical prognostic tools in lung cancer published Jan 1, 1996-Jan 27, 2015 was performed. In addition, web-based resources were searched. A priori criteria determined by the Molecular Modellers Working Group of the American Joint Committee on Cancer were used to investigate the quality and usefulness of tools. Criteria included clinical presentation, model development approaches, validation strategies, and performance metrics. Results Thirty-two prognostic tools were identified. Patients with metastases were the most frequently considered population in non-small cell lung cancer. All tools for small cell lung cancer covered that entire patient population. Included prognostic factors varied considerably across tools. Internal validity was not formally evaluated for most tools and only eleven were evaluated for external validity. Two key considerations were highlighted for tool development: identification of an explicit purpose related to a relevant clinical population and clear decision-points, and prioritized inclusion of established prognostic factors over emerging factors. Conclusions Prognostic tools will contribute more meaningfully to the practice of personalized medicine if better study design and analysis approaches are used in their development and validation. PMID:26313682

  2. Current HER2 Testing Recommendations and Clinical Relevance as a Predictor of Response to Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, Tarah J; Sanders, Melinda E; Abramson, Vandana G

    2015-06-01

    Clinical decision-making in the treatment of breast cancer depends on an accurate determination and understanding of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status. The guidelines for HER2 testing were recently updated in late 2013, but limitations continue to exist in the interpretation and clinical application of results when the tumor specimens do not fall neatly into positive or negative categories with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization testing. The issues, including discordance between pathologists or laboratories, polysomy, and genetic heterogeneity, present challenging situations that are difficult to translate into clinical significance. The present review discussed the changes in the updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guidelines, the clinical relevance of complex issues in HER2 testing, and the implications of the results on the response to HER2-targeted therapies. Great advances have been made in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer; however, the challenge remains to determine the best testing analysis that will identify patients who will benefit the most from these therapies.

  3. Comparative Inter-Species Pharmacokinetics of Phenoxyacetic Acid Herbicides and Related Organic Acids. Evidence that the Dog is Not a Relevant Species for Evaluation of Human Health Risk.

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Chuck

    2004-07-15

    findings suggest that for new structurally similar organic acids, a limited comparative species (rat vs. dog) pharmacokinetic analysis early in the toxicology evaluation process may provide important insight into the relevance of the dog. In summary, the substantial difference between the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids in dogs relative to other species, including humans, questions the relevance of using dog toxicity data for the extrapolation of human health risk.

  4. Clinical empathy and narrative competence: the relevance of reading talmudic legends as literary fiction.

    PubMed

    Davidson, John H

    2015-04-01

    The "curative potential" in almost any clinical setting depends on a caregiver establishing and maintaining an empathic connection with patients so as to achieve "narrative competence" in discerning and acting in accord with their preferences and best interests. The "narrative medicine" model of shared "close reading of literature and reflective writing" among clinicians as a means of fostering a capacity for clinical empathy has gained validation with recent empirical studies demonstrating the enhancement of theory of mind (ToM), broadly conceived as empathy, in readers of literary fiction. Talmudic legends, like that of Rabbi Judah's death, are under-appreciated, relevant sources of literary fiction for these efforts. The limitations of narrative medicine are readily counterbalanced by simultaneously practiced attention to traditional bioethical principles, including-especially-beneficence, non-maleficence, and autonomy.

  5. The association between clinically relevant anxiety and other non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Si-Ming; Yuan, Yong-Sheng; Tong, Qing; Zhang, Li; Xu, Qin-Rong; Ding, Jian; Zhang, Ke-Zhong

    2015-11-01

    Anxiety disorders in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are often missed due to an overlap with other non-motor symptoms. The relationships between anxiety and other non-motor symptoms in PD still remain unclear. We used the Hamilton anxiety rating scale and the Non-motor Symptoms Questionnaire to measure anxiety and the complex range of non-motor symptoms in 99 PD patients. The relationships between anxiety and other PD-related non-motor symptoms were examined through regression analyses. 25 % of PD patients were diagnosed with clinically relevant anxiety. Non-motor symptoms were more prominent in patients with anxiety. Depression, urinary disorders, and sleep disruption were the factors most likely to influence anxiety in PD. Our findings have revealed a strong interplay between anxiety and other non-motor symptoms of PD and have highlighted the need for a holistic approach towards the clinical treatment of this disabling condition.

  6. Clinical Empathy and Narrative Competence: The Relevance of Reading Talmudic Legends as Literary Fiction

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The “curative potential” in almost any clinical setting depends on a caregiver establishing and maintaining an empathic connection with patients so as to achieve “narrative competence” in discerning and acting in accord with their preferences and best interests. The “narrative medicine” model of shared “close reading of literature and reflective writing” among clinicians as a means of fostering a capacity for clinical empathy has gained validation with recent empirical studies demonstrating the enhancement of theory of mind (ToM), broadly conceived as empathy, in readers of literary fiction. Talmudic legends, like that of Rabbi Judah’s death, are under-appreciated, relevant sources of literary fiction for these efforts. The limitations of narrative medicine are readily counterbalanced by simultaneously practiced attention to traditional bioethical principles, including—especially—beneficence, non-maleficence, and autonomy. PMID:25973266

  7. Less than meets the eye: reappraising the clinical relevance of attentional bias in addiction.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Paul; Schoenmakers, Tim M; Field, Matt

    2015-05-01

    Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in attentional bias in addiction, particularly its clinical relevance. Specifically, numerous articles claimed to demonstrate either that (1) attentional bias measured in treatment settings could predict subsequent relapse to substance use, or (2) direct modification of attentional bias reduced substance use and improved treatment outcomes. In this paper, we critically evaluate empirical studies that investigated these issues. We show that the evidence regarding both of these claims is decidedly mixed, and that many of the studies that appear to yield positive findings have serious methodological and statistical limitations. We contend that the available literature suggests that attentional bias for drug cues fluctuates within individuals because it is an output of the underlying motivational state at that moment in time, but there is no convincing evidence that it exerts a causal influence on substance use. Future research should make use of experience sampling methodology to characterise the clinical significance of fluctuations in attentional bias over time.

  8. Psychometric properties and clinical relevance of the adolescent sleep hygiene scale in Dutch adolescents.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Eduard J; van Kampen, Ris K A; van Kooten, Tamar; Meijer, Anne Marie

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated reliability, validity, and clinical relevance of the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale (ASHS) in Dutch adolescents. The Dutch translation of the ASHS was administered to 186 normal-sleeping adolescents and 112 adolescents with insomnia. Their sleep variables were measured using sleep logs and questionnaires. From the insomnia group, scores were also obtained after six weeks of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (n=58) or waiting list (n=22). The full scale of the ASHS had acceptable internal consistency. The results showed moderate to strong correlations of the ASHS (domains) with sleep quality, sleep duration and chronic sleep reduction. Furthermore, the Dutch ASHS was able to discriminate between normal sleepers and adolescents with insomnia, and scores of adolescents with insomnia improved after treatment. These findings confirm the importance of sleep hygiene in adolescent sleep, and contribute to the validity of the ASHS and its applicability in research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cladosporium Species Recovered from Clinical Samples in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Deanna A.; Martin-Vicente, Adela; Cano-Lira, José F.; Wiederhold, Nathan; Guarro, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Cladosporium species are ubiquitous, saprobic, dematiaceous fungi, only infrequently associated with human and animal opportunistic infections. We have studied a large set of Cladosporium isolates recovered from clinical samples in the United States to ascertain the predominant species there in light of recent taxonomic changes in this genus and to determine whether some could possibly be rare potential pathogens. A total of 92 isolates were identified using phenotypic and molecular methods, which included sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and a fragment of the large subunit (LSU) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), as well as fragments of the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1α) and actin (Act) genes. The most frequent species was Cladosporium halotolerans (14.8%), followed by C. tenuissimum (10.2%), C. subuliforme (5.7%), and C. pseudocladosporioides (4.5%). However, 39.8% of the isolates did not correspond to any known species and were deemed to comprise at least 17 new lineages for Cladosporium. The most frequent anatomic site of isolation was the respiratory tract (54.5%), followed by superficial (28.4%) and deep tissues and fluids (14.7%). Species of the two recently described cladosporiumlike genera Toxicocladosporium and Penidiella are reported for the first time from clinical samples. In vitro susceptibility testing of 92 isolates against nine antifungal drugs showed a variety of results but high activity overall for the azoles, echinocandins, and terbinafine. PMID:26179305

  10. Taxonomy and Antifungal Susceptibility of Clinically Important Rasamsonia Species

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, S.; Meijer, M.; Bertout, S.; Frisvad, J. C.; Meis, J. F.; Bouchara, J. P.; Samson, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, Geosmithia argillacea has been increasingly reported in humans and animals and can be considered an emerging pathogen. The taxonomy of Geosmithia was recently studied, and Geosmithia argillacea and related species were transferred to the new genus Rasamsonia. The diversity among a set of Rasamsonia argillacea strains, including 28 clinical strains, was studied, and antifungal susceptibility profiles were generated. Data obtained from morphological studies and from phylogenetic analyses of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and partial β-tubulin and calmodulin sequences revealed the presence of four species in the Rasamsonia argillacea complex, two of which are newly described here: R. piperina sp. nov. and R. aegroticola sp. nov. In contrast to other related genera, all Rasamsonia species can be identified with ITS sequences. A retrospective identification was performed on recently reported clinical isolates from animal or human patients. Susceptibility tests showed that the antifungal susceptibility profiles of the four members of the R. argillacea complex are similar, and caspofungin showed significant activity in vitro, followed by amphotericin B and posaconazole. Voriconazole was the least active of the antifungals tested. The phenotypically similar species R. brevistipitata and R. cylindrospora had different antifungal susceptibility profiles, and this indicates that correct species identification is important to help guide appropriate antifungal therapy. PMID:23077129

  11. Time-Domain Simulations of Transient Species in Experimentally Relevant Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ueltschi, Tyler W.; Fischer, Sean A.; Apra, Edoardo; Tarnovsky, Alexander N.; Govind, Niranjan; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2016-02-04

    Simulating the spectroscopic properties of short-lived thermal and photochemical reaction intermediates and products is a challenging task, as these species often feature atypical molecular and electronic structures. The complex environments in which such species typically reside in practice add further complexity to the problem. Herein, we tackle this problem in silico using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations, employing iso-CHBr3, namely H(Br)C-Br-Br, as a prototypical system. This species was chosen because it features both a non-conventional C-Br-Br bonding pattern, as well as a strong dependence of its spectral features on the local environment in which it resides, as illustrated in recent experimental reports. The spectroscopic properties of iso-CHBr3 were measured by several groups that captured this transient intermediate in the photochemistry of CHBr3 in the gas phase, in rare gas matrices at 5K, and in solution under ambient laboratory conditions. We simulate the UV-Vis and IR spectra of iso-CHBr3 in all three media, including a Ne cluster (64 atoms) and a methylcyclohexane cage (14 solvent molecules) representative of the matrix isolated and solvated species. We exclusively perform fully quantum mechanical static and dynamic simulations. By comparing our condensed phase simulations to their experimental analogues, we stress the importance of (i) conformational sampling, even at cryogenic temperatures, and (ii) using a fully quantum mechanical description of both solute and bath to properly account for the experimental observables.

  12. Time-Domain Simulations of Transient Species in Experimentally Relevant Environments.

    PubMed

    Ueltschi, Tyler W; Fischer, Sean A; Aprà, Edoardo; Tarnovsky, Alexander N; Govind, Niranjan; El-Khoury, Patrick Z; Hess, Wayne P

    2016-02-04

    Simulating the spectroscopic properties of short-lived thermal and photochemical reaction intermediates and products is a challenging task, as these species often feature atypical molecular and electronic structures. The complex environments in which such species typically reside in practice add further complexity to the problem. Herein, we tackle this problem in silico using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations, employing iso-CHBr3, namely H(Br)C-Br-Br, as a prototypical system. This species was chosen because it features both a nonconventional C-Br-Br bonding pattern, as well as a strong dependence of its spectral features on the local environment in which it resides, as illustrated in recent experimental reports. We simulate the UV-vis and IR spectra of iso-CHBr3 in the gas phase, as well as in a Ne cluster (64 atoms) and in a methylcyclohexane cage (14 solvent molecules) representative of the previously characterized matrix isolated and solvated iso-CHBr3 species. We exclusively perform fully quantum mechanical static and dynamic simulations. By comparing our condensed phase simulations to their experimental analogues, we stress the importance of (i) conformational sampling, even at cryogenic temperatures, and (ii) using a fully quantum mechanical description of both solute and bath to properly account for the experimental observables.

  13. Clinical relevance of magnetic resonance imaging in cervical spine clearance: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Shelby; Inaba, Kenji; Karamanos, Efstathios; Pham, Martin; Byerly, Saskya; Talving, Peep; Reddy, Sravanthi; Linnebur, Megan; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2014-09-01

    A missed cervical spine (CS) injury can have devastating consequences. When CS injuries cannot be ruled out clinically using the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study low-risk criteria because of either a neurologic deficit or pain, the optimal imaging modality for CS clearance remains controversial. To investigate the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for CS clearance. A prospective observational study was conducted from January 1, 2010, through May 31, 2011, at a level I trauma center. Participants included 830 adults who were awake, alert, and able to be examined who experienced blunt trauma with resultant midline CS tenderness and/or neurologic deficits and were undergoing CT of the CS. Initial examinations, all CS imaging results, interventions, and final CS diagnoses were documented. The criterion standard for the sensitivity and specificity calculations was final diagnosis of CS injury at the time of discharge. Clinically significant CS injuries, defined as injuries requiring surgical stabilization or halo placement. Overall, 164 CS injuries (19.8%) were diagnosed, and 23 of these (2.8%) were clinically significant. All clinically significant injuries were detected by CT. Fifteen of 681 patients (2.2%) with a normal CT scan had a newly identified finding on MRI; however, none of the injuries required surgical intervention or halo placement. There was no change in management on the basis of MRI findings. The sensitivity and specificity of CT for detecting CS injury was 90.9% and 100%, respectively. For clinically significant CS injuries, the sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 100%. Computed tomography is effective in the detection of clinically significant CS injuries in adults deemed eligible for evaluation who had a neurologic deficit or CS pain. Magnetic resonance imaging does not provide any additional clinically relevant information.

  14. Nurses in the clinical area: relevance of a PhD.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Lesley M; Mohan, Shantala

    2008-01-01

    This project aimed to explore the application and relevance of a PhD to nurses working in the clinical area. The complexity of nursing practice requires clinical nurses to be competent as investigators and professional leaders who could help structure nursing practice in more efficient ways. Research proposes that a PhD offers Limited employment opportunities, is mainly research oriented and tends to direct a nurse away from the clinical field. A mixed method study design utilising surveys and interviews was chosen to collect data for this study. Participants were nurses with a doctoral degree working/having worked in a clinical area after obtaining their PhD Nurses were recruited through student databases from Australian universities that offer doctoral degrees in nursing and also by using a snowball sampling technique. The majority of the 19 nurses who participated in the study had: varied expectation of doing a PhD; maintained their clinical positions after obtaining their doctoral degree, considered that the degree helped them to obtain better jobs/promotions and acknowledged the value of the PhD in patient care, in improving research and informing health policy. This study has exposed the positive aspects of completing a PhD and identifies its constructive application in the clinical area. It is essential to provide support and opportunities for nurses working in the clinical area to pursue doctoral degrees in order to enable them to enhance knowledge and build confidence and leadership skills and contribute to the improvement of nursing practice and the continued development of the profession.

  15. Clinical relevance of cluster analysis in phenotyping allergic rhinitis in a real-life study.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Philippe Jean; Devillier, Philippe; Tadmouri, Abir; Mesbah, Kamal; Demoly, Pascal; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Disease stratification, using phenotypic characterization performed either by hypothesis- or data-driven methods, was developed to improve clinical decisions. However, cluster analysis has not been used for allergic rhinitis. To define clusters in allergic rhinitis and to compare them with ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma), a hypothesis-driven approach. A French observational prospective multicenter study (EVEIL: Echelle visuelle analogique dans la rhinite allergique) was carried out on 990 patients consulting general practitioners for allergic rhinitis and treated as per clinical practice. In this study, changes in symptom scores, visual analogue scales and quality of life were measured at baseline and after 14 days of treatment. A post hoc analysis was performed to identify clusters of patients with allergic rhinitis – using Ward's hierarchical method – and to define their clinical relevance at baseline and after 14 days of treatment. The cluster approach was compared to the ARIA approach. Patients were clustered into 4 phenotypes which partly followed the ARIA classes. These phenotypes differed in their disease severity including symptoms and quality of life. Physicians in real-life practice prescribed medication regardless of the phenotype and severity, with the exception of patients with ocular symptoms. Prescribed treatments were comparable in hypothesis- and data-driven analyses. The prevalence of uncontrolled patients during treatment was similar in the 4 clusters, but was significantly different according to the ARIA classes. Cluster analysis using demographic and clinical parameters only does not appear to add relevant information for disease stratification in allergic rhinitis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Clinical relevance of comorbidity in obsessive compulsive disorder: the Netherlands OCD Association study.

    PubMed

    Hofmeijer-Sevink, Mieke Klein; van Oppen, Patricia; van Megen, Harold J; Batelaan, Neeltje M; Cath, Danielle C; van der Wee, Nic J A; van den Hout, Marcel A; van Balkom, Anton J

    2013-09-25

    This study describes lifetime and current rates of comorbidity, its onset and its consequences in a large clinical sample of patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). A wide range of risk factors and clinical characteristics were also examined to determine whether pure OCD is different from OCD with current comorbidity. Finally, the temporal sequencing of the disorders was examined. Data were obtained from the Netherlands Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Association (NOCDA) study. A sample of 382 participants with current OCD (during the past month) was evaluated. Current comorbidity occurred in 55% of patients with OCD, while 78% suffered from lifetime comorbidity. Comorbidity is associated with more severe OCD, anxiety and depressive symptoms and more negative consequences on daily life. Multiple comorbid disorders often precede OCD and influence both its course and severity. Childhood trauma and neuroticism are vulnerability factors for the development of multiple comorbid disorders in OCD. It should be noted that causal inferences about the association between risk factors and OCD are precluded since our results were based on cross-sectional data. (Multiple) comorbidity in OCD is clinically relevant since it is associated with a specific pattern of vulnerability, with greater chronicity, with more severe OCD and more negative consequences on daily life. This indicates that the diagnosis and treatment of all comorbid disorders is clinically relevant, and clinicians should be especially aware of multiple disorders in cases of childhood trauma and high levels of neuroticism. Primary OCD has a different developmental and comorbidity pattern compared to secondary OCD. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Occurrence of Ochroconis and Verruconis Species in Clinical Specimens from the United States

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Alejandra; Sutton, Deanna A.; Samerpitak, Kittipan; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Guarro, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Ochroconis is a dematiaceous fungus able to infect immunocompetent people. Recently, the taxonomy of the genus has been reevaluated, and the most relevant species, Ochroconis gallopava, was transferred to the new genus Verruconis. Due to the important clinical implications of these fungi and based on the recent classification, it was of interest to know the spectra of Ochroconis and Verruconis species in clinical samples received in a reference laboratory in the United States. A set of 51 isolates was identified morphologically and molecularly based on sequence analyses of the nuclear ribosomal RNA (nrRNA), actin, and β-tubulin genes. Verruconis gallopava was the most common species (68.6%), followed by Ochroconis mirabilis (21.5%). One isolate of Ochroconis cordanae was found, being reported for the first time in a clinical setting. The most common anatomical site of isolation was the lower respiratory tract (58.8%), followed by superficial and deep tissues at similar frequencies (21.6 and 19.6%, respectively). Interestingly, three new species were found, which are Ochroconis olivacea and Ochroconis ramosa from clinical specimens and Ochroconis icarus of an environmental origin. The in vitro antifungal susceptibilities of eight antifungal drugs against the Ochroconis isolates revealed that terbinafine and micafungin were the most active drugs. PMID:25232157

  18. Oxidative Stability of Tc(I) Tricarbonyl Species Relevant to the Hanford Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sayandev; Hall, Gabriel B.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Walter, Eric D.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2015-12-17

    Technetium (Tc), which exists predominately in the liquid supernatant and salt cake fractions of the nuclear tank waste stored at the U.S. DOE Hanford Site, is one of the most difficult contaminants to dispose of and/or remediate. In the strongly alkaline environments prevalent in the tank waste, its dominant chemical form is pertechnetate (TcO4-, oxidation state +7). However, based on experimentation to-date, a significant fraction of the soluble Tc cannot be effectively separated from the wastes and may be present as a non-pertechnetate species. The presence of a non pertechnetate species significantly complicates disposition of low-activity waste (LAW), and the development of methods to either convert them to pertechnetate or to separate the non-pertechnetate species directly is needed. The challenge is the uncertainty regarding the nature and stability of the alkaline-soluble, low-valence, non pertechnetate species in the liquid tank waste. One objective of the Tc management project is to address this knowledge gap. This fiscal year (FY) 2015 report summarizes experimental work exploring the oxidative stability of model low-valence Tc(I) tricarbonyl species, derived from the [Tc(CO)3]+ moiety. These compounds are of interest due to their implied presence in several Hanford tank waste supernatants. Work in part was initiated in FY 2014, and a series of samples containing non-pertechnetate Tc generated ex situ or in situ in pseudo-Hanford tank supernatant simulant solutions was prepared and monitored for oxidation to Tc(VII) (Levitskaia et al. 2014). This experimentation continued in FY 2015, and new series of samples containing Tc(I) as [Tc(CO)3]+•Ligand was tested. The monitoring method used for these studies was a combination of 99Tc NMR and EPR spectroscopies.

