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Sample records for clock genes period

  1. Finding Clocks in Genes: A Bayesian Approach to Estimate Periodicity

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yan; Hong, Christian I.; Lim, Sookkyung; Song, Seongho

    2016-01-01

    Identification of rhythmic gene expression from metabolic cycles to circadian rhythms is crucial for understanding the gene regulatory networks and functions of these biological processes. Recently, two algorithms, JTK_CYCLE and ARSER, have been developed to estimate periodicity of rhythmic gene expression. JTK_CYCLE performs well for long or less noisy time series, while ARSER performs well for detecting a single rhythmic category. However, observing gene expression at high temporal resolution is not always feasible, and many scientists are interested in exploring both ultradian and circadian rhythmic categories simultaneously. In this paper, a new algorithm, named autoregressive Bayesian spectral regression (ABSR), is proposed. It estimates the period of time-course experimental data and classifies gene expression profiles into multiple rhythmic categories simultaneously. Through the simulation studies, it is shown that ABSR substantially improves the accuracy of periodicity estimation and clustering of rhythmic categories as compared to JTK_CYCLE and ARSER for the data with low temporal resolution. Moreover, ABSR is insensitive to rhythmic patterns. This new scheme is applied to existing time-course mouse liver data to estimate period of rhythms and classify the genes into ultradian, circadian, and arrhythmic categories. It is observed that 49.2% of the circadian profiles detected by JTK_CYCLE with 1-hour resolution are also detected by ABSR with only 4-hour resolution. PMID:27340654

  2. Clock genes and cancer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Patricia A; Yang, Xiaoming; Hrushesky, William J M

    2009-12-01

    Period genes ( Per2, Per1) are essential circadian clock genes. They also function as negative growth regulators. Per2 mutant mice show de novo and radiation-induced epithelial hyperplasia, tumors, and an abnormal DNA damage response. Human tumors show Period gene mutations or decreased expression. Other murine clock gene mutations are not associated with a tumor prone phenotype. Shift work and nocturnal light exposure are associated with circadian clock disruption and with increased cancer risk. The mechanisms responsible for the connection between the circadian clock and cancer are not well defined. We propose that circadian disruption per se is not uniformly tumor promoting and the mechanisms for tumor promotion by specific circadian clock disturbances will differ dependent upon the genes and pathways involved. We propose that Period clock gene mutations promote tumorigenesis by unique molecular pathways. Per2 and Per1 modulate beta-catenin and cell proliferation in colon and non-colon cancer cells. Per2 mutation increases intestinal beta-catenin levels and colon polyp formation. Per2 mutation also increases Apc(Min/+)-mediated intestinal and colonic polyp formation. Intestinal tumorigenesis per se may also alter clock function as a result of increased beta-catenin destabilizing PER2 protein. Levels and circadian rhythm of PER2 in Apc(Min/+) mouse intestine are markedly decreased, and selective abnormalities in intestinal clock gene and clock-controlled gene expression are seen. We propose that tumor promotion by loss of PERIOD clock proteins is unique to these clock genes as a result of altered beta-catenin signaling and DNA damage response. PERIOD proteins may offer new targets for cancer prevention and control.

  3. The clock gene Period1 regulates innate routine behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Bechstein, Philipp; Rehbach, Nils-Jörn; Yuhasingham, Gowzekan; Schürmann, Christoph; Göpfert, Melanie; Kössl, Manfred; Maronde, Erik

    2014-04-22

    Laboratory mice are well capable of performing innate routine behaviour programmes necessary for courtship, nest-building and exploratory activities although housed for decades in animal facilities. We found that in mice inactivation of the clock gene Period1 profoundly changes innate routine behaviour programmes like those necessary for courtship, nest building, exploration and learning. These results in wild-type and Period1 mutant mice, together with earlier findings on courtship behaviour in wild-type and period-mutant Drosophila melanogaster, suggest a conserved role of Period-genes on innate routine behaviour. Additionally, both per-mutant flies and Period1-mutant mice display spatial learning and memory deficits. The profound influence of Period1 on routine behaviour programmes in mice, including female partner choice, may be independent of its function as a circadian clock gene, since Period1-deficient mice display normal circadian behaviour.

  4. The Circadian Clock Gene Period1 Connects the Molecular Clock to Neural Activity in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Block, Gene D.; Colwell, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    The neural activity patterns of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons are dynamically regulated throughout the circadian cycle with highest levels of spontaneous action potentials during the day. These rhythms in electrical activity are critical for the function of the circadian timing system and yet the mechanisms by which the molecular clockwork drives changes in the membrane are not well understood. In this study, we sought to examine how the clock gene Period1 (Per1) regulates the electrical activity in the mouse SCN by transiently and selectively decreasing levels of PER1 through use of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide. We found that this treatment effectively reduced SCN neural activity. Direct current injection to restore the normal membrane potential partially, but not completely, returned firing rate to normal levels. The antisense treatment also reduced baseline [Ca2+]i levels as measured by Fura2 imaging technique. Whole cell patch clamp recording techniques were used to examine which specific potassium currents were altered by the treatment. These recordings revealed that the large conductance [Ca2+]i-activated potassium currents were reduced in antisense-treated neurons and that blocking this current mimicked the effects of the anti-sense on SCN firing rate. These results indicate that the circadian clock gene Per1 alters firing rate in SCN neurons and raise the possibility that the large conductance [Ca2+]i-activated channel is one of the targets. PMID:26553726

  5. The Circadian Clock Gene Period1 Connects the Molecular Clock to Neural Activity in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Takashi; Block, Gene D; Colwell, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    The neural activity patterns of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons are dynamically regulated throughout the circadian cycle with highest levels of spontaneous action potentials during the day. These rhythms in electrical activity are critical for the function of the circadian timing system and yet the mechanisms by which the molecular clockwork drives changes in the membrane are not well understood. In this study, we sought to examine how the clock gene Period1 (Per1) regulates the electrical activity in the mouse SCN by transiently and selectively decreasing levels of PER1 through use of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide. We found that this treatment effectively reduced SCN neural activity. Direct current injection to restore the normal membrane potential partially, but not completely, returned firing rate to normal levels. The antisense treatment also reduced baseline [Ca(2+)]i levels as measured by Fura2 imaging technique. Whole cell patch clamp recording techniques were used to examine which specific potassium currents were altered by the treatment. These recordings revealed that the large conductance [Ca(2+)]i-activated potassium currents were reduced in antisense-treated neurons and that blocking this current mimicked the effects of the anti-sense on SCN firing rate. These results indicate that the circadian clock gene Per1 alters firing rate in SCN neurons and raise the possibility that the large conductance [Ca(2+)]i-activated channel is one of the targets.

  6. Glucocorticoid ultradian rhythmicity directs cyclical gene pulsing of the clock gene period 1 in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Conway-Campbell, B L; Sarabdjitsingh, R A; McKenna, M A; Pooley, J R; Kershaw, Y M; Meijer, O C; De Kloet, E R; Lightman, S L

    2010-10-01

    In vivo glucocorticoid (GC) secretion exhibits a distinctive ultradian rhythmicity. The lipophilic hormone can rapidly diffuse into cells, although only the pulse peak is of sufficient amplitude to activate the low affinity glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Discrete pulses readily access brain regions such as the hippocampus where GR expression is enriched and known to regulate neuronal function, including memory and learning processes. In the present study, we have tested the hypothesis that GR brain targets are responsive to ultradian GC rhythmicity. We have used adrenalectomised rats replaced with pulses of corticosterone to determine the transcriptional effects of ultradian pulses in the hippocampus. Confocal microscopy confirmed that each GC pulse results in transient GR nuclear localisation in hippocampal CA1 neurones. Concomitant GR activation and DNA binding was demonstrated by synthetic glucocorticoid response element oligonucleotide binding, and verified for the Clock gene Period 1 promoter region by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Strikingly each GC pulse induced a 'burst' of transcription of Period 1 measured by heterogeneous nuclear RNA quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The net effect of pulsatile GC exposure on accumulation of the mature transcript was also assessed, revealing a plateau of mRNA levels throughout the time course of pulsatile exposure, indicating the pulse timing works optimally for steady state Per1 expression. The plateau dropped to baseline within 120 min of the final pulse, indicating a relatively short half-life for hippocampal Per1. The significance of this strict temporal control is that any perturbation to the pulse frequency or duration would have rapid quantitative effects on the levels of Per1. This in turn could affect hippocampal function, especially circadian related memory and learning processes.

  7. Melanopsin resets circadian rhythms in cells by inducing clock gene Period1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Shuhei; Uehara, Tomoe; Matsuo, Minako; Kikuchi, Yo; Numano, Rika

    2014-02-01

    The biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes are under the control of internal clocks with the period of approximately 24 hr, circadian rhythms. The expression of clock gene Period1 (Per1) oscillates autonomously in cells and is induced immediately after a light pulse. Per1 is an indispensable member of the central clock system to maintain the autonomous oscillator and synchronize environmental light cycle. Per1 expression could be detected by Per1∷luc and Per1∷GFP plasmid DNA in which firefly luciferase and Green Fluorescence Protein were rhythmically expressed under the control of the mouse Per1 promoter in order to monitor mammalian circadian rhythms. Membrane protein, MELANOPSIN is activated by blue light in the morning on the retina and lead to signals transduction to induce Per1 expression and to reset the phase of circadian rhythms. In this report Per1 induction was measured by reporter signal assay in Per1∷luc and Per1∷GFP fibroblast cell at the input process of circadian rhythms. To the result all process to reset the rhythms by Melanopsin is completed in single cell like in the retina projected to the central clock in the brain. Moreover, the phase of circadian rhythm in Per1∷luc cells is synchronized by photo-activated Melanopsin, because the definite peak of luciferase activity in one dish was found one day after light illumination. That is an available means that physiological circadian rhythms could be real-time monitor as calculable reporter (bioluminescent and fluorescent) chronological signal in both single and groups of cells.

  8. Case-control study of the PERIOD3 clock gene length polymorphism and colorectal adenoma formation.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Melannie; Burch, James B; Steck, Susan E; Chen, Chin-Fu; Hurley, Thomas G; Cavicchia, Philip; Ray, Meredith; Shivappa, Nitin; Guess, Jaclyn; Zhang, Hongmei; Youngstedt, Shawn D; Creek, Kim E; Lloyd, Stephen; Yang, Xiaoming; Hébert, James R

    2015-02-01

    Clock genes are expressed in a self-perpetuating, circadian pattern in virtually every tissue including the human gastrointestinal tract. They coordinate cellular processes critical for tumor development, including cell proliferation, DNA damage response and apoptosis. Circadian rhythm disturbances have been associated with an increased risk for colon cancer and other cancers. This mechanism has not been elucidated, yet may involve dysregulation of the 'period' (PER) clock genes, which have tumor suppressor properties. A variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) in the PERIOD3 (PER3) gene has been associated with sleep disorders, differences in diurnal hormone secretion, and increased premenopausal breast cancer risk. Susceptibility related to PER3 has not been examined in conjunction with adenomatous polyps. This exploratory case-control study was the first to test the hypothesis that the 5-repeat PER3 VNTR sequence is associated with increased odds of adenoma formation. Information on demographics, medical history, occupation and lifestyle was collected prior to colonoscopy. Cases (n=49) were individuals with at least one histopathologically confirmed adenoma. Controls (n=97) included patients with normal findings or hyperplastic polyps not requiring enhanced surveillance. Unconditional multiple logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), after adjusting for potential confounding. Adenomas were detected in 34% of participants. Cases were more likely to possess the 5-repeat PER3 genotype relative to controls (4/5 OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 0.9-4.8; 5/5 OR, 5.1; 95% CI, 1.4-18.1; 4/5+5/5 OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.7-5.4). Examination of the Oncomine microarray database indicated lower PERIOD gene expression in adenomas relative to adjacent normal tissue. Results suggest a need for follow-up in a larger sample.

  9. Clock Genes in Glia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chi-Castañeda, Donají

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are periodic patterns in biological processes that allow the organisms to anticipate changes in the environment. These rhythms are driven by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock in vertebrates. At a molecular level, circadian rhythms are regulated by the so-called clock genes, which oscillate in a periodic manner. The protein products of clock genes are transcription factors that control their own and other genes’ transcription, collectively known as “clock-controlled genes.” Several brain regions other than the SCN express circadian rhythms of clock genes, including the amygdala, the olfactory bulb, the retina, and the cerebellum. Glia cells in these structures are expected to participate in rhythmicity. However, only certain types of glia cells may be called “glial clocks,” since they express PER-based circadian oscillators, which depend of the SCN for their synchronization. This contribution summarizes the current information about clock genes in glia cells, their plausible role as oscillators and their medical implications. PMID:27666286

  10. RNAi of the circadian clock gene period disrupts the circadian rhythm but not the circatidal rhythm in the mangrove cricket.

    PubMed

    Takekata, Hiroki; Matsuura, Yu; Goto, Shin G; Satoh, Aya; Numata, Hideharu

    2012-08-23

    The clock mechanism for circatidal rhythm has long been controversial, and its molecular basis is completely unknown. The mangrove cricket, Apteronemobius asahinai, shows two rhythms simultaneously in its locomotor activity: a circatidal rhythm producing active and inactive phases as well as a circadian rhythm modifying the activity intensity of circatidal active phases. The role of the clock gene period (per), one of the key components of the circadian clock in insects, was investigated in the circadian and circatidal rhythms of A. asahinai using RNAi. After injection of double-stranded RNA of per, most crickets did not show the circadian modulation of activity but the circatidal rhythm persisted without a significant difference in the period from controls. Thus, per is functionally involved in the circadian rhythm but plays no role, or a less important role, in the circatidal rhythm. We conclude that the circatidal rhythm in A. asahinai is controlled by a circatidal clock whose molecular mechanism is different from that of the circadian clock.

  11. Expression of the circadian clock gene Period2 in the hippocampus: possible implications for synaptic plasticity and learned behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Louisa M-C; Dragich, Joanna M; Kudo, Takashi; Odom, Irene H; Welsh, David K; O'Dell, Thomas J; Colwell, Christopher S

    2009-01-01

    Genes responsible for generating circadian oscillations are expressed in a variety of brain regions not typically associated with circadian timing. The functions of this clock gene expression are largely unknown, and in the present study we sought to explore the role of the Per2 (Period 2) gene in hippocampal physiology and learned behaviour. We found that PER2 protein is highly expressed in hippocampal pyramidal cell layers and that the expression of both protein and mRNA varies with a circadian rhythm. The peaks of these rhythms occur in the late night or early morning and are almost 180° out-of-phase with the expression rhythms measured from the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the same animals. The rhythms in Per2 expression are autonomous as they are present in isolated hippocampal slices maintained in culture. Physiologically, Per2-mutant mice exhibit abnormal long-term potentiation. The underlying mechanism is suggested by the finding that levels of phosphorylated cAMP-response-element-binding protein, but not phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase, are reduced in hippocampal tissue from mutant mice. Finally, Per2-mutant mice exhibit deficits in the recall of trace, but not cued, fear conditioning. Taken together, these results provide evidence that hippocampal cells contain an autonomous circadian clock. Furthermore, the clock gene Per2 may play a role in the regulation of long-term potentiation and in the recall of some forms of learned behaviour. PMID:19570032

  12. A nondiapausing variant of the flesh fly, Sarcophaga bullata, that shows arrhythmic adult eclosion and elevated expression of two circadian clock genes, period and timeless.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shin G; Han, Bing; Denlinger, David L

    2006-01-01

    We describe a variant of the flesh fly, Sarcophaga bullata, which fails to enter pupal diapause in response to short daylength and low temperatures. This fly also has an arrhythmic adult eclosion pattern: rather than eclosing in early photophase, the variant ecloses arrhythmically throughout the photophase and scotophase. The loss of both diapause (photoperiodic response) and the gating of adult eclosion (presumably a circadian response) suggests that the same clock system is involved in these two responses. An examination of the expression patterns of the clock genes period and timeless demonstrates that both genes are present in the nondiapausing variant, but surprisingly, both genes are expressed at higher levels. This abnormality we observe, possibly the consequence of an upstream clock gene malfunction or a malfunction of the autoregulatory loop, results in disruption of a component of the clock system that is apparently needed for both photoperiodism and circadian rhythmicity.

  13. Expression of clock genes period and timeless in the central nervous system of the Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella.

    PubMed

    Kobelková, Alena; Závodská, Radka; Sauman, Ivo; Bazalová, Olga; Dolezel, David

    2015-04-01

    Homologous circadian genes are found in all insect clocks, but their contribution to species-specific circadian timing systems differs. The aim of this study was to extend research within Lepidoptera to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying circadian clock plasticity and evolution. The Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella (Pyralidae), represents a phylogenetically ancestral lepidopteran species. We have identified circadian rhythms in egg hatching, adult emergence, and adult locomotor activity. Cloning full-length complementary DNAs and further characterization confirmed one copy of period and timeless genes in both sexes. Both per and tim transcripts oscillate in their abundance in E. kuehniella heads under light-dark conditions. PER-like immunoreactivity (PER-lir) was observed in nuclei and cytoplasm of most neurons in the central brain, the ventral part of subesophageal complex, the neurohemal organs, the optic lobes, and eyes. PER-lir in photoreceptor nuclei oscillated during the day with maximal intensity in the light phase of the photoperiodic regime and lack of a signal in the middle of the dark phase. Expression patterns of per and tim messenger RNAs (mRNAs) were revealed in the identical location as the PER-lir was detected. In the photoreceptors, a daily rhythm in the intensity of expression of both per mRNA and tim mRNA was found. These findings suggest E. kuehniella as a potential lepidopteran model for circadian studies. PMID:25637625

  14. Analysis of the genetic structure of allopatric populations of Lutzomyia umbratilis using the period clock gene.

    PubMed

    de Souza Freitas, Moises Thiago; Ríos-Velasquez, Claudia Maria; da Silva, Lidiane Gomes; Costa, César Raimundo Lima; Marcelino, Abigail; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; Balbino, Valdir de Queiroz; Pessoa, Felipe Arley Costa

    2016-02-01

    In South America, Lutzomyia umbratilis is the main vector of Leishmania guyanensis, one of the species involved in the transmission of American tegumentary leishmaniasis. In Brazil, L. umbratilis has been recorded in the Amazon region, and an isolated population has been identified in the state of Pernambuco, Northeastern region. This study assessed the phylogeographic structure of three allopatric Brazilian populations of L. umbratilis. Samples of L. umbratilis were collected from Rio Preto da Eva (north of the Amazon River, Amazonas), from Manacapuru (south of the Amazon River), and from the isolated population in Recife, Pernambuco state. These samples were processed to obtain sequences of the period gene. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of two distinct monophyletic clades: one clade comprised of the Recife and Rio Preto da Eva samples, and one clade comprised of the Manacapuru samples. Comparing the Manacapuru population with the Recife and Rio Preto da Eva populations revealed high indices of interpopulational divergence. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that geographical distance and environmental differences have not modified the ancestral relationship shared by the Recife and Rio Preto da Eva populations. Genetic similarities suggest that, in evolutionary terms, these populations are more closely related to each other than to the Manacapuru population. These results confirm the existence of an L. umbratilis species complex composed of at least two incipient species.

  15. Analysis of the genetic structure of allopatric populations of Lutzomyia umbratilis using the period clock gene.

    PubMed

    de Souza Freitas, Moises Thiago; Ríos-Velasquez, Claudia Maria; da Silva, Lidiane Gomes; Costa, César Raimundo Lima; Marcelino, Abigail; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; Balbino, Valdir de Queiroz; Pessoa, Felipe Arley Costa

    2016-02-01

    In South America, Lutzomyia umbratilis is the main vector of Leishmania guyanensis, one of the species involved in the transmission of American tegumentary leishmaniasis. In Brazil, L. umbratilis has been recorded in the Amazon region, and an isolated population has been identified in the state of Pernambuco, Northeastern region. This study assessed the phylogeographic structure of three allopatric Brazilian populations of L. umbratilis. Samples of L. umbratilis were collected from Rio Preto da Eva (north of the Amazon River, Amazonas), from Manacapuru (south of the Amazon River), and from the isolated population in Recife, Pernambuco state. These samples were processed to obtain sequences of the period gene. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of two distinct monophyletic clades: one clade comprised of the Recife and Rio Preto da Eva samples, and one clade comprised of the Manacapuru samples. Comparing the Manacapuru population with the Recife and Rio Preto da Eva populations revealed high indices of interpopulational divergence. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that geographical distance and environmental differences have not modified the ancestral relationship shared by the Recife and Rio Preto da Eva populations. Genetic similarities suggest that, in evolutionary terms, these populations are more closely related to each other than to the Manacapuru population. These results confirm the existence of an L. umbratilis species complex composed of at least two incipient species. PMID:26655040

  16. Temperature cycle amplitude alters the adult eclosion time and expression pattern of the circadian clock gene period in the onion fly.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yosuke; Watari, Yasuhiko; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Goto, Shin G

    2016-03-01

    Soil temperature cycles are considered to play an important role in the entrainment of circadian clocks of underground insects. However, because of the low conductivity of soil, temperature cycles are gradually dampened and the phase of the temperature cycle is delayed with increasing soil depth. The onion fly, Delia antiqua, pupates at various soil depths, and its eclosion is timed by a circadian clock. This fly is able to compensate for the depth-dependent phase delay of temperature change by advancing the eclosion time with decreasing amplitude of the temperature cycle. Therefore, pupae can eclose at the appropriate time irrespective of their location at any depth. However, the mechanism that regulates eclosion time in response to temperature amplitude is still unknown. To understand whether this mechanism involves the circadian clock or further downstream physiological processes, we examined the expression patterns of period (per), a circadian clock gene, of D. antiqua under temperature cycles that were square wave cycles of 12-h warm phase (W) and 12-h cool phase (C) with the temperature difference of 8 °C (WC 29:21 °C) and 1 °C (WC 25.5:24.5 °C). The phase of oscillation in per expression was found to commence 3.5h earlier under WC 25.5:24.5 °C as compared to WC 29:21 °C. This difference was in close agreement with the eclosion time difference between the two temperature cycles, suggesting that the mechanism that responds to the temperature amplitude involves the circadian clock. PMID:26776097

  17. Clock gene variants differentiate mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika Paulina; Pawlak, Joanna Maria; Maciukiewicz, Malgorzata; Moczko, Jerzy; Wilkosc, Monika; Leszczynska-Rodziewicz, Anna; Zaremba, Dorota; Hauser, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations in clock-related genes were hypothesized to be involved to in the susceptibility of mood disorders MD (both unipolar (UPD) and bipolar (BPD) disorders). In our work we investigated role of gene variants form four core period proteins: CLOCK, ARNTL, TIM and PER3. The total sample comprised from 744 mood disorders inpatients (UPD = 229, BPD = 515) and 635 healthy voluntary controls. The 42 SNPs from four genes of interest were genotyped. We used single polymorphisms, haplotypes, SNPs interactions and prediction analysis using classical statistical and machine learning methods. We observed association between two polymorphisms of CLOCK (rs1801260 and rs11932595) with BPDII and two polymorphisms of TIM (rs2291739, rs11171856) with UPD. We also detected ARNTL haplotype variant (rs1160996C/rs11022779G/rs1122780T) to be associated with increased risk of MD, BPD (both types). We established significant epistatic interaction between PER3 (rs2172563) and ARNTL (rs4146388 and rs7107287) in case of BPD. Additionally relation between PER3 (rs2172563) and CLOCK (rs1268271 and rs3805148) appeared in case of UPD. Classification and Regression Trees (C and RT) showed significant predictive value for 10 polymorphisms in all analyzed genes. However we failed to obtain model with sufficient predictive power. During analyses of sleep disturbances sample, we found carriers of homozygote variants (ARNTL: rs11022778 TT, rs1562438 TT, rs1982350 AA and PER3: rs836755 CC) showing more frequent falling asleep difficulties when compare to other genotypes carriers. Our study suggested a putative role of the CLOCK, TIM, ARNTL and PER3 and polymorphisms in MD susceptibility. In our analyses we showed association of specific gene variants with particular types of MD. We also confirmed necessity of performing separate analyzes for BPD and UPD patients. Comprehensive statistical approach is required even with individual symptoms analyses.

  18. Clock Genes Show Circadian Rhythms in Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, L.; Seon, Y.J.; McHugh, J.; Papagerakis, S.; Papagerakis, P.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous self-sustained oscillations with 24-hour periods that regulate diverse physiological and metabolic processes through complex gene regulation by “clock” transcription factors. The oral cavity is bathed by saliva, and its amount and content are modified within regular daily intervals. The clock mechanisms that control salivary production remain unclear. Our objective was to evaluate the expression and periodicity of clock genes in salivary glands. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry were performed to show circadian mRNA and protein expression and localization of key clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1, and Per2), ion and aqua channel genes (Ae2a, Car2, and Aqp5), and salivary gland markers. Clock gene mRNAs and clock proteins were found differentially expressed in the serous acini and duct cells of all major salivary glands. The expression levels of clock genes and Aqp5 showed regular oscillatory patterns under both light/dark and complete-dark conditions. Bmla1 overexpression resulted in increased Aqp5 expression levels. Analysis of our data suggests that salivary glands have a peripheral clock mechanism that functions both in normal light/dark conditions and in the absence of light. This finding may increase our understanding of the control mechanisms of salivary content and flow. PMID:22699207

  19. Hypothermia modulates circadian clock gene expression in lizard peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Daniela; Frigato, Elena; Vernesi, Cristiano; Foà, Augusto; Foulkes, Nicholas S; Bertolucci, Cristiano

    2007-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms whereby the circadian clock responds to temperature changes are poorly understood. The ruin lizard Podarcis sicula has historically proven to be a valuable vertebrate model for exploring the influence of temperature on circadian physiology. It is an ectotherm that naturally experiences an impressive range of temperatures during the course of the year. However, no tools have been available to dissect the molecular basis of the clock in this organism. Here, we report the cloning of three lizard clock gene homologs (Period2, Cryptochrome1, and Clock) that have a close phylogenetic relationship with avian clock genes. These genes are expressed in many tissues and show a rhythmic expression profile at 29 degrees C in light-dark and constant darkness lighting conditions, with phases comparable to their mammalian and avian counterparts. Interestingly, we show that at low temperatures (6 degrees C), cycling clock gene expression is attenuated in peripheral clocks with a characteristic increase in basal expression levels. We speculate that this represents a conserved vertebrate clock gene response to low temperatures. Furthermore, these results bring new insight into the issue of whether circadian clock function is compatible with hypothermia.

  20. Clock gene evolution and functional divergence.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Eran; Last, Kim S; Olive, Peter J W; Kyriacou, C P

    2004-10-01

    In considering the impact of the earth's changing geophysical conditions during the history of life, it is surprising to learn that the earth's rotational period may have been as short as 4 h, as recently as 1900 million years ago (or 1.9 billion years ago). The implications of such figures for the origin and evolution of clocks are considerable, and the authors speculate on how this short rotational period might have influenced the development of the "protoclock" in early microorganisms, such as the Cyanobacteria, during the geological periodsin which they arose and flourished. They then discuss the subsequent duplication of clock genes that took place around and after the Cambrian period, 543 million years ago, and its consequences. They compare the relative divergences of the canonical clock genes, which reveal the Per family to be the most rapidly evolving. In addition, the authors use a statistical test to predict which residues within the PER and CRY families may have undergone functional specialization.

  1. Rat retina shows robust circadian expression of clock and clock output genes in explant culture

    PubMed Central

    Buonfiglio, Daniella C.; Malan, André; Sandu, Cristina; Jaeger, Catherine; Cipolla-Neto, José; Hicks, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Circadian rhythms are central to vision and retinal physiology. A circadian clock located within the retina controls various rhythmic processes including melatonin synthesis in photoreceptors. In the present study, we evaluated the rhythmic expression of clock genes and clock output genes in retinal explants maintained for several days in darkness. Methods Retinas were dissected from Wistar rats, either wild-type or from the Per1-luciferase transgenic line housed under a daily 12 h:12 h light-dark cycle (LD12/12), and put in culture at zeitgeber time (ZT) 12 on semipermeable membranes. Explants from wild-type rats were collected every 4 h over 3 days, and total RNA was extracted, quantified, and reverse transcribed. Gene expression was assessed with quantitative PCR, and the periodicity of the relative mRNA amounts was assessed with nonlinear least squares fitting to sine wave functions. Bioluminescence in explants from Per1-luciferase rats was monitored for several days under three different culture protocols. Results Rhythmic expression was found for all studied clock genes and for clock downstream targets such as c-fos and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aanat) genes. Clock and output genes cycled with relatively similar periods and acrophases (peaks of expression during subjective night, except c-fos, which peaked around the end of the subjective day). Data for Per1 were confirmed with bioluminescence monitoring, which also permitted culture conditions to be optimized to study the retina clock. Conclusions Our work shows the free-running expression profile of multiple clock genes and potential clock targets in mammalian retinal explants. This research further strengthens the notion that the retina contains a self-sustained oscillator that can be functionally characterized in organotypic culture. PMID:24940028

  2. Short-day and long-day expression patterns of genes involved in the flesh fly clock mechanism: period, timeless, cycle and cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shin G.; Denlinger, David L.

    2002-08-01

    Though our knowledge of the molecular details of the circadian clock has advanced rapidly, the functional elements of the photoperiodic clock remain largely unknown. As a first step to approach this issue, we report here the sequences and expression patterns of period (per), timeless (tim), cycle (cyc) and cryptochrome (cry) mRNAs in the flesh fly Sarcophaga crassipalpis. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the genes in S. crassipalpis show high similarity to homologous genes in other insects that have been investigated. S. crassipalpis TIM has a unique C-terminus that contains a poly Q region. A diel rhythmicity of per and tim mRNA abundance was detected in the adult heads (peak during scotophase), while cry and cyc mRNA abundance remained fairly constant throughout. The abundance of cyc mRNA was quite low when compared to per, tim and cry mRNA. Rearing temperature affected the amount of per and tim mRNAs: abundance of per mRNA increased at 20 degrees C when compared to 25 degrees C, but that of tim mRNA decreased. Photoperiod influenced the expression patterns of per and tim mRNA: the peak of per mRNA expression shifted in concert with onset of the scotophase, while a shift in tim mRNA expression was less pronounced. The amplitude of tim mRNA was severely dampened under long daylength, but that of per mRNA was not affected. These distinct patterns of expression suggest that this information could be used to determine photoperiodic responses such as diapause.

  3. microRNA modulation of circadian clock period and entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hai-Ying M.; Papp, Joseph W.; Varlamova, Olga; Dziema, Heather; Russell, Brandon; Curfman, John P.; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Shimizu, Kimiko; Okamura, Hitoshi; Impey, Soren; Obrietan, Karl

    2007-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, non-coding, RNAs that regulate the stability or translation of mRNA transcripts. Although recent work has implicated miRNAs in development and in disease, the expression and function of miRNAs in the adult mammalian nervous system has not been extensively characterized. Here, we examine the role of two brain-specific miRNAs, miR-219 and miR-132, in modulating the circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. miR-219 is a target of the CLOCK/BMAL1 complex, exhibits robust circadian rhythms of expression and the in vivo knockdown of miR-219 lengthens the circadian period. miR-132 is induced by photic entrainment cues via a MAPK/CREB-dependent mechanism, modulates clock gene expression, and attenuates the entraining effects of light. Collectively, these data reveal miRNAs as clock- and light-regulated genes and provide a mechanistic examination of their roles as effectors of pacemaker activity and entrainment. PMID:17553428

  4. Crosstalk of clock gene expression and autophagy in aging

    PubMed Central

    Kalfalah, Faiza; Janke, Linda; Schiavi, Alfonso; Tigges, Julia; Ix, Alexander; Ventura, Natascia; Boege, Fritz; Reinke, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy and the circadian clock counteract tissue degeneration and support longevity in many organisms. Accumulating evidence indicates that aging compromises both the circadian clock and autophagy but the mechanisms involved are unknown. Here we show that the expression levels of transcriptional repressor components of the circadian oscillator, most prominently the human Period homologue PER2, are strongly reduced in primary dermal fibroblasts from aged humans, while raising the expression of PER2 in the same cells partially restores diminished autophagy levels. The link between clock gene expression and autophagy is corroborated by the finding that the circadian clock drives cell-autonomous, rhythmic autophagy levels in immortalized murine fibroblasts, and that siRNA-mediated downregulation of PER2 decreases autophagy levels while leaving core clock oscillations intact. Moreover, the Period homologue lin-42 regulates autophagy and life span in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved role for Period proteins in autophagy control and aging. Taken together, this study identifies circadian clock proteins as set-point regulators of autophagy and puts forward a model, in which age-related changes of clock gene expression promote declining autophagy levels. PMID:27574892

  5. Circadian expression of clock and putative clock-controlled genes in skeletal muscle of the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Ian P G; Johnston, Ian A

    2012-01-01

    To identify circadian patterns of gene expression in skeletal muscle, adult male zebrafish were acclimated for 2 wk to a 12:12-h light-dark photoperiod and then exposed to continuous darkness for 86 h with ad libitum feeding. The increase in gut food content associated with the subjective light period was much diminished by the third cycle, enabling feeding and circadian rhythms to be distinguished. Expression of zebrafish paralogs of mammalian transcriptional activators of the circadian mechanism (bmal1, clock1, and rora) followed a rhythmic pattern with a ∼24-h periodicity. Peak expression of rora paralogs occurred at the beginning of the subjective light period [Zeitgeber time (ZT)07 and ZT02 for roraa and rorab], whereas the highest expression of bmal1 and clock paralogs occurred 12 h later (ZT13-15 and ZT16 for bmal and clock paralogs). Expression of the transcriptional repressors cry1a, per1a/1b, per2, per3, nr1d2a/2b, and nr1d1 also followed a circadian pattern with peak expression at ZT0-02. Expression of the two paralogs of cry2 occurred in phase with clock1a/1b. Duplicated genes had a high correlation of expression except for paralogs of clock1, nr1d2, and per1, with cry1b showing no circadian pattern. The highest expression difference was 9.2-fold for the activator bmal1b and 51.7-fold for the repressor per1a. Out of 32 candidate clock-controlled genes, only myf6, igfbp3, igfbp5b, and hsf2 showed circadian expression patterns. Igfbp3, igfbp5b, and myf6 were expressed in phase with clock1a/1b and had an average of twofold change in expression from peak to trough, whereas hsf2 transcripts were expressed in phase with cry1a and had a 7.2-fold-change in expression. The changes in expression of clock and clock-controlled genes observed during continuous darkness were also observed at similar ZTs in fish exposed to a normal photoperiod in a separate control experiment. The role of circadian clocks in regulating muscle maintenance and growth are discussed

  6. Mutations in the circadian gene CLOCK in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Alhopuro, Pia; Björklund, Mikael; Sammalkorpi, Heli; Turunen, Mikko; Tuupanen, Sari; Biström, Mia; Niittymäki, Iina; Lehtonen, Heli J; Kivioja, Teemu; Launonen, Virpi; Saharinen, Juha; Nousiainen, Kari; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Nuorva, Kyösti; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Järvinen, Heikki; Orntoft, Torben; Arango, Diego; Lehtonen, Rainer; Karhu, Auli; Taipale, Jussi; Aaltonen, Lauri A

    2010-07-01

    The circadian clock regulates daily variations in physiologic processes. CLOCK acts as a regulator in the circadian apparatus controlling the expression of other clock genes, including PER1. Clock genes have been implicated in cancer-related functions; in this work, we investigated CLOCK as a possible target of somatic mutations in microsatellite unstable colorectal cancers. Combining microarray gene expression data and public gene sequence information, we identified CLOCK as 1 of 790 putative novel microsatellite instability (MSI) target genes. A total of 101 MSI colorectal carcinomas (CRC) were sequenced for a coding microsatellite in CLOCK. The effect of restoring CLOCK expression was studied in LS180 cells lacking wild-type CLOCK by stably expressing GST-CLOCK or glutathione S-transferase empty vector and testing the effects of UV-induced apoptosis and radiation by DNA content analysis using flow cytometry. Putative novel CLOCK target genes were searched by using ChIP-seq. CLOCK mutations occurred in 53% of MSI CRCs. Restoring CLOCK expression in cells with biallelic CLOCK inactivation resulted in protection against UV-induced apoptosis and decreased G(2)-M arrest in response to ionizing radiation. Using ChIP-Seq, novel CLOCK-binding elements were identified near DNA damage genes p21, NBR1, BRCA1, and RAD50. CLOCK is shown to be mutated in cancer, and altered response to DNA damage provides one plausible mechanism of tumorigenesis.

  7. Clock gene variation in Tachycineta swallows.

    PubMed

    Dor, Roi; Cooper, Caren B; Lovette, Irby J; Massoni, Viviana; Bulit, Flor; Liljesthrom, Marcela; Winkler, David W

    2012-01-01

    Many animals use photoperiod cues to synchronize reproduction with environmental conditions and thereby improve their reproductive success. The circadian clock, which creates endogenous behavioral and physiological rhythms typically entrained to photoperiod, is well characterized at the molecular level. Recent work provided evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q length polymorphism and latitude and, within a population, an association with the date of laying and the length of the incubation period. Despite relatively high overall breeding synchrony, the timing of clutch initiation has a large impact on the fitness of swallows in the genus Tachycineta. We compared length polymorphism in the Clock poly-Q region among five populations from five different Tachycineta species that breed across a hemisphere-wide latitudinal gradient (Fig. 1). Clock poly-Q variation was not associated with latitude; however, there was an association between Clock poly-Q allele diversity and the degree of clutch size decline within breeding seasons. We did not find evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q variation and date of clutch initiation in for any of the five Tachycineta species, nor did we found a relationship between incubation duration and Clock genotype. Thus, there is no general association between latitude, breeding phenology, and Clock polymorphism in this clade of closely related birds.Figure 1Photos of Tachycineta swallows that were used in this study: A) T. bicolor from Ithaca, New York, B) T. leucorrhoa from Chascomús, Argentina, C) T. albilinea from Hill Bank, Belize, D) T. meyeni from Puerto Varas, Chile, and E) T. thalassina from Mono Lake, California, Photographers: B: Valentina Ferretti; A, C-E: David Winkler.

  8. Body weight, metabolism and clock genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Biological rhythms are present in the lives of almost all organisms ranging from plants to more evolved creatures. These oscillations allow the anticipation of many physiological and behavioral mechanisms thus enabling coordination of rhythms in a timely manner, adaption to environmental changes and more efficient organization of the cellular processes responsible for survival of both the individual and the species. Many components of energy homeostasis exhibit circadian rhythms, which are regulated by central (suprachiasmatic nucleus) and peripheral (located in other tissues) circadian clocks. Adipocyte plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis, the signaling of satiety and cellular differentiation and proliferation. Also, the adipocyte circadian clock is probably involved in the control of many of these functions. Thus, circadian clocks are implicated in the control of energy balance, feeding behavior and consequently in the regulation of body weight. In this regard, alterations in clock genes and rhythms can interfere with the complex mechanism of metabolic and hormonal anticipation, contributing to multifactorial diseases such as obesity and diabetes. The aim of this review was to define circadian clocks by describing their functioning and role in the whole body and in adipocyte metabolism, as well as their influence on body weight control and the development of obesity. PMID:20712885

  9. Body weight, metabolism and clock genes.

    PubMed

    Zanquetta, Melissa M; Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia; Monteiro, Maria Beatriz; Villares, Sandra Mf

    2010-08-16

    Biological rhythms are present in the lives of almost all organisms ranging from plants to more evolved creatures. These oscillations allow the anticipation of many physiological and behavioral mechanisms thus enabling coordination of rhythms in a timely manner, adaption to environmental changes and more efficient organization of the cellular processes responsible for survival of both the individual and the species. Many components of energy homeostasis exhibit circadian rhythms, which are regulated by central (suprachiasmatic nucleus) and peripheral (located in other tissues) circadian clocks. Adipocyte plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis, the signaling of satiety and cellular differentiation and proliferation. Also, the adipocyte circadian clock is probably involved in the control of many of these functions. Thus, circadian clocks are implicated in the control of energy balance, feeding behavior and consequently in the regulation of body weight. In this regard, alterations in clock genes and rhythms can interfere with the complex mechanism of metabolic and hormonal anticipation, contributing to multifactorial diseases such as obesity and diabetes. The aim of this review was to define circadian clocks by describing their functioning and role in the whole body and in adipocyte metabolism, as well as their influence on body weight control and the development of obesity.

  10. Chronic inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum calcium-release channels and calcium-ATPase lengthens the period of hepatic clock gene Per1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The role played by calcium as a regulator of circadian rhythms is not well understood. The effect of the pharmacological inhibition of the ryanodine receptor (RyR), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), and endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA), as well as the intracellular Ca2+-chelator BAPTA-AM was explored on the 24-h rhythmicity of the liver-clock protein PER1 in an experimental model of circadian synchronization by light and restricted-feeding schedules. Methods Liver explants from Period1-luciferase (Per1-luc) transgenic rats with either free food access or with a restricted meal schedule were treated for several days with drugs to inhibit the activity of IP3Rs (2-APB), RyRs (ryanodine), or SERCA (thapsigargin) as well as to suppress intracellular calcium fluctuations (BAPTA-AM). The period of Per1-luc expression was measured during and after drug administration. Results Liver explants from rats fed ad libitum showed a lengthened period in response to all the drugs tested. The pharmacological treatments of the explants from meal-entrained rats induced the same pattern, with the exception of the ryanodine treatment which, unexpectedly, did not modify the Per1-luc period. All effects associated with drug application were reversed after washout, indicating that none of the pharmacological treatments was toxic to the liver cultures. Conclusions Our data suggest that Ca2+ mobilized from internal deposits modulates the molecular circadian clock in the liver of rats entrained by light and by restricted meal access. PMID:21740569

  11. Coexisting chaotic and periodic dynamics in clock escapements.

    PubMed

    Moon, Francis C; Stiefel, Preston D

    2006-09-15

    This paper addresses the nature of noise in machines. As a concrete example, we examine the dynamics of clock escapements from experimental, historical and analytical points of view. Experiments on two escapement mechanisms from the Reuleaux kinematic collection at Cornell University are used to illustrate chaotic-like noise in clocks. These vibrations coexist with the periodic dynamics of the balance wheel or pendulum. A mathematical model is presented that shows how self-generated chaos in clocks can break the dry friction in the gear train. This model is shown to exhibit a strange attractor in the structural vibration of the clock. The internal feedback between the oscillator and the escapement structure is similar to anti-control of chaos models.

  12. Circadian rhythms and clock genes in psychotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Elaine Waddington; Coutu, Daniel L; Cermakian, Nicolas; Boivin, Diane B

    2010-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence suggest that a disordered circadian system contributes to the etiology and symptomatology of major psychiatric disorders. Sleep disturbances, particularly rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, have been observed in bipolar affective disorder (BPD) and schizophrenia. Therapies aimed at altering the timing and duration of sleep and realigning circadian rhythms, including sleep scheduling, wake extension, light therapy and drug therapies that alter sleep and circadian rhythms appear beneficial for affective disorders. Interventional studies aiming to correct sleep and circadian disturbances in schizophrenia are scarce, although exogenous melatonin has been shown to improve both sleep structure and psychotic symptoms. The study of molecular clock mechanisms in psychiatric disorders is also gaining interest. Genetics studies have found associations with CLOCK, PERIOD1, PERIOD3, and TIMELESS in schizophrenia. Most research on BPD has focused on polymorphisms of CLOCK, but the lithium target GSK-3 may also be significant. New research examining the role of circadian rhythms and clock genes in major mental illness is likely to produce rapid advances in circadian-based therapeutics.

  13. Persistence, period and precision of autonomous cellular oscillators from the zebrafish segmentation clock.

    PubMed

    Webb, Alexis B; Lengyel, Iván M; Jörg, David J; Valentin, Guillaume; Jülicher, Frank; Morelli, Luis G; Oates, Andrew C

    2016-02-13

    In vertebrate development, the sequential and rhythmic segmentation of the body axis is regulated by a "segmentation clock". This clock is comprised of a population of coordinated oscillating cells that together produce rhythmic gene expression patterns in the embryo. Whether individual cells autonomously maintain oscillations, or whether oscillations depend on signals from neighboring cells is unknown. Using a transgenic zebrafish reporter line for the cyclic transcription factor Her1, we recorded single tailbud cells in vitro. We demonstrate that individual cells can behave as autonomous cellular oscillators. We described the observed variability in cell behavior using a theory of generic oscillators with correlated noise. Single cells have longer periods and lower precision than the tissue, highlighting the role of collective processes in the segmentation clock. Our work reveals a population of cells from the zebrafish segmentation clock that behave as self-sustained, autonomous oscillators with distinctive noisy dynamics.

  14. Daily Rhythmicity of Clock Gene Transcripts in Atlantic Cod Fast Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lazado, Carlo C.; Kumaratunga, Hiruni P. S.; Nagasawa, Kazue; Babiak, Igor; Giannetto, Alessia; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2014-01-01

    The classical notion of a centralized clock that governs circadian rhythmicity has been challenged with the discovery of peripheral oscillators that enable organisms to cope with daily changes in their environment. The present study aimed to identify the molecular clock components in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and to investigate their daily gene expression in fast skeletal muscle. Atlantic cod clock genes were closely related to their orthologs in teleosts and tetrapods. Synteny was conserved to varying degrees in the majority of the 18 clock genes examined. In particular, aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like 2 (arntl2), RAR-related orphan receptor A (rora) and timeless (tim) displayed high degrees of conservation. Expression profiling during the early ontogenesis revealed that some transcripts were maternally transferred, namely arntl2, cryptochrome 1b and 2 (cry1b and cry2), and period 2a and 2b (per2a and per2b). Most clock genes were ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, suggesting the possible existence of multiple peripheral clock systems in Atlantic cod. In particular, they were all detected in fast skeletal muscle, with the exception of neuronal PAS (Per-Arnt-Single-minded) domain-containing protein (npas1) and rora. Rhythmicity analysis revealed 8 clock genes with daily rhythmic expression, namely arntl2, circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (clock), npas2, cry2, cry3 per2a, nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1 (nr1d1), and nr1d2a. Transcript levels of the myogenic genes myogenic factor 5 (myf5) and muscleblind-like 1 (mbnl1) strongly correlated with clock gene expression. This is the first study to unravel the molecular components of peripheral clocks in Atlantic cod. Taken together, our data suggest that the putative clock system in fast skeletal muscle of Atlantic cod has regulatory implications on muscle physiology, particularly in the expression of genes related to myogenesis. PMID:24921252

  15. The Tibetan medicine Zuotai influences clock gene expression in the liver of mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huan; Li, Wen-Kai; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Wei, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The circadian clock is involved in drug metabolism, efficacy and toxicity. Drugs could in turn affect the biological clock as a mechanism of their actions. Zuotai is an essential component of many popular Tibetan medicines for sedation, tranquil and “detoxification,” and is mainly composed of metacinnabar (β-HgS). The pharmacological and/or toxicological basis of its action is unknown. This study aimed to examine the effect of Zuotai on biological clock gene expression in the liver of mice. Materials and methods. Mice were orally given Zuotai (10 mg/kg, 1.5-fold of clinical dose) daily for 7 days, and livers were collected every 4 h during the 24 h period. Total RNA was extracted and subjected to real-time RT-PCR analysis of circadian clock gene expression. Results. Zuotai decreased the oscillation amplitude of the clock core gene Clock, neuronal PAS domain protein 2 (Npas2), Brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1 (Bmal1) at 10:00. For the clock feedback negative control genes, Zuotai had no effect on the oscillation of the clock gene Cryptochrome (Cry1) and Period genes (Per1–3). For the clock-driven target genes, Zuotai increased the oscillation amplitude of the PAR-bZip family member D-box-binding protein (Dbp), decreased nuclear factor interleukin 3 (Nfil3) at 10:00, but had no effect on thyrotroph embryonic factor (Tef); Zuotai increased the expression of nuclear receptor Rev-Erbα (Nr1d1) at 18:00, but had little influence on the nuclear receptor Rev-Erbβ (Nr1d2) and RORα. Conclusion. The Tibetan medicine Zuotai could influence the expression of clock genes, which could contribute to pharmacological and/or toxicological effects of Zuotai. PMID:26855871

  16. Harmine lengthens circadian period of the mammalian molecular clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Saori; Tomita, Tatsunosuke; Miyazaki, Koyomi; Itoh, Nanako; Yasumoto, Yuki; Oike, Hideaki; Doi, Ryosuke; Oishi, Katsutaka

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock is a cell-autonomous endogenous system that generates circadian rhythms in the behavior and physiology of most organisms. We previously reported that the harmala alkaloid, harmine, lengthens the circadian period of Bmal1 transcription in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Clock protein dynamics were examined using real-time reporter assays of PER2::LUC to determine the effects of harmine on the central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Harmine significantly lengthened the period of PER2::LUC expression in embryonic fibroblasts, in neuronal cells differentiated from neuronal progenitor cells and in SCN slices obtained from PER2::LUC mice. Although harmine did not induce the transient mRNA expression of clock genes such as Per1, Per2 and Bmal1 in embryonic fibroblasts, it significantly extended the half-life of PER2::LUC protein in neuronal cells and SCN slices. Harmine might lengthen the circadian period of the molecular clock by increasing PER2 protein stability in the SCN.

  17. Clock genes in hypertension: novel insights from rodent models.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jacob; Diaz, Alexander N; Gumz, Michelle L

    2014-10-01

    The circadian clock plays an integral role in the regulation of physiological processes, including the regulation of blood pressure. However, deregulation of the clock can lead to pathophysiological states including hypertension. Recent work has implicated the circadian clock genes in the regulation of processes in the heart, kidney, vasculature, and the metabolic organs, which are all critical in the regulation of the blood pressure. The goal of this review is to provide an introduction and general overview into the role of circadian clock genes in the regulation of blood pressure with a focus on their deregulation in the etiology of hypertension. This review will focus on the core circadian clock genes CLOCK, BMAL1, Per, and Cry.

  18. The Physiological Period Length of the Human Circadian Clock In Vivo Is Directly Proportional to Period in Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Moriggi, Ermanno; Revell, Victoria L.; Hack, Lisa M.; Lockley, Steven W.; Arendt, Josephine; Skene, Debra J.; Meier, Fides; Izakovic, Jan; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Cajochen, Christian; Sergeeva, Oksana J.; Cheresiz, Sergei V.; Danilenko, Konstantin V.; Eckert, Anne; Brown, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Diurnal behavior in humans is governed by the period length of a circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the brain hypothalamus. Nevertheless, the cell-intrinsic mechanism of this clock is present in most cells of the body. We have shown previously that for individuals of extreme chronotype (“larks” and “owls”), clock properties measured in human fibroblasts correlated with extreme diurnal behavior. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we have measured circadian period in human primary fibroblasts taken from normal individuals and, for the first time, compared it directly with physiological period measured in vivo in the same subjects. Human physiological period length was estimated via the secretion pattern of the hormone melatonin in two different groups of sighted subjects and one group of totally blind subjects, each using different methods. Fibroblast period length was measured via cyclical expression of a lentivirally delivered circadian reporter. Within each group, a positive linear correlation was observed between circadian period length in physiology and in fibroblast gene expression. Interestingly, although blind individuals showed on average the same fibroblast clock properties as sighted ones, their physiological periods were significantly longer. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the period of human circadian behaviour is mostly driven by cellular clock properties in normal individuals and can be approximated by measurement in peripheral cells such as fibroblasts. Based upon differences among sighted and blind subjects, we also speculate that period can be modified by prolonged unusual conditions such as the total light deprivation of blindness. PMID:21042402

  19. Visualizing and Quantifying Intracellular Behavior and Abundance of the Core Circadian Clock Protein PERIOD2.

    PubMed

    Smyllie, Nicola J; Pilorz, Violetta; Boyd, James; Meng, Qing-Jun; Saer, Ben; Chesham, Johanna E; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Krogager, Toke P; Spiller, David G; Boot-Handford, Raymond; White, Michael R H; Hastings, Michael H; Loudon, Andrew S I

    2016-07-25

    Transcriptional-translational feedback loops (TTFLs) are a conserved molecular motif of circadian clocks. The principal clock in mammals is the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. In SCN neurons, auto-regulatory feedback on core clock genes Period (Per) and Cryptochrome (Cry) following nuclear entry of their protein products is the basis of circadian oscillation [1, 2]. In Drosophila clock neurons, the movement of dPer into the nucleus is subject to a circadian gate that generates a delay in the TTFL, and this delay is thought to be critical for oscillation [3, 4]. Analysis of the Drosophila clock has strongly influenced models of the mammalian clock, and such models typically infer complex spatiotemporal, intracellular behaviors of mammalian clock proteins. There are, however, no direct measures of the intracellular behavior of endogenous circadian proteins to support this: dynamic analyses have been limited and often have no circadian dimension [5-7]. We therefore generated a knockin mouse expressing a fluorescent fusion of native PER2 protein (PER2::VENUS) for live imaging. PER2::VENUS recapitulates the circadian functions of wild-type PER2 and, importantly, the behavior of PER2::VENUS runs counter to the Drosophila model: it does not exhibit circadian gating of nuclear entry. Using fluorescent imaging of PER2::VENUS, we acquired the first measures of mobility, molecular concentration, and localization of an endogenous circadian protein in individual mammalian cells, and we showed how the mobility and nuclear translocation of PER2 are regulated by casein kinase. These results provide new qualitative and quantitative insights into the cellular mechanism of the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:27374340

  20. l-Ornithine affects peripheral clock gene expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Takafumi; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Mari; Nakamura, Kaai; Hamaguchi, Yutaro; Ikeda, Yuko; Ishida, Yuko; Wang, Guanying; Shirakawa, Chise; Tanihata, Yoko; Ohara, Kazuaki; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral circadian clock is entrained by factors in the external environment such as scheduled feeding, exercise, and mental and physical stresses. In addition, recent studies in mice demonstrated that some food components have the potential to control the peripheral circadian clock during scheduled feeding, although information about these components remains limited. l-Ornithine is a type of non-protein amino acid that is present in foods and has been reported to have various physiological functions. In human trials, for example, l-ornithine intake improved a subjective index of sleep quality. Here we demonstrate, using an in vivo monitoring system, that repeated oral administration of l-ornithine at an early inactive period in mice induced a phase advance in the rhythm of PER2 expression. By contrast, l-ornithine administration to mouse embryonic fibroblasts did not affect the expression of PER2, indicating that l-ornithine indirectly alters the phase of PER2. l-Ornithine also increased plasma levels of insulin, glucose and glucagon-like peptide-1 alongside mPer2 expression, suggesting that it exerts its effects probably via insulin secretion. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that l-ornithine affects peripheral clock gene expression and may expand the possibilities of L-ornithine as a health food. PMID:27703199

  1. The molecular clock regulates circadian transcription of tissue factor gene.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohkura, Naoki

    2013-02-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is involved in endotoxin-induced inflammation and mortality. We found that the circadian expression of TF mRNA, which peaked at the day to night transition (activity onset), was damped in the liver of Clock mutant mice. Luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses using embryonic fibroblasts derived from wild-type or Clock mutant mice showed that CLOCK is involved in transcription of the TF gene. Furthermore, the results of real-time luciferase reporter experiments revealed that the circadian expression of TF mRNA is regulated by clock molecules through a cell-autonomous mechanism via an E-box element located in the promoter region.

  2. Cloning, tissue expression pattern and daily rhythms of Period1, Period2, and Clock transcripts in the flatfish Senegalese sole, Solea senegalensis.

    PubMed

    Martín-Robles, Águeda J; Whitmore, David; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Pendón, Carlos; Muñoz-Cueto, José A

    2012-07-01

    An extensive network of endogenous oscillators governs vertebrate circadian rhythmicity. At the molecular level, they are composed of a set of clock genes that participate in transcriptional-translational feedback loops to control their own expression and that of downstream output genes. These clocks are synchronized with the environment, although entrainment by external periodic cues remains little explored in fish. In this work, partial cDNA sequences of clock genes representing both positive (Clock) and negative (Period1, Period2) elements of the molecular feedback loops were obtained from the nocturnal flatfish Senegalese sole, a relevant species for aquaculture and chronobiology. All of the above genes exhibited high identities with their respective teleost clock genes, and Per-Arnt-Sim or basic helix-loop-helix binding domains were recognized in their primary structure. They showed a widespread distribution through the animal body and some of them displayed daily mRNA rhythms in central (retina, optic tectum, diencephalon, and cerebellum) and peripheral (liver) tissues. These rhythms were most robust in retina and liver, exhibiting marked Period1 and Clock daily oscillations in transcript levels as revealed by ANOVA and cosinor analysis. Interestingly, expression profiles were inverted in retina and optic tectum compared to liver. Such differences suggest the existence of tissue-dependent zeitgebers for clock gene expression in this species (i.e., light for retina and optic tectum and feeding time for liver). This study provides novel insight into the location of the molecular clocks (central vs. peripheral) and their different phasing and synchronization pathways, which contributes to better understand the teleost circadian systems and its plasticity.

  3. The Clock gene clone and its circadian rhythms in Pelteobagrus vachelli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Chuanjie; Shao, Ting

    2015-05-01

    The Clock gene, a key molecule in circadian systems, is widely distributed in the animal kingdom. We isolated a 936-bp partial cDNA sequence of the Clock gene ( Pva-clock) from the darkbarbel catfish Pelteobagrus vachelli that exhibited high identity with Clock genes of other species of fish and animals (65%-88%). The putative domains included a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain and two period-ARNT-single-minded (PAS) domains, which were also similar to those in other species of fish and animals. Pva-Clock was primarily expressed in the brain, and was detected in all of the peripheral tissues sampled. Additionally, the pattern of Pva-Clock expression over a 24-h period exhibited a circadian rhythm in the brain, liver and intestine, with the acrophase at zeitgeber time 21:35, 23:00, and 23:23, respectively. Our results provide insight into the function of the molecular Clock of P. vachelli.

  4. Influence of photoperiodic history on clock genes and the circadian pacemaker in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Rohleder, Nils; Langer, Christina; Maus, Christian; Spiwoks-Becker, Isabella; Emser, Angela; Engel, Lydia; Spessert, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    The influence of seasonal lighting conditions on expression of clock genes and the circadian pacemaker was investigated in the rat retina. For this purpose, the 24-h profiles of nine clock genes (bmal1, clock, per1, per2, per3, dec1, dec2, cry1 and cry 2) and the arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase gene as an indicator of the circadian pacemaker output were compared between light-dark periods of 8 : 16 and 16 : 8 h. The photoperiod influenced the daily patterns of the amount of transcript for per1, per3, dec2 and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase. This indicates that photoperiodic information modulates clock gene expression in addition to the circadian pacemaker of the retina. Under constant darkness, photoperiod-dependent changes in the daily profile of the level of transcript persisted for the arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase gene but not for any of the clock genes. Hence, quantitative expression of each clock gene is influenced by the photoperiod only under the acute light-dark cycle, whereas the pacemaker is capable of storing photoperiodic information from past cycles.

  5. Deregulated expression of circadian clock and clock-controlled cell cycle genes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sobia; Munawar, Mustafa; Shahid, Adeela; Malik, Meera; Ullah, Hafeez; Fatima, Warda; Mohsin, Shahida; Mahmood, Saqib

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous and self-sustained oscillations of multiple biological processes with approximately 24-h rhythmicity. Circadian genes and their protein products constitute the molecular components of the circadian oscillator that form positive/negative feedback loops and generate circadian rhythms. The circadian regulation extends from core clock genes to various clock-controlled genes that include various cell cycle genes. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes, therefore, may lead to genomic instability and accelerated cellular proliferation potentially promoting carcinogenesis. The current study encompasses the investigation of simultaneous expression of four circadian clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1 and Per2) and three clock-controlled cell cycle genes (Myc, Cyclin D1 and Wee1) at mRNA level and determination of serum melatonin levels in peripheral blood samples of 37 CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) patients and equal number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls in order to indicate association between deregulated circadian clock and manifestation of CLL. Results showed significantly down-regulated expression of Bmal1, Per1, Per2 and Wee1 and significantly up-regulated expression of Myc and Cyclin D1 (P < 0.0001) in CLL patients as compared to healthy controls. When expression of these genes was compared between shift-workers and non-shift-workers within the CLL group, the expression was found more aberrant in shift-workers as compared to non-shift-workers. However, this difference was found statistically significant for Myc and Cyclin D1 only (P < 0.05). Serum melatonin levels were found significantly low (P < 0.0001) in CLL subjects as compared to healthy controls whereas melatonin levels were found still lower in shift-workers as compared to non-shift-workers within CLL group (P < 0.01). Our results suggest that aberrant expression of circadian clock genes can lead to aberrant expression of their downstream targets that are

  6. Circadian rhythms in the CNS and peripheral clock disorders: human sleep disorders and clock genes.

    PubMed

    Ebisawa, Takashi

    2007-02-01

    Genetic analyses of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD), such as familial advanced sleep phase syndrome (ASPS) and delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS), and morningness-eveningness revealed the relationship between variations in clock genes and diurnal change in human behaviors. Variations such as T3111C in the Clock gene are reportedly associated with morningness-eveningness. Two of the pedigrees of familial ASPS (FASPS) are caused by mutations in clock genes: the S662G mutation in the Per2 gene or the T44A mutation in the casein kinase 1 delta (CK1delta) gene, although these mutations are not found in other pedigrees of FASPS. As for DSPS, a missense variation in the Per3 gene is identified as a risk factor, while the one in the CK1epsilon gene is thought to be protective. These findings suggest that further, as yet unidentified, gene variations are involved in human circadian activity. Many of the CRSD-relevant variations reported to date seem to affect the phosphorylation status of the clock proteins. A recent study using mathematical models of circadian rhythm generation has provided a new insight into the role of phosphorylation in the molecular mechanisms of these disorders. PMID:17299246

  7. Discrete gene replication events drive coupling between the cell cycle and circadian clocks

    PubMed Central

    Paijmans, Joris; Bosman, Mark; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Lubensky, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Many organisms possess both a cell cycle to control DNA replication and a circadian clock to anticipate changes between day and night. In some cases, these two rhythmic systems are known to be coupled by specific, cross-regulatory interactions. Here, we use mathematical modeling to show that, additionally, the cell cycle generically influences circadian clocks in a nonspecific fashion: The regular, discrete jumps in gene-copy number arising from DNA replication during the cell cycle cause a periodic driving of the circadian clock, which can dramatically alter its behavior and impair its function. A clock built on negative transcriptional feedback either phase-locks to the cell cycle, so that the clock period tracks the cell division time, or exhibits erratic behavior. We argue that the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus has evolved two features that protect its clock from such disturbances, both of which are needed to fully insulate it from the cell cycle and give it its observed robustness: a phosphorylation-based protein modification oscillator, together with its accompanying push–pull read-out circuit that responds primarily to the ratios of different phosphoform concentrations, makes the clock less susceptible to perturbations in protein synthesis; the presence of multiple, asynchronously replicating copies of the same chromosome diminishes the effect of replicating any single copy of a gene. PMID:27035936

  8. Glucocorticoids Affect 24 h Clock Genes Expression in Human Adipose Tissue Explant Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Abellán, Purificación; Díez-Noguera, Antoni; Madrid, Juan A.; Luján, Juan A.; Ordovás, José M.; Garaulet, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Aims to examine firstly whether CLOCK exhibits a circadian expression in human visceral (V) and subcutaneous (S) adipose tissue (AT) in vitro as compared with BMAL1 and PER2, and secondly to investigate the possible effect of the glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone (DEX) on positive and negative clock genes expression. Subjects and Methods VAT and SAT biopsies were obtained from morbid obese women (body mass index≥40 kg/m2) (n = 6). In order to investigate rhythmic expression pattern of clock genes and the effect of DEX on CLOCK, PER2 and BMAL1 expression, control AT (without DEX) and AT explants treated with DEX (2 hours) were cultured during 24 h and gene expression was analyzed at the following times: 10:00 h, 14:00 h, 18:00 h, 22:00 h, 02:00 h and 06:00 h, using qRT-PCR. Results CLOCK, BMAL1 and PER2 expression exhibited circadian patterns in both VAT and SAT explants that were adjusted to a typical 24 h sinusoidal curve. PER2 expression (negative element) was in antiphase with respect to CLOCK and in phase with BMAL1 expression (both positive elements) in the SAT (situation not present in VAT). A marked effect of DEX exposure on both positive and negative clock genes expression patterns was observed. Indeed, DEX treatment modified the rhythmicity pattern towards altered patterns with a period lower than 24 hours in all genes and in both tissues. Conclusions 24 h patterns in CLOCK and BMAL1 (positive clock elements) and PER2 (negative element) mRNA levels were observed in human adipose explants. These patterns were altered by dexamethasone exposure. PMID:23251369

  9. The clock protein period 2 synchronizes mitotic expansion and decidual transformation of human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Muter, Joanne; Lucas, Emma S; Chan, Yi-Wah; Brighton, Paul J; Moore, Jonathan D; Lacey, Lauren; Quenby, Siobhan; Lam, Eric W-F; Brosens, Jan J

    2015-04-01

    Implantation requires coordinated interactions between the conceptus and surrounding decidual cells, but the involvement of clock genes in this process is incompletely understood. Circadian oscillations are predicated on transcriptional-translational feedback loops, which balance the activities of the transcriptional activators CLOCK (circadian locomotor output cycles kaput) and brain muscle arnt-like 1 and repressors encoded by PER (Period) and Cryptochrome genes. We show that loss of PER2 expression silences circadian oscillations in decidualizing human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs). Down-regulation occurred between 12 and 24 hours following differentiation and coincided with reduced CLOCK binding to a noncanonical E-box enhancer in the PER2 promoter. RNA sequencing revealed that premature inhibition of PER2 by small interfering RNA knockdown leads to a grossly disorganized decidual response. Gene ontology analysis highlighted a preponderance of cell cycle regulators among the 1121 genes perturbed upon PER2 knockdown. Congruently, PER2 inhibition abrogated mitotic expansion of differentiating HESCs by inducing cell cycle block at G2/M. Analysis of 70 midluteal endometrial biopsies revealed an inverse correlation between PER2 transcript levels and the number of miscarriages in women suffering reproductive failure (Spearman rank test, ρ = -0.3260; P = 0.0046). Thus, PER2 synchronizes endometrial proliferation with initiation of aperiodic decidual gene expression; uncoupling of these events may cause recurrent pregnancy loss. PMID:25573754

  10. Association between Circadian Clock Genes and Diapause Incidence in Drosophila triauraria

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Masa-Toshi

    2011-01-01

    Diapause is an adaptive response triggered by seasonal photoperiodicity to overcome unfavorable seasons. The photoperiodic clock is a system that controls seasonal physiological processes, but our knowledge about its physiological mechanisms and genetic architecture remains incomplete. The circadian clock is another system that controls daily rhythmic physiological phenomena. It has been argued that there is a connection between the two clocks. To examine the genetic connection between them, we analyzed the associations of five circadian clock genes (period, timeless, Clock, cycle and cryptochrome) with the occurrence of diapause in Drosophila triauraria, which shows a robust reproductive diapause with clear photoperiodicity. Non-diapause strains found in low latitudes were compared in genetic crosses with the diapause strain, in which the diapause trait is clearly dominant. Single nucleotide polymorphism and deletion analyses of the five circadian clock genes in backcross progeny revealed that allelic differences in timeless and cryptochrome between the strains were additively associated with the differences in the incidence of diapause. This suggests that there is a molecular link between certain circadian clock genes and the occurrence of diapause. PMID:22164210

  11. Temporal Expression of the Clock Genes in the Water Flea Daphnia pulex (Crustacea: Cladocera).

    PubMed

    Bernatowicz, Piotr P; Kotwica-Rolinska, Joanna; Joachimiak, Ewa; Sikora, Anna; Polanska, Marta A; Pijanowska, Joanna; Bębas, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    The timekeeping mechanisms that operate at the core of circadian clocks (oscillators) are based on interacting molecular feedback loops consisting of clock and clock-associated genes. However, there is a lack of comprehensive studies on the expression of clock genes (particularly those forming its core) in single crustacean species at the mRNA and protein levels, and these studies could serve as a basis for constructing a model of the crustacean molecular oscillator. Studies on Daphnia pulex are well suited to fill this gap because this species is the only representative crustacean whose genome has been sequenced. We analyzed the abundance of 20 gene transcripts throughout the day in the whole bodies of D. pulex (single clone); we found that 15 of these genes were transcriptionally active, and most had daily expression level changes. According to the functional classification of their homologues in insects, these genes may represent elements of the Daphnia molecular oscillator core and its input and output pathways. Studies of PERIOD (PER) protein, one of the main clock components, revealed its rhythmic expression pattern in the epidermis, gut, and ovaries. Finally, the cycling levels of many of these clock components observed in animals reared in continuous light led to the conclusion that the Daphnia oscillator, even if it is structurally similar to the oscillators of other arthropods, can be considered a particularly important adaptive mechanism for living in environments with extreme photoperiods.