  19. A Historical Taxonomy of Origin of Species Problems and Its Relevance to the Historiography of Evolutionary Thought.

    PubMed

    Tanghe, Koen B

    2016-11-07

    Historians tend to speak of the problem of the origin of species or the species question, as if it were a monolithic problem. In reality, the phrase (or similar variants) refers to a, historically, surprisingly fluid and pluriform scientific issue. It has, in the course of the past five centuries, been used in no less than ten different ways or contexts. A clear taxonomy of these separate problems is useful or relevant in two ways. It certainly helps to disentangle confusions that have inevitably emerged in the literature in its absence. It may, secondly, also help us to gain a more thorough understanding, or sharper view, of the (pre)history of evolutionary thought. A consequent problem-centric look at that (pre)history through the lens of various origin of species problems certainly yields intriguing results, including and particularly for our understanding of the genesis of the Wallace-Darwin theory of evolution through natural selection.

  20. Clinically relevant concentrations of di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) uncouple cardiac syncytium

    SciTech Connect

    Gillum, Nikki; Karabekian, Zaruhi; Swift, Luther M.; Brown, Ronald P.; Kay, Matthew W.; Sarvazyan, Narine

    2009-04-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a widely used plasticizer found in a variety of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) medical products. The results of studies in experimental animals suggest that DEHP leached from flexible PVC tubing may cause health problems in some patient populations. While the cancerogenic and reproductive effects of DEHP are well recognized, little is known about the potential adverse impact of phthalates on the heart. This study examined the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of DEHP on neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. It was found that application of DEHP to a confluent, synchronously beating cardiac cell network, leads to a marked, concentration-dependent decrease in conduction velocity and asynchronous cell beating. The mechanism behind these changes was a loss of gap junctional connexin-43, documented using Western blot analysis, dye-transfer assay and immunofluorescence. In addition to its effect on electrical coupling, DEHP treatment also affected the mechanical movement of myocyte layers. The latter was linked to the decreased stiffness of the underlying fibroblasts, as the amount of triton-insoluble vimentin was significantly decreased in DEHP-treated samples. The data indicate that DEHP, in clinically relevant concentrations, can impair the electrical and mechanical behavior of a cardiac cell network. Applicability of these findings to human patients remains to be established.

  1. Antibiofilm Activity of the Brown Alga Halidrys siliquosa against Clinically Relevant Human Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Busetti, Alessandro; Thompson, Thomas P.; Tegazzini, Diana; Megaw, Julianne; Maggs, Christine A.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2015-01-01

    The marine brown alga Halidrys siliquosa is known to produce compounds with antifouling activity against several marine bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of organic extracts obtained from the marine brown alga H. siliquosa against a focused panel of clinically relevant human pathogens commonly associated with biofilm-related infections. The partially fractionated methanolic extract obtained from H. siliquosa collected along the shores of Co. Donegal; Ireland; displayed antimicrobial activity against bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus; Streptococcus; Enterococcus; Pseudomonas; Stenotrophomonas; and Chromobacterium with MIC and MBC values ranging from 0.0391 to 5 mg/mL. Biofilms of S. aureus MRSA were found to be susceptible to the algal methanolic extract with MBEC values ranging from 1.25 mg/mL to 5 mg/mL respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy using LIVE/DEAD staining confirmed the antimicrobial nature of the antibiofilm activity observed using the MBEC assay. A bioassay-guided fractionation method was developed yielding 10 active fractions from which to perform purification and structural elucidation of clinically-relevant antibiofilm compounds. PMID:26058011

  2. Impact analysis studies of clinical prediction rules relevant to primary care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Emma; Uijen, Maike J M; Clyne, Barbara; Zarabzadeh, Atieh; Keogh, Claire; Galvin, Rose; Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Following appropriate validation, clinical prediction rules (CPRs) should undergo impact analysis to evaluate their effect on patient care. The aim of this systematic review is to narratively review and critically appraise CPR impact analysis studies relevant to primary care. Setting Primary care. Participants Adults and children. Intervention Studies that implemented the CPR compared to usual care were included. Study design Randomised controlled trial (RCT), controlled before–after, and interrupted time series. Primary outcome Physician behaviour and/or patient outcomes. Results A total of 18 studies, incorporating 14 unique CPRs, were included. The main study design was RCT (n=13). Overall, 10 studies reported an improvement in primary outcome with CPR implementation. Of 6 musculoskeletal studies, 5 were effective in altering targeted physician behaviour in ordering imaging for patients presenting with ankle, knee and neck musculoskeletal injuries. Of 6 cardiovascular studies, 4 implemented cardiovascular risk scores, and 3 reported no impact on physician behaviour outcomes, such as prescribing and referral, or patient outcomes, such as reduction in serum lipid levels. 2 studies examined CPRs in decision-making for patients presenting with chest pain and reduced inappropriate admissions. Of 5 respiratory studies, 2 were effective in reducing antibiotic prescribing for sore throat following CPR implementation. Overall, study methodological quality was often unclear due to incomplete reporting. Conclusions Despite increasing interest in developing and validating CPRs relevant to primary care, relatively few have gone through impact analysis. To date, research has focused on a small number of CPRs across few clinical domains only. PMID:27008685

  3. Clinical relevance of the transcriptional signature regulated by CDC42 in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Mora, Fatima; Locke, Warwick J.; Bandrés, Eva; Gallego-Ortega, David; Cejas, Paloma; García-Cabezas, Miguel Angel; Colino-Sanguino, Yolanda; Feliú, Jaime; del Pulgar, Teresa Gómez; Lacal, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    CDC42 is an oncogenic Rho GTPase overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC). Although CDC42 has been shown to regulate gene transcription, the specific molecular mechanisms regulating the oncogenic ability of CDC42 remain unknown. Here, we have characterized the transcriptional networks governed by CDC42 in the CRC SW620 cell line using gene expression analysis. Our results establish that several cancer-related signaling pathways, including cell migration and cell proliferation, are regulated by CDC42. This transcriptional signature was validated in two large cohorts of CRC patients and its clinical relevance was also studied. We demonstrate that three CDC42-regulated genes offered a better prognostic value when combined with CDC42 compared to CDC42 alone. In particular, the concordant overexpression of CDC42 and silencing of the putative tumor suppressor gene CACNA2D2 dramatically improved the prognostic value. The CACNA2D2/CDC42 prognostic classifier was further validated in a third CRC cohort as well as in vitro and in vivo CRC models. Altogether, we show that CDC42 has an active oncogenic role in CRC via the transcriptional regulation of multiple cancer-related pathways and that CDC42-mediated silencing of CACNA2D2 is clinically relevant. Our results further support the use of CDC42 specific inhibitors for the treatment of the most aggressive types of CRC. PMID:28460460

  4. Isoflurane and desflurane at clinically relevant concentrations induce amyloid {beta}-peptide oligomerization: An NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Pravat K Fodale, Vincenzo

    2009-02-13

    Current understanding on Alzheimer's disease (AD) reveals that soluble amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}) oligomeric formation plays an important role in AD pathophysiology. A potential role for several inhaled anesthetics in promoting A{beta} oligomer formation has been suggested. Using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study, we previously demonstrated that at a high concentration (higher than clinically relevant concentrations), the inhaled anesthetics halothane and isoflurane, interact with specific amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31) and induce A{beta} oligomerization. The present study confirms this is true at a clinically relevant concentration. Isoflurane and desflurane induce A{beta} oligomerization by inducing chemical shift changes of the critical amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31), reinforcing the evidence that perturbation of these three crucial residues indeed plays an important role in oligomerization. These findings support the emerging hypothesis that several commonly used inhaled anesthetics could be involved in neurodegeneration, as well as risk factor for accelerating the onset of AD.

  5. Testing small molecule analogues of the Acanthocheilonema viteae immunomodulator ES-62 against clinically relevant allergens.

    PubMed

    Janicova, L; Rzepecka, J; Rodgers, D T; Doonan, J; Bell, K S; Lumb, F E; Suckling, C J; Harnett, M M; Harnett, W

    2016-06-01

    ES-62 is a glycoprotein secreted by the filarial nematode Acanthocheilonema viteae that protects against ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyper-responsiveness in mice by virtue of covalently attached anti-inflammatory phosphorylcholine (PC) residues. We have recently generated a library of small molecule analogues (SMAs) of ES-62 based around its active PC moiety as a starting point in novel drug development for asthma and identified two compounds - termed 11a and 12b - that mirror ES-62's protective effects. In this study, we have moved away from OVA, a model allergen, to test the SMAs against two clinically relevant allergens - house dust mite (HDM) and cockroach allergen (CR) extract. We show that both SMAs offer some protection against development of lung allergic responses to CR, in particular reducing eosinophil infiltration, whereas only SMA 12b is effective in protecting against eosinophil-dependent HDM-induced allergy. These data therefore suggest that helminth molecule-induced protection against model allergens may not necessarily translate to clinically relevant allergens. Nevertheless, in this study, we have managed to demonstrate that it is possible to produce synthetic drug-like molecules based on a parasitic worm product that show therapeutic potential with respect to asthma resulting from known triggers in humans.

  6. [Does the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI) identify a clinically relevant subgroup among young offenders?].

    PubMed

    Mingers, Daniel; Köhler, Denis; Huchzermeier, Christian; Hinrichs, Günter

    2017-01-01

    Does the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory identify one or more high-risk subgroups among young offenders? Which recommendations for possible courses of action can be derived for individual clinical or forensic cases? Method: Model-based cluster analysis (Raftery, 1995) was conducted on a sample of young offenders (N = 445, age 14–22 years, M = 18.5, SD = 1.65). The resulting model was then tested for differences between clusters with relevant context variables of psychopathy. The variables included measures of intelligence, social competence, drug use, and antisocial behavior. Results: Three clusters were found (Low Trait, Impulsive/Irresponsible, Psychopathy) that differ highly significantly concerning YPI scores and the variables mentioned above. The YPI Scores Δ Low = 4.28 (Low Trait – Impulsive/Irresponsible) and Δ High = 6.86 (Impulsive/Irresponsible – Psychopathy) were determined to be thresholds between the clusters. The allocation of a person to be assessed within the calculated clusters allows for an orientation of consequent tests beyond the diagnosis of psychopathy. We conclude that the YPI is a valuable instrument for the assessment of young offenders, as it yields clinically and forensically relevant information concerning the cause and expected development of psychopathological behavior.

  7. Clinical relevance of and risk factors associated with medication administration time errors.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Rick; Bos, Jacqueline; Pot, Hans; Pluim, Marien; Kramers, Cornelis

    2013-06-15

    The clinical relevance of and risk factors associated with errors related to medication administration time were studied. In this explorative study, 66 medication administration rounds were studied on two wards (surgery and neurology) of a hospital. Data on medication errors were collected using the blister collection method. The emptied packaging material of medication was collected after each round and compared with each patient's medication orders. Administration time errors were defined as medication administration (actual intake) occurring more than one hour before or after the prescribed time. Generalized estimating equations analysis was performed to study the correlation between medication administration errors and risk factors. Data from 129 patients were included in the study. Among these 129 patients, 2874 opportunities for error were recorded. The majority of opportunities for error occurred during the 7 a.m. round. Within the 2874 opportunities for errors, 10 administration time errors occurred for medications that might interact with food or another medication. Time of administration (noon and 3 p.m.), route of administration (injection or infusion), and frequency of administration (if necessary) had significant protective effects against the occurrence of administration time errors. The rectal route of administration was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of administration time errors compared with the oral route. A clinically relevant administration time error occurred in 2 cases (0.07%). Analysis of medication administration rounds found time errors to be the most common medication error.

  8. Nicotine at clinically relevant concentrations affects atrial inward rectifier potassium current sensitive to acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Bébarová, Markéta; Matejovič, Peter; Švecová, Olga; Kula, Roman; Šimurdová, Milena; Šimurda, Jiří

    2017-05-01

    Nicotine abuse is associated with variety of diseases including arrhythmias, most often atrial fibrillation (AF). Altered inward rectifier potassium currents including acetylcholine-sensitive current I K(Ach) are known to be related to AF pathogenesis. Since relevant data are missing, we aimed to investigate I K(Ach) changes at clinically relevant concentrations of nicotine. Experiments were performed by the whole cell patch clamp technique at 23 ± 1 °C on isolated rat atrial myocytes. Nicotine was applied at following concentrations: 4, 40 and 400 nM; ethanol at 20 mM (∼0.09%). Nicotine at 40 and 400 nM significantly activated constitutively active component of I K(Ach) with the maximum effect at 40 nM (an increase by ∼100%); similar effect was observed at -110 and -50 mV. Changes at 4 nM nicotine were negligible on average. Coapplication of 40 nM nicotine and 20 mM ethanol (which is also known to activate this current) did not show cumulative effect. In the case of acetylcholine-induced component of I K(Ach), a dual effect of nicotine and its correlation with the current magnitude in control were apparent: the current was increased by nicotine in the cells showing small current in control and vice versa. The effect of 40 and 400 nM nicotine on acetylcholine-induced component of I K(Ach) was significantly different at -110 and -50 mV. We conclude that nicotine at clinically relevant concentrations significantly increased constitutively active component of I K(Ach) and showed a dual effect on its acetylcholine-induced component, similarly as ethanol. Synchronous application of nicotine and ethanol did not cause additive effect.

  9. Clinical Relevance of Bronchial Anthracofibrosis in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyera; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lim, Jae-Kwang; Oh, Serim; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Yong Dae; Kim, Miyoung; Lee, Jaehee; Kim, Chang-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background Bronchial anthracofibrosis (BAF), which is associated with exposure to biomass smoke in inefficiently ventilated indoor areas, can take the form of obstructive lung disease. Patients with BAF can mimic or present with an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The purpose of the current study was to investigate the prevalence of BAF in Korean patients with COPD exacerbation as well as to examine the clinical features of these patients in order to determine its clinical relevance. Methods A total of 206 patients with COPD exacerbation were divided into BAF and non-BAF groups, according to computed tomography findings. We compared both clinical and radiologic variables between the two groups. Results Patients with BAF (51 [25%]) were older, with a preponderance of nonsmoking women; moreover, they showed a more frequent association with exposure to wood smoke compared to those without BAF. However, no differences in the severity of illness and clinical course between the two groups were observed. Patients in the BAF group had less severe airflow obstruction, but more common and severe pulmonary hypertension signs than those in the non-BAF group. Conclusion Compared with non-BAF COPD, BAF may be associated with milder airflow limitation and more frequent signs of pulmonary hypertension with a more severe grade in patients presenting with COPD exacerbation. PMID:25309607

  10. Covariate pharmacokinetic model building in oncology and its potential clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Joerger, Markus

    2012-03-01

    When modeling pharmacokinetic (PK) data, identifying covariates is important in explaining interindividual variability, and thus increasing the predictive value of the model. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling with stepwise covariate modeling is frequently used to build structural covariate models, and the most commonly used software-NONMEM-provides estimations for the fixed-effect parameters (e.g., drug clearance), interindividual and residual unidentified random effects. The aim of covariate modeling is not only to find covariates that significantly influence the population PK parameters, but also to provide dosing recommendations for a certain drug under different conditions, e.g., organ dysfunction, combination chemotherapy. A true covariate is usually seen as one that carries unique information on a structural model parameter. Covariate models have improved our understanding of the pharmacology of many anticancer drugs, including busulfan or melphalan that are part of high-dose pretransplant treatments, the antifolate methotrexate whose elimination is strongly dependent on GFR and comedication, the taxanes and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, the latter being subject of cytochrome p450 3A4 (CYP3A4) associated metabolism. The purpose of this review article is to provide a tool to help understand population covariate analysis and their potential implications for the clinic. Accordingly, several population covariate models are listed, and their clinical relevance is discussed. The target audience of this article are clinical oncologists with a special interest in clinical and mathematical pharmacology.

  11. Clinical Relevance of the SRS-Schwab Classification for Degenerative Lumbar Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Kee-Yong; Jang, Won-Hee; Kim, Young-Hoon; Park, Dong-Chul

    2016-03-01

    Retrospective cohort study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical relevance of the SRS-Schwab classification for degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS). The SRS-Schwab classification has been presented and validated as a useful tool for adult spinal deformity (ASD). This classification includes various types of ASD (degenerative de novo scoliosis or adult form of idiopathic scoliosis). However, DLS has different clinical characteristics and pathophysiology compared with other forms of ASD. In this retrospective cohort study, 216 (146 conservatively treated and 70 surgically treated) DLS patients were enrolled. The average patient age was 72.1 ± 7.4 years. Clinical parameters for disability were measured using Oswestry disability index (ODI) and back and leg pain numerical rating scale. Radiographic parameters included SRS-Schwab sagittal modifiers (pelvic tilt [PT]; sagittal vertical axis [SVA];pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis [PI-LL]), T1 pelvic angle, and coronal parameters (Cobb's angle [CA]; coronal imbalance [CI]; coronal deviation distance [CDD]; tilting angle [TA]). Correlations between clinical parameters and radiographic parameters were assessed and surgical rates along the SRS-Schwab sagittal modifiers were evaluated. Only PI-LL as a sagittal radiographic parameter showed a weak correlation with clinical parameters (r = 0.137-0.176) (P < 0.05). Coronal parameters such as CA, CI, CDD, and TA also showed weak correlation with clinical parameters (r = 0.137-0.202) (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis identified CA, CI, CDD, and PI-LL to be correlated with clinical parameters. On analysis for clinical outcomes (surgical rates and patient self-reported disability) along the grades of the SRS-Schwab sagittal modifiers, PT and SVA were not related to higher surgical rates or disability. Even though some radiological parameters showed statistically significant results, correlation between radiological and clinical parameters was

  12. Lesser used species of Bolivia and their relevance to sustainable forest management

    Treesearch

    Marc Barany; A. L. Hammett; Philip A. Araman

    2003-01-01

    Bolivia has extensive forest resources and potential to become one of the world’s largest producers of tropical wood. However, this potential is currently constrained due to the depletion of Bolivia’s top commercial timber species (mahogany, Spanish cedar, and South American oak). To insure that Bolivia’s forestry sector contributes to the growth of the national...

  13. Delisting Process for Endangered Species and Relevance to Populations on Army Lands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    02239) Bald eagle, WA state DPS Wildcat Steelhead Club 09-15-1995 Delist NOT AVAILABLE Bee Creek Cave harvestman Williamson County Commissioners Court...there may be a rela- tively large genetic difference between the Douglas County and Columbia River populations, which indicates a lack of gene flow...would substantially constrict the current range of the sub- species. Second, each population has genetic characteristics that are not found in the other

  14. Prediction of Clinically Relevant Herb-Drug Clearance Interactions Using Sandwich-Cultured Human Hepatocytes: Schisandra spp. Case Study.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jonathan P; Freeman, Kimberly M; Friley, Weslyn W; Herman, Ashley G; Black, Christopher B; Brouwer, Kenneth R; Roe, Amy L

    2017-09-01

    The Schisandraceae family is reported to have a range of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory effects. As with all herbal preparations, extracts of Schisandra species are mixtures composed of >50 lignans, especially schizandrins, deoxyschizandrins, and gomisins. In China, Schisandra sphenanthera extract (SSE) is often coadministered with immunosuppressant treatment of transplant recipients. In cases of coadministration, the potential for herb-drug interactions (HDIs) increases. Clinical studies have been used to assess HDI potential of SSE. Results demonstrated that chronic SSE administration reduced midazolam (MDZ) clearance by 52% in healthy volunteers. Although clinical studies are definitive and considered the "gold standard," these studies are impractical for routine HDI assessments. Alternatively, in vitro strategies can be used to reduce the need for clinical studies. Transporter-certified sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHHs) provide a fully integrated hepatic cell system that maintains drug clearance pathways (metabolism and transport) and key regulatory pathways constitutive active/androstane receptor and pregnane X receptor (CAR/PXR) necessary for quantitative assessment of HDI potential. Mechanistic studies conducted in SCHHs demonstrated that SSE and the more commonly used dietary supplement Schisandra chinensis extract (SCE) inhibited CYP3A4/5-mediated metabolism and induced CYP3A4 mRNA in a dose-dependent manner. SSE and SCE reduced MDZ clearance to 0.577- and 0.599-fold of solvent control, respectively, in chronically exposed SCHHs. These in vitro results agreed with SSE clinical findings and predicted a similar in vivo HDI effect with SCE exposure. These findings support the use of an SCHH system that maintains transport, metabolic, and regulatory functionality for routine HDI assessments to predict clinically relevant clearance interactions. Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s).

  15. Clinical relevance of access targets for elective dental treatment under general anesthesia in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sonia S; Casas, Michael J; Kenny, David J; Barrett, Edward J

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical relevance of access targets for elective dental procedures performed under general anesthesia at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, by assessing incremental changes in the burden of dental disease over wait times for such procedures. Children scheduled for elective dental procedures under general anesthesia were assigned a priority according to the dental diagnosis and the medical risk status. Each priority level was defined by a specific diagnostic code and access target (maximum acceptable wait time). The dental records of children who underwent dental procedures with general anesthesia between June 2005 and December 2008 were assessed retrospectively. A novel assessment scale was used to measure the cumulative burden of dental disease during the waiting period. A total of 378 children (age range 10 months to 17 years) met the inclusion criteria. Statistically significant correlations were identified between disease burden and wait times for priority group IV (access target 90 days) (p=0.004), for the entire sample (p<0.001), for children with advanced dental caries and low medical risk (p=0.005), for patients with comorbidities (p=0.036), for healthy patients (p<0.001), for females (p=0.014) and for males (p=0.008). The mean cumulative burden of disease over time did not differ between matched groups with and without comorbidity (p=0.38). A trend suggestive of increasing burden of dental disease for children with longer wait times for elective dental procedures involving general anesthesia was found, but it was not clinically significant. Refinements in the assessment scale and a better understanding of the natural history of dental disease will likely be useful in developing clinically relevant access targets.

  16. Photoactivated disinfection of Streptococcus intermedius through dentin disc at clinically relevant intervals: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bonstein, Tammy; Mikulski, Lynn M; Bush, Mary A; Bush, Peter J

    2010-10-01

    In this present study we have tested the impact of porfimer sodium (Photofrin, AXCAN PHARMA Inc., Quebec, Canada) photoactivated disinfection (PD) on cells of Streptococcus intermedius in suspension. In order to provide basic data to support future clinical studies of PD in dentistry the study used exposure to Quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) dental curing light for clinically relevant time periods to activate Photofrin and measured its effectiveness under a variety of conditions including activation through dentin hard tissue. S. intermedius was grown in planktonic suspension for 48h. Nine groups were formed: three control groups (1-3) and six experimental groups (4-9). Groups 4-6 tested the use of Photofrin treatment combined with QTH light at various intervals of irradiation (5, 15 and 60s). Groups 7-9 were similar to groups 4-6 with the exception that irradiation commenced through a dentin disc. Following treatment, bacteria were plated. Colony counts were measured following 72h incubation at 37 degrees C. Statistical analysis was carried out by one-way ANOVA at a 95% confidence level. A significant reduction in S. intermedius colony counts was observed for all experimental groups and one control group. The reduction in numbers of colonies in the experimental groups varied from 79.28 to 99.40% with an average of 94.61%. Reduction in viable bacterial cells indicated a strong relationship between power density and irradiation interval. When curing light energy density was lower due to the irradiation through the 1mm dentin disc, prolonged irradiation interval enhanced bacterial kill. In conclusion, where direct irradiation is not possible for PD treatment, irradiation through dentin may still be done successfully within a clinically relevant interval.

  17. Clinical relevance of valgus deformity of proximal femur in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Kang, Jong Yeol; Chung, Chin Youb; Kwon, Dae Gyu; Lee, Sang Hyeong; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon; Yoo, Won Joon; Park, Moon Seok

    2010-01-01

    Proximal femoral deformity related to physis has not been studied in patients with cerebral palsy (CP). This study was performed to investigate the clinical relevance of neck shaft angle (NSA), head shaft angle (HSA), and proximal femoral epiphyseal shape in patients with CP, which represent the deformities of metaphysis, physis, and epiphysis, respectively. Three hundred eighty-four patients with CP (mean age 9.1 y, 249 males and 135 females) were included. Extent of involvement and functional states [Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level] were obtained. Radiographic measurements including NSA, HSA, and qualitative shape of the proximal femoral epiphysis were evaluated and analyzed according to extent of involvement and GMFCS level. Reliability and correlation with each measurement were assessed. Multiple regression test was performed to examine the significant contributing factors to migration percentage (MP) that represents hip instability. NSA showed excellent interobserver reliability with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.976. Correlation with the MP was higher in the NSA (r=0.419, P<0.001) than in the HSA (r=0.256, P<0.001). NSA, HSA, and MP tended to increase with increasing GMFCS level, and proportion of valgus deformed proximal femoral epiphysis also increased with increasing GMFCS level, which means valgus deformity and unstable hips in the less favorable functional states. Multiple regression analysis revealed NSA, GMFCS level, and shape of the proximal femoral epiphysis to be significant factors affecting MP. NSA appeared to be more clinically relevant than HSA in evaluating proximal femoral deformity in patients with CP. Shape of proximal femoral epiphysis is believed to have clinical implications in terms of hip instability. Diagnostic level II.

  18. Molecular and morphological identification of Colletotrichum species of clinical interest.

    PubMed

    Cano, Josep; Guarro, Josep; Gené, Josepa

    2004-06-01

    Colletotrichum species have caused human infections in recent years. Because of the difficulties in recognizing them in vitro, we have designed a quick and unambiguous molecular test, based on the amplification of a specific fragment of the internal transcribed spacer 1 region, to distinguish any Colletotrichum isolate from other fungi, including the common pathogenic species. Analysis of the sequences of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fragment showed sufficient variability to clearly separate the five species of Colletotrichum that are of clinical interest, i.e., Colletotrichum coccodes, C. crassipes, C. dematium, C. gloeosporioides, and C. graminicola. Sequencing of the D1-D2 region of the large-subunit rDNA gene also supported these results. Additionally, we reviewed the most suitable morphological characteristics for the in vitro identification of these increasingly important opportunistic fungi.

  19. Molecular and Morphological Identification of Colletotrichum Species of Clinical Interest

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Josep; Guarro, Josep; Gené, Josepa

    2004-01-01

    Colletotrichum species have caused human infections in recent years. Because of the difficulties in recognizing them in vitro, we have designed a quick and unambiguous molecular test, based on the amplification of a specific fragment of the internal transcribed spacer 1 region, to distinguish any Colletotrichum isolate from other fungi, including the common pathogenic species. Analysis of the sequences of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fragment showed sufficient variability to clearly separate the five species of Colletotrichum that are of clinical interest, i.e., Colletotrichum coccodes, C. crassipes, C. dematium, C. gloeosporioides, and C. graminicola. Sequencing of the D1-D2 region of the large-subunit rDNA gene also supported these results. Additionally, we reviewed the most suitable morphological characteristics for the in vitro identification of these increasingly important opportunistic fungi. PMID:15184418

  20. Taxonomy, biology, and clinical aspects of Fusarium species.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, P E; Dignani, M C; Anaissie, E J

    1994-01-01

    There are several taxonomic systems available for identifying Fusarium species. The philosophy used in each taxonomic system is discussed as well as problems encountered in working with Fusarium species in culture. Fusarium species are toxigenic, and the mycotoxins produced by these organisms are often associated with animal and human diseases. The implications for the association of the carcinogens, fumonisins, produced by Fusarium moniliforme and other Fusarium species with human diseases are discussed. Foreign-body-associated fusarial infection such as keratitis in contact lens wearers, onychomycosis, skin infections, and disseminated multiorgan infections are discussed. Disseminated fusarial hyalohyphomycosis has emerged as a significant, usually fatal infection in the immunocompromised host. Successful outcome is determined by the degree of immunosuppression, the extent of the infection, and the presence of a removable focus such as an indwelling central venous catheter. These infections may be clinically suspected on the basis of a constellation of clinical and laboratory findings, which should lead to prompt therapy, probably with one of the newer antifungal agents. Perhaps the use of such agents or the use of colony-stimulating factors may improve the outcome of this devastating infection. However, until new approaches for treatment develop, effective preventive measures are urgently needed. Images PMID:7834602

  1. Effects of seawater temperature increase on economically relevant native and introduced clam species.

    PubMed

    Velez, Cátia; Figueira, Etelvina; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Freitas, Rosa

    2017-02-01

    As a consequence of climate change, global warming is expected to increase during the 21(st) century. Taking this into account, the impact of rising temperatures on the native Ruditapes decussatus and introduced R. philippinarum bivalve species was assessed, through biochemical and mRNA transcription analyses. Our findings showed that at 21 °C the electron transport system and antioxidant enzyme activity, as well as the expression of Hsp70 gene were induced in R. decussatus when compared with 17 °C. On the other hand, at 25 °C results suggested that R. decussatus closed their valves during short periods, as a behavioral strategy, down-regulating the expression of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism (Cox-1 and 16S) and chaperone function (Hsp70) compared with organisms at 17 °C. In addition, the introduced species (R. philippinarum) increased the electron transport system and antioxidant activities, as well as gene expression of antioxidant enzymes and molecular chaperone (Hsp70) at 21 °C. However, antioxidant mechanisms were not enough to prevent lipid membrane damages at 21 °C. At 25 °C R. philippinarum presented increased electron transport system and antioxidant activity, as well as the expression of genes associated with apoptosis regulation and molecular chaperone. Overall, the present findings indicate that in a global warming scenario both species are able to induce different mechanisms to mitigate the impacts of temperature increase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Update on cardiovascular safety of PPARgamma agonists and relevance to medicinal chemistry and clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Ciudin, Andreea; Hernandez, Cristina; Simó, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activator receptors (PPARs) are now known as members of the nuclear hormonereceptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate gene expression in response to nutritional and physiological stimuli. PPARγ plays a crucial role in glucose homeostasis and it is involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism and adipocyte differentiation and function. From all the PAARγ ligands, the thiazolidindiones (TZDs) are of most clinical importance. Rosiglitazone and pioglitazone have been largely used so far in the clinical practice. They provide similar effects on glycemic control, as well as a range of similar adverse effects, such as weight gain, fluid retention, and increased risk of hearth failure, which seem to be PPARγ mediated. Interestingly, they differ on their effect on lipid and cardiovascular safety profile, indicating a PPARγ-independent mechanism. Indeed, rosiglitazone was recently withdrawn in Europe and its use has been restricted in USA as a consequence of increased risk of cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetic patients. This review is focused on the cardiovascular effects of rosiglitazone and pioglitazone as representative members of PPARγ ligands, because they were widely evaluated in many clinical trials and experimental studies and data obtained from these studies are relevant from medicinal chemistry and clinical pharmacology point of view. Finally, an overview on the development of selective PPARγ modulators and/or dual PPARα/γ agonists will be given. These new approaches might provide anti-hyperglycemic efficacy without the associated undesirable side-effects. However, further experimental and clinical studies evaluating the theoretical benefit and safety of this therapeutic strategy are needed.

  3. Desktop transcriptome sequencing from archival tissue to identify clinically relevant translocations.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Robert T; Zhang, Bing; Zhu, Shirley X; Varma, Sushama; Smith, Kevin S; Montgomery, Stephen B; van de Rijn, Matt; Zehnder, Jim; West, Robert B

    2013-06-01

    Somatic mutations, often translocations or single nucleotide variations, are pathognomonic for certain types of cancers and are increasingly of clinical importance for diagnosis and prediction of response to therapy. Conventional clinical assays only evaluate 1 mutation at a time, and targeted tests are often constrained to identify only the most common mutations. Genome-wide or transcriptome-wide high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of clinical samples offers an opportunity to evaluate for all clinically significant mutations with a single test. Recently a "desktop version" of HTS has become available, but most of the experience to date is based on data obtained from high-quality DNA from frozen specimens. In this study, we demonstrate, as a proof of principle, that translocations in sarcomas can be diagnosed from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue with desktop HTS. Using the first generation MiSeq platform, full transcriptome sequencing was performed on FFPE material from archival blocks of 3 synovial sarcomas, 3 myxoid liposarcomas, 2 Ewing sarcomas, and 1 clear cell sarcoma. Mapping the reads to the "sarcomatome" (all known 83 genes involved in translocations and mutations in sarcoma) and using a novel algorithm for ranking fusion candidates, the pathognomonic fusions and the exact breakpoints were identified in all cases of synovial sarcoma, myxoid liposarcoma, and clear cell sarcoma. The Ewing sarcoma fusion gene was detectable in FFPE material only with a sequencing platform that generates greater sequencing depth. The results show that a single transcriptome HTS assay, from FFPE, has the potential to replace conventional molecular diagnostic techniques for the evaluation of clinically relevant mutations in cancer.

  4. Clinical relevance of the revised Atlanta classification focusing on severity stratification system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Oh, Dongwook; Paik, Woo Hyun; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung Koo

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the limitation of the Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis (AP), two international classifications have been recently proposed; the revised Atlanta classification and the determinant-based classification. There is an inconsistency between the two international classifications on whether infected necrosis (IN) is the major determinant of severity in AP. The aim of the current study was to validate the revised Atlanta classification and to determine the association of this new classification system with relevant clinical outcome in patients with AP. Data have been collected on 553 patients with AP admitted to a single center during the 7-year period commencing January 2006. Primary outcomes included the need for interventions, the need for intensive care unit (ICU) care, length of ICU stay, total hospital stay, and mortality. The different grades of severity for revised Atlanta classification system were associated with statistically significant differences in terms of clinical outcomes. Patients with severe AP that had IN, compared to those without IN, were associated with worse clinical outcomes. Having stratified patients with severe AP category according to the presence or absence of IN, the mortality rate increased fourfold to 32.3% for the presence of infected necrosis. Overall, the revised Atlanta classification seems to be valid, since it correlates well with clinical outcome. To more accurately assess clinical outcome of patients with severe AP defined by the revised Atlanta classification, however, severe AP patients with IN should be considered separately from those without IN in classification system. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Motivation factors for suicidal behavior and their clinical relevance in admitted psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Miyabi; Yoshizawa, Yuka; Asamura, Kaori; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Tokunaga, Taro; Ishimoto, Kayo; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Harima, Hirohiko; Kumagai, Naoki; Okazaki, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Background Suicidal behavior (SB) is a major, worldwide health concern. To date there is limited understanding of the associated motivational aspects which accompany this self-initiated conduct. Aims To develop a method for identifying motivational features associated with SB by studying admitted psychiatric patients, and to examine their clinical relevance. Methods By performing a factor analytic study using data obtained from a patient sample exhibiting high suicidality and a variety of SB methods, Motivations for SB Scale (MSBS) was constructed to measure the features. Data included assessments of DSM-IV psychiatric and personality disorders, suicide intent, depressive symptomatology, overt aggression, recent life events (RLEs) and methods of SB, collated from structured interviews. Association of identified features with clinical variables was examined by correlation analyses and MANCOVA. Results Factor analyses elicited a 4-factor solution composed of Interpersonal-testing (IT), Interpersonal-change (IC), Self-renunciation (SR) and Self-sustenance (SS). These factors were classified according to two distinctions, namely interpersonal vs. intra-personal directedness, and the level of assumed influence by SB or the relationship to prevailing emotions. Analyses revealed meaningful links between patient features and clinical variables. Interpersonal-motivations (IT and IC) were associated with overt aggression, low suicidality and RLE discord or conflict, while SR was associated with depression, high suicidality and RLE separation or death. Borderline personality disorder showed association with IC and SS. When self-strangulation was set as a reference SB method, self-cutting and overdose-taking were linked to IT and SS, respectively. Conclusions The factors extracted in this study largely corresponded to factors from previous studies, implying that they may be useful in a wider clinical context. The association of these features with SB-related factors suggests

  6. Clinically relevant genetic biomarkers from the brain in alcoholism with representation on high resolution chromosome ideograms.

    PubMed

    Manzardo, Ann M; McGuire, Austen; Butler, Merlin G

    2015-04-15

    Alcoholism arises from combined effects of multiple biological factors including genetic and non-genetic causes with gene/environmental interaction. Intensive research and advanced genetic technology has generated a long list of genes and biomarkers involved in alcoholism neuropathology. These markers reflect complex overlapping and competing effects of possibly hundreds of genes which impact brain structure, function, biochemical alcohol processing, sensitivity and risk for dependence. We compiled a tabular list of clinically relevant genetic biomarkers for alcoholism targeting expression disturbances in the human brain through an extensive search of keywords related to alcoholism, alcohol abuse, and genetics from peer reviewed medical research articles and related nationally sponsored websites. Gene symbols were then placed on high resolution human chromosome ideograms with gene descriptions in tabular form. We identified 337 clinically relevant genetic biomarkers and candidate genes for alcoholism and alcohol-responsiveness from human brain research. Genetic biomarkers included neurotransmitter pathways associated with brain reward processes for dopaminergic (e.g., DRD2, MAOA, and COMT), serotoninergic (e.g., HTR3A, HTR1B, HTR3B, and SLC6A4), GABAergic (e.g., GABRA1, GABRA2, and GABRG1), glutaminergic (GAD1, GRIK3, and GRIN2C) and opioid (e.g., OPRM1, OPRD1, and OPRK1) pathways which presumably impact reinforcing properties of alcohol. Gene level disturbances in cellular and molecular networks impacted by alcohol and alcoholism pathology include transketolase (TKT), transferrin (TF), and myelin (e.g., MBP, MOBP, and MOG). High resolution chromosome ideograms provide investigators, physicians, geneticists and counselors a convenient visual image of the distribution of alcoholism genetic biomarkers from brain research with alphabetical listing of genes in tabular form allowing comparison between alcoholism-related phenotypes, and clinically-relevant alcoholism

  7. The Clinical Relevance of Force Platform Measures in Multiple Sclerosis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Prosperini, Luca; Pozzilli, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Balance impairment and falls are frequent in patients with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), and they may occur even at the earliest stage of the disease and in minimally impaired patients. The introduction of computer-based force platform measures (i.e., static and dynamic posturography) has provided an objective and sensitive tool to document both deficits and improvements in balance. By using more challenging test conditions, force platform measures can also reveal subtle balance disorders undetectable by common clinical scales. Furthermore, posturographic techniques may also allow to reliably identify PwMS who are at risk of accidental falls. Although force platform measures offer several theoretical advantages, only few studies extensively investigated their role in better managing PwMS. Standardised procedures, as well as clinical relevance of changes detected by static or dynamic posturography, are still lacking. In this review, we summarized studies which investigated balance deficit by means of force platform measures, focusing on their ability in detecting patients at high risk of falls and in estimating rehabilitation-induced changes, highlighting the pros and the cons with respect to clinical scales. PMID:23766910

  8. Polanyi's tacit knowing and the relevance of epistemology to clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Henry, Stephen G

    2010-04-01

    Most clinicians take for granted a simple, reductionist understanding of medical knowledge that is at odds with how they actually practice medicine; routine medical decisions incorporate more complicated kinds of information than most standard accounts of medical reasoning suggest. A better understanding of the structure and function of knowledge in medicine can lead to practical improvements in clinical medicine. This understanding requires some familiarity with epistemology, the study of knowledge and its structure, in medicine. Michael Polanyi's theory of tacit knowing is advanced as the basis for developing a more accurate understanding of medical knowledge. Tacit knowing, which explores the taken-for-granted background knowledge that underlies all human knowing, is explained in detail with a focus on its relevance for clinical medicine. The implications of recognizing tacit knowing in medicine and medical decisions are discussed. These include the ability to explain the importance of the clinical encounter in medical practice, mechanisms for analysing patient and doctor as persons, and the need for humility given the uncertainty that the tacit dimension injects into all medical decisions. This more robust medical epistemology allows clinicians to better articulate the nature and importance of patient-centred care, to avoid pitfalls inherent in reductionist approaches to medical knowledge, and to think more clearly about the relationships between medicine and health care at the individual and population levels.