  12. Clock genes × stress × reward interactions in alcohol and substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Perreau-Lenz, Stéphanie; Spanagel, Rainer

    2015-06-01

    Adverse life events and highly stressful environments have deleterious consequences for mental health. Those environmental factors can potentiate alcohol and drug abuse in vulnerable individuals carrying specific genetic risk factors, hence producing the final risk for alcohol- and substance-use disorders development. The nature of these genes remains to be fully determined, but studies indicate their direct or indirect relation to the stress hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and/or reward systems. Over the past decade, clock genes have been revealed to be key-players in influencing acute and chronic alcohol/drug effects. In parallel, the influence of chronic stress and stressful life events in promoting alcohol and substance use and abuse has been demonstrated. Furthermore, the reciprocal interaction of clock genes with various HPA-axis components, as well as the evidence for an implication of clock genes in stress-induced alcohol abuse, have led to the idea that clock genes, and Period genes in particular, may represent key genetic factors to consider when examining gene × environment interaction in the etiology of addiction. The aim of the present review is to summarize findings linking clock genes, stress, and alcohol and substance abuse, and to propose potential underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

  13. [Functional polymorphisms in clock genes and circadian rhythm sleep disorders].

    PubMed

    Ebisawa, Takashi

    2007-06-01

    Polymorphisms in clock genes induce circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Mutations in Per2 gene (S662G) or Casein Kinasel delta (CK16) gene (T44A) cause Familial advanced sleep phase syndrome. Missense polymorphisms in Per3 (V647G) and CK1e (S408N) genes increase or decrease the risk of developing delayed sleep phase syndrome. All of these polymorphisms seem to affect the phosphorylation of the clock proteins. Some of the polymorphisms in CK1, which shows reduced enzyme activity in vitro, induced increased phosphorylation of PER proteins in in vivo assays. Careful attention should be paid to analyze the complex system composed of feedback loops, such as the biological clock. PMID:17633519

  14. Breast cancer risk, nightwork, and circadian clock gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Truong, Thérèse; Liquet, Benoît; Menegaux, Florence; Plancoulaine, Sabine; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mulot, Claire; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Sanchez, Marie; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Richardson, Sylvia; Guénel, Pascal

    2014-08-01

    Night shift work has been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer pointing to a role of circadian disruption. We investigated the role of circadian clock gene polymorphisms and their interaction with nightwork in breast cancer risk in a population-based case-control study in France including 1126 breast cancer cases and 1174 controls. We estimated breast cancer risk associated with each of the 577 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 23 circadian clock genes. We also used a gene- and pathway-based approach to investigate the overall effect on breast cancer of circadian clock gene variants that might not be detected in analyses based on individual SNPs. Interactions with nightwork were tested at the SNP, gene, and pathway levels. We found that two SNPs in RORA (rs1482057 and rs12914272) were associated with breast cancer in the whole sample and among postmenopausal women. In this subpopulation, we also reported an association with rs11932595 in CLOCK, and with CLOCK, RORA, and NPAS2 in the analyses at the gene level. Breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women was also associated with overall genetic variation in the circadian gene pathway (P=0.04), but this association was not detected in premenopausal women. There was some evidence of an interaction between PER1 and nightwork in breast cancer in the whole sample (P=0.024), although the effect was not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing (P=0.452). Our results support the hypothesis that circadian clock gene variants modulate breast cancer risk.

  15. Synthesising gene clock with toggle switch and oscillator.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Liang; Chen, Po-Kuei; Cheng, Young-Yi

    2015-06-01

    The usefulness of a genetic clock lies in its role to stimulate a sequence of logic reactions for sequential biological circuits. A clock signal is a periodic square wave, its amplitude alternates at a steady frequency between fixed minimal and maximal levels. Transition between the minimum and the maximum is instantaneous for an ideal square wave; however, the function is unrealisable in physical bio-systems. This research develops a new genetic clock generator based on a genetic oscillator, in which, a sine wave generator is adopted as a signal oscillator. It is shown that combination of a genetic oscillator with a toggle switch is able to generate clock signals forming an efficient way to generate a near square wave. In silico study confirms the proposed idea. PMID:26021329

  16. Synthesising gene clock with toggle switch and oscillator.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Liang; Chen, Po-Kuei; Cheng, Young-Yi

    2015-06-01

    The usefulness of a genetic clock lies in its role to stimulate a sequence of logic reactions for sequential biological circuits. A clock signal is a periodic square wave, its amplitude alternates at a steady frequency between fixed minimal and maximal levels. Transition between the minimum and the maximum is instantaneous for an ideal square wave; however, the function is unrealisable in physical bio-systems. This research develops a new genetic clock generator based on a genetic oscillator, in which, a sine wave generator is adopted as a signal oscillator. It is shown that combination of a genetic oscillator with a toggle switch is able to generate clock signals forming an efficient way to generate a near square wave. In silico study confirms the proposed idea.

  17. Mathematical modeling of an oscillating gene circuit to unravel the circadian clock network of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bujdoso, Nora; Davis, Seth J.

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock is an interconnected network highly tractable to systems approaches. Most elements in the transcriptional–translational oscillator were identified by genetic means and the expression of clock genes in various mutants led to the founding hypothesis of a positive–negative feedback loop being the core clock. The identification of additional clock genes beyond those defined in the core led to the use of systems approaches to decipher this angiosperm oscillator circuit. Kinetic modeling was first used to explain periodicity effects of various circadian mutants. This conformed in a flexible way to experimental details. Such observations allowed a recursive use of hypothesis generating from modeling, followed by experimental corroboration. More recently, the biochemical finding of new description of a DNA-binding activity for one class of clock components directed improvements in feature generation, one of which revealed that the core of the oscillator is a negative–negative feedback loop. The recursive use of modeling and experimental validation has thus revealed many essential transcriptional components that drive negative arms in the circadian oscillator. What awaits is to more fully describe the positive arms and an understanding of how additional pathways converge on the clock. PMID:23355842

  18. Direct Repression of Evening Genes by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 in the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock.

    PubMed

    Kamioka, Mari; Takao, Saori; Suzuki, Takamasa; Taki, Kyomi; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Nakamichi, Norihito

    2016-03-01

    The circadian clock is a biological timekeeping system that provides organisms with the ability to adapt to day-night cycles. Timing of the expression of four members of the Arabidopsis thaliana PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR(PRR) family is crucial for proper clock function, and transcriptional control of PRRs remains incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that direct regulation of PRR5 by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) determines the repression state of PRR5 in the morning. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses indicated that CCA1 associates with three separate regions upstream of PRR5 CCA1 and its homolog LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) suppressed PRR5 promoter activity in a transient assay. The regions bound by CCA1 in the PRR5 promoter gave rhythmic patterns with troughs in the morning, when CCA1 and LHY are at high levels. Furthermore,ChIP-seq revealed that CCA1 associates with at least 449 loci with 863 adjacent genes. Importantly, this gene set contains genes that are repressed but upregulated incca1 lhy double mutants in the morning. This study shows that direct binding by CCA1 in the morning provides strong repression of PRR5, and repression by CCA1 also temporally regulates an evening-expressed gene set that includes PRR5. PMID:26941090

  19. Periodic dip of lipidperoxidation in humans: a redox signal to synchronize peripheral circadian clocks?

    PubMed

    Cardona, F

    2004-01-01

    The output generated by the endogenous circadian clock to control circadian functions and temporal organization in metazoans is unknown. Redox state perturbations generated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants are known to influence the expression of a number of genes and signal transduction pathways. Evidence has been recently provided that the reduced redox cofactors NAD and NADP both regulate clock gene activity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and are induced by it. Significant periodic variations of lipidperoxidation in human blood with a dip at 04.00 h have been previously reported. Such variations could be expected to alter the cellular redox state, thus possibly functioning as periodic redox signals from the master clock. To verify the existence of the mentioned variations the serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker of lipidperoxidation, were monitored by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography in 39 healthy subjects at 3-h intervals over a 24-h period. Throughout the test period, only biological noise could be detected in all test persons. However, the normalized MDA levels at 03.00 h were significantly lower (p < 0.05 to < 0.00005) in 38 (97%) of the cases and showed a significantly lower standard deviation (p < 0.004) than at any of the other 3-h intervals, indicating a periodic dip of lipidperoxidation (PDL) in diurnal active subjects. We hypothesize that the PDL, on the basis of its time of appearance, its frequency and its potential influence on cellular redox state, represents a periodic systemic redox output of the SCN, in terms of a relatively short and sudden interruption of the daily oxidative noise. According to recent research, it could be the result of redox alterations induced by the SCN activity and at the same time the pathway by which the master clock resets and synchronizes peripheral oscillators to the light/dark cycle. Additionally, the antioxidative function of the pineal gland activity postulated elsewhere

  20. Persistence, period and precision of autonomous cellular oscillators from the zebrafish segmentation clock

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Alexis B; Lengyel, Iván M; Jörg, David J; Valentin, Guillaume; Jülicher, Frank; Morelli, Luis G; Oates, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrate development, the sequential and rhythmic segmentation of the body axis is regulated by a “segmentation clock”. This clock is comprised of a population of coordinated oscillating cells that together produce rhythmic gene expression patterns in the embryo. Whether individual cells autonomously maintain oscillations, or whether oscillations depend on signals from neighboring cells is unknown. Using a transgenic zebrafish reporter line for the cyclic transcription factor Her1, we recorded single tailbud cells in vitro. We demonstrate that individual cells can behave as autonomous cellular oscillators. We described the observed variability in cell behavior using a theory of generic oscillators with correlated noise. Single cells have longer periods and lower precision than the tissue, highlighting the role of collective processes in the segmentation clock. Our work reveals a population of cells from the zebrafish segmentation clock that behave as self-sustained, autonomous oscillators with distinctive noisy dynamics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08438.001 PMID:26880542

  1. Circadian Clock-Regulated Expression of Phytochrome and Cryptochrome Genes in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Réka; Kevei, Éva; Hall, Anthony; Millar, Andrew J.; Nagy, Ferenc; Kozma-Bognár, László

    2001-01-01

    Many physiological and biochemical processes in plants exhibit endogenous rhythms with a period of about 24 h. Endogenous oscillators called circadian clocks regulate these rhythms. The circadian clocks are synchronized to the periodic environmental changes (e.g. day/night cycles) by specific stimuli; among these, the most important is the light. Photoreceptors, phytochromes, and cryptochromes are involved in setting the clock by transducing the light signal to the central oscillator. In this work, we analyzed the spatial, temporal, and long-term light-regulated expression patterns of the Arabidopsis phytochrome (PHYA to PHYE) and cryptochrome (CRY1 and CRY2) promoters fused to the luciferase (LUC+) reporter gene. The results revealed new details of the tissue-specific expression and light regulation of the PHYC and CRY1 and 2 promoters. More importantly, the data obtained demonstrate that the activities of the promoter::LUC+ constructs, with the exception of PHYC::LUC+, display circadian oscillations under constant conditions. In addition, it is shown by measuring the mRNA abundance of PHY and CRY genes under constant light conditions that the circadian control is also maintained at the level of mRNA accumulation. These observations indicate that the plant circadian clock controls the expression of these photoreceptors, revealing the formation of a new regulatory loop that could modulate gating and resetting of the circadian clock. PMID:11743105

  2. Sexual dimorphism in clock genes expression in human adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was carried out to investigate whether sex-related differences exist in the adipocyte expression of clock genes from subcutaneous abdominal and visceral fat depots in severely obese patients. METHODS: We investigated 16 morbidly obese patients, eight men and eight women (mean age 45 +/- 2...

  3. Bidirectional CLOCK/BMAL1-dependent circadian gene regulation by retinoic acid in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Hidenori; Oishi, Katsutaka; Ishida, Norio . E-mail: n.ishida@aist.go.jp

    2006-12-15

    A central circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the mammalian hypothalamus entrains peripheral clocks through both neural and humoral factors. Although candidates for entrainment factors have been described, their details remain obscure. Here, we screened ligands for nuclear receptors that affect CLOCK/BMAL1-dependent transactivation of the mouse Period1 (mPer1) gene in NIH3T3 cells. We found that retinoic acids (RAs) significantly up-regulate mPer1 expression in an E-box-dependent manner. We also found that RAs up-regulate the expression of other E-box-dependent circadian genes such as mPer2, arginine vasopressin (mAVP), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (mPPAR{alpha}). Surprisingly, the effect of RAs on CLOCK/BMAL1 (E-box)-dependent mRNA expression was bidirectional and depended on the presence of exogenous retinoic acid receptor {alpha} (RAR{alpha}). These results suggest that RAs regulate the CLOCK/BMAL1-dependent transcription of circadian genes in a complex manner.

  4. Identification of putative circadian clock genes in the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus.

    PubMed

    Chesmore, Kevin N; Watson, Winsor H; Chabot, Christopher C

    2016-09-01

    While the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, has robust circadian and circatidal rhythms, virtually nothing is known about the molecular basis of these rhythms in this species or any other chelicerate. In this study, next generation sequencing was used to assemble transcriptomic reads and then putative homologs of known core and accessory circadian genes were identified in these databases. Homologous transcripts were discovered for one circadian clock input gene, five core genes, 22 accessory genes, and two possible output pathways. Alignments and functional domain analyses showed generally high conservation between the putative L. polyphemus clock genes and homologs from Drosophila melanogaster and Daphnia pulex. The presence of both cry1 and cry2 in the L. polyphemus transcriptome would classify its system as an "ancestral", type 2 clock system. In addition, a novel duplication of CYCLE, and a novel triplication of PERIOD were found. Investigations are currently underway to determine if any of these "circadian" genes also participate in the molecular processes that drive the Limulus circatidal clock. PMID:27341138

  5. Evidence for clock genes circadian rhythms in human full-term placenta.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Silvia; Murias, Lucía; Fernández-Plaza, Catalina; Díaz, Irene; González, Celestino; Otero, Jesús; Díaz, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Biological rhythms are driven by endogenous biological clocks; in mammals, the master clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. This master pacemaker can synchronize other peripheral oscillators in several tissues such as some involved in endocrine or reproductive functions. The presence of an endogenous placental clock has received little attention. In fact, there are no studies in human full-term placentas. To test the existence of an endogenous pacemaker in this tissue we have studied the expression of circadian locomoter output cycles kaput (Clock), brain and muscle arnt-like (Bmal)1, period (Per)2, and cryptochrome (Cry)1 mRNAs at 00, 04, 08, 12, 16, and 20 hours by qPCR. The four clock genes studied are expressed in full-term human placenta. The results obtained allow us to suggest that a peripheral oscillator exists in human placenta. Data were analyzed using Fourier series where only the Clock and Bmal1 expression shows a circadian rhythm.

  6. Core clock, SUB1, and ABAR genes mediate flooding and drought responses via alternative splicing in soybean.

    PubMed

    Syed, Naeem H; Prince, Silvas J; Mutava, Raymond N; Patil, Gunvant; Li, Song; Chen, Wei; Babu, Valliyodan; Joshi, Trupti; Khan, Saad; Nguyen, Henry T

    2015-12-01

    Circadian clocks are a great evolutionary innovation and provide competitive advantage during the day/night cycle and under changing environmental conditions. The circadian clock mediates expression of a large proportion of genes in plants, achieving a harmonious relationship between energy metabolism, photosynthesis, and biotic and abiotic stress responses. Here it is shown that multiple paralogues of clock genes are present in soybean (Glycine max) and mediate flooding and drought responses. Differential expression of many clock and SUB1 genes was found under flooding and drought conditions. Furthermore, natural variation in the amplitude and phase shifts in PRR7 and TOC1 genes was also discovered under drought and flooding conditions, respectively. PRR3 exhibited flooding- and drought-specific splicing patterns and may work in concert with PRR7 and TOC1 to achieve energy homeostasis under flooding and drought conditions. Higher expression of TOC1 also coincides with elevated levels of abscisic acid (ABA) and variation in glucose levels in the morning and afternoon, indicating that this response to abiotic stress is mediated by ABA, endogenous sugar levels, and the circadian clock to fine-tune photosynthesis and energy utilization under stress conditions. It is proposed that the presence of multiple clock gene paralogues with variation in DNA sequence, phase, and period could be used to screen exotic germplasm to find sources for drought and flooding tolerance. Furthermore, fine tuning of multiple clock gene paralogues (via a genetic engineering approach) should also facilitate the development of flooding- and drought-tolerant soybean varieties.

  7. Assignment of circadian function for the Neurospora clock gene frequency.

    PubMed

    Merrow, M; Brunner, M; Roenneberg, T

    1999-06-10

    Circadian clocks consist of three elements: entrainment pathways (inputs), the mechanism generating the rhythmicity (oscillator), and the output pathways that control the circadian rhythms. It is difficult to assign molecular clock components to any one of these elements. Experiments show that inputs can be circadianly regulated and outputs can feed back on the oscillator. Mathematical simulations indicate that under- or overexpression of a gene product can result in arrhythmicity, whether the protein is part of the oscillator or substantially part of a rhythmically expressed input pathway. To distinguish between these two possibilities, we used traditional circadian entrainment protocols on a genetic model system, Neurospora crassa.

  8. Circadian rhythmicity of active GSK3 isoforms modulates molecular clock gene rhythms in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Besing, Rachel C; Paul, Jodi R; Hablitz, Lauren M; Rogers, Courtney O; Johnson, Russell L; Young, Martin E; Gamble, Karen L

    2015-04-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and synchronizes daily rhythms at the cellular level via transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprising clock genes such as Bmal1 and Period (Per). Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a serine/threonine kinase, phosphorylates at least 5 core clock proteins and shows diurnal variation in phosphorylation state (inactivation) of the GSK3β isoform. Whether phosphorylation of the other primary isoform (GSK3α) varies across the subjective day-night cycle is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if the endogenous rhythm of GSK3 (α and β) phosphorylation is critical for rhythmic BMAL1 expression and normal amplitude and periodicity of the molecular clock in the SCN. Significant circadian rhythmicity of phosphorylated GSK3 (α and β) was observed in the SCN from wild-type mice housed in constant darkness for 2 weeks. Importantly, chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms impaired rhythmicity of the GSK3 target BMAL1. Furthermore, chronic pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 with 20 µM CHIR-99021 enhanced the amplitude and shortened the period of PER2::luciferase rhythms in organotypic SCN slice cultures. These results support the model that GSK3 activity status is regulated by the circadian clock and that GSK3 feeds back to regulate the molecular clock amplitude in the SCN.

  9. Circadian rhythms of clock gene expression in the cerebellum of serotonin-deficient Pet-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Erin V; Mintz, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin plays an important role in the central regulation of circadian clock function. Serotonin levels are generally higher in the brain during periods of high activity, and these periods are in turn heavily regulated by the circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. However, the role of serotonin as a regulator of circadian rhythms elsewhere in the brain has not been extensively examined. In this study, we examined circadian rhythms of clock gene expression in the cerebellum in mice lacking the Pet-1 transcription factor, which results in a developed brain that is deficient in serotonin neurons. If serotonin helps to synchronize rhythms in brain regions other than the suprachiasmatic nucleus, we would expect to see differences in clock gene expression in these serotonin deficient mice. We found minor differences in the expression of Per1 and Per2 in the knockout mice as compared to wild type, but these differences were small and of questionable functional importance. We also measured the response of cerebellar clocks to injections of the serotonin agonist 8-OH-DPAT during the early part of the night. No effect on clock genes was observed, though the immediate-early gene Fos showed increased expression in wild type mice but not the knockouts. These results suggest that serotonin is not an important mediator of circadian rhythms in the cerebellum in a way that parallels its regulation of the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

  10. Butyrate Infusions in the Ovine Fetus Delay the Biologic Clock for Globin Gene Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Susan P.; Rudolph, Abraham; Faller, Douglas V.; Roman, Christine; Cohen, Ruth A.; Chen, Shao-Jing; Kan, Yuet Wai

    1988-11-01

    The switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin expression is regulated in many mammalian species by a developmental clock-like mechanism and determined by the gestational age of the fetus. Prolonging fetal globin gene expression is of considerable interest for therapeutic potential in diseases caused by abnormal β -globin genes. Butyric acid, which is found in increased plasma concentrations in infants of diabetic mothers who have delayed globin gene switching, was infused into catheterized fetal lambs in utero during the time of the normal globin gene switch period. The globin gene switch was significantly delayed in three of four butyrate-treated fetuses compared with controls and was entirely prevented in one fetus in whom the infusion was begun before the globin switch was under way. These data provide a model for investigating and arresting the biologic clock of hemoglobin switching.

  11. Continuous activity and no cycling of clock genes in the Antarctic midge during the polar summer.

    PubMed

    Kobelkova, Alena; Goto, Shin G; Peyton, Justin T; Ikeno, Tomoko; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2015-10-01

    The extreme seasonal shifts of day length in polar regions, ranging from constant light in the summer to constant darkness in the winter, pose an intriguing environment for probing activity rhythms and the functioning of circadian clocks. Here, we monitor locomotor activity during the summer on the Antarctic Peninsula and under laboratory conditions, as well as the accompanying patterns of clock gene expression in the Antarctic midge, the only insect endemic to Antarctica. Larvae and adults are most active during the warmest portion of the day, but at a constant temperature they remain continuously active regardless of the photoregime, and activity also persists in constant darkness. The canonical clock genes period, timeless, Clock, and vrille are expressed in the head but we detected no cycling of expression in either the field or under diverse photoregimes in the laboratory. The timekeeping function of the clock has possibly been lost, enabling the midge to opportunistically exploit the unpredictable availability of permissive thermal conditions for growth, development, and reproduction during the short summer in Antarctica.

  12. Clock gene evolution: seasonal timing, phylogenetic signal, or functional constraint?

    PubMed

    Krabbenhoft, Trevor J; Turner, Thomas F

    2014-01-01

    Genetic determinants of seasonal reproduction are not fully understood but may be important predictors of organism responses to climate change. We used a comparative approach to study the evolution of seasonal timing within a fish community in a natural common garden setting. We tested the hypothesis that allelic length variation in the PolyQ domain of a circadian rhythm gene, Clock1a, corresponded to interspecific differences in seasonal reproductive timing across 5 native and 1 introduced cyprinid fishes (n = 425 individuals) that co-occur in the Rio Grande, NM, USA. Most common allele lengths were longer in native species that initiated reproduction earlier (Spearman's r = -0.70, P = 0.23). Clock1a allele length exhibited strong phylogenetic signal and earlier spawners were evolutionarily derived. Aside from length variation in Clock1a, all other amino acids were identical across native species, suggesting functional constraint over evolutionary time. Interestingly, the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus) exhibited less allelic variation in Clock1a and observed heterozygosity was 2- to 6-fold lower than the 5 other (nonimperiled) species. Reduced genetic variation in this functionally important gene may impede this species' capacity to respond to ongoing environmental change. PMID:24558102

  13. Oscillation of Clock and Clock Controlled Genes Induced by Serum Shock in Human Breast Epithelial and Breast Cancer Cells: Regulation by Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, S.; Mao, L.; Duplessis, T.; Yuan, L.; Dauchy, R.; Dauchy, E.; Blask, D.E.; Frasch, T.; Hill, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates differences in expression of clock and clock-controlled genes (CCGs) between human breast epithelial and breast cancer cells and breast tumor xenografts in circadian intact rats and examines if the pineal hormone melatonin influences clock gene and CCG expression. Oscillation of clock gene expression was not observed under standard growth conditions in vitro, however, serum shock (50% horse serum for 2 h) induced oscillation of clock gene and CCG expression in MCF-10A cells, which was repressed or disrupted in MCF-7 cells. Melatonin administration following serum shock differentially suppressed or induced clock gene (Bmal1 and Per2) and CCG expression in MCF10A and MCF-7 cells. These studies demonstrate the lack of rhythmic expression of clock genes and CCGs of cells in vitro and that transplantation of breast cancer cells as xenografts into circadian competent hosts re-establishes a circadian rhythm in the peripheral clock genes of tumor cells. PMID:23012497

  14. Circadian and ultradian rhythms of clock gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of freely moving mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Daisuke; Honma, Ken-ichi; Honma, Sato

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the temporal order of physiology and behavior is primarily regulated by the circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Rhythms are generated in cells by an auto-regulatory transcription/translation feedback loop, composed of several clock genes and their protein products. Taking advantage of bioluminescence reporters, we have succeeded in continuously monitoring the expression of clock gene reporters Per1-luc, PER2::LUC and Bmal1-ELuc in the SCN of freely moving mice for up to 3 weeks in constant darkness. Bioluminescence emitted from the SCN was collected with an implanted plastic optical fiber which was connected to a cooled photomultiplier tube. We found robust circadian rhythms in the clock gene expression, the phase-relation of which were the same as those observed ex vivo. The circadian rhythms were superimposed by episodic bursts which had ultradian periods of approximately 3.0 h. Episodic bursts often accompanied activity bouts, but stoichiometric as well as temporal analyses revealed no causality between them. Clock gene expression in the SCN in vivo is regulated by the circadian pacemaker and ultradian rhythms of unknown origin. PMID:26194231

  15. Circadian and ultradian rhythms of clock gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of freely moving mice

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Daisuke; Honma, Ken-ichi; Honma, Sato

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the temporal order of physiology and behavior is primarily regulated by the circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Rhythms are generated in cells by an auto-regulatory transcription/translation feedback loop, composed of several clock genes and their protein products. Taking advantage of bioluminescence reporters, we have succeeded in continuously monitoring the expression of clock gene reporters Per1-luc, PER2::LUC and Bmal1-ELuc in the SCN of freely moving mice for up to 3 weeks in constant darkness. Bioluminescence emitted from the SCN was collected with an implanted plastic optical fiber which was connected to a cooled photomultiplier tube. We found robust circadian rhythms in the clock gene expression, the phase-relation of which were the same as those observed ex vivo. The circadian rhythms were superimposed by episodic bursts which had ultradian periods of approximately 3.0 h. Episodic bursts often accompanied activity bouts, but stoichiometric as well as temporal analyses revealed no causality between them. Clock gene expression in the SCN in vivo is regulated by the circadian pacemaker and ultradian rhythms of unknown origin. PMID:26194231

  16. Clock genes, intestinal transport and plasma lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2009-05-01

    Light and food are two major environmental factors that impact daily life. Light entrainment is centrally controlled by suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. Food entrainment might require cooperation between the intestine and dorsomedial hypothalamus. Clock genes that are essential for light entrainment also play a part in food entrainment. Understanding the role of clock genes in the entrainment of intestinal functions, as well as in gut-brain communication during food entrainment, will enhance our understanding of gastrointestinal and metabolic disorders. This review highlights recent studies examining light- and food-entrained regulation of plasma lipids and of various intestinal activities and offers insight into the role of the intestine in food entrainment. PMID:19349191

  17. Altered circadian clock gene expression in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anne-Sofie; Owe-Larsson, Björn; Hetta, Jerker; Lundkvist, Gabriella B

    2016-07-01

    Impaired circadian rhythmicity has been reported in several psychiatric disorders. Schizophrenia is commonly associated with aberrant sleep-wake cycles and insomnia. It is not known if schizophrenia is associated with disturbances in molecular rhythmicity. We cultured fibroblasts from skin samples obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia and from healthy controls, respectively, and analyzed the circadian expression during 48h of the clock genes CLOCK, BMAL1, PER1, PER2, CRY1, CRY2, REV-ERBα and DBP. In fibroblasts obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia, we found a loss of rhythmic expression of CRY1 and PER2 compared to cells from healthy controls. We also estimated the sleep quality in these patients and found that most of them suffered from poor sleep in comparison with the healthy controls. In another patient sample, we analyzed mononuclear blood cells from patients with schizophrenia experiencing their first episode of psychosis, and found decreased expression of CLOCK, PER2 and CRY1 compared to blood cells from healthy controls. These novel findings show disturbances in the molecular clock in schizophrenia and have important implications in our understanding of the aberrant rhythms reported in this disease. PMID:27132483

  18. Acute melatonin treatment alters dendritic morphology and circadian clock gene expression in the hippocampus of Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Tomoko; Nelson, Randy J

    2015-02-01

    In the hippocampus of Siberian hamsters, dendritic length and dendritic complexity increase in the CA1 region whereas dendritic spine density decreases in the dentate gyrus region at night. However, the underlying mechanism of the diurnal rhythmicity in hippocampal neuronal remodeling is unknown. In mammals, most daily rhythms in physiology and behaviors are regulated by a network of circadian clocks. The central clock, located in the hypothalamus, controls melatonin secretion at night and melatonin modifies peripheral clocks by altering expression of circadian clock genes. In this study, we examined the effects of acute melatonin treatment on the circadian clock system as well as on morphological changes of hippocampal neurons. Male Siberian hamsters were injected with melatonin in the afternoon; 4 h later, mRNA levels of hypothalamic and hippocampal circadian clock genes and hippocampal neuron dendritic morphology were assessed. In the hypothalamus, melatonin treatment did not alter Period1 and Bmal1 expression. However, melatonin treatment increased both Period1 and Bmal1 expression in the hippocampus, suggesting that melatonin affected molecular oscillations in the hippocampus. Melatonin treatment also induced rapid remodeling of hippocampal neurons; melatonin increased apical dendritic length and dendritic complexity in the CA1 region and reduced the dendritic spine density in the dentate gyrus region. These data suggest that structural changes in hippocampal neurons are regulated by a circadian clock and that melatonin functions as a nighttime signal to coordinate the diurnal rhythm in neuronal remodeling.

  19. Osmotic stress at the barley root affects expression of circadian clock genes in the shoot.

    PubMed

    Habte, Ermias; Müller, Lukas M; Shtaya, Munqez; Davis, Seth J; von Korff, Maria

    2014-06-01

    The circadian clock is an important timing system that controls physiological responses to abiotic stresses in plants. However, there is little information on the effects of the clock on stress adaptation in important crops, like barley. In addition, we do not know how osmotic stress perceived at the roots affect the shoot circadian clock. Barley genotypes, carrying natural variation at the photoperiod response and clock genes Ppd-H1 and HvELF3, were grown under control and osmotic stress conditions to record changes in the diurnal expression of clock and stress-response genes and in physiological traits. Variation at HvELF3 affected the expression phase and shape of clock and stress-response genes, while variation at Ppd-H1 only affected the expression levels of stress genes. Osmotic stress up-regulated expression of clock and stress-response genes and advanced their expression peaks. Clock genes controlled the expression of stress-response genes, but had minor effects on gas exchange and leaf transpiration. This study demonstrated that osmotic stress at the barley root altered clock gene expression in the shoot and acted as a spatial input signal into the clock. Unlike in Arabidopsis, barley primary assimilation was less controlled by the clock and more responsive to environmental perturbations, such as osmotic stress. PMID:24895755

  20. Obesity alters the expression profile of clock genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Tahira, Kazunobu; Fukuda, Noboru; Aoyama, Takahiko; Tsunemi, Akiko; Matsumoto, Siroh; Nagura, Chinami; Matsumoto, Taro; Soma, Masayoshi; Shimba, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the variation in expression profile of clock genes and obesity using peripheral blood mononuclear (PMN) cells. Material and methods The subjects comprised 10 obese patients and 10 healthy volunteers. Blood was collected at different time-points during the day and levels of blood sugar, IRI, adiponectin and leptin were determined. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were sampled, and expression levels of brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1 (BMAL1), Period (PER)1, PER2, Cryptochrome (CRY)1, CRY2, and REV-ERBα mRNA were quantified. Results During the day, the expression levels of BMAL1, CRY1, CRY2 and PER2 genes in PMN cells of the obese group were all significantly higher compared to those in the non-obese group. In addition, expression of BMAL1, CRY1, CRY2 and PER2 genes in PMN cells increased between 12:00 and 21:00 in the obese group. In PMN cells of both groups, PER1 gene expression showed a bimodal pattern, with high expression at 9:00 and 18:00. Conclusions Differences were observed in the expression profile variation of clock genes between the obese and non-obese groups. This study reveals the differences in clock gene expression profiles between obese and non-obese subjects, with evidence for two distinct chronotypes, and suggests a contribution of these chronotypes to fat accumulation in humans. PMID:22328874

  1. Orexin signaling regulates both the hippocampal clock and the circadian oscillation of Alzheimer’s disease-risk genes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhixiong; Jiang, Weiliang; Zhang, Eric Erquan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a circadian clock-related disease. However, it is not very clear whether pre-symptomatic AD leads to circadian disruption or whether malfunction of circadian rhythms exerts influence on development of AD. Here, we report a functional clock that exists in the hippocampus. This oscillator both receives input signals and maintains the cycling of the hippocampal Per2 gene. One of the potential inputs to the oscillator is orexin signaling, which can shorten the hippocampal clock period and thereby regulate the expression of clock-controlled-genes (CCGs). A 24-h time course qPCR analysis followed by a JTK_CYCLE algorithm analysis indicated that a number of AD-risk genes are potential CCGs in the hippocampus. Specifically, we found that Bace1 and Bace2, which are related to the production of the amyloid-beta peptide, are CCGs. BACE1 is inhibited by E4BP4, a repressor of D-box genes, while BACE2 is activated by CLOCK:BMAL1. Finally, we observed alterations in the rhythmic expression patterns of Bace2 and ApoE in the hippocampus of aged APP/PS1dE9 mice. Our results therefore indicate that there is a circadian oscillator in the hippocampus whose oscillation could be regulated by orexins. Hence, orexin signaling regulates both the hippocampal clock and the circadian oscillation of AD-risk genes. PMID:27796320

  2. Codon usage affects the structure and function of the Drosophila circadian clock protein PERIOD.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jingjing; Murphy, Katherine A; Zhou, Mian; Li, Ying H; Lam, Vu H; Tabuloc, Christine A; Chiu, Joanna C; Liu, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Codon usage bias is a universal feature of all genomes, but its in vivo biological functions in animal systems are not clear. To investigate the in vivo role of codon usage in animals, we took advantage of the sensitivity and robustness of the Drosophila circadian system. By codon-optimizing parts of Drosophila period (dper), a core clock gene that encodes a critical component of the circadian oscillator, we showed that dper codon usage is important for circadian clock function. Codon optimization of dper resulted in conformational changes of the dPER protein, altered dPER phosphorylation profile and stability, and impaired dPER function in the circadian negative feedback loop, which manifests into changes in molecular rhythmicity and abnormal circadian behavioral output. This study provides an in vivo example that demonstrates the role of codon usage in determining protein structure and function in an animal system. These results suggest a universal mechanism in eukaryotes that uses a codon usage "code" within genetic codons to regulate cotranslational protein folding. PMID:27542830

  3. Regulation of intestinal lipid absorption by clock genes.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Plasma levels of triacylglycerols and diacylglycerols, the lipoproteins that transport them, and proteins involved in their absorption from the intestinal lumen fluctuate in a circadian manner. These changes are likely controlled by clock genes expressed in the intestine that are probably synchronized by neuronal and humoral signals from the suprachiasmatic nuclei, which constitute a master clock entrained by light signals from the eyes and from the environment, e.g., food availability. Acute changes in circadian rhythms--e.g., due to nonsynchronous work schedules or a transcontinental flight--may trigger intestinal discomfort. Chronic disruptions in circadian control mechanisms may predispose the individual to irritable bowel syndrome, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and peptic ulcer disease. A more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying temporal changes in intestinal activity might allow us to identify novel targets for developing therapeutic approaches to these disorders. PMID:25033063

  4. Regulation of intestinal lipid absorption by clock genes.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Plasma levels of triacylglycerols and diacylglycerols, the lipoproteins that transport them, and proteins involved in their absorption from the intestinal lumen fluctuate in a circadian manner. These changes are likely controlled by clock genes expressed in the intestine that are probably synchronized by neuronal and humoral signals from the suprachiasmatic nuclei, which constitute a master clock entrained by light signals from the eyes and from the environment, e.g., food availability. Acute changes in circadian rhythms--e.g., due to nonsynchronous work schedules or a transcontinental flight--may trigger intestinal discomfort. Chronic disruptions in circadian control mechanisms may predispose the individual to irritable bowel syndrome, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and peptic ulcer disease. A more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying temporal changes in intestinal activity might allow us to identify novel targets for developing therapeutic approaches to these disorders.

  5. Low variation in the polymorphic Clock gene poly-Q region despite population genetic structure across barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) populations.

    PubMed

    Dor, Roi; Lovette, Irby J; Safran, Rebecca J; Billerman, Shawn M; Huber, Gernot H; Vortman, Yoni; Lotem, Arnon; McGowan, Andrew; Evans, Matthew R; Cooper, Caren B; Winkler, David W

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of several species have reported a latitudinal cline in the circadian clock gene, Clock, which influences rhythms in both physiology and behavior. Latitudinal variation in this gene may hence reflect local adaptation to seasonal variation. In some bird populations, there is also an among-individual association between Clock poly-Q genotype and clutch initiation date and incubation period. We examined Clock poly-Q allele variation in the Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica), a species with a cosmopolitan geographic distribution and considerable variation in life-history traits that may be influenced by the circadian clock. We genotyped Barn Swallows from five populations (from three subspecies) and compared variation at the Clock locus to that at microsatellite loci and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We found very low variation in the Clock poly-Q region, as >96% of individuals were homozygous, and the two other alleles at this locus were globally rare. Genetic differentiation based on the Clock poly-Q locus was not correlated with genetic differentiation based on either microsatellite loci or mtDNA sequences. Our results show that high diversity in Clock poly-Q is not general across avian species. The low Clock variation in the background of heterogeneity in microsatellite and mtDNA loci in Barn Swallows may be an outcome of stabilizing selection on the Clock locus.

  6. Low Variation in the Polymorphic Clock Gene Poly-Q Region Despite Population Genetic Structure across Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) Populations

    PubMed Central

    Dor, Roi; Lovette, Irby J.; Safran, Rebecca J.; Billerman, Shawn M.; Huber, Gernot H.; Vortman, Yoni; Lotem, Arnon; McGowan, Andrew; Evans, Matthew R.; Cooper, Caren B.; Winkler, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of several species have reported a latitudinal cline in the circadian clock gene, Clock, which influences rhythms in both physiology and behavior. Latitudinal variation in this gene may hence reflect local adaptation to seasonal variation. In some bird populations, there is also an among-individual association between Clock poly-Q genotype and clutch initiation date and incubation period. We examined Clock poly-Q allele variation in the Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica), a species with a cosmopolitan geographic distribution and considerable variation in life-history traits that may be influenced by the circadian clock. We genotyped Barn Swallows from five populations (from three subspecies) and compared variation at the Clock locus to that at microsatellite loci and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We found very low variation in the Clock poly-Q region, as >96% of individuals were homozygous, and the two other alleles at this locus were globally rare. Genetic differentiation based on the Clock poly-Q locus was not correlated with genetic differentiation based on either microsatellite loci or mtDNA sequences. Our results show that high diversity in Clock poly-Q is not general across avian species. The low Clock variation in the background of heterogeneity in microsatellite and mtDNA loci in Barn Swallows may be an outcome of stabilizing selection on the Clock locus. PMID:22216124

  7. Light and clock expression of the Neurospora clock gene frequency is differentially driven by but dependent on WHITE COLLAR-2.

    PubMed Central

    Collett, Michael A; Garceau, Norm; Dunlap, Jay C; Loros, Jennifer J

    2002-01-01

    Visible light is thought to reset the Neurospora circadian clock by acting through heterodimers of the WHITE COLLAR-1 and WHITE COLLAR-2 proteins to induce transcription of the frequency gene. To characterize this photic entrainment we examined frq expression in constant light, under which condition the mRNA and protein of this clock gene were strongly induced. In continuous illumination FRQ accumulated in a highly phosphorylated state similar to that seen at subjective dusk, the time at which a step from constant light to darkness sets the clock. Examination of frq expression in several wc-2 mutant alleles surprisingly revealed differential regulation when frq expression was compared between constant light, following a light pulse, and darkness (clock-driven expression). Construction of a wc-2 null strain then demonstrated that WC-2 is absolutely required for both light and clock-driven frq expression, in contrast to previous expectations based on presumptive nulls containing altered Zn-finger function. Additionally, we found that frq light signal transduction differs from that of other light-regulated genes. Thus clock and light-driven frq expression is differentially regulated by, but dependent on, WC-2. PMID:11805052

  8. Disrupting the circadian clock: Gene-specific effects on aging, cancer, and other phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Elizabeth A.; Weaver, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The circadian clock imparts 24-hour rhythmicity on gene expression and cellular physiology in virtually all cells. Disruption of the genes necessary for the circadian clock to function has diverse effects, including aging-related phenotypes. Some circadian clock genes have been described as tumor suppressors, while other genes have less clear functions in aging and cancer. In this Review, we highlight a recent study [Dubrovsky et al., Aging 2: 936-944, 2010] and discuss the much larger field examining the relationship between circadian clock genes, circadian rhythmicity, aging-related phenotypes, and cancer. PMID:21566258

  9. Disrupting the circadian clock: gene-specific effects on aging, cancer, and other phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Elizabeth A; Weaver, David R

    2011-05-01

    The circadian clock imparts 24-hour rhythmicity on gene expression and cellular physiology in virtually all cells. Disruption of the genes necessary for the circadian clock to function has diverse effects, including aging-related phenotypes. Some circadian clock genes have been described as tumor suppressors, while other genes have less clear functions in aging and cancer. In this Review, we highlight a recent study [Dubrovsky et al., Aging 2: 936-944, 2010] and discuss the much larger field examining the relationship between circadian clock genes, circadian rhythmicity, aging-related phenotypes, and cancer.

  10. period-1 encodes an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that influences nutritional compensation of the Neurospora circadian clock

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, Jillian M.; Bartholomai, Bradley M.; Ringelberg, Carol; Baker, Scott E.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2015-12-22

    Mutants in the period-1 (prd-1) gene, characterized by a recessive allele, display a reduced growth rate and period lengthening of the developmental cycle controlled by the circadian clock. We refined the genetic location of prd-1 and used whole genome sequencing to find the mutation defining it, confirming the identity of prd-1 by rescuing the mutant circadian phenotype via transformation. PRD-1 is an RNA helicase whose orthologs, DDX5 and DDX17 in humans and Dbp2p in yeast, are implicated in various processes including transcriptional regulation, elongation, and termination, 23 ribosome biogenesis, and RNA decay. Although prdi-1smutantssiois an ATP-dependent RNA helicase, member of a sub-family display a long period (~25 hrs) circadian developmental cycle, they interestingly display a wild type period when the core circadian oscillator is tracked using a frq-luciferase transcriptional fusion under conditions of limiting nutritional carbon; the core oscillator runs with a long period under glucose-sufficient conditions. Thus PRD-1 clearly impacts the circadian oscillator and is not only part of a metabolic oscillator ancillary to the core clock. PRD-1 is an essential protein and its expression is neither light-regulated nor clock-regulated. However, it is transiently induced by glucose; in the presence of sufficient glucose PRD-1 is in the nucleus until glucose runs out which elicits its disappearance from the nucleus. Because circadian period length is carbon concentration-dependent, prd­-1 may be formally viewed as clock mutant with defective nutritional compensation of circadian period length.

  11. period-1 encodes an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that influences nutritional compensation of the Neurospora circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Jillian M.; Bartholomai, Bradley M.; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Baker, Scott E.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2015-01-01

    Mutants in the period-1 (prd-1) gene, characterized by a recessive allele, display a reduced growth rate and period lengthening of the developmental cycle controlled by the circadian clock. We refined the genetic location of prd-1 and used whole genome sequencing to find the mutation defining it, confirming the identity of prd-1 by rescuing the mutant circadian phenotype via transformation. PRD-1 is an RNA helicase whose orthologs, DDX5 [DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) Box Helicase 5] and DDX17 in humans and DBP2 (Dead Box Protein 2) in yeast, are implicated in various processes, including transcriptional regulation, elongation, and termination, ribosome biogenesis, and mRNA decay. Although prd-1 mutants display a long period (∼25 h) circadian developmental cycle, they interestingly display a WT period when the core circadian oscillator is tracked using a frq-luciferase transcriptional fusion under conditions of limiting nutritional carbon; the core oscillator in the prd-1 mutant strain runs with a long period under glucose-sufficient conditions. Thus, PRD-1 clearly impacts the circadian oscillator and is not only part of a metabolic oscillator ancillary to the core clock. PRD-1 is an essential protein, and its expression is neither light-regulated nor clock-regulated. However, it is transiently induced by glucose; in the presence of sufficient glucose, PRD-1 is in the nucleus until glucose runs out, which elicits its disappearance from the nucleus. Because circadian period length is carbon concentration-dependent, prd-1 may be formally viewed as a clock mutant with defective nutritional compensation of circadian period length. PMID:26647184

  12. Reciprocity Between Robustness of Period and Plasticity of Phase in Biological Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Tetsuhiro S.; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2015-11-01

    Circadian clocks exhibit the robustness of period and plasticity of phase against environmental changes such as temperature and nutrient conditions. Thus far, however, it is unclear how both are simultaneously achieved. By investigating distinct models of circadian clocks, we demonstrate reciprocity between robustness and plasticity: higher robustness in the period implies higher plasticity in the phase, where changes in period and in phase follow a linear relationship with a negative coefficient. The robustness of period is achieved by the adaptation on the limit cycle via a concentration change of a buffer molecule, whose temporal change leads to a phase shift following a shift of the limit-cycle orbit in phase space. Generality of reciprocity in clocks with the adaptation mechanism is confirmed with theoretical analysis of simple models, while biological significance is discussed.

  13. EGR1 regulates hepatic clock gene amplitude by activating Per1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weiwei; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Qian; Lai, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Shan; Jiang, Chen; Xu, Ying; Xue, Bin; Du, Jie; Li, Chao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian clock system is composed of a master clock and peripheral clocks. At the molecular level, the rhythm-generating mechanism is controlled by a molecular clock composed of positive and negative feedback loops. However, the underlying mechanisms for molecular clock regulation that affect circadian clock function remain unclear. Here, we show that Egr1 (early growth response 1), an early growth response gene, is expressed in mouse liver in a circadian manner. Consistently, Egr1 is transactivated by the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer through a conserved E-box response element. In hepatocytes, EGR1 regulates the transcription of several core clock genes, including Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Rev-erbα and Rev-erbβ, and the rhythm amplitude of their expression is dependent on EGR1’s transcriptional function. Further mechanistic studies indicated that EGR1 binds to the proximal region of the Per1 promoter to activate its transcription directly. When the peripheral clock is altered by light or feeding behavior transposition in Egr1-deficient mice, the expression phase of hepatic clock genes shifts normally, but the amplitude is also altered. Our data reveal a critical role for EGR1 in the regulation of hepatic clock circuitry, which may contribute to the rhythm stability of peripheral clock oscillators. PMID:26471974

  14. Deep RNA profiling identified CLOCK and molecular clock genes as pathophysiological signatures in collagen VI myopathy.

    PubMed

    Scotton, Chiara; Bovolenta, Matteo; Schwartz, Elena; Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Martoni, Elena; Passarelli, Chiara; Armaroli, Annarita; Osman, Hana; Rodolico, Carmelo; Messina, Sonia; Pegoraro, Elena; D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Gualandi, Francesca; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Boffi, Patrizia; Maioli, Maria Antonietta; Lochmüller, Hanns; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Katherine; Castrignanò, Tiziana; Pesole, Graziano; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Merlini, Luciano; Braghetta, Paola; Bonaldo, Paolo; Bernardi, Paolo; Foley, Reghan; Cirak, Sebahattin; Zaharieva, Irina; Muntoni, Francesco; Capitanio, Daniele; Gelfi, Cecilia; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Yuryev, Anton; Lebowitz, Michael; Zhang, Xiping; Hodge, Brian A; Esser, Karyn A; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2016-04-15

    Collagen VI myopathies are genetic disorders caused by mutations in collagen 6 A1, A2 and A3 genes, ranging from the severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy to the milder Bethlem myopathy, which is recapitulated by collagen-VI-null (Col6a1(-/-)) mice. Abnormalities in mitochondria and autophagic pathway have been proposed as pathogenic causes of collagen VI myopathies, but the link between collagen VI defects and these metabolic circuits remains unknown. To unravel the expression profiling perturbation in muscles with collagen VI myopathies, we performed a deep RNA profiling in both Col6a1(-/-)mice and patients with collagen VI pathology. The interactome map identified common pathways suggesting a previously undetected connection between circadian genes and collagen VI pathology. Intriguingly, Bmal1(-/-)(also known as Arntl) mice, a well-characterized model displaying arrhythmic circadian rhythms, showed profound deregulation of the collagen VI pathway and of autophagy-related genes. The involvement of circadian rhythms in collagen VI myopathies is new and links autophagy and mitochondrial abnormalities. It also opens new avenues for therapies of hereditary myopathies to modulate the molecular clock or potential gene-environment interactions that might modify muscle damage pathogenesis.

  15. Clock genes localize to quantitative trait loci for stage-specific growth in juvenile coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Kathleen G; McClelland, Erin K; Naish, Kerry A

    2010-01-01

    In most organisms, an internal circadian clock coordinates the expression of biological rhythms and enables individuals to anticipate and respond to the seasonally changing environment. There is remarkable conservation of function in the molecular machinery underlying this circadian clock across taxa with 4 canonical proteins interacting to form an autoregulatory feedback loop: CLOCK, CRYPTOCHROME, PERIOD, and BMAL. We mapped duplicated copies of Clock and Cryptochrome in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to determine if these genes localize to quantitative trait loci (QTL) for hatch timing, weight, length, and growth rate measured throughout the juvenile life-history stage. We found that Cryptochrome2b mapped to a QTL region for growth (measured at 304 days post-hatching) on linkage group OKI06. The percentage of variation (PEV) explained by this QTL was 15.2%. Cryptochrome2b was also associated with a marginally nonsignificant QTL for length (measured at 395 days post-hatching). OtsClock1b mapped to a QTL region for growth rate (PEV 10.1%) and length (PEV 10.5%) on linkage group OKI24 (measured at 479 days posthatching). Neither gene localized to QTL for hatch timing or weight. Our findings indicate that the growth rate and length QTL associated with OtsClock1b and Cryptochrome2b are development stage-specific and may result from temporally differentiated gene expression patterns.

  16. Effects of acute and chronic STZ-induced diabetes on clock gene expression and feeding in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Jonathon; Nguyen, Diane; Cornélissen, Germaine; Halberg, Franz; Hoogerwerf, Willemijntje A

    2010-05-01

    Diabetes may shift clock gene expression within peripheral organs. However, little is known about the effect of diabetes on the gastrointestinal molecular clock. We therefore investigated the effect of diabetes on gastrointestinal clock gene expression. As peripheral clock gene expression is strongly driven by food intake, we also determined the effect of STZ-induced diabetes on patterns of food intake. The effects of acute (1 week) and chronic (12 weeks) STZ-induced diabetes on period (per) genes in the stomach body, proximal and distal colon, liver, kidney, and lung of C57BL/6J mice were assessed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Food intake studies were completed using automated feeding equipment. Rhythmicity in expression of per2 and per3 persisted in all organs. However, per2 and per3 expression of STZ-injected mice was generally phase delayed within the gastrointestinal tract but not within the kidney or lung as compared with vehicle-injected mice. The phase delay was most pronounced for per2 in the proximal colon at 12 weeks. Food intake was rhythmic with larger circadian amplitude for diabetic mice than for control mice. Thus, STZ-induced diabetes differentially alters peripheral per expression. STZ-induced diabetes does not alter the circadian phase of food intake. Alterations in clock gene expression in a mouse model of diabetes are most pronounced in those organs that are intimately associated with food processing and metabolism. PMID:20091094

  17. Pregnancy-induced changes in the circadian expression of hepatic clock genes: implications for maternal glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wharfe, Michaela D; Wyrwoll, Caitlin S; Waddell, Brendan J; Mark, Peter J

    2016-09-01

    Adaptations in maternal carbohydrate metabolism are particularly important in pregnancy because glucose is the principal energy substrate used by the fetus. As metabolic homeostasis is intricately linked to the circadian system via the rhythmic expression of clock genes, it is likely that metabolic adaptations during pregnancy also involve shifts in maternal circadian function. We hypothesized that maternal adaptation in pregnancy involves changes in the hepatic expression of clock genes, which drive downstream shifts in circadian expression of glucoregulatory genes. Maternal liver and plasma (n = 6-8/group) were collected across 24-h periods (0800, 1200, 1600, 2000, 0000, 0400) from C57Bl/6J mice under isoflurane-nitrous oxide anesthesia prior to and on days 6, 10, 14 and 18 of pregnancy (term = day 19). Hepatic expression of clock genes and glucoregulatory genes was determined by RT-qPCR. Hepatic clock gene expression was substantially altered across pregnancy, most notably in late gestation when the circadian rhythmicity of several clock genes was attenuated (≤64% reduced amplitude on day 18). These changes were associated with a similar decline in rhythmicity of the key glucoregulatory genes Pck1, G6Pase, and Gk, and by day 18, Pck1 was no longer rhythmic. Overall, our data show marked adaptations in the liver clock during mouse pregnancy, changes that may contribute to the altered circadian variation in glucoregulatory genes near term. We propose that the observed reduction of daily oscillations in glucose metabolism ensure a sustained supply of glucose to meet the high demands of fetal growth. PMID:27406739

  18. A role for clock genes in sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Franken, Paul

    2013-10-01

    The timing and quality of both sleep and wakefulness are thought to be regulated by the interaction of two processes. One of these two processes keeps track of the prior sleep-wake history and controls the homeostatic need for sleep while the other sets the time-of-day that sleep preferably occurs. The molecular pathways underlying the latter, circadian process have been studied in detail and their key role in physiological time-keeping has been well established. Analyses of sleep in mice and flies lacking core circadian clock gene proteins have demonstrated, however, that besides disrupting circadian rhythms, also sleep homeostatic processes were affected. Subsequent studies revealed that sleep loss alters both the mRNA levels and the specific DNA-binding of the key circadian transcriptional regulators to their target sequences in the mouse brain. The fact that sleep loss impinges on the very core of the molecular circadian circuitry might explain why both inadequate sleep and disrupted circadian rhythms can similarly lead to metabolic pathology. The evidence for a role for clock genes in sleep homeostasis will be reviewed here.

  19. Mutation at the circadian clock gene EARLY MATURITY 8 adapts domesticated barley (Hordeum vulgare) to short growing seasons.

    PubMed

    Faure, Sebastien; Turner, Adrian S; Gruszka, Damian; Christodoulou, Vangelis; Davis, Seth J; von Korff, Maria; Laurie, David A

    2012-05-22

    The circadian clock is an autonomous oscillator that produces endogenous biological rhythms with a period of about 24 h. This clock allows organisms to coordinate their metabolism and development with predicted daily and seasonal changes of the environment. In plants, circadian rhythms contribute to both evolutionary fitness and agricultural productivity. Nevertheless, we show that commercial barley varieties bred for short growing seasons by use of early maturity 8 (eam8) mutations, also termed mat-a, are severely compromised in clock gene expression and clock outputs. We identified EAM8 as a barley ortholog of the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock regulator EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) and demonstrate that eam8 accelerates the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth and inflorescence development. We propose that eam8 was selected as barley cultivation moved to high-latitude short-season environments in Europe because it allowed rapid flowering in genetic backgrounds that contained a previously selected late-flowering mutation of the photoperiod response gene Ppd-H1. We show that eam8 mutants have increased expression of the floral activator HvFT1, which is independent of allelic variation at Ppd-H1. The selection of independent eam8 mutations shows that this strategy facilitates short growth-season adaptation and expansion of the geographic range of barley, despite the pronounced clock defect.

  20. Modelling the dual role of Per phosphorylation and its effect on the period and phase of the mammalian circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Leloup, J-C; Goldbeter, A

    2011-01-01

    Circadian clocks are regulated at the post-translational level by a variety of processes among which protein phosphorylation plays a prominent, although complex, role. Thus, the phosphorylation of different sites on the clock protein PER by casein kinase I (CKI) can lead to opposite effects on the stability of the protein and on the period of circadian oscillations. Here the authors extend a computational model previously proposed for the mammalian circadian clock by incorporating two distinct phosphorylations of PER by CKI. On the basis of experimental observations the authors consider that phosphorylation at one site (denoted here PER-P1) enhances the rate of degradation of the protein and decreases the period, while phosphorylation at another site (PER-P2) stabilises the protein, enhances the transcription of the Per gene, and increases the period. The model also incorporates an additional phosphorylation of PER by the Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK3). The authors show that the extended model incorporating the antagonistic effects of PER phosphorylations by CKI can account for observations pertaining to (i) the decrease in period in the Tau mutant, because of an increase in phosphorylation by CKI leading to PER-P1, and (ii) the familial advanced sleep phase syndrome (FASPS) in which the period is shortened and the phase of the oscillations is advanced when the rate of phosphorylation leading to PER-P2 is decreased. The model further accounts for the increase in period observed in the presence of CKI inhibitors that decrease the rate of phosphorylation leading to both PER-P1 and PER-P2. A similar increase in period results from inhibition of GSK3. [Includes supplementary material]. PMID:21261401

  1. Catabolic cytokines disrupt the circadian clock and the expression of clock-controlled genes in cartilage via an NFкB-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guo, B.; Yang, N.; Borysiewicz, E.; Dudek, M.; Williams, J.L.; Li, J.; Maywood, E.S.; Adamson, A.; Hastings, M.H.; Bateman, J.F.; White, M.R.H.; Boot-Handford, R.P.; Meng, Q.J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To define how the catabolic cytokines (Interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)) affect the circadian clock mechanism and the expression of clock-controlled catabolic genes within cartilage, and to identify the downstream pathways linking the cytokines to the molecular clock within chondrocytes. Methods Ex vivo cartilage explants were isolated from the Cry1-luc or PER2::LUC clock reporter mice. Clock gene dynamics were monitored in real-time by bioluminescence photon counting. Gene expression changes were studied by qRT-PCR. Functional luc assays were used to study the function of the core Clock/BMAL1 complex in SW-1353 cells. NFкB pathway inhibitor and fluorescence live-imaging of cartilage were performed to study the underlying mechanisms. Results Exposure to IL-1β severely disrupted circadian gene expression rhythms in cartilage. This effect was reversed by an anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone, but not by other clock synchronizing agents. Circadian disruption mediated by IL-1β was accompanied by disregulated expression of endogenous clock genes and clock-controlled catabolic pathways. Mechanistically, NFкB signalling was involved in the effect of IL-1β on the cartilage clock in part through functional interference with the core Clock/BMAL1 complex. In contrast, TNFα had little impact on the circadian rhythm and clock gene expression in cartilage. Conclusion In our experimental system (young healthy mouse cartilage), we demonstrate that IL-1β (but not TNFα) abolishes circadian rhythms in Cry1-luc and PER2::LUC gene expression. These data implicate disruption of the chondrocyte clock as a novel aspect of the catabolic responses of cartilage to pro-inflammatory cytokines, and provide an additional mechanism for how chronic joint inflammation may contribute to osteoarthritis (OA). PMID:26521744

  2. The role of mPer2 clock gene in glucocorticoid and feeding rhythms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shutong; Liu, Aiyi; Weidenhammer, Adam; Cooksey, Robert C; McClain, Donald; Kim, Myung K; Aguilera, Greti; Abel, E Dale; Chung, Jay H

    2009-05-01

    The circadian clock synchronizes the activity level of an organism to the light-dark cycle of the environment. Energy intake, as well as energy metabolism, also has a diurnal rhythm. Although the role of the clock genes in the sleep-wake cycle is well characterized, their role in the generation of the metabolic rhythms is poorly understood. Here, we use mice deficient in the clock protein mPer2 to study how the circadian clock regulates two critical metabolic rhythms: glucocorticoid and food intake rhythms. Our findings indicate that mPer2-/- mice do not have a glucocorticoid rhythm even though the corticosterone response to hypoglycemia, ACTH, and restraint stress is intact. In addition, the diurnal feeding rhythm is absent in mPer2-/- mice. On high-fat diet, they eat as much during the light period as they do during the dark period and develop significant obesity. The diurnal rhythm of neuroendocrine peptide alphaMSH, a major effector of appetite control, is disrupted in the hypothalamus of mPer2-/- mice even though the diurnal rhythm of ACTH, the alphaMSH precursor, is intact. Peripheral injection of alphaMSH, which has been shown to enter the brain, restored the feeding rhythm and induced weight loss in mPer2-/- mice. These findings emphasize the requirement of mPer2 in appetite control during the inactive period and the potential role of peripherally administered alphaMSH in restoring night-day eating pattern in individuals with circadian eating disorders such as night-eating syndrome, which is also associated with obesity.

  3. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Spoelstra, Kamiel; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew S. I.; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close to or equal to the natural light–dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive (“circadian resonance hypothesis”). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natural conditions for any eukaryotic organism. We tested this hypothesis in mice bearing a short-period mutation in the enzyme casein kinase 1ε (tau mutation), which accelerates free-running circadian cycles. We compared daily activity (feeding) rhythms, survivorship, and reproduction in six replicate populations in outdoor experimental enclosures, established with wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous mice in a Mendelian ratio. In the release cohort, survival was reduced in the homozygote mutant mice, revealing strong selection against short-period genotypes. Over the course of 14 mo, the relative frequency of the tau allele dropped from initial parity to 20%. Adult survival and recruitment of juveniles into the population contributed approximately equally to the selection for wild-type alleles. The expression of activity during daytime varied throughout the experiment and was significantly increased by the tau mutation. The strong selection against the short-period tau allele observed here contrasts with earlier studies showing absence of selection against a Period 2 (Per2) mutation, which disrupts internal clock function, but does not change period length. These findings are consistent with, and predicted by the theory that resonance of the circadian system plays an important role in individual fitness. PMID:26715747

  4. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice.

    PubMed

    Spoelstra, Kamiel; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew S I; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-19

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close to or equal to the natural light-dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive ("circadian resonance hypothesis"). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natural conditions for any eukaryotic organism. We tested this hypothesis in mice bearing a short-period mutation in the enzyme casein kinase 1ε (tau mutation), which accelerates free-running circadian cycles. We compared daily activity (feeding) rhythms, survivorship, and reproduction in six replicate populations in outdoor experimental enclosures, established with wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous mice in a Mendelian ratio. In the release cohort, survival was reduced in the homozygote mutant mice, revealing strong selection against short-period genotypes. Over the course of 14 mo, the relative frequency of the tau allele dropped from initial parity to 20%. Adult survival and recruitment of juveniles into the population contributed approximately equally to the selection for wild-type alleles. The expression of activity during daytime varied throughout the experiment and was significantly increased by the tau mutation. The strong selection against the short-period tau allele observed here contrasts with earlier studies showing absence of selection against a Period 2 (Per2) mutation, which disrupts internal clock function, but does not change period length. These findings are consistent with, and predicted by the theory that resonance of the circadian system plays an important role in individual fitness.

  5. Diurnal Preference Predicts Phase Differences in Expression of Human Peripheral Circadian Clock Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Andrew; Gellerman, David; Ay, Ahmet; Woods, Kerri Pruitt; Filipowicz, Allan Michael; Jain, Kriti; Bearden, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Circadian rhythms play an integral role in human behavior, physiology and health. Individual differences in daily rhythms (chronotypes) can affect individual sleep-wake cycles, activity patterns and behavioral choices. Diurnal preference, the tendency towards morningness or eveningness among individuals, has been associated with interpersonal variation in circadian clock-related output measures, including body temperature, melatonin levels and clock gene mRNA in blood, oral mucosa, and dermal fibroblast cell cultures. Methods: Here we report gene expression data from two principal clock genes sampled from hair follicle cells, a peripheral circadian clock. Hair follicle cells from fourteen individuals of extreme morning or evening chronotype were sampled at three time points. RNA was extracted and quantitative PCR assays were used to measure mRNA expression patterns of two clock genes, Per3 and Nr1d2. Results: We found significant differences in clock gene expression over time between chronotype groups, independent of gender or age of participants. Extreme evening chronotypes have a delay in phase of circadian clock gene oscillation relative to extreme morning types. Variation in the molecular clockwork of chronotype groups represents nearly three-hour phase differences (Per3: 2.61 hours; Nr1d2: 3.08 hours, both: 2.86) in circadian oscillations of these clock genes. Conclusions: The measurement of gene expression from hair follicles at three time points allows for a direct, efficient method of estimating phase shifts of a peripheral circadian clock in real-life conditions. The robust phase differences in temporal expression of clock genes associated with diurnal preferences provide the framework for further studies of the molecular mechanisms and gene-by-environment interactions underlying chronotype-specific behavioral phenomena, including social jetlag. PMID:27103930

  6. Feeding period restriction alters the expression of peripheral circadian rhythm genes without changing body weight in mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hagoon; Lee, Gung; Kong, Jinuk; Choi, Goun; Park, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Jae Bum

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the circadian clock is closely associated with metabolic regulation. However, whether an impaired circadian clock is a direct cause of metabolic dysregulation such as body weight gain is not clearly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that body weight gain in mice is not significantly changed by restricting feeding period to daytime or nighttime. The expression of peripheral circadian clock genes was altered by feeding period restriction, while the expression of light-regulated hypothalamic circadian clock genes was unaffected by either a normal chow diet (NCD) or a high-fat diet (HFD). In the liver, the expression pattern of circadian clock genes, including Bmal1, Clock, and Per2, was changed by different feeding period restrictions. Moreover, the expression of lipogenic genes, gluconeogenic genes, and fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver was also altered by feeding period restriction. Given that feeding period restriction does not affect body weight gain with a NCD or HFD, it is likely that the amount of food consumed might be a crucial factor in determining body weight. Collectively, these data suggest that feeding period restriction modulates the expression of peripheral circadian clock genes, which is uncoupled from light-sensitive hypothalamic circadian clock genes.

  7. Molecular clock of HIV-1 envelope genes under early immune selection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Park, Sung Yong; Love, Tanzy M. T.; Perelson, Alan S.; Mack, Wendy J.; Lee, Ha Youn

    2016-06-01

    Here, the molecular clock hypothesis that genes or proteins evolve at a constant rate is a key tool to reveal phylogenetic relationships among species. Using the molecular clock, we can trace an infection back to transmission using HIV-1 sequences from a single time point. Whether or not a strict molecular clock applies to HIV-1’s early evolution in the presence of immune selection has not yet been fully examined.

  8. Identification, Characterization, and Diel Pattern of Expression of Canonical Clock Genes in Nephrops norvegicus (Crustacea: Decapoda) Eyestalk.

    PubMed

    Sbragaglia, Valerio; Lamanna, Francesco; M Mat, Audrey; Rotllant, Guiomar; Joly, Silvia; Ketmaier, Valerio; de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Aguzzi, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus, is a burrowing decapod with a rhythmic burrow emergence (24 h) governed by the circadian system. It is an important resource for European fisheries and its behavior deeply affects its availability. The current knowledge of Nephrops circadian biology is phenomenological as it is currently the case for almost all crustaceans. In attempt to elucidate the putative molecular mechanisms underlying circadian gene regulation in Nephrops, we used a transcriptomics approach on cDNA extracted from the eyestalk, a structure playing a crucial role in controlling behavior of decapods. We studied 14 male lobsters under 12-12 light-darkness blue light cycle. We used the Hiseq 2000 Illumina platform to sequence two eyestalk libraries (under light and darkness conditions) obtaining about 90 millions 100-bp paired-end reads. Trinity was used for the de novo reconstruction of transcriptomes; the size at which half of all assembled bases reside in contigs (N50) was equal to 1796 (light) and 2055 (darkness). We found a list of candidate clock genes and focused our attention on canonical ones: timeless, period, clock and bmal1. The cloning of assembled fragments validated Trinity outputs. The putative Nephrops clock genes showed high levels of identity (blastx on NCBI) with known crustacean clock gene homologs such as Eurydice pulchra (period: 47%, timeless: 59%, bmal1: 79%) and Macrobrachium rosenbergii (clock: 100%). We also found a vertebrate-like cryptochrome 2. RT-qPCR showed that only timeless had a robust diel pattern of expression. Our data are in accordance with the current knowledge of the crustacean circadian clock, reinforcing the idea that the molecular clockwork of this group shows some differences with the established model in Drosophila melanogaster.