  9. Clinical relevance of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors in Iranian patients with gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Nader; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Asadi-Samani, Majid; Shirzad, Hedaytollah

    2016-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) usually colonizes the gastric mucosa of more than 50% of the human population, causing an infection that may appear in early childhood and can persist for life. H. pylori is suggested as the main cause of peptic ulcer and chronic gastritis. It is also associated with gastric cancer. Its severity and symptoms depend on environmental factors, host susceptibility and bacterial components, which allow H. pylori to switch between commensalism and pathogenicity. H. pylori is genetically highly variable, and the variability which affects H. pylori virulence factors might be useful in identifying the strains with different degrees of pathogenicity. The geographic distribution of distinct H. pylori genotypes is largely unknown and should be established. The prevalence of more pathogenic genotypes in certain areas may have important epidemiological consequences. It also might be associated with the severity of H. pylori related diseases in such regions. Given that Iran is located in the Middle East and Asian populations have revealed high levels of gastric cancer, it is of clinical interest to clarify the potential of H. pylori virulence markers in predicting the associated clinical outcomes. In this review, clinical relevance of adhesion molecules and significant virulence factors of H. pylori in Iranian patients with gastrointestinal diseases are discussed in comparison to other countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prophage Carriage and Diversity within Clinically Relevant Strains of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jinyu; Patel, Krusha V.; Hickenbotham, Peter T.; Nale, Janet Y.; Hargreaves, Katherine R.

    2012-01-01

    Prophages are encoded in most genomes of sequenced Clostridium difficile strains. They are key components of the mobile genetic elements and, as such, are likely to influence the biology of their host strains. The majority of these phages are not amenable to propagation, and therefore the development of a molecular marker is a useful tool with which to establish the extent and diversity of C. difficile prophage carriage within clinical strains. To design markers, several candidate genes were analyzed including structural and holin genes. The holin gene is the only gene present in all sequenced phage genomes, conserved at both terminals, with a variable mid-section. This allowed us to design two sets of degenerate PCR primers specific to C. difficile myoviruses and siphoviruses. Subsequent PCR analysis of 16 clinical C. difficile ribotypes showed that 15 of them are myovirus positive, and 2 of them are also siphovirus positive. Antibiotic induction and transmission electron microscope analysis confirmed the molecular prediction of myoviruses and/or siphovirus presence. Phylogenetic analysis of the holin sequences identified three groups of C. difficile phages, two within the myoviruses and a divergent siphovirus group. The marker also produced tight groups within temperate phages that infect other taxa, including Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, and Bacillus spp., which suggests the potential application of the holin gene to study prophage carriage in other bacteria. This study reveals the high incidence of prophage carriage in clinically relevant strains of C. difficile and correlates the molecular data to the morphological observation. PMID:22706062

  11. Mutation databases for inherited renal disease: are they complete, accurate, clinically relevant, and freely available?

    PubMed

    Savige, Judy; Dagher, Hayat; Povey, Sue

    2014-07-01

    This study examined whether gene-specific DNA variant databases for inherited diseases of the kidney fulfilled the Human Variome Project recommendations of being complete, accurate, clinically relevant and freely available. A recent review identified 60 inherited renal diseases caused by mutations in 132 genes. The disease name, MIM number, gene name, together with "mutation" or "database," were used to identify web-based databases. Fifty-nine diseases (98%) due to mutations in 128 genes had a variant database. Altogether there were 349 databases (a median of 3 per gene, range 0-6), but no gene had two databases with the same number of variants, and 165 (50%) databases included fewer than 10 variants. About half the databases (180, 54%) had been updated in the previous year. Few (77, 23%) were curated by "experts" but these included nine of the 11 with the most variants. Even fewer databases (41, 12%) included clinical features apart from the name of the associated disease. Most (223, 67%) could be accessed without charge, including those for 50 genes (40%) with the maximum number of variants. Future efforts should focus on encouraging experts to collaborate on a single database for each gene affected in inherited renal disease, including both unpublished variants, and clinical phenotypes. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  12. Prophage carriage and diversity within clinically relevant strains of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jinyu; Patel, Krusha V; Hickenbotham, Peter T; Nale, Janet Y; Hargreaves, Katherine R; Clokie, Martha R J

    2012-09-01

    Prophages are encoded in most genomes of sequenced Clostridium difficile strains. They are key components of the mobile genetic elements and, as such, are likely to influence the biology of their host strains. The majority of these phages are not amenable to propagation, and therefore the development of a molecular marker is a useful tool with which to establish the extent and diversity of C. difficile prophage carriage within clinical strains. To design markers, several candidate genes were analyzed including structural and holin genes. The holin gene is the only gene present in all sequenced phage genomes, conserved at both terminals, with a variable mid-section. This allowed us to design two sets of degenerate PCR primers specific to C. difficile myoviruses and siphoviruses. Subsequent PCR analysis of 16 clinical C. difficile ribotypes showed that 15 of them are myovirus positive, and 2 of them are also siphovirus positive. Antibiotic induction and transmission electron microscope analysis confirmed the molecular prediction of myoviruses and/or siphovirus presence. Phylogenetic analysis of the holin sequences identified three groups of C. difficile phages, two within the myoviruses and a divergent siphovirus group. The marker also produced tight groups within temperate phages that infect other taxa, including Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, and Bacillus spp., which suggests the potential application of the holin gene to study prophage carriage in other bacteria. This study reveals the high incidence of prophage carriage in clinically relevant strains of C. difficile and correlates the molecular data to the morphological observation.

  13. Clinical Relevance of RUNX1 and CBFB Alterations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Hematological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Metzeler, Klaus H; Bloomfield, Clara D

    2017-01-01

    The translocation t(8;21), leading to a fusion between the RUNX1 gene and the RUNX1T1 locus, was the first chromosomal translocation identified in cancer. Since the first description of this balanced rearrangement in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 1973, RUNX1 translocations and point mutations have been found in various myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms. In this chapter, we summarize the currently available data on the clinical relevance of core binding factor gene alterations in hematological disorders. In the first section, we discuss the prognostic implications of the core binding factor translocations RUNX1-RUNX1T1 and CBFB-MYH11 in AML patients. We provide an overview of the cooperating genetic events in patients with CBF-rearranged AML and their clinical implications, and review current treatment approaches for CBF AML and the utility of minimal residual disease monitoring. In the next sections, we summarize the available data on rare RUNX1 rearrangements in various hematologic neoplasms and the role of RUNX1 translocations in therapy-related myeloid neoplasia. The final three sections of the chapter cover the spectrum and clinical significance of RUNX1 point mutations in AML and myelodysplastic syndromes, in familial platelet disorder with associated myeloid malignancy, and in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  14. A guideline for the identification of environmentally relevant, ionizable organic molecule species.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Mario; Licha, Tobias

    2014-05-01

    An increasing number of organic compounds detected today in the aquatic environment are ionizable and, therefore, partially or permanently charged (ionic) under the pH conditions encountered in these systems. For evaluating their environmental behavior, which strongly depends on the charge state, the identification of functional groups together with their correct assignment of the respective acidic or basic dissociation constants (pKa) is essential. Despite the growing concern and increasing awareness for ionizable compounds, contradicting and/or confusing information regarding their acid/base properties can be regularly found in the literature, especially when complex structures are encountered. Therefore, we provide a simplified, general, and comprehensive guideline for the identification of ionizable functional groups in organic compounds combined with the correct assignment of their respective pKa values. Beside the explicit definition of basic terms, several tables with more than 30 of the most frequently encountered ionizable compound classes, including their typical pKa value ranges are the centerpiece of the proposed procedure. The straight forward application of the guideline is successfully shown for several environmentally relevant compounds as example. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Markers of oxidant stress that are clinically relevant in aging and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Kimberly D; Noren Hooten, Nicole; Trzeciak, Andrzej R; Evans, Michele K

    2013-03-01

    Despite the long held hypothesis that oxidant stress results in accumulated oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules and subsequently to aging and age-related chronic disease, it has been difficult to consistently define and specifically identify markers of oxidant stress that are consistently and directly linked to age and disease status. Inflammation because it is also linked to oxidant stress, aging, and chronic disease also plays an important role in understanding the clinical implications of oxidant stress and relevant markers. Much attention has focused on identifying specific markers of oxidative stress and inflammation that could be measured in easily accessible tissues and fluids (lymphocytes, plasma, serum). The purpose of this review is to discuss markers of oxidant stress used in the field as biomarkers of aging and age-related diseases, highlighting differences observed by race when data is available. We highlight DNA, RNA, protein, and lipid oxidation as measures of oxidative stress, as well as other well-characterized markers of oxidative damage and inflammation and discuss their strengths and limitations. We present the current state of the literature reporting use of these markers in studies of human cohorts in relation to age and age-related disease and also with a special emphasis on differences observed by race when relevant. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Hypersensitivities for acetaldehyde and other agents among cancer cells null for clinically relevant Fanconi anemia genes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soma; Sur, Surojit; Yerram, Sashidhar R; Rago, Carlo; Bhunia, Anil K; Hossain, M Zulfiquer; Paun, Bogdan C; Ren, Yunzhao R; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Azad, Nilofer A; Kern, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    Large-magnitude numerical distinctions (>10-fold) among drug responses of genetically contrasting cancers were crucial for guiding the development of some targeted therapies. Similar strategies brought epidemiological clues and prevention goals for genetic diseases. Such numerical guides, however, were incomplete or low magnitude for Fanconi anemia pathway (FANC) gene mutations relevant to cancer in FANC-mutation carriers (heterozygotes). We generated a four-gene FANC-null cancer panel, including the engineering of new PALB2/FANCN-null cancer cells by homologous recombination. A characteristic matching of FANCC-null, FANCG-null, BRCA2/FANCD1-null, and PALB2/FANCN-null phenotypes was confirmed by uniform tumor regression on single-dose cross-linker therapy in mice and by shared chemical hypersensitivities to various inter-strand cross-linking agents and γ-radiation in vitro. Some compounds, however, had contrasting magnitudes of sensitivity; a strikingly high (19- to 22-fold) hypersensitivity was seen among PALB2-null and BRCA2-null cells for the ethanol metabolite, acetaldehyde, associated with widespread chromosomal breakage at a concentration not producing breaks in parental cells. Because FANC-defective cancer cells can share or differ in their chemical sensitivities, patterns of selective hypersensitivity hold implications for the evolutionary understanding of this pathway. Clinical decisions for cancer-relevant prevention and management of FANC-mutation carriers could be modified by expanded studies of high-magnitude sensitivities.

  17. Hypersensitivities for Acetaldehyde and Other Agents among Cancer Cells Null for Clinically Relevant Fanconi Anemia Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Soma; Sur, Surojit; Yerram, Sashidhar R.; Rago, Carlo; Bhunia, Anil K.; Hossain, M. Zulfiquer; Paun, Bogdan C.; Ren, Yunzhao R.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Azad, Nilofer A.; Kern, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Large-magnitude numerical distinctions (>10-fold) among drug responses of genetically contrasting cancers were crucial for guiding the development of some targeted therapies. Similar strategies brought epidemiological clues and prevention goals for genetic diseases. Such numerical guides, however, were incomplete or low magnitude for Fanconi anemia pathway (FANC) gene mutations relevant to cancer in FANC-mutation carriers (heterozygotes). We generated a four-gene FANC-null cancer panel, including the engineering of new PALB2/FANCN-null cancer cells by homologous recombination. A characteristic matching of FANCC-null, FANCG-null, BRCA2/FANCD1-null, and PALB2/FANCN-null phenotypes was confirmed by uniform tumor regression on single-dose cross-linker therapy in mice and by shared chemical hypersensitivities to various inter-strand cross-linking agents and γ-radiation in vitro. Some compounds, however, had contrasting magnitudes of sensitivity; a strikingly high (19- to 22-fold) hypersensitivity was seen among PALB2-null and BRCA2-null cells for the ethanol metabolite, acetaldehyde, associated with widespread chromosomal breakage at a concentration not producing breaks in parental cells. Because FANC-defective cancer cells can share or differ in their chemical sensitivities, patterns of selective hypersensitivity hold implications for the evolutionary understanding of this pathway. Clinical decisions for cancer-relevant prevention and management of FANC-mutation carriers could be modified by expanded studies of high-magnitude sensitivities. PMID:24200853

  18. Molecular driver alterations and their clinical relevance in cancer of unknown primary site.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Harald; Pfarr, Nicole; Kriegsmann, Mark; Endris, Volker; Hielscher, Thomas; Lohneis, Philipp; Folprecht, Gunnar; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Dietel, Manfred; Weichert, Wilko; Krämer, Alwin

    2016-07-12

    Cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is defined as metastatic solid malignancy where no primary tumor is detected despite appropriate staging. About 90% of CUP represent adenocarcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma. Since therapy regimens are only modestly effective, identification of the molecular landscape of these neoplasms might be a promising approach to direct CUP therapy and aid in tumor classification. We screened a cohort of 128 patients with adenocarcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma meeting the definition of CUP. Massive parallel multigene sequencing of 50 genes, which had been selected due to their relevance as oncogenic drivers or druggable molecular targets could ultimately be performed on samples from 55 patients for whom complete clinical datasets were also available. Overall, 60 tumor-specific mutations and 29 amplifications/deletions, as revealed by coverage analysis, were detected in 46 cases (84%). The most frequently mutated genes were TP53 (30 cases, 55%), KRAS (9 cases, 16%), CDKN2A (5 cases, 9%), and SMAD4 (5 cases, 9%). The most frequently deleted gene was CDKN2A (8 cases, 15%). KRAS and CDKN2A mutations significantly correlated with poor progression-free survival (PFS) and, in case of KRAS, overall survival (OS). WIldtype TP53 and female sex defined a relatively favorable category, with favorable PFS and OS. 8 cases (15%) harbored mutations that may be targetable by currently approved drugs. Taken together, Mutations of relevant driver genes are present in the vast majority of CUP tumors. Some of them impact on prognosis and a subset is putatively druggable.

  19. Fungal-bacterial interactions and their relevance to oral health: linking the clinic and the bench.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Patricia I; Strausbaugh, Linda D; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing has accelerated knowledge on the oral microbiome. While the bacterial component of oral communities has been extensively characterized, the role of the fungal microbiota in the oral cavity is largely unknown. Interactions among fungi and bacteria are likely to influence oral health as exemplified by the synergistic relationship between Candida albicans and oral streptococci. In this perspective, we discuss the current state of the field of fungal-bacterial interactions in the context of the oral cavity. We highlight the need to conduct longitudinal clinical studies to simultaneously characterize the bacterial and fungal components of the human oral microbiome in health and during disease progression. Such studies need to be coupled with investigations using disease-relevant models to mechanistically test the associations observed in humans and eventually identify fungal-bacterial interactions that could serve as preventive or therapeutic targets for oral diseases.

  20. Fungal-bacterial interactions and their relevance to oral health: linking the clinic and the bench

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Patricia I.; Strausbaugh, Linda D.; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing has accelerated knowledge on the oral microbiome. While the bacterial component of oral communities has been extensively characterized, the role of the fungal microbiota in the oral cavity is largely unknown. Interactions among fungi and bacteria are likely to influence oral health as exemplified by the synergistic relationship between Candida albicans and oral streptococci. In this perspective, we discuss the current state of the field of fungal-bacterial interactions in the context of the oral cavity. We highlight the need to conduct longitudinal clinical studies to simultaneously characterize the bacterial and fungal components of the human oral microbiome in health and during disease progression. Such studies need to be coupled with investigations using disease-relevant models to mechanistically test the associations observed in humans and eventually identify fungal-bacterial interactions that could serve as preventive or therapeutic targets for oral diseases. PMID:25120959

  1. In vivo photoacoustic and fluorescence cystography using clinically relevant dual modal indocyanine green.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungjo; Kim, Jeesu; Jeon, Mansik; Song, Jaewon; Kim, Chulhong

    2014-10-21

    Conventional X-ray-based cystography uses radio-opaque materials, but this method uses harmful ionizing radiation and is not sensitive. In this study, we demonstrate nonionizing and noninvasive photoacoustic (PA) and fluorescence (FL) cystography using clinically relevant indocyanine green (ICG) in vivo. After transurethral injection of ICG into rats through a catheter, their bladders were photoacoustically and fluorescently visualized. A deeply positioned bladder below the skin surface (i.e., ~1.5-5 mm) was clearly visible in the PA and FL image using a laser pulse energy of less than 2 mJ/cm2 (1/15 of the safety limit). Then, the in vivo imaging results were validated through in situ studies. Our results suggest that dual modal cystography can provide a nonionizing and noninvasive imaging tool for bladder mapping.

  2. Skin autofluorescence, a non-invasive marker of advanced glycation end products: clinical relevance and limitations.

    PubMed

    Da Moura Semedo, Cidila; Webb, M'Balu; Waller, Helen; Khunti, Kamlesh; Davies, Melanie

    2017-01-31

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are protein-bound compounds derived from glycaemic and oxidative stress that contain fluorescent properties, which can be non-invasively measured as skin autofluorescence (SAF) by the AGE Reader. SAF has been demonstrated to be a biomarker of cumulative skin AGEs and potentially may be a better predictor for the development of chronic complications and mortality in diabetes than glycated haemoglobin A1c. However, there are several confounding factors that should be assessed prior to its broader application: these include presence of other fluorescent compounds in the skin that might be measured (eg, fluorophores), skin pigmentation and use of skin creams. The aim of this article is to provide a theoretical background of this newly developed method, evaluate its clinical relevance and discuss the potential confounding factors that need further analysis.

  3. Clinical relevance associated to the analysis of circulating tumour cells in patients with solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Serrano Fernádez, María José; Alvarez Merino, Juan Carlos; Martínez Zubiaurre, Iñigo; Fernández García, Ana; Sánchez Rovira, Pedro; Lorente Acosta, José Antonio

    2009-10-01

    The distant growth of tumour cells escaping from primary tumours, a process termed metastasis, represents the leading cause of death among patients affected by malignant neoplasias from breast and colon. During the metastasis process, cancer cells liberated from primary tumour tissue, also termed circulating tumour cells (CTCs), travel through the circulatory and/or lymphatic systems to reach distant organs. The early detection and the genotypic and phenotypic characterisation of such CTCs could represent a powerful diagnostic tool of the disease, and could also be considered an important predictive and prognostic marker of disease progression and treatment response. In this article we discuss the potential relevance in the clinic of monitoring CTCs from patients suffering from solid epithelial tumours, with emphasis on the impact of such analyses as a predictive marker for treatment response.

  4. Pattern and predictability in memory formation: From molecular mechanisms to clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Gary T.; Kopec, Ashley M.; Carew, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Most long-term memories are formed as a consequence of multiple experiences. The temporal spacing of these experiences is of considerable importance: experiences distributed over time (spaced training) are more easily encoded and remembered than either closely spaced experiences, or a single prolonged experience (massed training). In this article, we first review findings from studies in animal model systems that examine the cellular and molecular properties of the neurons and circuits in the brain that underlie training pattern sensitivity during long-term memory (LTM) formation. We next focus on recent findings which have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that support inter-trial interactions during the induction of LTM. Finally, we consider the implications of these findings for developing therapeutic strategies to address questions of direct clinical relevance. PMID:23727358

  5. New Insights into the Surgical Management of Tetralogy of Fallot: Physiological Fundamentals and Clinical Relevance.

    PubMed

    Bove, Thierry; François, Katrien; De Wolf, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of tetralogy of Fallot can be considered as a success story in the history of congenital heart diseases. Since the early outcome is no longer the main issue, the focus moved to the late sequelae of TOF repair, i.e. the pulmonary insufficiency and the secondary adaptation of the right ventricle. This review provides recent insights into the pathophysiological alterations of the right ventricle in relation to the reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract after repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Its clinical relevance is documented by addressing the policy changes regarding the optimal management at the time of surgical repair as well as properly defining criteria and timing for late pulmonary valve implantation.