  9. Identification, Characterization, and Diel Pattern of Expression of Canonical Clock Genes in Nephrops norvegicus (Crustacea: Decapoda) Eyestalk

    PubMed Central

    Sbragaglia, Valerio; Lamanna, Francesco; M. Mat, Audrey; Rotllant, Guiomar; Joly, Silvia; Ketmaier, Valerio; de la Iglesia, Horacio O.; Aguzzi, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus, is a burrowing decapod with a rhythmic burrow emergence (24 h) governed by the circadian system. It is an important resource for European fisheries and its behavior deeply affects its availability. The current knowledge of Nephrops circadian biology is phenomenological as it is currently the case for almost all crustaceans. In attempt to elucidate the putative molecular mechanisms underlying circadian gene regulation in Nephrops, we used a transcriptomics approach on cDNA extracted from the eyestalk, a structure playing a crucial role in controlling behavior of decapods. We studied 14 male lobsters under 12–12 light-darkness blue light cycle. We used the Hiseq 2000 Illumina platform to sequence two eyestalk libraries (under light and darkness conditions) obtaining about 90 millions 100-bp paired-end reads. Trinity was used for the de novo reconstruction of transcriptomes; the size at which half of all assembled bases reside in contigs (N50) was equal to 1796 (light) and 2055 (darkness). We found a list of candidate clock genes and focused our attention on canonical ones: timeless, period, clock and bmal1. The cloning of assembled fragments validated Trinity outputs. The putative Nephrops clock genes showed high levels of identity (blastx on NCBI) with known crustacean clock gene homologs such as Eurydice pulchra (period: 47%, timeless: 59%, bmal1: 79%) and Macrobrachium rosenbergii (clock: 100%). We also found a vertebrate-like cryptochrome 2. RT-qPCR showed that only timeless had a robust diel pattern of expression. Our data are in accordance with the current knowledge of the crustacean circadian clock, reinforcing the idea that the molecular clockwork of this group shows some differences with the established model in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:26524198

  10. Identification, Characterization, and Diel Pattern of Expression of Canonical Clock Genes in Nephrops norvegicus (Crustacea: Decapoda) Eyestalk.

    PubMed

    Sbragaglia, Valerio; Lamanna, Francesco; M Mat, Audrey; Rotllant, Guiomar; Joly, Silvia; Ketmaier, Valerio; de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Aguzzi, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus, is a burrowing decapod with a rhythmic burrow emergence (24 h) governed by the circadian system. It is an important resource for European fisheries and its behavior deeply affects its availability. The current knowledge of Nephrops circadian biology is phenomenological as it is currently the case for almost all crustaceans. In attempt to elucidate the putative molecular mechanisms underlying circadian gene regulation in Nephrops, we used a transcriptomics approach on cDNA extracted from the eyestalk, a structure playing a crucial role in controlling behavior of decapods. We studied 14 male lobsters under 12-12 light-darkness blue light cycle. We used the Hiseq 2000 Illumina platform to sequence two eyestalk libraries (under light and darkness conditions) obtaining about 90 millions 100-bp paired-end reads. Trinity was used for the de novo reconstruction of transcriptomes; the size at which half of all assembled bases reside in contigs (N50) was equal to 1796 (light) and 2055 (darkness). We found a list of candidate clock genes and focused our attention on canonical ones: timeless, period, clock and bmal1. The cloning of assembled fragments validated Trinity outputs. The putative Nephrops clock genes showed high levels of identity (blastx on NCBI) with known crustacean clock gene homologs such as Eurydice pulchra (period: 47%, timeless: 59%, bmal1: 79%) and Macrobrachium rosenbergii (clock: 100%). We also found a vertebrate-like cryptochrome 2. RT-qPCR showed that only timeless had a robust diel pattern of expression. Our data are in accordance with the current knowledge of the crustacean circadian clock, reinforcing the idea that the molecular clockwork of this group shows some differences with the established model in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:26524198

  11. Chronic mild stress alters circadian expressions of molecular clock genes in the liver.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kei; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tsukita, Sohei; Kaneko, Keizo; Shirai, Yuta; Munakata, Yuichiro; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Imai, Junta; Uno, Kenji; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sawada, Shojiro; Oka, Yoshitomo; Katagiri, Hideki

    2013-02-01

    Chronic stress is well known to affect metabolic regulation. However, molecular mechanisms interconnecting stress response systems and metabolic regulations have yet to be elucidated. Various physiological processes, including glucose/lipid metabolism, are regulated by the circadian clock, and core clock gene dysregulation reportedly leads to metabolic disorders. Glucocorticoids, acting as end-effectors of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, entrain the circadian rhythms of peripheral organs, including the liver, by phase-shifting core clock gene expressions. Therefore, we examined whether chronic stress affects circadian expressions of core clock genes and metabolism-related genes in the liver using the chronic mild stress (CMS) procedure. In BALB/c mice, CMS elevated and phase-shifted serum corticosterone levels, indicating overactivation of the HPA axis. The rhythmic expressions of core clock genes, e.g., Clock, Npas2, Bmal1, Per1, and Cry1, were altered in the liver while being completely preserved in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuculeus (SCN), suggesting that the SCN is not involved in alterations in hepatic core clock gene expressions. In addition, circadian patterns of glucose and lipid metabolism-related genes, e.g., peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (Ppar) α, Pparγ-1, Pparγ-coactivator-1α, and phosphoenolepyruvate carboxykinase, were also disturbed by CMS. In contrast, in C57BL/6 mice, the same CMS procedure altered neither serum corticosterone levels nor rhythmic expressions of hepatic core clock genes and metabolism-related genes. Thus, chronic stress can interfere with the circadian expressions of both core clock genes and metabolism-related genes in the liver possibly involving HPA axis overactivation. This mechanism might contribute to metabolic disorders in stressful modern societies.

  12. Temporal dynamics of mouse hippocampal clock gene expression support memory processing.

    PubMed

    Jilg, Antje; Lesny, Sandra; Peruzki, Natalie; Schwegler, Herbert; Selbach, Oliver; Dehghani, Faramarz; Stehle, Jörg H

    2010-03-01

    Hippocampal plasticity and mnemonic processing exhibit a striking time-of-day dependence and likely implicate a temporally structured replay of memory traces. Molecular mechanisms fulfilling the requirements of sensing time and capturing time-related information are coded in dynamics of so-called clock genes and their protein products, first discovered and described in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Using real-time PCR and immunohistochemical analyses, we show that in wildtype mice core clock components (mPer1/PER1, mPer2/PER2, mCry1/CRY1, mCry2/CRY2, mClock/CLOCK, mBmal1/BMAL1) are expressed in neurons of all subregions of the hippocampus in a time-locked fashion over a 24-h (diurnal) day/night cycle. Temporal profiling of these transcriptional regulators reveals distinct and parallel peaks, at times when memory traces are usually formed and/or consolidated. The coordinated rhythmic expression of hippocampal clock gene expression is greatly disordered in mice deficient for the clock gene mPer1, a key player implicated in both, maintenance and adaptative plasticity of circadian clocks. Moreover, Per1-knockout animals are severely handicapped in a hippocampus-dependent long-term spatial learning paradigm. We propose that the dynamics of hippocampal clock gene expression imprint a temporal structure on memory processing and shape at the same time the efficacy of behavioral learning. PMID:19437502

  13. Isoform switching facilitates period control in the Neurospora crassa circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Ozgur E; Locke, James C W; Tang, Sanyi; Carré, Isabelle; Millar, Andrew J; Rand, David A

    2008-01-01

    A striking and defining feature of circadian clocks is the small variation in period over a physiological range of temperatures. This is referred to as temperature compensation, although recent work has suggested that the variation observed is a specific, adaptive control of period. Moreover, given that many biological rate constants have a Q10 of around 2, it is remarkable that such clocks remain rhythmic under significant temperature changes. We introduce a new mathematical model for the Neurospora crassa circadian network incorporating experimental work showing that temperature alters the balance of translation between a short and long form of the FREQUENCY (FRQ) protein. This is used to discuss period control and functionality for the Neurospora system. The model reproduces a broad range of key experimental data on temperature dependence and rhythmicity, both in wild-type and mutant strains. We present a simple mechanism utilising the presence of the FRQ isoforms (isoform switching) by which period control could have evolved, and argue that this regulatory structure may also increase the temperature range where the clock is robustly rhythmic. PMID:18277380

  14. Circadian Rhythm Genes CLOCK and PER3 Polymorphisms and Morning Gastric Motility in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Mitsue; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Takagi, Ayaka; Motokubota, Naoko; Komai, Naho; Sakane, Naoki; Moritani, Toshio; Nagai, Narumi

    2015-01-01

    Background Clock genes regulate circadian rhythm and are involved in various physiological processes, including digestion. We therefore investigated the association between the CLOCK 3111T/C single nucleotide polymorphism and the Period3 (PER3) variable-number tandem-repeat polymorphism (either 4 or 5 repeats 54 nt in length) with morning gastric motility. Methods Lifestyle questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were performed with 173 female volunteers (mean age, 19.4 years). Gastric motility, evaluated by electrogastrography (EGG), blood pressure, and heart rate levels were measured at 8:30 a.m. after an overnight fast. For gastric motility, the spectral powers (% normal power) and dominant frequency (DF, peak of the power spectrum) of the EGG were evaluated. The CLOCK and PER3 polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results Subjects with the CLOCK C allele (T/C or C/C genotypes: n = 59) showed a significantly lower DF (mean, 2.56 cpm) than those with the T/T genotype (n = 114, 2.81 cpm, P < 0.05). Subjects with the longer PER3 allele (PER34/5 or PER35/5 genotypes: n = 65) also showed a significantly lower DF (2.55 cpm) than those with the shorter PER34/4 genotype (n = 108, 2.83 cpm, P < 0.05). Furthermore, subjects with both the T/C or C/C and PER34/5 or PER35/5 genotypes showed a significantly lower DF (2.43 cpm, P < 0.05) than subjects with other combinations of the alleles (T/T and PER34/4 genotype, T/C or C/C and PER34/4 genotypes, and T/T and PER34/5 or PER35/5 genotypes). Conclusions These results suggest that minor polymorphisms of the circadian rhythm genes CLOCK and PER3 may be associated with poor morning gastric motility, and may have a combinatorial effect. The present findings may offer a new viewpoint on the role of circadian rhythm genes on the peripheral circadian systems, including the time-keeping function of the gut. PMID:25775462

  15. Direct Repression of Evening Genes by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 in the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kamioka, Mari; Takao, Saori; Suzuki, Takamasa; Taki, Kyomi; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Nakamichi, Norihito

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a biological timekeeping system that provides organisms with the ability to adapt to day-night cycles. Timing of the expression of four members of the Arabidopsis thaliana PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR) family is crucial for proper clock function, and transcriptional control of PRRs remains incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that direct regulation of PRR5 by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) determines the repression state of PRR5 in the morning. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses indicated that CCA1 associates with three separate regions upstream of PRR5. CCA1 and its homolog LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) suppressed PRR5 promoter activity in a transient assay. The regions bound by CCA1 in the PRR5 promoter gave rhythmic patterns with troughs in the morning, when CCA1 and LHY are at high levels. Furthermore, ChIP-seq revealed that CCA1 associates with at least 449 loci with 863 adjacent genes. Importantly, this gene set contains genes that are repressed but upregulated in cca1 lhy double mutants in the morning. This study shows that direct binding by CCA1 in the morning provides strong repression of PRR5, and repression by CCA1 also temporally regulates an evening-expressed gene set that includes PRR5. PMID:26941090

  16. Acute light exposure suppresses circadian rhythms in clock gene expression.

    PubMed

    Grone, Brian P; Chang, Doris; Bourgin, Patrice; Cao, Vinh; Fernald, Russell D; Heller, H Craig; Ruby, Norman F

    2011-02-01

    Light can induce arrhythmia in circadian systems by several weeks of constant light or by a brief light stimulus given at the transition point of the phase response curve. In the present study, a novel light treatment consisting of phase advance and phase delay photic stimuli given on 2 successive nights was used to induce circadian arrhythmia in the Siberian hamster ( Phodopus sungorus). We therefore investigated whether loss of rhythms in behavior was due to arrhythmia within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). SCN tissue samples were obtained at 6 time points across 24 h in constant darkness from entrained and arrhythmic hamsters, and per1, per2 , bmal1, and cry1 mRNA were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. The light treatment eliminated circadian expression of clock genes within the SCN, and the overall expression of these genes was reduced by 18% to 40% of entrained values. Arrhythmia in per1, per2, and bmal1 was due to reductions in the amplitudes of their oscillations. We suggest that these data are compatible with an amplitude suppression model in which light induces singularity in the molecular circadian pacemaker.

  17. Circadian clock genes universally control key agricultural traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian clocks are endogenous timers that enable plants to synchronize biological processes with daily and seasonal environmental conditions in order to allocate resources during the most beneficial times of day and year. The circadian clock regulates a number of central plant activities, includin...

  18. Effect of Light on Expression of Clock Genes in Xenopus laevis Melanophores.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Magalhães Moraes, Maria Nathália; de Oliveira Poletini, Maristela; Ramos, Bruno Cesar Ribeiro; de Lima, Leonardo Henrique Ribeiro Graciani; de Lauro Castrucci, Ana Maria

    2013-12-26

    Light-dark cycles are considered important cues to entrain biological clocks. A feedback loop of clock gene transcription and translation is the molecular basis underlying the mechanism of both central and peripheral clocks. Xenopus laevis embryonic melanophores respond to light with melanin granule dispersion, response possibly mediated by the photopigment melanopsin. In order to test whether light modulates clock gene expression in Xenopus melanophores, we used qPCR to evaluate the relative mRNA levels of Per1, Per2, Clock and Bmal1 in cultured melanophores exposed to light-dark (LD) cycle or constant darkness (DD). LD cycles elicited temporal changes in the expression of Per1, Per2 and Bmal1. A 10-min pulse of blue light was able to increase the expression of Per1 and Per2. Red light had no effect on the expression of these clock genes. These data suggest the participation of a blue-wavelength sensitive pigment in the light-dark cycle-mediated oscillation of the endogenous clock. Our results add an important contribution to the emerging field of peripheral clocks, which in non-mammalian vertebrates have been mostly studied in Drosophila and Danio rerio. Within this context, we show that Xenopus laevis melanophores, which have already led to melanopsin discovery, represent an ideal model to understanding circadian rhythms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of light on expression of clock genes in Xenopus laevis melanophores.

    PubMed

    Magalhães Moraes, Maria Nathália de Carvalho; de Oliveira Poletini, Maristela; Ribeiro Ramos, Bruno Cesar; de Lima, Leonardo Henrique Ribeiro Graciani; de Lauro Castrucci, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Light-dark cycles are considered important cues to entrain biological clocks. A feedback loop of clock gene transcription and translation is the molecular basis underlying the mechanism of both central and peripheral clocks. Xenopus laevis embryonic melanophores respond to light with melanin granule dispersion, response possibly mediated by the photopigment melanopsin. To test whether light modulates clock gene expression in Xenopus melanophores, we used qPCR to evaluate the relative mRNA levels of Per1, Per2, Clock and Bmal1 in cultured melanophores exposed to light-dark (LD) cycle or constant darkness (DD). LD cycles elicited temporal changes in the expression of Per1, Per2 and Bmal1. A 10-min pulse of blue light was able to increases the expression of Per1 and Per2. Red light had no effect on the expression of these clock genes. These data suggest the participation of a blue-wavelength sensitive pigment in the light-dark cycle-mediated oscillation of the endogenous clock. Our results add an important contribution to the emerging field of peripheral clocks, which in nonmammalian vertebrates have been mostly studied in Drosophila and Danio rerio. Within this context, we show that X. laevis melanophores, which have already led to melanopsin discovery, represent an ideal model to understanding circadian rhythms.

  20. Influence of age on clock gene expression in peripheral blood cells of healthy women.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hitoshi; Ushijima, Kentarou; Kumazaki, Masafumi; Takamura, Toshinari; Yokota, Noritsugu; Saito, Tetsuo; Irie, Shin; Kaneko, Shuichi; Fujimura, Akio

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a close relationship between circadian clock function and the development of obesity and various age-related diseases. In this study, we investigated whether messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of clock genes are associated with age, body mass index, blood pressures, fasting plasma glucose, or shift work. Peripheral blood cells were obtained from 70 healthy women, including 25 shift workers, at approximately 9:00 AM. Transcript levels of clock genes (CLOCK, BMAL1, PER1, and PER3) were determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Stepwise multiple regression analysis demonstrated that BMAL1 mRNA levels were correlated only with age (beta = -.50, p < .001). In contrast, PER3 levels were correlated with fasting plasma glucose (beta = -.29, p < .05) and shift work (beta = .31, p < .05). These results suggest that increased age, glucose intolerance, and irregular hours independently affect the intracellular clock in humans.

  1. Molecular analyses of circadian gene variants reveal sex-dependent links between depression and clocks.

    PubMed

    Shi, S-q; White, M J; Borsetti, H M; Pendergast, J S; Hida, A; Ciarleglio, C M; de Verteuil, P A; Cadar, A G; Cala, C; McMahon, D G; Shelton, R C; Williams, S M; Johnson, C H

    2016-03-01

    An extensive literature links circadian irregularities and/or sleep abnormalities to mood disorders. Despite the strong genetic component underlying many mood disorders, however, previous genetic associations between circadian clock gene variants and major depressive disorder (MDD) have been weak. We applied a combined molecular/functional and genetic association approach to circadian gene polymorphisms in sex-stratified populations of control subjects and case subjects suffering from MDD. This approach identified significant sex-dependent associations of common variants of the circadian clock genes hClock, hPer3 and hNpas2 with major depression and demonstrated functional effects of these polymorphisms on the expression or activity of the hCLOCK and hPER3 proteins, respectively. In addition, hCLOCK expression is affected by glucocorticoids, consistent with the sex-dependency of the genetic associations and the modulation of glucocorticoid-mediated stress response, providing a mechanism by which the circadian clock controls outputs that may affect psychiatric disorders. We conclude that genetic polymorphisms in circadian genes (especially hClock and hPer3, where functional assays could be tested) influence risk of developing depression in a sex- and stress-dependent manner. These studies support a genetic connection between circadian disruption and mood disorders, and confirm a key connection between circadian gene variation and major depression.

  2. Molecular analyses of circadian gene variants reveal sex-dependent links between depression and clocks

    PubMed Central

    Shi, S-q; White, M J; Borsetti, H M; Pendergast, J S; Hida, A; Ciarleglio, C M; de Verteuil, P A; Cadar, A G; Cala, C; McMahon, D G; Shelton, R C; Williams, S M; Johnson, C H

    2016-01-01

    An extensive literature links circadian irregularities and/or sleep abnormalities to mood disorders. Despite the strong genetic component underlying many mood disorders, however, previous genetic associations between circadian clock gene variants and major depressive disorder (MDD) have been weak. We applied a combined molecular/functional and genetic association approach to circadian gene polymorphisms in sex-stratified populations of control subjects and case subjects suffering from MDD. This approach identified significant sex-dependent associations of common variants of the circadian clock genes hClock, hPer3 and hNpas2 with major depression and demonstrated functional effects of these polymorphisms on the expression or activity of the hCLOCK and hPER3 proteins, respectively. In addition, hCLOCK expression is affected by glucocorticoids, consistent with the sex-dependency of the genetic associations and the modulation of glucocorticoid-mediated stress response, providing a mechanism by which the circadian clock controls outputs that may affect psychiatric disorders. We conclude that genetic polymorphisms in circadian genes (especially hClock and hPer3, where functional assays could be tested) influence risk of developing depression in a sex- and stress-dependent manner. These studies support a genetic connection between circadian disruption and mood disorders, and confirm a key connection between circadian gene variation and major depression. PMID:26926884

  3. The circadian Clock gene regulates acrosin activity of sperm through serine protease inhibitor A3K

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shuting; Liang, Xin; Wang, Yuhui; Jiang, Zhou; Liu, Yanyou; Hou, Wang; Li, Shiping; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study found that CLOCK knockdown in the testes of male mice led to a reduced fertility, which might be associated with the lower acrosin activity. In this present study, we examined the differential expression in proteins of CLOCK knockdown sperm. Clock gene expression was knocked down in cells to confirm those differentially expressions and serine protease inhibitor SERPINA3K was identified as a potential target. The up-regulated SERPINA3K revealed an inverse relationship with Clock knockdown. Direct treatment of normal sperm with recombinant SERPINA3K protein inhibited the acrosin activity and reduced in vitro fertilization rate. The luciferase reporter gene assay showed that the down-regulated of Clock gene could activate the Serpina3k promoter, but this activation was not affected by the mutation of E-box core sequence. Co-IP demonstrated a natural interaction between SERPIAN3K and RORs (α and β). Taken together, these results demonstrated that SERPINA3K is involved in the Clock gene-mediated male fertility by regulating acrosin activity and provide the first evidence that SERPINA3K could be regulated by Clock gene via retinoic acid-related orphan receptor response elements. PMID:26264441

  4. Atypical expression of circadian clock genes in denervated mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Reiko; Yamamoto, Saori; Horikawa, Kazumasa; Yasumoto, Yuki; Nikawa, Takeshi; Mukai, Chiaki; Oishi, Katsutaka

    2015-05-01

    The central circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus synchronizes peripheral clocks through neural and humoral signals in most mammalian tissues. Here, we analyzed the effects of unilateral sciatic denervation on the expression of circadian clock- and clock-controlled genes in the gastrocnemius muscles of mice twice per day on days 0, 3, 7, 9, 11 and 14 after denervation and six times on each of days 7 and 28 after denervation to assess the regulation mechanism of the circadian clock in skeletal muscle. Sciatic denervation did not affect systemic circadian rhythms since core body temperature (Day 7), corticosterone secretion (Days 7 and 28), and hepatic clock gene expression remained intact (Days 7 and 28). Expression levels of most circadian clock-related genes such as Arntl, Per1, Rora, Nr1d1 and Dbp were reduced in accordance with the extent of muscle atrophy, although circadian Per2 expression was significantly augmented (Day 28). Cosinor analysis revealed that the circadian expression of Arntl (Days 7 and 28) and Dbp (Day 28) was phase advanced in denervated muscle. The mRNA expression of Clock was significantly increased in denervated muscle on Day 3 when the severe atrophy was absent, and it was not affected by atrophic progression for 28 days. Sciatic denervation did not affect the expression of these genes in the contralateral muscle (Days 7 and 28), suggesting that humoral changes were not involved in denervation-induced muscle clock disruption. We then analyzed genome-wide gene expression using microarrays to determine the effects of disrupting the molecular clock in muscle on circadian rhythms at Day 7. Among 478 circadian genes, 313 lost rhythmicity in the denervated muscles. These denervation-sensitive genes included the lipid metabolism-related genes, Nrip1, Bbs1, Ptgis, Acot1, Scd2, Hpgd, Insig1, Dhcr24, Ldlr and Mboat1. Our findings revealed that sciatic denervation disrupts the circadian expression of clock and clock

  5. Duplicated Clock genes with unique polyglutamine domains provide evidence for nonhomologous recombination in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    O'Malley, K G; Banks, M A

    2008-01-01

    Circadian rhythms underlie diverse life functions ranging from cellular activities to behavior. Multiple clock genes play a central role in the generation of these rhythms. We partially characterized two copies of the Clock gene from Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), OtsClock1a and OtsClock1b. The 6,460 bp OtsClock1a sequence contains 16 exons, 15 introns and encompasses three highly conserved domains indicating it is a novel member of the bHLH-PAS superfamily of transcription factors. The second copy, OtsClock1b, consists of five exons and five introns spanning 1,945 bp. A polyglutamine repeat motif (PolyQ), characteristic of a majority of CLOCK proteins, is present in both OTSCLOCK1a and OTSCLOCK1b. However, the Chinook PolyQ domains are uniquely positioned inside the gene. Interestingly, a 1,200 bp non-coding segment located downstream of the OtsClock1a PolyQ domain is absent from OtsClock1b. This insertion/deletion is 91% similar to the Salmo salar Transferrin gene. A phylogenetic analysis of 11 CLOCK proteins shows that OtsClock1a and OtsClock1b are paralogs which likely arose subsequent to the salmonid genome-wide duplication event. Ultimately, the Chinook salmon Clock genes are key components to our understanding the genetic mechanisms underlying temporally regulated life history traits in Pacific salmonids. PMID:17503191

  6. Rhythmic changes in colonic motility are regulated by period genes.

    PubMed

    Hoogerwerf, Willemijntje A; Shahinian, Vahakn B; Cornélissen, Germaine; Halberg, Franz; Bostwick, Jonathon; Timm, John; Bartell, Paul A; Cassone, Vincent M

    2010-02-01

    Human bowel movements usually occur during the day and seldom during the night, suggesting a role for a biological clock in the regulation of colonic motility. Research has unveiled molecular and physiological mechanisms for biological clock function in the brain; less is known about peripheral rhythmicity. This study aimed to determine whether clock genes such as period 1 (per1) and period2 (per2) modulate rhythmic changes in colonic motility. Organ bath studies, intracolonic pressure measurements, and stool studies were used to examine measures of colonic motility in wild-type and per1per2 double-knockout mice. To further examine the mechanism underlying rhythmic changes in circular muscle contractility, additional studies were completed in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) knockout mice. Intracolonic pressure changes and stool output in vivo, and colonic circular muscle contractility ex vivo, are rhythmic with greatest activity at the start of night in nocturnal wild-type mice. In contrast, rhythmicity in these measures was absent in per1per2 double-knockout mice. Rhythmicity was also abolished in colonic circular muscle contractility of wild-type mice in the presence of N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and in nNOS knockout mice. These findings suggest that rhythms in colonic motility are regulated by both clock genes and a nNOS-mediated inhibitory process and suggest a connection between these two mechanisms.

  7. Rhythmic changes in colonic motility are regulated by period genes.

    PubMed

    Hoogerwerf, Willemijntje A; Shahinian, Vahakn B; Cornélissen, Germaine; Halberg, Franz; Bostwick, Jonathon; Timm, John; Bartell, Paul A; Cassone, Vincent M

    2010-02-01

    Human bowel movements usually occur during the day and seldom during the night, suggesting a role for a biological clock in the regulation of colonic motility. Research has unveiled molecular and physiological mechanisms for biological clock function in the brain; less is known about peripheral rhythmicity. This study aimed to determine whether clock genes such as period 1 (per1) and period2 (per2) modulate rhythmic changes in colonic motility. Organ bath studies, intracolonic pressure measurements, and stool studies were used to examine measures of colonic motility in wild-type and per1per2 double-knockout mice. To further examine the mechanism underlying rhythmic changes in circular muscle contractility, additional studies were completed in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) knockout mice. Intracolonic pressure changes and stool output in vivo, and colonic circular muscle contractility ex vivo, are rhythmic with greatest activity at the start of night in nocturnal wild-type mice. In contrast, rhythmicity in these measures was absent in per1per2 double-knockout mice. Rhythmicity was also abolished in colonic circular muscle contractility of wild-type mice in the presence of N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and in nNOS knockout mice. These findings suggest that rhythms in colonic motility are regulated by both clock genes and a nNOS-mediated inhibitory process and suggest a connection between these two mechanisms. PMID:19926812

  8. Rhythmic changes in colonic motility are regulated by period genes

    PubMed Central

    Shahinian, Vahakn B.; Cornélissen, Germaine; Halberg, Franz; Bostwick, Jonathon; Timm, John; Bartell, Paul A.; Cassone, Vincent M.

    2010-01-01

    Human bowel movements usually occur during the day and seldom during the night, suggesting a role for a biological clock in the regulation of colonic motility. Research has unveiled molecular and physiological mechanisms for biological clock function in the brain; less is known about peripheral rhythmicity. This study aimed to determine whether clock genes such as period 1 (per1) and period2 (per2) modulate rhythmic changes in colonic motility. Organ bath studies, intracolonic pressure measurements, and stool studies were used to examine measures of colonic motility in wild-type and per1per2 double-knockout mice. To further examine the mechanism underlying rhythmic changes in circular muscle contractility, additional studies were completed in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) knockout mice. Intracolonic pressure changes and stool output in vivo, and colonic circular muscle contractility ex vivo, are rhythmic with greatest activity at the start of night in nocturnal wild-type mice. In contrast, rhythmicity in these measures was absent in per1per2 double-knockout mice. Rhythmicity was also abolished in colonic circular muscle contractility of wild-type mice in the presence of Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and in nNOS knockout mice. These findings suggest that rhythms in colonic motility are regulated by both clock genes and a nNOS-mediated inhibitory process and suggest a connection between these two mechanisms. PMID:19926812

  9. Altered dynamics in the circadian oscillation of clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of patients suffering from idiopathic hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Julian; Halfter, Hartmut; Heidbreder, Anna; Röhr, Dominik; Gess, Burkhard; Boentert, Mathias; Osada, Nani; Young, Peter

    2014-01-01

    From single cell organisms to the most complex life forms, the 24-hour circadian rhythm is important for numerous aspects of physiology and behavior such as daily periodic fluctuations in body temperature and sleep-wake cycles. Influenced by environmental cues - mainly by light input -, the central pacemaker in the thalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) controls and regulates the internal clock mechanisms which are present in peripheral tissues. In order to correlate modifications in the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythm with the pathophysiology of idiopathic hypersomnia, this study aimed to investigate the dynamics of the expression of circadian clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of idiopathic hypersomniacs (IH) in comparison to those of healthy controls (HC). Ten clinically and polysomnographically proven IH patients were recruited from the department of sleep medicine of the University Hospital of Muenster. Clinical diagnosis was done by two consecutive polysomnographies (PSG) and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT). Fourteen clinical healthy volunteers served as control group. Dermal fibroblasts were obtained via punch biopsy and grown in cell culture. The expression of circadian clock genes was investigated by semiquantitative Reverse Transcriptase-PCR qRT-PCR analysis, confirming periodical oscillation of expression of the core circadian clock genes BMAL1, PER1/2 and CRY1/2. The amplitude of the rhythmically expressed BMAL1, PER1 and PER2 was significantly dampened in dermal fibroblasts of IH compared to HC over two circadian periods whereas the overall expression of only the key transcriptional factor BMAL1 was significantly reduced in IH. Our study suggests for the first time an aberrant dynamics in the circadian clock in IH. These findings may serve to better understand some clinical features of the pathophysiology in sleep - wake rhythms in IH. PMID:24454829

  10. Estradiol differently affects melanin synthesis of malignant and normal melanocytes: a relationship with clock and clock-controlled genes.

    PubMed

    Poletini, Maristela Oliveira; de Assis, Leonardo Vinicius Monteiro; Moraes, Maria Nathalia; Castrucci, Ana Maria de Lauro

    2016-10-01

    Melanin production within melanocytes is regulated, among others, by estradiol, whose effects on melanogenesis are still not completely elucidated. Here we show that although 10(-7) M 17β-estradiol (E2) increased tyrosinase mRNA levels in B16-F10 malignant melanocytes, there was a transient decrease and abolishment of the temporal variation of melanin content. Both parameters were much higher in the malignant than in normal Melan-a cells. Considering that silencing clock machinery in human melanocytes increases melanogenesis, we investigated clock gene expression in those cell lines. Except for Melan-a Bmal1 and B16-F10 Per2 expression of control cells, Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 expression increased independently of cell type or E2 treatment after 24 h. However, melanoma cells showed a marked increase in Per1 and Bma11 expression in response to E2 at the same time points, what may rule out E2 as a synchronizer agent since the expression of those genes were not in antiphase. Next, we investigated the expression of Xpa, a clock-controlled gene, which in Melan-a cells, peaked at 18 h, and E2 treatment shifted this peak to 24 h, whereas B16-F10 Xpa expression peaked at 24 h in both control and E2 group, and it was higher compared to Melan-a cells in both groups. Therefore, malignant and normal melanocytes display profound differences on core elements of the local clock, and how they respond to E2, what is most probably determinant of the differences seen on melanin synthesis and Tyrosinase and Xpa expression. Understanding these processes at the molecular level could bring new strategies to treat melanoma. PMID:27535239

  11. Messenger RNA expression of chicken CLOCK gene in the response to Campylobacter jejuni inoculation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyi; Liu, Liying; Zhang, Maozhi; Yang, Ning; Qi, Yukai; Sun, Yu; Li, Xianyao

    2015-09-01

    Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) is a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Previous research has shown that circadian rhythm plays a critical role in host response to C. jejuni colonization. The CLOCK gene is one of the core genes regulating circadian rhythms and shows significant expression on 7 d post-C. jejuni inoculation. The objective of this study was to investigate temporal and spatial expression of chicken CLOCK gene post-C. jejuni inoculation. Cecal and splenic RNA were isolated from 2 distinct chicken breeds and used to compare the mRNA expression of CLOCK gene between inoculated and noninoculated chickens within each breed and between breeds within each of inoculated and noninoculated groups. Our results showed that the CLOCK gene was significantly down-regulated at 20 h postinoculation (hpi) in cecum and spleen in Jiningbairi chicken. CLOCK gene was significantly down-regulated at 4 and 16 hpi and up-regulated at 8 hpi in cecum and spleen in specific pathogen free white leghorn noninoculated chicken. The findings suggested that expression of CLOCK gene was significantly changed post C. jejuin inoculation. This change was affected by genetic background, tissue, and time points postinoculation.

  12. Preferential retention of circadian clock genes during diploidization following whole genome triplication in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Lou, Ping; Wu, Jian; Cheng, Feng; Cressman, Laura G; Wang, Xiaowu; McClung, C Robertson

    2012-06-01

    Much has been learned about the architecture and function of the circadian clock of Arabidopsis thaliana, a model for plant circadian rhythms. Circadian rhythms contribute to evolutionary fitness, suggesting that circadian rhythmicity may also contribute to agricultural productivity. Therefore, we extend our study of the plant circadian clock to Brassica rapa, an agricultural crop. Since its separation from Arabidopsis, B. rapa has undergone whole genome triplication and subsequent diploidization that has involved considerable gene loss. We find that circadian clock genes are preferentially retained relative to comparison groups of their neighboring genes, a set of randomly chosen genes, and a set of housekeeping genes broadly conserved in eukaryotes. The preferential retention of clock genes is consistent with the gene dosage hypothesis, which predicts preferential retention of highly networked or dose-sensitive genes. Two gene families encoding transcription factors that play important roles in the plant core oscillator--the PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATORS, including TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1, and the REVEILLE family, including CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL--exhibit preferential retention consistent with the gene dosage hypothesis, but a third gene family, including ZEITLUPE, that encodes F-Box proteins that regulate posttranslational protein stability offers an exception.

  13. Calorie restriction regulates circadian clock gene expression through BMAL1 dependent and independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sonal A.; Velingkaar, Nikkhil; Makwana, Kuldeep; Chaudhari, Amol; Kondratov, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Feeding behavior, metabolism and circadian clocks are interlinked. Calorie restriction (CR) is a feeding paradigm known to extend longevity. We found that CR significantly affected the rhythms in the expression of circadian clock genes in mice on the mRNA and protein levels, suggesting that CR reprograms the clocks both transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally. The effect of CR on gene expression was distinct from the effects of time-restricted feeding or fasting. Furthermore, CR affected the circadian output through up- or down-regulation of the expression of several clock-controlled transcriptional factors and the longevity candidate genes. CR-dependent effects on some clock gene expression were impaired in the liver of mice deficient for BMAL1, suggesting importance of this transcriptional factor for the transcriptional reprogramming of the clock, however, BMAL1- independent mechanisms also exist. We propose that CR recruits biological clocks as a natural mechanism of metabolic optimization under conditions of limited energy resources. PMID:27170536

  14. Circadian Clock genes Per2 and clock regulate steroid production, cell proliferation, and luteinizing hormone receptor transcription in ovarian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Takashi; Hirai, Yuko; Murayama, Chiaki; Miyamoto, Akio; Miyazaki, Hitoshi; Miyazaki, Koyomi

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Per2 and Clock siRNAs decreased the number of granulosa cells and LHr expression. {yields}Per2 siRNA treatment did not stimulate the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom. {yields} Clock siRNA treatment inhibited the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom mRNA. {yields}Per2 and Clock siRNA treatment increased and unchanged, respectively, progesterone production in FSH-treated granulosa cells. {yields} The expression of StAR mRNA was increased by Per2 siRNA and unchanged by Clock siRNA. -- Abstract: Circadian Clock genes are associated with the estrous cycle in female animals. Treatment with Per2 and Clock siRNAs decreased the number of granulosa cells and LHr expression in follicle-stimulating hormone FSH-treated granulosa cells. Per2 siRNA treatment did not stimulate the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom, whereas Clock siRNA treatment inhibited the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom mRNA. Per2 and Clock siRNA treatment increased and unchanged, respectively, progesterone production in FSH-treated granulosa cells. Similarly, expression of StAR mRNA was increased by Per2 siRNA and unchanged by Clock siRNA. Our data provide a new insight that Per2 and Clock have different action on ovarian granulosa cell functions.

  15. Autocatalysis-driven clock reaction II: kinetics of the pentathionate-periodate reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Horváth, Attila K

    2014-10-23

    The pentathionate-periodate reaction has been investigated by spectrophotometrically monitoring the total amount of iodine evolved in the presence of phosphoric acid/dihydrogen phosphate buffer at 468 nm. The majority of the main characteristics of the title system is very reminiscent of that found recently in the pentathionate-iodate reaction, a system that led us to classify generally the clock reactions. Along with the pentathionate-iodate reaction the title system is proposed to belong to the autocatalysis-driven clock reactions as well. The kinetic model of the pentathionate-iodate system published recently was implemented by the necessary reactions of periodate to compose a 24-step kinetic model in which the mechanisms of the pentathionate-iodine, pentathionate-iodate, bisulfite-periodate, bisulfite-iodate, iodide-periodate, and the well-known Dushman reactions are combined. A thorough analysis revealed that the direct pentathionate-periodate reaction plays a role only to produce iodide ion via a finite sequence of reactions, and once its concentration reaches a certain level, the reaction is almost exclusively governed by the pentathionate-iodine, the iodide-periodate, and the Dushman reactions. As expected strong catalytic effect of the buffer composition is also found that can readily be explained by its well-known catalytic influence on the Dushman reaction. PMID:25268333

  16. The core clock gene Per1 phases molecular and electrical circadian rhythms in SCN neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeff R.

    2016-01-01

    The brain’s biological clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), exhibits endogenous 24-hour rhythms in gene expression and spontaneous firing rate; however, the functional relationship between these neuronal rhythms is not fully understood. Here, we used a Per1::GFP transgenic mouse line that allows for the simultaneous quantification of molecular clock state and firing rate in SCN neurons to examine the relationship between these key components of the circadian clock. We find that there is a stable, phased relationship between E-box-driven clock gene expression and spontaneous firing rate in SCN neurons and that these relationships are independent of light input onto the system or of GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic activity. Importantly, the concordant phasing of gene and neural rhythms is disrupted in the absence of the homologous clock gene Per1, but persists in the absence of the core clock gene Per2. These results suggest that Per1 plays a unique, non-redundant role in phasing gene expression and firing rate rhythms in SCN neurons to increase the robustness of cellular timekeeping. PMID:27602274

  17. The core clock gene Per1 phases molecular and electrical circadian rhythms in SCN neurons.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeff R; McMahon, Douglas G

    2016-01-01

    The brain's biological clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), exhibits endogenous 24-hour rhythms in gene expression and spontaneous firing rate; however, the functional relationship between these neuronal rhythms is not fully understood. Here, we used a Per1::GFP transgenic mouse line that allows for the simultaneous quantification of molecular clock state and firing rate in SCN neurons to examine the relationship between these key components of the circadian clock. We find that there is a stable, phased relationship between E-box-driven clock gene expression and spontaneous firing rate in SCN neurons and that these relationships are independent of light input onto the system or of GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic activity. Importantly, the concordant phasing of gene and neural rhythms is disrupted in the absence of the homologous clock gene Per1, but persists in the absence of the core clock gene Per2. These results suggest that Per1 plays a unique, non-redundant role in phasing gene expression and firing rate rhythms in SCN neurons to increase the robustness of cellular timekeeping. PMID:27602274

  18. The core clock gene Per1 phases molecular and electrical circadian rhythms in SCN neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeff R.

    2016-01-01

    The brain’s biological clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), exhibits endogenous 24-hour rhythms in gene expression and spontaneous firing rate; however, the functional relationship between these neuronal rhythms is not fully understood. Here, we used a Per1::GFP transgenic mouse line that allows for the simultaneous quantification of molecular clock state and firing rate in SCN neurons to examine the relationship between these key components of the circadian clock. We find that there is a stable, phased relationship between E-box-driven clock gene expression and spontaneous firing rate in SCN neurons and that these relationships are independent of light input onto the system or of GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic activity. Importantly, the concordant phasing of gene and neural rhythms is disrupted in the absence of the homologous clock gene Per1, but persists in the absence of the core clock gene Per2. These results suggest that Per1 plays a unique, non-redundant role in phasing gene expression and firing rate rhythms in SCN neurons to increase the robustness of cellular timekeeping.

  19. Association between genetic variants of the clock gene and obesity and sleep duration.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Macarena; Obregón, Ana María; Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors related to lifestyle aspects. It has been shown that reduced sleep is associated with increased body mass index (BMI). Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK) gene variants have also been associated with obesity. The objective of this mini-review was to discuss the available literature related to CLOCK gene variants associated with adiposity and sleep duration in humans. In total, 16 articles complied with the terms of the search that reported CLOCK variants associated with sleep duration, energy intake, and BMI. Overall, six CLOCK single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with sleep duration, and three variants have been associated with energy intake variables. Overall, the most studied area has been the association of CLOCK gene with obesity; close to eight common variants have been associated with obesity. The most studied CLOCK SNP in different populations is rs1801260, and most of these populations correspond to European populations. Collectively, identifying at risk CLOCK genotypes is a new area of research that may help identify individuals who are more susceptible to overeating and gaining weight when exposed to short sleep durations. PMID:26553137

  20. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation. PMID:27631008

  1. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation.

  2. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Sun, Ning; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe; Lu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation.

  3. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Sun, Ning; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe; Lu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation. PMID:27631008

  4. Daily differential expression of melatonin-related genes and clock genes in rat cumulus-oocyte complex: changes after pinealectomy.

    PubMed

    Coelho, L A; Peres, R; Amaral, F G; Reiter, R J; Cipolla-Neto, J

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the maturational stage (immature and mature ovaries) differences of mRNA expression of melatonin-forming enzymes (Aanat and Asmt), melatonin membrane receptors (Mt1 and Mt2) and putative nuclear (Rorα) receptors, and clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Cry2) in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) from weaning Wistar rats. We also examined the effects of pinealectomy and of melatonin pharmacological replacement on the daily expression of these genes in COC. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that in oocytes, the mRNA expression of Asmt, Mt2, Clock, Bmal1, Per2, and Cry1 were higher (P < 0.05) in immature ovaries than in the mature ones. In cumulus cells, the same pattern of mRNA expression for Asmt, Aanat, Rorα, Clock, Per1, Cry1, and Cry2 genes was observed. In oocytes, pinealectomy altered the daily mRNA expression profiles of Asmt, Mt1, Mt2, Clock, Per1, Cry1, and Cry2 genes. In cumulus cells, removal of the pineal altered the mRNA expression profiles of Mt1, Mt2, Rorα, Aanat, Asmt, Clock, Bmal1, Per2, Cry1, and Cry2 genes. Melatonin treatment partially or completely re-established the daily mRNA expression profiles of most genes studied. The mRNA expression of melatonin-related genes and clock genes in rat COC varies with the maturational stage of the meiotic cellular cycle in addition to the hour of the day. This suggests that melatonin might act differentially in accordance with the maturational stage of cumulus/oocyte complex. In addition, it seems that circulating pineal melatonin is very important in the design of the daily profile of mRNA expression of COC clock genes and genes related to melatonin synthesis and action.

  5. In vivo imaging of clock gene expression in multiple tissues of freely moving mice.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Toshiyuki; Sutherland, Kenneth; Ishikawa, Masayori; Miyamoto, Naoki; Honma, Sato; Shirato, Hiroki; Honma, Ken-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Clock genes are expressed throughout the body, although how they oscillate in unrestrained animals is not known. Here, we show an in vivo imaging technique that enables long-term simultaneous imaging of multiple tissues. We use dual-focal 3D tracking and signal-intensity calibration to follow gene expression in a target area. We measure circadian rhythms of clock genes in the olfactory bulb, right and left ears and cortices, and the skin. In addition, the kinetic relationship between gene expression and physiological responses to experimental cues is monitored. Under stable conditions gene expression is in phase in all tissues. In response to a long-duration light pulse, the olfactory bulb shifts faster than other tissues. In Cry1(-/-) Cry2(-/-) arrhythmic mice circadian oscillation is absent in all tissues. Thus, our system successfully tracks circadian rhythms in clock genes in multiple tissues in unrestrained mice. PMID:27285820

  6. Circadian and Circalunar Clock Interactions in a Marine Annelid

    PubMed Central

    Zantke, Juliane; Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko; Arboleda, Enrique; Lohs, Claudia; Schipany, Katharina; Hallay, Natalia; Straw, Andrew D.; Todo, Takeshi; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Life is controlled by multiple rhythms. Although the interaction of the daily (circadian) clock with environmental stimuli, such as light, is well documented, its relationship to endogenous clocks with other periods is little understood. We establish that the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii possesses endogenous circadian and circalunar (monthly) clocks and characterize their interactions. The RNAs of likely core circadian oscillator genes localize to a distinct nucleus of the worm’s forebrain. The worm’s forebrain also harbors a circalunar clock entrained by nocturnal light. This monthly clock regulates maturation and persists even when circadian clock oscillations are disrupted by the inhibition of casein kinase 1δ/ε. Both circadian and circalunar clocks converge on the regulation of transcript levels. Furthermore, the circalunar clock changes the period and power of circadian behavior, although the period length of the daily transcriptional oscillations remains unaltered. We conclude that a second endogenous noncircadian clock can influence circadian clock function. PMID:24075994

  7. Comparative study of pineal clock gene and AANAT2 expression in relation to melatonin synthesis in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    McStay, Elsbeth; Migaud, Herve; Vera, Luisa Maria; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Davie, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    The photoreceptive teleost pineal is considered to be essential to the generation, synchronisation and maintenance of biological rhythms, primarily via melatonin release. The role of internal (circadian clock) and external (light) signals controlling melatonin production in the fish pineal differs between species, yet the reasons underpinning this remain largely unknown. Whilst in salmonids, pineal melatonin is apparently regulated directly by light, in all other studied teleosts, rhythmic melatonin production persists endogenously under the regulation of clock gene expression. To better understand the role of clocks in teleost pineals, this study aimed to characterise the expression of selected clock genes in vitro under different photoperiodic conditions in comparison to in vivo in both Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and in European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) (in vitro 12L:12D), a species known to display endogenous rhythmic melatonin synthesis. Results revealed no rhythmic clock gene (Clock, Period 1 &2) expression in Atlantic salmon or European seabass (Clock and Period 1) pineal in vitro. However rhythmic expression of Cryptochrome 2 and Period 1 in the Atlantic salmon pineal was observed in vivo, which infers extra-pineal regulation of clocks in this species. No rhythmic arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (Aanat2) expression was observed in the Atlantic salmon yet in the European seabass, circadian Aanat2 expression was observed. Subsequent in silico analysis of available Aanat2 genomic sequences reveals that Atlantic salmon Aanat2 promoter sequences do not contain similar regulatory architecture as present in European seabass, and previously described in other teleosts which alludes to a loss in functional connection in the pathway.

  8. Sleep loss reduces the DNA-binding of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NPAS2 to specific clock genes in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Mongrain, Valérie; La Spada, Francesco; Curie, Thomas; Franken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that clock genes contribute to the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Indeed, mutations in some clock genes modify the markers of sleep homeostasis and an increase in homeostatic sleep drive alters clock gene expression in the forebrain. Here, we investigate a possible mechanism by which sleep deprivation (SD) could alter clock gene expression by quantifying DNA-binding of the core-clock transcription factors CLOCK, NPAS2, and BMAL1 to the cis-regulatory sequences of target clock genes in mice. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we first showed that, as reported for the liver, DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to target clock genes changes in function of time-of-day in the cerebral cortex. Tissue extracts were collected at ZT0 (light onset), -6, -12, and -18, and DNA enrichment of E-box or E'-box containing sequences was measured by qPCR. CLOCK and BMAL1 binding to Cry1, Dbp, Per1, and Per2 depended on time-of-day, with maximum values reached at around ZT6. We then observed that SD, performed between ZT0 and -6, significantly decreased DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to Dbp, consistent with the observed decrease in Dbp mRNA levels after SD. The DNA-binding of NPAS2 and BMAL1 to Per2 was also decreased by SD, although SD is known to increase Per2 expression in the cortex. DNA-binding to Per1 and Cry1 was not affected by SD. Our results show that the sleep-wake history can affect the clock molecular machinery directly at the level of chromatin binding thereby altering the cortical expression of Dbp and Per2 and likely other targets. Although the precise dynamics of the relationship between DNA-binding and mRNA expression, especially for Per2, remains elusive, the results also suggest that part of the reported circadian changes in DNA-binding of core clock components in tissues peripheral to the suprachiasmatic nuclei could, in fact, be sleep-wake driven.

  9. Sleep Loss Reduces the DNA-Binding of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NPAS2 to Specific Clock Genes in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Curie, Thomas; Franken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that clock genes contribute to the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Indeed, mutations in some clock genes modify the markers of sleep homeostasis and an increase in homeostatic sleep drive alters clock gene expression in the forebrain. Here, we investigate a possible mechanism by which sleep deprivation (SD) could alter clock gene expression by quantifying DNA-binding of the core-clock transcription factors CLOCK, NPAS2, and BMAL1 to the cis-regulatory sequences of target clock genes in mice. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we first showed that, as reported for the liver, DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to target clock genes changes in function of time-of-day in the cerebral cortex. Tissue extracts were collected at ZT0 (light onset), −6, −12, and −18, and DNA enrichment of E-box or E'-box containing sequences was measured by qPCR. CLOCK and BMAL1 binding to Cry1, Dbp, Per1, and Per2 depended on time-of-day, with maximum values reached at around ZT6. We then observed that SD, performed between ZT0 and −6, significantly decreased DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to Dbp, consistent with the observed decrease in Dbp mRNA levels after SD. The DNA-binding of NPAS2 and BMAL1 to Per2 was also decreased by SD, although SD is known to increase Per2 expression in the cortex. DNA-binding to Per1 and Cry1 was not affected by SD. Our results show that the sleep-wake history can affect the clock molecular machinery directly at the level of chromatin binding thereby altering the cortical expression of Dbp and Per2 and likely other targets. Although the precise dynamics of the relationship between DNA-binding and mRNA expression, especially for Per2, remains elusive, the results also suggest that part of the reported circadian changes in DNA-binding of core clock components in tissues peripheral to the suprachiasmatic nuclei could, in fact, be sleep-wake driven. PMID:22039518

  10. Circadian Clocks and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Marcheva, Biliana; Ramsey, Kathryn M.; Peek, Clara B.; Affinati, Alison; Maury, Eleonore; Bass, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks maintain periodicity in internal cycles of behavior, physiology, and metabolism, enabling organisms to anticipate the 24-h rotation of the Earth. In mammals, circadian integration of metabolic systems optimizes energy harvesting and utilization across the light/dark cycle. Disruption of clock genes has recently been linked to sleep disorders and to the development of cardiometabolic disease. Conversely, aberrant nutrient signaling affects circadian rhythms of behavior. This chapter reviews the emerging relationship between the molecular clock and metabolic systems and examines evidence that circadian disruption exerts deleterious consequences on human health. PMID:23604478

  11. Involvement of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in the influence of timed high-fat evening diet on the hepatic clock and lipogenic gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Zhu, Zengyan; Xie, Meilin; Xue, Jie

    2015-09-01

    A high-fat diet may result in changes in hepatic clock gene expression, but potential mechanisms are not yet elucidated. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recognized as a key regulator of energy metabolism and certain clock genes. Therefore, we hypothesized that AMPK may be involved in the alteration of hepatic clock gene expression under a high-fat environment. This study aimed to examine the effects of timed high-fat evening diet on the activity of hepatic AMPK, clock genes, and lipogenic genes. Mice with hyperlipidemic fatty livers were induced by orally administering high-fat milk via gavage every evening (19:00-20:00) for 6 weeks. Results showed that timed high-fat diet in the evening not only decreased the hepatic AMPK protein expression and activity but also disturbed its circadian rhythm. Accordingly, the hepatic clock genes, including clock, brain-muscle-Arnt-like 1, cryptochrome 2, and period 2, exhibited prominent changes in their expression rhythms and/or amplitudes. The diurnal rhythms of the messenger RNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1α, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 were also disrupted; the amplitude of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorγcoactivator 1α was significantly decreased at 3 time points, and fatty liver was observed. These findings demonstrate that timed high-fat diet at night can change hepatic AMPK protein levels, activity, and circadian rhythm, which may subsequently alter the circadian expression of several hepatic clock genes and finally result in the disorder of hepatic lipogenic gene expression and the formation of fatty liver.

  12. Circadian dysregulation of clock genes: clues to rapid treatments in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bunney, BG; Li, JZ; Walsh, DM; Stein, R; Vawter, MP; Cartagena, P; Barchas, JD; Schatzberg, AF; Myers, RM; Watson, SJ; Akil, H; Bunney, WE

    2016-01-01

    Conventional antidepressants require 2–8 weeks for a full clinical response. In contrast, two rapidly acting antidepressant interventions, low-dose ketamine and sleep deprivation (SD) therapy, act within hours to robustly decrease depressive symptoms in a subgroup of major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. Evidence that MDD may be a circadian-related illness is based, in part, on a large set of clinical data showing that diurnal rhythmicity (sleep, temperature, mood and hormone secretion) is altered during depressive episodes. In a microarray study, we observed widespread changes in cyclic gene expression in six regions of postmortem brain tissue of depressed patients matched with controls for time-of-death (TOD). We screened 12 000 transcripts and observed that the core clock genes, essential for controlling virtually all rhythms in the body, showed robust 24-h sinusoidal expression patterns in six brain regions in control subjects. In MDD patients matched for TOD with controls, the expression patterns of the clock genes in brain were significantly dysregulated. Some of the most robust changes were seen in anterior cingulate (ACC). These findings suggest that in addition to structural abnormalities, lesion studies, and the large body of functional brain imaging studies reporting increased activation in the ACC of depressed patients who respond to a wide range of therapies, there may be a circadian dysregulation in clock gene expression in a subgroup of MDDs. Here, we review human, animal and neuronal cell culture data suggesting that both low-dose ketamine and SD can modulate circadian rhythms. We hypothesize that the rapid antidepressant actions of ketamine and SD may act, in part, to reset abnormal clock genes in MDD to restore and stabilize circadian rhythmicity. Conversely, clinical relapse may reflect a desynchronization of the clock, indicative of a reactivation of abnormal clock gene function. Future work could involve identifying specific small

  13. Circadian dysregulation of clock genes: clues to rapid treatments in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bunney, B G; Li, J Z; Walsh, D M; Stein, R; Vawter, M P; Cartagena, P; Barchas, J D; Schatzberg, A F; Myers, R M; Watson, S J; Akil, H; Bunney, W E

    2015-02-01

    Conventional antidepressants require 2-8 weeks for a full clinical response. In contrast, two rapidly acting antidepressant interventions, low-dose ketamine and sleep deprivation (SD) therapy, act within hours to robustly decrease depressive symptoms in a subgroup of major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. Evidence that MDD may be a circadian-related illness is based, in part, on a large set of clinical data showing that diurnal rhythmicity (sleep, temperature, mood and hormone secretion) is altered during depressive episodes. In a microarray study, we observed widespread changes in cyclic gene expression in six regions of postmortem brain tissue of depressed patients matched with controls for time-of-death (TOD). We screened 12 000 transcripts and observed that the core clock genes, essential for controlling virtually all rhythms in the body, showed robust 24-h sinusoidal expression patterns in six brain regions in control subjects. In MDD patients matched for TOD with controls, the expression patterns of the clock genes in brain were significantly dysregulated. Some of the most robust changes were seen in anterior cingulate (ACC). These findings suggest that in addition to structural abnormalities, lesion studies, and the large body of functional brain imaging studies reporting increased activation in the ACC of depressed patients who respond to a wide range of therapies, there may be a circadian dysregulation in clock gene expression in a subgroup of MDDs. Here, we review human, animal and neuronal cell culture data suggesting that both low-dose ketamine and SD can modulate circadian rhythms. We hypothesize that the rapid antidepressant actions of ketamine and SD may act, in part, to reset abnormal clock genes in MDD to restore and stabilize circadian rhythmicity. Conversely, clinical relapse may reflect a desynchronization of the clock, indicative of a reactivation of abnormal clock gene function. Future work could involve identifying specific small

  14. Organ-specific development characterizes circadian clock gene Per2 expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Nishide, Shin-ya; Hashimoto, Kazuaki; Nishio, Takuya; Honma, Ken-ichi; Honma, Sato

    2014-01-01

    To explore developmental changes in circadian organization of central and peripheral oscillators, circadian rhythms in clock gene expression were examined in 12 organs in transgenic rats carrying a bioluminescence reporter for Per2. Organ slices were obtained from different developmental stages starting at postnatal day 5 and tissue was cultured for more than 6 days. In addition, four organs were examined from embryonic day 20. Robust circadian rhythms in bioluminescence were detected in all organs examined. The circadian period in vitro was specific to each organ and remained essentially the same during development. The circadian peak phase on the first day of culture was significantly different not only among organs but also in the same organ. Three patterns in circadian phase were detected during development. Thus, during development, circadian phase did not change in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, adrenal gland, and liver, whereas delay shifts were seen in the pineal, lung, heart, kidney, spleen, thymus, and testis. Finally, circadian phase advanced at postnatal day 10-15 and subsequently delayed in skeletal muscle and stomach.Circadian amplitude also showed developmental changes in several organs. These findings indicate that the temporal orders of physiological functions of various organs change during development. Such age-dependent and organ-specific changes in the phase relationship among circadian clocks most likely reflect entrainment to organ-specific time cues at different developmental stages.

  15. Passive cigarette smoking changes the circadian rhythm of clock genes in rat intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Numaguchi, Shumpei; Esumi, Mariko; Sakamoto, Mika; Endo, Michiko; Ebihara, Takayuki; Soma, Hirotoki; Yoshida, Akio; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate the molecular changes in intervertebral discs (IVDs) caused by passive smoking. Rats were subjected to 8 weeks of passive smoking; thereafter, their lumbar vertebrae were harvested. The annulus fibrosus and cartilage endplate (AF/CEP) were harvested together, and the nucleus pulposus (NP) was isolated separately. The expression of 27,342 rat genes was analyzed. In 3 "nonsmoking" rats, 96 of 112 genes whose expression varied ≥10-fold between the AF/CEP and NP were more highly expressed in the AF/CEP. With these differentially expressed genes, we uncovered novel AF/CEP and NP marker genes and indicated their possible novel functions. Although passive smoking induced less marked alteration in the gene expression profiles of both the AF/CEP and NP, multiple clock-related genes showed altered expression. These genes were expressed with a circadian rhythm in IVD cells, and most genes showed a phase shift of -6 to -9 h induced by passive smoking. Some clock-related genes showed abolished oscillation in the NP. Passive smoking also changed the expression levels of proteases and protease inhibitors and reduced the expression of NP marker genes. Thus, passive smoking induces changes in the circadian rhythm of a peripheral clock (IVD clock) that might be involved in molecular events related to IVD degeneration.

  16. Diabetic retinopathy alters light-induced clock gene expression and dopamine levels in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Lahouaoui, Hasna; Coutanson, Christine; Cooper, Howard M.; Bennis, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common consequences of diabetes that affects millions of working-age adults worldwide and leads to progressive degeneration of the retina, visual loss, and blindness. Diabetes is associated with circadian disruption of the central and peripheral circadian clocks, but the mechanisms responsible for such alterations are unknown. Using a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of diabetes, we investigated whether diabetes alters 1) the circadian regulation of clock genes in the retina and in the central clocks, 2) the light response of clock genes in the retina, and/or 3) light-driven retinal dopamine (DA), a major output marker of the retinal clock. Methods To quantify circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled genes, retinas and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) from the same animals were collected every 4 h in circadian conditions, 12 weeks post-diabetes. Induction of Per1, Per2, and c-fos mRNAs was quantified in the retina after the administration of a pulse of monochromatic light (480 nm, 1.17×1014 photons/cm2/s, 15 min) at circadian time 16. Gene expression was assessed with real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT–PCR). Pooled retinas from the control and STZ-diabetic mice were collected 2 h after light ON and light OFF (Zeitgeber time (ZT)2 and ZT14), and DA and its metabolite were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results We found variable effects of diabetes on the expression of clock genes in the retina and only slight differences in phase and/or amplitude in the SCN. c-fos and Per1 induction by a 480 nm light pulse was abolished in diabetic animals at 12 weeks post-induction of diabetes in comparison with the control mice, suggesting a deficit in light-induced neuronal activation of the retinal clock. Finally, we quantified a 56% reduction in the total number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunopositive cells, associated with a decrease in DA levels during the subjective day (ZT2

  17. The candidate gene, Clock, localizes to a strong spawning time quantitative trait locus region in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Leder, E H; Danzmann, R G; Ferguson, M M

    2006-01-01

    We applied a candidate gene mapping approach to an existing quantitative trait loci (QTL) data set for spawning date in rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss) to ascertain whether these genes could potentially account for any observed QTL effects. Several genes were chosen for their known or suspected roles in reproduction, circadian, or circannual timing, including salmon-type gonadotropin-releasing hormone 3A and 3B (GnRH3A and GnRH3B), Clock, Period1, and arylalkylamine N-acetlytransferase-1 and -2 (AANAT-1 and AANAT-2). Genes were sequenced, and polymorphisms were identified in parents of two rainbow trout mapping families, one of which was used previously to detect spawn timing QTL. Interval mapping was used to identify associations between genetic markers and spawning date effects. Using a genetic map that was updated with 574 genetic markers (775 total), we found evidence for 11 significant or suggestive QTL regions. Most QTL were only localized within one of the parents; however, a strong QTL region was identified in both female and male parents on linkage group RT-8 that explained 20% and 50% of trait variance, respectively. The Clock gene mapped to this region. Period1 mapped to a region in the female parent associated with a marginal effect (P = .056) on spawn timing. Other candidate genes were not associated with significant QTL effects.

  18. MYC/MIZ1-dependent gene repression inversely coordinates the circadian clock with cell cycle and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Shostak, Anton; Ruppert, Bianca; Ha, Nati; Bruns, Philipp; Toprak, Umut H.; Lawerenz, Chris; Lichter, Peter; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Radomski, Sylwester; Scholz, Ingrid; Richter, Gesine; Siebert, Reiner; Wagner, Susanne; Haake, Andrea; Richter, Julia; Aukema, Sietse; Ammerpohl, Ole; Lopez, Christina; Nagel, Inga; Vater, Inga; Wagner, Rabea; Borst, Christoph; Haas, Siegfried; Rohde, Marius; Burkhardt, Birgit; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Claviez, Alexander; Dreyling, Martin; Eberth, Sonja; Trümper, Lorenz; Kube, Dieter; Stadler, Christina; Einsele, Hermann; Frickhofen, Norbert; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Karsch, Dennis; Kneba, Michael; Mantovani-Löffler, Luisa; Staib, Peter; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Ott, German; Küppers, Ralf; Weniger, Marc; Hummel, Michael; Lenze, Dido; Szczepanowski, Monika; Klapper, Wolfram; Kostezka, Ulrike; Möller, Peter; Rosenwald, Andreas; Leich, Ellen; Pischimariov, Jordan; Binder, Vera; Borkhardt, Arndt; Hezaveh, Kebria; Hoell, Jessica; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schilhabel, Markus; Schreiber, Stefan; Bernhart, Stephan H.; Doose, Gero; Hoffmann, Steve; Kretzmer, Helene; Langenberger, David; Binder, Hans; Hopp, Lydia; Kreuz, Markus; Loeffler, Markus; Rosolowski, Maciej; Korbel, Jan; Sungalee, Stefanie; Stadler, Peter F.; Zenz, Thorsten; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Diernfellner, Axel; Brunner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock and the cell cycle are major cellular systems that organize global physiology in temporal fashion. It seems conceivable that the potentially conflicting programs are coordinated. We show here that overexpression of MYC in U2OS cells attenuates the clock and conversely promotes cell proliferation while downregulation of MYC strengthens the clock and reduces proliferation. Inhibition of the circadian clock is crucially dependent on the formation of repressive complexes of MYC with MIZ1 and subsequent downregulation of the core clock genes BMAL1 (ARNTL), CLOCK and NPAS2. We show furthermore that BMAL1 expression levels correlate inversely with MYC levels in 102 human lymphomas. Our data suggest that MYC acts as a master coordinator that inversely modulates the impact of cell cycle and circadian clock on gene expression. PMID:27339797

  19. Restricted feeding regime affects clock gene expression profiles in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of rats exposed to constant light.

    PubMed

    Nováková, M; Polidarová, L; Sládek, M; Sumová, A

    2011-12-01

    The master circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) is dominantly entrained by external light/dark cycle to run with a period of a solar day, that is, 24 h, and synchronizes various peripheral clocks located in the body's cells and tissues accordingly. A daily restricted normocaloric feeding regime synchronizes the peripheral clocks but has no effect on SCN rhythmicity. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether feeding regime may affect the molecular mechanism generating SCN rhythmicity under conditions in which the rhythmicity is disturbed, as occurs under constant light. The rats were maintained under constant light for 30 days and were either fed ad libitum during the whole period, or their access to food was restricted to only 6 h a day during the last 2 weeks in constant light. Locomotor activity was monitored during the whole experiment. On the last day in constant light, daily expression profiles of the clock genes Per1, Per2, Bmal1, and Rev-erbα were determined in the SCN of both groups by in situ hybridization. Due to their exposure to constant light, the rats fed ad libitum became completely arrhythmic, while those exposed to the restricted feeding were active mostly during the time of food availability. In the SCN of behaviorally arrhythmic rats, no oscillations in Rev-erbα and Bmal1 gene expression were detected, but very low amplitude, borderline significant, oscillations in Per1 and Per2 persisted. Restricted feeding induced significant circadian rhythms in Rev-erbα and Bmal1 gene expression, but did not affect the low amplitude oscillations of Per1 and Per2 expression. These findings demonstrate that, under specific conditions, when the rhythmicity of the SCN is disturbed and other temporal entraining cues are lacking, the SCN molecular clockwork may likely sense temporal signals from changes in metabolic state delivered by normocaloric food.

  20. EFFECT OF SEASONAL CHANGES ON TESTICULAR MORPHOLOGY AND THE EXPRESSION OF CIRCADIAN CLOCK GENES IN JAPANESE WOOD MICE (APODEMUS SPECIOSUS).

    PubMed

    Akiyama, M; Takino, S; Sugano, Y; Yamada, T; Nakata, A; Miura, T; Fukumoto, M; Yamashiro, H

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the seasonality of reproduction throughout the year in Japanese wood mice (Apodemus speciosus). The effect of seasonal changes on testicular morphology and the periodic expression of circadian clock genes in the hypothalamus and testes of male individuals was evaluated. We also examined the morphology of the testes and caudae epididymides of male mice. In addition, RT-PCR analysis was carried out with mRNA extracted from the hypothalamus and testes to evaluate the expression of the circadian clock genes Clock, Bmal1, Per1, and Cry1. The complete induction of testicular activity was detected from February to April and from August to October, with testes weight increasing with the completion of spermatogenesis (reproductive season). From May to early June and from November to early January, testicular weight declined, the seminiferous tubules reduced in size, spermatogenesis was arrested, and sperm were not produced (non-reproductive season). From mid- June to July and mid-January, the re-induction of testicular activity for spermatogenesis was observed in the seminiferous tubules (transitional season). Out of the four examined genes, Cry1 had the highest expression level in both the hypothalamus and testes throughout the year, followed by Bmal1, Per1, and Clock. The expression of Bmal1 was significantly lower in the hypothalamus and testes during the transitional season compared to the reproductive and non-reproductive seasons. Cry1 transcript levels were also significantly lower in the hypothalamus and testes during the transitional season compared to the reproductive season. In conclusion, the results indicating changes in testicular morphology revealed annual reproductive, non-reproductive, and transmission periods in Japanese wood mice. When an increase in testicular activity was observed indicating the onset of the reproductive season, the mean day length was approximately 11–13 h. The expression of the circadian clock genes Bmal1

  1. Demographic history and adaptation account for clock gene diversity in humans.

    PubMed

    Dall'Ara, I; Ghirotto, S; Ingusci, S; Bagarolo, G; Bertolucci, C; Barbujani, G

    2016-09-01

    Circadian clocks give rise to daily oscillations in behavior and physiological functions that often anticipate upcoming environmental changes generated by the Earth rotation. In model organisms a relationship exists between several genes affecting the circadian rhythms and latitude. We investigated the allele distributions at 116 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 25 human clock and clock-related genes from the 1000Genomes Project, and at a reference data set of putatively neutral polymorphisms. The global genetic structure at the clock genes did not differ from that observed at the reference data set. We then tested for evidence of local adaptation searching for FST outliers under both an island and a hierarchical model, and for significant association between allele frequencies and environmental variables by a Bayesian approach. A total of 230 SNPs in 23 genes, or 84 SNPs in 19 genes, depending on the significance thresholds chosen, showed signs of local adaptation, whereas a maximum of 190 SNPs in 23 genes had significant covariance with one or more environmental variables. Only two SNPs from two genes (NPAS2 and AANAT) exhibit both elevated population differentiation and covariance with at least one environmental variable. We then checked whether the SNPs emerging from these analyses fall within a set of candidate SNPs associated with different chronotypes or sleep disorders. Correlation of five such SNPs with environmental variables supports a selective role of latitude or photoperiod, but certainly not a major one.

  2. Search for evidence of a clock related to the solar 154 day complex of periodicities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Bai, T.

    1992-01-01

    Evidence that has recently been compiled (Bai and Sturrock 1991) indicates that the enigmatic 154-day periodicity in solar activity may be viewed as part of a complex of periodicities that are approximate multiples of 25.8 days, suggesting that the Sun contains a 'clock' with frequency in the range 440 to 463 nano Hz. The clock may comprise either an oscillator or a rotator, each of which may be either real or virtual. We have reconsidered a previous spectrum analysis of the Zurich sunspot-number sequence by Knight, Schatten, and Sturrock (1979) which revealed a sharp, persistent and significant periodicity with a period of 12.072 days, corresponding to a frequency of about 958.8 nano Hz. This periodicity may be regarded as the (second) upper sideband of the second harmonic (2nu(sub R) + 2nu(sub E)) of a fundamental frequency of 447.7 nano Hz that is clearly within the search band. In this expression, nu(sub R) is the sidereal frequency of the hypothetical rotator and nu(sub E) is the frequency (31.69 nano Hz) of the Earth in its orbital motion around the Sun. In analyzing sunspot area data derived from the Greenwich data set, and on noting that any frequency is defined only to within the Nyquist frequency, we find clear evidence not only for the upper sideband of the second harmonic, but also for the second harmonic (2nu(sub R)) and the lower sideband of the second harmonic (2nu(sub R) - 2nu(sub E)). There is no strong peak at the fundamental frequency in the Greenwich data, but there is in the Zurich sunspot data. The effect of a linear oscillator is, to the lowest order in the amplitude, the same as the combined effect of two rotators of opposite polarities. A rotator that has arbitrary orientation with respect to the ecliptic may influence the outer layers of the Sun and thereby modulate the occurrence of solar activity such as sunspots. By analyzing a simple model, we find that such a rotator would influence surface activity in such a way that the spectrum of

  3. Association of CLOCK, ARNTL, and NPAS2 gene polymorphisms and seasonal variations in mood and behavior.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae-In; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Kang, Seung-Gul; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Park, Young-Min; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Moon, Joung-Ho; Song, Hye-Min; Lee, Eunil; Kim, Leen

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a condition of seasonal mood changes characterized by recurrent depression in autumn or winter that spontaneously remits in spring or summer. Evidence has suggested that circadian gene variants contribute to the pathogenesis of SAD. In this study, we investigated polymorphisms in the CLOCK, ARNTL, and NPAS2 genes in relation to seasonal variation in 507 healthy young adults. Seasonal variations were assessed with the Seasonality Pattern Assessment Questionnaire. The prevalence of SAD was 12.0% (winter-type 9.3%, summer-type 2.8%). No significant difference was found between the groups in the genotype distribution of ARNTL rs2278749 and NPAS2 rs2305160. The T allele of CLOCK rs1801260 was significantly more frequent in seasonals (SAD + subsyndromal SAD) compared with non-seasonals (p = 0.020, odds ratio = 1.89, 95% confidence interval = 1.09-3.27). Global seasonality score was significantly different among genotypes of CLOCK rs1801260, but not among genotypes of ARNTL rs2278749 and NPAS2 rs2305160. However, statistical difference was observed in the body weight and appetite subscales among genotypes of ARNTL rs2278749 and in the body weight subscale among genotypes of NPAS2 rs2305160. There was synergistic interaction between CLOCK rs1801260 and ARNTL rs2278749 on seasonality. To our knowledge, this study is the first to reveal an association between the CLOCK gene and seasonal variations in mood and behavior in the Korean population. Although we cannot confirm previous findings of an association between SAD and the ARNTL and NPAS2 genes, these genes may influence seasonal variations through metabolic factors such as body weight and appetite. The interaction of the CLOCK and ARNTL genes contributes to susceptibility for SAD. PMID:26134245

  4. Association of CLOCK, ARNTL, and NPAS2 gene polymorphisms and seasonal variations in mood and behavior.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae-In; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Kang, Seung-Gul; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Park, Young-Min; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Moon, Joung-Ho; Song, Hye-Min; Lee, Eunil; Kim, Leen

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a condition of seasonal mood changes characterized by recurrent depression in autumn or winter that spontaneously remits in spring or summer. Evidence has suggested that circadian gene variants contribute to the pathogenesis of SAD. In this study, we investigated polymorphisms in the CLOCK, ARNTL, and NPAS2 genes in relation to seasonal variation in 507 healthy young adults. Seasonal variations were assessed with the Seasonality Pattern Assessment Questionnaire. The prevalence of SAD was 12.0% (winter-type 9.3%, summer-type 2.8%). No significant difference was found between the groups in the genotype distribution of ARNTL rs2278749 and NPAS2 rs2305160. The T allele of CLOCK rs1801260 was significantly more frequent in seasonals (SAD + subsyndromal SAD) compared with non-seasonals (p = 0.020, odds ratio = 1.89, 95% confidence interval = 1.09-3.27). Global seasonality score was significantly different among genotypes of CLOCK rs1801260, but not among genotypes of ARNTL rs2278749 and NPAS2 rs2305160. However, statistical difference was observed in the body weight and appetite subscales among genotypes of ARNTL rs2278749 and in the body weight subscale among genotypes of NPAS2 rs2305160. There was synergistic interaction between CLOCK rs1801260 and ARNTL rs2278749 on seasonality. To our knowledge, this study is the first to reveal an association between the CLOCK gene and seasonal variations in mood and behavior in the Korean population. Although we cannot confirm previous findings of an association between SAD and the ARNTL and NPAS2 genes, these genes may influence seasonal variations through metabolic factors such as body weight and appetite. The interaction of the CLOCK and ARNTL genes contributes to susceptibility for SAD.

  5. Time-related dynamics of variation in core clock gene expression levels in tissues relevant to the immune system.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, G; Sothern, R B; Greco, A; Pazienza, V; Vinciguerra, M; Liu, S; Cai, Y

    2011-01-01

    Immune parameters show rhythmic changes with a 24-h periodicity driven by an internal circadian timing system that relies on clock genes (CGs). CGs form interlocked transcription-translation feedback loops to generate and maintain 24-h mRNA and protein oscillations. In this study we evaluate and compare the profiles and the dynamics of variation of CG expression in peripheral blood, and two lymphoid tissues of mice. Expression levels of seven recognized key CGs (mBmal1, mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry1, mCry2, and Rev-erbalpha) were evaluated by quantitative RT- PCR in spleen, thymus and peripheral blood of C57BL/6 male mice housed on a 12-h light (L)-dark (D) cycle and sacrificed every 4 h for 24 h (3-4 mice/time point). We found a statistically significant time-effect in spleen (S), thymus (T) and blood (B) for the original values of expression level of mBmal1 (S), mClock (T, B), mPer1 (S, B), mPer2 (S), mCry1 (S), mCry2 (B) and mRev-Erbalpha (S, T, B) and for the fractional variation calculated between single time-point expression value of mBmal1 (B), mPer2 (T), mCry2 (B) and mRev-Erbalpha (S). A significant 24-h rhythm was validated for five CGs in blood (mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry2, mRev-Erbalpha), for four CGs in the spleen (mBmal1, mPer1, mPer2, mRev-Erbalpha), and for three CGs in the thymus (mClock, mPer2, mRev-Erbalpha). The original values of acrophases for mBmal1, mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry1 and mCry2 were very similar for spleen and thymus and advanced by several hours for peripheral blood compared to the lymphoid tissues, whereas the phases of mRev-Erbalpha were coincident for all three tissues. In conclusion, central and peripheral lymphoid tissues in the mouse show different sequences of activation of clock gene expression compared to peripheral blood. These differences may underlie the compartmental pattern of web functioning in the immune system.

  6. Time-related dynamics of variation in core clock gene expression levels in tissues relevant to the immune system.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, G; Sothern, R B; Greco, A; Pazienza, V; Vinciguerra, M; Liu, S; Cai, Y

    2011-01-01

    Immune parameters show rhythmic changes with a 24-h periodicity driven by an internal circadian timing system that relies on clock genes (CGs). CGs form interlocked transcription-translation feedback loops to generate and maintain 24-h mRNA and protein oscillations. In this study we evaluate and compare the profiles and the dynamics of variation of CG expression in peripheral blood, and two lymphoid tissues of mice. Expression levels of seven recognized key CGs (mBmal1, mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry1, mCry2, and Rev-erbalpha) were evaluated by quantitative RT- PCR in spleen, thymus and peripheral blood of C57BL/6 male mice housed on a 12-h light (L)-dark (D) cycle and sacrificed every 4 h for 24 h (3-4 mice/time point). We found a statistically significant time-effect in spleen (S), thymus (T) and blood (B) for the original values of expression level of mBmal1 (S), mClock (T, B), mPer1 (S, B), mPer2 (S), mCry1 (S), mCry2 (B) and mRev-Erbalpha (S, T, B) and for the fractional variation calculated between single time-point expression value of mBmal1 (B), mPer2 (T), mCry2 (B) and mRev-Erbalpha (S). A significant 24-h rhythm was validated for five CGs in blood (mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry2, mRev-Erbalpha), for four CGs in the spleen (mBmal1, mPer1, mPer2, mRev-Erbalpha), and for three CGs in the thymus (mClock, mPer2, mRev-Erbalpha). The original values of acrophases for mBmal1, mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry1 and mCry2 were very similar for spleen and thymus and advanced by several hours for peripheral blood compared to the lymphoid tissues, whereas the phases of mRev-Erbalpha were coincident for all three tissues. In conclusion, central and peripheral lymphoid tissues in the mouse show different sequences of activation of clock gene expression compared to peripheral blood. These differences may underlie the compartmental pattern of web functioning in the immune system. PMID:22230394

  7. Molecular Mechanisms that Regulate the Coupled Period of the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Kyoung; Kilpatrick, Zachary P.; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josić, Krešimir

    2014-05-01

    In mammals, most cells in the brain and peripheral tissues generate circadian (~24hr) rhythms autonomously. These self-sustained rhythms are coordinated and entrained by a master circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Within the SCN, the individual rhythms of each neuron are synchronized through intercellular signaling. One important feature of SCN is that the synchronized period is close to the cell population mean of intrinsic periods. In this way, the synchronized period of the SCN stays close to the periods of cells in peripheral tissues. This is important for SCN to entrain cells throughout the body. However, the mechanism that drives the period of the coupled SCN cells to the population mean is not known. We use mathematical modeling and analysis to show that the mechanism of transcription repression plays a pivotal role in regulating the coupled period. Specifically, we use phase response curve analysis to show that the coupled period within the SCN stays near the population mean if transcriptional repression occurs via protein sequestration. In contrast, the coupled period is far from the mean if repression occurs through highly nonlinear Hill-type regulation (e.g. oligomer- or phosphorylation-based repression). Furthermore, we find that the timescale of intercellular coupling needs to be fast compared to that of intracellular feedback to maintain the mean period. These findings reveal the important relationship between the intracellular transcriptional feedback loop and intercellular coupling. This relationship explains why transcriptional repression appears to occur via protein sequestration in multicellular organisms, mammals and Drosophila, in contrast with the phosphorylation-based repression in unicellular organisms. That is, transition to protein sequestration is essential for synchronizing multiple cells with a period close to the population mean (~24hr).

  8. The Zebrafish Period2 Protein Positively Regulates the Circadian Clock through Mediation of Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR)-related Orphan Receptor α (Rorα)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyong; Zhong, Zhaomin; Zhong, Yingbin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Han

    2015-01-01

    We report the characterization of a null mutant for zebrafish circadian clock gene period2 (per2) generated by transcription activator-like effector nuclease and a positive role of PER2 in vertebrate circadian regulation. Locomotor experiments showed that per2 mutant zebrafish display reduced activities under light-dark and 2-h phase delay under constant darkness, and quantitative real time PCR analyses showed up-regulation of cry1aa, cry1ba, cry1bb, and aanat2 but down-regulation of per1b, per3, and bmal1b in per2 mutant zebrafish, suggesting that Per2 is essential for the zebrafish circadian clock. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that Per2 represses aanat2 expression through E-box and enhances bmal1b expression through the Ror/Rev-erb response element, implicating that Per2 plays dual roles in the zebrafish circadian clock. Cell transfection and co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Per2 enhances bmal1b expression through binding to orphan nuclear receptor Rorα. The enhancing effect of mouse PER2 on Bmal1 transcription is also mediated by RORα even though it binds to REV-ERBα. Moreover, zebrafish Per2 also appears to have tissue-specific regulatory roles in numerous peripheral organs. These findings help define the essential functions of Per2 in the zebrafish circadian clock and in particular provide strong evidence for a positive role of PER2 in the vertebrate circadian system. PMID:25544291

  9. Neural clocks and Neuropeptide F/Y regulate circadian gene expression in a peripheral metabolic tissue

    PubMed Central

    Erion, Renske; King, Anna N; Wu, Gang; Hogenesch, John B; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis requires coordination between circadian clocks in different tissues. Also, systemic signals appear to be required for some transcriptional rhythms in the mammalian liver and the Drosophila fat body. Here we show that free-running oscillations of the fat body clock require clock function in the PDF-positive cells of the fly brain. Interestingly, rhythmic expression of the cytochrome P450 transcripts, sex-specific enzyme 1 (sxe1) and Cyp6a21, which cycle in the fat body independently of the local clock, depends upon clocks in neurons expressing neuropeptide F (NPF). NPF signaling itself is required to drive cycling of sxe1 and Cyp6a21 in the fat body, and its mammalian ortholog, Npy, functions similarly to regulate cycling of cytochrome P450 genes in the mouse liver. These data highlight the importance of neuronal clocks for peripheral rhythms, particularly in a specific detoxification pathway, and identify a novel and conserved role for NPF/Npy in circadian rhythms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13552.001 PMID:27077948

  10. Diurnal Corticosterone Presence and Phase Modulate Clock Gene Expression in the Male Rat Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Elizabeth R; Chun, Lauren E; Hinds, Laura R; Spencer, Robert L

    2016-04-01

    Mood disorders are associated with dysregulation of prefrontal cortex (PFC) function, circadian rhythms, and diurnal glucocorticoid (corticosterone [CORT]) circulation. Entrainment of clock gene expression in some peripheral tissues depends on CORT. In this study, we characterized over the course of the day the mRNA expression pattern of the core clock genes Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 in the male rat PFC and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) under different diurnal CORT conditions. In experiment 1, rats were left adrenal-intact (sham) or were adrenalectomized (ADX) followed by 10 daily antiphasic (opposite time of day of the endogenous CORT peak) ip injections of either vehicle or 2.5 mg/kg CORT. In experiment 2, all rats received ADX surgery followed by 13 daily injections of vehicle or CORT either antiphasic or in-phase with the endogenous CORT peak. In sham rats clock gene mRNA levels displayed a diurnal pattern of expression in the PFC and the SCN, but the phase differed between the 2 structures. ADX substantially altered clock gene expression patterns in the PFC. This alteration was normalized by in-phase CORT treatment, whereas antiphasic CORT treatment appears to have eliminated a diurnal pattern (Per1 and Bmal1) or dampened/inverted its phase (Per2). There was very little effect of CORT condition on clock gene expression in the SCN. These experiments suggest that an important component of glucocorticoid circadian physiology entails CORT regulation of the molecular clock in the PFC. Consequently, they also point to a possible mechanism that contributes to PFC disrupted function in disorders associated with abnormal CORT circulation. PMID:26901093

  11. Solitons Beyond Binary: Possibility of Fibre-Optic Transmission of Two Bits per Clock Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrmann, Philipp; Hause, Alexander; Mitschke, Fedor

    2012-11-01

    Optical telecommunication employs light pulses travelling down optical fibres; in a binary format logical Ones and Zeroes are represented by the presence or absence of a light pulse in a given time slot, respectively. The fibre's data-carrying capacity must keep up with increasing demand, but for binary coding it now approaches its limit. Alternative coding schemes beyond binary are currently hotly debated; the challenge is to mitigate detrimental effects from the fibre's nonlinearity. Here we provide proof-of-principle that coding with solitons and soliton molecules allows to encode two bits of data per clock period. Solitons do not suffer from nonlinearity, rather, they rely on it; this endows them with greater robustness. However, they are universally considered to be restricted to binary coding. With that notion now refuted, it is warranted to rethink future systems.

  12. The 3111 Clock gene polymorphism is not associated with sleep and circadian rhythmicity in phenotypically characterized human subjects.

    PubMed

    Robilliard, Donna L; Archer, Simon N; Arendt, Josephine; Lockley, Steven W; Hack, Lisa M; English, Judie; Leger, Damien; Smits, Marcel G; Williams, Adrian; Skene, Debra J; Von Schantz, Malcolm

    2002-12-01

    Mutations in clock genes are associated with abnormal circadian parameters, including sleep. An association has been reported previously between a polymorphism (3111C), situated in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the circadian gene Clock and evening preference. In the present study, this polymorphism was assessed in: (1) 105 control subjects with defined diurnal preference, (2) 26 blind subjects with free-running circadian rhythms and characterized with regard to circadian period (tau) and (3) 16 delayed sleep phase syndrome patients. The control group was chosen from a larger population (n = 484) by Horne-Ostberg questionnaire analysis, from which three subgroups were selected (evening, intermediate and morning preference). Data from sleep diaries completed by 90% of these subjects showed a strong correlation between preferred and estimated timings of sleep and wake. The mean timings of activities for the evening group were at least 2 h later than the morning group. Genetic analysis showed that, in contrast with the previously published finding, there was no association between 3111C and eveningness. Neither was there an association between 3111C and tau, nor a significant difference in 3111C frequency between the normal and delayed sleep phase syndrome groups. To assess the effect of this polymorphism on messenger RNA (mRNA) translatability, luciferase reporter gene constructs containing the two Clock polymorphic variants in their 3'-UTR were transfected into COS-1 cells and luciferase activity measured. No significant difference was observed between the two variants. These results do not support Clock 3111C as a marker for diurnal preference, tau, or delayed sleep phase syndrome in humans.

  13. The circadian clock of teleost fish: a comparative analysis reveals distinct fates for duplicated genes.

    PubMed

    Toloza-Villalobos, Jessica; Arroyo, José Ignacio; Opazo, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a central oscillator that coordinates endogenous rhythms. Members of six gene families underlie the metabolic machinery of this system. Although this machinery appears to correspond to a highly conserved genetic system in metazoans, it has been recognized that vertebrates possess a more diverse gene inventory than that of non-vertebrates. This difference could have originated in the two successive rounds of whole-genome duplications that took place in the common ancestor of the group. Teleost fish underwent an extra event of whole-genome duplication, which is thought to have provided an abundance of raw genetic material for the biological innovations that facilitated the radiation of the group. In this study, we assessed the relative contributions of whole-genome duplication and small-scale gene duplication to generate the repertoire of genes associated with the circadian clock of teleost fish. To achieve this goal, we annotated genes from six gene families associated with the circadian clock in eight teleost fish species, and we reconstructed their evolutionary history by inferring phylogenetic relationships. Our comparative analysis indicated that teleost species possess a variable repertoire of genes related to the circadian clock gene families and that the actual diversity of these genes has been shaped by a variety of phenomena, such as the complete deletion of ohnologs, the differential retention of genes, and lineage-specific gene duplications. From a functional perspective, the subfunctionalization of two ohnolog genes (PER1a and PER1b) in zebrafish highlights the power of whole-genome duplications to generate biological diversity.

  14. Overall alteration of circadian clock gene expression in the chestnut cold response.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Cristian; Ramos, Alberto; Acebo, Paloma; Contreras, Angela; Casado, Rosa; Allona, Isabel; Aragoncillo, Cipriano

    2008-01-01

    Cold acclimation in woody plants may have special features compared to similar processes in herbaceous plants. Recent studies have shown that circadian clock behavior in the chestnut tree (Castanea sativa) is disrupted by cold temperatures and that the primary oscillator feedback loop is not functional at 4 degrees C or in winter. In these conditions, CsTOC1 and CsLHY genes are constantly expressed. Here, we show that this alteration also affects CsPRR5, CsPRR7 and CsPRR9. These genes are homologous to the corresponding Arabidopsis PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR genes, which are also components of the circadian oscillator feedback network. The practically constant presence of mRNAs of the 5 chestnut genes at low temperature reveals an unknown aspect of clock regulation and suggests a mechanism regulating the transcription of oscillator genes as a whole.

  15. Rapid assessment of gene function in the circadian clock using artificial microRNA in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongsik; Somers, David E

    2010-10-01

    Rapid assessment of the effect of reduced levels of gene products is often a bottleneck in determining how to proceed with an interesting gene candidate. Additionally, gene families with closely related members can confound determination of the role of even a single one of the group. We describe here an in vivo method to rapidly determine gene function using transient expression of artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mesophyll protoplasts. We use a luciferase-based reporter of circadian clock activity to optimize and validate this system. Protoplasts transiently cotransfected with promoter-luciferase and gene-specific amiRNA plasmids sustain free-running rhythms of bioluminescence for more than 6 d. Using both amiRNA plasmids available through the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center, as well as custom design of constructs using the Weigel amiRNA design algorithm, we show that transient knockdown of known clock genes recapitulates the same circadian phenotypes reported in the literature for loss-of-function mutant plants. We additionally show that amiRNA designed to knock down expression of the casein kinase II β-subunit gene family lengthens period, consistent with previous reports of a short period in casein kinase II β-subunit overexpressors. Our results demonstrate that this system can facilitate a much more rapid analysis of gene function by obviating the need to initially establish stably transformed transgenics to assess the phenotype of gene knockdowns. This approach will be useful in a wide range of plant disciplines when an endogenous cell-based phenotype is observable or can be devised, as done here using a luciferase reporter.

  16. Nucleotide sequences of immunoglobulin eta genes of chimpanzee and orangutan: DNA molecular clock and hominoid evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sakoyama, Y.; Hong, K.J.; Byun, S.M.; Hisajima, H.; Ueda, S.; Yaoita, Y.; Hayashida, H.; Miyata, T.; Honjo, T.

    1987-02-01

    To determine the phylogenetic relationships among hominoids and the dates of their divergence, the complete nucleotide sequences of the constant region of the immunoglobulin eta-chain (C/sub eta1/) genes from chimpanzee and orangutan have been determined. These sequences were compared with the human eta-chain constant-region sequence. A molecular clock (silent molecular clock), measured by the degree of sequence divergence at the synonymous (silent) positions of protein-encoding regions, was introduced for the present study. From the comparison of nucleotide sequences of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin and ..beta..- and delta-globulin genes between humans and Old World monkeys, the silent molecular clock was calibrated: the mean evolutionary rate of silent substitution was determined to be 1.56 x 10/sup -9/ substitutions per site per year. Using the silent molecular clock, the mean divergence dates of chimpanzee and orangutan from the human lineage were estimated as 6.4 +/- 2.6 million years and 17.3 +/- 4.5 million years, respectively. It was also shown that the evolutionary rate of primate genes is considerably slower than those of other mammalian genes.

  17. Toward the Beginning of Time: Circadian Rhythms in Metabolism Precede Rhythms in Clock Gene Expression in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Jiffin K.; Rucker, Edmund B.; Cassone, Vincent M.

    2012-01-01

    The appearance, progression, and potential role for circadian rhythms during early development have previously focused mainly on the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and peri- and postnatal expression of canonical clock genes. More recently, gene expression studies in embryonic stem cells have shown that some clock genes are expressed in undifferentiated cells; however rhythmicity was only established when cells are directed toward a neural fate. These studies also concluded that a functional clock is not present in ESCs, based solely on their gene expression. The null hypothesis underlying the present study is that embryonic stem cells become rhythmic in both clock gene expression and glucose utilization only when allowed to spontaneously differentiate. Undifferentiated stem cells (ESCs, n = 6 cultures/timepoint for all experiments) were either maintained in their pluripotent state or released into differentiation (dESCs, n = 6 cultures/timepoint for all experiments). Glucose utilization was assayed through 2-deoxyglucose uptake measurement, and clock gene and glucose transporter expression was assayed every 4 hours for 2 days in ESCs and dESCs by quantitative PCR (qPCR) in the same cell lysates. Undifferentiated stem cells expressed a self-sustained rhythm in glucose uptake that was not coincident with rhythmic expression of clock genes. This physiological rhythm was paralleled by glucose transporter mRNA expression. Upon differentiation, circadian patterns of some but not all clock genes were expressed, and the amplitude of the glucose utilization rhythm was enhanced in dESCs. These data provide the earliest evidence of a functional circadian clock, in addition to further challenging the idea that rhythmic transcription of clock genes are necessary for rhythmic physiological output and suggest a role for a clock-controlled physiology in the earliest stages of development. PMID:23155474

  18. Comprehensive Mapping of Regional Expression of the Clock Protein PERIOD2 in Rat Forebrain across the 24-h Day

    PubMed Central

    Harbour, Valerie L.; Weigl, Yuval; Robinson, Barry; Amir, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, a light-entrainable clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates circadian rhythms by synchronizing oscillators throughout the brain and body. Notably, the nature of the relation between the SCN clock and subordinate oscillators in the rest of the brain is not well defined. We performed a high temporal resolution analysis of the expression of the circadian clock protein PERIOD2 (PER2) in the rat forebrain to characterize the distribution, amplitude and phase of PER2 rhythms across different regions. Eighty-four LEW/Crl male rats were entrained to a 12-h: 12-h light/dark cycle, and subsequently perfused every 30 min across the 24-h day for a total of 48 time-points. PER2 expression was assessed with immunohistochemistry and analyzed using automated cell counts. We report the presence of PER2 expression in 20 forebrain areas important for a wide range of motivated and appetitive behaviors including the SCN, bed nucleus, and several regions of the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and cortex. Eighteen areas displayed significant PER2 rhythms, which peaked at different times of day. Our data demonstrate a previously uncharacterized regional distribution of rhythms of a clock protein expression in the brain that provides a sound basis for future studies of circadian clock function in animal models of disease. PMID:24124556

  19. The orphan receptor Rev-erbα gene is a target of the circadian clock pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Triqueneaux, Gérard; Thenot, Sandrine; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Antoch, Marina P; Safi, Rachid; Takahashi, Joseph S; Delaunay, Franck; Laudet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Rev-erbα is a ubiquitously expressed orphan nuclear receptor which functions as a constitutive transcriptional repressor and is expressed in vertebrates according to a robust circadian rhythm. We report here that two Rev-erbα mRNA isoforms, namely Rev-erbα1 and Rev-erbα2, are generated through alternative promoter usage and that both show a circadian expression pattern in an in vitro system using serum-shocked fibroblasts. Both promoter regions P1 (Rev-erbα1) and P2 (Rev-erbα2) contain several E-box DNA sequences, which function as response elements for the core circadian-clock components: CLOCK and BMAL1. The CLOCK–BMAL1 heterodimer stimulates the activity of both P1 and P2 promoters in transient transfection assay by 3–6-fold. This activation was inhibited by the overexpression of CRY1, a component of the negative limb of the circadian transcriptional loop. Critical E-box elements were mapped within both promoters. This regulation is conserved in vertebrates since we found that the CLOCK–BMAL1 heterodimer also regulates the zebrafish Rev-erbα gene. In line with these data Rev-erbα circadian expression was strongly impaired in the livers of Clock mutant mice and in the pineal glands of zebrafish embryos treated with Clock and Bmal1 antisense oligonucleotides. Together these data demonstrate that CLOCK is a critical regulator of Rev-erbα circadian gene expression in evolutionarily distant vertebrates and suggest a role for Rev-erbα in the circadian clock output. PMID:15591021

  20. Polymorphism at the Clock gene predicts phenology of long-distance migration in birds.

    PubMed

    Saino, Nicola; Bazzi, Gaia; Gatti, Emanuele; Caprioli, Manuela; Cecere, Jacopo G; Possenti, Cristina D; Galimberti, Andrea; Orioli, Valerio; Bani, Luciano; Rubolini, Diego; Gianfranceschi, Luca; Spina, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Dissecting phenotypic variance in life history traits into its genetic and environmental components is at the focus of evolutionary studies and of pivotal importance to identify the mechanisms and predict the consequences of human-driven environmental change. The timing of recurrent life history events (phenology) is under strong selection, but the study of the genes that control potential environmental canalization in phenological traits is at its infancy. Candidate genes for circadian behaviour entrained by photoperiod have been screened as potential controllers of phenological variation of breeding and moult in birds, with inconsistent results. Despite photoperiodic control of migration is well established, no study has reported on migration phenology in relation to polymorphism at candidate genes in birds. We analysed variation in spring migration dates within four trans-Saharan migratory species (Luscinia megarhynchos; Ficedula hypoleuca; Anthus trivialis; Saxicola rubetra) at a Mediterranean island in relation to Clock and Adcyap1 polymorphism. Individuals with larger number of glutamine residues in the poly-Q region of Clock gene migrated significantly later in one or, respectively, two species depending on sex and whether the within-individual mean length or the length of the longer Clock allele was considered. The results hinted at dominance of the longer Clock allele. No significant evidence for migration date to covary with Adcyap1 polymorphism emerged. This is the first evidence that migration phenology is associated with Clock in birds. This finding is important for evolutionary studies of migration and sheds light on the mechanisms that drive bird phenological changes and population trends in response to climate change.

  1. Sleep disturbances and circadian CLOCK genes in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Monika; Schäfer, Michael; Coogan, Andrew; Häßler, Frank; Thome, Johannes

    2012-10-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterised by a deep-reaching pattern of affective instability, incoherent identity, self-injury, suicide attempts, and disturbed interpersonal relations and lifestyle. The daily activities of BPD patients are often chaotic and disorganized, with patients often staying up late while sleeping during the day. These behavioural patterns suggest that altered circadian rhythms may be associated with BPD. Furthermore, BPD patients frequently report suffering from sleep disturbances. In this review, we overview the evidence that circadian rhythms and sleep are disturbed in BPD, and we explore the possibility that personality traits that are pertinent for BPD may be associated with circadian typology, and perhaps to circadian genotypes. With regards to sleep architecture, we review the evidence that BPD patients display altered non-REM and REM sleep. A possible cue to a deeper understanding of this temporal dysregulation might be an analysis of the circadian clock at the molecular and cellular level, as well as behavioural studies using actigraphy and we suggest avenues for further exploration of these factors. PMID:22806005

  2. Stochastic Regulation of her1/7 Gene Expression Is the Source of Noise in the Zebrafish Somite Clock Counteracted by Notch Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Robert P.; Hanisch, Anja; Soza-Ried, Cristian; Sahai, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The somite segmentation clock is a robust oscillator used to generate regularly-sized segments during early vertebrate embryogenesis. It has been proposed that the clocks of neighbouring cells are synchronised via inter-cellular Notch signalling, in order to overcome the effects of noisy gene expression. When Notch-dependent communication between cells fails, the clocks of individual cells operate erratically and lose synchrony over a period of about 5 to 8 segmentation clock cycles (2–3 hours in the zebrafish). Here, we quantitatively investigate the effects of stochasticity on cell synchrony, using mathematical modelling, to investigate the likely source of such noise. We find that variations in the transcription, translation and degradation rate of key Notch signalling regulators do not explain the in vivo kinetics of desynchronisation. Rather, the analysis predicts that clock desynchronisation, in the absence of Notch signalling, is due to the stochastic dissociation of Her1/7 repressor proteins from the oscillating her1/7 autorepressed target genes. Using in situ hybridisation to visualise sites of active her1 transcription, we measure an average delay of approximately three minutes between the times of activation of the two her1 alleles in a cell. Our model shows that such a delay is sufficient to explain the in vivo rate of clock desynchronisation in Notch pathway mutant embryos and also that Notch-mediated synchronisation is sufficient to overcome this stochastic variation. This suggests that the stochastic nature of repressor/DNA dissociation is the major source of noise in the segmentation clock. PMID:26588097

  3. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination.

    PubMed

    Malik, Astha; Kondratov, Roman V; Jamasbi, Roudabeh J; Geusz, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte proliferation during

  4. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination

    PubMed Central

    Kondratov, Roman V.; Jamasbi, Roudabeh J.

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte proliferation during

  5. Monitoring cell-autonomous circadian clock rhythms of gene expression using luciferase bioluminescence reporters.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Khan, Sanjoy K; Kathale, Nimish D; Xu, Haiyan; Liu, Andrew C

    2012-09-27

    In mammals, many aspects of behavior and physiology such as sleep-wake cycles and liver metabolism are regulated by endogenous circadian clocks (reviewed). The circadian time-keeping system is a hierarchical multi-oscillator network, with the central clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) synchronizing and coordinating extra-SCN and peripheral clocks elsewhere. Individual cells are the functional units for generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms, and these oscillators of different tissue types in the organism share a remarkably similar biochemical negative feedback mechanism. However, due to interactions at the neuronal network level in the SCN and through rhythmic, systemic cues at the organismal level, circadian rhythms at the organismal level are not necessarily cell-autonomous. Compared to traditional studies of locomotor activity in vivo and SCN explants ex vivo, cell-based in vitro assays allow for discovery of cell-autonomous circadian defects. Strategically, cell-based models are more experimentally tractable for phenotypic characterization and rapid discovery of basic clock mechanisms. Because circadian rhythms are dynamic, longitudinal measurements with high temporal resolution are needed to assess clock function. In recent years, real-time bioluminescence recording using firefly luciferase as a reporter has become a common technique for studying circadian rhythms in mammals, as it allows for examination of the persistence and dynamics of molecular rhythms. To monitor cell-autonomous circadian rhythms of gene expression, luciferase reporters can be introduced into cells via transient transfection or stable transduction. Here we describe a stable transduction protocol using lentivirus-mediated gene delivery. The lentiviral vector system is superior to traditional methods such as transient transfection and germline transmission because of its efficiency and versatility: it permits efficient delivery and stable integration into the host

  6. Segregation of expression of mPeriod gene homologs in neurons and glia: possible divergent roles of mPeriod1 and mPeriod2 in the brain.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hai-Ying M; Alvarez-Saavedra, Matias; Dziema, Heather; Choi, Yun Sik; Li, Aiqing; Obrietan, Karl

    2009-08-15

    The suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the mammalian hypothalamus function as the master circadian clock, coordinating the timing of diverse cell populations and organ systems. Dysregulation of clock timing is linked to a broad range of human conditions, including obesity, cardiovascular disease and a wide spectrum of neurological disorders. Aberrant regulation of expression of the PERIOD genes has been associated with improper cell division and human cancers, while the autosomal dominant disorder familial advanced sleep phase syndrome has been mapped to a single missense mutation within the critical clock gene hPERIOD2. An essential tool to begin to dissect the inherent molecular timing process is the clock gene reporter. Here, we functionally characterize two new mouse transgenic clock reporters, mPeriod1-Venus and mPeriod2-DsRED. Venus and DsRED are fluorescent proteins that can be used to monitor transcription in individual cells in real-time. Imaging of the SCN revealed oscillations, as well as light inducibility, in Venus and DsRED expression. Rhythmic Venus and DsRED expression was observed in distinct SCN cell populations, suggesting the existence of discrete cellular SCN clocks. Outside of the SCN, mPeriod1-Venus expression was broadly expressed in neuronal and non-neuronal populations. Conversely, mPeriod2-DsRED was expressed in glial populations and progenitor cells of the dentate gyrus; limited expression was detected in neurons. This distinct expression pattern of the two reporters reveals that the central nervous system possesses mechanistically distinct subpopulations of neuronal and non-neuronal cellular clocks. These novel mouse models will facilitate our understanding of clock timing and its role in human diseases. PMID:19477955

  7. A Bayesian approach for parameter estimation in the extended clock gene circuit of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Higham, Catherine F; Husmeier, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock is an important molecular mechanism that enables many organisms to anticipate and adapt to environmental change. Pokhilko et al. recently built a deterministic ODE mathematical model of the plant circadian clock in order to understand the behaviour, mechanisms and properties of the system. The model comprises 30 molecular species (genes, mRNAs and proteins) and over 100 parameters. The parameters have been fitted heuristically to available gene expression time series data and the calibrated model has been shown to reproduce the behaviour of the clock components. Ongoing work is extending the clock model to cover downstream effects, in particular metabolism, necessitating further parameter estimation and model selection. This work investigates the challenges facing a full Bayesian treatment of parameter estimation. Using an efficient adaptive MCMC proposed by Haario et al. and working in a high performance computing setting, we quantify the posterior distribution around the proposed parameter values and explore the basin of attraction. We investigate if Bayesian inference is feasible in this high dimensional setting and thoroughly assess convergence and mixing with different statistical diagnostics, to prevent apparent convergence in some domains masking poor mixing in others.

  8. The Light Wavelength Affects the Ontogeny of Clock Gene Expression and Activity Rhythms in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Di Rosa, Viviana; Frigato, Elena; López-Olmeda, José F.; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco J.; Bertolucci, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Light plays a key role in synchronizing rhythms and setting the phase of early development. However, to date, little is known about the impact of light wavelengths during the ontogeny of the molecular clock and the behavioural rhythmicity. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of light of different wavelengths (white, blue and red) on the onset of locomotor activity and clock gene (per1b, per2, clock1, bmal1 and dbp) expression rhythms. For this purpose, 4 groups of zebrafish embryo/larvae were raised from 0 to 7 days post-fertilization (dpf) under the following lighting conditions: three groups maintained under light:dark (LD) cycles with white (full visible spectrum, LDW), blue (LDB), or red light (LDR), and one group raised under constant darkness (DD). The results showed that lighting conditions influenced activity rhythms. Larvae were arrhythmic under DD, while under LD cycles they developed wavelength-dependent daily activity rhythms which appeared earlier under LDB (4 dpf) than under LDW or LDR (5 dpf). The results also revealed that development and lighting conditions influenced clock gene expression. While clock1 rhythmic expression appeared in all lighting conditions at 7 dpf, per1b, per2 and dbp showed daily variations already at 3 dpf. Curiously, bmal1 showed consistent rhythmic expression from embryonic stage (0 dpf). Summarizing, the data revealed that daily rhythms appeared earlier in the larvae reared under LDB than in those reared under LDW and LDR. These results emphasize the importance of lighting conditions and wavelengths during early development for the ontogeny of daily rhythms of gene expression and how these rhythms are reflected on the behavioural rhythmicity of zebrafish larvae. PMID:26147202

  9. The Light Wavelength Affects the Ontogeny of Clock Gene Expression and Activity Rhythms in Zebrafish Larvae.

    PubMed

    Di Rosa, Viviana; Frigato, Elena; López-Olmeda, José F; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Bertolucci, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Light plays a key role in synchronizing rhythms and setting the phase of early development. However, to date, little is known about the impact of light wavelengths during the ontogeny of the molecular clock and the behavioural rhythmicity. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of light of different wavelengths (white, blue and red) on the onset of locomotor activity and clock gene (per1b, per2, clock1, bmal1 and dbp) expression rhythms. For this purpose, 4 groups of zebrafish embryo/larvae were raised from 0 to 7 days post-fertilization (dpf) under the following lighting conditions: three groups maintained under light:dark (LD) cycles with white (full visible spectrum, LDW), blue (LDB), or red light (LDR), and one group raised under constant darkness (DD). The results showed that lighting conditions influenced activity rhythms. Larvae were arrhythmic under DD, while under LD cycles they developed wavelength-dependent daily activity rhythms which appeared earlier under LDB (4 dpf) than under LDW or LDR (5 dpf). The results also revealed that development and lighting conditions influenced clock gene expression. While clock1 rhythmic expression appeared in all lighting conditions at 7 dpf, per1b, per2 and dbp showed daily variations already at 3 dpf. Curiously, bmal1 showed consistent rhythmic expression from embryonic stage (0 dpf). Summarizing, the data revealed that daily rhythms appeared earlier in the larvae reared under LDB than in those reared under LDW and LDR. These results emphasize the importance of lighting conditions and wavelengths during early development for the ontogeny of daily rhythms of gene expression and how these rhythms are reflected on the behavioural rhythmicity of zebrafish larvae.

  10. From Blue Light to Clock Genes in Zebrafish ZEM-2S Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Bruno C. R.; Moraes, Maria Nathália C. M.; Poletini, Maristela O.; Lima, Leonardo H. R. G.; Castrucci, Ana Maria L.

    2014-01-01

    Melanopsin has been implicated in the mammalian photoentrainment by blue light. This photopigment, which maximally absorbs light at wavelengths between 470 and 480 nm depending on the species, is found in the retina of all classes of vertebrates so far studied. In mammals, melanopsin activation triggers a signaling pathway which resets the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Unlike mammals, Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio do not rely only on their eyes to perceive light, in fact their whole body may be capable of detecting light and entraining their circadian clock. Melanopsin, teleost multiple tissue (tmt) opsin and others such as neuropsin and va-opsin, are found in the peripheral tissues of Danio rerio, however, there are limited data concerning the photopigment/s or the signaling pathway/s directly involved in light detection. Here, we demonstrate that melanopsin is a strong candidate to mediate synchronization of zebrafish cells. The deduced amino acid sequence of melanopsin, although being a vertebrate opsin, is more similar to invertebrate than vertebrate photopigments, and melanopsin photostimulation triggers the phosphoinositide pathway through activation of a Gq/11-type G protein. We stimulated cultured ZEM-2S cells with blue light at wavelengths consistent with melanopsin maximal absorption, and evaluated the time course expression of per1b, cry1b, per2 and cry1a. Using quantitative PCR, we showed that blue light is capable of slightly modulating per1b and cry1b genes, and drastically increasing per2 and cry1a expression. Pharmacological assays indicated that per2 and cry1a responses to blue light are evoked through the activation of the phosphoinositide pathway, which crosstalks with nitric oxide (NO) and mitogen activated protein MAP kinase (MAPK) to activate the clock genes. Our results suggest that melanopsin may be important in mediating the photoresponse in Danio rerio ZEM-2S cells, and provide new insights about the

  11. The circadian clock gene regulatory module enantioselectively mediates imazethapyr-induced early flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haifeng; Han, Xiao; Peng, Xiaofeng; Lu, Tao; Liu, Weiping; Fu, Zhengwei

    2014-03-01

    Plant growth and development are strongly affected by environmental pollutants, such as herbicides. Widely used herbicides can remain in soil or aquatic systems for long periods of time. Herbicide pollutants have been reported to heavily affect global plant growth and pose a significant challenge to agriculture. However, it is unclear whether herbicides affect plant flowering. Here, we demonstrated that imazethapyr (IM), a chiral herbicide, can enantioselectively promote flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana. We clarified the possible mechanism by which IM promotes flowering and found that the photoperiod pathway may play an important role in propagating the IM stress signal. IM enantiomers decreased the amplitude of core oscillators (CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL) and utilized the up-regulation of the GIGANTEA-(CONSTANS)-FLOWERING LOCUS T pathway to induce floral gene, APETALA1 over-expression enantioselectively; this treatment ultimately caused early flowering. Our findings provide new insight into the method by which plants control reproductive timing in response to herbicide stress. Flowering time is an important trait in crops and affects the life cycles of pollinator species. The persistence of herbicides in the biosphere will alter plant life cycles and diversity. PMID:24484962

  12. Clock-genes and mitochondrial respiratory activity: Evidence of a reciprocal interplay.

    PubMed

    Scrima, Rosella; Cela, Olga; Merla, Giuseppe; Augello, Bartolomeo; Rubino, Rosa; Quarato, Giovanni; Fugetto, Sabino; Menga, Marta; Fuhr, Luise; Relógio, Angela; Piccoli, Claudia; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Capitanio, Nazzareno

    2016-08-01

    In the past few years mounting evidences have highlighted the tight correlation between circadian rhythms and metabolism. Although at the organismal level the central timekeeper is constituted by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei practically all the peripheral tissues are equipped with autonomous oscillators made up by common molecular clockworks represented by circuits of gene expression that are organized in interconnected positive and negative feed-back loops. In this study we exploited a well-established in vitro synchronization model to investigate specifically the linkage between clock gene expression and the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). Here we show that synchronized cells exhibit an autonomous ultradian mitochondrial respiratory activity which is abrogated by silencing the master clock gene ARNTL/BMAL1. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of the mitochondrial OxPhos system resulted in dramatic deregulation of the rhythmic clock-gene expression and a similar result was attained with mtDNA depleted cells (Rho0). Our findings provide a novel level of complexity in the interlocked feedback loop controlling the interplay between cellular bioenergetics and the molecular clockwork. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060253

  13. The circadian clock-associated gene gigantea1 affects maize developmental transitions.

    PubMed

    Bendix, Claire; Mendoza, Juan M; Stanley, Desiree N; Meeley, Robert; Harmon, Frank G

    2013-07-01

    The circadian clock is an internal timing mechanism that allows plants to make developmental decisions in accordance with environmental conditions. In model plants, circadian clock-associated gigantea (gi) genes are directly involved in control of growth and developmental transitions. The maize gigantea1 (gi1) gene is the more highly expressed of the two gi homeologs, and its function is uncharacterized. To understand the role of gi1 in the regulatory networks of the maize circadian clock system, gi1 mutants were evaluated for changes in flowering time, phase change and growth control. When grown in long-day (LD) photoperiods, gi1 mutants flowered earlier than non-mutant plants, but this difference was not apparent in short-day (SD) photoperiods. Therefore, gi1 participates in a pathway that suppresses flowering in LD photoperiods, but not in SD. Part of the underlying cause of early flowering was up-regulated expression of the FT-like floral activator gene zea mays centroradialis8 (zcn8) and the CONSTANS-like flowering regulatory gene constans of zea mays1 (conz1). gi1 mutants also underwent vegetative phase change earlier and grew taller than non-mutant plants. These findings indicate gi1 has a repressive function in multiple regulatory pathways that govern maize growth and development. PMID:23336247

  14. Glutamine synthetase gene evolution: A good molecular clock

    SciTech Connect

    Pesole, G.; Lanvave, C.; Saccone, C. ); Bozzetti, M.P. ); Preparata, G. )

    1991-01-15

    Glutamine synthetase gene evolution in various animals, plants, and bacteria was evaluated by a general stationary Markov model. The evolutionary process proved to be unexpectedly regular even for a time span as long as that between the divergence of prokaryotes from eukaryotes. This enabled us to draw phylogenetic trees for species whose phylogeny cannot be easily reconstructed from the fossil record. The calculation of the times of divergence of the various organelle-specific enzymes led us to hypothesize that the pea and bean chloroplast genes for these enzymes originated from the duplication of nuclear genes as a result of the different metabolic needs of the various species. The data indicate that the duplication of plastid glutamine synthetase genes occurred long after the endosymbiotic events that produced the organelles themselves.

  15. Glutamine synthetase gene evolution: a good molecular clock.

    PubMed Central

    Pesole, G; Bozzetti, M P; Lanave, C; Preparata, G; Saccone, C

    1991-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) gene evolution in various animals, plants, and bacteria was evaluated by a general stationary Markov model. The evolutionary process proved to be unexpectedly regular even for a time span as long as that between the divergence of prokaryotes from eukaryotes. This enabled us to draw phylogenetic trees for species whose phylogeny cannot be easily reconstructed from the fossil record. Our calculation of the times of divergence of the various organelle-specific enzymes led us to hypothesize that the pea and bean chloroplast genes for these enzymes originated from the duplication of nuclear genes as a result of the different metabolic needs of the various species. Our data indicate that the duplication of plastid glutamine synthetase genes occurred long after the endosymbiotic events that produced the organelles themselves. PMID:1671172

  16. Rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes in human leukocytes and beard hair follicle cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Makiko; Hida, Akiko; Kitamura, Shingo; Enomoto, Minori; Ohsawa, Yosuke; Katayose, Yasuko; Nozaki, Kentaro; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Aritake, Sayaka; Higuchi, Shigekazu; Tamura, Miyuki; Kato, Mie; Mishima, Kazuo

    2012-09-01

    Evaluating individual circadian rhythm traits is crucial for understanding the human biological clock system. The present study reports characterization of physiological and molecular parameters in 13 healthy male subjects under a constant routine condition, where interfering factors were kept to minimum. We measured hormonal secretion levels and examined temporal expression profiles of circadian clock genes in peripheral leukocytes and beard hair follicle cells. All 13 subjects had prominent daily rhythms in melatonin and cortisol secretion. Significant circadian rhythmicity was found for PER1 in 9 subjects, PER2 in 3 subjects, PER3 in all 13 subjects, and BMAL1 in 8 subjects in leukocytes. Additionally, significant circadian rhythmicity was found for PER1 in 5 of 8 subjects tested, PER2 in 2 subjects, PER3 in 6 subjects, and BMAL1 in 3 subjects in beard hair follicle cells. The phase of PER1 and PER3 rhythms in leukocytes correlated significantly with that of physiological rhythms. Our results demonstrate that leukocytes and beard hair follicle cells possess an endogenous circadian clock and suggest that PER1 and PER3 expression would be appropriate biomarkers and hair follicle cells could be a useful tissue source for the evaluation of biological clock traits in individuals. PMID:22902636

  17. Circadian clock genes: effects on dopamine, reward and addiction.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Puja K; Ozburn, Angela R; McClung, Colleen A

    2015-06-01

    Addiction is a widespread public health issue with social and economic ramifications. Substance abuse disorders are often accompanied by disruptions in circadian rhythms including sleep/wake cycles, which can exacerbate symptoms of addiction and dependence. Additionally, genetic disturbance of circadian molecular mechanisms can predispose some individuals to substance abuse disorders. In this review, we will discuss how circadian genes can regulate midbrain dopaminergic activity and subsequently, drug intake and reward. We will also suggest future directions for research on circadian genes and drugs of abuse.

  18. Circadian Clock Genes: Effects on Dopamine, Reward and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Puja K.; Ozburn, Angela R.; McClung, Colleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Addiction is a widespread public health issue with social and economic ramifications. Substance abuse disorders are often accompanied by disruptions in circadian rhythms including sleep/wake cycles, which can exacerbate symptoms of addiction and dependence. Additionally, genetic disturbance of circadian molecular mechanisms can predispose some individuals to substance abuse disorders. In this review, we will discuss how circadian genes can regulate midbrain dopaminergic activity and subsequently, drug intake and reward. We will also suggest future directions for research on circadian genes and drugs of abuse. PMID:25641765

  19. Differential effect of fructose on fat metabolism and clock gene expression in hepatocytes vs. myotubes.

    PubMed

    Chapnik, Nava; Rozenblit-Susan, Sigal; Genzer, Yoni; Froy, Oren

    2016-08-01

    In the liver, fructose bypasses the main rate-limiting step of glycolysis at the level of phosphofructokinase, allowing it to act as an unregulated substrate for de novo lipogenesis. It has been reported that consumption of large amounts of fructose increases de novo lipogenesis in the liver. However, the effect of fructose on ectopic deposition of muscle fat has been under dispute. Our aim was to study the effect of fructose on levels of genes and proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation and synthesis in hepatocytes vs. muscle cells. In addition, as fat accumulation leads to disruption of daily rhythms, we tested the effect of fructose treatment on clock gene expression. AML-12 hepatocytes and C2C12 myotubes were treated with fructose or glucose for 2 consecutive 24-h cycles and harvested every 6h. In contrast to glucose, fructose disrupted clock gene rhythms in hepatocytes, but in myotubes, it led to more robust rhythms. Fructose led to low levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) and high levels of LIPIN1 in hepatocytes compared with glucose. In contrast, fructose led to high pAMPK and low LIPIN1 and microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein (MTTP) levels in myotubes compared with glucose. Analysis of fat content revealed that fructose led to less fat accumulation in myotubes compared to hepatocytes. In summary, fructose shifts metabolism towards fatty acid synthesis and clock disruption in hepatocytes, but not in myotubes. PMID:27240446

  20. Circadian clock gene LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL directly regulates the timing of floral scent emission in Petunia

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, Myles P.; Hewett Hazelton, Kristen D.; Hempton, Andrew K.; Shim, Jae Sung; Yamamoto, Breanne M.; Riffell, Jeffrey A.; Imaizumi, Takato

    2015-01-01

    Flowers present a complex display of signals to attract pollinators, including the emission of floral volatiles. Volatile emission is highly regulated, and many species restrict emissions to specific times of the day. This rhythmic emission of scent is regulated by the circadian clock; however, the mechanisms have remained unknown. In Petunia hybrida, volatile emissions are dominated by products of the floral volatile benzenoid/phenylpropanoid (FVBP) metabolic pathway. Here we demonstrate that the circadian clock gene P. hybrida LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY; PhLHY) regulates the daily expression patterns of the FVBP pathway genes and floral volatile production. PhLHY expression peaks in the morning, antiphasic to the expression of P. hybrida GIGANTEA (PhGI), the master scent regulator ODORANT1 (ODO1), and many other evening-expressed FVBP genes. Overexpression phenotypes of PhLHY in Arabidopsis caused an arrhythmic clock phenotype, which resembles those of LHY overexpressors. In Petunia, constitutive expression of PhLHY depressed the expression levels of PhGI, ODO1, evening-expressed FVBP pathway genes, and FVBP emission in flowers. Additionally, in the Petunia lines in which PhLHY expression was reduced, the timing of peak expression of PhGI, ODO1, and the FVBP pathway genes advanced to the morning. Moreover, PhLHY protein binds to cis-regulatory elements called evening elements that exist in promoters of ODO1 and other FVBP genes. Thus, our results imply that PhLHY directly sets the timing of floral volatile emission by restricting the expression of ODO1 and other FVBP genes to the evening in Petunia. PMID:26124104

  1. The Wnt3a/β-catenin target gene Mesogenin1 controls the segmentation clock by activating a Notch signaling program

    PubMed Central

    Chalamalasetty, Ravindra B.; Dunty, William C.; Biris, Kristin K.; Ajima, Rieko; Iacovino, Michelina; Beisaw, Arica; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Chapman, Deborah L.; Yoon, Jeong Kyo; Kyba, Michael; Yamaguchi, Terry P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Segmentation is an organizing principle of body plans. The segmentation clock, a molecular oscillator best illustrated by the cyclic expression of Notch signaling genes, controls the periodic cleavage of somites from unsegmented presomitic mesoderm (PSM) during vertebrate segmentation. Wnt3a controls the spatiotemporal expression of cyclic Notch genes, however the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Transcriptional profiling of Wnt3a−/− embryos led to the identification of the bHLH transcription factor, Mesogenin1 (Msgn1), as a direct target gene of Wnt3a. To identify Msgn1 targets, we performed genome-wide studies of Msgn1 activity in embryonic stem cells. Here we show that Msgn1 is a major transcriptional activator of a Notch signaling program, synergizing with Notch to trigger clock gene expression. Msgn1 also indirectly regulates cyclic genes in the Fgf and Wnt pathways. Thus, Msgn1 is a central component of a transcriptional cascade that translates a spatial Wnt3a gradient into a temporal pattern of clock gene expression. PMID:21750544

  2. Monitoring Alternative Splicing Changes in Arabidopsis Circadian Clock Genes.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Craig G; Fuller, John; Calixto, Cristiane P G; McNicol, Jim; Booth, Clare; Brown, John W S; Staiger, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional control makes an important contribution to circadian regulation of gene expression. In higher plants, alternative splicing is particularly prevalent upon abiotic and biotic stress and in the circadian system. Here we describe in detail a high-resolution reverse transcription-PCR based panel (HR RT-PCR) to monitor alternative splicing events. The use of the panel allows the quantification of changes in the proportion of splice isoforms between different samples, e.g., different time points, different tissues, genotypes, ecotypes, or treatments. PMID:26867620

  3. The Mammalian Circadian Clock Gene Per2 Modulates Cell Death in Response to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Magnone, Maria Chiara; Langmesser, Sonja; Bezdek, April Candice; Tallone, Tiziano; Rusconi, Sandro; Albrecht, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Living in the earth’s oxygenated environment forced organisms to develop strategies to cope with the damaging effects of molecular oxygen known as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we show that Per2, a molecular component of the mammalian circadian clock, is involved in regulating a cell’s response to oxidative stress. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) containing a mutation in the Per2 gene are more resistant to cytotoxic effects mediated by ROS than wild-type cells, which is paralleled by an altered regulation of bcl-2 expression in Per2 mutant MEFs. The elevated survival rate and alteration of NADH/NAD+ ratio in the mutant cells is reversed by introduction of the wild-type Per2 gene. Interestingly, clock synchronized cells display a time dependent sensitivity to paraquat, a ROS inducing agent. Our observations indicate that the circadian clock is involved in regulating the fate of a cell to survive or to die in response to oxidative stress, which could have implications for cancer development and the aging process. PMID:25628599

  4. The chondrocyte clock gene Bmal1 controls cartilage homeostasis and integrity

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Michal; Gossan, Nicole; Yang, Nan; Im, Hee-Jeong; Ruckshanthi, Jayalath P.D.; Yoshitane, Hikari; Li, Xin; Jin, Ding; Wang, Ping; Boudiffa, Maya; Bellantuono, Ilaria; Fukada, Yoshitaka; Boot-Handford, Ray P.; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent and debilitating joint disease, and there are currently no effective disease-modifying treatments available. Multiple risk factors for OA, such as aging, result in progressive damage and loss of articular cartilage. Autonomous circadian clocks have been identified in mouse cartilage, and environmental disruption of circadian rhythms in mice predisposes animals to OA-like damage. However, the contribution of the cartilage clock mechanisms to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis is still unclear. Here, we have shown that expression of the core clock transcription factor BMAL1 is disrupted in human OA cartilage and in aged mouse cartilage. Furthermore, targeted Bmal1 ablation in mouse chondrocytes abolished their circadian rhythm and caused progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. We determined that BMAL1 directs the circadian expression of many genes implicated in cartilage homeostasis, including those involved in catabolic, anabolic, and apoptotic pathways. Loss of BMAL1 reduced the levels of phosphorylated SMAD2/3 (p-SMAD2/3) and NFATC2 and decreased expression of the major matrix-related genes Sox9, Acan, and Col2a1, but increased p-SMAD1/5 levels. Together, these results define a regulatory mechanism that links chondrocyte BMAL1 to the maintenance and repair of cartilage and suggest that circadian rhythm disruption is a risk factor for joint diseases such as OA. PMID:26657859

  5. Circadian Clock Genes Modulate Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation, Migration and Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Helene; Vanneaux, Valerie; Domet, Thomas; Parouchev, Alexandre; Larghero, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Many of the components that regulate the circadian clock have been identified in organisms and humans. The influence of circadian rhythm (CR) on the regulation of stem cells biology began to be evaluated. However, little is known on the role of CR on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of CR on the differentiation capacities of bone marrow hMSCs, as well as the regulation of cell cycle and migration capabilities. To that, we used both a chemical approach with a GSK-3β specific inhibitor (2’E,3’Z-6-bromoindirubin-3’-oxime, BIO) and a knockdown of CLOCK and PER2, two of the main genes involved in CR regulation. In these experimental conditions, a dramatic inhibition of adipocyte differentiation was observed, while osteoblastic differentiation capacities were not modified. In addition, cell migration was decreased in PER2-/- cells. Lastly, downregulation of circadian clock genes induced a modification of the hMSCs cell cycle phase distribution, which was shown to be related to a change of the cyclin expression profile. Taken together, these data showed that CR plays a role in the regulation of hMSCs differentiation and division, and likely represent key factor in maintaining hMSCs properties. PMID:26741371

  6. PERIOD2 is a circadian negative regulator of PAI-1 gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Miyazaki, Koyomi; Uchida, Daisuke; Ohkura, Naoki; Wakabayashi, Miyuki; Doi, Ryosuke; Matsuda, Juzo; Ishida, Norio

    2009-04-01

    An increased level of obesity-induced plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To determine whether the circadian clock component PERIOD2 (PER2) is involved in the regulation of PAI-1 gene expression, we performed transient transfection assays in vitro, and generated transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing PER2. We then compared PAI-1 expression in Tg and wild-type (WT) mice with or without obesity induced by a high-fat/high-sucrose diet. PER2 suppressed CLOCK:BMAL1- and CLOCK:BMAL2-dependent transactivation of the PAI-1 promoter in vitro. Furthermore, nuclear translocation is dispensable for PER2 to suppress CLOCK:BMAL1-dependent transactivation of the PAI-1 promoter, because functional loss of the nuclear localization domain did not affect either the interaction with BMAL1 or the suppressive role of PER2. The diurnal expression of clock and clock-controlled genes was disrupted in a gene-specific manner, whereas that of PAI-1 mRNA was significantly damped in the hearts of PER2 Tg mice fed with a normal diet. Obesity-induced plasma PAI-1 increase was significantly suppressed in Tg mice in accordance with cardiac PAI-1 mRNA levels, whereas body weight gain and changes in metabolic parameters were identical between WT and Tg mice. Endogenous PAI-1 gene expression induced by transforming growth factor-beta1 was significantly attenuated in embryonic fibroblasts derived from Tg mice compared with those from WT mice. Our results demonstrated that PER2 represses PAI-1 gene transcription in a BMAL1/2-dependent manner. The present findings also suggest that PER2 attenuates obesity-induced hypofibrinolysis by downregulating PAI-1 expression independently of metabolic disorders.

  7. THE mPER2 CLOCK GENE MODULATES COCAINE ACTIONS IN THE MOUSE CIRCADIAN SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Brager, Allison J.; Stowie, Adam C.; Prosser, Rebecca A.; Glass, J. David

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine is a potent disruptor of photic and non-photic pathways for circadian entrainment of the master circadian clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). These actions of cocaine likely involve its modulation of molecular (clock gene) components for SCN clock timekeeping. At present, however, the physiological basis of such an interaction is unclear. To address this question, we compared photic and non-photic phase-resetting responses between wild-type (WT) and Per2 mutant mice expressing nonfunctional PER2 protein to systemic and intra-SCN cocaine administrations. In the systemic trials, cocaine was administered i.p. (20 mg/kg) either at midday or prior to a light pulse in the early night to assess its non-photic and photic behavioral phase-resetting actions, respectively. In the intra-SCN trial, cocaine was administered by reverse microdialysis at midday to determine if the SCN is a direct target for its non-photic phase-resetting action. Non-photic phase-advancing responses to i.p. cocaine at midday were significantly (~3.5-fold) greater in Per2 mutants than WTs. However, the phase-advancing action of intra-SCN cocaine perfusion at midday did not differ between genotypes. In the light pulse trial, Per2 mutants exhibited larger photic phase-delays than did WTs, and the attenuating action of cocaine on this response was proportionately larger than in WTs. These data indicate that the Per2 clock gene is a potent modulator of cocaine’s actions in the circadian system. With regard to non-photic phase-resetting, the SCN is confirmed as a direct target of cocaine action; however, Per2 modulation of this effect likely occurs outside of the SCN. PMID:23333842

  8. A latitudinal cline in the Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Clock gene: evidence for selection on PolyQ length variants.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Kathleen G; Banks, Michael A

    2008-12-22

    A critical seasonal event for anadromous Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is the time at which adults migrate from the ocean to breed in freshwater. We investigated whether allelic variation at the circadian rhythm genes, OtsClock1a and OtsClock1b, underlies genetic control of migration timing among 42 populations in North America. We identified eight length variants of the functionally important polyglutamine repeat motif (PolyQ) of OtsClock1b while OtsClock1a PolyQ was highly conserved. We found evidence of a latitudinal cline in average allele length and frequency of the two most common OtsClock1b alleles. The shorter 335 bp allele increases in frequency with decreasing latitude while the longer 359 bp allele increases in frequency at higher latitudes. Comparison to 13 microsatellite loci showed that 335 and 359 bp deviate significantly from neutral expectations. Furthermore, a hierarchical gene diversity analysis based on OtsClock1b PolyQ variation revealed that run timing explains 40.9 per cent of the overall genetic variance among populations. By contrast, an analysis based on 13 microsatellite loci showed that run timing explains only 13.2 per cent of the overall genetic variance. Our findings suggest that length polymorphisms in OtsClock1b PolyQ may be maintained by selection and reflect an adaptation to ecological factors correlated with latitude, such as the seasonally changing day length.

  9. The Pendulum Clock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, John E.

    1991-01-01

    The development and function of the pendulum clock is discussed from a historical perspective. Computations for the period of and forces acting on a pendulum are presented. The remarkable workmanship of early clock makers is described. (CW)

  10. Temporal transcriptomics suggest that twin-peaking genes reset the clock

    PubMed Central

    Pembroke, William G; Babbs, Arran; Davies, Kay E; Ponting, Chris P; Oliver, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives daily rhythmic behavior and physiology, yet a detailed understanding of its coordinated transcriptional programmes is lacking. To reveal the finer details of circadian variation in the mammalian SCN transcriptome we combined laser-capture microdissection (LCM) and RNA-seq over a 24 hr light / dark cycle. We show that 7-times more genes exhibited a classic sinusoidal expression signature than previously observed in the SCN. Another group of 766 genes unexpectedly peaked twice, near both the start and end of the dark phase; this twin-peaking group is significantly enriched for synaptic transmission genes that are crucial for light-induced phase shifting of the circadian clock. 341 intergenic non-coding RNAs, together with novel exons of annotated protein-coding genes, including Cry1, also show specific circadian expression variation. Overall, our data provide an important chronobiological resource (www.wgpembroke.com/shiny/SCNseq/) and allow us to propose that transcriptional timing in the SCN is gating clock resetting mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10518.001 PMID:26523393

  11. Synergistic induction of the clock protein PERIOD by insulin-like peptide and prothoracicotropic hormone in Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera): implications for convergence of hormone signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Vafopoulou, Xanthe; Steel, Colin G H

    2014-01-01

    We showed previously that release of the cerebral neurohormones, bombyxin (an insulin-like peptide, ILP) and prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) from the brain have strong circadian rhythms, driven by master clock cells in the brain. These neurohormone rhythms synchronize the photosensitive brain clock with the photosensitive peripheral clock in the cells of the prothoracic glands (PGs), in which both regulate steroidogenesis. Here, using immunohistochemistry and confocal laser scanning microscopy, we show these neurohormones likely act on clock cells in the brain and PGs by regulating expression of PERIOD (PER) protein. PER is severely reduced in the nuclei of all clock cells in continuous light, but on transfer of tissues to darkness in vitro, it is rapidly induced. A 4h pulse of either PTTH or ILPs to brain and PGs in vitro both rapidly and highly significantly induce PER in the nuclei of clock cells. Administration of both neurohormones together induces more PER than does either alone and even more than does transfer to darkness, at least in PG cells. These are clearly non-steroidogenic actions of these peptides. In the peripheral oscillators salivary gland (SG) and fat body cells, neither bombyxin nor PTTH nor darkness induced PER, but a combination of both bombyxin and PTTH induced PER. Thus, PTTH and ILPs exert synergistic actions on induction of PER in both clock cells and peripheral oscillators, implying their signaling pathways converge, but in different ways in different cell types. We infer clock cells are able to integrate light cycle information with internal signals from hormones.