  6. Expanding the scope and relevance of health interventions: Moving beyond clinical trials and behavior change models

    PubMed Central

    Rigg, Khary K.; Cook, Hilary H.; Murphy, John W.

    2014-01-01

    An overemphasis on clinical trials and behavior change models has narrowed the knowledge base that can be used to design interventions. The overarching point is that the process of overanalyzing variables is impeding the process of gaining insight into the everyday experiences that shape how people define health and seek treatment. This claim is especially important to health decision-making and behavior change because subtle interpretations often influence the decisions that people make. This manuscript provides a critique of traditional approaches to developing health interventions, and theoretically justifies what and why changes are warranted. The limited scope of these models is also discussed, and an argument is made to adopt a strategy that includes the perceptions of people as necessary for understanding health and health-related decision-making. Three practical strategies are suggested to be used with the more standard approaches to assessing the effectiveness and relevance of health interventions. PMID:25053530

  7. Clinical significance of Bacillus species isolated from blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Weber, D J; Saviteer, S M; Rutala, W A; Thomann, C A

    1989-06-01

    To determine the clinical significance of blood isolates of Bacillus, we reviewed all blood cultures obtained at North Carolina Memorial Hospital between 1981 and 1985. Over the five-year study period the number of patients (incidence per 10,000 hospital admissions) from whom Bacillus was isolated increased from 4.97 in 1981 to 12.5 in 1985. The incidence per 1,000 blood cultures also increased from 1.12 in 1981 to 2.33 in 1985. Review of the medical records of 78 of the 95 patients (82%) with positive cultures allowed retrospective classification of five isolates (6.4%) as clinically significant, 33 isolates (42.3%) as possibly significant, and 40 isolates (51.3%) as nonsignificant. Underlying diseases in patients with clinically significant Bacillus bacteremia included burn trauma in two, leukemia in one, carcinoma in one, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in one. All isolates judged to be clinically significant and the majority of possibly significant isolates were B cereus. We conclude that the isolation of Bacillus species from blood cultures is clinically significant in 5% to 10% of cases, that the incidence of Bacillus bacteremia is increasing, and that burn trauma should be added to the list of conditions known to predispose to clinically significant Bacillus bacteremia.

  8. The Soil Microbiota Harbors a Diversity of Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing β-Lactamases of Potential Clinical Relevance.

    PubMed

    Gudeta, Dereje Dadi; Bortolaia, Valeria; Amos, Greg; Wellington, Elizabeth M H; Brandt, Kristian K; Poirel, Laurent; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Westh, Henrik; Guardabassi, Luca

    2015-10-19

    The origin of carbapenem-hydrolyzing metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) acquired by clinical bacteria is largely unknown. We investigated the frequency, host range, diversity, and functionality of MBLs in the soil microbiota. Twenty-five soil samples of different types and geographical origins were analyzed by antimicrobial selective culture, followed by phenotypic testing and expression of MBL-encoding genes in Escherichia coli, and whole-genome sequencing of MBL-producing strains was performed. Carbapenemase activity was detected in 29 bacterial isolates from 13 soil samples, leading to identification of seven new MBLs in presumptive Pedobacter roseus (PEDO-1), Pedobacter borealis (PEDO-2), Pedobacter kyungheensis (PEDO-3), Chryseobacterium piscium (CPS-1), Epilithonimonas tenax (ESP-1), Massilia oculi (MSI-1), and Sphingomonas sp. (SPG-1). Carbapenemase production was likely an intrinsic feature in Chryseobacterium and Epilithonimonas, as it occurred in reference strains of different species within these genera. The amino acid identity to MBLs described in clinical bacteria ranged between 40 and 69%. Remarkable features of the new MBLs included prophage integration of the encoding gene (PEDO-1), an unusual amino acid residue at a key position for MBL structure and catalysis (CPS-1), and overlap with a putative OXA β-lactamase (MSI-1). Heterologous expression of PEDO-1, CPS-1, and ESP-1in E. coli significantly increased the MICs of ampicillin, ceftazidime, cefpodoxime, cefoxitin, and meropenem. Our study shows that MBL producers are widespread in soil and include four genera that were previously not known to produce MBLs. The MBLs produced by these bacteria are distantly related to MBLs identified in clinical samples but constitute resistance determinants of clinical relevance if acquired by pathogenic bacteria. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. The Soil Microbiota Harbors a Diversity of Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing β-Lactamases of Potential Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Gudeta, Dereje Dadi; Bortolaia, Valeria; Amos, Greg; Wellington, Elizabeth M. H.; Brandt, Kristian K.; Poirel, Laurent; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Westh, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    The origin of carbapenem-hydrolyzing metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) acquired by clinical bacteria is largely unknown. We investigated the frequency, host range, diversity, and functionality of MBLs in the soil microbiota. Twenty-five soil samples of different types and geographical origins were analyzed by antimicrobial selective culture, followed by phenotypic testing and expression of MBL-encoding genes in Escherichia coli, and whole-genome sequencing of MBL-producing strains was performed. Carbapenemase activity was detected in 29 bacterial isolates from 13 soil samples, leading to identification of seven new MBLs in presumptive Pedobacter roseus (PEDO-1), Pedobacter borealis (PEDO-2), Pedobacter kyungheensis (PEDO-3), Chryseobacterium piscium (CPS-1), Epilithonimonas tenax (ESP-1), Massilia oculi (MSI-1), and Sphingomonas sp. (SPG-1). Carbapenemase production was likely an intrinsic feature in Chryseobacterium and Epilithonimonas, as it occurred in reference strains of different species within these genera. The amino acid identity to MBLs described in clinical bacteria ranged between 40 and 69%. Remarkable features of the new MBLs included prophage integration of the encoding gene (PEDO-1), an unusual amino acid residue at a key position for MBL structure and catalysis (CPS-1), and overlap with a putative OXA β-lactamase (MSI-1). Heterologous expression of PEDO-1, CPS-1, and ESP-1in E. coli significantly increased the MICs of ampicillin, ceftazidime, cefpodoxime, cefoxitin, and meropenem. Our study shows that MBL producers are widespread in soil and include four genera that were previously not known to produce MBLs. The MBLs produced by these bacteria are distantly related to MBLs identified in clinical samples but constitute resistance determinants of clinical relevance if acquired by pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26482314

  10. Is the hymen a suitable cut-off point for clinically relevant pelvic organ prolapse?

    PubMed

    Wiegersma, Marian; Panman, Chantal M C R; Kollen, Boudewijn J; Berger, Marjolein Y; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Dekker, Janny H

    2017-05-01

    The primary objective was to evaluate the ability of different anatomic cut-off points, as established in specialist urogynecology populations, to identify clinically relevant prolapse in a population of postmenopausal women with pelvic floor symptoms recruited from primary care. Cross-sectional study among 890 women (≥55 years) screened for pelvic floor symptoms. The Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory 20 was used to measure symptoms, and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) system was used to assess prolapse. Areas under the curves, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated for the hymen as a cut-off point for symptomatic prolapse of the anterior and posterior vaginal wall. For the apical compartment, a cut-off point of -5cm relative to the hymen was used. Vaginal bulging was the only symptom reported more often with increasing POP-Q stages. Areas under the curves (95% confidence intervals) to discriminate between women with and without vaginal bulging symptoms were 0.66 (0.61-0.72), 0.56 (0.50-0.63), and 0.61 (0.55-0.66) for the anterior (Ba), posterior (Bp) and apical (C) compartment, respectively. When the hymen was used as the cut-off point, Ba had a sensitivity of 38.1% and a specificity of 82.4%, and Bp had a sensitivity of 13.3% and a specificity of 96.5%. For C, the cut-off point of -5cm relative to the hymen had a sensitivity of 37.9% and a specificity of 73.1%. The anatomic cut-off points for clinically relevant prolapse established in the specialist urogynecology population cannot adequately identify symptomatic prolapse in a population of postmenopausal women with pelvic floor symptoms recruited from primary care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Chromosomal patterns of gene expression from microarray data: methodology, validation and clinical relevance in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Turkheimer, Federico E; Roncaroli, Federico; Hennuy, Benoit; Herens, Christian; Nguyen, Minh; Martin, Didier; Evrard, Annick; Bours, Vincent; Boniver, Jacques; Deprez, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression microarrays represent a powerful technique for the simultaneous investigation of thousands of genes. The evidence that genes are not randomly distributed in the genome and that their coordinated expression depends on their position on chromosomes has highlighted the need for mathematical approaches to exploit this dependency for the analysis of expression data-sets. Results We have devised a novel mathematical technique (CHROMOWAVE) based on the Haar wavelet transform and applied it to a dataset obtained with the Affymetrix® HG-U133_Plus_2 array in 27 gliomas. CHROMOWAVE generated multi-chromosomal pattern featuring low expression in chromosomes 1p, 4, 9q, 13, 18, and 19q. This pattern was not only statistically robust but also clinically relevant as it was predictive of favourable outcome. This finding was replicated on a data-set independently acquired by another laboratory. FISH analysis indicated that monosomy 1p and 19q was a frequent feature of tumours displaying the CHROMOWAVE pattern but that allelic loss on chromosomes 4, 9q, 13 and 18 was much less common. Conclusion The ability to detect expression changes of spatially related genes and to map their position on chromosomes makes CHROMOWAVE a valuable screening method for the identification and display of regional gene expression changes of clinical relevance. In this study, FISH data showed that monosomy was frequently associated with diffuse low gene expression on chromosome 1p and 19q but not on chromosomes 4, 9q, 13 and 18. Comparative genomic hybridisation, allelic polymorphism analysis and methylation studies are in progress in order to identify the various mechanisms involved in this multi-chromosomal expression pattern. PMID:17140431

  12. Challenging the clinical relevance of folinic acid over rescue after high dose methotrexate (HDMTX).

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ian J

    2013-11-01

    The use of adequate folinic acid rescue (in clinically relevant doses) after high dose methotrexate will prevent neurotoxicity without reducing treatment results. A literature search was performed to test the hypothesis that no evidence for the existence of folinic acid over-rescue of high-dose methotrexate (MTX) in clinically relevant situations exists (evidence that too much folinic acid reduced cure rate). Examples of folinic acid over-rescue after lower doses of MTX were found and has been cited as evidence of over rescue of high dose MTX. Mega doses of folinic acid, used when toxic levels of MTX occurred, also could neutralize the MTX effect. Data were found to support the contention that higher levels of MTX require disproportionally higher folinic acid doses for rescue. Careful examination of the available studies after HDMTX yielded more convincing alternative explanations for reduction in cure rate than over rescue. Little convincing evidence for the existence of over rescue after HDMTX was found. The rescue of high-dose MTX with an appropriate dose of folinic acid that can prevent toxicity, especially neurotoxicity, was not shown to reduce the therapeutic effect. No evidence was found that higher doses of folinic acid after high dose MTX reduces the therapeutic effect. Acceptance of the hypothesis can prevent harm being caused (especially brain damage) by reversing the trend of dose reduction in FA rescue. The recognition that the use of higher folinic acid doses is safe, can prevent neurotoxicity, and does not reduce prognosis has important implications for the development of effective non toxic treatment protocols. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Direct toxic effects of aqueous extract of cigarette smoke on cardiac myocytes at clinically relevant concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Shigeyuki; Zhang Xiuquan; Kadono, Toshie; Matsuoka, Nobuhiro; Rollins, Douglas; Badger, Troy; Rodesch, Christopher K.; Barry, William H.

    2009-04-01

    Aims: Our goal was to determine if clinically relevant concentrations of aqueous extract of cigarette smoke (CSE) have direct deleterious effects on ventricular myocytes during simulated ischemia, and to investigate the mechanisms involved. Methods: CSE was prepared with a smoking chamber. Ischemia was simulated by metabolic inhibition (MI) with cyanide (CN) and 0 glucose. Adult rabbit and mouse ventricular myocyte [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was measured by flow cytometry using fluo-3. Mitochondrial [Ca{sup 2+}] was measured with confocal microscopy, and Rhod-2 fluorescence. The mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) was detected by TMRM fluorescence and myocyte contracture. Myocyte oxidative stress was quantified by dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence with confocal microscopy. Results: CSE 0.1% increased myocyte contracture caused by MI. The nicotine concentration (HPLC) in 0.1% CSE was 15 ng/ml, similar to that in humans after smoking cigarettes. CSE 0.1% increased mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uptake, and increased the susceptibility of mitochondria to the MPT. CSE 0.1% increased DCF fluorescence in isolated myocytes, and increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in paced myocytes exposed to 2.0 mM CN, 0 glucose (P-MI). These effects were inhibited by the superoxide scavenger Tiron. The effect of CSE on [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} during P-MI was also prevented by ranolazine. Conclusions: CSE in clinically relevant concentrations increases myocyte [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} during simulated ischemia, and increases myocyte susceptibility to the MPT. These effects appear to be mediated at least in part by oxidative radicals in CSE, and likely contribute to the effects of cigarette smoke to increase myocardial infarct size, and to decrease angina threshold.

  14. Power to detect clinically relevant carry-over in a series of cross-over studies.

    PubMed

    Putt, Mary E

    2006-08-15

    The potential for carry-over effects is an important consideration in the design of any cross-over study, and can cause an investigator to abandon the design altogether. In cross-over studies, carry-over is the lingering effect of a treatment into the subsequent period. Carry-over effects are differences in the extent of the carry-over between the treatments under consideration. It is well known that the test for carry-over effects in individual studies has low power. Empirical evidence of carry-over effects, or the absence of carry-over effects, could be useful for investigators considering the design. Here we develop methods for expressing the power to detect carry-over as a function of the power to detect a clinically relevant treatment effect. Our results suggest that for two-treatment, two-period cross-over studies the power to detect clinically relevant carry-over effects is often less than 15 per cent, and the number of studies needed to differentiate this effect from the type I error rate of 10 per cent is prohibitive. For the three-treatment three-period cross-over design, the power to detect carry-over effects was larger than for the two-period study, but still approached the type I error rate in a number of cases. Unequivocal conclusions about the absence of carry-over effects based on collections of hypothesis tests appear unlikely. Similar findings are presented for bioequivalence studies. For bioequivalence studies, small carry-over effects (e.g. 12.5 per cent of the treatment effect) can seriously inflate the type I error rate, particularly when the power to detect equivalence is high.

  15. Clinical relevance of the ROC and free-response paradigms for comparing imaging system efficacies.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, D P

    2010-01-01

    Observer performance studies are widely used to assess medical imaging systems. Unlike technical/engineering measurements observer performance include the entire imaging chain and the radiologist. However, the widely used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method ignores lesion localisation information. The free-response ROC (FROC) method uses the location information to appropriately reward or penalise correct or incorrect localisations, respectively. This paper describes a method for improving the clinical relevance of FROC studies. The method consists of assigning appropriate risk values to the different lesions that may be present on a single image. A high-risk lesion is one that is critical to detect and act upon, and is assigned a higher risk value than a low-risk lesion, one that is relatively innocuous. Instead of simply counting the number of lesions that are detected, as is done in conventional FROC analysis, a risk-weighted count is used. This has the advantage of rewarding detections of high-risk lesions commensurately more than detections of lower risk lesions. Simulations were used to demonstrate that the new method, termed case-based analysis, results in a higher figure of merit for an expert who detects more high-risk lesions than a naive observer who detects more low-risk lesions, even though both detect the same total number of lesions. Conventional free-response analysis is unable to distinguish between the two types of observers. This paper also comments on the issue of clinical relevance of ROC analysis vs. FROC for tasks that involve lesion localisation.

  16. Clinically-Relevant Measures Associated with Altered Contact Forces in Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background Knee joint contact forces are altered after anterior cruciate ligament injury during walking and may be related to clinically-relevant measures of impairments or self-reported function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of several clinically-relevant measures with altered knee contact forces in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Methods Data for this study represent a cross-sectional observational analysis of thirty-seven (23 M, 14 F) patients with complete unilateral anterior cruciate ligament injury. Gait analysis with electromyography was used to obtain estimates of tibiofemoral joint contact force using an electromyography-driven musculoskeletal model. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify measures associated with tibiofemoral joint contact force. Findings Involved knee extensor muscle strength and patient-reported knee function on the Global Rating Scale of Perceived Function were significantly associated with peak tibiofemoral contact force for the involved limb. Patients who were stronger and who perceived higher knee function walked with greater contact forces on their involved knees. After controlling for walking speed, involved extensor strength explained 8.9% of the variance in involved peak tibiofemoral contact force and score on the Global Rating Scale explained an additional 9.4% of the variance. Interpretation Improvements in involved quadriceps strength and overall function as measured by patient self-report may be important for increasing involved limb contact forces, thereby restoring loading symmetry in these patients who demonstrate decreased involved limb loading after injury. These results highlight the potential value of studying the recovery of strength, self-reported function and joint loading symmetry in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury. PMID:24746854

  17. Per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates do not predict clinically relevant patient dose errors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Zhen Heming; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to determine the statistical correlation between per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates and several clinically relevant, anatomy-based dose errors for per-patient IMRT QA. The intent is to assess the predictive power of a common conventional IMRT QA performance metric, the Gamma passing rate per beam. Methods: Ninety-six unique data sets were created by inducing four types of dose errors in 24 clinical head and neck IMRT plans, each planned with 6 MV Varian 120-leaf MLC linear accelerators using a commercial treatment planning system and step-and-shoot delivery. The error-free beams/plans were used as ''simulated measurements'' (for generating the IMRT QA dose planes and the anatomy dose metrics) to compare to the corresponding data calculated by the error-induced plans. The degree of the induced errors was tuned to mimic IMRT QA passing rates that are commonly achieved using conventional methods. Results: Analysis of clinical metrics (parotid mean doses, spinal cord max and D1cc, CTV D95, and larynx mean) vs IMRT QA Gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 2/2, 1/1) showed that in all cases, there were only weak to moderate correlations (range of Pearson's r-values: -0.295 to 0.653). Moreover, the moderate correlations actually had positive Pearson's r-values (i.e., clinically relevant metric differences increased with increasing IMRT QA passing rate), indicating that some of the largest anatomy-based dose differences occurred in the cases of high IMRT QA passing rates, which may be called ''false negatives.'' The results also show numerous instances of false positives or cases where low IMRT QA passing rates do not imply large errors in anatomy dose metrics. In none of the cases was there correlation consistent with high predictive power of planar IMRT passing rates, i.e., in none of the cases did high IMRT QA Gamma passing rates predict low errors in anatomy dose metrics or vice versa. Conclusions: There is a lack of correlation between

  18. Toxicity of aqueous vanadium to zooplankton and phytoplankton species of relevance to the athabasca oil sands region.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Stephanie; Liber, Karsten

    2017-03-01

    Vanadium (V) is an abundant trace metal present in bitumen from the Athabasca Oil Sands (AOS) region in Alberta, Canada. The upgrading of bitumen can result in the production of large volumes of a carbonaceous material referred to as petroleum coke that contains V at elevated levels compared to the native bitumen. Previous studies have shown that coke has the capacity to leach ecotoxicologically relevant levels of V into water it contacts, yet limited data are available on the toxicity of aqueous V to planktonic organisms. Therefore, this study set out to evaluate the acute and chronic toxicity of V (as vanadate oxyanions) to freshwater zooplankton and phytoplankton species that are either commonly-used laboratory species, or species more regionally-representative of northern Alberta. Four cladoceran (2-d and 21-d tests) and two algal (3-d tests) species were exposed to V to obtain both acute and chronic toxicity estimates. Acute V toxicity (LC50s) ranged from 0.60mgV/L for Ceriodaphnia quadrangula to 2.17mgV/L for Daphnia pulex. Chronic toxicity estimates (EC50s) for cladoceran survival and reproduction were nearly identical within species and ranged from a low of 0.13 to a high of 0.46mgV/L for Daphnia dentifera and D. pulex, respectively. The lack of sublethal V toxicity in daphnia suggests a direct mechanism of toxicity through ion imbalance. Growth inhibition (EC50) of green algae occurred at concentrations of 3.24 and 4.12mgV/L for Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Scenedesmus quadricauda, respectively. Overall, cladocerans were more sensitive to V than green algae, with survival of the field-collected D. dentifera being approximately 2.5 to 3.5 times more sensitive to acute and chronic V exposure than the standard test species D. pulex. However, there were no significant differences in V toxicity between the field-collected cladocerans Simocephalus serrulatus and C. quadrangula, compared to the respective standard species D. pulex and Ceriodaphnia dubia

  19. A conscious mouse model of gastric ileus using clinically relevant endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Firpo, Matthew A; Rollins, Michael D; Szabo, Aniko; Gull, Justin D; Jackson, Jeffrey D; Shao, Yuanlin; Glasgow, Robert E; Mulvihill, Sean J

    2005-01-01

    Background Gastric ileus is an unsolved clinical problem and current treatment is limited to supportive measures. Models of ileus using anesthetized animals, muscle strips or isolated smooth muscle cells do not adequately reproduce the clinical situation. Thus, previous studies using these techniques have not led to a clear understanding of the pathophysiology of ileus. The feasibility of using food intake and fecal output as simple, clinically relevant endpoints for monitoring ileus in a conscious mouse model was evaluated by assessing the severity and time course of various insults known to cause ileus. Methods Delayed food intake and fecal output associated with ileus was monitored after intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin, laparotomy with bowel manipulation, thermal injury or cerulein induced acute pancreatitis. The correlation of decreased food intake after endotoxin injection with gastric ileus was validated by measuring gastric emptying. The effect of endotoxin on general activity level and feeding behavior was also determined. Small bowel transit was measured using a phenol red marker. Results Each insult resulted in a transient and comparable decrease in food intake and fecal output consistent with the clinical picture of ileus. The endpoints were highly sensitive to small changes in low doses of endotoxin, the extent of bowel manipulation, and cerulein dose. The delay in food intake directly correlated with delayed gastric emptying. Changes in general activity and feeding behavior were insufficient to explain decreased food intake. Intestinal transit remained unchanged at the times measured. Conclusion Food intake and fecal output are sensitive markers of gastric dysfunction in four experimental models of ileus. In the mouse, delayed gastric emptying appears to be the major cause of the anorexic effect associated with ileus. Gastric dysfunction is more important than small bowel dysfunction in this model. Recovery of stomach function appears to be

  20. Gene expression profiling identifies distinct molecular subgroups of leiomyosarcoma with clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yin-Fai; Roe, Toby; Mangham, D Chas; Fisher, Cyril; Grimer, Robert J; Judson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Soft tissue sarcomas are heterogeneous and a major complication in their management is that the existing classification scheme is not definitive and is still evolving. Leiomyosarcomas, a major histologic category of soft tissue sarcomas, are malignant tumours displaying smooth muscle differentiation. Although defined as a single group, they exhibit a wide range of clinical behaviour. We aimed to carry out molecular classification to identify new molecular subgroups with clinical relevance. Methods: We used gene expression profiling on 20 extra-uterine leiomyosarcomas and cross-study analyses for molecular classification of leiomyosarcomas. Clinical significance of the subgroupings was investigated. Results: We have identified two distinct molecular subgroups of leiomyosarcomas. One group was characterised by high expression of 26 genes that included many genes from the sub-classification gene cluster proposed by Nielsen et al. These sub-classification genes include genes that have importance structurally, as well as in cell signalling. Notably, we found a statistically significant association of the subgroupings with tumour grade. Further refinement led to a group of 15 genes that could recapitulate the tumour subgroupings in our data set and in a second independent sarcoma set. Remarkably, cross-study analyses suggested that these molecular subgroups could be found in four independent data sets, providing strong support for their existence. Conclusions: Our study strongly supported the existence of distinct leiomyosarcoma molecular subgroups, which have clinical association with tumour grade. Our findings will aid in advancing the classification of leiomyosarcomas and lead to more individualised and better management of the disease. PMID:27607470

  1. Preclinical characterization of primary porcine hepatocytes in a clinically relevant flat membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Maringka, Michael; Giri, Shibashish; Bader, Augustinus

    2010-01-01

    Using primary porcine hepatocytes, artificial extracorporeal liver support (AEL) is a therapy that carries out the liver functions of liver failure patients until their own organs have been regenerated or until whole organ transplantation. Significant variation exists with regard to current bioreactor designs for AEL, and they may not reflect the in vivo architecture of the liver since each individual hepatocyte has its own direct contact with blood plasma for oxygen and nutrient supply and detoxification. The present study, based on our flat membrane bioreactor (FMB), aimed at in vivo liver architecture and to meet authentic clinical levels of human plasma exposure. Since many existing preclinical AELs are based on commercial culture medium with or without nonhuman serum, they may not authentically reflect the clinical situation in human patients, and little research has been done on human plasma exposure in in vitro culture-based bioreactors. To address this situation, herein we examined liver-specific functions such as albumin secretion, urea synthesis, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), cell membrane stability by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) test and ammonia clearance by using human plasma and serum-free medium in long-term culture of primary porcine hepatocytes to show the potential of our clinically relevant FMB. We observed that the organotypical double-gel (DG) culture is superior to conventional collagen-coated single-gel (SG) cultures. The performance of liver-specific functions by the FMB has long-term stability with intact cell morphology for up to 20 days under both plasma exposure and serum-free media. Our three focus points (long-term culture that correlates with the generation time of spontaneous regeneration, high-density culture, organotypical culture model using human plasma) may provide valuable clinical clues for AEL.

  2. Characterization of Iron-Imido Species Relevant for N-Group Transfer Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Iovan, Diana A.; Betley, Theodore A.

    2016-01-01

    A sterically accessible tert-butyl-substituted dipyrrinato di-iron(II) complex [(tBuL)FeCl]2 possessing two bridging chloride atoms was synthesized from the previously reported solvento adduct. Upon treatment with aryl azides, the formation of high-spin FeIII species was confirmed by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Crystallographic characterization revealed two possible oxidation products: (1) a terminal iron iminyl from aryl azides bearing ortho isopropyl substituents, (tBuL)FeCl(•NC6H3-2,6-iPr2); or (2) a bridging di-iron imido arising from reaction with 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)aryl azide, [(tBuL)FeCl]2(μ-NC6H3-3,5-(CF3)2). Similar to the previously reported (ArL)FeCl(•NC6H4-4-tBu), the monomeric iron imido is best described as a high-spin FeIII antiferromagnetically coupled to an iminyl radical, affording an S = 2 spin state as confirmed by SQUID magnetometry. The di-iron imido possesses an S = 0 ground state, arising from two high-spin FeIII centers weakly antiferromagnetically coupled through the bridging imido ligand. The terminal iron iminyl complex undergoes facile decomposition via intra- or intermolecular hydrogen-atom abstraction (HAA) from an imido aryl ortho isopropyl group, or from 1,4-cyclohexadiene, respectively. The bridging di-iron imido is a competent N-group transfer reagent to cyclic internal olefins as well as styrene. Although solid-state magnetometry indicates an antiferromagnetic interaction between the two iron centers (J = −108.7 cm−1) in [(tBuL)FeCl]2(μ-NC6H3-3,5-(CF3)2), we demonstrate that in solution the bridging imido can facilitate HAA as well as dissociate into a terminal iminyl species, which then can promote HAA. In situ monitoring reveals the di-iron bridging imido is a catalytically competent intermediate, one of several iron complexes observed in the amination of C–H bond substrates or styrene aziridination. PMID:26788747

  3. Reactive oxygen species in Hevea brasiliensis latex and relevance to Tapping Panel Dryness.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Leclercq, Julie; Montoro, Pascal

    2016-11-29

    Environmental stress can lead to oxidative stress resulting from an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and involves redox adjustments. Natural rubber is synthesized in laticifers, which is a non-photosynthetic tissue particularly prone to oxidative stress. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge on the ROS production and ROS-scavenging systems in laticifers. These regulations have been the subject of intense research into a physiological syndrome, called Tapping Panel Dryness (TPD), affecting latex production in Hevea brasiliensis In order to prevent TPD occurrence, monitoring thiol content appeared to be a crucial factor of latex diagnosis. Thiols, ascorbate and γ-tocotrienol are the major antioxidants in latex. They are involved in membrane protection from ROS and likely have an effect on the quality of raw rubber. Some transcription factors might play a role in the redox regulatory network in Hevea, in particular ethylene response factors, which have been the most intensively studied given the role of ethylene on rubber production. Current challenges for rubber research and development with regard to redox systems will involve improving antioxidant capacity using natural genetic variability.

  4. [Identification of Candida species of clinical importance by means of a modified auxonographic method].

    PubMed

    Lobaina Rodríguez, Tamara; Zhurbenko, Raisa; Rodríguez Martínez, Claudio; Zayas Ruiz, Yordania; Rodríguez Rodríguez, Ailen

    2010-01-01

    Candida species are responsible for the most common opportunistic mycotic infections. Rapid and accurate identification of yeast has become relevant not only for the effective management of infections, but also for the prevention of drug resistance. Up to now, yeast identification procedures are based on a variety of tests, including their ability to use sugars. the purpose of the study was to evaluate a modified auxonographic procedure with the use of carbonated compounds for the rapid identification of Candida species within 24 to 48 h. the new procedure is based on the carbohydrates assimilation (auxonograph) and was developed and evaluated for the identification of the most clinically relevant Candida species. A total number of 164 Candida species strains were included in the study, 156 of them were isolated from clinical specimens and other 8 reference strains from the central culture collection of BioCen (C. albicans, C. tropicalis. C. parapsilosis, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, C. krusei y C. kefyr). The new methodology was based on the use of standardized yeast suspension of carbon-free culture medium sterilized by autoclaving. After gelling the mixture (60 mL of cultural medium and 3 mL of microbial suspension), 10 microL of different carbohydrate filtering-sterilized solutions were dispensed at different points of the culture medium surface. The carbohydrate uptake was seen as a growth zone around the carbohydrate point of distribution after 24-48 h of incubation. all Candida species were correctly identified by the modified auxonographic method and 100 % agreement with the Wickerham technique was achieved. the alternative method for the auxonographic carbon test is simple, reliable, faster and easier to interpret than the Wickerham method.

  5. Four new species of Talaromyces from clinical sources.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Suarez, Marcela; Sutton, Deanna A; Gené, Josepa; García, Dania; Wiederhold, Nathan; Guarro, Josep; Cano-Lira, José F

    2017-10-01

    The genus Talaromyces constitutes an important group of molds with species that are mainly found in soil, indoor environments and food products. Traditionally, it has been considered, together with Eupenicillium, the teleomorphic state of Penicillium. However, the taxonomy of these fungi has changed considerably, and Talaromyces currently includes sexually and asexually reproducing species. In a previous study of the occurrence of penicillium-like fungi from clinical samples in the USA, we used the combined phylogeny of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the rDNA and β-tubulin (BenA) gene to identify 31 isolates of Talaromyces, 85 of Penicillium and two of Rasamsonia. However, seven isolates of Talaromyces were assigned to the corresponding sections but not to any particular species. In this study, we have resolved the taxonomy of these isolates through a multilocus sequence analysis of the ITS, fragments of the BenA, calmodulin (CaM), and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2) genes, and a detailed phenotypic study. As a result, four new species are described and illustrated, ie Talaromyces alveolaris, T. georgiensis, T. minnesotensis and T. rapidus. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Aspergillus fumigatus-Related Species in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lamoth, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the main etiologic agent of invasive aspergillosis (IA). Other Aspergillus species belonging to the section Fumigati (A. fumigatus complex) may occasionally be the cause of IA. These strains are often misidentified, as they cannot be distinguished from A. fumigatus by conventional morphological analysis and sequencing methods. This lack of recognition may have important consequences as these A. fumigatus-related species often display some level of intrinsic resistance to azoles and other antifungal drugs. A. lentulus, A. udagawae, A. viridinutans, and A. thermomutatus (Neosartorya pseudofischeri) have been associated with refractory cases of IA. Microbiologists should be able to suspect the presence of these cryptic species behind a putative A. fumigatus isolate on the basis of some simple characteristics, such as defect in sporulation and/or unusual antifungal susceptibility profile. However, definitive species identification requires specific sequencing analyses of the beta-tubulin or calmodulin genes, which are not available in most laboratories. Multiplex PCR assays or matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization – time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) gave promising results for rapid and accurate distinction between A. fumigatus and other Aspergillus spp. of the section Fumigati in clinical practice. Improved diagnostic procedures and antifungal susceptibility testing may be helpful for the early detection and management of these particular IA cases. PMID:27242710

  7. Cell death and cell death responses in liver disease: mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Luedde, Tom; Kaplowitz, Neil; Schwabe, Robert F

    2014-10-01

    Hepatocellular death is present in almost all types of human liver disease and is used as a sensitive parameter for the detection of acute and chronic liver disease of viral, toxic, metabolic, or autoimmune origin. Clinical data and animal models suggest that hepatocyte death is the key trigger of liver disease progression, manifested by the subsequent development of inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Modes of hepatocellular death differ substantially between liver diseases. Different modes of cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis, and necroptosis trigger specific cell death responses and promote progression of liver disease through distinct mechanisms. In this review, we first discuss molecular mechanisms by which different modes of cell death, damage-associated molecular patterns, and specific cell death responses contribute to the development of liver disease. We then review the clinical relevance of cell death, focusing on biomarkers; the contribution of cell death to drug-induced, viral, and fatty liver disease and liver cancer; and evidence for cell death pathways as therapeutic targets.

  8. Clinical and Neurobiological Relevance of Current Animal Models of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Chan; Gonzales, Edson Luck; Lázaro, María T.; Choi, Chang Soon; Bahn, Geon Ho; Yoo, Hee Jeong; Shin, Chan Young

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social and communication impairments, as well as repetitive and restrictive behaviors. The phenotypic heterogeneity of ASD has made it overwhelmingly difficult to determine the exact etiology and pathophysiology underlying the core symptoms, which are often accompanied by comorbidities such as hyperactivity, seizures, and sensorimotor abnormalities. To our benefit, the advent of animal models has allowed us to assess and test diverse risk factors of ASD, both genetic and environmental, and measure their contribution to the manifestation of autistic symptoms. At a broader scale, rodent models have helped consolidate molecular pathways and unify the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying each one of the various etiologies. This approach will potentially enable the stratification of ASD into clinical, molecular, and neurophenotypic subgroups, further proving their translational utility. It is henceforth paramount to establish a common ground of mechanistic theories from complementing results in preclinical research. In this review, we cluster the ASD animal models into lesion and genetic models and further classify them based on the corresponding environmental, epigenetic and genetic factors. Finally, we summarize the symptoms and neuropathological highlights for each model and make critical comparisons that elucidate their clinical and neurobiological relevance. PMID:27133257

  9. Enhancement in dentin collagen’s biological stability after proanthocyanidins treatment in clinically relevant time periods

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Chen, Mingsheng; Yao, Xiaomei; Xu, Changqi; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether proanthocyanidins (PA) is capable of improving dentin collagen’s biological stability through cross-linking within time periods that are clinically relevant. Materials and methods Demineralized dentin collagen slabs were treated with 3.75 wt% PA solution for 10 s, 1 min, 30 min, 60 min, 120 min, 360 min, and 720 min, respectively. The resultant cross-linked collagen samples were subject to digestion with 0.1% collagenase at 37 °C for 2 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 36 h, and 48 h. The percentage of weight loss after digestion was calculated to evaluate PA-treated collagen’s resistance toward enzymatic degradation. Fourier-Transformed Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to probe evidences of PA-collagen interactions after various periods of PA treatment. Results The collagenase digestion assay suggests that PA treatment as short as 10 s can enhance collagen’s resistance toward enzymatic challenge. The FTIR spectroscopy further verifies that PA is indeed incorporated into collagen regardless of treatment time, possibly via a mechanism involving the chemical interactions between PA and collagen. Significance This study confirmed that PA can effectively cross-link collagen and improve its biological stability in time periods as short as 10 s. The use of PA as a priming agent is therefore clinically feasible and is a promising approach to improving the durability of current dentin bonding systems. PMID:23434233

  10. Education in the clinical context: establishing a strategic framework to ensure relevance.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Amanda; Fox, Robyn; Armit, Lyn

    2008-01-01

    Quality contemporary practice relies on nurses to provide health care within an embedded nexus of clinical, professional and organisational learning that leads them through a career trajectory that encourages lifelong development. Within complex health service environments this is fraught with difficulties. Enhancing practice is multifaceted requiring not just education for the acquisition of skills and abilities but time and space for reflection on experience within the clinical context. This ultimately leads to professional knowledge development. Queensland Health has developed a Nursing and Midwifery Staff Development Framework to assist nurses in structuring their experiences in the practice setting to enable their professional goals. Learning is guided within this framework through its collective modus operandi, that is, the development of teams that overlap to identify and progress the educational agenda; resources to develop consistent relevant learning material that incorporates evidence obtained through practices and the literature; and educator and clinician networks across health services throughout the state, and furthermore, links with the tertiary sector to assist in marketing, applicability and synergy with further education.

  11. Molecular landscape of acute myeloid leukemia in younger adults and its clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Grimwade, David; Ivey, Adam; Huntly, Brian J P

    2016-01-07

    Recent major advances in understanding the molecular basis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) provide a double-edged sword. Although defining the topology and key features of the molecular landscape are fundamental to development of novel treatment approaches and provide opportunities for greater individualization of therapy, confirmation of the genetic complexity presents a huge challenge to successful translation into routine clinical practice. It is now clear that many genes are recurrently mutated in AML; moreover, individual leukemias harbor multiple mutations and are potentially composed of subclones with differing mutational composition, rendering each patient's AML genetically unique. In order to make sense of the overwhelming mutational data and capitalize on this clinically, it is important to identify (1) critical AML-defining molecular abnormalities that distinguish biological disease entities; (2) mutations, typically arising in subclones, that may influence prognosis but are unlikely to be ideal therapeutic targets; (3) mutations associated with preleukemic clones; and (4) mutations that have been robustly shown to confer independent prognostic information or are therapeutically relevant. The reward of identifying AML-defining molecular lesions present in all leukemic populations (including subclones) has been exemplified by acute promyelocytic leukemia, where successful targeting of the underlying PML-RARα oncoprotein has eliminated the need for chemotherapy for disease cure. Despite the molecular heterogeneity and recognizing that treatment options for other forms of AML are limited, this review will consider the scope for using novel molecular information to improve diagnosis, identify subsets of patients eligible for targeted therapies, refine outcome prediction, and track treatment response.