  12. Maternal obesity disrupts circadian rhythms of clock and metabolic genes in the offspring heart and liver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Danfeng; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Mei; Liu, Chang

    2015-06-01

    Early life nutritional adversity is tightly associated with the development of long-term metabolic disorders. Particularly, maternal obesity and high-fat diets cause high risk of obesity in the offspring. Those offspring are also prone to develop hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis and cardiovascular diseases. However, the precise underlying mechanisms leading to these metabolic dysregulation in the offspring remain unclear. On the other hand, disruptions of diurnal circadian rhythms are known to impair metabolic homeostasis in various tissues including the heart and liver. Therefore, we investigated that whether maternal obesity perturbs the circadian expression rhythms of clock, metabolic and inflammatory genes in offspring heart and liver by using RT-qPCR and Western blotting analysis. Offspring from lean and obese dams were examined on postnatal day 17 and 35, when pups were nursed by their mothers or took food independently. On P17, genes examined in the heart either showed anti-phase oscillations (Cpt1b, Pparα, Per2) or had greater oscillation amplitudes (Bmal1, Tnf-α, Il-6). Such phase abnormalities of these genes were improved on P35, while defects in amplitudes still existed. In the liver of 17-day-old pups exposed to maternal obesity, the oscillation amplitudes of most rhythmic genes examined (except Bmal1) were strongly suppressed. On P35, the oscillations of circadian and inflammatory genes became more robust in the liver, while metabolic genes were still kept non-rhythmic. Maternal obesity also had a profound influence in the protein expression levels of examined genes in offspring heart and liver. Our observations indicate that the circadian clock undergoes nutritional programing, which may contribute to the alternations in energy metabolism associated with the development of metabolic disorders in early life and adulthood.

  13. The in vitro maintenance of clock genes expression within the rat pineal gland under standard and norepinephrine-synchronized stimulation.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Silva, Jéssica; Cipolla-Neto, José; Peliciari-Garcia, Rodrigo A

    2014-01-01

    Although the norepinephrine (NE) synchronization protocol was proved to be an important procedure for further modulating in vitro pineal melatonin synthesis, the maintenance of clock genes under the same conditions remained to be investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the maintenance of the clock genes expression in pineal gland cultures under standard and NE-synchronized stimulation. The glands were separated into three experimental groups: Control, Standard (acute NE-stimulation), and NE-synchronized. The expression of Bmal1, Per2, Cry2, Rev-erbα, the clock controlled gene Dbp and Arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase were investigated, as well as melatonin content. No oscillations were observed in the expression of the investigated genes from the control group. Under Standard NE stimulation, the clock genes did not exhibit a rhythmic pattern of expression. However, in the NE-synchronized condition, a rhythmic expression pattern was observed in all cases. An enhancement in pineal gland responsiveness to NE stimulation, reflected in an advanced synthesis of melatonin was also observed. Our results reinforce our previous hypothesis that NE synchronization of pineal gland culture mimics the natural rhythmic release of NE in the gland, increasing melatonin synthesis and keeping the pineal circadian clock synchronized, ensuring the fine adjustments that are relied in the clockwork machinery.

  14. Daily rhythms of clock gene expression and feeding behavior during the larval development in gilthead seabream, Sparus aurata.

    PubMed

    Mata-Sotres, José Antonio; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume; Sánchez-Vázquez, F Javier; Yúfera, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Light is the main environmental time cue which synchronizes daily rhythms and the molecular clock of vertebrates. Indeed, alterations in photoperiod have profound physiological effects in fish (e.g. reproduction and early development). In order to identify the changes in clock genes expression in gilthead seabream larvae during ontogeny, three different photoperiods were tested: a regular 12L:12D cycle (LD), a continuous light 24L:0D (LL) and a two-phases photoperiod (LL + LD) in which the photoperiod changed from LL to LD on day 15 after hatching (dph). Larvae were sampled on 10, 18, 30 and 60 days post-hatch (dph) during a 24 h cycle. In addition to the expression of clock genes (clock, bmal1, cry1 and per3), food intake was measured. Under LD photoperiod, larvae feed intake and clock genes expression showed a rhythmic pattern with a strong light synchronization, with the acrophases occurring at the same hour in all tested ages. Under LL photoperiod, the larvae also showed a rhythmic pattern but the acrophases occurred at different times depending on the age, although at the end of the experiment (60 dph) clock genes expression and feed intake rhythms were similar to those larvae exposed to LD photoperiod. Moreover, the expression levels of bmal1 and cry1 were much lower than in LD photoperiod. Under the LL + LD photoperiod, the 10 dph larvae showed the same patterns as LL treatment while 18 and 30 dph larvae showed the same patterns as LD treatment. These results revealed the presence of internal factors driving rhythmic physiological responses during larvae development under constant environmental conditions. The LL + LD treatment demonstrates the plasticity of the clock genes expression and the strong effect of light as synchronizer in developing fish larvae.

  15. Clock genes and their genomic distributions in three species of salmonid fishes: Associations with genes regulating sexual maturation and cell cycling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clock family genes encode transcription factors that regulate clock-controlled genes and thus regulate many physiological mechanisms/processes in a circadian fashion. Clock1 duplicates and copies of Clock3 and NPAS2-like genes were partially characterized (genomic sequencing) and mapped using family-based indels/SNPs in rainbow trout (RT)(Oncorhynchus mykiss), Arctic charr (AC)(Salvelinus alpinus), and Atlantic salmon (AS)(Salmo salar) mapping panels. Results Clock1 duplicates mapped to linkage groups RT-8/-24, AC-16/-13 and AS-2/-18. Clock3/NPAS2-like genes mapped to RT-9/-20, AC-20/-43, and AS-5. Most of these linkage group regions containing the Clock gene duplicates were derived from the most recent 4R whole genome duplication event specific to the salmonids. These linkage groups contain quantitative trait loci (QTL) for life history and growth traits (i.e., reproduction and cell cycling). Comparative synteny analyses with other model teleost species reveal a high degree of conservation for genes in these chromosomal regions suggesting that functionally related or co-regulated genes are clustered in syntenic blocks. For example, anti-müllerian hormone (amh), regulating sexual maturation, and ornithine decarboxylase antizymes (oaz1 and oaz2), regulating cell cycling, are contained within these syntenic blocks. Conclusions Synteny analyses indicate that regions homologous to major life-history QTL regions in salmonids contain many candidate genes that are likely to influence reproduction and cell cycling. The order of these genes is highly conserved across the vertebrate species examined, and as such, these genes may make up a functional cluster of genes that are likely co-regulated. CLOCK, as a transcription factor, is found within this block and therefore has the potential to cis-regulate the processes influenced by these genes. Additionally, clock-controlled genes (CCGs) are located in other life-history QTL regions within salmonids suggesting that

  16. Transcription factor NF-Y is a functional regulator of the transcription of core clock gene Bmal1.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jun; Zhou, Yongchun; Lai, Hao; Lei, Shi; Chi, Lisa H; Mo, Xianwei

    2013-11-01

    The circadian clock enables organisms to adjust to daily environmental changes and synchronize multiple molecular, biochemical, physiological, and behavioral processes accordingly. In mammalian clock work, Bmal1 is the most important core clock gene, which works with another core clock gene Clock to drive the expression of other clock genes and clock-controlled genes. However, the regulation of Bmal1 has not been fully understood. This work was aimed at identifying the positive regulator(s) of Bmal1 transcription. A series of 5' deletion reporter constructs was generated, and binding site mutations of mouse Bmal1 promoter fragments were cloned into pGL3-basic and pGL3(R2.1)-basic plasmids and transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. Luciferase activity was either measured 48 h after transfection or recorded for 4 days after serum shock. DNA affinity precipitation assay was used to detect the transcription factors binding to Bmal1 promoter. Small interfering RNA against nuclear factor Y, subunit A (NF-YA) and dominant negative NF-YA were employed to study the role of NF-Y in Bmal1 transcription regulation. Deletion and mutation analyses identified two clusters of CCAAT/GC-boxes at the proximal region of Bmal1 promoter as the activating cis-elements. Bmal1 promoter activity was up-regulated by NF-Y and/or Sp1 and repressed by dominant negative NF-YA or siRNA against NF-YA. The activation of Bmal1 promoter activity by NF-Y and Sp1 was inhibited by Rev-Erbα. DNA affinity precipitation assay showed that NF-Y and Sp1 bound to the two CCAAT/GC clusters of Bmal1 promoter. These results indicate that NF-Y is a functional activator of Bmal1 transcription and it cooperates with Sp1 and Rev-Erbα to generate the daily cycle of Bmal1 expression.

  17. Circadian control by the reduction/oxidation pathway: catalase represses light-dependent clock gene expression in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Jun; Cho, Sehyung; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2007-10-01

    Light is the key entraining stimulus for the circadian clock, but several features of the signaling pathways that convert the photic signal to clock entrainment remain to be deciphered. Here, we show that light induces the production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) that acts as the second messenger coupling photoreception to the zebrafish circadian clock. Treatment of light-responsive Z3 cells with H(2)O(2) triggers the induction of zCry1a and zPer2 genes and the subsequent circadian oscillation of zPer1. Remarkably, the induction kinetics and oscillation profile in response to H(2)O(2) are identical to those initiated by light. Catalase (Cat), an antioxidant enzyme degrading H(2)O(2), shows an oscillating pattern of expression and activity, antiphasic to zCry1a and zPer2. Interestingly, overexpression of zCAT results in a reduced light-dependent zCry1a and zPer2 gene induction. In contrast, inhibition of zCAT function enhances light-mediated inducibility of these clock genes. These findings implicate the enzymatic function of zCAT enzyme in the negative regulation of light-dependent clock gene transcriptional activation. Our findings provide an attractive link between the regulation of the cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) state and the photic signaling pathways implicated in circadian control.

  18. Functional Implications of the CLOCK 3111T/C Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Ozburn, Angela R.; Purohit, Kush; Parekh, Puja K.; Kaplan, Gabrielle N.; Falcon, Edgardo; Mukherjee, Shibani; Cates, Hannah M.; McClung, Colleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythm disruptions are prominently associated with bipolar disorder (BD). Circadian rhythms are regulated by the molecular clock, a family of proteins that function together in a transcriptional–translational feedback loop. The CLOCK protein is a key transcription factor of this feedback loop, and previous studies have found that manipulations of the Clock gene are sufficient to produce manic-like behavior in mice (1). The CLOCK 3111T/C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs1801260) is a genetic variation of the human CLOCK gene that is significantly associated with increased frequency of manic episodes in BD patients (2). The 3111T/C SNP is located in the 3′-untranslated region of the CLOCK gene. In this study, we sought to examine the functional implications of the human CLOCK 3111T/C SNP by transfecting a mammalian cell line (mouse embryonic fibroblasts isolated from Clock−/− knockout mice) with pcDNA plasmids containing the human CLOCK gene with either the T or C SNP at position 3111. We then measured circadian gene expression over a 24-h time period. We found that the CLOCK3111C SNP resulted in higher mRNA levels than the CLOCK 3111T SNP. Furthermore, we found that Per2, a transcriptional target of CLOCK, was also more highly expressed with CLOCK 3111C expression, indicating that the 3′-UTR SNP affects the expression, function, and stability of CLOCK mRNA. PMID:27148095

  19. Placental genetic variations in circadian clock-related genes increase the risk of placental abruption

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chunfang; Gelaye, Bizu; Denis, Marie; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Ananth, Cande V; Pacora, Percy N; Salazar, Manuel; Sanchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of placental abruption (PA) remains poorly understood. We examined variations in SNPs of circadian clock-related genes in placenta with PA risk. We also explored placental and maternal genomic contributions to PA risk. Placental genomic DNA samples were isolated from 280 PA cases and 244 controls. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina Cardio-MetaboChip. We examined 116 SNPs in 13 genes known to moderate circadian rhythms. Logistic regression models were fit to estimate odds ratios (ORs). The combined effect of multiple SNPs on PA risk was estimated using a weighted genetic risk score. We examined independent and joint associations of wGRS derived from placental and maternal genomes with PA. Seven SNPs in five genes (ARNTL2, CRY2, DEC1, PER3 and RORA), in the placental genome, were associated with PA risk. Each copy of the minor allele (G) of a SNP in the RORA gene (rs2899663) was associated with a 30% reduced odds of PA (95% CI 0.52-0.95). The odds of PA increased with increasing placental-wGRS (Ptrend<0.001). The ORs were 1.00, 2.16, 3.24 and 4.48 across quartiles. Associations persisted after the maternal-wGRS was included in the model. There was evidence of an additive contribution of placental and maternal genetic contributions to PA risk. Participants with placental- and maternal-wGRS in the highest quartile, compared with those in the lowest quartile, had a 15.57-fold (95% CI 3.34-72.60) increased odds of PA. Placental variants in circadian clock-related genes are associated with PA risk; and the association persists after control of genetic variants in the maternal genome. PMID:27186326

  20. Expression of clock proteins in developing tooth.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Papagerakis, Silvana; Schnell, Santiago D; Hoogerwerf, Willemijntje A; Papagerakis, Petros

    2011-01-01

    Morphological and functional changes during ameloblast and odontoblast differentiation suggest that enamel and dentin formation is under circadian control. Circadian rhythms are endogenous self-sustained oscillations with periods of 24h that control diverse physiological and metabolic processes. Mammalian clock genes play a key role in synchronizing circadian functions in many organs. However, close to nothing is known on clock genes expression during tooth development. In this work, we investigated the expression of four clock genes during tooth development. Our results showed that circadian clock genes Bmal1, clock, per1, and per2 mRNAs were detected in teeth by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry showed that clock protein expression was first detected in teeth at the bell stage (E17), being expressed in EOE and dental papilla cells. At post-natal day four (PN4), all four clock proteins continued to be expressed in teeth but with different intensities, being strongly expressed within the nucleus of ameloblasts and odontoblasts and down-regulated in dental pulp cells. Interestingly, at PN21 incisor, expression of clock proteins was down-regulated in odontoblasts of the crown-analogue side but expression was persisting in root-analogue side odontoblasts. In contrast, both crown and root odontoblasts were strongly stained for all four clock proteins in first molars at PN21. Within the periodontal ligament (PDL) space, epithelial rests of Malassez (ERM) showed the strongest expression among other PDL cells. Our data suggests that clock genes might be involved in the regulation of ameloblast and odontoblast functions, such as enamel and dentin protein secretion and matrix mineralization.

  1. Defining the robust behaviour of the plant clock gene circuit with absolute RNA timeseries and open infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Flis, Anna; Fernández, Aurora Piñas; Zielinski, Tomasz; Mengin, Virginie; Sulpice, Ronan; Stratford, Kevin; Hume, Alastair; Pokhilko, Alexandra; Southern, Megan M; Seaton, Daniel D; McWatters, Harriet G; Stitt, Mark; Halliday, Karen J; Millar, Andrew J

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of the complex, transcriptional feedback loops in the circadian clock mechanism has depended upon quantitative, timeseries data from disparate sources. We measure clock gene RNA profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, grown with or without exogenous sucrose, or in soil-grown plants and in wild-type and mutant backgrounds. The RNA profiles were strikingly robust across the experimental conditions, so current mathematical models are likely to be broadly applicable in leaf tissue. In addition to providing reference data, unexpected behaviours included co-expression of PRR9 and ELF4, and regulation of PRR5 by GI. Absolute RNA quantification revealed low levels of PRR9 transcripts (peak approx. 50 copies cell(-1)) compared with other clock genes, and threefold higher levels of LHY RNA (more than 1500 copies cell(-1)) than of its close relative CCA1. The data are disseminated from BioDare, an online repository for focused timeseries data, which is expected to benefit mechanistic modelling. One data subset successfully constrained clock gene expression in a complex model, using publicly available software on parallel computers, without expert tuning or programming. We outline the empirical and mathematical justification for data aggregation in understanding highly interconnected, dynamic networks such as the clock, and the observed design constraints on the resources required to make this approach widely accessible. PMID:26468131

  2. Defining the robust behaviour of the plant clock gene circuit with absolute RNA timeseries and open infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Flis, Anna; Fernández, Aurora Piñas; Zielinski, Tomasz; Mengin, Virginie; Sulpice, Ronan; Stratford, Kevin; Hume, Alastair; Pokhilko, Alexandra; Southern, Megan M; Seaton, Daniel D; McWatters, Harriet G; Stitt, Mark; Halliday, Karen J; Millar, Andrew J

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of the complex, transcriptional feedback loops in the circadian clock mechanism has depended upon quantitative, timeseries data from disparate sources. We measure clock gene RNA profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, grown with or without exogenous sucrose, or in soil-grown plants and in wild-type and mutant backgrounds. The RNA profiles were strikingly robust across the experimental conditions, so current mathematical models are likely to be broadly applicable in leaf tissue. In addition to providing reference data, unexpected behaviours included co-expression of PRR9 and ELF4, and regulation of PRR5 by GI. Absolute RNA quantification revealed low levels of PRR9 transcripts (peak approx. 50 copies cell(-1)) compared with other clock genes, and threefold higher levels of LHY RNA (more than 1500 copies cell(-1)) than of its close relative CCA1. The data are disseminated from BioDare, an online repository for focused timeseries data, which is expected to benefit mechanistic modelling. One data subset successfully constrained clock gene expression in a complex model, using publicly available software on parallel computers, without expert tuning or programming. We outline the empirical and mathematical justification for data aggregation in understanding highly interconnected, dynamic networks such as the clock, and the observed design constraints on the resources required to make this approach widely accessible.

  3. Defining the robust behaviour of the plant clock gene circuit with absolute RNA timeseries and open infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Flis, Anna; Fernández, Aurora Piñas; Zielinski, Tomasz; Mengin, Virginie; Sulpice, Ronan; Stratford, Kevin; Hume, Alastair; Pokhilko, Alexandra; Southern, Megan M.; Seaton, Daniel D.; McWatters, Harriet G.; Stitt, Mark; Halliday, Karen J.; Millar, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the complex, transcriptional feedback loops in the circadian clock mechanism has depended upon quantitative, timeseries data from disparate sources. We measure clock gene RNA profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, grown with or without exogenous sucrose, or in soil-grown plants and in wild-type and mutant backgrounds. The RNA profiles were strikingly robust across the experimental conditions, so current mathematical models are likely to be broadly applicable in leaf tissue. In addition to providing reference data, unexpected behaviours included co-expression of PRR9 and ELF4, and regulation of PRR5 by GI. Absolute RNA quantification revealed low levels of PRR9 transcripts (peak approx. 50 copies cell−1) compared with other clock genes, and threefold higher levels of LHY RNA (more than 1500 copies cell−1) than of its close relative CCA1. The data are disseminated from BioDare, an online repository for focused timeseries data, which is expected to benefit mechanistic modelling. One data subset successfully constrained clock gene expression in a complex model, using publicly available software on parallel computers, without expert tuning or programming. We outline the empirical and mathematical justification for data aggregation in understanding highly interconnected, dynamic networks such as the clock, and the observed design constraints on the resources required to make this approach widely accessible. PMID:26468131

  4. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) circadian clock genes can respond rapidly to temperature in an EARLY FLOWERING 3-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Brett; Deng, Weiwei; Clausen, Jenni; Oliver, Sandra; Boden, Scott; Hemming, Megan; Trevaskis, Ben

    2016-01-01

    An increase in global temperatures will impact future crop yields. In the cereal crops wheat and barley, high temperatures accelerate reproductive development, reducing the number of grains per plant and final grain yield. Despite this relationship between temperature and cereal yield, it is not clear what genes and molecular pathways mediate the developmental response to increased temperatures. The plant circadian clock can respond to changes in temperature and is important for photoperiod-dependent flowering, and so is a potential mechanism controlling temperature responses in cereal crops. This study examines the relationship between temperature, the circadian clock, and the expression of flowering-time genes in barley (Hordeum vulgare), a crop model for temperate cereals. Transcript levels of barley core circadian clock genes were assayed over a range of temperatures. Transcript levels of core clock genes CCA1, GI, PRR59, PRR73, PRR95, and LUX are increased at higher temperatures. CCA1 and PRR73 respond rapidly to a decrease in temperature whereas GI and PRR59 respond rapidly to an increase in temperature. The response of GI and the PRR genes to changes in temperature is lost in the elf3 mutant indicating that their response to temperature may be dependent on a functional ELF3 gene. PMID:27580625

  5. Interaction of growth hormone overexpression and nutritional status on pituitary gland clock gene expression in coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Hyoung; White, Samantha L; Devlin, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    Clock genes are involved in generating a circadian rhythm that is integrated with the metabolic state of an organism and information from the environment. Growth hormone (GH) transgenic coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, show a large increase in growth rate, but also attenuated seasonal growth modulations, modified timing of physiological transformations (e.g. smoltification) and disruptions in pituitary gene expression compared with wild-type salmon. In several fishes, circadian rhythm gene expression has been found to oscillate in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, as well as in multiple peripheral tissues, but this control system has not been examined in the pituitary gland nor has the effect of transgenic growth modification been examined. Thus, the daily expression of 10 core clock genes has been examined in pituitary glands of GH transgenic (T) and wild-type coho salmon (NT) entrained on a regular photocycle (12L: 12D) and provided either with scheduled feeding or had food withheld for 60 h. Most clock genes in both genotypes showed oscillating patterns of mRNA levels with light and dark cycles. However, T showed different amplitudes and patterns of expression compared with wild salmon, both in fed and starved conditions. The results from this study indicate that constitutive expression of GH is associated with changes in clock gene regulation, which may play a role in the disrupted behavioural and physiological phenotypes observed in growth-modified transgenic strains.

  6. [Molecular mechanisms of circadian clock functioning].

    PubMed

    Karbovskyĭ, L L; Minchenko, D O; Garmash, Ia A; Minchenko, O G

    2011-01-01

    Most physiological processes of all organisms are rhythmic with a period of about 24 h and are generated by an endogenous biological CLOCK present in all cells. However, there is also a central CLOCK--the primary circadian pacemaker which is localized in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the mammalian hypothalamus. Factors of groups Period (PER1, PER2 and PER3), BMAL (BMAL1 and BMAL2), CRYptochromes (CRY1 and CRY2) as well as some other factors are the components of this circadian CLOCK system. Some of these genes contain E-box sequences and their expression is regulated by a transcription factor complex CLOCK-BMAL1. The enzymes responsible for the post-translational modification of circadian gene products are also the components of circadian CLOCK system. These enzymes define CLOCK's work and determine the duration of circadian biorhythm and functional state of the whole organism. The most important of these enzymes are casein kinase-1epsilon and -1delta. We have analysed data about the interconnection between the circadian CLOCK system, cell cycle, and cancerogenesis as well as about the sensitivity of circadian gene expression to the action of toxic agents and nanomaterials.

  7. Disruption of the circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte influences mycardial contractile function, metabolism, and gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virtually every mammalian cell, including cardiomyocytes, possesses an intrinsic circadian clock. The role of this transcriptionally based molecular mechanism in cardiovascular biology is poorly understood. We hypothesized that the circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte influences diurnal variatio...

  8. The intrinsic circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte directly regulates myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virtually every mammalian cell, including cardiomyocytes, possesses an intrinsic circadian clock. The role of this transcriptionally based molecular mechanism in cardiovascular biology remains unknown. We hypothesized that circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte plays a role in regulating myocardia...

  9. Sleep Disturbance and Altered Expression of Circadian Clock Genes in Patients With Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Hui; Hwang, Chung-Feng; Lin, Pai-Mei; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Hsu, Cheng-Ming; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Yang, Ming-Yu

    2015-07-01

    The cause of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) remains unclear and therefore it is often considered as idiopathic. Sleep disturbance has been linked to SSNHL and circadian rhythm disruption, but the link between circadian rhythm disruption and SSNHL has never been investigated.In this study, we surveyed the sleep quality of 38 patients with SSNHL using a simple insomnia sleep questionnaire. The expression of circadian clock genes in peripheral blood (PB) leukocytes from 38 patients with SSNHL and 71 healthy subjects was accessed using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and validated using immunocytochemical staining.We found that 61.8% of patients with SSNHL suffered from insomnia before the insult of hearing loss. Besides, significantly decreased expression of PER1, CRY1, CRY2, CLOCK, BMAL1, and CKlε was found in PB leukocytes of patients with SSNHL when compared with healthy subjects. SSNHL patients with vertigo had significantly lower expression of CRY1 and CKlε than patients without vertigo symptoms. Our results imply the association of sleep disturbance and disrupted circadian rhythm in SSNHL.

  10. Time of feeding and the intrinsic circadian clock drive rhythms in hepatic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vollmers, Christopher; Gill, Shubhroz; DiTacchio, Luciano; Pulivarthy, Sandhya R; Le, Hiep D; Panda, Satchidananda

    2009-12-15

    In mammals, the circadian oscillator generates approximately 24-h rhythms in feeding behavior, even under constant environmental conditions. Livers of mice held under constant darkness exhibit circadian rhythm in abundance in up to 15% of expressed transcripts. Therefore, oscillations in hepatic transcripts could be driven by rhythmic food intake or sustained by the hepatic circadian oscillator, or a combination of both. To address this question, we used distinct feeding and fasting paradigms on wild-type (WT) and circadian clock-deficient mice. We monitored temporal patterns of feeding and hepatic transcription. Both food availability and the temporal pattern of feeding determined the repertoire, phase, and amplitude of the circadian transcriptome in WT liver. In the absence of feeding, only a small subset of transcripts continued to express circadian patterns. Conversely, temporally restricted feeding restored rhythmic transcription of hundreds of genes in oscillator-deficient mouse liver. Our findings show that both temporal pattern of food intake and the circadian clock drive rhythmic transcription, thereby highlighting temporal regulation of hepatic transcription as an emergent property of the circadian system.

  11. A role for the clock gene, Per1 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qi; Gery, Sigal; Dashti, Azadeh; Yin, Dong; Zhou, Yan; Gu, Jiang; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Circadian rhythms regulate diverse physiological processes including homeostatic functions of steroid hormones and their receptors. Perturbations of these rhythms are associated with pathogenic conditions, such as depression, diabetes, and cancer. Androgens play an important role in both normal development and carcinogenesis of the prostate. In the present study, we investigated a potential role for the core clock factor, Per1, in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Serum-shocked synchronized prostate cancer cells displayed disrupted circadian rhythms compared to the normal prostate tissue. Using Oncomine to perform a meta-analysis of microarray expression studies, we found that Per1 is downregulated in human prostate cancer samples compared with normal prostates. Reporter assays demonstrated that Per1 inhibited transactivation of the androgen receptor (AR) both in 293T cells overexpressing the AR and in the prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP. Forced expression of Per1 in LNCaP cells, diminished the expression of known androgen-sensitive genes following stimulation with dihydrotestosterone (DHT). We showed that Per1 physically interacted with AR; and in addition, we found that Per1 itself is regulated by androgens in prostate cancer cells. Overexpression of Per1 in prostate cancer cells resulted in significant growth inhibition and apoptosis. Our results support the emerging role of circadian genes as key players in malignant transformation. Further elucidating the connections between clock genes and the AR pathway could benefit the development of new therapeutic strategies for prostate cancer, as well as, provide insights into chronotherapy as a way to optimize current therapies. PMID:19752089

  12. Differential regulation of two period genes in the Xenopus eye.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, M; Wang, Y; Steenhard, B M; Besharse, J C

    2000-10-20

    The recent identification and analysis of mammalian homologues of the well characterized Drosophila circadian clock gene, Period (Per), has led to the idea that key features of vertebrate circadian rhythmicity are conserved at the molecular level. The Xenopus laevis retina contains a circadian clock mechanism that can be studied in vitro. To study the rhythmic expression of Per in the Xenopus retina, we used a degenerate RT-PCR strategy to obtain cDNA clones covering the entire 1427 amino acid coding region of a Xenopus homologue of Per2 and a partial cDNA sequence for a Xenopus homologue of Per1. Northern blot analysis shows that xPer1 and xPer2 transcripts are expressed most abundantly in the eye and the brain. However, rhythmic expression of xPer2 transcripts in the retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is light dependent and occurs only under 12 h light/12 h dark (LD) conditions, not in constant dark (DD). In contrast, xPer1 mRNA accumulation is rhythmic under both LD and DD conditions. Light dependent regulation of xPer2 mRNA and circadian regulation of xPer1 mRNA in the Xenopus retina differs from that in Drosophila and mammals. Light dependence of xPer2 mRNA levels and the offset phase relationship of the xPer2 rhythm to that for xPer1 suggests a role for xPer2 in circadian entrainment. PMID:11042357

  13. Circadian molecular clocks and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Fergal C; Rao, Aparna; Maguire, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Physiological processes such as the sleep-wake cycle, metabolism and hormone secretion are controlled by a circadian rhythm adapted to 24h day-night periodicity. This circadian synchronisation is in part controlled by ambient light decreasing melatonin secretion by the pineal gland and co-ordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Peripheral cell autonomous circadian clocks controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the master regulator, exist within every cell of the body and are comprised of at least twelve genes. These include the basic helix-loop-helix/PAS domain containing transcription factors; Clock, BMal1 and Npas2 which activate transcription of the periodic genes (Per1 and Per2) and cryptochrome genes (Cry1 and Cry2). Points of coupling exist between the cellular clock and the cell cycle. Cell cycle genes which are affected by the molecular circadian clock include c-Myc, Wee1, cyclin D and p21. Therefore the rhythm of the circadian clock and cancer are interlinked. Molecular examples exist including activation of Per2 leads to c-myc overexpression and an increased tumor incidence. Mice with mutations in Cryptochrome 1 and 2 are arrhythmic (lack a circadian rhythm) and arrhythmic mice have a faster rate of growth of implanted tumors. Epidemiological finding of relevance include 'The Nurses' Health Study' where it was established that women working rotational night shifts have an increased incidence of breast cancer. Compounds that affect circadian rhythm exist with attendant future therapeutic possibilities. These include casein kinase I inhibitors and a candidate small molecule KL001 that affects the degradation of cryptochrome. Theoretically the cell cycle and malignant disease may be targeted vicariously by selective alteration of the cellular molecular clock. PMID:24099911

  14. Differential maturation of circadian rhythms in clock gene proteins in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the pars tuberalis during mouse ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Nariman; Agathagelidis, Manuel; Lee, Choogon; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of many body functions in mammals are controlled by a master pacemaker residing in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) that synchronises peripheral oscillators. The SCN and peripheral oscillators share several components of the molecular clockwork and comprise transcriptional activators (BMAL1 and CLOCK/NPAS2) and inhibitors (mPER1/2 and mCRY1/2). Here we compared the ontogenetic maturation of the clockwork in the SCN and pars tuberalis (PT). The PT is a peripheral oscillator that strongly depends on rhythmic melatonin signals. Immunoreactions for clock gene proteins were determined in the SCN and PT at four different timepoints during four differential stages of mouse ontogeny: foetal (embryonic day 18), newborn (2-day-old), infantile (10-day-old), and adult. In the foetal SCN levels of immunoreactions of all clock proteins were significantly lower as compared to adult levels except for BMAL1. In the newborn SCN the clock protein immunoreactions had not yet reached adult levels, but the infantile SCN showed similar levels of immunreactions as the adult. In contrast, immunoreactions for all clock gene proteins in the foetal PT were as intense as in newborn, infantile, and adult and showed the same phase. As the foetal pineal gland is not yet capable of rhythmic melatonin production, the rhythms in clock gene proteins in the foetal PT are presumably dependent on the maternal melatonin signal. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that maternal melatonin is important for establishing and maintaining circadian rhythms in a foetal peripheral oscillator. PMID:19222558

  15. Gene-gene interaction between serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) and CLOCK modulates the risk of metabolic syndrome in rotating shiftworkers.

    PubMed

    Sookoian, Silvia; Gianotti, Tomas Fernandez; Burgueño, Adriana; Pirola, Carlos Jose

    2010-07-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission and the master circadian CLOCK gene are physiological modulators of the circadian system. In addition, both are involved in the physiopathology of metabolic syndrome (MS). The authors sought to examine the potential effect of the gene-gene interaction between the functional 44-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism in the promoter region (serotonin-transporter-linked promoter region polymorphism or 5-HTTLPR) of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) and common variants of the gene CLOCK on the genetic risk underlying MS of shift-workers. To test this hypothesis, 856 men were studied; 518 dayworkers were compared with 338 rotating shiftworkers. Medical history, health examination including anthropometric and arterial blood pressure measurements, a questionnaire on health-related behaviors, and biochemical determinations were obtained from every participant. 5-HTTLPR genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction followed by gel electrophoresis. Six tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CLOCK gene with a minor allele frequency >10 % (rs1554483 C/G, rs11932595 A/G, rs4580704 C/G, rs6843722 A/C, rs6850524 C/G, and rs4864548 A/G), encompassing 117 kb of chromosome 4 and representing 115 polymorphic sites (r(2) > .8), were genotyped. A significant interaction between the 5-HTTLPR variant and the haplotype rs1554483-rs4864548 of the CLOCK gene was detected for diastolic (p = .0058) and systolic blood pressure (p = .0014), arterial hypertension (p = .033), plasma triglycerides levels (p = .033), and number of MS components (p = .01). In all these cases, the higher values were observed in rotating shiftworkers homozygous for the SLC6A4 S allele and carrying the haplotype composed by the CLOCK rs1554483 G and rs4864548 A variants. In conclusion, these data suggest a potential interaction (epistatic effect) of serotonin transporter and CLOCK gene variation on the genetic susceptibility to develop MS by rotating shiftworkers.

  16. Reading the molecular clock from the decay of internal symmetry of a gene.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, P E; Dugaiczyk, A

    1994-01-01

    The closely related serum albumin, alpha-fetoprotein, and vitamin D-binding proteins are derived from a common ancestor, which itself was the result of a triplication of an ancestral gene. We have aligned the sequences of these proteins against themselves to assess the degree to which the ancestral 3-fold symmetry has been retained; in a dot plot, relics of the molecular symmetry appear as a series of alignments parallel to the main diagonal. The decay of internal symmetry reflects the rate of change of a gene in a single line of evolutionary descent. We examined 11 serum albumins, 2 ceruloplasmins, 3 alpha-fetoproteins, and 3 vitamin D-binding proteins. We have found that ceruloplasmin evolves at the same rate in human and rat, whereas albumin, alpha-fetoprotein, and vitamin D-binding protein evolve at different rates. The human genes had the highest alignment scores, indicating the most preserved ancestral features. We conclude that the molecular clock may run at different rates for the same gene in different species. PMID:7512733

  17. Synergistic induction of the clock protein PERIOD by insulin-like peptide and prothoracicotropic hormone in Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera): implications for convergence of hormone signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Vafopoulou, Xanthe; Steel, Colin G. H.

    2014-01-01

    We showed previously that release of the cerebral neurohormones, bombyxin (an insulin-like peptide, ILP) and prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) from the brain have strong circadian rhythms, driven by master clock cells in the brain. These neurohormone rhythms synchronize the photosensitive brain clock with the photosensitive peripheral clock in the cells of the prothoracic glands (PGs), in which both regulate steroidogenesis. Here, using immunohistochemistry and confocal laser scanning microscopy, we show these neurohormones likely act on clock cells in the brain and PGs by regulating expression of PERIOD (PER) protein. PER is severely reduced in the nuclei of all clock cells in continuous light, but on transfer of tissues to darkness in vitro, it is rapidly induced. A 4h pulse of either PTTH or ILPs to brain and PGs in vitro both rapidly and highly significantly induce PER in the nuclei of clock cells. Administration of both neurohormones together induces more PER than does either alone and even more than does transfer to darkness, at least in PG cells. These are clearly non-steroidogenic actions of these peptides. In the peripheral oscillators salivary gland (SG) and fat body cells, neither bombyxin nor PTTH nor darkness induced PER, but a combination of both bombyxin and PTTH induced PER. Thus, PTTH and ILPs exert synergistic actions on induction of PER in both clock cells and peripheral oscillators, implying their signaling pathways converge, but in different ways in different cell types. We infer clock cells are able to integrate light cycle information with internal signals from hormones. PMID:24600396

  18. Gender effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms and miRNAs targeting clock-genes in metastatic colorectal cancer patients (mCRC)

    PubMed Central

    Garufi, Carlo; Giacomini, Elisa; Torsello, Angela; Sperduti, Isabella; Melucci, Elisa; Mottolese, Marcella; Zeuli, Massimo; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Ricciardi, Teresa; Cognetti, Francesco; Magnani, Mauro; Ruzzo, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    The circadian system is composed of a set of clock-genes including PERIOD, CLOCK, BMAL1 and CRY. Disrupting this system promotes cancer development and progression. The expression levels of miR-206, miR-219, miR-192, miR-194 and miR-132 regulating clock-genes and three functional polymorphisms rs11133373 C/G, rs1801260 T/C, rs11133391 T/C in CLOCK sequence were associated with the survival of 83 mCRC patients (50 males and 33 females). Longer overall survival (OS) was observed in women compared to men, 50 versus 31 months. This difference was associated with rs11133373 C/C genotype (p = 0.01), rs1801260 T/C+C/C genotype (p = 0.06) and rs11133391 T/T genotype (p = 0.06). Moreover women expressing high levels (H) of miR-192 (p = 0.03), miR-206 (p = 0.003), miR-194 (p = 0.02) and miR-219 (p = 0.002) had a longer OS compared to men. In women longer OS was reinforced by the simultaneous presence of two or more H-miR, 58 months versus 15 months (p = 0.0008); in this group of women an OS of 87 months was reached with the additional presence of rs11133391T/T genotype (p = 0.02). In this study we identified a subgroup of female patients who seems to have a better prognosis. Personalized medicine should prospectively take into account both genetic and gender differences. PMID:27666868

  19. The Mouse Clock Mutation Behaves as an Antimorph and Maps within the W(19h) Deletion, Distal of Kit

    PubMed Central

    King, D. P.; Vitaterna, M. H.; Chang, A. M.; Dove, W. F.; Pinto, L. H.; Turek, F. W.; Takahashi, J. S.

    1997-01-01

    Clock is a semidominant mutation identified from an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen in mice. Mice carrying the Clock mutation exhibit abnormalities of circadian behavior, including lengthening of endogenous period and loss of rhythmicity. To identify the gene affected by this mutation, we have generated a high-resolution genetic map (>1800 meioses) of the Clock locus. We report that Clock is 0.7 cM distal of Kit on mouse chromosome 5. Mapping shows that Clock lies within the W(19H) deletion. Complementation analysis of different Clock and W(19H) compound genotypes indicates that the Clock mutation behaves as an antimorph. This antimorphic behavior of Clock strongly argues that Clock defines a gene centrally involved in the mammalian circadian system. PMID:9215907

  20. Modulation of learning and memory by the targeted deletion of the circadian clock gene Bmal1 in forebrain circuits.

    PubMed

    Snider, Kaitlin H; Dziema, Heather; Aten, Sydney; Loeser, Jacob; Norona, Frances E; Hoyt, Kari; Obrietan, Karl

    2016-07-15

    A large body of literature has shown that the disruption of circadian clock timing has profound effects on mood, memory and complex thinking. Central to this time keeping process is the master circadian pacemaker located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Of note, within the central nervous system, clock timing is not exclusive to the SCN, but rather, ancillary oscillatory capacity has been detected in a wide range of cell types and brain regions, including forebrain circuits that underlie complex cognitive processes. These observations raise questions about the hierarchical and functional relationship between the SCN and forebrain oscillators, and, relatedly, about the underlying clock-gated synaptic circuitry that modulates cognition. Here, we utilized a clock knockout strategy in which the essential circadian timing gene Bmal1 was selectively deleted from excitatory forebrain neurons, whilst the SCN clock remained intact, to test the role of forebrain clock timing in learning, memory, anxiety, and behavioral despair. With this model system, we observed numerous effects on hippocampus-dependent measures of cognition. Mice lacking forebrain Bmal1 exhibited deficits in both acquisition and recall on the Barnes maze. Notably, loss of forebrain Bmal1 abrogated time-of-day dependent novel object location memory. However, the loss of Bmal1 did not alter performance on the elevated plus maze, open field assay, and tail suspension test, indicating that this phenotype specifically impairs cognition but not affect. Together, these data suggest that forebrain clock timing plays a critical role in shaping the efficiency of learning and memory retrieval over the circadian day. PMID:27091299

  1. Modulation of learning and memory by the targeted deletion of the circadian clock gene Bmal1 in forebrain circuits.

    PubMed

    Snider, Kaitlin H; Dziema, Heather; Aten, Sydney; Loeser, Jacob; Norona, Frances E; Hoyt, Kari; Obrietan, Karl

    2016-07-15

    A large body of literature has shown that the disruption of circadian clock timing has profound effects on mood, memory and complex thinking. Central to this time keeping process is the master circadian pacemaker located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Of note, within the central nervous system, clock timing is not exclusive to the SCN, but rather, ancillary oscillatory capacity has been detected in a wide range of cell types and brain regions, including forebrain circuits that underlie complex cognitive processes. These observations raise questions about the hierarchical and functional relationship between the SCN and forebrain oscillators, and, relatedly, about the underlying clock-gated synaptic circuitry that modulates cognition. Here, we utilized a clock knockout strategy in which the essential circadian timing gene Bmal1 was selectively deleted from excitatory forebrain neurons, whilst the SCN clock remained intact, to test the role of forebrain clock timing in learning, memory, anxiety, and behavioral despair. With this model system, we observed numerous effects on hippocampus-dependent measures of cognition. Mice lacking forebrain Bmal1 exhibited deficits in both acquisition and recall on the Barnes maze. Notably, loss of forebrain Bmal1 abrogated time-of-day dependent novel object location memory. However, the loss of Bmal1 did not alter performance on the elevated plus maze, open field assay, and tail suspension test, indicating that this phenotype specifically impairs cognition but not affect. Together, these data suggest that forebrain clock timing plays a critical role in shaping the efficiency of learning and memory retrieval over the circadian day.

  2. Variants of the CLOCK gene affect the risk of idiopathic male infertility in the Han-Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ouxi; Ding, Xinliang; Nie, Jihua; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru; Tong, Jian; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental animal studies suggested that the circadian locomotor output cycles kaput protein gene (CLOCK) has been reported to play a critical role in sperm function and male fertility. The aim of this study was to determine whether variants of the CLOCK gene are involved in idiopathic male infertility. The study included 478 idiopathic infertile men and 194 fertile controls who completed physical examinations. Each subject donated 5 ml of peripheral blood and a sample of semen in the ejaculate. An aliquot of each blood sample was used to separate the serum for the measurement of testosterone as well as follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) using the standard radioimmunoassay. The rest of the blood samples was used to extract the DNA for the assay of three tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms of CLOCK gene, viz., rs1801260, rs3817444 and rs3749474, using the real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR. The ejaculate of each subject was used for semen analysis by computer-assisted semen analysis system. The results indicated: (a) the variant rs1801260 associated with normal semen parameters was linked to a significant increase in the risk of idiopathic infertility, (b) the variant rs3817444 associated with both normal and abnormal semen parameters also indicated an increased risk of idiopathic infertility, and (c) the variants rs3749474 associated with both normal and abnormal semen parameters, on the other hand, conferred no significant risk for male infertility. Furthermore, elevated serum testosterone and FSH levels were correlated with the three variants of CLOCK gene in idiopathic infertility. The findings demonstrate that the human subjects with variants of the CLOCK gene are associated with idiopathic male infertility and therefore may be applied as a risk factor of male infertility.

  3. Regulation of behavioral circadian rhythms and clock protein PER1 by the deubiquitinating enzyme USP2

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaoming; Duguay, David; Bédard, Nathalie; Rachalski, Adeline; Baquiran, Gerardo; Na, Chan Hyun; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Storch, Kai-Florian; Peng, Junmin; Wing, Simon S.; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Summary Endogenous 24-hour rhythms are generated by circadian clocks located in most tissues. The molecular clock mechanism is based on feedback loops involving clock genes and their protein products. Post-translational modifications, including ubiquitination, are important for regulating the clock feedback mechanism. Previous work has focused on the role of ubiquitin ligases in the clock mechanism. Here we show a role for the rhythmically-expressed deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin specific peptidase 2 (USP2) in clock function. Mice with a deletion of the Usp2 gene (Usp2 KO) display a longer free-running period of locomotor activity rhythms and altered responses of the clock to light. This was associated with altered expression of clock genes in synchronized Usp2 KO mouse embryonic fibroblasts and increased levels of clock protein PERIOD1 (PER1). USP2 can be coimmunoprecipitated with several clock proteins but directly interacts specifically with PER1 and deubiquitinates it. Interestingly, this deubiquitination does not alter PER1 stability. Taken together, our results identify USP2 as a new core component of the clock machinery and demonstrate a role for deubiquitination in the regulation of the circadian clock, both at the level of the core pacemaker and its response to external cues. PMID:23213472

  4. Regulation of behavioral circadian rhythms and clock protein PER1 by the deubiquitinating enzyme USP2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaoming; Duguay, David; Bédard, Nathalie; Rachalski, Adeline; Baquiran, Gerardo; Na, Chan Hyun; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Storch, Kai-Florian; Peng, Junmin; Wing, Simon S; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2012-08-15

    Endogenous 24-hour rhythms are generated by circadian clocks located in most tissues. The molecular clock mechanism is based on feedback loops involving clock genes and their protein products. Post-translational modifications, including ubiquitination, are important for regulating the clock feedback mechanism. Previous work has focused on the role of ubiquitin ligases in the clock mechanism. Here we show a role for the rhythmically-expressed deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin specific peptidase 2 (USP2) in clock function. Mice with a deletion of the Usp2 gene (Usp2 KO) display a longer free-running period of locomotor activity rhythms and altered responses of the clock to light. This was associated with altered expression of clock genes in synchronized Usp2 KO mouse embryonic fibroblasts and increased levels of clock protein PERIOD1 (PER1). USP2 can be coimmunoprecipitated with several clock proteins but directly interacts specifically with PER1 and deubiquitinates it. Interestingly, this deubiquitination does not alter PER1 stability. Taken together, our results identify USP2 as a new core component of the clock machinery and demonstrate a role for deubiquitination in the regulation of the circadian clock, both at the level of the core pacemaker and its response to external cues.

  5. Mathematical modeling of light-mediated HPA axis activity and downstream implications on the entrainment of peripheral clock genes.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, Panteleimon D; Corbett, Siobhan A; Calvano, Steven E; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2014-10-15

    In this work we propose a semimechanistic model that describes the photic signal transduction to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis that ultimately regulates the synchronization of peripheral clock genes (PCGs). Our HPA axis model predicts that photic stimulation induces a type-1 phase response curve to cortisol's profile with increased cortisol sensitivity to light exposure in its rising phase, as well as the shortening of cortisol's period as constant light increases (Aschoff's first rule). Furthermore, our model provides insight into cortisol's phase and amplitude dependence on photoperiods and reveals that cortisol maintains highest amplitude variability when it is entrained by a balanced schedule of light and dark periods. Importantly, by incorporating the links between HPA axis and PCGs we were able to investigate how cortisol secretion impacts the entrainment of a population of peripheral cells and show that disrupted light schedules, leading to blunted cortisol secretion, fail to synchronize a population of PCGs which further signifies the loss of circadian rhythmicity in the periphery of the body.

  6. Closing the circadian loop: CLOCK-induced transcription of its own inhibitors per and tim.

    PubMed

    Darlington, T K; Wager-Smith, K; Ceriani, M F; Staknis, D; Gekakis, N; Steeves, T D; Weitz, C J; Takahashi, J S; Kay, S A

    1998-06-01

    The circadian oscillator generates a rhythmic output with a period of about 24 hours. Despite extensive studies in several model systems, the biochemical mode of action has not yet been demonstrated for any of its components. Here, the Drosophila CLOCK protein was shown to induce transcription of the circadian rhythm genes period and timeless. dCLOCK functioned as a heterodimer with a Drosophila homolog of BMAL1. These proteins acted through an E-box sequence in the period promoter. The timeless promoter contains an 18-base pair element encompassing an E-box, which was sufficient to confer dCLOCK responsiveness to a reporter gene. PERIOD and TIMELESS proteins blocked dCLOCK's ability to transactivate their promoters via the E-box. Thus, dCLOCK drives expression of period and timeless, which in turn inhibit dCLOCK's activity and close the circadian loop.

  7. Conserved and divergent rhythms of crassulacean acid metabolism-related and core clock gene expression in the cactus Opuntia ficus-indica.

    PubMed

    Mallona, Izaskun; Egea-Cortines, Marcos; Weiss, Julia

    2011-08-01

    The cactus Opuntia ficus-indica is a constitutive Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species. Current knowledge of CAM metabolism suggests that the enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PPCK) is circadian regulated at the transcriptional level, whereas phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) are posttranslationally controlled. As little transcriptomic data are available from obligate CAM plants, we created an expressed sequence tag database derived from different organs and developmental stages. Sequences were assembled, compared with sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information nonredundant database for identification of putative orthologs, and mapped using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Orthology and Gene Ontology. We identified genes involved in circadian regulation and CAM metabolism for transcriptomic analysis in plants grown in long days. We identified stable reference genes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction and found that OfiSAND, like its counterpart in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and OfiTUB are generally appropriate standards for use in the quantification of gene expression in O. ficus-indica. Three kinds of expression profiles were found: transcripts of OfiPPCK oscillated with a 24-h periodicity; transcripts of the light-active OfiNADP-ME and OfiPPDK genes adapted to 12-h cycles, while transcript accumulation patterns of OfiPEPC and OfiMDH were arrhythmic. Expression of the circadian clock gene OfiTOC1, similar to Arabidopsis, oscillated with a 24-h periodicity, peaking at night. Expression of OfiCCA1 and OfiPRR9, unlike in Arabidopsis, adapted best to a 12-h rhythm, suggesting that circadian clock gene interactions differ from those of Arabidopsis. Our results indicate that the evolution of CAM metabolism could be the result of modified circadian regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional

  8. The Arabidopsis SRR1 gene mediates phyB signaling and is required for normal circadian clock function

    PubMed Central

    Staiger, Dorothee; Allenbach, Laure; Salathia, Neeraj; Fiechter, Vincent; Davis, Seth J.; Millar, Andrew J.; Chory, Joanne; Fankhauser, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Plants possess several photoreceptors to sense the light environment. In Arabidopsis cryptochromes and phytochromes play roles in photomorphogenesis and in the light input pathways that synchronize the circadian clock with the external world. We have identified SRR1 (sensitivity to red light reduced), a gene that plays an important role in phytochrome B (phyB)-mediated light signaling. The recessive srr1 null allele and phyB mutants display a number of similar phenotypes indicating that SRR1 is required for normal phyB signaling. Genetic analysis suggests that SRR1 works both in the phyB pathway but also independently of phyB. srr1 mutants are affected in multiple outputs of the circadian clock in continuous light conditions, including leaf movement and expression of the clock components, CCA1 and TOC1. Clock-regulated gene expression is also impaired during day–night cycles and in constant darkness. The circadian phenotypes of srr1 mutants in all three conditions suggest that SRR1 activity is required for normal oscillator function. The SRR1 gene was identified and shown to code for a protein conserved in numerous eukaryotes including mammals and flies, implicating a conserved role for this protein in both the animal and plant kingdoms. PMID:12533513

  9. Geography of the circadian gene clock and photoperiodic response in western North American populations of the threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, C.; Unruh, L.; Zimmerman, C.; Bradshaw, W. E.; Holzapfel, C. M.; Cresko, W. A.

    2014-01-01

    The gene clock is a core component of the daily circadian oscillator in flies and mammals. This gene gained renewed interest over a decade ago when the C-terminus of the Clock protein was found to include polyglutamine repeat domains (PolyQ). Since that time, several studies have used variation in PolyQ as a proxy for variation in circadian function. Furthermore, conjectures were made about the possible role of this variation in photoperiodic control of seasonal timing in birds and fishes, generally with questionable results. Herein, we use controlled laboratory experiments to show that Oregon and Alaskan threespine stickleback, collected from populations that differ by 18° of latitude, show no significant variation in length of the polyglutamine domain of clock, or in photoperiodic response within or between latitudes despite the fact that male and female sticklebacks are photoperiodic at both latitudes. Hence, we urge caution when interpreting variation in the PolyQ domain of the clock gene in the context of seasonal activities or in relationship to photoperiodism along geographical gradients. PMID:23464546

  10. Timing of expression of the core clock gene Bmal1 influences its effects on aging and survival

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guangrui; Chen, Lihong; Grant, Gregory R.; Paschos, Georgios; Song, Wen-Liang; Musiek, Erik S.; Lee, Vivian; McLoughlin, Sarah C.; Grosser, Tilo; Cotsarelis, George; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2016-01-01

    The absence of Bmal1, a core clock gene, results in a loss of circadian rhythms, an acceleration of aging, and a shortened life span in mice. To address the importance of circadian rhythms in the aging process, we generated conditional Bmal1 knockout mice that lacked the BMAL1 protein during adult life and found that wild-type circadian variations in wheel-running activity, heart rate, and blood pressure were abolished. Ocular abnormalities and brain astrogliosis were conserved irrespective of the timing of Bmal1 deletion. However, life span, fertility, body weight, blood glucose levels, and age-dependent arthropathy - which are altered in standard Bmal1 knockout mice - remained unaltered, while atherosclerosis and hair growth improved, in the conditional adult-life Bmal1 knockout mice, despite abolition of clock function. Hepatic RNA-Seq revealed that expression of oscillatory genes was dampened in the adult-life Bmal1 knockout mice, while overall gene expression was largely unchanged. Thus, many phenotypes in conventional Bmal1 knockout mice, hitherto attributed to disruption of circadian rhythms, reflect the loss of properties of BMAL1 that are independent of its role in the clock. These findings prompt re-evaluation of the systemic consequences of disruption of the molecular clock. PMID:26843191

  11. Do Caucasian and Asian clocks tick differently?

    PubMed

    Barbosa, A A; Pedrazzoli, M; Koike, B D V; Tufik, S

    2010-01-01

    The Period 3 and Clock genes are important components of the mammalian molecular circadian system. Studies have shown association between polymorphisms in these clock genes and circadian phenotypes in different populations. Nevertheless, differences in the pattern of allele frequency and genotyping distribution are systematically observed in studies with different ethnic groups. To investigate and compare the pattern of distribution in a sample of Asian and Caucasian populations living in Brazil, we evaluated two well-studied polymorphisms in the clock genes: a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in PER3 and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in CLOCK. The aim of this investigation was to search for clues about human evolutionary processes related to circadian rhythms. We selected 109 Asian and 135 Caucasian descendants. The frequencies of the shorter allele (4 repeats) in the PER3 gene and the T allele in the CLOCK gene among Asians (0.86 and 0.84, respectively) were significantly higher than among Caucasians (0.69 and 0.71, respectively). Our results directly confirmed the different distribution of these polymorphisms between the Asian and Caucasian ethnic groups. Given the genetic differences found between groups, two points became evident: first, ethnic variations may have implications for the interpretation of results in circadian rhythm association studies, and second, the question may be raised about which evolutionary conditions shaped these genetic clock variations.

  12. Circadian molecular clock in lung pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Isaac K; Yao, Hongwei; Sellix, Michael T; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-11-15

    Disrupted daily or circadian rhythms of lung function and inflammatory responses are common features of chronic airway diseases. At the molecular level these circadian rhythms depend on the activity of an autoregulatory feedback loop oscillator of clock gene transcription factors, including the BMAL1:CLOCK activator complex and the repressors PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME. The key nuclear receptors and transcription factors REV-ERBα and RORα regulate Bmal1 expression and provide stability to the oscillator. Circadian clock dysfunction is implicated in both immune and inflammatory responses to environmental, inflammatory, and infectious agents. Molecular clock function is altered by exposomes, tobacco smoke, lipopolysaccharide, hyperoxia, allergens, bleomycin, as well as bacterial and viral infections. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) regulates the timing of the clock through acetylation of BMAL1 and PER2 and controls the clock-dependent functions, which can also be affected by environmental stressors. Environmental agents and redox modulation may alter the levels of REV-ERBα and RORα in lung tissue in association with a heightened DNA damage response, cellular senescence, and inflammation. A reciprocal relationship exists between the molecular clock and immune/inflammatory responses in the lungs. Molecular clock function in lung cells may be used as a biomarker of disease severity and exacerbations or for assessing the efficacy of chronotherapy for disease management. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of clock-controlled cellular and molecular functions in the lungs and highlight the repercussions of clock disruption on the pathophysiology of chronic airway diseases and their exacerbations. Furthermore, we highlight the potential for the molecular clock as a novel chronopharmacological target for the management of lung pathophysiology.

  13. Explaining the sawtooth: latitudinal periodicity in a circadian gene correlates with shifts in generation number.

    PubMed

    Levy, R C; Kozak, G M; Wadsworth, C B; Coates, B S; Dopman, E B

    2015-01-01

    Many temperate insects take advantage of longer growing seasons at lower latitudes by increasing their generation number or voltinism. In some insects, development time abruptly decreases when additional generations are fit into the season. Consequently, latitudinal 'sawtooth' clines associated with shifts in voltinism are seen for phenotypes correlated with development time, like body size. However, latitudinal variation in voltinism has not been linked to genetic variation at specific loci. Here, we show a pattern in allele frequency among voltinism ecotypes of the European corn borer moth (Ostrinia nubilalis) that is reminiscent of a sawtooth cline. We characterized 145 autosomal and sex-linked SNPs and found that period, a circadian gene that is genetically linked to a major QTL determining variation in post-diapause development time, shows cyclical variation between voltinism ecotypes. Allele frequencies at an unlinked circadian clock gene cryptochrome1 were correlated with period. These results suggest that selection on development time to 'fit' complete life cycles into a latitudinally varying growing season produces oscillations in alleles associated with voltinism, primarily through changes at loci underlying the duration of transitions between diapause and other life history phases. Correlations among clock loci suggest possible coupling between the circadian clock and the circannual rhythms for synchronizing seasonal life history. We anticipate that latitudinal oscillations in allele frequency will represent signatures of adaptation to seasonal environments in other insects and may be critical to understanding the ecological and evolutionary consequences of variable environments, including response to global climate change. PMID:25430782

  14. A Compact Model for the Complex Plant Circadian Clock.

    PubMed

    De Caluwé, Joëlle; Xiao, Qiying; Hermans, Christian; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Leloup, Jean-Christophe; Gonze, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timekeeper that allows organisms to anticipate and adapt to the daily variations of their environment. The plant clock is an intricate network of interlocked feedback loops, in which transcription factors regulate each other to generate oscillations with expression peaks at specific times of the day. Over the last decade, mathematical modeling approaches have been used to understand the inner workings of the clock in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Those efforts have produced a number of models of ever increasing complexity. Here, we present an alternative model that combines a low number of equations and parameters, similar to the very earliest models, with the complex network structure found in more recent ones. This simple model describes the temporal evolution of the abundance of eight clock gene mRNA/protein and captures key features of the clock on a qualitative level, namely the entrained and free-running behaviors of the wild type clock, as well as the defects found in knockout mutants (such as altered free-running periods, lack of entrainment, or changes in the expression of other clock genes). Additionally, our model produces complex responses to various light cues, such as extreme photoperiods and non-24 h environmental cycles, and can describe the control of hypocotyl growth by the clock. Our model constitutes a useful tool to probe dynamical properties of the core clock as well as clock-dependent processes. PMID:26904049

  15. A Compact Model for the Complex Plant Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    De Caluwé, Joëlle; Xiao, Qiying; Hermans, Christian; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Leloup, Jean-Christophe; Gonze, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timekeeper that allows organisms to anticipate and adapt to the daily variations of their environment. The plant clock is an intricate network of interlocked feedback loops, in which transcription factors regulate each other to generate oscillations with expression peaks at specific times of the day. Over the last decade, mathematical modeling approaches have been used to understand the inner workings of the clock in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Those efforts have produced a number of models of ever increasing complexity. Here, we present an alternative model that combines a low number of equations and parameters, similar to the very earliest models, with the complex network structure found in more recent ones. This simple model describes the temporal evolution of the abundance of eight clock gene mRNA/protein and captures key features of the clock on a qualitative level, namely the entrained and free-running behaviors of the wild type clock, as well as the defects found in knockout mutants (such as altered free-running periods, lack of entrainment, or changes in the expression of other clock genes). Additionally, our model produces complex responses to various light cues, such as extreme photoperiods and non-24 h environmental cycles, and can describe the control of hypocotyl growth by the clock. Our model constitutes a useful tool to probe dynamical properties of the core clock as well as clock-dependent processes. PMID:26904049

  16. Photoperiodic Modulation of Circadian Clock and Reproductive Axis Gene Expression in the Pre-Pubertal European Sea Bass Brain

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Rute S. T.; Gomez, Ana; Zanuy, Silvia; Carrillo, Manuel; Canário, Adelino V. M.

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition of reproductive competence requires the activation of the brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG) axis, which in most vertebrates, including fishes, is initiated by changes in photoperiod. In the European sea bass long-term exposure to continuous light (LL) alters the rhythm of reproductive hormones, delays spermatogenesis and reduces the incidence of precocious males. In contrast, an early shift from long to short photoperiod (AP) accelerates spermatogenesis. However, how photoperiod affects key genes in the brain to trigger the onset of puberty is still largely unknown. Here, we investigated if the integration of the light stimulus by clock proteins is sufficient to activate key genes that trigger the BPG axis in the European sea bass. We found that the clock genes clock, npas2, bmal1 and the BPG genes gnrh, kiss and kissr share conserved transcription factor frameworks in their promoters, suggesting co-regulation. Other gene promoters of the BGP axis were also predicted to be co-regulated by the same frameworks. Co-regulation was confirmed through gene expression analysis of brains from males exposed to LL or AP photoperiod compared to natural conditions: LL fish had suppressed gnrh1, kiss2, galr1b and esr1, while AP fish had stimulated npas2, gnrh1, gnrh2, kiss2, kiss1rb and galr1b compared to NP. It is concluded that fish exposed to different photoperiods present significant expression differences in some clock and reproductive axis related genes well before the first detectable endocrine and morphological responses of the BPG axis. PMID:26641263

  17. Clock genes explain large proportion of phenotypic variance in systolic blood pressure and this control is not modified by environmental temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Diurnal variation in blood pressure (BP) is regulated, in part, by an endogenous circadian clock; however, few human studies have identified associations between clock genes and BP. Accounting for environmental temperature may be necessary to correct for seasonal bias. METHODS: We examin...

  18. Experimental and clinical aspects of melatonin and clock genes in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peschke, Elmar; Bähr, Ina; Mühlbauer, Eckhard

    2015-08-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin influences insulin secretion, as well as glucagon and somatostatin secretion, both in vivo and in vitro. These effects are mediated by two specific, high-affinity, seven transmembrane, pertussis toxin-sensitive, Gi-protein-coupled melatonin receptors, MT1 and MT2. Both isoforms are expressed in the β-cells, α-cells as well as δ-cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans and are involved in the modulation of insulin secretion, leading to inhibition of the adenylate cyclase-dependent cyclic adenosine monophosphate as well as cyclic guanosine monophosphate formation in pancreatic β-cells by inhibiting the soluble guanylate cyclase, probably via MT2 receptors. In this way, melatonin also likely inhibits insulin secretion, whereas using the inositol triphosphate pathway after previous blocking of Gi-proteins by pertussis toxin, melatonin increases insulin secretion. Desynchrony of receptor signaling may lead to the development of type 2 diabetes. This notion has recently been supported by genomewide association studies pinpointing variances of the MT2 receptor as a risk factor for this rapidly spreading metabolic disturbance. As melatonin is secreted in a clearly diurnal fashion, it is safe to assume that it also has a diurnal impact on the blood-glucose-regulating function of the islet. Observations of the circadian expression of clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Per1,2,3, and Cry1,2) in pancreatic islets, as well as in INS1 rat insulinoma cells, may indicate that circadian rhythms are generated in the β-cells themselves. The circadian secretion of insulin from pancreatic islets is clock-driven. Disruption of circadian rhythms and clock function leads to metabolic disturbances, for example, type 2 diabetes. The study of melatonin-insulin interactions in diabetic rat models has revealed an inverse relationship between these two hormones. Both type 2 diabetic rats and patients exhibit decreased melatonin levels and slightly increased

  19. Overdispersion of the molecular clock: temporal variation of gene-specific substitution rates in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Trevor; Hartl, Daniel L

    2008-08-01

    Simple models of molecular evolution assume that sequences evolve by a Poisson process in which nucleotide or amino acid substitutions occur as rare independent events. In these models, the expected ratio of the variance to the mean of substitution counts equals 1, and substitution processes with a ratio greater than 1 are called overdispersed. Comparing the genomes of 10 closely related species of Drosophila, we extend earlier evidence for overdispersion in amino acid replacements as well as in four-fold synonymous substitutions. The observed deviation from the Poisson expectation can be described as a linear function of the rate at which substitutions occur on a phylogeny, which implies that deviations from the Poisson expectation arise from gene-specific temporal variation in substitution rates. Amino acid sequences show greater temporal variation in substitution rates than do four-fold synonymous sequences. Our findings provide a general phenomenological framework for understanding overdispersion in the molecular clock. Also, the presence of substantial variation in gene-specific substitution rates has broad implications for work in phylogeny reconstruction and evolutionary rate estimation.

  20. The aging biological clock in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Case, Mary E; Griffith, James; Dong, Wubei; Tigner, Ira L; Gaines, Kimberly; Jiang, James C; Jazwinski, S Michal; Arnold, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The biological clock affects aging through ras-1 (bd) and lag-1, and these two longevity genes together affect a clock phenotype and the clock oscillator in Neurospora crassa. Using an automated cell-counting technique for measuring conidial longevity, we show that the clock-associated genes lag-1 and ras-1 (bd) are true chronological longevity genes. For example, wild type (WT) has an estimated median life span of 24 days, while the double mutant lag-1, ras-1 (bd) has an estimated median life span of 120 days for macroconidia. We establish the biochemical function of lag-1 by complementing LAG1 and LAC1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with lag-1 in N. crassa. Longevity genes can affect the clock as well in that, the double mutant lag-1, ras-1 (bd) can stop the circadian rhythm in asexual reproduction (i.e., banding in race tubes) and lengthen the period of the frequency oscillator to 41 h. In contrast to the ras-1 (bd), lag-1 effects on chronological longevity, we find that this double mutant undergoes replicative senescence (i.e., the loss of replication function with time), unlike WT or the single mutants, lag-1 and ras-1 (bd). These results support the hypothesis that sphingolipid metabolism links aging and the biological clock through a common stress response PMID:25535564

  1. Synchronization of Cellular Clocks in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Shun; Isejima, Hiromi; Matsuo, Takuya; Okura, Ryusuke; Yagita, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Masaki; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2003-11-01

    Individual cellular clocks in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the circadian center, are integrated into a stable and robust pacemaker with a period length of about 24 hours. We used real-time analysis of gene expression to show synchronized rhythms of clock gene transcription across hundreds of neurons within the mammalian SCN in organotypic slice culture. Differentially phased neuronal clocks are topographically arranged across the SCN. A protein synthesis inhibitor set all cell clocks to the same initial phase and, after withdrawal, intrinsic interactions among cell clocks reestablished the stable program of gene expression across the assemblage. Na+-dependent action potentials contributed to establishing cellular synchrony and maintaining spontaneous oscillation across the SCN.

  2. Circadian rhythms of clock gene expression in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) central and peripheral tissues: influence of different lighting and feeding conditions.