  12. Integrative Analysis of Cellular Morphometric Context Reveals Clinically Relevant Signatures in Lower Grade Glioma⋆

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ju; Wang, Yunfu; Cai, Weidong; Borowsky, Alexander; Parvin, Bahram; Chang, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Integrative analysis based on quantitative representation of whole slide images (WSIs) in a large histology cohort may provide predictive models of clinical outcome. On one hand, the efficiency and effectiveness of such representation is hindered as a result of large technical variations (e.g., fixation, staining) and biological heterogeneities (e.g., cell type, cell state) that are always present in a large cohort. On the other hand, perceptual interpretation/validation of important multivariate phenotypic signatures are often difficult due to the loss of visual information during feature transformation in hyperspace. To address these issues, we propose a novel approach for integrative analysis based on cellular morphometric context, which is a robust representation of WSI, with the emphasis on tumor architecture and tumor heterogeneity, built upon cellular level morphometric features within the spatial pyramid matching (SPM) framework. The proposed approach is applied to The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) lower grade glioma (LGG) cohort, where experimental results (i) reveal several clinically relevant cellular morphometric types, which enables both perceptual interpretation/validation and further investigation through gene set enrichment analysis; and (ii) indicate the significantly increased survival rates in one of the cellular morphometric context subtypes derived from the cellular morphometric context. PMID:28018994

  13. Long-term Clinical Relevance of De Novo Donor-Specific Antibodies After Pediatric Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Grabhorn, Enke; Binder, Thomas M C; Obrecht, Denise; Brinkert, Florian; Lehnhardt, Anja; Herden, Uta; Peine, Sven; Nashan, Björn; Ganschow, Rainer; Briem-Richter, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Anti-HLA antibodies and especially donor-specific antibodies (DSA) play a significant role in graft survival after solid organ transplantation. Their impact on long-term survival in adult liver transplantation (LT) is controversial, but they may be a risk factor. The effects of DSA after pediatric LT are still unclear. We performed a retrospective evaluation of DSA in sera from 43 children who had received transplants at our tertiary center. Twenty-four patients had good long-term clinical and laboratory graft function (group 1), whereas 19 LT recipients suffered from histologically confirmed and clinically relevant chronic allograft rejection (group 2); 16 of these have already undergone retransplantation due to graft dysfunction. Inclusion criteria were availability of sera before the first LT to identify preformed antibodies in case of DSA positivity after LT and long-term follow-up at our institution. Sera were analyzed for anti-HLA antibodies using Luminex single antigen beads, where a mean fluorescence intensity value of more than 1500 was considered positive. The prevalence of DSA was 33% for group 1 and 68% for group 2. Antibodies were predominantly HLA class II. Values of mean fluorescence intensity were comparable in both groups. Only one of the DSA+ ve patients from group 1 exhibited preformed antibodies. In conclusion, pediatric patients with chronic rejection revealed a higher rate of de novo DSA, especially of HLA-class II DSA. Further studies are necessary to confirm these data with a larger pediatric cohort.

  14. The Clinical Relevance of Antifibrillarin (anti-U3-RNP) Autoantibodies in Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tall, F; Dechomet, M; Riviere, S; Cottin, V; Ballot, E; Tiev, K P; Montin, R; Morin, C; Chantran, Y; Grange, C; Jullien, D; Ninet, J; Chretien, P; Cabane, J; Fabien, N; Johanet, C

    2017-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease associated with several antinuclear autoantibodies useful to diagnosis and prognosis. The aim of the present multicentric study was to determine the clinical relevance of antifibrillarin autoantibodies (AFA) in patients with SSc. The clinical features of 37 patients with SSc positive for AFA (AFA+) and 139 SSc patients without AFA (AFA-) were collected retrospectively from medical records to enable a comparison between AFA- and AFA+ patients. Antifibrillarin autoantibodies were screened by an indirect immunofluorescence technique using HEp2 cells and identified by an in-house Western blot technique and/or an EliA test. Comparing AFA+ and AFA- patients, AFA+ patients were significantly younger at disease onset (36.9 versus 42.9; P = 0.02), more frequently male (P = 0.02) and of Afro-Caribbean descent (65% versus 7.7%; P < 0.001). At diagnosis, the Rodnan skin score evaluating the cutaneous manifestations was higher (13.3 versus 8.7; P = 0.01) and myositis was also more common in the AFA+ group (31.4% versus 12.2%; P < 0.01). Patients with AFA+ were not associated with diffuse cutaneous SSc or with lung involvement and no difference in survival was observed. Antifibrillarin autoantibodies are associated with patients of Afro-Caribbean origin and can identify patients with SSc who are younger at disease onset and display a higher prevalence of myositis.

  15. Pharmacology of dextromethorphan: Relevance to dextromethorphan/quinidine (Nuedexta®) clinical use.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Charles P; Traynelis, Stephen F; Siffert, Joao; Pope, Laura E; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2016-08-01

    Dextromethorphan (DM) has been used for more than 50years as an over-the-counter antitussive. Studies have revealed a complex pharmacology of DM with mechanisms beyond blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and inhibition of glutamate excitotoxicity, likely contributing to its pharmacological activity and clinical potential. DM is rapidly metabolized to dextrorphan, which has hampered the exploration of DM therapy separate from its metabolites. Coadministration of DM with a low dose of quinidine inhibits DM metabolism, yields greater bioavailability and enables more specific testing of the therapeutic properties of DM apart from its metabolites. The development of the drug combination DM hydrobromide and quinidine sulfate (DM/Q), with subsequent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for pseudobulbar affect, led to renewed interest in understanding DM pharmacology. This review summarizes the interactions of DM with brain receptors and transporters and also considers its metabolic and pharmacokinetic properties. To assess the potential clinical relevance of these interactions, we provide an analysis comparing DM activity from in vitro functional assays with the estimated free drug DM concentrations in the brain following oral DM/Q administration. The findings suggest that DM/Q likely inhibits serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake and also blocks NMDA receptors with rapid kinetics. Use of DM/Q may also antagonize nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, particularly those composed of α3β4 subunits, and cause agonist activity at sigma-1 receptors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical Relevance of Androgen Receptor Splice Variants in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Benjamin L; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2015-12-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) currently benefits from a wealth of treatment options, yet still remains lethal in the vast majority of patients. It is becoming increasingly understood that this disease entity continues to evolve over time, acquiring additional and diverse resistance mechanisms with each subsequent therapy used. This dynamic relationship between treatment pressure and disease resistance can be challenging for the managing clinician. The recent discovery of alternate splice variants of the androgen receptor (AR) is one potential mechanism of escape in mCRPC, and recognizing this resistance mechanism might be important for optimal treatment selection for our patients. AR-V7 appears to be the most relevant AR splice variant, and early clinical data suggest that it is a negative prognostic marker in mCRPC. Emerging evidence also suggests that detection of AR-V7 may be associated with resistance to novel hormonal therapy (abiraterone and enzalutamide) but may be compatible with sensitivity to taxane chemotherapy (docetaxel and cabazitaxel). Adding to this complexity is the observation that AR-V7 is a dynamic marker whose status may change across time and depending on selective pressures induced by different therapies. Finally, it is possible that AR-V7 may represent a therapeutic target in mCRPC if drugs can be designed that degrade or inhibit AR splice variants or block their transcriptional activity. Several such agents (including galeterone, EPI-506, and bromodomain/BET inhibitors) are now in clinical development.

  17. In vivo radiosensitization efficacy of KU-2285 and etanidazole at clinically relevant low radiation doses

    SciTech Connect

    Oya, Natsuo; Shibamoto, Yuta; Sasai, Keisuke; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Sugiyama, Taketoshi )

    1993-12-01

    The in vivo radiosensitization efficacy of KU-2285 (a fluorinated nitroimidazole derivative) at clinically relevant low radiation doses (2-4 Gy) was compared with that of etanidazole using four types of assays with EMT6, SCCVII, and C[sup 3]H mammary tumors. The in vivo-in vitro cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay and the chromosomal aberration assay were used to assess the sensitizing effect at single doses of 2-4 Gy. After in vivo treatment for tumors, tumor cells were cultured in the presence of cytochalasin B for the former assay or demecolcine for the latter assay, and the micronucleus frequency in binucleate cells and the chromosomal frequency in metaphase cells were evaluated after 42 hr and 3 hr of culture. In addition, an in vivo-in vitro colony assay and a growth delay assay were performed using fractionated irradiation regimens (4 Gy [times] 5). The sensitizer enhancement ratio for 100-400 mg/kg of KU-2285 was between 1.12 and 1.42. KU-2285 was a more efficient sensitizer than etanidazole in 3 of 9 experiments and as efficient as etanidazole in the remaining six experiments. Both the micronucleus assay and the chromosomal aberration assay appeared to be very useful in evaluating the in vivo sensitizing effect at low radiation doses. KU-2285 had a definite radiosensitizing effect even at low radiation doses, and clinical trials of KU-2285 may be warranted. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Serology and clinical relevance of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in native Korean goats (Capra hircus coreanae).

    PubMed

    Jung, Byeong Yeal; Lee, Seung-Hun; Kim, Ha-Young; Byun, Jae-Won; Shin, Dong-Ho; Kim, Daekeun; Kwak, Dongmi

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to assess the seroprevalence and clinical relevance of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, which is the causative agent of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA), in native Korean goats (Capra hircus coreanae). A total of 466 native Korean goats from 40 herds (11 to 12 samples per herd) were randomly selected throughout the nation and evaluated by direct palpation, bacterial isolation, ELISA, and PCR. In serological examinations, 267 (57.3 %) of the goats tested were positive against C. pseudotuberculosis. When seroprevalence was analyzed according to age, region, and season, statistically significant differences were observed in relation to all three parameters (P < 0.05). For clinical examination, the superficial lymph nodes of all goats were palpated to diagnose CLA. Pus samples taken from superficial abscesses were used for bacterial isolation. Among the 466 goats tested, 34 (7.3 %) were presumptively diagnosed with CLA, and C. pseudotuberculosis was isolated from 24 goats (70.6 % of goats with CLA lesions) whose infections were confirmed by PCR. Considering the high seroprevalence and bacterial isolation rate from most of the superficial CLA lesions, it is suspected that many internal CLA lesions exist in this goat population. These results suggest that C. pseudotuberculosis infection is widespread in native Korean goats, and appropriate control programs need to be established.

  19. Detection of Adriamycin-DNA adducts by accelerator mass spectrometry at clinically relevant Adriamycin concentrations.

    PubMed

    Coldwell, Kate E; Cutts, Suzanne M; Ognibene, Ted J; Henderson, Paul T; Phillips, Don R

    2008-09-01

    Limited sensitivity of existing assays has prevented investigation of whether Adriamycin-DNA adducts are involved in the anti-tumour potential of Adriamycin. Previous detection has achieved a sensitivity of a few Adriamycin-DNA adducts/10(4) bp DNA, but has required the use of supra-clinical drug concentrations. This work sought to measure Adriamycin-DNA adducts at sub-micromolar doses using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique with origins in geochemistry for radiocarbon dating. We have used conditions previously validated (by less sensitive decay counting) to extract [(14)C]Adriamycin-DNA adducts from cells and adapted the methodology to AMS detection. Here we show the first direct evidence of Adriamycin-DNA adducts at clinically-relevant Adriamycin concentrations. [(14)C]Adriamycin treatment (25 nM) resulted in 4.4 +/- 1.0 adducts/10(7) bp ( approximately 1300 adducts/cell) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, representing the best sensitivity and precision reported to date for the covalent binding of Adriamycin to DNA. The exceedingly sensitive nature of AMS has enabled over three orders of magnitude increased sensitivity of Adriamycin-DNA adduct detection and revealed adduct formation within an hour of drug treatment. This method has been shown to be highly reproducible for the measurement of Adriamycin-DNA adducts in tumour cells in culture and can now be applied to the detection of these adducts in human tissues.

  20. The Taccalonolides: Microtubule Stabilizers that Circumvent Clinically Relevant Taxane Resistance Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Risinger, April L.; Jackson, Evelyn M.; Polin, Lisa A.; Helms, Gregory L.; LeBoeuf, Desiree A.; Joe, Patrick A.; Hopper-Borge, Elizabeth; Ludueña, Richard F.; Kruh, Gary D.; Mooberry, Susan L.

    2009-01-01

    The taccalonolides are a class of structurally and mechanistically distinct microtubule-stabilizing agents isolated from Tacca chantrieri. A crucial feature of the taxane family of microtubule stabilizers is their susceptibility to cellular resistance mechanisms including overexpression of P-glycoprotein, MRP7 and the βIII isotype of tubulin. The ability of four taccalonolides, A, E, B and N, to circumvent these multidrug resistance mechanisms was studied. Taccalonolides A, E, B and N were effective in vitro against cell lines that overexpress P-glycoprotein and MRP7. In addition, taccalonolides A and E were highly active in vivo against a doxorubicin- and paclitaxel- resistant Pgp-expressing tumor, Mam17/ADR. An isogenic HeLa-derived cell line that expresses the βIII isotype of tubulin was generated to evaluate the effect of βIII-tubulin on drug sensitivity. When compared with parental HeLa cells, the βIII-tubulin overexpressing cell line was less sensitive to paclitaxel, docetaxel, epothilone B and vinblastine. In striking contrast, the βIII-tubulin overexpressing cell line showed greater sensitivity to all four taccalonolides. These data cumulatively suggest that the taccalonolides have advantages over the taxanes in their ability to circumvent multiple drug resistance mechanisms. The ability of the taccalonolides to overcome clinically relevant mechanisms of drug resistance in vitro and in vivo confirms that the taccalonolides represent a valuable addition to the family of microtubule-stabilizing compounds with clinical potential. PMID:18974132

  1. Relevance of anatomy to medical education and clinical practice: perspectives of medical students, clinicians, and educators.

    PubMed

    Sbayeh, Amgad; Qaedi Choo, Mohammad A; Quane, Kathleen A; Finucane, Paul; McGrath, Deirdre; O'Flynn, Siun; O'Mahony, Siobhain M; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P

    2016-12-01

    Against a backdrop of ever-changing diagnostic and treatment modalities, stakeholder perceptions (medical students, clinicians, anatomy educators) are crucial for the design of an anatomy curriculum which fulfils the criteria required for safe medical practice. This study compared perceptions of students, practising clinicians, and anatomy educators with respect to the relevance of anatomy education to medicine. A quantitative survey was administered to undergraduate entry (n = 352) and graduate entry students (n = 219) at two Irish medical schools, recently graduated Irish clinicians (n = 146), and anatomy educators based in Irish and British medical schools (n = 30). Areas addressed included the association of anatomy with medical education and clinical practice, mode of instruction, and curriculum duration. Graduate-entry students were less likely to associate anatomy with the development of professionalism, teamwork skills, or improved awareness of ethics in medicine. Clinicians highlighted the challenge of tailoring anatomy education to increase student readiness to function effectively in a clinical role. Anatomy educators indicated dissatisfaction with the time available for anatomy within medical curricula, and were equivocal about whether curriculum content should be responsive to societal feedback. The group differences identified in the current study highlight areas and requirements which medical education curriculum developers should be sensitive to when designing anatomy courses.

  2. Cell Death and Cell Death Responses in Liver Disease: Mechanisms and Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Luedde, Tom; Kaplowitz, Neil; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hepatocellular death is present in almost all types of human liver disease and is used as a sensitive parameter for the detection of acute and chronic liver disease of viral, toxic, metabolic, or autoimmune origin. Clinical data and animal models suggest that hepatocyte death is the key trigger of liver disease progression, manifested by the subsequent development of inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Modes of hepatocellular death differ substantially between liver diseases. Different modes of cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis, and necroptosis trigger specific cell death responses and promote progression of liver disease through distinct mechanisms. In this review, we first discuss molecular mechanisms by which different modes of cell death, damage-associated molecular patterns, and specific cell death responses contribute to the development of liver disease. We then review the clinical relevance of cell death, focusing on biomarkers; the contribution of cell death to drug-induced, viral, and fatty liver disease and liver cancer; and evidence for cell death pathways as therapeutic targets. PMID:25046161

  3. Warfarin accelerates ectopic mineralization in Abcc6(-/-) mice: clinical relevance to pseudoxanthoma elasticum.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaoli; Guo, Haitao; Chou, David W; Harrington, Dominic J; Schurgers, Leon J; Terry, Sharon F; Uitto, Jouni

    2013-04-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a multisystem ectopic mineralization disorder caused by mutations in the ABCC6 gene. Warfarin, a commonly used anticoagulant, is associated with increased mineralization of the arterial blood vessels and cardiac valves. We hypothesized that warfarin may accelerate ectopic tissue mineralization in PXE, with clinical consequences. To test this hypothesis, we developed a model in which Abcc6(-/-) mice, which recapitulate features of PXE, were fed a diet supplemented with warfarin and vitamin K1. Warfarin action was confirmed by significantly increased serum levels of oxidized vitamin K. For mice placed on a warfarin-containing diet, quantitative chemical and morphometric analyses revealed massive accumulation of mineral deposits in a number of tissues. Mice fed a warfarin-containing diet were also shown to have abundant uncarboxylated form of matrix Gla protein, which allowed progressive tissue mineralization to ensue. To explore the clinical relevance of these findings, 1747 patients with PXE from the approximately 4000 patients in the PXE International database were surveyed about the use of warfarin. Of the 539 respondents, 2.6% reported past or present use of warfarin. Based on the prevalence of PXE (approximately 1:50,000), thousands of patients with PXE worldwide may be at risk for worsening of PXE as a result of warfarin therapy. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Distal semimembranosus muscle-tendon-unit review: morphology, accurate terminology, and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Benninger, Brion; Delamarter, Taylor

    2013-02-01

    Our knowledge of the stability of the posteromedial knee is evolving. The distal semimembranosus is an important posteromedial stabilizer of the knee. Current anatomical texts and atlases do not accurately detail the distal insertion. Journal literature commonly mentions multiple distal insertions, one of which contributes to the oblique popliteal ligament. The purpose of this study was to review the literature, current morphology, terminology and clinical relevance of the distal semimembranosus muscle-tendon-unit (SMTU), and suggest alternative nomenclature. : Literature search was conducted on anatomical and clinical texts, atlases, journals and websites to analyze the distal morphology of the semimembranosus muscle. Deep dissections were performed on 31 embalmed cadavers, 56 knees in total (27Rt and 29L), identifying the distal semimembranosus tendon morphology. : : Literature search revealed significantly inconsistent morphology of the distal semimembranosus muscle-tendon-unit. Cadaver dissection revealed a consistent trifurcation with three dominant expansions. Cadaver dissection also revealed an oblique popliteal tendon/expansion, indigenous to SMTU, not a ligament. : This study provides evidence of a consistent morphology and suggests a more precise nomenclature of the distal SMTU, which includes renaming the oblique popliteal ligament as the oblique popliteal tendon/expansion.