    PubMed

    Costa, Leandro S; Serrano, Ignacio; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco J; López-Olmeda, Jose F

    2016-08-01

    The present research aimed to investigate the existence of clock gene expression rhythms in tilapia, their endogenous origin, and how light and feeding cycles synchronize these rhythms. In the first experiment, two groups of fish were kept under an LD cycle and fed at two different time points: in the middle of the light (ML) or in the middle of the dark (MD) phase. In the second experiment, fish fed at ML was fasted and kept under constant lighting (LL) conditions for 1 day. In both experiments, the samples from central (optic tectum and hypothalamus) and peripheral (liver) tissues were collected every 3 h throughout a 24 h cycle. The expression levels of clock genes bmal1a, clock1, per1b, cry2a, and cry5 were analyzed by quantitative PCR. All the clock genes analyzed in brain regions showed daily rhythms: clock1, bmal1a, and cry2a showed the acrophase approximately at the end of the light phase (ZT 8:43-11:22 h), whereas per1b and cry5 did so between the end of the dark phase and the beginning of the light phase, respectively (ZT 21:16-4:00 h). These rhythms persisted under constant conditions. No effect of the feeding time was observed in the brain. In the liver, however, the rhythms of clock1 and cry5 were influenced by feeding, and a shift was observed in the MD fish group (ZT 3:58 h for clock1 and 11:20 h for cry5). This study provides the first insights into the molecular clock of tilapia, a very important fish species for aquaculture. It also reveals the endogenous origin of clock gene rhythms and the ability of feeding time to shift the phase in some clock genes in the peripheral, but not the central, oscillator. PMID:27085855

  3. Rapid attenuation of circadian clock gene oscillations in the rat heart following ischemia-reperfusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The intracellular circadian clock consists of a series of transcriptional modulators that together allow the cell to perceive the time of day. Circadian clocks have been identified within various components of the cardiovascular system (e.g., cardiomyocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells) and possess...

  4. Functional conservation of clock-related genes in flowering plants: overexpression and RNA interference analyses of the circadian rhythm in the monocotyledon Lemna gibba.

    PubMed

    Serikawa, Masayuki; Miwa, Kumiko; Kondo, Takao; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2008-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are found in organisms from cyanobacteria to plants and animals. In flowering plants, the circadian clock is involved in the regulation of various physiological phenomena, including growth, leaf movement, stomata opening, and floral transitions. Molecular mechanisms underlying the circadian clock have been identified using Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana); the functions and genetic networks of a number of clock-related genes, including CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1, LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY), TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1, GIGANTEA (GI), and EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3), have been analyzed. The degree to which clock systems are conserved among flowering plants, however, is still unclear. We previously isolated homologs for Arabidopsis clock-related genes from monocotyledon Lemna plants. Here, we report the physiological roles of these Lemna gibba genes (LgLHYH1, LgLHYH2, LgGIH1, and LgELF3H1) in the circadian system. We studied the effects of overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi) of these genes on the rhythmic expression of morning- and evening-specific reporters. Overexpression of each gene disrupted the rhythmicity of either or both reporters, suggesting that these four homologs can be involved in the circadian system. RNAi of each of the genes except LgLHYH2 affected the bioluminescence rhythms of both reporters. These results indicated that these homologs are involved in the circadian system of Lemna plants and that the structure of the circadian clock is likely to be conserved between monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Interestingly, RNAi of LgGIH1 almost completely abolished the circadian rhythm; because this effect appeared to be much stronger than the phenotype observed in an Arabidopsis gi loss-of-function mutant, the precise role of each clock gene may have diverged in the clock systems of Lemna and Arabidopsis. PMID:18281417

  5. Synchronized human skeletal myotubes of lean, obese and type 2 diabetic patients maintain circadian oscillation of clock genes

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Jan; Timmers, Silvie; Moonen-Kornips, Esther; Duez, Helene; Staels, Bart; Hesselink, Matthijs K. C.; Schrauwen, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Cell and animal studies have demonstrated that circadian rhythm is governed by autonomous rhythmicity of clock genes. Although disturbances in circadian rhythm have been implicated in metabolic disease development, it remains unknown whether muscle circadian rhythm is altered in human models of type 2 diabetes. Here we used human primary myotubes (HPM) to investigate if rhythmicity of clock- and metabolic gene expression is altered in donors with obesity or type 2 diabetes compared to metabolically healthy donors. HPM were obtained from skeletal muscle biopsies of four groups: type 2 diabetic patients and their BMI- and age-matched obese controls and from lean, healthy and young endurance trained athletes and their age-matched sedentary controls. HPM were differentiated for 7 days before synchronization by serum shock followed by gene expression profiling over the next 72 hours. HPM display robust circadian rhythms in clock genes, but REVERBA displayed dampened rhythmicity in type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, rhythmicity in NAMPT and SIRT1 expression was only observed in HPM from trained athletes. Rhythmicity in expression of key-regulators of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism was modest. We demonstrate that in human skeletal muscle REVERBA/B, NAMPT and SIRT1 circadian rhythms are affected in donors of sedentary life style and poor health status. PMID:27756900

  6. Circadian Mechanisms of Food Anticipatory Rhythms in Rats Fed Once or Twice Daily: Clock Gene and Endocrine Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Danica F.; Katsuyama, Ângela M.; Pavlovski, Ilya; Michalik, Mateusz; Patterson, Zachary; Parfyonov, Maksim; Smit, Andrea N.; Marchant, Elliott G.; Chung, John; Abizaid, Alfonso; Storch, Kai-Florian; de la Iglesia, Horacio; Mistlberger, Ralph E.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks in many brain regions and peripheral tissues are entrained by the daily rhythm of food intake. Clocks in one or more of these locations generate a daily rhythm of locomotor activity that anticipates a regular mealtime. Rats and mice can also anticipate two daily meals. Whether this involves 1 or 2 circadian clocks is unknown. To gain insight into how the circadian system adjusts to 2 daily mealtimes, male rats in a 12∶12 light-dark cycle were fed a 2 h meal either 4 h after lights-on or 4 h after lights-off, or a 1 h meal at both times. After 30 days, brain, blood, adrenal and stomach tissue were collected at 6 time points. Multiple clock genes from adrenals and stomachs were assayed by RT-PCR. Blood was assayed for corticosterone and ghrelin. Bmal1 expression was quantified in 14 brain regions by in situ hybridization. Clock gene rhythms in adrenal and stomach from day-fed rats oscillated in antiphase with the rhythms in night-fed rats, and at an intermediate phase in rats fed twice daily. Corticosterone and ghrelin in 1-meal rats peaked at or prior to the expected mealtime. In 2-meal rats, corticosterone peaked only prior the nighttime meal, while ghrelin peaked prior to the daytime meal and then remained elevated. The olfactory bulb, nucleus accumbens, dorsal striatum, cerebellum and arcuate nucleus exhibited significant daily rhythms of Bmal1 in the night-fed groups that were approximately in antiphase in the day-fed groups, and at intermediate levels (arrhythmic) in rats anticipating 2 daily meals. The dissociations between anticipatory activity and the peripheral clocks and hormones in rats anticipating 2 daily meals argue against a role for these signals in the timing of behavioral rhythms. The absence of rhythmicity at the tissue level in brain regions from rats anticipating 2 daily meals support behavioral evidence that circadian clock cells in these tissues may reorganize into two populations coupled to different meals. PMID:25502949

  7. Development and morphology of the clock-gene-expressing lateral neurons of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Shafer, Orie T; Wülbeck, Corinna; Grieshaber, Eva; Rieger, Dirk; Taghert, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The clock-gene-expressing lateral neurons are essential for the locomotor activity rhythm of Drosophila melanogaster. Traditionally, these neurons are divided into three groups: the dorsal lateral neurons (LN(d)), the large ventral lateral neurons (l-LN(v)), and the small ventral lateral neurons (s-LN(v)), whereby the latter group consists of four neurons that express the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) and a fifth PDF-negative neuron. So far, only the l-LN(v) and the PDF-positive s-LN(v) have been shown to project into the accessory medulla, a small neuropil that contains the circadian pacemaker center in several insects. We show here that the other lateral neurons also arborize in the accessory medulla, predominantly forming postsynaptic sites. Both the l-LN(v) and LN(d) are anatomically well suited to connect the accessory medullae. Whereas the l-LN(v) may receive ipsilateral photic input from the Hofbauer-Buchner eyelet, the LN(d) invade mainly the contralateral accessory medulla and thus may receive photic input from the contralateral side. Both the LN(d) and the l-LN(v) differentiate during midmetamorphosis. They do so in close proximity to one another and the fifth PDF-negative s-LN(v), suggesting that these cell groups may derive from common precursors. PMID:17099895

  8. Local molecular clocks in three nuclear genes: divergence times for rodents and other mammals and incompatibility among fossil calibrations.

    PubMed

    Douzery, Emmanuel J P; Delsuc, Frédéric; Stanhope, Michael J; Huchon, Dorothée

    2003-01-01

    Reconstructing the chronology of mammalian evolution is a debated issue between molecule- and fossil-based inferences. A methodological limitation of molecules is the evolutionary rate variation among lineages, precluding the application of the global molecular clock. We considered 2422 first and second codon positions of the combined ADRA2B, IRBP, and vWF nuclear genes for a well-documented set of placentals including an extensive sampling of rodents. Using seven independent calibration points and a maximum-likelihood framework, we evaluated whether molecular and paleontological estimates of mammalian divergence dates may be reconciled by the local molecular clocks approach, allowing local constancy of substitution rates with variations at larger phylogenetic scales. To handle the difficulty of choosing among all possible rate assignments for various lineages, local molecular clocks were based on the results of branch-length and two-cluster tests. Extensive lineage-specific variation of evolutionary rates was detected, even among rodents. Cross-calibrations indicated some incompatibilities between divergence dates based on different paleontological references. To decrease the impact of a single calibration point, estimates derived from independent calibrations displaying only slight reciprocal incompatibility were averaged. The divergence dates inferred for the split between mice and rats (approximately 13-19 Myr) was younger than previously published molecular estimates. The most recent common ancestors of rodents, primates and rodents, boreoeutherians, and placentals were estimated to be, respectively, approximately 60, 70, 75, and 78 Myr old. Global clocks, local clocks, and quartet dating analyses suggested a Late Cretaceous origin of the crown placental clades followed by a Tertiary radiation of some placental orders like rodents.

  9. A comparison of global, gene-specific, and relaxed clock methods in a comparative genomics framework: dating the polyploid history of soybean (Glycine max).

    PubMed

    Egan, Ashley N; Doyle, Jeff

    2010-10-01

    It is widely recognized that many genes and lineages do not adhere to a molecular clock, yet molecular clocks are commonly used to date divergences in comparative genomic studies. We test the application of a molecular clock across genes and lineages in a phylogenetic framework utilizing 12 genes linked in a 1-Mb region on chromosome 13 of soybean (Glycine max); homoeologous copies of these genes formed by polyploidy in Glycine; and orthologous copies in G. tomentella, Phaseolus vulgaris, and Medicago truncatula. We compare divergence dates estimated by two methods each in three frameworks: a global molecular clock with a single rate across genes and lineages using full and approximate likelihood methods based on synonymous substitutions, a gene-specific clock assuming rate constancy over lineages but allowing a different rate for each gene, and a relaxed molecular clock where rates may vary across genes and lineages estimated under penalized likelihood and Bayesian inference. We use the cumulative variance across genes as a means of quantifying precision. Our results suggest that divergence dating methods produce results that are correlated, but that older nodes are more variable and more difficult to estimate with precision and accuracy. We also find that models incorporating less rate heterogeneity estimate older dates of divergence than more complex models, as node age increases. A mixed model nested analysis of variance testing the effects of framework, method, and gene found that framework had a significant effect on the divergence date estimates but that most variation among dates is due to variation among genes, suggesting a need to further characterize and understand the evolutionary phenomena underlying rate variation within genomes, among genes, and across lineages.

  10. Entrainment to periodic initiation and transition rates in a computational model for gene translation.

    PubMed

    Margaliot, Michael; Sontag, Eduardo D; Tuller, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    Periodic oscillations play an important role in many biomedical systems. Proper functioning of biological systems that respond to periodic signals requires the ability to synchronize with the periodic excitation. For example, the sleep/wake cycle is a manifestation of an internal timing system that synchronizes to the solar day. In the terminology of systems theory, the biological system must entrain or phase-lock to the periodic excitation. Entrainment is also important in synthetic biology. For example, connecting several artificial biological systems that entrain to a common clock may lead to a well-functioning modular system. The cell-cycle is a periodic program that regulates DNA synthesis and cell division. Recent biological studies suggest that cell-cycle related genes entrain to this periodic program at the gene translation level, leading to periodically-varying protein levels of these genes. The ribosome flow model (RFM) is a deterministic model obtained via a mean-field approximation of a stochastic model from statistical physics that has been used to model numerous processes including ribosome flow along the mRNA. Here we analyze the RFM under the assumption that the initiation and/or transition rates vary periodically with a common period T. We show that the ribosome distribution profile in the RFM entrains to this periodic excitation. In particular, the protein synthesis pattern converges to a unique periodic solution with period T. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first proof of entrainment in a mathematical model for translation that encapsulates aspects such as initiation and termination rates, ribosomal movement and interactions, and non-homogeneous elongation speeds along the mRNA. Our results support the conjecture that periodic oscillations in tRNA levels and other factors related to the translation process can induce periodic oscillations in protein levels, and may suggest a new approach for re-engineering genetic systems to obtain a

  11. Diurnal expression of clock genes in pineal gland and brain and plasma levels of melatonin and cortisol in Atlantic salmon parr and smolts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tien-sheng; Ruoff, Peter; Fjelldal, Per G

    2010-10-01

    In Atlantic salmon, the preadaptation to a marine life, i.e., parr-smolt transformation, and melatonin production in the pineal gland are regulated by the photoperiod. However, the clock genes have never been studied in the pineal gland of this species. The aim of the present study was to describe the diurnal expression of clock genes (Per1-like, Cry2, and Clock) in the pineal gland and brain of Atlantic salmon parr and smolts in freshwater, as well as plasma levels of melatonin and cortisol. By employing an out-of-season smolt production model, the parr-smolt transformation was induced by subjecting triplicate groups of parr to 6 wks (wks 0 to 6) under a 12 h:12 h light-dark (LD) regime followed by 6 wks (wks 6 to 12) of continuous light (LL). The measured clock genes in both pineal gland and brain and the plasma levels of melatonin and cortisol showed significant daily variations in parr under LD in wk 6, whereas these rhythms were abolished in smolts under LL in wk 12. In parr, the pineal Per1-like and Cry2 expression peaked in the dark phase, whereas the pineal Clock expression was elevated during the light phase. Although this study presents novel findings on the clock gene system in the teleost pineal gland, the role of this system in the regulation of smoltification needs to be studied in more detail.

  12. Screening of clock gene polymorphisms demonstrates association of a PER3 polymorphism with morningness-eveningness preference and circadian rhythm sleep disorder.

    PubMed

    Hida, Akiko; Kitamura, Shingo; Katayose, Yasuko; Kato, Mie; Ono, Hiroko; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Makoto; Ebisawa, Takashi; Inoue, Yuichi; Kamei, Yuichi; Okawa, Masako; Takahashi, Kiyohisa; Mishima, Kazuo

    2014-09-09

    A system of self-sustained biological clocks controls the 24-h rhythms of behavioral and physiological processes such as the sleep-wake cycle. The circadian clock system is regulated by transcriptional and translational negative feedback loops of multiple clock genes. Polymorphisms in circadian clock genes have been associated with morningness-eveningness (diurnal) preference, familial advanced sleep phase type (ASPT), and delayed sleep phase type (DSPT). We genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms in circadian clock genes in 182 DSPT individuals, 67 free-running type (FRT) individuals, and 925 controls. The clock gene polymorphisms were tested for associations with diurnal preference and circadian rhythm sleep disorder (CRSD) phenotypes. The PER3 polymorphism (rs228697) was significantly associated with diurnal preference and the FRT phenotype. The minor allele of rs228697 was more prevalent in evening types than in morning types (sex-adjusted odds ratio (OR), 2.483, Bonferroni-corrected P = 0.012) and in FRT individuals compared with the controls (age- and sex-adjusted OR, 2.021, permutated P = 0.017). Our findings support the notion that PER3 polymorphisms could be a potential genetic marker for an individual's circadian and sleep phenotypes.

  13. Differential effects of a restricted feeding schedule on clock-gene expression in the hypothalamus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Minana-Solis, M C; Angeles-Castellanos, M; Feillet, C; Pevet, P; Challet, E; Escobar, C

    2009-07-01

    Restricted feeding schedules (RFS) entrain digestive, hormonal, and metabolic functions as well as oscillations of clock genes, such as Per1 and Per2, in peripheral organs. In the brain, in particular the hypothalamus, RFS induce and shift daily rhythms of Per1 and Per2 expression. To determine whether RFS affect clock genes in extra-SCN oscillators in a uniform manner, the present study investigated daily rhythms of Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 expression in various hypothalamic regions. Wistar rats were entrained to daily RFS (2 h food access starting at ZT6, RFS) or fed ad libitum (C) for three weeks. Brains were sampled every 3 h starting at ZT0, and were processed with in situ hybridization. In response to RFS, Per1 expression showed a 3 h phase advance in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), while Per2 and Bmal1 remained unaffected. Per1 was triggered at ZT6, anticipating food access in both arcuate (ARC) and dorsomedial nuclei (DMH), and was unaffected in the ventromedial (VMH) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei. In contrast, Per2 expression during RFS showed a marked postprandial peak in the PVN, was unchanged in the ARC, and was down-regulated in the DMH and VMH. The temporal patterns of Bmal1 expression were not significantly modified in RFS rats. RFS differentially affected clock-gene expression (phase change, up- or downregulation) depending on the combination of hypothalamic nuclei and targeted genes. Present data highlight that metabolic or temporal cues elicited by feeding modify the temporal organization in the hypothalamus and are not exclusive for a food-entrained oscillator.

  14. Differential Regulation of the Period Genes in Striatal Regions following Cocaine Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Falcon, Edgardo; Ozburn, Angela; Mukherjee, Shibani; Roybal, Kole; McClung, Colleen A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that disruptions in circadian rhythms contribute to the pathophysiology of multiple psychiatric diseases, including drug addiction. In fact, a number of the genes involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms are also involved in modulating the reward value for drugs of abuse, like cocaine. Thus, we wanted to determine the effects of chronic cocaine on the expression of several circadian genes in the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) and Caudate Putamen (CP), regions of the brain known to be involved in the behavioral responses to drugs of abuse. Moreover, we wanted to explore the mechanism by which these genes are regulated following cocaine exposure. Here we find that after repeated cocaine exposure, expression of the Period (Per) genes and Neuronal PAS Domain Protein 2 (Npas2) are elevated, in a somewhat regionally selective fashion. Moreover, NPAS2 (but not CLOCK (Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput)) protein binding at Per gene promoters was enhanced following cocaine treatment. Mice lacking a functional Npas2 gene failed to exhibit any induction of Per gene expression after cocaine, suggesting that NPAS2 is necessary for this cocaine-induced regulation. Examination of Per gene and Npas2 expression over twenty-four hours identified changes in diurnal rhythmicity of these genes following chronic cocaine, which were regionally specific. Taken together, these studies point to selective disruptions in Per gene rhythmicity in striatial regions following chronic cocaine treatment, which are mediated primarily by NPAS2. PMID:23776671

  15. Effects of Photoperiod Extension on Clock Gene and Neuropeptide RNA Expression in the SCN of the Soay Sheep.

    PubMed

    Dardente, Hugues; Wyse, Cathy A; Lincoln, Gerald A; Wagner, Gabriela C; Hazlerigg, David G

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, changing daylength (photoperiod) is the main synchronizer of seasonal functions. The photoperiodic information is transmitted through the retino-hypothalamic tract to the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), site of the master circadian clock. To investigate effects of day length change on the sheep SCN, we used in-situ hybridization to assess the daily temporal organization of expression of circadian clock genes (Per1, Per2, Bmal1 and Fbxl21) and neuropeptides (Vip, Grp and Avp) in animals acclimated to a short photoperiod (SP; 8h of light) and at 3 or 15 days following transfer to a long photoperiod (LP3, LP15, respectively; 16h of light), achieved by an acute 8-h delay of lights off. We found that waveforms of SCN gene expression conformed to those previously seen in LP acclimated animals within 3 days of transfer to LP. Mean levels of expression for Per1-2 and Fbxl21 were nearly 2-fold higher in the LP15 than in the SP group. The expression of Vip was arrhythmic and unaffected by photoperiod, while, in contrast to rodents, Grp expression was not detectable within the sheep SCN. Expression of the circadian output gene Avp cycled robustly in all photoperiod groups with no detectable change in phasing. Overall these data suggest that synchronizing effects of light on SCN circadian organisation proceed similarly in ungulates and in rodents, despite differences in neuropeptide gene expression. PMID:27458725

  16. Effects of Photoperiod Extension on Clock Gene and Neuropeptide RNA Expression in the SCN of the Soay Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Dardente, Hugues; Wyse, Cathy A.; Lincoln, Gerald A.; Wagner, Gabriela C.; Hazlerigg, David G.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, changing daylength (photoperiod) is the main synchronizer of seasonal functions. The photoperiodic information is transmitted through the retino-hypothalamic tract to the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), site of the master circadian clock. To investigate effects of day length change on the sheep SCN, we used in-situ hybridization to assess the daily temporal organization of expression of circadian clock genes (Per1, Per2, Bmal1 and Fbxl21) and neuropeptides (Vip, Grp and Avp) in animals acclimated to a short photoperiod (SP; 8h of light) and at 3 or 15 days following transfer to a long photoperiod (LP3, LP15, respectively; 16h of light), achieved by an acute 8-h delay of lights off. We found that waveforms of SCN gene expression conformed to those previously seen in LP acclimated animals within 3 days of transfer to LP. Mean levels of expression for Per1-2 and Fbxl21 were nearly 2-fold higher in the LP15 than in the SP group. The expression of Vip was arrhythmic and unaffected by photoperiod, while, in contrast to rodents, Grp expression was not detectable within the sheep SCN. Expression of the circadian output gene Avp cycled robustly in all photoperiod groups with no detectable change in phasing. Overall these data suggest that synchronizing effects of light on SCN circadian organisation proceed similarly in ungulates and in rodents, despite differences in neuropeptide gene expression. PMID:27458725

  17. Clock controls angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Lasse Dahl; Cao, Yihai

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms control multiple physiological and pathological processes, including embryonic development in mammals and development of various human diseases. We have recently, in a developing zebrafish embryonic model, discovered that the circadian oscillation controls developmental angiogenesis. Disruption of crucial circadian regulatory genes, including Bmal1 and Period2, results in marked impairment or enhancement of vascular development in zebrafish. At the molecular level, we show that the circadian regulator Bmal1 directly targets the promoter region of the vegf gene in zebrafish, leading to an elevated expression of VEGF. These findings can reasonably be extended to developmental angiogenesis in mammals and even pathological angiogenesis in humans. Thus, our findings, for the first time, shed new light on mechanisms that underlie circadian clock-regulated angiogenesis. PMID:23324349

  18. The Drosophila CLOCK protein undergoes daily rhythms in abundance, phosphorylation, and interactions with the PER-TIM complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Bae, K; Edery, I

    1998-10-01

    We report the in vivo characterization of the Drosophila CLOCK protein (dCLOCK), a transcription factor that is required for the expression of the circadian clock genes period (per) and timeless (tim). dCLOCK undergoes circadian fluctuations in abundance, is phosphorylated throughout a daily cycle, and interacts with PER, TIM, and/or the PER-TIM complex during the night but not during most of the day. Our results suggest that PER and TIM participate in transcriptional autoinhibition by physically interacting with dCLOCK or a dCLOCK-containing complex. Nevertheless, in the absence of PER or TIM, the levels of dCLOCK are constitutively low, indicating that PER and TIM also act as positive elements in the feedback loop by stimulating the production of dCLOCK.

  19. Association between the CLOCK gene 3111 T > C polymorphism and an irregular menstrual cycle in Korean adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kye-Hyun; Kim, Yunsin; Ha, Juwon; Shin, Dong-Won; Shin, Young-Chul; Oh, Kang-Seob; Woo, Hee-Yeon; Lim, Se-Won

    2015-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is an example of a human infradian rhythm, but an altered sleep-wake cycle or a disrupted circadian rhythm can change the regularity of the menstrual cycle. In this study, we investigated whether an irregular menstrual cycle is associated with polymorphisms in the CLOCK (3111T > C) and/or PER3 (variable number tandem repeat, VNTR) genes, which are known to have an impact on the circadian rhythm. One hundred ninety-seven postmenarchal, adolescent girls from two girls' high schools in Seoul, Korea, were studied. All participants were requested to complete the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) to assess the emotional distress that might cause menstrual irregularity. Every participant donated a blood sample from which DNA was extracted and genotyped for the CLOCK 3111T > C and PER3 VNTR polymorphisms. A significant association was found between the CLOCK 3111T > C genotype and irregular menstrual cycles. Subjects with the 3111T > C genotype had a high risk of an irregular menstrual cycle compared with 3111T/T homozygous subjects (odds ratio [OR] = 2.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.26-6.55). When multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to adjust for age, PSS, STAI, BDI and BMI, subjects with the 3111T > C polymorphism showed a significantly increased OR for irregular menstrual cycles (OR = 3.09; 95% CI: 1.32-7.21). There was no significant association between the PER3 VNTR polymorphism and the irregularity of the menstrual cycle (p > 0.05). The results of this study suggest that the CLOCK 3111T > C polymorphism could be an independent risk factor for irregular menstrual cycles, irrespective of psychological distress and endocrine or metabolic conditions, and could be used as a molecular marker for gynecological studies on this aspect.

  20. The association of circadian clock candidate genes to increased adiposity in the TIGER study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is a highly prevalent disease that has become a major health crisis in the United States. A number of studies have suggested a link between the altered sleep/wake patterns associated with our "24 hour" lifestyle and obesity. We hypothesize that disruption of the circadian clock intrinsic t...

  1. A length polymorphism in the circadian clock gene Per3 influences age at onset of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Dallaspezia, Sara; Colombo, Cristina; Pirovano, Adele; Marino, Elena; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2008-11-14

    Age at onset of bipolar disorder might represent the penetrance of the system for specific genetic liability involved in the genesis of the illness. Genetic factors influencing age at onset have been shown to play a role in shaping core characteristics of the illness, such as severity and pattern of recurrence. Genetic variants of genes regulating the circadian clock could contribute to define endophenotypes of bipolar disorder, and have been associated with clinical features of the disease. The coding region of Per3 gene contains a variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) polymorphism which has been associated with diurnal preference, sleep structure and sleep homeostasis in healthy subjects. In a homogeneous sample of 99 patients affected by bipolar disorder type I we observed that Per3 VNTR influenced age at onset of illness: earlier age at onset in homozygote carriers of Per35 variant, later in homozygotes for Per34, and intermediate in heterozygotes. Allele frequencies were not significantly different from those reported in healthy subjects. Results need to be confirmed in larger samples, but warrant interest for the variants of molecular clock genes as possible endophenotypes of bipolar disorder.

  2. Temporal expression of seven clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the pars tuberalis of the sheep: evidence for an internal coincidence timer.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, Gerald; Messager, Sophie; Andersson, Håkan; Hazlerigg, David

    2002-10-15

    The 24-h expression of seven clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Cry2, and CK1 epsilon ) was assayed by in situ hybridization in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the pars tuberalis (PT) of the pituitary gland, collected every 4 h throughout 24 h, from female Soay sheep kept under long (16-h light/8-h dark) or short (8-h light/16-h dark) photoperiods. Locomotor activity was diurnal, inversely related to melatonin secretion, and prolactin levels were increased under long days. All clock genes were expressed in the ovine SCN and PT. In the SCN, there was a 24-h rhythm in Clock expression, in parallel with Bmal1, in antiphase with cycles in Per1 and Per2; there was low-amplitude oscillation of Cry1 and Cry2. The waveform of only Per1 and Per2 expression was affected by photoperiod, with extended elevated expression under long days. In the PT, the high-amplitude 24-h cycles in the expression of Bmal1, Clock, Per1, Per2, Cry1, and Cry2, but not CK1 epsilon, were influenced by photoperiod. Per1 and Per2 peaked during the day, whereas Cry1 and Cry2 peaked early in the night. Hence, photoperiod via melatonin had a marked effect on the phase relationship between Per/Cry genes in the PT. This supports the conclusion that an "external coincidence model" best explains the way photoperiod affects the waveform of clock gene expression in the SCN, the central pacemaker, whereas an "internal coincidence model" best explains the way melatonin affects the phasing of clock gene expression in the PT to mediate the photoperiodic control of a summer or winter physiology.

  3. Feeding and circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Pardini, Lissia; Kaeffer, Bertrand

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian genome encodes at least a dozen of genes directly involved in the regulation of the feedback loops constituting the circadian clock. The circadian system is built up on a multitude of oscillators organized according to a hierarchical model in which neurons of the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus may drive the central circadian clock and all the other somatic cells may possess the molecular components allowing tissues and organs to constitute peripheral clocks. Suprachiasmatic neurons are driving the central circadian clock which is reset by lighting cues captured and integrated by the melanopsin cells of the retina and define the daily rhythms of locomotor activity and associated physiological regulatory pathways like feeding and metabolism. This central clock entrains peripheral clocks which can be synchronized by non-photic environmental cues and uncoupled from the central one depending on the nature and the strength of the circadian signal. The human circadian clock and its functioning in central or peripheral tissues are currently being explored to increase the therapeutic efficacy of timed administration of drugs or radiation, and to offer better advice on lighting and meal timing useful for frequent travelers suffering from jet lag and for night workers' comfort. However, the molecular mechanism driving and coordinating the central and peripheral clocks through a wide range of synchronizers (lighting, feeding, physical or social activities) remains a mystery.

  4. Human Diurnal Preference and Circadian Rhythmicity are Not Associated with the CLOCK 3111C/T Gene Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Anne-Marie; Buch, Alison M.; Bradstreet, Dayna S.; Klements, David J.; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic association studies of the CLOCK 3111C/T polymorphism and diurnal preference have yielded conflicting results since the first report that the 3111C allele was associated with eveningness. The goal of the present study was to investigate the association of this polymorphism with diurnal preference and circadian physiology in a group of 179 individuals, by comparing the frequency of the 3111C allele to diurnal preference, habitual sleep timing, circadian phase markers, and circadian period. We did not find a significant association between this allele and morningness/eveningness or any circadian marker. PMID:21628555

  5. Entrainment of the mouse circadian clock by sub-acute physical and psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Yu; Shiraishi, Takuya; Kikuchi, Yosuke; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Kuriki, Daisuke; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Motohashi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Tomoko; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-01-01

    The effects of acute stress on the peripheral circadian system are not well understood in vivo. Here, we show that sub-acute stress caused by restraint or social defeat potently altered clock gene expression in the peripheral tissues of mice. In these peripheral tissues, as well as the hippocampus and cortex, stressful stimuli induced time-of-day-dependent phase-advances or -delays in rhythmic clock gene expression patterns; however, such changes were not observed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, i.e. the central circadian clock. Moreover, several days of stress exposure at the beginning of the light period abolished circadian oscillations and caused internal desynchronisation of peripheral clocks. Stress-induced changes in circadian rhythmicity showed habituation and disappeared with long-term exposure to repeated stress. These findings suggest that sub-acute physical/psychological stress potently entrains peripheral clocks and causes transient dysregulation of circadian clocks in vivo.

  6. A tunable artificial circadian clock in clock-defective mice

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessandro, Matthew; Beesley, Stephen; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Chen, Rongmin; Abich, Estela; Cheng, Wayne; Yi, Paul; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Lee, Choogon

    2015-01-01

    Self-sustaining oscillations are essential for diverse physiological functions such as the cell cycle, insulin secretion and circadian rhythms. Synthetic oscillators using biochemical feedback circuits have been generated in cell culture. These synthetic systems provide important insight into design principles for biological oscillators, but have limited similarity to physiological pathways. Here we report the generation of an artificial, mammalian circadian clock in vivo, capable of generating robust, tunable circadian rhythms. In mice deficient in Per1 and Per2 genes (thus lacking circadian rhythms), we artificially generate PER2 rhythms and restore circadian sleep/wake cycles with an inducible Per2 transgene. Our artificial clock is tunable as the period and phase of the rhythms can be modulated predictably. This feature, and other design principles of our work, might enhance the study and treatment of circadian dysfunction and broader aspects of physiology involving biological oscillators. PMID:26617050

  7. A tunable artificial circadian clock in clock-defective mice.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Matthew; Beesley, Stephen; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Chen, Rongmin; Abich, Estela; Cheng, Wayne; Yi, Paul; Takahashi, Joseph S; Lee, Choogon

    2015-11-30

    Self-sustaining oscillations are essential for diverse physiological functions such as the cell cycle, insulin secretion and circadian rhythms. Synthetic oscillators using biochemical feedback circuits have been generated in cell culture. These synthetic systems provide important insight into design principles for biological oscillators, but have limited similarity to physiological pathways. Here we report the generation of an artificial, mammalian circadian clock in vivo, capable of generating robust, tunable circadian rhythms. In mice deficient in Per1 and Per2 genes (thus lacking circadian rhythms), we artificially generate PER2 rhythms and restore circadian sleep/wake cycles with an inducible Per2 transgene. Our artificial clock is tunable as the period and phase of the rhythms can be modulated predictably. This feature, and other design principles of our work, might enhance the study and treatment of circadian dysfunction and broader aspects of physiology involving biological oscillators.

  8. Machine learning helps identify CHRONO as a circadian clock component.

    PubMed

    Anafi, Ron C; Lee, Yool; Sato, Trey K; Venkataraman, Anand; Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Kavakli, Ibrahim H; Hughes, Michael E; Baggs, Julie E; Growe, Jacqueline; Liu, Andrew C; Kim, Junhyong; Hogenesch, John B

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decades, researchers have characterized a set of "clock genes" that drive daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. This arduous work has yielded results with far-reaching consequences in metabolic, psychiatric, and neoplastic disorders. Recent attempts to expand our understanding of circadian regulation have moved beyond the mutagenesis screens that identified the first clock components, employing higher throughput genomic and proteomic techniques. In order to further accelerate clock gene discovery, we utilized a computer-assisted approach to identify and prioritize candidate clock components. We used a simple form of probabilistic machine learning to integrate biologically relevant, genome-scale data and ranked genes on their similarity to known clock components. We then used a secondary experimental screen to characterize the top candidates. We found that several physically interact with known clock components in a mammalian two-hybrid screen and modulate in vitro cellular rhythms in an immortalized mouse fibroblast line (NIH 3T3). One candidate, Gene Model 129, interacts with BMAL1 and functionally represses the key driver of molecular rhythms, the BMAL1/CLOCK transcriptional complex. Given these results, we have renamed the gene CHRONO (computationally highlighted repressor of the network oscillator). Bi-molecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation demonstrate that CHRONO represses by abrogating the binding of BMAL1 to its transcriptional co-activator CBP. Most importantly, CHRONO knockout mice display a prolonged free-running circadian period similar to, or more drastic than, six other clock components. We conclude that CHRONO is a functional clock component providing a new layer of control on circadian molecular dynamics.

  9. c-MYC targets the central oscillator gene Per1 and is regulated by the circadian clock at the post-transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Repouskou, Anastasia; Prombona, Anastasia

    2016-04-01

    Cell proliferation in mammals follows a circadian rhythm while disruption of clock gene expression has been linked to tumorigenesis. Expression of the c-Myc oncogene is frequently deregulated in tumors, facilitating aberrant cell proliferation. c-MYC protein levels display circadian rhythmicity, which is compatible with an in vitro repressive role of the clock-activating complex BMAL1/CLOCK on its promoter. In this report, we provide evidence for the in vivo binding of the core circadian factor BMAL1 on the human c-Myc promoter. In addition, analysis of protein synthesis and degradation rates, as well as post-translational acetylation, demonstrate that the clock tightly controls cellular MYC levels. The oncoprotein itself is a transcription factor that by responding to mitogenic signals regulates the expression of several hundred genes. c-MYC-driven transcription is generally exerted upon dimerization with MAX and binding to E-box elements, a sequence that is also recognized by the circadian heterodimer. Our reporter assays reveal that the MYC/MAX dimer cannot affect transcription of the circadian gene Per1. However, when overexpressed, c-MYC is able to repress Per1 transactivation by BMAL1/CLOCK via targeting selective E-box sequences. Importantly, upon serum stimulation, MYC was detected in BMAL1 protein complexes. Together, these data demonstrate a novel interaction between MYC and circadian transactivators resulting in reduced clock-driven transcription. Perturbation of Per1 expression by MYC constitutes a plausible alternative explanation for the deregulated expression of clock genes observed in many types of cancer.

  10. Redox rhythm reinforces the circadian clock to gate immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mian; Wang, Wei; Karapetyan, Sargis; Mwimba, Musoki; Marqués, Jorge; Buchler, Nicolas E; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-07-23

    Recent studies have shown that in addition to the transcriptional circadian clock, many organisms, including Arabidopsis, have a circadian redox rhythm driven by the organism's metabolic activities. It has been hypothesized that the redox rhythm is linked to the circadian clock, but the mechanism and the biological significance of this link have only begun to be investigated. Here we report that the master immune regulator NPR1 (non-expressor of pathogenesis-related gene 1) of Arabidopsis is a sensor of the plant's redox state and regulates transcription of core circadian clock genes even in the absence of pathogen challenge. Surprisingly, acute perturbation in the redox status triggered by the immune signal salicylic acid does not compromise the circadian clock but rather leads to its reinforcement. Mathematical modelling and subsequent experiments show that NPR1 reinforces the circadian clock without changing the period by regulating both the morning and the evening clock genes. This balanced network architecture helps plants gate their immune responses towards the morning and minimize costs on growth at night. Our study demonstrates how a sensitive redox rhythm interacts with a robust circadian clock to ensure proper responsiveness to environmental stimuli without compromising fitness of the organism.

  11. A molecular clock regulates angiopoietin-like protein 2 expression.

    PubMed

    Kadomatsu, Tsuyoshi; Uragami, Shota; Akashi, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Yoshiki; Nakajima, Hiroo; Nakashima, Yukiko; Endo, Motoyoshi; Miyata, Keishi; Terada, Kazutoyo; Todo, Takeshi; Node, Koichi; Oike, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Various physiological and behavioral processes exhibit circadian rhythmicity. These rhythms are usually maintained by negative feedback loops of core clock genes, namely, CLOCK, BMAL, PER, and CRY. Recently, dysfunction in the circadian clock has been recognized as an important foundation for the pathophysiology of lifestyle-related diseases, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. We have reported that angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) contributes to the pathogenesis of these lifestyle-related diseases by inducing chronic inflammation. However, molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of ANGPTL2 expression are poorly understood. Here, we assess circadian rhythmicity of ANGPTL2 expression in various mouse tissues. We observed that ANGPTL2 rhythmicity was similar to that of the PER2 gene, which is regulated by the CLOCK/BMAL1 complex. Promoter activity of the human ANGPTL2 gene was significantly induced by CLOCK and BMAL1, an induction markedly attenuated by CRY co-expression. We also identified functional E-boxes in the ANGPTL2 promoter and observed occupancy of these sites by endogenous CLOCK in human osteosarcoma cells. Furthermore, Cry-deficient mice exhibited arrhythmic Angptl2 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that periodic expression of ANGPTL2 is regulated by a molecular clock.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythm in Lotus japonicus and Arabidopsis thaliana are sufficiently compatible to regulate heterologous core clock genes robustly.

    PubMed

    Ueoka-Nakanishi, Hanayo; Yamashino, Takafumi; Ishida, Kai; Kamioka, Mari; Nakamichi, Norihito; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Recent intensive studies of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have revealed the molecular mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in detail. Results of phylogenetic analyses indicated that some of core clock genes are widely conserved throughout the plant kingdom. For another model plant the legume Lotus japonicus, we have reported that it has a set of putative clock genes highly homologous to A. thaliana. Taking advantage of the L. japonicus hairy root transformation system, in this study we characterized the promoter activity of A. thaliana core clock genes CCA1 and PRR5 in heterologous L. japonicus cells and found that the molecular mechanism of circadian rhythm in L. japonicus is compatible with that of A. thaliana. PMID:23221703

  13. Pulsed Optically Pumped Rb clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micalizio, S.; Levi, F.; Godone, A.; Calosso, C. E.; François, B.; Boudot, R.; Affolderbach, C.; Kang, S.; Gharavipour, M.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2016-06-01

    INRIM demonstrated a Rb vapour cell clock based on pulsed optical pumping (POP) with unprecedented frequency stability performances, both in the short and in the medium-long term period. In the frame of a EMRP project, we are developing a new clock based on the same POP principle but adopting solutions aimed at reducing the noise sources affecting the INRIM clock. At the same time, concerning possible technological applications, particular care are devoted in the project to reduce the size and the weight of the clock, still keeping the excellent stability of the INRIM clock. The paper resumes the main results of this activity.

  14. Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts the core molecular clock and diurnal rhythms of metabolic genes in the liver without affecting the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Filiano, Ashley N; Millender-Swain, Telisha; Johnson, Russell; Young, Martin E; Gamble, Karen L; Bailey, Shannon M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and lipid biosynthesis, facilitating the development of alcoholic fatty liver disease. Many of these same metabolic pathways are directly regulated by cell autonomous circadian clocks, and recent studies suggest that disruption of daily rhythms in metabolism contributes to multiple common cardiometabolic diseases (including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease). However, it is not known whether ethanol disrupts the core molecular clock in the liver, nor whether this, in turn, alters rhythms in lipid metabolism. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption disrupts the molecular circadian clock in the liver and potentially changes the diurnal expression patterns of lipid metabolism genes. Consistent with previous studies, male C57BL/6J mice fed an ethanol-containing diet exhibited higher levels of liver triglycerides compared to control mice, indicating hepatic steatosis. Further, the diurnal oscillations of core clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, and Per2) and clock-controlled genes (Dbp, Hlf, Nocturnin, Npas2, Rev-erbα, and Tef) were altered in livers from ethanol-fed mice. In contrast, ethanol had only minor effects on the expression of core clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). These results were confirmed in Per2(Luciferase) knock-in mice, in which ethanol induced a phase advance in PER2::LUC bioluminescence oscillations in liver, but not SCN. Further, there was greater variability in the phase of PER2::LUC oscillations in livers from ethanol-fed mice. Ethanol consumption also affected the diurnal oscillations of metabolic genes, including Adh1, Cpt1a, Cyp2e1, Pck1, Pdk4, Ppargc1a, Ppargc1b and Srebp1c, in the livers of C57BL/6J mice. In summary, chronic ethanol consumption alters the function of the circadian clock in liver. Importantly, these results suggest that chronic ethanol consumption, at levels sufficient to cause steatosis

  15. Clock-controlled output gene Dbp is a regulator of Arnt/Hif-1β gene expression in pancreatic islet β-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakabayashi, Hiroko; Ohta, Yasuharu Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Susuki, Yosuke; Taguchi, Akihiko; Tanabe, Katsuya; Kondo, Manabu; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Nagao, Yuko; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Arnt mRNA expressed in a circadian manner in mouse pancreatic islets. •Expressions of Dbp and Arnt damped in the islets of a diabetic model mouse. •DBP and E4BP4 regulate Arnt promoter activity by direct binding. •Arnt may have a role in connecting circadian rhythm and metabolism. -- Abstract: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) has emerged as a potential determinant of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes in humans. An 82% reduction in Arnt expression was observed in islets from type 2 diabetic donors as compared to non-diabetic donors. However, few regulators of Arnt expression have been identified. Meanwhile, disruption of the clock components CLOCK and BMAL1 is known to result in hypoinsulinemia and diabetes, but the molecular details remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel molecular connection between Arnt and two clock-controlled output genes, albumin D-element binding protein (Dbp) and E4 binding protein 4 (E4bp4). By conducting gene expression studies using the islets of Wfs1{sup −/−} A{sup y}/a mice that develop severe diabetes due to β-cell apoptosis, we demonstrated clock-related gene expressions to be altered in the diabetic mice. Dbp mRNA decreased by 50%, E4bp4 mRNA increased by 50%, and Arnt mRNA decreased by 30% at Zeitgever Time (ZT) 12. Mouse pancreatic islets exhibited oscillations of clock gene expressions. E4BP4, a D-box negative regulator, oscillated anti-phase to DBP, a D-box positive regulator. We also found low-amplitude circadian expression of Arnt mRNA, which peaked at ZT4. Over-expression of DBP raised both mRNA and protein levels of ARNT in HEK293 and MIN6 cell lines. Arnt promoter-driven luciferase reporter assay in MIN6 cells revealed that DBP increased Arnt promoter activity by 2.5-fold and that E4BP4 competitively inhibited its activation. In addition, on ChIP assay, DBP and E4BP4 directly bound to D-box elements within the

  16. Machine Learning Helps Identify CHRONO as a Circadian Clock Component

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Anand; Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Kavakli, Ibrahim H.; Hughes, Michael E.; Baggs, Julie E.; Growe, Jacqueline; Liu, Andrew C.; Kim, Junhyong; Hogenesch, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, researchers have characterized a set of “clock genes” that drive daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. This arduous work has yielded results with far-reaching consequences in metabolic, psychiatric, and neoplastic disorders. Recent attempts to expand our understanding of circadian regulation have moved beyond the mutagenesis screens that identified the first clock components, employing higher throughput genomic and proteomic techniques. In order to further accelerate clock gene discovery, we utilized a computer-assisted approach to identify and prioritize candidate clock components. We used a simple form of probabilistic machine learning to integrate biologically relevant, genome-scale data and ranked genes on their similarity to known clock components. We then used a secondary experimental screen to characterize the top candidates. We found that several physically interact with known clock components in a mammalian two-hybrid screen and modulate in vitro cellular rhythms in an immortalized mouse fibroblast line (NIH 3T3). One candidate, Gene Model 129, interacts with BMAL1 and functionally represses the key driver of molecular rhythms, the BMAL1/CLOCK transcriptional complex. Given these results, we have renamed the gene CHRONO (computationally highlighted repressor of the network oscillator). Bi-molecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation demonstrate that CHRONO represses by abrogating the binding of BMAL1 to its transcriptional co-activator CBP. Most importantly, CHRONO knockout mice display a prolonged free-running circadian period similar to, or more drastic than, six other clock components. We conclude that CHRONO is a functional clock component providing a new layer of control on circadian molecular dynamics. PMID:24737000

  17. Orexin as an input of circadian system in goldfish: Effects on clock gene expression and locomotor activity rhythms.

    PubMed

    Nisembaum, Laura G; de Pedro, Nuria; Delgado, María J; Sánchez-Bretaño, Aída; Isorna, Esther

    2014-02-01

    Orexins are neuropeptides mainly known for regulating feeding behavior and sleep-wakefulness cycle in vertebrates. Daily variations of orexin-A expression have been reported in fish, with the highest levels preceding feeding time. However, it is unknown if such variations could be related with daily rhythms of clock genes, which form the molecular core of circadian oscillators. The aim of the present study was to identify the possible role of orexin as an input element of the goldfish circadian system. It was investigated the effects of orexin-A (10ng/gbw) intracerebroventricular injections on the expression of clock genes, NPY and ghrelin, as well as on daily locomotor activity rhythms. Goldfish held under 12L:12D photoperiod and injected at midday with orexin or saline, were sacrificed at 1 and 3h post-injection. The analysis of genes expression by qReal Time PCR showed an increment of Per genes in hypothalamus and foregut at 3h post-injection, but not in hindgut and liver. The gBmal1a expression remained unaltered in all the studied tissues. Orexin induced NPY in the hypothalamus and ghrelin in the foregut. Locomotor activity was studied in fish daily injected with orexin for several consecutive days under different experimental conditions. Orexin synchronized locomotor activity in goldfish maintained in 24L and fasting conditions. Present results support a cross-talking between orexin-A and other feeding regulators at central and peripheral level, and suggest, for the first time, a role of this peptide as an input of the circadian system in fish.

  18. Timed restricted feeding restores the rhythms of expression of the clock protein, Period2, in the oval nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and central nucleus of the amygdala in adrenalectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Segall, L A; Verwey, M; Amir, S

    2008-11-11

    Feeding schedules that limit food availability to a set time of day are powerful synchronizers of the rhythms of expression of the circadian clock protein Period 2 (PER2) in the limbic forebrain in rats. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms that mediate the effect of such timed restricted feeding (TRF) schedules on the expression of PER2. Adrenal glucocorticoids have been implicated in the circadian regulation of clock genes expression in peripheral tissues as well as in the control of the rhythms of expression of PER2 in certain limbic forebrain regions, such as the oval nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTov) and central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA) in rats. To study the possible involvement of glucocorticoids in the regulation of PER2 expression by TRF, we assessed the effect of adrenalectomy on TRF-entrained PER2 rhythms in the limbic forebrain in rats. Adrenalectomy selectively abolished the rhythms of PER2 in the BNSTov and CEA in normally fed rats, as previously shown, but had no effect on TRF-entrained PER2 rhythms in the same structures. These findings show that the effect of TRF on PER2 rhythms in the limbic forebrain is independent of adrenal glucocorticoids and demonstrate that the involvement of glucocorticoids in the regulation PER2 rhythms in the limbic forebrain is not only region specific, as previously shown, but also state dependent.

  19. Age-associated circadian period changes in Arabidopsis leaves.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunmin; Kim, Yumi; Yeom, Miji; Lim, Junhyun; Nam, Hong Gil

    2016-04-01

    As most organisms age, their appearance, physiology, and behaviour alters as part of a life history strategy that maximizes their fitness over their lifetime. The passage of time is measured by organisms and is used to modulate these age-related changes. Organisms have an endogenous time measurement system called the circadian clock. This endogenous clock regulates many physiological responses throughout the life history of organisms to enhance their fitness. However, little is known about the relation between ageing and the circadian clock in plants. Here, we investigate the association of leaf ageing with circadian rhythm changes to better understand the regulation of life-history strategy in Arabidopsis. The circadian periods of clock output genes were approximately 1h shorter in older leaves than younger leaves. The periods of the core clock genes were also consistently shorter in older leaves, indicating an effect of ageing on regulation of the circadian period. Shortening of the circadian period with leaf age occurred faster in plants grown under a long photoperiod compared with a short photoperiod. We screened for a regulatory gene that links ageing and the circadian clock among multiple clock gene mutants. Only mutants for the clock oscillator TOC1 did not show a shortened circadian period during leaf ageing, suggesting that TOC1 may link age to changes in the circadian clock period. Our findings suggest that age-related information is incorporated into the regulation of the circadian period and that TOC1 is necessary for this integrative process.

  20. Age-associated circadian period changes in Arabidopsis leaves

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunmin; Kim, Yumi; Yeom, Miji; Lim, Junhyun; Nam, Hong Gil

    2016-01-01

    As most organisms age, their appearance, physiology, and behaviour alters as part of a life history strategy that maximizes their fitness over their lifetime. The passage of time is measured by organisms and is used to modulate these age-related changes. Organisms have an endogenous time measurement system called the circadian clock. This endogenous clock regulates many physiological responses throughout the life history of organisms to enhance their fitness. However, little is known about the relation between ageing and the circadian clock in plants. Here, we investigate the association of leaf ageing with circadian rhythm changes to better understand the regulation of life-history strategy in Arabidopsis. The circadian periods of clock output genes were approximately 1h shorter in older leaves than younger leaves. The periods of the core clock genes were also consistently shorter in older leaves, indicating an effect of ageing on regulation of the circadian period. Shortening of the circadian period with leaf age occurred faster in plants grown under a long photoperiod compared with a short photoperiod. We screened for a regulatory gene that links ageing and the circadian clock among multiple clock gene mutants. Only mutants for the clock oscillator TOC1 did not show a shortened circadian period during leaf ageing, suggesting that TOC1 may link age to changes in the circadian clock period. Our findings suggest that age-related information is incorporated into the regulation of the circadian period and that TOC1 is necessary for this integrative process. PMID:27012281

  1. Effects of TWIN-OF-EYELESS on Clock Gene Expression and Central-Pacemaker Neuron Development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Glossop, Nicholas R J; Gummadova, Jennet O; Ghangrekar, Indrayani; Hardin, Paul E; Coutts, Graham A

    2014-06-10

    Circadian oscillators are autonomous molecular rhythms that reside in cells to align whole-organism physiology and behavior to the 24-h day. In flies, as in mammals, the oscillator operates in cells that coexpress CLOCK (CLK) and CYCLE (CYC). Recent work in Drosophila has shown that CLK is unique in its ability to generate heterologous oscillators, indicating that Clk gene expression defines the circadian cell fate. Here, using standard in vitro and in vivo techniques, we show that TWIN-OF-EYELESS (TOY; dPax6) regulates Clk expression in small ventrolateral neurons (s-LNvs) that coordinate sleep-wake cycles. Crucially, toy binds multiple sites at the Clk locus, is expressed independent of CLK-CYC in LNvs, regulates CLK protein levels under optimal photoperiodic conditions, and sets clock-speed during endogenous free-run. Furthermore, TOY is necessary for the onset of Clk expression in LNvs during embryogenesis. We propose that TOY contributes to a transcription complex that functions upstream of the oscillator to promote Clk expression in s-LNvs.

  2. Phenotypic correlates of Clock gene variation in a wild blue tit population: evidence for a role in seasonal timing of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Liedvogel, Miriam; Szulkin, Marta; Knowles, Sarah C L; Wood, Matthew J; Sheldon, Ben C

    2009-06-01

    The timing of reproduction in birds varies considerably within populations and is often under strong natural selection. Individual timing within years is dependent on a range of environmental factors in addition to having an additive genetic basis. In vertebrates, an increasing amount is known about the molecular basis for variation in biological timing. The Clock gene includes a variable poly-glutamine (poly-Q) repeat influencing behaviour and physiology. Recent work in birds, fish and insects has demonstrated associations between Clock genotype and latitude across populations, which match latitudinal variation in breeding time. In this study, we investigated the phenotypic correlates of variation in Clock genotype within a single blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus population over two successive breeding seasons. In females, but not in males, we observed a general trend for birds with fewer poly-Q repeats to breed earlier in the season. Incubation duration was shorter in both females and males with fewer repeats at the polymorphic Clock locus. Poly-Q Clock allele-frequency was homogenously distributed within the study population and did not exhibit any consistent environment-related variation. We further tested for effects of Clock genotype on reproductive success and survival, and found that females with fewer poly-Q repeats produced a higher number of fledged offspring. Our results therefore suggest that (i) selection in females, but not in males, for fewer poly-Q repeats may be operating, (ii) the across-population associations in timing of breeding involving this locus could be linked to variation within populations, and (iii) the Clock gene might be involved in local adaptation to seasonal environments.

  3. Conserved expression profiles of circadian clock-related genes in two Lemna species showing long-day and short-day photoperiodic flowering responses.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Kumiko; Serikawa, Masayuki; Suzuki, Sayaka; Kondo, Takao; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2006-05-01

    The Lemna genus is a group of monocotyledonous plants with tiny, floating bodies. Lemna gibba G3 and L. paucicostata 6746 were once intensively analyzed for physiological timing systems of photoperiodic flowering and circadian rhythms since they showed obligatory and sensitive photoperiodic responses of a long-day and a short-day plant, respectively. We attempted to approach the divergence of biological timing systems at the molecular level using these plants. We first employed molecular techniques to study their circadian clock systems. We developed a convenient bioluminescent reporter system to monitor the circadian rhythms of Lemna plants. As in Arabidopsis, the Arabidopsis CCA1 promoter produced circadian expression in Lemna plants, though the phases and the sustainability of bioluminescence rhythms were somewhat diverged between them. Lemna homologs of the Arabidopsis clock-related genes LHY/CCA1, GI, ELF3 and PRRs were then isolated as candidates for clock-related genes in these plants. These genes showed rhythmic expression profiles that were basically similar to those of Arabidopsis under light-dark conditions. Results from co-transfection assays using the bioluminescence reporter and overexpression effectors suggested that the LHY and GI homologs of Lemna can function in the circadian clock system like the counterparts of Arabidopsis. All these results suggested that the frame of the circadian clock appeared to be conserved not only between the two Lemna plants but also between monocotyledons and dicotyledons. However, divergence of gene numbers and expression profiles for LHY/CCA1 homologs were found between Lemna, rice and Arabidopsis, suggesting that some modification of clock-related components occurred through their evolution.

  4. Conserved expression profiles of circadian clock-related genes in two Lemna species showing long-day and short-day photoperiodic flowering responses.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Kumiko; Serikawa, Masayuki; Suzuki, Sayaka; Kondo, Takao; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2006-05-01

    The Lemna genus is a group of monocotyledonous plants with tiny, floating bodies. Lemna gibba G3 and L. paucicostata 6746 were once intensively analyzed for physiological timing systems of photoperiodic flowering and circadian rhythms since they showed obligatory and sensitive photoperiodic responses of a long-day and a short-day plant, respectively. We attempted to approach the divergence of biological timing systems at the molecular level using these plants. We first employed molecular techniques to study their circadian clock systems. We developed a convenient bioluminescent reporter system to monitor the circadian rhythms of Lemna plants. As in Arabidopsis, the Arabidopsis CCA1 promoter produced circadian expression in Lemna plants, though the phases and the sustainability of bioluminescence rhythms were somewhat diverged between them. Lemna homologs of the Arabidopsis clock-related genes LHY/CCA1, GI, ELF3 and PRRs were then isolated as candidates for clock-related genes in these plants. These genes showed rhythmic expression profiles that were basically similar to those of Arabidopsis under light-dark conditions. Results from co-transfection assays using the bioluminescence reporter and overexpression effectors suggested that the LHY and GI homologs of Lemna can function in the circadian clock system like the counterparts of Arabidopsis. All these results suggested that the frame of the circadian clock appeared to be conserved not only between the two Lemna plants but also between monocotyledons and dicotyledons. However, divergence of gene numbers and expression profiles for LHY/CCA1 homologs were found between Lemna, rice and Arabidopsis, suggesting that some modification of clock-related components occurred through their evolution. PMID:16524874

  5. Functional molecular analysis of a circadian clock gene timeless promoter from the Drosophilid fly Chymomyza costata.

    PubMed

    Kobelková, Alena; Bajgar, Adam; Dolezel, David

    2010-12-01

    The circadian transcription of the tim gene is tightly regulated by the protein complex dCLK/CYC, which directly interacts with a series of closely spaced E-box and E-box-like elements in the Drosophila timeless promoter. The tim promoter from D. melanogaster has been studied in detail both in tissue cultures and in living flies yet has never been investigated in other species. This article presents a detailed functional analysis of the tim promoter from the drosophilid fly, Chymomyza costata, in Drosophila tissue cultures. A comparison of tim promoters from wt and npd-mutants confirmed that the 1855 bp deletion in the latter removes crucial regulatory cis-elements as well as the minimal promoter, being subsequently responsible for the lack of tim mRNA expression. Deletion and substitution mutations of the wt tim promoter showed that the region containing the canonical E-box, TER-box, and 2 incomplete E-box sequences is essential for CLK/CYC-mediated expression, while the PERR element appears to be a repressor in S2 cells. Furthermore, the expression of the circadian genes timeless, period , vrille, and doubletime was quantified in C. costata adults. Striking differences were found in expression profiles for tim, per, and vri between wild-type and npd-mutant individuals.

  6. Peripheral Circadian Clocks Mediate Dietary Restriction-Dependent Changes in Lifespan and Fat Metabolism in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Katewa, Subhash D; Akagi, Kazutaka; Bose, Neelanjan; Rakshit, Kuntol; Camarella, Timothy; Zheng, Xiangzhong; Hall, David; Davis, Sonnet; Nelson, Christopher S; Brem, Rachel B; Ramanathan, Arvind; Sehgal, Amita; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2016-01-12

    Endogenous circadian clocks orchestrate several metabolic and signaling pathways that are known to modulate lifespan, suggesting clocks as potential targets for manipulation of metabolism and lifespan. We report here that the core circadian clock genes, timeless (tim) and period (per), are required for the metabolic and lifespan responses to DR in Drosophila. Consistent with the involvement of a circadian mechanism, DR enhances the amplitude of cycling of most circadian clock genes, including tim, in peripheral tissues. Mass-spectrometry-based lipidomic analysis suggests a role of tim in cycling of specific medium chain triglycerides under DR. Furthermore, overexpression of tim in peripheral tissues improves its oscillatory amplitude and extends lifespan under ad libitum conditions. Importantly, effects of tim on lifespan appear to be mediated through enhanced fat turnover. These findings identify a critical role for specific clock genes in modulating the effects of nutrient manipulation on fat metabolism and aging. PMID:26626459

  7. Peripheral Circadian Clocks Mediate Dietary Restriction-Dependent Changes in Lifespan and Fat Metabolism in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Katewa, Subhash D; Akagi, Kazutaka; Bose, Neelanjan; Rakshit, Kuntol; Camarella, Timothy; Zheng, Xiangzhong; Hall, David; Davis, Sonnet; Nelson, Christopher S; Brem, Rachel B; Ramanathan, Arvind; Sehgal, Amita; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2016-01-12

    Endogenous circadian clocks orchestrate several metabolic and signaling pathways that are known to modulate lifespan, suggesting clocks as potential targets for manipulation of metabolism and lifespan. We report here that the core circadian clock genes, timeless (tim) and period (per), are required for the metabolic and lifespan responses to DR in Drosophila. Consistent with the involvement of a circadian mechanism, DR enhances the amplitude of cycling of most circadian clock genes, including tim, in peripheral tissues. Mass-spectrometry-based lipidomic analysis suggests a role of tim in cycling of specific medium chain triglycerides under DR. Furthermore, overexpression of tim in peripheral tissues improves its oscillatory amplitude and extends lifespan under ad libitum conditions. Importantly, effects of tim on lifespan appear to be mediated through enhanced fat turnover. These findings identify a critical role for specific clock genes in modulating the effects of nutrient manipulation on fat metabolism and aging.

  8. Diurnal expression of functional and clock-related genes throughout the rat HPA axis: system-wide shifts in response to a restricted feeding schedule.

    PubMed

    Girotti, Milena; Weinberg, Marc S; Spencer, Robert L

    2009-04-01

    The diurnal rhythm of glucocorticoid secretion depends on the suprachiasmatic (SCN) and dorsomedial (putative food-entrainable oscillator; FEO) nuclei of the hypothalamus, two brain regions critical for coordination of physiological responses to photoperiod and feeding cues, respectively. In both cases, time keeping relies upon diurnal oscillations in clock gene (per1, per2, and bmal) expression. Glucocorticoids may play a key role in synchronization of the rest of the body to photoperiod and food availability. Thus glucocorticoid secretion may be both a target and an important effector of SCN and FEO output. Remarkably little, however, is known about the functional diurnal rhythms of the individual components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. We examined the 24-h pattern of hormonal secretion (ACTH and corticosterone), functional gene expression (c-fos, crh, pomc, star), and clock gene expression (per1, per2 and bmal) in each compartment of the HPA axis under a 12:12-h light-dark cycle and compared with relevant SCN gene expression. We found that each anatomic component of the HPA axis has a unique circadian signature of functional and clock gene expression. We then tested the susceptibility of these measures to nonphotic entrainment cues by restricting food availability to only a portion of the light phase of a 12:12-h light-dark cycle. Restricted feeding is a strong zeitgeber that can dramatically alter functional and clock gene expression at all levels of the HPA axis, despite ongoing photoperiod cues and only minor changes in SCN clock gene expression. Thus the HPA axis may be an important mediator of the body entrainment to the FEO.

  9. Punctual Transcriptional Regulation by the Rice Circadian Clock under Fluctuating Field Conditions[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Jun; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Izawa, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Plant circadian clocks that oscillate autonomously with a roughly 24-h period are entrained by fluctuating light and temperature and globally regulate downstream genes in the field. However, it remains unknown how punctual internal time produced by the circadian clock in the field is and how it is affected by environmental fluctuations due to weather or daylength. Using hundreds of samples of field-grown rice (Oryza sativa) leaves, we developed a statistical model for the expression of circadian clock-related genes integrating diurnally entrained circadian clock with phase setting by light, both responses to light and temperature gated by the circadian clock. We show that expression of individual genes was strongly affected by temperature. However, internal time estimated from expression of multiple genes, which may reflect transcriptional regulation of downstream genes, is punctual to 22 min and not affected by weather, daylength, or plant developmental age in the field. We also revealed perturbed progression of internal time under controlled environment or in a mutant of the circadian clock gene GIGANTEA. Thus, we demonstrated that the circadian clock is a regulatory network of multiple genes that retains accurate physical time of day by integrating the perturbations on individual genes under fluctuating environments in the field. PMID:25757473

  10. Partners in time: EARLY BIRD associates with ZEITLUPE and regulates the speed of the Arabidopsis clock.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Mikael; McWatters, Harriet G; Bakó, László; Takata, Naoki; Gyula, Péter; Hall, Anthony; Somers, David E; Millar, Andrew J; Eriksson, Maria E

    2011-04-01

    The circadian clock of the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is made up of a complex series of interacting feedback loops whereby proteins regulate their own expression across day and night. early bird (ebi) is a circadian mutation that causes the clock to speed up: ebi plants have short circadian periods, early phase of clock gene expression, and are early flowering. We show that EBI associates with ZEITLUPE (ZTL), known to act in the plant clock as a posttranslational mediator of protein degradation. However, EBI is not degraded by its interaction with ZTL. Instead, ZTL counteracts the effect of EBI during the day and increases it at night, modulating the expression of key circadian components. The partnership of EBI with ZTL reveals a novel mechanism involved in controlling the complex transcription-translation feedback loops of the clock. This work highlights the importance of cross talk between the ubiquitination pathway and transcriptional control for regulation of the plant clock.

  11. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and pomegranate influence circadian gene expression and period length.

    PubMed

    Loizides-Mangold, Ursula; Koren-Gluzer, Marie; Skarupelova, Svetlana; Makhlouf, Anne-Marie; Hayek, Tony; Aviram, Michael; Dibner, Charna

    2016-01-01

    The circadian timing system regulates key aspects of mammalian physiology. Here, we analyzed the effect of the endogenous antioxidant paraoxonase 1 (PON1), a high-density lipoprotein-associated lipolactonase that hydrolyses lipid peroxides and attenuates atherogenesis, on circadian gene expression in C57BL/6J and PON1KO mice fed a normal chow diet or a high-fat diet (HFD). Expression levels of core-clock transcripts Nr1d1, Per2, Cry2 and Bmal1 were altered in skeletal muscle in PON1-deficient mice in response to HFD. These findings were supported by circadian bioluminescence reporter assessments in mouse C2C12 and human primary myotubes, synchronized in vitro, where administration of PON1 or pomegranate juice modulated circadian period length. PMID:27010443

  12. Circadian Regulation of Myocardial Sarcomeric Titin-cap (Tcap, Telethonin): Identification of Cardiac Clock-Controlled Genes Using Open Access Bioinformatics Data

    PubMed Central

    Podobed, Peter S.; Alibhai, Faisal J.; Chow, Chi-Wing; Martino, Tami A.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are important for healthy cardiovascular physiology and are regulated at the molecular level by a circadian clock mechanism. We and others previously demonstrated that 9–13% of the cardiac transcriptome is rhythmic over 24 h daily cycles; the heart is genetically a different organ day versus night. However, which rhythmic mRNAs are regulated by the circadian mechanism is not known. Here, we used open access bioinformatics databases to identify 94 transcripts with expression profiles characteristic of CLOCK and BMAL1 targeted genes, using the CircaDB website and JTK_Cycle. Moreover, 22 were highly expressed in the heart as determined by the BioGPS website. Furthermore, 5 heart-enriched genes had human/mouse conserved CLOCK:BMAL1 promoter binding sites (E-boxes), as determined by UCSC table browser, circadian mammalian promoter/enhancer database PEDB, and the European Bioinformatics Institute alignment tool (EMBOSS). Lastly, we validated findings by demonstrating that Titin cap (Tcap, telethonin) was targeted by transcriptional activators CLOCK and BMAL1 by showing 1) Tcap mRNA and TCAP protein had a diurnal rhythm in murine heart; 2) cardiac Tcap mRNA was rhythmic in animals kept in constant darkness; 3) Tcap and control Per2 mRNA expression and cyclic amplitude were blunted in ClockΔ19/Δ19 hearts; 4) BMAL1 bound to the Tcap promoter by ChIP assay; 5) BMAL1 bound to Tcap promoter E-boxes by biotinylated oligonucleotide assay; and 6) CLOCK and BMAL1 induced tcap expression by luciferase reporter assay. Thus this study identifies circadian regulated genes in silico, with validation of Tcap, a critical regulator of cardiac Z-disc sarcomeric structure and function. PMID:25121604

  13. Heterogeneous Expression of the Core Circadian Clock Proteins among Neuronal Cell Types in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Zhijing; Ribelayga, Christophe P.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in metabolism, physiology, and behavior originate from cell-autonomous circadian clocks located in many organs and structures throughout the body and that share a common molecular mechanism based on the clock genes and their protein products. In the mammalian neural retina, despite evidence supporting the presence of several circadian clocks regulating many facets of retinal physiology and function, the exact cellular location and genetic signature of the retinal clock cells remain largely unknown. Here we examined the expression of the core circadian clock proteins CLOCK, BMAL1, NPAS2, PERIOD 1(PER1), PERIOD 2 (PER2), and CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2) in identified neurons of the mouse retina during daily and circadian cycles. We found concurrent clock protein expression in most retinal neurons, including cone photoreceptors, dopaminergic amacrine cells, and melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive ganglion cells. Remarkably, diurnal and circadian rhythms of expression of all clock proteins were observed in the cones whereas only CRY2 expression was found to be rhythmic in the dopaminergic amacrine cells. Only a low level of expression of the clock proteins was detected in the rods at any time of the daily or circadian cycle. Our observations provide evidence that cones and not rods are cell-autonomous circadian clocks and reveal an important disparity in the expression of the core clock components among neuronal cell types. We propose that the overall temporal architecture of the mammalian retina does not result from the synchronous activity of pervasive identical clocks but rather reflects the cellular and regional heterogeneity in clock function within retinal tissue. PMID:23189207

  14. Colorectal liver metastases with a disrupted circadian rhythm phase shift the peripheral clock in liver and kidney.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Sander A; Oklejewicz, Malgorzata; Ahmadi, Ali R; Tamanini, Filippo; Ijzermans, Jan N M; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; de Bruin, Ron W F

    2015-03-01

    Circadian clock genes regulate 10-15% of the transcriptome, and might function as tumor suppressor genes. Relatively little is known about the circadian clock in tumors and its effect on surrounding healthy tissues. Therefore, we compared the 24-hr expression levels of key circadian clock genes in liver and kidney of healthy control mice with those of mice bearing C26 colorectal tumor metastases in the liver. Metastases were induced by injection of C26 colorectal carcinoma cells into the spleen. Subsequently, tumor, liver and kidney tissue was collected around the clock to compare circadian rhythmicity. Expression levels of five clock genes (Rev-Erbα, Per1, Per2, Bmal1 and Cry1) and three clock-controlled genes (CCGs; Dbp, p21 and Wee1) were determined by qRT-PCR. Liver and kidney tissue of healthy control mice showed normal 24-hr oscillations of all clock genes and CCGs, consistent with normal circadian rhythmicity. In colorectal liver metastases, however, 24-hr oscillations were completely absent for all clock genes and CCGs except Cry1. Liver and kidney tissue of tumor-bearing mice showed a shift in clock periodicity relative to control mice. In the liver we observed a phase advance, whereas in the kidney the phase was delayed. These data show that hepatic metastases of C26 colon carcinoma with a disrupted circadian rhythm phase shift liver and kidney tissue clocks, which strongly suggests a systemic effect on peripheral clocks. The possibility that tumors may modify peripheral clocks to escape from ordinary circadian rhythms and in this way contribute to fatigue and sleep disorders in cancer patients is discussed.

  15. Uncoupling of peripheral and master clock gene rhythms by reversed feeding leads to an exacerbated inflammatory response after polymicrobial sepsis in mice.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Yoshimasa; Iwasaka, Hideo; Koga, Hironori; Shingu, Chihiro; Matsumoto, Shigekiyo; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2014-03-01

    Reversed feeding uncouples peripheral and master clock gene rhythms and leads to an increased risk of disease development. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of clock gene uncoupling on sepsis-induced inflammation using a mouse cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model. C57BL/6N mice were entrained to a 12-h light-dark cycle (lights on at 7 AM). Mice were permitted ad libitum feeding either during the night (7 PM-7 AM) or the nonphysiological light phase (7 AM-7 PM) for a week before CLP. In daytime-fed mice, phase inversion of clock gene expression was observed in the liver, but not in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Daytime-fed mice also had decreased body weight and food intake. Survival rate was significantly lower in daytime-fed mice (29%) compared with nighttime-fed mice (54%) 72 h after CLP (P = 0.03). Serum levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α, high mobility group box 1, IL-1α, IL-9, eotaxin, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor increased in daytime-fed mice compared with nighttime-fed mice after CLP. Baseline expression levels of sirtuin peroxisome 1 and proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α in the liver decreased in daytime-fed mice compared with nighttime-fed mice. Thus, daytime feeding induces clock gene uncoupling, which leads to decreased expression of longevity-related and energy metabolism proteins. Daytime feeding may also increase the levels of inflammatory cytokines, thereby increasing mortality in a mouse sepsis model. Our findings suggest that uncoupling of peripheral and master clock gene rhythms by reversed feeding exacerbates inflammatory responses.

  16. Variation in candidate genes CLOCK and ADCYAP1 does not consistently predict differences in migratory behavior in the songbird genus Junco

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Mark P

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies exploring the molecular genetic basis for migratory variation in animals have identified polymorphisms in two genes ( CLOCK and ADCYAP1) that are linked to circadian rhythms and correlate with migratory propensity and phenology among individuals and populations. Results from these initial studies are mixed, however, and additional data are needed to assess the generality and diversity of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the biology of migration. We sequenced CLOCK and ADCYAP1 in 15 populations across the two species of the avian genus Junco, a North American lineage in which multiple recently diverged subspecies and populations range from sedentary to long-distance migrants. We found no consistent associations between allele length and migratory status across the genus for either CLOCK or ADCYAP1. However, within two subspecies groups, populations that migrate longer distances have longer CLOCK alleles on average. Additionally, there was a positive relationship between ADCYAP1 allele length and migratory restlessness (zugunruhe) among individuals within one of two captive populations studied—a result similar to those reported previously within captive blackcaps ( Sylvia atricapilla). We conclude that, while both ADCYAP1 and CLOCK may correlate with migratory propensity within or among certain populations or species, previously identified relationships between migratory behavior and sequence variants cannot be easily generalized across taxa. PMID:24627781

  17. Circadian clocks in the ovary.

    PubMed

    Sellix, Michael T; Menaker, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Clock gene expression has been observed in tissues of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Whereas the contribution of hypothalamic oscillators to the timing of reproductive biology is well known, the role of peripheral oscillators like those in the ovary is less clear. Circadian clocks in the ovary might play a role in the timing of ovulation. Disruption of the clock in ovarian cells or desynchrony between ovarian clocks and circadian oscillators elsewhere in the body may contribute to the onset and progression of various reproductive pathologies. In this paper, we review evidence for clock function in the ovary across a number of species and offer a novel perspective into the role of this clock in normal ovarian physiology and in diseases that negatively affect fertility.

  18. Circadian Rhythms, the Molecular Clock, and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lefta, Mellani; Wolff, Gretchen; Esser, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Almost all organisms ranging from single cell bacteria to humans exhibit a variety of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical rhythms. In mammals, circadian rhythms control the timing of many physiological processes over a 24-h period, including sleep-wake cycles, body temperature, feeding, and hormone production. This body of research has led to defined characteristics of circadian rhythms based on period length, phase, and amplitude. Underlying circadian behaviors is a molecular clock mechanism found in most, if not all, cell types including skeletal muscle. The mammalian molecular clock is a complex of multiple oscillating networks that are regulated through transcriptional mechanisms, timed protein turnover, and input from small molecules. At this time, very little is known about circadian aspects of skeletal muscle function/metabolism but some progress has been made on understanding the molecular clock in skeletal muscle. The goal of this chapter is to provide the basic terminology and concepts of circadian rhythms with a more detailed review of the current state of knowledge of the molecular clock, with reference to what is known in skeletal muscle. Research has demonstrated that the molecular clock is active in skeletal muscles and that the muscle-specific transcription factor, MyoD, is a direct target of the molecular clock. Skeletal muscle of clock-compromised mice, Bmal1−/− and ClockΔ19 mice, are weak and exhibit significant disruptions in expression of many genes required for adult muscle structure and metabolism. We suggest that the interaction between the molecular clock, MyoD, and metabolic factors, such as PGC-1, provide a potential system of feedback loops that may be critical for both maintenance and adaptation of skeletal muscle. PMID:21621073

  19. Circadian rhythms, the molecular clock, and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Lefta, Mellani; Wolff, Gretchen; Esser, Karyn A

    2011-01-01

    Almost all organisms ranging from single cell bacteria to humans exhibit a variety of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical rhythms. In mammals, circadian rhythms control the timing of many physiological processes over a 24-h period, including sleep-wake cycles, body temperature, feeding, and hormone production. This body of research has led to defined characteristics of circadian rhythms based on period length, phase, and amplitude. Underlying circadian behaviors is a molecular clock mechanism found in most, if not all, cell types including skeletal muscle. The mammalian molecular clock is a complex of multiple oscillating networks that are regulated through transcriptional mechanisms, timed protein turnover, and input from small molecules. At this time, very little is known about circadian aspects of skeletal muscle function/metabolism but some progress has been made on understanding the molecular clock in skeletal muscle. The goal of this chapter is to provide the basic terminology and concepts of circadian rhythms with a more detailed review of the current state of knowledge of the molecular clock, with reference to what is known in skeletal muscle. Research has demonstrated that the molecular clock is active in skeletal muscles and that the muscle-specific transcription factor, MyoD, is a direct target of the molecular clock. Skeletal muscle of clock-compromised mice, Bmal1(-/-) and Clock(Δ19) mice, are weak and exhibit significant disruptions in expression of many genes required for adult muscle structure and metabolism. We suggest that the interaction between the molecular clock, MyoD, and metabolic factors, such as PGC-1, provide a potential system of feedback loops that may be critical for both maintenance and adaptation of skeletal muscle.

  20. Influence of simulated microgravity on clock genes expression rhythmicity and underlying blood circulating miRNAs-mRNA co-expression regulatory mechanism in C57BL/6J mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Ke; Qu, Lina

    were consecutively performed. Blood samples and liver tissues were collected from tail-suspended and control mice under LD 12:12h and DD conditions during the 12th, 13th and 14th testing days at 4h intervals. Melatonin and corticosterone in mice plasma at different time points were assayed. NIH-3T3 cells were plated in culture dish for 22h before the experiment. For ground-based simulation of weightlessness, the medium was exchanged with DMEM containing 50% horse serum to synchronization, after 2 h, this medium was replaced with DMEM and 10% FBS. Then, at various time point (0, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48h), cells were cultured on the roating clinostat at 30r/min. Total RNA was extracted from liver and NIH-3T3 cells and subsequently reverse-transcribed. The SYBR green I real-time quantitative PCR system was conducted to examine the mRNA expression level of clock, bmal1, per1, per2, cry1 and cry2 in mice and NIH-3T3 cells, respectively. Paired comparisons of the circadian genes expression between period, peak values, amplitude and mesor (midline estimating statistic of rhythm) were examined for evidence of circadian variation using Chronos-Fit software in mice and Cosine analyses in NIH-3T3 cells. Statistical analysis: All numerical data were expressed as the mean ± standard deviation (SD). Statistical differences among groups were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to determine time points differences in the study parameters. Statistical differences between two groups were determined by the Student's t test. Results: (1) Circadian rhythm of clock and bmal1 mRNA expression was found in each testing day with similar peak phase in both tail suspension group and control group. Compared with control group, tail suspension group showed that the peak phase of clock gene mRNA level advanced approximately 4 hours and the amplitude of bmal1 gene mRNA level significantly reduced at ZT2 and ZT6. (2) The expression of circadian genes in NIH-3T3 cells demonstrated

  1. Circadian clocks and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Victoria; Williams, Jack L; Meng, Qing-Jun; Streuli, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks respond to environmental time cues to coordinate 24-hour oscillations in almost every tissue of the body. In the breast, circadian clocks regulate the rhythmic expression of numerous genes. Disrupted expression of circadian genes can alter breast biology and may promote cancer. Here we overview circadian mechanisms, and the connection between the molecular clock and breast biology. We describe how disruption of circadian genes contributes to cancer via multiple mechanisms, and link this to increased tumour risk in women who work irregular shift patterns. Understanding the influence of circadian rhythms on breast cancer could lead to more efficacious therapies, reformed public health policy and improved patient outcome. PMID:27590298

  2. Circadian clock gene CRY2 degradation is involved in chemoresistance of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lekun; Yang, Zihuan; Zhou, Junyi; Tung, Jung-Yu; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Wang, Lei; Deng, Yanhong; Wang, Puning; Wang, Jianping; Lee, Mong-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers for predicting chemotherapy response are important to treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) is a circadian clock protein involved in cell cycle, but the biological consequences of this activity in cancer are poorly understood. We set up biochemical and cell biology analyses to analyze CRY2 expression and chemoresistance. Here we report that CRY2 is overexpressed in chemoresistant CRC samples, and CRY2 overexpression is correlated with poor patient survival. Knockdown CRY2 increased colorectal cancer sensitivity to oxaliplatin in colorectal cancer cell. We also identify FBXW7 as a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase for targeting CRY2 through proteasomal degradation. Mechanistic studies show that CRY2 is regulated by FBXW7, in which FBXW7 binds directly to phosphorylated Thr300 of CRY2. Furthermore, FBXW7 expression leads to degradation of CRY2 through enhancing CRY2 ubiquitination and accelerating CRY2’s turnover rate. High expressed FBXW7 downregulates CRY2 and increases colorectal cancer cells sensitivity to chemotherapy. Low FBXW7 expression is correlated with high CRY2 expression in CRC patient samples. Also, low FBXW7 expression is correlated with poor patient survival. Taken together, our findings indicate that the upregulation of CRY2 caused by downregulation of FBXW7 may be a novel prognostic biomarker and may represent a new therapeutic target in colorectal cancer. PMID:25855785

  3. Clock Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markle, Sandra

    1988-01-01

    A science unit on clocks demonstrates the need to control variables to obtain reliable results from an experiment. Two activities, one for beginners and one for advanced students, are included. Directions for making a sundial are offered. (MT)

  4. Circadian influences on dopamine circuits of the brain: regulation of striatal rhythms of clock gene expression and implications for psychopathology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Verwey, Michael; Dhir, Sabine; Amir, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clock proteins form an autoregulatory feedback loop that is central to the endogenous generation and transmission of daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. Increasingly, circadian rhythms in clock gene expression are being reported in diverse tissues and brain regions that lie outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock in mammals. For many of these extra-SCN rhythms, however, the region-specific implications are still emerging. In order to gain important insights into the potential behavioral, physiological, and psychological relevance of these daily oscillations, researchers have begun to focus on describing the neurochemical, hormonal, metabolic, and epigenetic contributions to the regulation of these rhythms. This review will highlight important sites and sources of circadian control within dopaminergic and striatal circuitries of the brain and will discuss potential implications for psychopathology and disease . For example, rhythms in clock gene expression in the dorsal striatum are sensitive to changes in dopamine release, which has potential implications for Parkinson’s disease and drug addiction. Rhythms in the ventral striatum and limbic forebrain are sensitive to psychological and physical stressors, which may have implications for major depressive disorder. Collectively, a rich circadian tapestry has emerged that forces us to expand traditional views and to reconsider the psychopathological, behavioral, and physiological importance of these region-specific rhythms in brain areas that are not immediately linked with the regulation of circadian rhythms.

  5. Circadian influences on dopamine circuits of the brain: regulation of striatal rhythms of clock gene expression and implications for psychopathology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Verwey, Michael; Dhir, Sabine; Amir, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clock proteins form an autoregulatory feedback loop that is central to the endogenous generation and transmission of daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. Increasingly, circadian rhythms in clock gene expression are being reported in diverse tissues and brain regions that lie outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock in mammals. For many of these extra-SCN rhythms, however, the region-specific implications are still emerging. In order to gain important insights into the potential behavioral, physiological, and psychological relevance of these daily oscillations, researchers have begun to focus on describing the neurochemical, hormonal, metabolic, and epigenetic contributions to the regulation of these rhythms. This review will highlight important sites and sources of circadian control within dopaminergic and striatal circuitries of the brain and will discuss potential implications for psychopathology and disease . For example, rhythms in clock gene expression in the dorsal striatum are sensitive to changes in dopamine release, which has potential implications for Parkinson’s disease and drug addiction. Rhythms in the ventral striatum and limbic forebrain are sensitive to psychological and physical stressors, which may have implications for major depressive disorder. Collectively, a rich circadian tapestry has emerged that forces us to expand traditional views and to reconsider the psychopathological, behavioral, and physiological importance of these region-specific rhythms in brain areas that are not immediately linked with the regulation of circadian rhythms. PMID:27635233

  6. Circadian influences on dopamine circuits of the brain: regulation of striatal rhythms of clock gene expression and implications for psychopathology and disease.

    PubMed

    Verwey, Michael; Dhir, Sabine; Amir, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clock proteins form an autoregulatory feedback loop that is central to the endogenous generation and transmission of daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. Increasingly, circadian rhythms in clock gene expression are being reported in diverse tissues and brain regions that lie outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock in mammals. For many of these extra-SCN rhythms, however, the region-specific implications are still emerging. In order to gain important insights into the potential behavioral, physiological, and psychological relevance of these daily oscillations, researchers have begun to focus on describing the neurochemical, hormonal, metabolic, and epigenetic contributions to the regulation of these rhythms. This review will highlight important sites and sources of circadian control within dopaminergic and striatal circuitries of the brain and will discuss potential implications for psychopathology and disease . For example, rhythms in clock gene expression in the dorsal striatum are sensitive to changes in dopamine release, which has potential implications for Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Rhythms in the ventral striatum and limbic forebrain are sensitive to psychological and physical stressors, which may have implications for major depressive disorder. Collectively, a rich circadian tapestry has emerged that forces us to expand traditional views and to reconsider the psychopathological, behavioral, and physiological importance of these region-specific rhythms in brain areas that are not immediately linked with the regulation of circadian rhythms.

  7. Circadian influences on dopamine circuits of the brain: regulation of striatal rhythms of clock gene expression and implications for psychopathology and disease.

    PubMed

    Verwey, Michael; Dhir, Sabine; Amir, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clock proteins form an autoregulatory feedback loop that is central to the endogenous generation and transmission of daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. Increasingly, circadian rhythms in clock gene expression are being reported in diverse tissues and brain regions that lie outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock in mammals. For many of these extra-SCN rhythms, however, the region-specific implications are still emerging. In order to gain important insights into the potential behavioral, physiological, and psychological relevance of these daily oscillations, researchers have begun to focus on describing the neurochemical, hormonal, metabolic, and epigenetic contributions to the regulation of these rhythms. This review will highlight important sites and sources of circadian control within dopaminergic and striatal circuitries of the brain and will discuss potential implications for psychopathology and disease . For example, rhythms in clock gene expression in the dorsal striatum are sensitive to changes in dopamine release, which has potential implications for Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Rhythms in the ventral striatum and limbic forebrain are sensitive to psychological and physical stressors, which may have implications for major depressive disorder. Collectively, a rich circadian tapestry has emerged that forces us to expand traditional views and to reconsider the psychopathological, behavioral, and physiological importance of these region-specific rhythms in brain areas that are not immediately linked with the regulation of circadian rhythms. PMID:27635233

  8. CBF gene expression in peach leaf and bark tissues is gated by a circadian clock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CBFs regulate a host of genes (CBF-regulon) that respond to low temperature and play a role in cold acclimation. In peach, (Prunus persica) there are at least 4 CBF genes situated in tandem on scaffold 5 of the peach genome. This is in contrast to apple (Malus x domestica) where there are 5 comple...

  9. CBF gene expression in peach leaf and bark tissues is gated by a circadian clock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CBF transcription factors are part of the AP2/ERF domain family of DNA-binding proteins that recognize a C-repeat response cis-acting element that regulates a number of cold-responsive genes (CBF-regulon). In peach (Prunus persica), five CBF genes are situated in tandem on scaffold (Linkage Group) ...

  10. Compartmentalized expression of light-induced clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the diurnal grass rat (Arvicanthis niloticus)

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Campbell, Amy; Tomczak, Ashley; Nunez, Antonio A.; Smale, Laura; Yan, Lily

    2009-01-01

    Photic responses of the circadian system are mediated through light-induced clock gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In nocturnal rodents, depending on the timing of light exposure, Per1 and Per2 gene expression shows distinct compartmentalized patterns that correspond to the behavioral responses. Whether the gene-and region-specific induction patterns are unique to nocturnal animals, or are also present in diurnal species is unknown. We explored this question by examining the light-induced Per1 and Per2 gene expression in functionally distinct SCN sub regions, using diurnal grass rats Arvicanthis niloticus. Light exposure during nighttime induced Per1 and Per2 expression in the SCN, showing unique spatiotemporal profiles depending on the phase of the light exposure. After a phase delaying light pulse (LP) in the early night, strong Per1 induction was observed in the retinorecipient core region of the SCN, while strong Per2 induction was observed throughout the entire SCN. After a phase advancing LP in the late night, Per1 was first induced in the core and then extended into the whole SCN, accompanied by a weak Per2 induction. This compartmentalized expression pattern is very similar to that observed in nocturnal rodents, suggesting that the same molecular and intercellular pathways underlying acute photic responses are present in both diurnal and nocturnal species. However, after a LP in early subjective day, which induces phase advances in diurnal grass rats, but not in nocturnal rodents, we did not observe any Per1 or Per2 induction in the SCN. This result suggests that in spite of remarkable similarities in the SCN of diurnal and nocturnal rodents, unique mechanisms are involved in mediating the phase shifts of diurnal animals during the subjective day. PMID:19393297

  11. CLOCK gene is implicated in weight reduction in obese patients participating in a dietary programme based on the Mediterranean diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: The success of obesity therapy is dependent on the genetic background of the patient. Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK), one of the transcription factors from the positive limb of the molecular clock, is involved in metabolic alterations. Objective: To investigate whethe...

  12. The effect of chronic morphine or methadone exposure and withdrawal on clock gene expression in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus and AA-NAT activity in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Pačesová, D; Novotný, J; Bendová, Z

    2016-07-18

    The circadian rhythms of many behavioral and physiological functions are regulated by the major circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Long-term opiate addiction and drug withdrawal may affect circadian rhythmicity of various hormones or the sleep/activity pattern of many experimental subjects; however, limited research has been done on the long-term effects of sustained opiate administration on the intrinsic rhythmicity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and pineal gland. Here we compared the effects of repeated daily treatment of rats with morphine or methadone and subsequent naloxone-precipitated withdrawal on the expression of the Per1, Per2, and Avp mRNAs in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and on arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase activity in the pineal gland. We revealed that 10-day administration and withdrawal of both these drugs failed to affect clock genes and Avp expression in the SCN. Our results indicate that opioid-induced changes in behavioral and physiological rhythms originate in brain structures downstream of the suprachiasmatic nucleus regulatory output pathway. Furthermore, we observed that acute withdrawal from methadone markedly extended the period of high night AA-NAT activity in the pineal gland. This suggests that withdrawal from methadone, a widely used drug for the treatment of opioid dependence, may have stronger impact on melatonin synthesis than withdrawal from morphine. PMID:27070740

  13. Human skin keratinocytes, melanocytes, and fibroblasts contain distinct circadian clock machineries.

    PubMed

    Sandu, Cristina; Dumas, Marc; Malan, André; Sambakhe, Diariétou; Marteau, Clarisse; Nizard, Carine; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Perrier, Eric; Challet, Etienne; Pévet, Paul; Felder-Schmittbuhl, Marie-Paule

    2012-10-01

    Skin acts as a barrier between the environment and internal organs and performs functions that are critical for the preservation of body homeostasis. In mammals, a complex network of circadian clocks and oscillators adapts physiology and behavior to environmental changes by generating circadian rhythms. These rhythms are induced in the central pacemaker and peripheral tissues by similar transcriptional-translational feedback loops involving clock genes. In this work, we investigated the presence of functional oscillators in the human skin by studying kinetics of clock gene expression in epidermal and dermal cells originating from the same donor and compared their characteristics. Primary cultures of fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and melanocytes were established from an abdominal biopsy and expression of clock genes following dexamethasone synchronization was assessed by qPCR. An original mathematical method was developed to analyze simultaneously up to nine clock genes. By fitting the oscillations to a common period, the phase relationships of the genes could be determined accurately. We thereby show the presence of functional circadian machinery in each cell type. These clockworks display specific periods and phase relationships between clock genes, suggesting regulatory mechanisms that are particular to each cell type. Taken together, our data demonstrate that skin has a complex circadian organization. Oscillators are present not only in fibroblasts but also in epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes and are likely to act in coordination to drive rhythmic functions within the skin.

  14. Influence of torpor on cardiac expression of genes involved in the circadian clock and protein turnover in the Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    PubMed

    Crawford, Fiona I J; Hodgkinson, Cassandra L; Ivanova, Elena; Logunova, Larisa B; Evans, Gary J; Steinlechner, Stephan; Loudon, Andrew S I

    2007-11-14

    The Siberian hamster exhibits the key winter adaptive strategy of daily torpor, during which metabolism and heart rate are slowed for a few hours and body temperature declines by up to 20 degrees C, allowing substantial energetic savings. Previous studies of hibernators in which temperature drops by >30 degrees C for many days to weeks have revealed decreased transcription and translation during hypometabolism and identified several key physiological pathways involved. Here we used a cDNA microarray to define cardiac transcript changes over the course of a daily torpor bout and return to normothermia, and we show that, in common with hibernators, a relatively small proportion of the transcriptome (<5%) exhibited altered expression over a torpor bout. Pathways exhibiting significantly altered gene expression included transcriptional regulation, RNA stability and translational control, globin regulation, and cardiomyocyte function. Remarkably, gene representatives of the entire ubiquitylation pathway were significantly altered over the torpor bout, implying a key role for cardiac protein turnover and translation during a low-temperature torpor bout. The circadian clock maintained rhythmic transcription during torpor. Quantitative PCR profiling of heart, liver, and lung and in situ hybridization studies of clock genes in the hypothalamic circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus revealed that many circadian regulated transcripts exhibited synchronous alteration in expression during arousal. Our data highlight the potential importance of genes involved in protein turnover as part of the adaptive strategy of low-temperature torpor in a seasonal mammal.

  15. Identification and temporal expression of putative circadian clock transcripts in the amphipod crustacean Talitrus saltator

    PubMed Central

    O’Grady, Joseph F.; Hoelters, Laura S.; Swain, Martin T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Talitrus saltator is an amphipod crustacean that inhabits the supralittoral zone on sandy beaches in the Northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean. T. saltator exhibits endogenous locomotor activity rhythms and time-compensated sun and moon orientation, both of which necessitate at least one chronometric mechanism. Whilst their behaviour is well studied, currently there are no descriptions of the underlying molecular components of a biological clock in this animal, and very few in other crustacean species. Methods We harvested brain tissue from animals expressing robust circadian activity rhythms and used homology cloning and Illumina RNAseq approaches to sequence and identify the core circadian clock and clock-related genes in these samples. We assessed the temporal expression of these genes in time-course samples from rhythmic animals using RNAseq. Results We identified a comprehensive suite of circadian clock gene homologues in T. saltator including the ‘core’ clock genes period (Talper), cryptochrome 2 (Talcry2), timeless (Taltim), clock (Talclk), and bmal1 (Talbmal1). In addition we describe the sequence and putative structures of 23 clock-associated genes including two unusual, extended isoforms of pigment dispersing hormone (Talpdh). We examined time-course RNAseq expression data, derived from tissues harvested from behaviourally rhythmic animals, to reveal rhythmic expression of these genes with approximately circadian period in Talper and Talbmal1. Of the clock-related genes, casein kinase IIβ (TalckIIβ), ebony (Talebony), jetlag (Taljetlag), pigment dispensing hormone (Talpdh), protein phosphatase 1 (Talpp1), shaggy (Talshaggy), sirt1 (Talsirt1), sirt7 (Talsirt7) and supernumerary limbs (Talslimb) show temporal changes in expression. Discussion We report the sequences of principle genes that comprise the circadian clock of T. saltator and highlight the conserved structural and functional domains of their deduced cognate proteins. Our

  16. Melatonin adjusts the expression pattern of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and induces antidepressant-like effect in a mouse model of seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Andras David; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Kawai, Misato; Goda, Ryosei; Matsuo, Haruka; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Nagasawa, Mao; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Yasuo, Shinobu

    2015-05-01

    Recently, we have shown that C57BL/6J mice exhibit depression-like behavior under short photoperiod and suggested them as an animal model for investigating seasonal affective disorder (SAD). In this study, we tested if manipulations of the circadian clock with melatonin treatment could effectively modify depression-like and anxiety-like behaviors and brain serotonergic system in C57BL/6J mice. Under short photoperiods (8-h light/16-h dark), daily melatonin treatments 2 h before light offset have significantly altered the 24-h patterns of mRNA expression of circadian clock genes (per1, per2, bmal1 and clock) within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) mostly by increasing amplitude in their expressional rhythms without inducing robust phase shifts in them. Melatonin treatments altered the expression of genes of serotonergic neurotransmission in the dorsal raphe (tph2, sert, vmat2 and 5ht1a) and serotonin contents in the amygdala. Importantly, melatonin treatment reduced the immobility in forced swim test, a depression-like behavior. As a key mechanism of melatonin-induced antidepressant-like effect, the previously proposed phase-advance hypothesis of the circadian clock could not be confirmed under conditions of our experiment. However, our findings of modest adjustments in both the amplitude and phase of the transcriptional oscillators in the SCN as a result of melatonin treatments may be sufficient to associate with the effects seen in the brain serotonergic system and with the improvement in depression-like behavior. Our study confirmed a predictive validity of C57BL/6J mice as a useful model for the molecular analysis of links between the clock and brain serotonergic system, which could greatly accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of SAD, as well as the search for new treatments.

  17. Dietary oleanolic acid mediates circadian clock gene expression in liver independently of diet and animal model but requires apolipoprotein A1.

    PubMed

    Gabás-Rivera, Clara; Martínez-Beamonte, Roberto; Ríos, José L; Navarro, María A; Surra, Joaquín C; Arnal, Carmen; Rodríguez-Yoldi, María J; Osada, Jesús

    2013-12-01

    Oleanolic acid is a triterpene widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom and present in virgin olive oil at a concentration of 57 mg/kg. To test the hypotheses that its long-term administration could modify hepatic gene expression in several animal models and that this could be influenced by the presence of APOA1-containing high-density lipoproteins (HDLs), diets including 0.01% oleanolic acid were provided to Apoe- and Apoa1-deficient mice and F344 rats. Hepatic transcriptome was analyzed in Apoe-deficient mice fed long-term semipurified Western diets differing in the oleanolic acid content. Gene expression changes, confirmed by reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction, were sought for their implication in hepatic steatosis. To establish the effect of oleanolic acid independently of diet and animal model, male rats were fed chow diet with or without oleanolic acid, and to test the influence of HDL, Apoa1-deficient mice consuming the latter diet were used. In Apoe-deficient mice, oleanolic acid intake increased hepatic area occupied by lipid droplets with no change in oxidative stress. Bmal1 and the other core component of the circadian clock, Clock, together with Elovl3, Tubb2a and Cldn1 expressions, were significantly increased, while Amy2a5, Usp2, Per3 and Thrsp were significantly decreased in mice receiving the compound. Bmal1 and Cldn1 expressions were positively associated with lipid droplets. Increased Clock and Bmal1 expressions were also observed in rats, but not in Apoa1-deficient mice. The core liver clock components Clock-Bmal1 are a target of oleanolic acid in two animal models independently of the diets provided, and this compound requires APOA1-HDL for its hepatic action.

  18. Functional interaction of the circadian clock and UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8-controlled UV-B signaling pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Balázs; Kozma-Bognár, László; Kevei, Eva; Hajdu, Anita; Binkert, Melanie; Davis, Seth Jon; Schäfer, Eberhard; Ulm, Roman; Nagy, Ferenc

    2011-07-01

    Circadian clocks regulate many molecular and physiological processes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), allowing the timing of these processes to occur at the most appropriate time of the day in a 24-h period. The accuracy of timing relies on the synchrony of the clock and the environmental day/night cycle. Visible light is the most potent signal for such synchronization, but light-induced responses are also rhythmically attenuated (gated) by the clock. Here, we report a similar mutual interaction of the circadian clock and non-damaging photomorphogenic UV-B light. We show that low-intensity UV-B radiation acts as entraining signal for the clock. UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) and CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) are required, but ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5) and HY5 HOMOLOG (HYH) are dispensable for this process. UV-B responsiveness of clock gene expression suggests that photomorphogenic UV-B entrains the plant clock through transcriptional activation. We also demonstrate that UV-B induction of gene expression under these conditions is gated by the clock in a HY5/HYH-independent manner. The arrhythmic early flowering 3-4 mutant showed non-gated, high-level gene induction by UV-B, yet displayed no increased tolerance to UV-B stress. Thus, the temporal restriction of UV-B responsiveness by the circadian clock can be considered as saving resources during acclimation without losing fitness.

  19. Entrainment of circadian clocks in mammals by arousal and food.

    PubMed

    Mistlberger, Ralph E; Antle, Michael C

    2011-06-30

    Circadian rhythms in mammals are regulated by a system of endogenous circadian oscillators (clock cells) in the brain and in most peripheral organs and tissues. One group of clock cells in the hypothalamic SCN (suprachiasmatic nuclei) functions as a pacemaker for co-ordinating the timing of oscillators elsewhere in the brain and body. This master clock can be reset and entrained by daily LD (light-dark) cycles and thereby also serves to interface internal with external time, ensuring an appropriate alignment of behavioural and physiological rhythms with the solar day. Two features of the mammalian circadian system provide flexibility in circadian programming to exploit temporal regularities of social stimuli or food availability. One feature is the sensitivity of the SCN pacemaker to behavioural arousal stimulated during the usual sleep period, which can reset its phase and modulate its response to LD stimuli. Neural pathways from the brainstem and thalamus mediate these effects by releasing neurochemicals that inhibit retinal inputs to the SCN clock or that alter clock-gene expression in SCN clock cells. A second feature is the sensitivity of circadian oscillators outside of the SCN to stimuli associated with food intake, which enables animals to uncouple rhythms of behaviour and physiology from LD cycles and align these with predictable daily mealtimes. The location of oscillators necessary for food-entrained behavioural rhythms is not yet certain. Persistence of these rhythms in mice with clock-gene mutations that disable the SCN pacemaker suggests diversity in the molecular basis of light- and food-entrainable clocks. PMID:21819388

  20. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  1. Partners in Time: EARLY BIRD Associates with ZEITLUPE and Regulates the Speed of the Arabidopsis Clock1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Mikael; McWatters, Harriet G.; Bakó, László; Takata, Naoki; Gyula, Péter; Hall, Anthony; Somers, David E.; Millar, Andrew J.; Eriksson, Maria E.

    2011-01-01

    The circadian clock of the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is made up of a complex series of interacting feedback loops whereby proteins regulate their own expression across day and night. early bird (ebi) is a circadian mutation that causes the clock to speed up: ebi plants have short circadian periods, early phase of clock gene expression, and are early flowering. We show that EBI associates with ZEITLUPE (ZTL), known to act in the plant clock as a posttranslational mediator of protein degradation. However, EBI is not degraded by its interaction with ZTL. Instead, ZTL counteracts the effect of EBI during the day and increases it at night, modulating the expression of key circadian components. The partnership of EBI with ZTL reveals a novel mechanism involved in controlling the complex transcription-translation feedback loops of the clock. This work highlights the importance of cross talk between the ubiquitination pathway and transcriptional control for regulation of the plant clock. PMID:21300918

  2. The circadian clock in cancer development and therapy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most aspects of mammalian function display circadian rhythms driven by an endogenous clock. The circadian clock is operated by genes and comprises a central clock in the brain that responds to environmental cues and controls subordinate clocks in peripheral tissues via circadian output pathways. The...

  3. Estimation of divergence times in litostomatean ciliates (Ciliophora: Intramacronucleata), using Bayesian relaxed clock and 18S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Vďačný, Peter

    2015-08-01

    The class Litostomatea comprises a diverse assemblage of free-living and endosymbiotic ciliates. To understand diversification dynamic of litostomateans, divergence times of their main groups were estimated with the Bayesian molecular dating, a technique allowing relaxation of molecular clock and incorporation of flexible calibration points. The class Litostomatea very likely emerged during the Cryogenian around 680 Mya. The origin of the subclass Rhynchostomatia is dated to about 415 Mya, while that of the subclass Haptoria to about 654 Mya. The order Pleurostomatida, emerging about 556 Mya, was recognized as the oldest group within the subclass Haptoria. The order Spathidiida appeared in the Paleozoic about 442 Mya. The three remaining haptorian orders evolved in the Paleozoic/Mesozoic periods: Didiniida about 419 Mya, Lacrymariida about 269 Mya, and Haptorida about 194 Mya. The subclass Trichostomatia originated from a spathidiid ancestor in the Mesozoic about 260 Mya. A further goal of this study was to investigate the impact of various settings on posterior divergence time estimates. The root placement and tree topology as well as the priors of the rate-drift model, birth-death process and nucleotide substitution rate, had no significant effect on calculation of posterior divergence time estimates. However, removal of calibration points could significantly change time estimates at some nodes.

  4. Circadian clocks: lessons from fish.

    PubMed

    Idda, M Laura; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Vallone, Daniela; Gothilf, Yoav; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Foulkes, Nicholas S

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular and cellular organization of the circadian timing system in vertebrates has increased enormously over the past decade. In large part, progress has been based on genetic studies in the mouse as well as on fundamental similarities between vertebrate and Drosophila clocks. The zebrafish was initially considered as a potentially attractive genetic model for identifying vertebrate clock genes. However, instead, fish have ultimately proven to be valuable complementary models for studying various aspects of clock biology. For example, many fish can shift from diurnal to nocturnal activity implying specific flexibility in their clock function. We have learned much about the function of light input pathways, and the ontogeny and function of the pineal organ, the fish central pacemaker. Finally, blind cavefish have also provided new insight into the evolution of the circadian clock under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:22877658

  5. A network of (autonomic) clock outputs.

    PubMed

    Kalsbeek, A; Perreau-Lenz, S; Buijs, R M

    2006-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) is composed of thousands of oscillator neurons, each of which is dependent on the cell-autonomous action of a defined set of circadian clock genes. A major question is still how these individual oscillators are organized into a biological clock producing a coherent output that is able to time all the different daily changes in behavior and physiology. We investigated which anatomical connections and neurotransmitters are used by the biological clock to control the daily release pattern of a number of hormones. The picture that emerged shows projections contacting target neurons in the medial hypothalamus surrounding the SCN. The activity of these pre-autonomic and neuro-endocrine target neurons is controlled by differentially timed waves of, among others, vasopressin, GABA, and glutamate release from SCN terminals. Together our data indicate that, with regard to the timing of their main release period within the light-dark (LD) cycle, at least 4 subpopulations of SCN neurons should be discerned. The different subgroups do not necessarily follow the phenotypic differences among SCN neurons. Thus, different subgroups can be found within neuron populations containing the same neurotransmitter. Remarkably, a similar distinction of 4 differentially timed subpopulations of SCN neurons was recently also discovered in experiments determining the temporal patterns of rhythmicity in individual SCN neurons by way of the electrophysiology or clock gene expression. Moreover, the specialization of the SCN may go as far as a single body structure; i.e., the SCN seems to contain neurons that specifically target the liver, pineal, and adrenal. PMID:16687294

  6. RNA around the clock – regulation at the RNA level in biological timing

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Christine; Staiger, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    The circadian timing system in plants synchronizes their physiological functions with the environment. This is achieved by a global control of gene expression programs with a considerable part of the transcriptome undergoing 24-h oscillations in steady-state abundance. These circadian oscillations are driven by a set of core clock proteins that generate their own 24-h rhythm through periodic feedback on their own transcription. Additionally, post-transcriptional events are instrumental for oscillations of core clock genes and genes in clock output. Here we provide an update on molecular events at the RNA level that contribute to the 24-h rhythm of the core clock proteins and shape the circadian transcriptome. We focus on the circadian system of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana but also discuss selected regulatory principles in other organisms. PMID:25999975

  7. Organ specificity in the plant circadian system is explained by different light inputs to the shoot and root clocks.

    PubMed

    Bordage, Simon; Sullivan, Stuart; Laird, Janet; Millar, Andrew J; Nimmo, Hugh G

    2016-10-01

    Circadian clocks allow the temporal compartmentalization of biological processes. In Arabidopsis, circadian rhythms display organ specificity but the underlying molecular causes have not been identified. We investigated the mechanisms responsible for the similarities and differences between the clocks of mature shoots and roots in constant conditions and in light : dark cycles. We developed an imaging system to monitor clock gene expression in shoots and light- or dark-grown roots, modified a recent mathematical model of the Arabidopsis clock and used this to simulate our new data. We showed that the shoot and root circadian clocks have different rhythmic properties (period and amplitude) and respond differently to light quality. The root clock was entrained by direct exposure to low-intensity light, even in antiphase to the illumination of shoots. Differences between the clocks were more pronounced in conditions where light was present than in constant darkness, and persisted in the presence of sucrose. We simulated the data successfully by modifying those parameters of a clock model that are related to light inputs. We conclude that differences and similarities between the shoot and root clocks can largely be explained by organ-specific light inputs. This provides mechanistic insight into the developing field of organ-specific clocks.

  8. Organ specificity in the plant circadian system is explained by different light inputs to the shoot and root clocks.

    PubMed

    Bordage, Simon; Sullivan, Stuart; Laird, Janet; Millar, Andrew J; Nimmo, Hugh G

    2016-10-01

    Circadian clocks allow the temporal compartmentalization of biological processes. In Arabidopsis, circadian rhythms display organ specificity but the underlying molecular causes have not been identified. We investigated the mechanisms responsible for the similarities and differences between the clocks of mature shoots and roots in constant conditions and in light : dark cycles. We developed an imaging system to monitor clock gene expression in shoots and light- or dark-grown roots, modified a recent mathematical model of the Arabidopsis clock and used this to simulate our new data. We showed that the shoot and root circadian clocks have different rhythmic properties (period and amplitude) and respond differently to light quality. The root clock was entrained by direct exposure to low-intensity light, even in antiphase to the illumination of shoots. Differences between the clocks were more pronounced in conditions where light was present than in constant darkness, and persisted in the presence of sucrose. We simulated the data successfully by modifying those parameters of a clock model that are related to light inputs. We conclude that differences and similarities between the shoot and root clocks can largely be explained by organ-specific light inputs. This provides mechanistic insight into the developing field of organ-specific clocks. PMID:27240972

  9. Tissue-Specific Changes in Molecular Clocks During the Transition from Pregnancy to Lactation in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Theresa M.; Crodian, Jennifer; Erickson, Emily; Kuropatwinski, Karen K.; Gleiberman, Anatoli S.; Antoch, Marina P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Circadian clocks regulate homeostasis and mediate responses to stressors. Lactation is one of the most energetically demanding periods of an adult female's life. Peripartum changes occur in almost every organ so the dam can support neonatal growth through milk production while homeostasis is maintained. How circadian clocks are involved in adaptation to lactation is currently unknown. The abundance and temporal pattern of core clock genes' expression were measured in suprachiasmatic nucleus, liver, and mammary from late pregnant and early lactation mice. Tissue-specific changes in molecular clocks occurred between physiological states. Amplitude and robustness of rhythms increased in suprachiasmatic nucleus and liver. Mammary rhythms of core molecular clock genes were suppressed. Attenuated rhythms appeared to be a physiological adaptation of mammary to lactation, because manipulation of timing of suckling resulting in significant differences in plasma prolactin and corticosterone had no effect on amplitude. Analysis of core clock proteins revealed that the stoichiometric relationship between positive (CLOCK) and negative (PER2) components remained 1:1 in liver but was increased to 4:1 in mammary during physiological transition. Induction of differentiation of mammary epithelial cell line HC11 with dexamethasone, insulin, and prolactin resulted in similar stoichiometric changes among positive and negative clock regulators, and prolactin induced phase shifts in HC11 Arntl expression rhythm. Data support that distinct mechanisms drive periparturient changes in mammary clock. Stoichiometric change in clock regulators occurs with gland differentiation. Suppression of mammary clock gene expression rhythms represents a physiological adaptation to suckling cues. Adaptations in mammary clock are likely needed in part to support suckling demands of neonates. PMID:24759789

  10. Temperature compensation and temperature sensation in the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Philip B.; Young, Michael W.; Siggia, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    All known circadian clocks have an endogenous period that is remarkably insensitive to temperature, a property known as temperature compensation, while at the same time being readily entrained by a diurnal temperature oscillation. Although temperature compensation and entrainment are defining features of circadian clocks, their mechanisms remain poorly understood. Most models presume that multiple steps in the circadian cycle are temperature-dependent, thus facilitating temperature entrainment, but then insist that the effect of changes around the cycle sums to zero to enforce temperature compensation. An alternative theory proposes that the circadian oscillator evolved from an adaptive temperature sensor: a gene circuit that responds only to temperature changes. This theory implies that temperature changes should linearly rescale the amplitudes of clock component oscillations but leave phase relationships and shapes unchanged. We show using timeless luciferase reporter measurements and Western blots against TIMELESS protein that this prediction is satisfied by the Drosophila circadian clock. We also review evidence for pathways that couple temperature to the circadian clock, and show previously unidentified evidence for coupling between the Drosophila clock and the heat-shock pathway. PMID:26578788

  11. Ras-mediated deregulation of the circadian clock in cancer.

    PubMed

    Relógio, Angela; Thomas, Philippe; Medina-Pérez, Paula; Reischl, Silke; Bervoets, Sander; Gloc, Ewa; Riemer, Pamela; Mang-Fatehi, Shila; Maier, Bert; Schäfer, Reinhold; Leser, Ulf; Herzel, Hanspeter; Kramer, Achim; Sers, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are essential to the temporal regulation of molecular processes in living systems and as such to life itself. Deregulation of these rhythms leads to failures in biological processes and eventually to the manifestation of pathological phenotypes including cancer. To address the questions as to what are the elicitors of a disrupted clock in cancer, we applied a systems biology approach to correlate experimental, bioinformatics and modelling data from several cell line models for colorectal and skin cancer. We found strong and weak circadian oscillators within the same type of cancer and identified a set of genes, which allows the discrimination between the two oscillator-types. Among those genes are IFNGR2, PITX2, RFWD2, PPARγ, LOXL2, Rab6 and SPARC, all involved in cancer-related pathways. Using a bioinformatics approach, we extended the core-clock network and present its interconnection to the discriminative set of genes. Interestingly, such gene signatures link the clock to oncogenic pathways like the RAS/MAPK pathway. To investigate the potential impact of the RAS/MAPK pathway - a major driver of colorectal carcinogenesis - on the circadian clock, we used a computational model which predicted that perturbation of BMAL1-mediated transcription can generate the circadian phenotypes similar to those observed in metastatic cell lines. Using an inducible RAS expression system, we show that overexpression of RAS disrupts the circadian clock and leads to an increase of the circadian period while RAS inhibition causes a shortening of period length, as predicted by our mathematical simulations. Together, our data demonstrate that perturbations induced by a single oncogene are sufficient to deregulate the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:24875049

  12. Ras-Mediated Deregulation of the Circadian Clock in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Relógio, Angela; Thomas, Philippe; Medina-Pérez, Paula; Reischl, Silke; Bervoets, Sander; Gloc, Ewa; Riemer, Pamela; Mang-Fatehi, Shila; Maier, Bert; Schäfer, Reinhold; Leser, Ulf; Herzel, Hanspeter; Kramer, Achim; Sers, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are essential to the temporal regulation of molecular processes in living systems and as such to life itself. Deregulation of these rhythms leads to failures in biological processes and eventually to the manifestation of pathological phenotypes including cancer. To address the questions as to what are the elicitors of a disrupted clock in cancer, we applied a systems biology approach to correlate experimental, bioinformatics and modelling data from several cell line models for colorectal and skin cancer. We found strong and weak circadian oscillators within the same type of cancer and identified a set of genes, which allows the discrimination between the two oscillator-types. Among those genes are IFNGR2, PITX2, RFWD2, PPARγ, LOXL2, Rab6 and SPARC, all involved in cancer-related pathways. Using a bioinformatics approach, we extended the core-clock network and present its interconnection to the discriminative set of genes. Interestingly, such gene signatures link the clock to oncogenic pathways like the RAS/MAPK pathway. To investigate the potential impact of the RAS/MAPK pathway - a major driver of colorectal carcinogenesis - on the circadian clock, we used a computational model which predicted that perturbation of BMAL1-mediated transcription can generate the circadian phenotypes similar to those observed in metastatic cell lines. Using an inducible RAS expression system, we show that overexpression of RAS disrupts the circadian clock and leads to an increase of the circadian period while RAS inhibition causes a shortening of period length, as predicted by our mathematical simulations. Together, our data demonstrate that perturbations induced by a single oncogene are sufficient to deregulate the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:24875049

  13. Diversity of Human Clock Genotypes and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoying; Ptáček, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2014-01-01

    The molecular clock consists of a number of genes that form transcriptional and post-transcriptional feedback loops, which function together to generate circadian oscillations that give rise to circadian rhythms of our behavioral and physiological processes. Genetic variations in these clock genes have been shown to be associated with phenotypic effects in a repertoire of biological processes, such as diurnal preference, sleep, metabolism, mood regulation, addiction, and fertility. Consistently, rodent models carrying mutations in clock genes also demonstrate similar phenotypes. Taken together, these studies suggest that human clock-gene variants contribute to the phenotypic differences observed in various behavioral and physiological processes, although to validate this requires further characterization of the molecular consequences of these polymorphisms. Investigating the diversity of human genotypes and the phenotypic effects of these genetic variations shall advance our understanding of the function of the circadian clock and how we can employ the clock to improve our overall health. PMID:23899594

  14. Gene Identification Algorithms Using Exploratory Statistical Analysis of Periodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Shashi Bajaj; Sen, Pradip Kumar

    2010-10-01

    Studying periodic pattern is expected as a standard line of attack for recognizing DNA sequence in identification of gene and similar problems. But peculiarly very little significant work is done in this direction. This paper studies statistical properties of DNA sequences of complete genome using a new technique. A DNA sequence is converted to a numeric sequence using various types of mappings and standard Fourier technique is applied to study the periodicity. Distinct statistical behaviour of periodicity parameters is found in coding and non-coding sequences, which can be used to distinguish between these parts. Here DNA sequences of Drosophila melanogaster were analyzed with significant accuracy.

  15. Periodic, Quasi-periodic and Chaotic Dynamics in Simple Gene Elements with Time Delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoko; Lu, Mingyang; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Onuchic, José N.

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory gene circuit motifs play crucial roles in performing and maintaining vital cellular functions. Frequently, theoretical studies of gene circuits focus on steady-state behaviors and do not include time delays. In this study, the inclusion of time delays is shown to entirely change the time-dependent dynamics for even the simplest possible circuits with one and two gene elements with self and cross regulations. These elements can give rise to rich behaviors including periodic, quasi-periodic, weak chaotic, strong chaotic and intermittent dynamics. We introduce a special power-spectrum-based method to characterize and discriminate these dynamical modes quantitatively. Our simulation results suggest that, while a single negative feedback loop of either one- or two-gene element can only have periodic dynamics, the elements with two positive/negative feedback loops are the minimalist elements to have chaotic dynamics. These elements typically have one negative feedback loop that generates oscillations, and another unit that allows frequent switches among multiple steady states or between oscillatory and non-oscillatory dynamics. Possible dynamical features of several simple one- and two-gene elements are presented in details. Discussion is presented for possible roles of the chaotic behavior in the robustness of cellular functions and diseases, for example, in the context of cancer.

  16. Periodic, Quasi-periodic and Chaotic Dynamics in Simple Gene Elements with Time Delays

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yoko; Lu, Mingyang; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Onuchic, José N.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory gene circuit motifs play crucial roles in performing and maintaining vital cellular functions. Frequently, theoretical studies of gene circuits focus on steady-state behaviors and do not include time delays. In this study, the inclusion of time delays is shown to entirely change the time-dependent dynamics for even the simplest possible circuits with one and two gene elements with self and cross regulations. These elements can give rise to rich behaviors including periodic, quasi-periodic, weak chaotic, strong chaotic and intermittent dynamics. We introduce a special power-spectrum-based method to characterize and discriminate these dynamical modes quantitatively. Our simulation results suggest that, while a single negative feedback loop of either one- or two-gene element can only have periodic dynamics, the elements with two positive/negative feedback loops are the minimalist elements to have chaotic dynamics. These elements typically have one negative feedback loop that generates oscillations, and another unit that allows frequent switches among multiple steady states or between oscillatory and non-oscillatory dynamics. Possible dynamical features of several simple one- and two-gene elements are presented in details. Discussion is presented for possible roles of the chaotic behavior in the robustness of cellular functions and diseases, for example, in the context of cancer. PMID:26876008

  17. Periodic, Quasi-periodic and Chaotic Dynamics in Simple Gene Elements with Time Delays.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoko; Lu, Mingyang; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Onuchic, José N

    2016-02-15

    Regulatory gene circuit motifs play crucial roles in performing and maintaining vital cellular functions. Frequently, theoretical studies of gene circuits focus on steady-state behaviors and do not include time delays. In this study, the inclusion of time delays is shown to entirely change the time-dependent dynamics for even the simplest possible circuits with one and two gene elements with self and cross regulations. These elements can give rise to rich behaviors including periodic, quasi-periodic, weak chaotic, strong chaotic and intermittent dynamics. We introduce a special power-spectrum-based method to characterize and discriminate these dynamical modes quantitatively. Our simulation results suggest that, while a single negative feedback loop of either one- or two-gene element can only have periodic dynamics, the elements with two positive/negative feedback loops are the minimalist elements to have chaotic dynamics. These elements typically have one negative feedback loop that generates oscillations, and another unit that allows frequent switches among multiple steady states or between oscillatory and non-oscillatory dynamics. Possible dynamical features of several simple one- and two-gene elements are presented in details. Discussion is presented for possible roles of the chaotic behavior in the robustness of cellular functions and diseases, for example, in the context of cancer.

  18. The chlorate-iodine clock reaction.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, André P; Faria, Roberto B

    2005-12-28

    A clock reaction produced by mixing chlorate and iodine solutions in perchloric acid media is reported. This is the first example of a clock reaction using chlorate as a reagent. Increasing chlorate and acid concentration reduces the induction period. Changing the initial iodine concentration does not affect the length of the induction period. The discovery of this clock reaction opens the possibility that a new family of oscillation reactions can be built using chlorate as reagent. PMID:16366551

  19. Characterization of orderly spatiotemporal patterns of clock gene activation in mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Nicholas C.; Tong, Tina Y.; Foley, Duncan; LeSauter, Joseph; Welsh, David K.

    2012-01-01

    Because we can observe oscillation within individual cells and in the tissue as a whole, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) presents a unique system in the mammalian brain for the analysis of individual cells and the networks of which they are a part. While dispersed cells of the SCN sustain circadian oscillations in isolation, they are unstable oscillators that require network interactions for robust cycling. Using cluster analysis to assess bioluminescence in acute brain slices from PERIOD2∷Luciferase (PER2∷LUC) knockin mice, and immunochemistry of SCN from animals harvested at various circadian times, we assessed the spatiotemporal activation patterns of PER2 to explore the emergence of a coherent oscillation at the tissue level. The results indicate that circadian oscillation is characterized by a stable daily cycle of PER2 expression involving orderly serial activation of specific SCN subregions, followed by a silent interval, with substantial symmetry between the left and right side of the SCN. The biological significance of the clusters identified in living slices was confirmed by co-expression of LUC and PER2 in fixed, immunochemically stained brain sections, with the spatiotemporal pattern of LUC expression resembling that revealed in the cluster analysis of bioluminescent slices. We conclude that the precise timing of PER2 expression within individual neurons is dependent on their location within the nucleus, and that small groups of neurons within the SCN give rise to distinctive and identifiable subregions. We propose that serial activation of these subregions is the basis of robustness and resilience of the daily rhythm of the SCN. PMID:21488990

  20. Characterization of orderly spatiotemporal patterns of clock gene activation in mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Foley, Nicholas C; Tong, Tina Y; Foley, Duncan; Lesauter, Joseph; Welsh, David K; Silver, Rae

    2011-05-01

    Because we can observe oscillation within individual cells and in the tissue as a whole, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) presents a unique system in the mammalian brain for the analysis of individual cells and the networks of which they are a part. While dispersed cells of the SCN sustain circadian oscillations in isolation, they are unstable oscillators that require network interactions for robust cycling. Using cluster analysis to assess bioluminescence in acute brain slices from PERIOD2::Luciferase (PER2::LUC) knockin mice, and immunochemistry of SCN from animals harvested at various circadian times, we assessed the spatiotemporal activation patterns of PER2 to explore the emergence of a coherent oscillation at the tissue level. The results indicate that circadian oscillation is characterized by a stable daily cycle of PER2 expression involving orderly serial activation of specific SCN subregions, followed by a silent interval, with substantial symmetry between the left and right side of the SCN. The biological significance of the clusters identified in living slices was confirmed by co-expression of LUC and PER2 in fixed, immunochemically stained brain sections, with the spatiotemporal pattern of LUC expression resembling that revealed in the cluster analysis of bioluminescent slices. We conclude that the precise timing of PER2 expression within individual neurons is dependent on their location within the nucleus, and that small groups of neurons within the SCN give rise to distinctive and identifiable subregions. We propose that serial activation of these subregions is the basis of robustness and resilience of the daily rhythm of the SCN.

  1. Cadmium-Induced Disruption in 24-h Expression of Clock and Redox Enzyme Genes in Rat Medial Basal Hypothalamus: Prevention by Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Cano-Barquilla, Pilar; Scacchi, Pablo A.; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Esquifino, Ana I.

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study we reported that a low daily p.o. dose of cadmium (Cd) disrupted the circadian expression of clock and redox enzyme genes in rat medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). To assess whether melatonin could counteract Cd activity, male Wistar rats (45 days of age) received CdCl2 (5 ppm) and melatonin (3 μg/mL) or vehicle (0.015% ethanol) in drinking water. Groups of animals receiving melatonin or vehicle alone were also included. After 1 month, MBH mRNA levels were measured by real-time PCR analysis at six time intervals in a 24-h cycle. In control MBH Bmal1 expression peaked at early scotophase, Per1 expression at late afternoon, and Per2 and Cry2 expression at mid-scotophase, whereas neither Clock nor Cry1 expression showed significant 24-h variations. This pattern was significantly disrupted (Clock, Bmal1) or changed in phase (Per1, Per2, Cry2) by CdCl2 while melatonin counteracted the changes brought about by Cd on Per1 expression only. In animals receiving melatonin alone the 24-h pattern of MBH Per2 and Cry2 expression was disrupted. CdCl2 disrupted the 24-h rhythmicity of Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-1, NOS-2, heme oxygenase (HO)-1, and HO-2 gene expression, most of the effects being counteracted by melatonin. In particular, the co-administration of melatonin and CdCl2 increased Cu/Zn-SOD gene expression and decreased that of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GSR), and HO-2. In animals receiving melatonin alone, significant increases in mean Cu/Zn and Mn-SOD gene expression, and decreases in that of GPx, GSR, NOS-1, NOS-2, HO-1, and HO-2, were found. The results indicate that the interfering effect of melatonin on the activity of a low dose of CdCl2 on MBH clock and redox enzyme genes is mainly exerted at the level of redox enzyme gene expression. PMID:21442002

  2. Detecting Periodic Genes from Irregularly Sampled Gene Expressions: A Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Time series microarray measurements of gene expressions have been exploited to discover genes involved in cell cycles. Due to experimental constraints, most microarray observations are obtained through irregular sampling. In this paper three popular spectral analysis schemes, namely, Lomb-Scargle, Capon and missing-data amplitude and phase estimation (MAPES), are compared in terms of their ability and efficiency to recover periodically expressed genes. Based on in silico experiments for microarray measurements of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lomb-Scargle is found to be the most efficacious scheme. 149 genes are then identified to be periodically expressed in the Drosophila melanogaster data set. PMID:18584052

  3. Unraveling the circadian clock in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Ma, Ligeng

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timing system responsible for coordinating an organism’s biological processes with its environment. Interlocked transcriptional feedback loops constitute the fundamental architecture of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, three feedback loops, the core loop, morning loop and evening loop, comprise a network that is the basis of the circadian clock. The components of these three loops are regulated in distinct ways, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. The discovery of the DNA-binding and repressive activities of TOC1 has overturned our initial concept of its function in the circadian clock. The alternative splicing of circadian clock-related genes plays an essential role in normal functioning of the clock and enables organisms to sense environmental changes. In this review, we describe the regulatory mechanisms of the circadian clock that have been identified in Arabidopsis. PMID:23221775

  4. Circadian clock genes Per1 and Per2 regulate the response of metabolism-associated transcripts to sleep disruption.

    PubMed

    Husse, Jana; Hintze, Sophie Charlotte; Eichele, Gregor; Lehnert, Hendrik; Oster, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Human and animal studies demonstrate that short sleep or poor sleep quality, e.g. in night shift workers, promote the development of obesity and diabetes. Effects of sleep disruption on glucose homeostasis and liver physiology are well documented. However, changes in adipokine levels after sleep disruption suggest that adipocytes might be another important peripheral target of sleep. Circadian clocks regulate metabolic homeostasis and clock disruption can result in obesity and the metabolic syndrome. The finding that sleep and clock disruption have very similar metabolic effects prompted us to ask whether the circadian clock machinery may mediate the metabolic consequences of sleep disruption. To test this we analyzed energy homeostasis and adipocyte transcriptome regulation in a mouse model of shift work, in which we prevented mice from sleeping during the first six hours of their normal inactive phase for five consecutive days (timed sleep restriction--TSR). We compared the effects of TSR between wild-type and Per1/2 double mutant mice with the prediction that the absence of a circadian clock in Per1/2 mutants would result in a blunted metabolic response to TSR. In wild-types, TSR induces significant transcriptional reprogramming of white adipose tissue, suggestive of increased lipogenesis, together with increased secretion of the adipokine leptin and increased food intake, hallmarks of obesity and associated leptin resistance. Some of these changes persist for at least one week after the end of TSR, indicating that even short episodes of sleep disruption can induce prolonged physiological impairments. In contrast, Per1/2 deficient mice show blunted effects of TSR on food intake, leptin levels and adipose transcription. We conclude that the absence of a functional clock in Per1/2 double mutants protects these mice from TSR-induced metabolic reprogramming, suggesting a role of the circadian timing system in regulating the physiological effects of sleep disruption.

  5. HvLUX1 is a candidate gene underlying the early maturity 10 locus in barley: phylogeny, diversity, and interactions with the circadian clock and photoperiodic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Campoli, Chiara; Pankin, Artem; Drosse, Benedikt; Casao, Cristina M; Davis, Seth J; von Korff, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Photoperiodic flowering is a major factor determining crop performance and is controlled by interactions between environmental signals and the circadian clock. We proposed Hvlux1, an ortholog of the Arabidopsis circadian gene LUX ARRHYTHMO, as a candidate underlying the early maturity 10 (eam10) locus in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). The link between eam10 and Hvlux1 was discovered using high-throughput sequencing of enriched libraries and segregation analysis. We conducted functional, phylogenetic, and diversity studies of eam10 and HvLUX1 to understand the genetic control of photoperiod response in barley and to characterize the evolution of LUX-like genes within barley and across monocots and eudicots. We demonstrate that eam10 causes circadian defects and interacts with the photoperiod response gene Ppd-H1 to accelerate flowering under long and short days. The results of phylogenetic and diversity analyses indicate that HvLUX1 was under purifying selection, duplicated at the base of the grass clade, and diverged independently of LUX-like genes in other plant lineages. Taken together, these findings contribute to improved understanding of the barley circadian clock, its interaction with the photoperiod pathway, and evolution of circadian systems in barley and across monocots and eudicots. PMID:23731278

  6. Pacemaker-neuron-dependent disturbance of the molecular clockwork by a Drosophila CLOCK mutant homologous to the mouse Clock mutation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Euna; Cho, Eunjoo; Kang, Doo Hyun; Jeong, Eun Hee; Chen, Zheng; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Kim, Eun Young

    2016-08-16

    Circadian clocks are composed of transcriptional/translational feedback loops (TTFLs) at the cellular level. In Drosophila TTFLs, the transcription factor dCLOCK (dCLK)/CYCLE (CYC) activates clock target gene expression, which is repressed by the physical interaction with PERIOD (PER). Here, we show that amino acids (AA) 657-707 of dCLK, a region that is homologous to the mouse Clock exon 19-encoded region, is crucial for PER binding and E-box-dependent transactivation in S2 cells. Consistently, in transgenic flies expressing dCLK with an AA657-707 deletion in the Clock (Clk(out)) genetic background (p{dClk-Δ};Clk(out)), oscillation of core clock genes' mRNAs displayed diminished amplitude compared with control flies, and the highly abundant dCLKΔ657-707 showed significantly decreased binding to PER. Behaviorally, the p{dClk-Δ};Clk(out) flies exhibited arrhythmic locomotor behavior in the photic entrainment condition but showed anticipatory activities of temperature transition and improved free-running rhythms in the temperature entrainment condition. Surprisingly, p{dClk-Δ};Clk(out) flies showed pacemaker-neuron-dependent alterations in molecular rhythms; the abundance of dCLK target clock proteins was reduced in ventral lateral neurons (LNvs) but not in dorsal neurons (DNs) in both entrainment conditions. In p{dClk-Δ};Clk(out) flies, however, strong but delayed molecular oscillations in temperature cycle-sensitive pacemaker neurons, such as DN1s and DN2s, were correlated with delayed anticipatory activities of temperature transition. Taken together, our study reveals that the LNv molecular clockwork is more sensitive than the clockwork of DNs to dysregulation of dCLK by AA657-707 deletion. Therefore, we propose that the dCLK/CYC-controlled TTFL operates differently in subsets of pacemaker neurons, which may contribute to their specific functions. PMID:27489346

  7. Housing under abnormal light-dark cycles attenuates day/night expression rhythms of the clock genes Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 in the amygdala and hippocampus of mice.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Shunpei; Tahara, Yu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Ishigooka, Jun; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-10-01

    Although the results of previous studies have suggested that disruptions in circadian rhythms are involved in the pathogenesis of depression, no studies have examined the interaction of clock gene expression deficit and depression state. In this study, we examined clock gene expression levels and depressive-like behavior in mice housed under 3.5h light, 3.5h dark (T = 7) conditions to investigate the association between clock gene expression and depressive state. C57BL/6J mice were housed under a T = 24 cycle (12h light, 12h dark) or a T = 7 cycle and clock gene expression levels in the hippocampus and the amygdala were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Depressive state was evaluated by the forced swim test (FST). Although circadian rhythms of Per1 and Per2 clock gene expression in the hippocampus and amygdala were still detected under T = 7 conditions, rhythmicity and expression levels of both significantly decreased. Mice housed with a T = 7 cycle showed increased immobile time in the FST than those with a T = 24 cycle. The present results suggest that the presence of a depressive state around the early active phase of activity may be related to impairment of rhythmicity and expression levels of Per1 and Per2 genes under abnormal light-dark conditions.

  8. Influence of night-shift and napping at work on urinary melatonin, 17-β-estradiol and clock gene expression in pre-menopausal nurses.