  5. Standardizing Analysis of Circulating MicroRNA: Clinical and Biological Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Nicholas H.; Wood, Marie E.; Perrapato, Scott D.; Francklyn, Christopher S.; Stein, Gary S.; Stein, Janet L.; Lian, Jane B.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs (c-miRNAs) provide a new dimension as clinical biomarkers for disease diagnosis, progression, and response to treatment. However, the discovery of individual miRNAs from biofluids that reliably reflect disease states is in its infancy. The highly variable nature of published studies exemplifies a need to standardize the analysis of miRNA in circulation. Here, we show that differential sample handling of serum leads to inconsistent and incomparable results. We present a standardized method of RNA isolation from serum that eliminates multiple freeze/thaw cycles, provides at least 3 normalization mechanisms, and can be utilized in studies that compare both archived and prospectively collected samples. It is anticipated that serum processed as described here can be profiled, either globally or on a gene by gene basis, for c-miRNAs and other non-coding RNA in the circulation to reveal novel, clinically relevant epigenetic signatures for a wide range of diseases. PMID:24357537

  6. Clinical Relevance of Sleep Duration: Results from a Cross-Sectional Analysis Using NHANES

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, M. Soledad; Stang, Paul; Blacketer, Clair; Kent, Justine M.; Wittenberg, Gayle M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess the clinical relevance of sleep duration, hours slept were compared by health status, presence of insomnia, and presence of depression, and the association of sleep duration with BMI and cardiovascular risk was quantified. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of subjects in the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys using adjusted linear and logistic regressions. Results: A total of 22,281 adults were included, 37% slept ≤ 6 hours, 36% were obese, and 45% reported cardiovascular conditions. Mean sleep duration was 6.87 hours. Better health was associated with more hours of sleep. Subjects with poor health reported sleeping 46 min, (95% CI −56.85 to −35.67) less than subjects with excellent health. Individuals with depression (vs. not depressed) reported 40 min less sleep, (95% CI −47.14 to −32.85). Individuals with insomnia (vs. without insomnia) reported 39 min less sleep, (95% CI −56.24 to −22.45). Duration of sleep was inversely related to BMI; for every additional hour of sleep, there was a decrease of 0.18 kg/m2 in BMI, (95% CI −0.30 to −0.06). The odds of reporting cardiovascular problems were 6.0% lower for every hour of sleep (odds ratio = 0.94, 95% CI [0.91 to 0.97]). Compared with subjects who slept ≤ 6 h, subjects who slept more had lower odds of reporting cardiovascular problems, with the exception of subjects ≥ 55 years old who slept ≥ 9 hours. Conclusions: Long sleep duration is associated with better health. The fewer the hours of sleep, the greater the BMI and reported cardiovascular disease. A difference of 30 minutes of sleep is associated with substantive impact on clinical well-being. Citation: Cepeda MS, Stang P, Blacketer C, Kent JM, Wittenberg GM. Clinical relevance of sleep duration: results from a cross-sectional analysis using NHANES. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(6):813–819. PMID:26951419

  7. Comparison of the cytotoxicity of clinically relevant cobalt-chromium and alumina ceramic wear particles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Germain, M A; Hatton, A; Williams, S; Matthews, J B; Stone, M H; Fisher, J; Ingham, E

    2003-02-01

    Concern over polyethylene wear particle induced aseptic loosening of metal-on-polyethylene hip prostheses has led to renewed interest in alternative materials such as metal-on-metal and alumina ceramic-on-alumina ceramic for total hip replacement. This study compared the effects of clinically relevant cobalt-chromium and alumina ceramic wear particles on the viability of U937 histiocytes and L929 fibroblasts in vitro. Clinically relevant cobalt-chromium wear particles were generated using a flat pin-on-plate tribometer. The mean size of the clinically relevant metal particles was 29.5+/-6.3 nm (range 5-200 nm). Clinically relevant alumina ceramic particles were generated in the Leeds MkII anatomical hip simulator from a Mittelmieier prosthesis using micro-separation motion. This produced particles with a bimodal size distribution. The majority (98%) of the clinically relevant alumina ceramic wear debris was 5-20 nm in size. The cytotoxicity of the clinically relevant wear particles was compared to commercially available cobalt-chromium (9.87 microm+/-5.67) and alumina ceramic (0.503+/-0.19 microm) particles. The effects of the particles on the cells over a 5 day period at different particle volume (microm(3)) to cell number ratios were tested and viability determined using ATP-Lite(TM). Clinically relevant cobalt-chromium particles 50 and 5 microm(3) per cell reduced the viability of U937 cells by 97% and 42% and reduced the viability of L929 cells by 95% and 73%, respectively. At 50 microm(3) per cell, the clinically relevant ceramic particles reduced U937 cell viability by 18%. None of the other concentrations of the clinically relevant particles were toxic. The commercial cobalt-chromium and alumina particles did not affect the viability of either the U937 histiocytes or the L929 fibroblasts.Thus at equivalent particle volumes the clinically relevant cobalt-chromium particles were more toxic then the alumina ceramic particles. This study has emphasised the fact

  8. Comprehensive Genomic Profiling of Central Giant Cell Lesions Identifies Clinically Relevant Genomic Alterations.

    PubMed

    Bezak, Brett; Lehrke, Heidi; Elvin, Julia; Gay, Laurie; Schembri-Wismayer, David; Viozzi, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    Comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) can simultaneously detect clinically relevant genomic alterations (CRGAs) in hundreds of cancer-related genes and direct treatment toward patient-specific therapy options for many tumors. This pilot study aimed to use CGP to describe CRGAs present in central giant cell lesions (CGCLs) to characterize any possible underlying genomic drivers of CGCLs. With institutional review board approval, electronic medical records were searched for patients with histologically confirmed CGCLs who underwent biopsy at Mayo Clinic from 2000 through 2014. Clinical characteristics were recorded from the medical records. At least 50 ng of DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival CGCL specimens by use of hybridization-capture, adaptor ligation-based libraries targeting all exons from 315 cancer-related genes plus select introns from 28 genes commonly rearranged in cancer. Samples were sequenced to high, uniform coverage and assessed for all 4 classes of genomic alterations: base substitutions, small insertions and deletions, rearrangements, and copy number alterations. Of 8 CGCL specimens, 3 (37.5%) harbored CRGAs, including base substitutions in BRAF, GNAS, and KRAS that are predicted to be oncogenic. In 1 sample, focal high-level amplification of the MITF gene was detected. Rearrangement in the PDGFRB gene was identified in a fourth sample, although the significance of this alteration is uncertain. This pilot study shows that a relatively high frequency of CRGAs (37.5%) can be identified in CGCLs by use of CGP. Furthermore, 25% of CGCLs analyzed had somatic mutations predicted to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, suggesting it may be a driver of the aggressive behavior of these lesions. On the basis of this study, genomic profiling of a larger cohort of CGCLs to validate these observations, as well as correlate mutations with aggressive versus nonaggressive biological behavior and

  9. Vasopressin in preeclampsia: a novel very early human pregnancy biomarker and clinically relevant mouse model.

    PubMed

    Santillan, Mark K; Santillan, Donna A; Scroggins, Sabrina M; Min, James Y; Sandgren, Jeremy A; Pearson, Nicole A; Leslie, Kimberly K; Hunter, Stephen K; Zamba, Gideon K D; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Grobe, Justin L

    2014-10-01

    Preeclampsia, a cardiovascular disorder of late pregnancy, is characterized as a low-renin hypertensive state relative to normotensive pregnancy. Because other nonpregnant low-renin hypertensive disorders often exhibit and are occasionally dependent on elevated arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion, we hypothesized a possible use for plasma AVP measurements in the prediction of preeclampsia. Copeptin is an inert prosegment of AVP that is secreted in a 1:1 molar ratio and exhibits a substantially longer biological half-life compared with AVP, rendering it a clinically useful biomarker of AVP secretion. Copeptin was measured throughout pregnancy in maternal plasma from preeclamptic and control women. Maternal plasma copeptin was significantly higher throughout preeclamptic pregnancies versus control pregnancies. While controlling for clinically significant confounders (age, body mass index, chronic essential hypertension, twin gestation, diabetes mellitus, and history of preeclampsia) using multivariate regression, the association of higher copeptin concentration and the development of preeclampsia remained significant. Receiver operating characteristic analyses reveal that as early as the sixth week of gestation, elevated maternal plasma copeptin concentration is a highly significant predictor of preeclampsia throughout pregnancy. Finally, chronic infusion of AVP during pregnancy (24 ng per hour) is sufficient to phenocopy preeclampsia in C57BL/6J mice, causing pregnancy-specific hypertension, renal glomerular endotheliosis, proteinuria, and intrauterine growth restriction. These data implicate AVP release as a novel predictive biomarker for preeclampsia very early in pregnancy, identify chronic AVP infusion as a novel and clinically relevant model of preeclampsia in mice, and are consistent with a potential causative role for AVP in preeclampsia in humans. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. The clinical relevance of the percentage flow-mediated dilation index.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Greg; Batterham, Alan M

    2015-02-01

    In 2010, the American College of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association could not recommend brachial artery percentage flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) for risk assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD) in asymptomatic adults. We aimed to scrutinise past and recently published findings regarding FMD% in this same context of clinical utility and conclude that (1) the question of whether brachial FMD% is a suitable substitute for coronary vasodilation is addressed by method agreement statistics rather than the correlation coefficients that have been reported in past studies. Also, the much-repeated view that brachial FMD% and coronary vasodilation are "closely related" is not entirely justified, even before the influence of baseline lumen diameters on this relationship is accounted for; (2) along with the specialist training and the considerable time (≥1 h) that is required for the FMD% protocol, the error in individual measurements and population reference ranges is too large for clinical decisions to be robust on individual patients; (3) many interventions that are proposed to change FMD% also change baseline artery diameter, which can bias estimates of any intervention effects on the flow-mediated response per se, and (4) the FMD% index generates spurious correlations between shear rate, artery diameter and endothelial function, which may help to explain the apparent paradoxes of FMD% being higher in obese people and lower in athletes. In conclusion, the clinical relevance of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation is unclear at present. The dependence of the chosen index, FMD%, on initial artery size has contributed to this lack of clarity.

  11. Development of Microcomputer Methods for Analysis and Simulation of Clinical Pharmacokinetic Data Relevant to New Drug Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-02

    interpretation, and simulation of pharmacokinetic data, dose - response kinetic data, and other data relevant to new drug development, for use with the Tektronix...Statistical Programs for Clinical Pharmacological Problems; Keywords: Clinical Pharmacokinetics, Dose - Response Relations, Pharmakinetic Simulation, Non-Parametric Statistics, Mefloquine, Microcomputer Graphics, Tektronix 4052.

  12. Environmental relevant concentrations of a chlorpyrifos commercial formulation affect two neotropical fish species, Cheirodon interruptus and Cnesterodon decemmaculatus.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Alejo Fabian; Ballesteros, María Laura; Bonansea, Rocío Inés; Filippi, Iohanna; Amé, María Valeria; Hued, Andrea Cecilia

    2017-12-01

    The increase of cultivated areas together with the intensive use of pesticides have greatly contributed to impair the quality of aquatic systems along different areas of South America. The main goal of the present study was to assess the effects of a commercial formulation of chlorpyrifos at environmentally relevant concentrations on two native fish species, Cheirodon interruptus and Cnesterodon decemmaculatus. Adult individuals were exposed during 48 h to the following concentrations: 0.084 nl/l (Ci-Cf 1) and 0.84 nl/l (Ci-CF 2) in C. interruptus (Ci) of Clorfox (CF), and 0.84 nl/l (Cd-CF 1) and 8.4 nl/l (Cd-CF 2) in C. decemmaculatus (Cd). Fish behavior was evaluated through locomotor activity and space usage variables. The activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in brain and muscle, catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) in brain, liver, muscle and gills, and aspartate amino-transferase (AST), alanine amino-transferase (ALT), AST/ALT ratio and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in liver, were measured. Both locomotor activity and space usage varied between the two species studied and between CF treatments. The enzyme activities showed significant variations in CAT for C. interruptus and in CAT, GST, AChE, AST, and AST/ALT for C. decemmaculatus under the exposure conditions. Given that both species responded to CF and the concentrations we tested are environmentally relevant, the presence of this pesticide in freshwater systems could impose a risk for populations of both native fish studied at field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Biological role and clinical relevance of central and peripheral circadian clocks].

    PubMed

    Husse, J; Leliavski, A; Oster, H

    2013-03-01

    In most species--from cyanobacteria to humans--genetically encoded circadian clocks have evolved to adapt behavioral and physiological processes to environmental changes brought about by the Earth's rotation. Clock disruption, e. g. by shift work, can lead to circadian misalignment, promoting the development of metabolic, immune and cognitive dysfunction. In mammals, a central circadian pacemaker residing in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus resets subordinate, but semi-independent cellular clocks in tissues such as liver, kidney, adrenal, and many brain areas. Peripheral clocks regulate various endocrine, metabolic and immune processes, whereas central oscillators modulate basic as well as higher brain functions. For the clinical practice it is of major importance to be aware of these physiological rhythms in order to correctly interpret laboratory data and other disease symptoms. Chronomedical therapies can reduce side effects and increase efficacy by optimizing the timing of treatment or directly affect disease state by restoring internal circadian synchrony.

  14. Does the choice of display system influence perception and visibility of clinically relevant features in digital pathology images?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimpe, Tom; Rostang, Johan; Avanaki, Ali; Espig, Kathryn; Xthona, Albert; Cocuranu, Ioan; Parwani, Anil V.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-03-01

    Digital pathology systems typically consist of a slide scanner, processing software, visualization software, and finally a workstation with display for visualization of the digital slide images. This paper studies whether digital pathology images can look different when presenting them on different display systems, and whether these visual differences can result in different perceived contrast of clinically relevant features. By analyzing a set of four digital pathology images of different subspecialties on three different display systems, it was concluded that pathology images look different when visualized on different display systems. The importance of these visual differences is elucidated when they are located in areas of the digital slide that contain clinically relevant features. Based on a calculation of dE2000 differences between background and clinically relevant features, it was clear that perceived contrast of clinically relevant features is influenced by the choice of display system. Furthermore, it seems that the specific calibration target chosen for the display system has an important effect on the perceived contrast of clinically relevant features. Preliminary results suggest that calibrating to DICOM GSDF calibration performed slightly worse than sRGB, while a new experimental calibration target CSDF performed better than both DICOM GSDF and sRGB. This result is promising as it suggests that further research work could lead to better definition of an optimized calibration target for digital pathology images resulting in a positive effect on clinical performance.

  15. Molecular driver alterations and their clinical relevance in cancer of unknown primary site

    PubMed Central

    Endris, Volker; Hielscher, Thomas; Lohneis, Philipp; Folprecht, Gunnar; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Dietel, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is defined as metastatic solid malignancy where no primary tumor is detected despite appropriate staging. About 90% of CUP represent adenocarcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma. Since therapy regimens are only modestly effective, identification of the molecular landscape of these neoplasms might be a promising approach to direct CUP therapy and aid in tumor classification. We screened a cohort of 128 patients with adenocarcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma meeting the definition of CUP. Massive parallel multigene sequencing of 50 genes, which had been selected due to their relevance as oncogenic drivers or druggable molecular targets could ultimately be performed on samples from 55 patients for whom complete clinical datasets were also available. Overall, 60 tumor-specific mutations and 29 amplifications/deletions, as revealed by coverage analysis, were detected in 46 cases (84%). The most frequently mutated genes were TP53 (30 cases, 55%), KRAS (9 cases, 16%), CDKN2A (5 cases, 9%), and SMAD4 (5 cases, 9%). The most frequently deleted gene was CDKN2A (8 cases, 15%). KRAS and CDKN2A mutations significantly correlated with poor progression-free survival (PFS) and, in case of KRAS, overall survival (OS). WIldtype TP53 and female sex defined a relatively favorable category, with favorable PFS and OS. 8 cases (15%) harbored mutations that may be targetable by currently approved drugs. Taken together, Mutations of relevant driver genes are present in the vast majority of CUP tumors. Some of them impact on prognosis and a subset is putatively druggable. PMID:27322425

  16. Prevalence and clinical relevance of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor-blocking antibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Diana, T; Krause, J; Olivo, P D; König, J; Kanitz, M; Decallonne, B; Kahaly, G J

    2017-09-01

    The prevalence and clinical relevance of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TSHR) blocking antibodies (TBAb) in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) was investigated. Serum TBAb were measured with a reporter gene bioassay using Chinese hamster ovary cells. Blocking activity was defined as percentage inhibition of luciferase expression relative to induction with bovine TSH alone (cut-off 40% inhibition). All samples were measured for TSHR stimulatory antibody (TSAb) and TSHR binding inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII). A total of 1079 unselected, consecutive patients with AITD and 302 healthy controls were included. All unselected controls were negative for TBAb and TSAb. In contrast, the prevalence of TBAb-positive patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease was 67 of 722 (9·3%) and 15 of 357 (4·2%). Of the 82 TBAb-positive patients, thirty-nine (48%), 33 (40%) and 10 (12%) were hypothyroid, euthyroid and hyperthyroid, respectively. Ten patients were both TBAb- and TSAb-positive (four hypothyroid, two euthyroid and four hyperthyroid). Thyroid-associated orbitopathy was present in four of 82 (4·9%) TBAb-positive patients, with dual TSHR antibody positivity being observed in three. TBAb correlated positively with TBII (r = 0·67, P < 0·001) and negatively with TSAb (r = -0·86, P < 0·05). The percentage of TBII-positive patients was higher the higher the level of inhibition in the TBAb assay. Of the TBAb-positive samples with  > 70% inhibition, 87% were TBII-positive. Functional TSHR antibodies impact thyroid status. TBAb determination is helpful in the evaluation and management of patients with AITD. The TBAb assay is a relevant and important tool to identify potentially reversible hypothyroidism. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  17. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonowski, H.; Hammer, M. U.; Reuter, S.; Bussiahn, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Woedtke, Th. von

    2015-12-15

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100–400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10–200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH{sub 2}O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup •−}) and hydroxyl radicals ({sup •}OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  18. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonowski, H.; Bussiahn, R.; Hammer, M. U.; Weltmann, K.-D.; von Woedtke, Th.; Reuter, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100-400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10-200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH2O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O2•-) and hydroxyl radicals (•OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  19. Clinically relevant quality measures for risk factor control in primary care: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Stefan; Gemperli, Armin; Collet, Tinh-Hai; Bauer, Douglas C; Zimmerli, Lukas; Cornuz, Jacques; Battegay, Edouard; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Kerr, Eve A; Aujesky, Drahomir; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2014-07-15

    primary care, evaluating whether physicians respond appropriately to poor risk factor control, in addition to assessing proportions in control, provide a broader view of the quality of care than relying solely on measures of proportions in control. Such measures could be more clinically relevant and acceptable to physicians than simply reporting levels of control.

  20. [EDNOS is an eating disorder of clinical relevance, on a par with anorexia and bulimia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Dingemans, A E; van Furth, E F

    2015-01-01

    The category 'eating disorder 'not otherwise specified'' (EDNOS) in DSM-IV is restricted to eating disorders of clinical severity that do not completely fulfil the criteria for anorexia and bulimia nervosa. The EDNOS category is, by definition, often regarded as a a residual category and in principle designed to incorporate a small group of patients with atypical characteristics. Health insurance companies argue that the treatment of patients diagnosed with EDNOS should not be treated in mental health institutions and therefore should not get their treatment costs reimbursed by the insurance companies. The most important argument of the insurance companies is that patients in the EDNOS category do not display serious psychiatric symptoms. The aim of this paper is to show that EDNOS is an eating disorder category of clinical relevance. The article provides a critical overview of literature on EDNOS which studies the prevalence, severity and course of the disorder. We also discuss to what extent the fifth version of dsm solves the problems relating to this residual category. We reviewed the literature. The classification given in DSM-IV is not an accurate reflection of clinical reality. Half of the patients presenting with an eating disorder and seeking treatment do meet the criteria for EDNOS. The duration and the severity of eating disorder psychopathology, the presence of comorbidity, the mortality, and the use of the mental health care services by individuals with an eating disorder appear to be very similar in EDNOS patients and in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Eating disorder classifications can be regarded as snapshots taken throughout the course of an illness. Over of the years patients can be afflicted with various subtypes of an eating disorder. DSM-5 places fewer patients in the EDNOS category that did DSM-IV. In the latest version of dsm, namely DSM-5, the number of patients with an eating disorder classified as EDNOS has declined. There

  1. Evidence, Mechanism, and Clinical Relevance of the Transdifferentiation from Lung Adenocarcinoma to Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shenda; Zhou, Shiyu; Qin, Zhen; Yang, Liu; Han, Xiangkun; Yao, Shun; Ji, Hongbin

    2017-03-08

    Lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are two distinct subtypes of non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Interestingly, approximately 4% to 9% of human non-small-cell lung carcinoma tumors contain mixed adenomatous and squamous pathologies in a single lesion, clinically termed adenosquamous cell carcinoma. More important, these two different pathological components frequently share identical oncogenic mutations, indicative of a potential transition. Indeed, recent data have provided convincing evidence in supporting the ADC to SCC transdifferentiation in lungs. In the liver kinase B1 (official name STK11)-deficient mouse model, lung ADC can progressively transdifferentiate to SCC through pathologically mixed adenosquamous cell carcinoma as the intermediate status. Mechanistic studies further identify essential roles of extracellular matrix remodeling and metabolic reprogramming during this phenotypic transition. Small molecular compounds, including lysyl oxidase inhibitors and reactive oxygen species-inducing reagents such as phenformin, significantly accelerate the transition from lung ADC to SCC and thus confer lung tumors with drug resistance. Consistent with these findings, recent clinical studies have shown that epidermal growth factor receptor-mutant lung ADC can transdifferentiate to SCC in relapsed cancer patients. Together, these data support that this phenotypic transition from lung ADC to SCC might represent a novel mechanism for drug resistance. This review will summarize our current understanding of the transdifferentiation from lung ADC to SCC.

  2. Evaluation and clinically relevant applications of a fluorescent imaging analog to fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Rahul A.; Josephson, Lee; Mahmood, Umar

    2009-11-01

    A fluorescent analog to 2-deoxy-2 [18F] fluoro-D-glucose position emission tomography (FDG-PET) would allow for the introduction of metabolic imaging into intraoperative and minimally invasive settings. We present through in vitro and in vivo experimentation an evaluation of 2-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-2-deoxyglucose (2-NBDG), a fluorescently labeled glucose molecule, as a molecular beacon of glucose utilization. The competitive inhibition of 2-NBDG uptake by excess free glucose is directly compared against FDG uptake inhibition in cultured cells. 2-NBDG uptake in the brain of a mouse experiencing a generalized seizure is measured, as well as in subcutaneously implanted tumors in mice during fed and fasting states. Localization of 2-NBDG into malignant tissues is studied by laser scanning microscopy. The