    PubMed

    Bracci, M; Copertaro, A; Manzella, N; Staffolani, S; Strafella, E; Nocchi, L; Barbaresi, M; Copertaro, B; Rapisarda, V; Valentino, M; Santarelli, L

    2013-01-01

    Night-workers experience disruption of the sleep-wake cycle and light at night which may increase breast cancer risk by suppressing the nocturnal melatonin surge, resulting in higher levels of circulating estrogens. Night-work may also deregulate peripheral clock genes which have been found to be altered in breast cancer. This study investigated urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), serum 17-beta-estradiol levels in premenopausal shift nurses at the end of the night-shift compared to a control group of daytime nurses. Peripheral clock gene expression in lymphocytes were also investigated. All participants were sampled in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. The effect of nurses’ ability to take a short nap during the night-shift was also explored. The shift-work group had significantly lower aMT6s levels than daytime nurses independently of a nap. Night-shift napping significantly influences 17-beta-estradiol levels resulting in higher outcomes in nurses who do not take a nap compared to napping group and daytime workers. Peripheral clock genes expression investigated was not significantly different among the groups. Our findings suggest that shift nurses experience changes in aMT6s levels after a night-shift. Napping habits influence 17-beta-estradiol levels at the end of a night-shift. These findings might be related to the increased cancer risk reported in night-shift workers and suggest that a short nap during night-shifts may exert a positive effect. PMID:23489707

  9. Influence of night-shift and napping at work on urinary melatonin, 17-β-estradiol and clock gene expression in pre-menopausal nurses.

    PubMed

    Bracci, M; Copertaro, A; Manzella, N; Staffolani, S; Strafella, E; Nocchi, L; Barbaresi, M; Copertaro, B; Rapisarda, V; Valentino, M; Santarelli, L

    2013-01-01

    Night-workers experience disruption of the sleep-wake cycle and light at night which may increase breast cancer risk by suppressing the nocturnal melatonin surge, resulting in higher levels of circulating estrogens. Night-work may also deregulate peripheral clock genes which have been found to be altered in breast cancer. This study investigated urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), serum 17-beta-estradiol levels in premenopausal shift nurses at the end of the night-shift compared to a control group of daytime nurses. Peripheral clock gene expression in lymphocytes were also investigated. All participants were sampled in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. The effect of nurses’ ability to take a short nap during the night-shift was also explored. The shift-work group had significantly lower aMT6s levels than daytime nurses independently of a nap. Night-shift napping significantly influences 17-beta-estradiol levels resulting in higher outcomes in nurses who do not take a nap compared to napping group and daytime workers. Peripheral clock genes expression investigated was not significantly different among the groups. Our findings suggest that shift nurses experience changes in aMT6s levels after a night-shift. Napping habits influence 17-beta-estradiol levels at the end of a night-shift. These findings might be related to the increased cancer risk reported in night-shift workers and suggest that a short nap during night-shifts may exert a positive effect.

  10. Strong resetting of the mammalian clock by constant light followed by constant darkness

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongmin; Seo, Dong-oh; Bell, Elijah; von Gall, Charlotte; Lee, Choogon

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian molecular circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) regulates locomotor activity rhythms as well as clocks in peripheral tissues (Reppert and Weaver, 2002; Ko and Takahashi, 2006). Constant light (LL) can induce behavioral and physiological arrhythmicity, by desynchronizing clock cells in the SCN (Ohta et al., 2005). We examined how the disordered clock cells resynchronize by probing the molecular clock and measuring behavior in mice transferred from LL to constant darkness (DD). The circadian locomotor activity rhythms disrupted in LL become robustly rhythmic again from the beginning of DD, and the starting phase of the rhythm in DD is specific, not random, suggesting that the desynchronized clock cells are quickly reset in an unconventional manner by the L:D transition. By measuring mPERIOD protein rhythms, we showed that the SCN and peripheral tissue clocks quickly become rhythmic again in phase with the behavioral rhythms. We propose that this resetting mechanism may be different from conventional phase shifting, which involves light-induction of Period genes (Albrecht et al., 1997; Shearman et al., 1997; Shigeyoshi et al., 1997). Using our functional insights, we could shift the circadian phase of locomotor activity rhythms by 12 hours using a 15-hour LL treatment: essentially producing phase reversal by a single light pulse, a feat that has not been reported previously in wild-type mice and that has potential clinical utility. PMID:19005049

  11. Role of cardiomyocyte circadian clock in myocardial metabolic adaptation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marked circadian rhythmicities in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology exist. The cardiomyocyte circadian clock has recently been linked to circadian rhythms in myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function. For instance, the cardiomyocyte circadian clock is essential f...

  12. Cryptochromes define a novel circadian clock mechanism in monarch butterflies that may underlie sun compass navigation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haisun; Sauman, Ivo; Yuan, Quan; Casselman, Amy; Emery-Le, Myai; Emery, Patrick; Reppert, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    The circadian clock plays a vital role in monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) migration by providing the timing component of time-compensated sun compass orientation, a process that is important for successful navigation. We therefore evaluated the monarch clockwork by focusing on the functions of a Drosophila-like cryptochrome (cry), designated cry1, and a vertebrate-like cry, designated cry2, that are both expressed in the butterfly and by placing these genes in the context of other relevant clock genes in vivo. We found that similar temporal patterns of clock gene expression and protein levels occur in the heads, as occur in DpN1 cells, of a monarch cell line that contains a light-driven clock. CRY1 mediates TIMELESS degradation by light in DpN1 cells, and a light-induced TIMELESS decrease occurs in putative clock cells in the pars lateralis (PL) in the brain. Moreover, monarch cry1 transgenes partially rescue both biochemical and behavioral light-input defects in cry(b) mutant Drosophila. CRY2 is the major transcriptional repressor of CLOCK:CYCLE-mediated transcription in DpN1 cells, and endogenous CRY2 potently inhibits transcription without involvement of PERIOD. CRY2 is co-localized with clock proteins in the PL, and there it translocates to the nucleus at the appropriate time for transcriptional repression. We also discovered CRY2-positive neural projections that oscillate in the central complex. The results define a novel, CRY-centric clock mechanism in the monarch in which CRY1 likely functions as a blue-light photoreceptor for entrainment, whereas CRY2 functions within the clockwork as the transcriptional repressor of a negative transcriptional feedback loop. Our data further suggest that CRY2 may have a dual role in the monarch butterfly's brain-as a core clock element and as an output that regulates circadian activity in the central complex, the likely site of the sun compass.

  13. Hormones and clocks: do they disrupt the locks? Fluctuating estrogen levels during menopausal transition may influence clock genes and trigger chronic telogen effluvium.

    PubMed

    Mirmirani, Paradi

    2016-01-01

    Chronic telogen effluvium describes the clinical condition noted mostly in middle-aged women of increased, diffuse scalp hair shedding that is prolonged and often presents with a fluctuating course that may continue for years but does not lead to visible hair thinning. Despite its description almost 20 years ago, the underlying pathologic cause of CTE is yet to be identified. However the culmination of research in the field of hair biology and the burgeoning field of chronobiology may lead to exciting breakthroughs in our understanding of CTE. In this paper the current literature on CTE is reviewed and a hypothesis is put forth that CTE may be triggered by hormonal fluctuations and alterations in circadian control genes. PMID:27617515

  14. Somitogenesis clock-wave initiation requires differential decay and multiple binding sites for clock protein.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Mark; Gedeon, Tomás

    2010-04-01

    Somitogenesis is a process common to all vertebrate embryos in which repeated blocks of cells arise from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) to lay a foundational pattern for trunk and tail development. Somites form in the wake of passing waves of periodic gene expression that originate in the tailbud and sweep posteriorly across the PSM. Previous work has suggested that the waves result from a spatiotemporally graded control protein that affects the oscillation rate of clock-gene expression. With a minimally constructed mathematical model, we study the contribution of two control mechanisms to the initial formation of this gene-expression wave. We test four biologically motivated model scenarios with either one or two clock protein transcription binding sites, and with or without differential decay rates for clock protein monomers and dimers. We examine the sensitivity of wave formation with respect to multiple model parameters and robustness to heterogeneity in cell population. We find that only a model with both multiple binding sites and differential decay rates is able to reproduce experimentally observed waveforms. Our results show that the experimentally observed characteristics of somitogenesis wave initiation constrain the underlying genetic control mechanisms.

  15. Molecular clocks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S Y; Ho, Simon Y W

    2016-05-23

    In the 1960s, several groups of scientists, including Emile Zuckerkandl and Linus Pauling, had noted that proteins experience amino acid replacements at a surprisingly consistent rate across very different species. This presumed single, uniform rate of genetic evolution was subsequently described using the term 'molecular clock'. Biologists quickly realised that such a universal pacemaker could be used as a yardstick for measuring the timescale of evolutionary divergences: estimating the rate of amino acid exchanges per unit of time and applying it to protein differences across a range of organisms would allow deduction of the divergence times of their respective lineages (Figure 1). PMID:27218841

  16. Effects of aging and genotype on circadian rhythms, sleep, and clock gene expression in APPxPS1 knock-in mice, a model for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Marilyn J; Smith, J Tyler; Franklin, Kathleen M; Beckett, Tina L; Murphy, M Paul; St Clair, Daret K; Donohue, Kevin D; Striz, Martin; O'Hara, Bruce F

    2012-08-01

    Profound disruptions of circadian rhythms and sleep/wake cycles constitute a major cause of institutionalization of AD patients. This study investigated whether a rodent model of AD, APP(NLH/NLH)/PS-1(P264L/264L) (APPxPS1) mice, exhibits circadian alterations. The APPxPS1 mice were generated using CD-1/129 mice and Cre-lox knock-in technology to "humanize" the mouse amyloid (A)β sequence and create a presenilin-1 mutation identified in familial early-onset AD patients. APPxPS1 and WT mice of several ages (~4, 11, and 15 months) were monitored for circadian rhythms in wheel running, cage activity, and sleep:wake behavior. After rhythm assessment, the mice were euthanized at zeitgeber time (ZT) 2 or 10 (i.e., 2 or 10 h after lights-on) and brains were dissected. Amyloidβ levels were measured in cortical samples and brain sections of the hypothalamus and hippocampus were prepared and used for in situ hybridization of circadian or neuropeptide genes. The most significant effects of the APPxPS1 transgenes were phase delays of ~2 h in the onset of daytime wakefulness bouts (P<0.005) and peak wakefulness (P<0.02), potentially relevant to phase delays previously reported in AD patients. However, genotype did not affect the major activity peaks or phases of wheel running, wake, or general movement, which were bimodal with dominant dawn and dusk activity. Expression of Period 2 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus was affected by ZT (P<0.0001) with a marginal interaction effect of age, genotype, and ZT (P<0.08). A separate analysis of the old animals indicated a robust interaction between ZT and genotype, as well as main effects of these parameters. Aging also altered sleep (e.g., bout length and amount of daytime sleep) and the amount of wheel running and cage activity. In conclusion, the APPxPS1 knock-in mice exhibit some alterations in their sleep:wake rhythm and clock gene expression, but do not show robust, genotype-related changes in activity rhythms. The prominent daytime

  17. HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES1 Is Required for Circadian Periodicity through the Promotion of Nucleo-Cytoplasmic mRNA Export in Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Dana R.; Gould, Peter; Foreman, Julia; Griffiths, Jayne; Bird, Susannah; Page, Rhiannon; Stewart, Kelly; Steel, Gavin; Young, Jack; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Millar, Andrew J.; Halliday, Karen J.; Hall, Anthony J.; Penfield, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Cold acclimation has been shown to be attenuated by the degradation of the INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION1 protein by the E3 ubiquitin ligase HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES1 (HOS1). However, recent work has suggested that HOS1 may have a wider range of roles in plants than previously appreciated. Here, we show that hos1 mutants are affected in circadian clock function, exhibiting a long-period phenotype in a wide range of temperature and light environments. We demonstrate that hos1 mutants accumulate polyadenylated mRNA in the nucleus and that the circadian defect in hos1 is shared by multiple mutants with aberrant mRNA export, but not in a mutant attenuated in nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of microRNAs. As revealed by RNA sequencing, hos1 exhibits gross changes to the transcriptome with genes in multiple functional categories being affected. In addition, we show that hos1 and other previously described mutants with altered mRNA export affect cold signaling in a similar manner. Our data support a model in which altered mRNA export is important for the manifestation of hos1 circadian clock defects and suggest that HOS1 may indirectly affect cold signaling through disruption of the circadian clock. PMID:24254125

  18. Epistatic and synergistic interactions between circadian clock mutations in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, L W; Feldman, J F

    2001-01-01

    We identified a series of epistatic and synergistic interactions among the circadian clock mutations of Neurospora crassa that indicate possible physical interactions among the various clock components encoded by these genes. The period-6 (prd-6) mutation, a short-period temperature-sensitive clock mutation, is epistatic to both the prd-2 and prd-3 mutations. The prd-2 and prd-3 long-period mutations show a synergistic interaction in that the period length of the double mutant strain is considerably longer than predicted. In addition, the prd-2 prd-3 double mutant strain also exhibits overcompensation to changes in ambient temperature, suggesting a role in the temperature compensation machinery of the clock. The prd-2, prd-3, and prd-6 mutations also show significant interactions with the frq(7) long-period mutation. These results suggest that the gene products of prd-2, prd-3, and prd-6 play an important role in both the timing and temperature compensation mechanisms of the circadian clock and may interact with the FRQ protein. PMID:11606531

  19. Crosstalking between the "gut-brain" hormone ghrelin and the circadian system in the goldfish. Effects on clock gene expression and food anticipatory activity.

    PubMed

    Nisembaum, Laura G; de Pedro, Nuria; Delgado, María J; Isorna, Esther

    2014-09-01

    Ghrelin is a potent orexigenic signal mainly synthesized in the stomach and foregut of vertebrates. Recent studies in rodents point out that ghrelin could also act as an input for the circadian system and/or as an output of peripheral food-entrainable oscillators, being involved in the food anticipatory activity (FAA). In this study we pursue the possible interaction of ghrelin with the circadian system in a teleost, the goldfish (Carassius auratus). First, we analyzed if ghrelin is able to modulate the core clock functioning by regulating clock gene expression in fish under a light/dark cycle 12L:12D and fed at 10 am. As expected the acute intraperitoneal (IP) injection of goldfish ghrelin (gGRL[1-19], 44 pmol/g bw) induced the expression of hypothalamic orexin. Moreover, ghrelin also induced (∼ 2-fold) some Per clock genes in hypothalamus and liver. This effect was partially counteracted in liver by the ghrelin antagonist ([D-Lys(3)]-GHRP-6, 100 pmol/g bw). Second, we investigated if ghrelin is involved in daily FAA rhythms. With this aim locomotor activity was studied in response to IP injections (5-10 days) of gGRL[1-19] and [D-Lys(3)]-GHRP-6 at the doses above indicated. Ghrelin and saline injected fish showed similar 24h activity patterns. However, ghrelin antagonist treatment abolished the FAA in schedule fed fish under 24h light, suggesting the involvement of the endogenous ghrelin system in this pre-feeding activity. Altogether these results suggest that ghrelin could be acting as an input for the entrainment of the food-entrainable oscillators in the circadian organization of goldfish.

  20. miRNA-132 orchestrates chromatin remodeling and translational control of the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Saavedra, Matías; Antoun, Ghadi; Yanagiya, Akiko; Oliva-Hernandez, Reynaldo; Cornejo-Palma, Daniel; Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Sonenberg, Nahum; Cheng, Hai-Ying M

    2011-02-15

    Mammalian circadian rhythms are synchronized to the external time by daily resetting of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in response to light. As the master circadian pacemaker, the SCN coordinates the timing of diverse cellular oscillators in multiple tissues. Aberrant regulation of clock timing is linked to numerous human conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, various neurological disorders and the hereditary disorder familial advanced sleep phase syndrome. Additionally, mechanisms that underlie clock resetting factor into the sleep and physiological disturbances experienced by night-shift workers and travelers with jet lag. The Ca(2+)/cAMP response element-binding protein-regulated microRNA, miR-132, is induced by light within the SCN and attenuates its capacity to reset, or entrain, the clock. However, the specific targets that are regulated by miR-132 and underlie its effects on clock entrainment remained elusive until now. Here, we show that genes involved in chromatin remodeling (Mecp2, Ep300, Jarid1a) and translational control (Btg2, Paip2a) are direct targets of miR-132 in the mouse SCN. Coordinated regulation of these targets underlies miR-132-dependent modulation of Period gene expression and clock entrainment: the mPer1 and mPer2 promoters are bound to and transcriptionally activated by MeCP2, whereas PAIP2A and BTG2 suppress the translation of the PERIOD proteins by enhancing mRNA decay. We propose that miR-132 is selectively enriched for chromatin- and translation-associated target genes and is an orchestrator of chromatin remodeling and protein translation within the SCN clock, thereby fine-tuning clock entrainment. These findings will further our understanding of mechanisms governing clock entrainment and its involvement in human diseases. PMID:21118894

  1. Dynamic properties of the segmentation clock mediated by microRNA.

    PubMed

    Jing, Bo; Yuan, Julin; Yin, Zhongqiong; Lv, Cheng; Lu, Shengming; Xiong, Haoshan; Tang, Huaqiao; Ye, Gang; Shi, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Somites are embryonic precursors that give rise to the axial skeleton and skeletal muscles and form the segmental vertebrate body plan. Somitogenesis is controlled by the "segmentation clock", which contains multiple oscillator genes that must be tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels for proper clock function. However, how the segmentation clock governs the formation of the somites at post-transcriptional level, remains unclear. In this work, we develop an integrated model with three modules for the segmentation clock and explore the mechanism for somite segmentation based on the dynamics of the network. By numerical simulations, we find that the amplitude and period of the somite segmentation clock are sensitive to Notch activity, which is fine-tuned by Lunatic fringe (Lfng) and microRNA (miRNA), and Lfng and miRNA are essential for forming the proper segmentation during somitogenesis. Moreover, miRNA is found to have a crucial role in minimizing the fluctuation period and amplitude to maintain coherent oscillation. Introduction of stochasticity in the model enables us to explain the available experimental data with dampening of oscillations. These findings uncover a fresh mechanism for regulation of the segmentation clock at a post-transcriptional level and provide important insights into how the relatively subtle effects of miRNAs on target genes can have broad effects in developmental situations that have critical requirements for tight posttranscriptional regulation.

  2. Influence of simulated microgravity on clock genes expression rhythmicity and underlying blood circulating miRNAs-mRNA co-expression regulatory mechanism in C57BL/6J mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Ke; Qu, Lina

    were consecutively performed. Blood samples and liver tissues were collected from tail-suspended and control mice under LD 12:12h and DD conditions during the 12th, 13th and 14th testing days at 4h intervals. Melatonin and corticosterone in mice plasma at different time points were assayed. NIH-3T3 cells were plated in culture dish for 22h before the experiment. For ground-based simulation of weightlessness, the medium was exchanged with DMEM containing 50% horse serum to synchronization, after 2 h, this medium was replaced with DMEM and 10% FBS. Then, at various time point (0, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48h), cells were cultured on the roating clinostat at 30r/min. Total RNA was extracted from liver and NIH-3T3 cells and subsequently reverse-transcribed. The SYBR green I real-time quantitative PCR system was conducted to examine the mRNA expression level of clock, bmal1, per1, per2, cry1 and cry2 in mice and NIH-3T3 cells, respectively. Paired comparisons of the circadian genes expression between period, peak values, amplitude and mesor (midline estimating statistic of rhythm) were examined for evidence of circadian variation using Chronos-Fit software in mice and Cosine analyses in NIH-3T3 cells. Statistical analysis: All numerical data were expressed as the mean ± standard deviation (SD). Statistical differences among groups were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to determine time points differences in the study parameters. Statistical differences between two groups were determined by the Student's t test. Results: (1) Circadian rhythm of clock and bmal1 mRNA expression was found in each testing day with similar peak phase in both tail suspension group and control group. Compared with control group, tail suspension group showed that the peak phase of clock gene mRNA level advanced approximately 4 hours and the amplitude of bmal1 gene mRNA level significantly reduced at ZT2 and ZT6. (2) The expression of circadian genes in NIH-3T3 cells demonstrated

  3. Evidence for the circadian gene period as a proximate mechanism of protandry in a pollinating fig wasp.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hai-Feng; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Dunn, Derek W; Niu, Li-Ming; Wang, Bo; Jia, Ling-Yi; Huang, Da-Wei

    2014-03-01

    Protandry in insects is the tendency for adult males to emerge before females and usually results from intra-sexual selection. However, the genetic basis of this common phenomenon is poorly understood. Pollinating fig wasp (Agaonidae) larvae develop in galled flowers within the enclosed inflorescences ('figs') of fig trees. Upon emergence, males locate and mate with the still galled females. After mating, males release females from their galls to enable dispersal. Females cannot exit galls or disperse from a fig without male assistance. We sampled male and female Ceratosolen solmsi (the pollinator of Ficus hispida) every 3 h over a 24 h emergence period, and then measured the expression of five circadian genes: period (per), clock (clk), cycle (cyc), pigment-dispersing factor (pdf) and clockwork orange (cwo). We found significant male-biased sexual dimorphism in the expression of all five genes. per showed the greatest divergence between the sexes and was the only gene rhythmically expressed. Expression of per correlated closely with emergence rates at specific time intervals in both male and female wasps. We suggest that this rhythmical expression of per may be a proximate mechanism of protandry in this species.

  4. Clock and light regulation of the CREB coactivator CRTC1 in the suprachiasmatic circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kensuke; Norona, Frances E; Alzate-Correa, Diego; Scarberry, Daniel; Hoyt, Kari R; Obrietan, Karl

    2013-05-22

    The CREB/CRE transcriptional pathway has been implicated in circadian clock timing and light-evoked clock resetting. To date, much of the work on CREB in circadian physiology has focused on how changes in the phosphorylation state of CREB regulate the timing processes. However, beyond changes in phosphorylation, CREB-dependent transcription can also be regulated by the CREB coactivator CRTC (CREB-regulated transcription coactivator), also known as TORC (transducer of regulated CREB). Here we profiled both the rhythmic and light-evoked regulation of CRTC1 and CRTC2 in the murine suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the locus of the master mammalian clock. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed rhythmic expression of CRTC1 in the SCN. CRTC1 expression was detected throughout the dorsoventral extent of the SCN in the middle of the subjective day, with limited expression during early night, and late night expression levels intermediate between mid-day and early night levels. In contrast to CRTC1, robust expression of CRTC2 was detected during both the subjective day and night. During early and late subjective night, a brief light pulse induced strong nuclear accumulation of CRTC1 in the SCN. In contrast with CRTC1, photic stimulation did not affect the subcellular localization of CRTC2 in the SCN. Additionally, reporter gene profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that CRTC1 was associated with CREB in the 5' regulatory region of the period1 gene, and that overexpression of CRTC1 leads to a marked upregulation in period1 transcription. Together, these data raise the prospect that CRTC1 plays a role in fundamental aspects of SCN clock timing and entrainment.

  5. A circadian sleep disorder reveals a complex clock.

    PubMed

    Mignot, Emmanuel; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2007-01-12

    Circadian rhythms are established by transcription of clock genes and autoregulatory transcriptional feedback loops. In this issue, Xu et al. (2007) characterize mice expressing a human Per2 mutation identified in patients with familial advanced sleep phase syndrome. Their results reveal that PER2 phosphorylation, by CK1delta and other kinases, is surprisingly complex and has opposite effects on PER2 levels and period length. PMID:17218251

  6. Plastic oscillators and fixed rhythms: Changes in the phase of clock-gene rhythms in the PVN are not reflected in the phase of the melatonin rhythm of grass rats

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Fairey, Carmel A.; Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Stowie, Adam; Walaszczyk, Erin; Smale, Laura; Nunez, Antonio A.

    2015-01-01

    The same clock-genes, including Period (PER) 1 and 2, that show rhythmic expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are also rhythmically expressed in other brain regions that serve as extra-SCN oscillators. Outside the hypothalamus, the phase of these extra-SCN oscillators appears to be reversed when diurnal and nocturnal mammals are compared. Based on mRNA data, PER1 protein is expected to peak in the late night in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) of nocturnal laboratory rats, but comparable data are not available for a diurnal species. Here we use the diurnal grass rat (Arvicanthis niloticus) to describe rhythms of PER1 and 2 protein in the PVN of animals that either show the species-typical day-active profile, or that adopt a night-active profile when given access to running wheels. For day-active animals housed with or without wheels, significant rhythms of PER1 or PER2 protein expression featured peaks in the late morning; night-active animals showed patterns similar to those expected from nocturnal laboratory rats. Since the PVN is part of the circuit that controls pineal rhythms, we also measured circulating levels of melatonin during the day and night in day-active animals with and without wheels and in night-active wheel runners. All three groups showed elevated levels of melatonin at night, with higher levels during both the day and night being associated with the levels of activity displayed by each group. The differential phase of rhythms in clock-gene protein in the PVN of diurnal and nocturnal animals presents a possible mechanism for explaining species differences in the phase of autonomic rhythms controlled, in part, by the PVN. The present study suggests that the phase of the oscillator of the PVN does not determine that of the melatonin rhythm in diurnal and nocturnal species or in diurnal and nocturnal chronotypes within a species. PMID:25575946

  7. A PTH-responsive circadian clock operates in ex vivo mouse femur fracture healing site

    PubMed Central

    Kunimoto, Tatsuya; Okubo, Naoki; Minami, Yoichi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Hosokawa, Toshihiro; Asada, Maki; Oda, Ryo; Kubo, Toshikazu; Yagita, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock contains clock genes including Bmal1 and Period2, and it maintains an interval rhythm of approximately 24 hours (the circadian rhythm) in various organs including growth plate and articular cartilage. As endochondral ossification is involved not only in growth plate but also in fracture healing, we investigated the circadian clock functions in fracture sites undergoing healing. Our fracture models using external fixation involved femurs of Period2::Luciferase knock-in mice which enables the monitoring of endogenous circadian clock state via bioluminescence. Organ culture was performed by collecting femurs, and fracture sites were observed using bioluminescence imaging systems. Clear bioluminescence rhythms of 24-hour intervals were revealed in fracture healing sites. When parathyroid hormone (PTH) was administered to fractured femurs in organ culture, peak time of Period2::Luciferase activity in fracture sites and growth plates changed, indicating that PTH-responsive circadian clock functions in the mouse femur fracture healing site. While PTH is widely used in treating osteoporosis, many studies have reported that it contributes to improvement of fracture healing. Future studies of the role of this local clock in wound healing may reveal a novel function of the circadian timing mechanism in skeletal cells. PMID:26926165

  8. Evolutionary links between circadian clocks and photoperiodic diapause in insects.

    PubMed

    Meuti, Megan E; Denlinger, David L

    2013-07-01

    In this article, we explore links between circadian clocks and the clock involved in photoperiodic regulation of diapause in insects. Classical resonance (Nanda-Hamner) and night interruption (Bünsow) experiments suggest a circadian basis for the diapause response in nearly all insects that have been studied. Neuroanatomical studies reveal physical connections between circadian clock cells and centers controlling the photoperiodic diapause response, and both mutations and knockdown of clock genes with RNA interference (RNAi) point to a connection between the clock genes and photoperiodic induction of diapause. We discuss the challenges of determining whether the clock, as a functioning module, or individual clock genes acting pleiotropically are responsible for the photoperiodic regulation of diapause, and how a stable, central circadian clock could be linked to plastic photoperiodic responses without compromising the clock's essential functions. Although we still lack an understanding of the exact mechanisms whereby insects measure day/night length, continued classical and neuroanatomical approaches, as well as forward and reverse genetic experiments, are highly complementary and should enable us to decipher the diverse ways in which circadian clocks have been involved in the evolution of photoperiodic induction of diapause in insects. The components of circadian clocks vary among insect species, and diapause appears to have evolved independently numerous times, thus, we anticipate that not all photoperiodic clocks of insects will interact with circadian clocks in the same fashion.

  9. Pregnancy-induced adaptations of the central circadian clock and maternal glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Wharfe, Michaela D; Mark, Peter J; Wyrwoll, Caitlin S; Smith, Jeremy T; Yap, Cassandra; Clarke, Michael W; Waddell, Brendan J

    2016-03-01

    Maternal physiological adaptations, such as changes to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, are central to pregnancy success. Circadian variation of the HPA axis is dependent on clock gene rhythms in the hypothalamus, but it is not known whether pregnancy-induced changes in maternal glucocorticoid levels are mediated via this central clock. We hypothesized that hypothalamic expression of clock genes changes across mouse pregnancy and this is linked to altered HPA activity. The anterior hypothalamus and maternal plasma were collected from C57Bl/6J mice prior to pregnancy and on days 6, 10, 14 and 18 of gestation (term=d19), across a 24-h period (0800, 1200, 1600, 2000, 0000, 0400 h). Hypothalamic expression of clock genes and Crh was determined by qPCR, plasma ACTH concentration measured by Milliplex assay and plasma corticosterone concentration by LC-MS/MS. Expression of all clock genes varied markedly across gestation, most notably at mid-gestation when levels of each gene were elevated. The pregnancy-induced increase in maternal corticosterone levels (by up to 14-fold on day 14) was not accompanied by a parallel shift in plasma ACTH (28% lower on day 14 compared with non-pregnant levels). Moreover, while circadian rhythmicity in corticosterone was maintained up to day 14 of gestation, this was effectively lost by day 18. Overall, our data show that the central circadian clock undergoes marked adaptations throughout mouse pregnancy, changes that are likely to contribute to maternal physiological adaptations. Importantly, however, neither hypothalamic clock genes nor plasma ACTH levels appear to drive the marked increase in maternal corticosterone after mid-gestation.

  10. Pregnancy-induced adaptations of the central circadian clock and maternal glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Wharfe, Michaela D; Mark, Peter J; Wyrwoll, Caitlin S; Smith, Jeremy T; Yap, Cassandra; Clarke, Michael W; Waddell, Brendan J

    2016-03-01

    Maternal physiological adaptations, such as changes to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, are central to pregnancy success. Circadian variation of the HPA axis is dependent on clock gene rhythms in the hypothalamus, but it is not known whether pregnancy-induced changes in maternal glucocorticoid levels are mediated via this central clock. We hypothesized that hypothalamic expression of clock genes changes across mouse pregnancy and this is linked to altered HPA activity. The anterior hypothalamus and maternal plasma were collected from C57Bl/6J mice prior to pregnancy and on days 6, 10, 14 and 18 of gestation (term=d19), across a 24-h period (0800, 1200, 1600, 2000, 0000, 0400 h). Hypothalamic expression of clock genes and Crh was determined by qPCR, plasma ACTH concentration measured by Milliplex assay and plasma corticosterone concentration by LC-MS/MS. Expression of all clock genes varied markedly across gestation, most notably at mid-gestation when levels of each gene were elevated. The pregnancy-induced increase in maternal corticosterone levels (by up to 14-fold on day 14) was not accompanied by a parallel shift in plasma ACTH (28% lower on day 14 compared with non-pregnant levels). Moreover, while circadian rhythmicity in corticosterone was maintained up to day 14 of gestation, this was effectively lost by day 18. Overall, our data show that the central circadian clock undergoes marked adaptations throughout mouse pregnancy, changes that are likely to contribute to maternal physiological adaptations. Importantly, however, neither hypothalamic clock genes nor plasma ACTH levels appear to drive the marked increase in maternal corticosterone after mid-gestation. PMID:26883207

  11. SKIP Is a Component of the Spliceosome Linking Alternative Splicing and the Circadian Clock in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Fangming; Xie, Qiguang; Wang, Huamei; Wang, Ying; Yue, Yanling; Gahura, Ondrej; Ma, Shuangshuang; Liu, Lei; Cao, Ying; Jiao, Yuling; Puta, Frantisek; McClung, C. Robertson; Xu, Xiaodong; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks generate endogenous rhythms in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans and facilitate entrainment to environmental diurnal cycles, thus conferring a fitness advantage. Both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms are prominent in the basic network architecture of circadian systems. Posttranscriptional regulation, including mRNA processing, is emerging as a critical step for clock function. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms linking RNA metabolism to the circadian clock network. Here, we report that a conserved SNW/Ski-interacting protein (SKIP) domain protein, SKIP, a splicing factor and component of the spliceosome, is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of circadian clock genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutation in SKIP lengthens the circadian period in a temperature-sensitive manner and affects light input and the sensitivity of the clock to light resetting. SKIP physically interacts with the spliceosomal splicing factor Ser/Arg-rich protein45 and associates with the pre-mRNA of clock genes, such as PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) and PRR9, and is necessary for the regulation of their alternative splicing and mRNA maturation. Genome-wide investigations reveal that SKIP functions in regulating alternative splicing of many genes, presumably through modulating recognition or cleavage of 5′ and 3′ splice donor and acceptor sites. Our study addresses a fundamental question on how the mRNA splicing machinery contributes to circadian clock function at a posttranscriptional level. PMID:22942380

  12. Synchronization of clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitaniak, Marcin; Czolczynski, Krzysztof; Perlikowski, Przemysław; Stefanski, Andrzej; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2012-08-01

    In this report we recall the famous Huygens’ experiment which gave the first evidence of the synchronization phenomenon. We consider the synchronization of two clocks which are accurate (show the same time) but have pendula with different masses. It has been shown that such clocks hanging on the same beam can show the almost complete (in-phase) and almost antiphase synchronizations. By almost complete and almost antiphase synchronization we defined the periodic motion of the pendula in which the phase shift between the displacements of the pendula is respectively close (but not equal) to 0 or π. We give evidence that almost antiphase synchronization was the phenomenon observed by Huygens in XVII century. We support our numerical studies by considering the energy balance in the system and showing how the energy is transferred between the pendula via oscillating beam allowing the pendula’s synchronization. Additionally we discuss the synchronization of a number of different pendulum clocks hanging from a horizontal beam which can roll on the parallel surface. It has been shown that after a transient, different types of synchronization between pendula can be observed; (i) the complete synchronization in which all pendula behave identically, (ii) pendula create three or five clusters of synchronized pendula. We derive the equations for the estimation of the phase differences between phase synchronized clusters. The evidence, why other configurations with a different number of clusters are not observed, is given.

  13. A blind circadian clock in cavefish reveals that opsins mediate peripheral clock photoreception.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Nicola; Frigato, Elena; Vallone, Daniela; Fröhlich, Nadine; Lopez-Olmeda, Jose Fernando; Foà, Augusto; Berti, Roberto; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Foulkes, Nicholas S

    2011-09-01

    The circadian clock is synchronized with the day-night cycle primarily by light. Fish represent fascinating models for deciphering the light input pathway to the vertebrate clock since fish cell clocks are regulated by direct light exposure. Here we have performed a comparative, functional analysis of the circadian clock involving the zebrafish that is normally exposed to the day-night cycle and a cavefish species that has evolved in perpetual darkness. Our results reveal that the cavefish retains a food-entrainable clock that oscillates with an infradian period. Importantly, however, this clock is not regulated by light. This comparative study pinpoints the two extra-retinal photoreceptors Melanopsin (Opn4m2) and TMT-opsin as essential upstream elements of the peripheral clock light input pathway. PMID:21909239

  14. Biological switches and clocks

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, John J.; Albert, Reka; Goldbeter, Albert; Ruoff, Peter; Sible, Jill

    2008-01-01

    To introduce this special issue on biological switches and clocks, we review the historical development of mathematical models of bistability and oscillations in chemical reaction networks. In the 1960s and 1970s, these models were limited to well-studied biochemical examples, such as glycolytic oscillations and cyclic AMP signalling. After the molecular genetics revolution of the 1980s, the field of molecular cell biology was thrown wide open to mathematical modellers. We review recent advances in modelling the gene–protein interaction networks that control circadian rhythms, cell cycle progression, signal processing and the design of synthetic gene networks. PMID:18522926

  15. Fast Clock Recovery for Digital Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tell, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit extracts clock signal from random non-return-to-zero data stream, locking onto clock within one bit period at 1-gigabitper-second data rate. Circuit used for synchronization in opticalfiber communications. Derives speed from very short response time of gallium arsenide metal/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFET's).

  16. Molecular Polymorphism in the Period Gene of Drosophila Simulans

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, E.; Peixoto, A. A.; Barbujani, G.; Costa, R.; Kyriacou, C. P.

    1994-01-01

    The threonine-glycine (Thr-Gly) repeat region of the period (per) gene of eight natural populations of Drosophila simulans from Europe and North Africa was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing and heteroduplex formation. Five different length alleles encoding 21, 23, 25 and two different kinds of 24 Thr-Gly pairs in the uninterrupted repeat were found. In the 3' region flanking the repeat 6 nucleotide substitutions (3 synonymous, 3 replacement) were observed in three different combinations that we called haplotypes I, II and III. The complete linkage disequilibrium observed between the haplotypes and these length variants allowed us to infer from the repeat length, the DNA sequence at the 3' polymorphic sites. The haplotypes were homogeneously distributed across Europe and North Africa. The data show statistically significant departures from neutral expectations according to the Tajima test. The results suggest that balancing selection might have played a role in determining the observed levels and patterns of genetic diversity at the per gene in D. simulans. PMID:7851767

  17. The circadian cycle of mPER clock gene products in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the siberian hamster encodes both daily and seasonal time.

    PubMed

    Nuesslein-Hildesheim, B; O'Brien, J A; Ebling, F J; Maywood, E S; Hastings, M H

    2000-08-01

    The circadian clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) regulates the pattern of melatonin secretion from the pineal gland such that the duration of release reflects the length of the night. This seasonally specific endocrine cue mediates annual timing in photoperiodic mammals. The aim of this study was to investigate how changes in photoperiod influence the cyclic expression of recently identified clock gene products (mPER and mTIM) in the SCN of a highly seasonal mammal, the Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus). Immunocytochemical studies indicate that the abundance of both mPER1 and mPER2 (but not mTIM) in the SCN exhibits very pronounced, synchronous daily cycles, peaking approximately 12 h after lights-on. These rhythms are circadian in nature as they continue approximately under free-running conditions. Their circadian waveform is modulated by photoperiod such that the phase of peak mPER expression is prolonged under long photoperiods. mPER1 protein is also expressed in the pars tuberalis of Siberian hamsters. In hamsters adapted to long days, the expression of mPER1 is elevated at the start of the light phase. In contrast, there is no clear elevation in mPER1 levels in the pars tuberalis of hamsters held on short photoperiods. These results indicate that core elements of the circadian clockwork are sensitive to seasonal time, and that encoding and decoding of seasonal information may be mediated by the actions of these transcriptional modulators.

  18. Changes in Gene Expression Patterns of Circadian-Clock, Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 and Nerve Growth Factor in Inflamed Human Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chien-Lin; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Shieh, Kun-Ruey

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythm is driven by the molecular circadian-clock system and regulates many physiological functions. Diurnal rhythms in the gastrointestinal tract are known to be related to feeding pattern, but whether these rhythms are also related to the gastrointestinal damage or injuries; for example, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is unclear. This study was conducted to determine whether expression of circadian-clock genes or factors involved in vagal stimulation or sensitization were altered in the esophagus of GERD patients. Diurnal patterns of PER1, PER2, BMAL1, CRY2, TRPV1, and NGF mRNA expression were found in patient controls, and these patterns were altered and significantly correlated to the GERD severity in GERD patients. Although levels of CRY1, TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF, and TAC1 mRNA expression did not show diurnal patterns, they were elevated and also correlated with GERD severity in GERD patients. Finally, strong correlations among PER1, TRPV1, NGF and CRY2 mRNA expression, and among PER2, TRPV1 and CRY2 expression were found. Expression levels of CRY1 mRNA highly correlated with levels of TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF and TAC1. This study suggests that the circadian rhythm in the esophagus may be important for the mediation of and/or the response to erosive damage in GERD patients. PMID:26337663

  19. Precise clock synchronization protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luit, E. J.; Martin, J. M. M.

    1993-12-01

    A distributed clock synchronization protocol is presented which achieves a very high precision without the need for very frequent resynchronizations. The protocol tolerates failures of the clocks: clocks may be too slow or too fast, exhibit omission failures and report inconsistent values. Synchronization takes place in synchronization rounds as in many other synchronization protocols. At the end of each round, clock times are exchanged between the clocks. Each clock applies a convergence function (CF) to the values obtained. This function estimates the difference between its clock and an average clock and corrects its clock accordingly. Clocks are corrected for drift relative to this average clock during the next synchronization round. The protocol is based on the assumption that clock reading errors are small with respect to the required precision of synchronization. It is shown that the CF resynchronizes the clocks with high precision even when relatively large clock drifts are possible. It is also shown that the drift-corrected clocks remain synchronized until the end of the next synchronization round. The stability of the protocol is proven.

  20. Molecular clock is involved in predictive circadian adjustment of renal function.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Annie Mercier; Centeno, Gabriel; Pradervand, Sylvain; Nikolaeva, Svetlana; Maquelin, Lionel; Cardinaux, Léonard; Bonny, Olivier; Firsov, Dmitri

    2009-09-22

    Renal excretion of water and major electrolytes exhibits a significant circadian rhythm. This functional periodicity is believed to result, at least in part, from circadian changes in secretion/reabsorption capacities of the distal nephron and collecting ducts. Here, we studied the molecular mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in the distal nephron segments, i.e., distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and connecting tubule (CNT) and the cortical collecting duct (CCD). Temporal expression analysis performed on microdissected mouse DCT/CNT or CCD revealed a marked circadian rhythmicity in the expression of a large number of genes crucially involved in various homeostatic functions of the kidney. This analysis also revealed that both DCT/CNT and CCD possess an intrinsic circadian timing system characterized by robust oscillations in the expression of circadian core clock genes (clock, bma11, npas2, per, cry, nr1d1) and clock-controlled Par bZip transcriptional factors dbp, hlf, and tef. The clock knockout mice or mice devoid of dbp/hlf/tef (triple knockout) exhibit significant changes in renal expression of several key regulators of water or sodium balance (vasopressin V2 receptor, aquaporin-2, aquaporin-4, alphaENaC). Functionally, the loss of clock leads to a complex phenotype characterized by partial diabetes insipidus, dysregulation of sodium excretion rhythms, and a significant decrease in blood pressure. Collectively, this study uncovers a major role of molecular clock in renal function.

  1. Ribosome profiling reveals the rhythmic liver translatome and circadian clock regulation by upstream open reading frames

    PubMed Central

    Janich, Peggy; Arpat, Alaaddin Bulak; Castelo-Szekely, Violeta; Lopes, Maykel; Gatfield, David

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian gene expression displays widespread circadian oscillations. Rhythmic transcription underlies the core clock mechanism, but it cannot explain numerous observations made at the level of protein rhythmicity. We have used ribosome profiling in mouse liver to measure the translation of mRNAs into protein around the clock and at high temporal and nucleotide resolution. We discovered, transcriptome-wide, extensive rhythms in ribosome occupancy and identified a core set of approximately 150 mRNAs subject to particularly robust daily changes in translation efficiency. Cycling proteins produced from nonoscillating transcripts revealed thus-far-unknown rhythmic regulation associated with specific pathways (notably in iron metabolism, through the rhythmic translation of transcripts containing iron responsive elements), and indicated feedback to the rhythmic transcriptome through novel rhythmic transcription factors. Moreover, estimates of relative levels of core clock protein biosynthesis that we deduced from the data explained known features of the circadian clock better than did mRNA expression alone. Finally, we identified uORF translation as a novel regulatory mechanism within the clock circuitry. Consistent with the occurrence of translated uORFs in several core clock transcripts, loss-of-function of Denr, a known regulator of reinitiation after uORF usage and of ribosome recycling, led to circadian period shortening in cells. In summary, our data offer a framework for understanding the dynamics of translational regulation, circadian gene expression, and metabolic control in a solid mammalian organ. PMID:26486724

  2. Differential Involvement of the Circadian Clock in the Expression of Genes Required for Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Synthesis, Assembly, and Activation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Pilgrim, M. L.; McClung, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the circadian clock in the regulation of expression of genes required for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) synthesis, assembly, and activation. Circadian oscillations in RCA (the gene encoding Rubisco activase) and RBCS (the gene encoding Rubisco small subunit) mRNA accumulation, with peak abundance occurring soon after dawn, occur in Arabidopsis thaliana grown in a light-dark (LD) photoperiod. These oscillations persist in plants that have been transferred from LD to either continuous darkness (DD) or continuous light (LL). In contrast, CPN60[alpha] (the gene encoding [alpha]-chaperonin) and CPN60[beta] (the gene encoding [beta]-chaperonin) mRNA abundance oscillates in a diurnal, but not in a circadian, fashion. Although rapid damping of the circadian oscillation in RCA mRNA abundance is observed in Arabidopsis that have been grown in LD and then transferred to DD for 2 d, the circadian oscillations in RCA and RBCS mRNA abundance persist for at least five continuous cycles in LL, demonstrating the robustness of the circadian oscillator. PMID:12231961

  3. The Expression of Three Opsin Genes from the Compound Eye of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Is Regulated by a Circadian Clock, Light Conditions and Nutritional Status

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shuo; Zhu, Jialin; Zhu, Weilong; Zhang, Xinfang; Li, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Qingwen

    2014-01-01

    Visual genes may become inactive in species that inhabit poor light environments, and the function and regulation of opsin components in nocturnal moths are interesting topics. In this study, we cloned the ultraviolet (UV), blue (BL) and long-wavelength-sensitive (LW) opsin genes from the compound eye of the cotton bollworm and then measured their mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR. The mRNA levels fluctuated over a daily cycle, which might be an adaptation of a nocturnal lifestyle, and were dependent on a circadian clock. Cycling of opsin mRNA levels was disturbed by constant light or constant darkness, and the UV opsin gene was up-regulated after light exposure. Furthermore, the opsin genes tended to be down-regulated upon starvation. Thus, this study illustrates that opsin gene expression is determined by multiple endogenous and exogenous factors and is adapted to the need for nocturnal vision, suggesting that color vision may play an important role in the sensory ecology of nocturnal moths. PMID:25353953

  4. The expression of three opsin genes from the compound eye of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is regulated by a circadian clock, light conditions and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuo; Zhu, Jialin; Zhu, Weilong; Zhang, Xinfang; Li, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Qingwen

    2014-01-01

    Visual genes may become inactive in species that inhabit poor light environments, and the function and regulation of opsin components in nocturnal moths are interesting topics. In this study, we cloned the ultraviolet (UV), blue (BL) and long-wavelength-sensitive (LW) opsin genes from the compound eye of the cotton bollworm and then measured their mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR. The mRNA levels fluctuated over a daily cycle, which might be an adaptation of a nocturnal lifestyle, and were dependent on a circadian clock. Cycling of opsin mRNA levels was disturbed by constant light or constant darkness, and the UV opsin gene was up-regulated after light exposure. Furthermore, the opsin genes tended to be down-regulated upon starvation. Thus, this study illustrates that opsin gene expression is determined by multiple endogenous and exogenous factors and is adapted to the need for nocturnal vision, suggesting that color vision may play an important role in the sensory ecology of nocturnal moths.

  5. The Pentose Phosphate Pathway Regulates the Circadian Clock.

    PubMed

    Rey, Guillaume; Valekunja, Utham K; Feeney, Kevin A; Wulund, Lisa; Milev, Nikolay B; Stangherlin, Alessandra; Ansel-Bollepalli, Laura; Velagapudi, Vidya; O'Neill, John S; Reddy, Akhilesh B

    2016-09-13

    The circadian clock is a ubiquitous timekeeping system that organizes the behavior and physiology of organisms over the day and night. Current models rely on transcriptional networks that coordinate circadian gene expression of thousands of transcripts. However, recent studies have uncovered phylogenetically conserved redox rhythms that can occur independently of transcriptional cycles. Here we identify the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), a critical source of the redox cofactor NADPH, as an important regulator of redox and transcriptional oscillations. Our results show that genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the PPP prolongs the period of circadian rhythms in human cells, mouse tissues, and fruit flies. These metabolic manipulations also cause a remodeling of circadian gene expression programs that involves the circadian transcription factors BMAL1 and CLOCK, and the redox-sensitive transcription factor NRF2. Thus, the PPP regulates circadian rhythms via NADPH metabolism, suggesting a pivotal role for NADPH availability in circadian timekeeping.

  6. Conserved function of core clock proteins in the gymnosperm Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst).

    PubMed

    Karlgren, Anna; Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Källman, Thomas; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    From studies of the circadian clock in the plant model species Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a number of important properties and components have emerged. These include the genes CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1), GIGANTEA (GI), ZEITLUPE (ZTL) and TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1 also known as PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR 1 (PRR1)) that via gene expression feedback loops participate in the circadian clock. Here, we present results from ectopic expression of four Norway spruce (Picea abies) putative homologs (PaCCA1, PaGI, PaZTL and PaPRR1) in Arabidopsis, their flowering time, circadian period length, red light response phenotypes and their effect on endogenous clock genes were assessed. For PaCCA1-ox and PaZTL-ox the results were consistent with Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the corresponding Arabidopsis genes. For PaGI consistent results were obtained when expressed in the gi2 mutant, while PaGI and PaPRR1 expressed in wild type did not display the expected phenotypes. These results suggest that protein function of PaCCA1, PaGI and PaZTL are at least partly conserved compared to Arabidopsis homologs, however further studies are needed to reveal the protein function of PaPRR1. Our data suggest that components of the three-loop network typical of the circadian clock in angiosperms were present before the split of gymnosperms and angiosperms.

  7. Conserved Function of Core Clock Proteins in the Gymnosperm Norway Spruce (Picea abies L. Karst)

    PubMed Central

    Karlgren, Anna; Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Källman, Thomas; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    From studies of the circadian clock in the plant model species Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a number of important properties and components have emerged. These include the genes CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1), GIGANTEA (GI), ZEITLUPE (ZTL) and TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1 also known as PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR 1 (PRR1)) that via gene expression feedback loops participate in the circadian clock. Here, we present results from ectopic expression of four Norway spruce (Picea abies) putative homologs (PaCCA1, PaGI, PaZTL and PaPRR1) in Arabidopsis, their flowering time, circadian period length, red light response phenotypes and their effect on endogenous clock genes were assessed. For PaCCA1-ox and PaZTL-ox the results were consistent with Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the corresponding Arabidopsis genes. For PaGI consistent results were obtained when expressed in the gi2 mutant, while PaGI and PaPRR1 expressed in wild type did not display the expected phenotypes. These results suggest that protein function of PaCCA1, PaGI and PaZTL are at least partly conserved compared to Arabidopsis homologs, however further studies are needed to reveal the protein function of PaPRR1. Our data suggest that components of the three-loop network typical of the circadian clock in angiosperms were present before the split of gymnosperms and angiosperms. PMID:23555899

  8. Evolutionary Links Between Circadian Clocks and Photoperiodic Diapause in Insects

    PubMed Central

    Meuti, Megan E.; Denlinger, David L.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we explore links between circadian clocks and the clock involved in photoperiodic regulation of diapause in insects. Classical resonance (Nanda–Hamner) and night interruption (Bünsow) experiments suggest a circadian basis for the diapause response in nearly all insects that have been studied. Neuroanatomical studies reveal physical connections between circadian clock cells and centers controlling the photoperiodic diapause response, and both mutations and knockdown of clock genes with RNA interference (RNAi) point to a connection between the clock genes and photoperiodic induction of diapause. We discuss the challenges of determining whether the clock, as a functioning module, or individual clock genes acting pleiotropically are responsible for the photoperiodic regulation of diapause, and how a stable, central circadian clock could be linked to plastic photoperiodic responses without compromising the clock’s essential functions. Although we still lack an understanding of the exact mechanisms whereby insects measure day/night length, continued classical and neuroanatomical approaches, as well as forward and reverse genetic experiments, are highly complementary and should enable us to decipher the diverse ways in which circadian clocks have been involved in the evolution of photoperiodic induction of diapause in insects. The components of circadian clocks vary among insect species, and diapause appears to have evolved independently numerous times, thus, we anticipate that not all photoperiodic clocks of insects will interact with circadian clocks in the same fashion. PMID:23615363

  9. Timing of molt of barn swallows is delayed in a rare Clock genotype

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Maria; Caprioli, Manuela; Fasola, Mauro; Lardelli, Roberto; Micheloni, Pierfrancesco; Scandolara, Chiara; Rubolini, Diego; Gianfranceschi, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Photoperiodic responses are major factors entraining circannual life-cycles, functioning to adaptively synchronize annual routines to seasonal fluctuations in ecological conditions. Photoperiodism in physiology and behaviour is enforced by genes, including the vertebrate Clock orthologues, which are associated, for example, with phenology of migration in fish and breeding in birds. However, the role of Clock in photoperiodic plumage molt processes is unknown. We analyzed variation in molt schedules in relation to Clock genotype, using the long-distance migratory barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) as a model and by identifying males and females using molecular sexing techniques. Consistently with previous studies, we found one very common (Q7) and two rare (Q6, Q8) variants of a functionally significant Clock polyglutamine repeat. Molt schedules of primary wing feathers of swallows during their wintering period in Nigeria differed among Clock genotypes: rare (1.1%) Q7/Q8 heterozygotes had significantly delayed molt compared to the other genotypes. Molt schedules did not differ between males and females, and no differential association between molt and Clock in relation to sex emerged. The same rare Clock genotype that exhibited delayed breeding in Europe was here found to delay molt in Africa. Though based on a limited number of Q7/Q8 individuals from an otherwise very large sample, these novel results suggest that Clock is involved in the photoperiodic control of both molt and breeding, potentially also via reciprocal carry-over effects. If confirmed in species with higher Clock polymorphism, present results may have far-reaching consequences for the study of photoperiodic control of molt and expression of annual routines. PMID:23638351

  10. Developmental and light-entrained expression of melatonin and its relationship to the circadian clock in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The primary hormone of the vertebrate pineal gland, melatonin, has been identified broadly throughout the eukaryotes. While the role for melatonin in cyclic behavior via interactions with the circadian clock has only been reported in vertebrates, comparative research has shown that the transcription-translation loops of the animal circadian clock likely date to the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor, leaving open significant questions about the evolutionary origin of melatonin signaling in circadian behavior by interacting with the molecular clock. Results Expression of melatonin in adult anemones showed peak expression at the end of light period (zeitgeber time (ZT) = 12) when cultured under diel conditions, coinciding with expression of genes and enzyme activity for members of the melatonin synthesis pathway (tryptophan hydroxylase and hydroxyindol-O-methyltransferase), which also showed rhythmic expression. During embryogenesis and juvenile stages, melatonin showed cyclic oscillations in concentration, peaking in midday. Spatial (in situ hybridization) and quantitative (real-time PCR) transcription of clock genes during development of N. vectensis showed these ‘clock’ genes are expressed early in the development, prior to rhythmic oscillations, suggesting functions independent of a function in the circadian clock. Finally, time-course studies revealed that animals transferred from diel conditions to constant darkness lose circadian expression for most of the clock genes within 4 days, which can be reset by melatonin supplementation. Conclusions Our results support an ancient role for melatonin in the circadian behavior of animals by showing cyclic expression of this hormone under diel conditions, light-dependent oscillations in genes in the melatonin synthesis pathway, and the function of melatonin in initiating expression of circadian clock genes in the cnidarian N. vectensis. The differences in expression melatonin and the circadian clock gene

  11. Genomic clocks and evolutionary timescales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair Hedges, S.; Kumar, Sudhir

    2003-01-01

    For decades, molecular clocks have helped to illuminate the evolutionary timescale of life, but now genomic data pose a challenge for time estimation methods. It is unclear how to integrate data from many genes, each potentially evolving under a different model of substitution and at a different rate. Current methods can be grouped by the way the data are handled (genes considered separately or combined into a 'supergene') and the way gene-specific rate models are applied (global versus local clock). There are advantages and disadvantages to each of these approaches, and the optimal method has not yet emerged. Fortunately, time estimates inferred using many genes or proteins have greater precision and appear to be robust to different approaches.

  12. Network balance via CRY signalling controls the Arabidopsis circadian clock over ambient temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Peter D; Ugarte, Nicolas; Domijan, Mirela; Costa, Maria; Foreman, Julia; MacGregor, Dana; Rose, Ken; Griffiths, Jayne; Millar, Andrew J; Finkenstädt, Bärbel; Penfield, Steven; Rand, David A; Halliday, Karen J; Hall, Anthony J W

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks exhibit ‘temperature compensation', meaning that they show only small changes in period over a broad temperature range. Several clock genes have been implicated in the temperature-dependent control of period in Arabidopsis. We show that blue light is essential for this, suggesting that the effects of light and temperature interact or converge upon common targets in the circadian clock. Our data demonstrate that two cryptochrome photoreceptors differentially control circadian period and sustain rhythmicity across the physiological temperature range. In order to test the hypothesis that the targets of light regulation are sufficient to mediate temperature compensation, we constructed a temperature-compensated clock model by adding passive temperature effects into only the light-sensitive processes in the model. Remarkably, this model was not only capable of full temperature compensation and consistent with mRNA profiles across a temperature range, but also predicted the temperature-dependent change in the level of LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL, a key clock protein. Our analysis provides a systems-level understanding of period control in the plant circadian oscillator. PMID:23511208

  13. Circadian Clock-Specific Roles for the Light Response Protein WHITE COLLAR-2

    PubMed Central

    Collett, Michael A.; Dunlap, Jay C.; Loros, Jennifer J.

    2001-01-01

    To understand the role of white collar-2 in the Neurospora circadian clock, we examined alleles of wc-2 thought to encode partially functional proteins. We found that wc-2 allele ER24 contained a conservative mutation in the zinc finger. This mutation results in reduced levels of circadian rhythm-critical clock gene products, frq mRNA and FRQ protein, and in a lengthened period of the circadian clock. In addition, this mutation altered a second canonical property of the clock, temperature compensation: as temperature increased, period length decreased substantially. This temperature compensation defect correlated with a temperature-dependent increase in overall FRQ protein levels, with the relative increase being greater in wc-2 (ER24) than in wild type, while overall frq mRNA levels were largely unaltered by temperature. We suggest that this temperature-dependent increase in FRQ levels partially rescues the lowered levels of FRQ resulting from the wc-2 (ER24) defect, yielding a shorter period at higher temperatures. Thus, normal activity of the essential clock component WC-2, a positive regulator of frq, is critical for establishing period length and temperature compensation in this circadian system. PMID:11283242

  14. A hierarchical phosphorylation cascade that regulates the timing of PERIOD nuclear entry reveals novel roles for proline-directed kinases and GSK-3β/SGG in circadian clocks

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hyuk Wan; Kim, Eun Young; Chiu, Joanna; Vanselow, Jens T.; Kramer, Achim; Edery, Isaac

    2010-01-01

    The daily timing of when PERIOD (PER) proteins translocate from the cytoplasm to the nucleus is a critical step in clock mechanisms underpinning circadian rhythms in animals. Numerous lines of evidence indicate that phosphorylation plays a prominent role in regulating various aspects of PER function and metabolism, including changes in its daily stability and subcellular distribution. In this report we show that phosphorylation of serine 661 (Ser661) by a proline-directed kinase(s) is a key phospho-signal on the Drosophila PER protein (dPER) that regulates the timing of its nuclear accumulation. Mutations that block phosphorylation at Ser661 do not affect dPER stability but delay its nuclear entry in key pacemaker neurons, yielding longer behavioral rhythms. Intriguingly, abolishing phosphorylation at Ser661 also attenuates the extent of dPER hyperphosphorylation in vivo, suggesting the phosphorylated state of Ser661 regulates phosphorylation at other sites on dPER. Indeed, we identify Ser657 as a site that is phosphorylated by GSK-3β (SHAGGY; SGG) in a manner dependent on priming at Ser661. Although not as dramatic as mutating Ser661, mutations that abolish phosphorylation at Ser657 also lead to longer behavioral periods, suggesting that a multi-kinase hierarchical phosphorylation module regulates the timing of dPER nuclear entry. Together with evidence in mammalian systems, our findings implicate Pro-directed kinases in clock mechanisms and suggest that PER proteins are key downstream targets of lithium therapy, a potent inhibitor of GSK-3β used to treat manic depression, a disorder associated with clock malfunction in humans. PMID:20861372

  15. Deregulation of the circadian clock constitutes a significant factor in tumorigenesis: a clockwork cancer. Part I: clocks and clocking machinery

    PubMed Central

    Uth, Kristin; Sleigh, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Many physiological processes occur in a rhythmic fashion, consistent with a 24-h cycle. The central timing of the day/night rhythm is set by a master clock, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (a tiny region in the hypothalamus), but peripheral clocks exist in different tissues, adjustable by cues other than light (temperature, food, hormone stimulation, etc.), functioning autonomously to the master clock. Presence of unrepaired DNA damage may adjust the circadian clock so that the phase in which checking for damage and DNA repair normally occurs is advanced or extended. The expression of many of the genes coding for proteins functioning in DNA damage-associated response pathways and DNA repair is directly or indirectly regulated by the core clock proteins. Setting up the normal rhythm of the circadian cycle also involves oscillating changes in the chromatin structure, allowing differential activation of various chromatin domains within the 24-h cycle. PMID:26019503

  16. Altered energy intake and the amplitude of the body temperature rhythm are associated with changes in phase, but not amplitude, of clock gene expression in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goh, Grace H; Mark, Peter J; Maloney, Shane K

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in mammals are driven by a central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In vitro, temperature cycles within the physiological range can act as potent entraining cues for biological clocks. We altered the body temperature (Tc) rhythm in rats by manipulating energy intake (EI) to determine whether EI-induced changes in Tc oscillations are associated with changes in SCN clock gene rhythms in vivo. Male Wistar rats (n = 16 per diet) were maintained on either an ad libitum diet (CON), a high energy cafeteria diet (CAF), or a calorie restricted diet (CR), and Tc was recorded every 30 min for 6-7 weeks. SCN tissue was harvested from rats at zeitgeber time (ZT) 0, ZT6, ZT12, or ZT18. Expression of the clock genes Bmal1, Per2, Cry1, and Rev-erbα, the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1, and the heat shock protein Hsp90aa1, were determined using qPCR. The circadian profile of gene expression for each gene was characterized using cosinor analysis. Compared to the CON rats, the amplitude of Tc was decreased in CAF rats by 0.1 °C (p < 0.001), and increased in CR rats by 0.3 °C (p < 0.001). The amplitude of Hsp90aa1 expression was lowest in CAF rats and highest in CR rats (p = 0.045), but the amplitude of all of the clock genes and Hsf1 were unaffected by diet (p > 0.25). Compared to CON, phase advances of the Tc, Bmal1, and Per2 rhythms were observed with CR feeding (p < 0.05), but CAF feeding elicited no significant changes in phase. The present results indicate that in vivo, the SCN is largely resistant to entrainment by EI-induced changes in the Tc rhythm, although some phase entrainment may occur.

  17. Clocks, Metabolism, and the Epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Dan; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2012-01-01

    Many behaviors and physiological activities in living organisms display circadian rhythms, allowing them to anticipate and prepare for the diurnal changes in the living environment. In this way, metabolic processes are aligned with the periodic environmental changes and behavioral cycles, such as the sleep/wake and fasting/feeding cycles. Disturbances of this alignment significantly increase the risk of metabolic diseases. Meanwhile, the circadian clock receives signals from the environment and feedback from metabolic pathways, and adjusts its activity and function. Growing evidence connects the circadian clock with epigenomic regulators. Here we review the recent advances in understanding the crosstalk between the circadian clock and energy metabolism through epigenomic programming and transcriptional regulation. PMID:22841001

  18. Dynamic properties of the segmentation clock mediated by microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Bo; Yuan, Julin; Yin, Zhongqiong; Lv, Cheng; Lu, Shengming; Xiong, Haoshan; Tang, Huaqiao; Ye, Gang; Shi, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Somites are embryonic precursors that give rise to the axial skeleton and skeletal muscles and form the segmental vertebrate body plan. Somitogenesis is controlled by the “segmentation clock”, which contains multiple oscillator genes that must be tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels for proper clock function. However, how the segmentation clock governs the formation of the somites at post-transcriptional level, remains unclear. In this work, we develop an integrated model with three modules for the segmentation clock and explore the mechanism for somite segmentation based on the dynamics of the network. By numerical simulations, we find that the amplitude and period of the somite segmentation clock are sensitive to Notch activity, which is fine-tuned by Lunatic fringe (Lfng) and microRNA (miRNA), and Lfng and miRNA are essential for forming the proper segmentation during somitogenesis. Moreover, miRNA is found to have a crucial role in minimizing the fluctuation period and amplitude to maintain coherent oscillation. Introduction of stochasticity in the model enables us to explain the available experimental data with dampening of oscillations. These findings uncover a fresh mechanism for regulation of the segmentation clock at a post-transcriptional level and provide important insights into how the relatively subtle effects of miRNAs on target genes can have broad effects in developmental situations that have critical requirements for tight posttranscriptional regulation. PMID:25755706

  19. Circadian clock system in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Yoshitaka; Okano, Toshiyuki

    2002-02-01

    The pineal gland is a neuroendocrine organ that functions as a central circadian oscillator in a variety of nonmammalian vertebrates. In many cases, the pineal gland retains photic input and endocrinal-output pathways both linked tightly to the oscillator. This contrasts well with the mammalian pineal gland equipped only with the output of melatonin production that is subject to neuronal regulation by central circadian oscillator located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Molecular studies on animal clock genes were performed first in Drosophila and later developed in rodents. More recently, clock genes such as Per, Cry, Clock, and Bmal have been found in a variety of vertebrate clock structures including the avian pineal gland. The profiles of the temporal change of the clock gene expression in the avian pineal gland are more similar to those in the mammalian SCN rather than to those in the mammalian pineal gland. Avian pineal gland and mammalian SCN seem to share a fundamental molecular framework of the clock oscillator composed of a transcription/translation-based autoregulatory feedback loop. The circadian time-keeping mechanism also requires several post-translational events, such as protein translocation and degradation processes, in which protein phosphorylation plays a very important role for the stable 24-h cycling of the oscillator and/or the photic-input pathway for entrainment of the clock. PMID:11890455

  20. Coupling cellular oscillators: a mechanism that maintains synchrony against developmental noise in the segmentation clock.

    PubMed

    Ishimatsu, Kana; Horikawa, Kazuki; Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2007-06-01

    A unique feature of vertebrate segmentation is its strict periodicity, which is governed by the segmentation clock consisting of numerous cellular oscillators. These cellular oscillators, driven by a negative-feedback loop of Hairy transcription factor, are linked through Notch-dependent intercellular coupling and display the synchronous expression of clock genes. Combining our transplantation experiments in zebrafish with mathematical simulations, we review how the cellular oscillators maintain synchrony and form a robust system that is resistant to the effects of developmental noise such as stochastic gene expression and active cell proliferation. The accumulated evidence indicates that the segmentation clock behaves as a "coupled oscillators," a mechanism that also underlies the synchronous flashing seen in fireflies.

  1. The circadian clock gene Bmal1 acts as a potential anti-oncogene in pancreatic cancer by activating the p53 tumor suppressor pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiliang; Zhao, Senlin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Erquan; Hu, Guoyong; Hu, Bin; Zheng, Ping; Xiao, Junhua; Lu, Zhanjun; Lu, Yingying; Ni, Jianbo; Chen, Congying; Wang, Xingpeng; Yang, Lijuan; Wan, Rong

    2016-02-28

    Disruption of the circadian clock has been shown to be associated with tumor development. This study aimed to investigate the role of the core circadian gene Bmal1 in pancreatic cancer (PC). We first found that the levels of Bmal1 were downregulated in PC samples and were closely correlated with the clinicopathological features of patients. To dissect the underlying mechanism, we performed a RNA-seq assay followed by systematic gene function and pathway enrichment analyses. We detected an anti-apoptotic and pro-proliferative transcriptome profile after Bmal1 knockdown in PC cells. Further in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that Bmal1 overexpression significantly inhibited cell proliferation and invasion and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, whereas Bmal1 knockdown promoted PC growth, as demonstrated in Bmal1-manipulated AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cell lines. Our mechanistic studies indicated that Bmal1 could directly bind to the p53 gene promoter and thereby transcriptionally activate the downstream tumor suppressor pathway in a p53-dependent manner. In sum, our findings suggest that Bmal1 acts as an anti-oncogene in PC and represents a potential biomarker for its diagnosis.

  2. Thermoplasticity in the plant circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    James, Allan B.; Syed, Naeem Hasan; Brown, John W. S.; Nimmo, Hugh G.

    2012-01-01

    In the March 2012 issue of The Plant Cell we describe extensive alternative splicing (AS) of Arabidopsis circadian clock genes. Notably these distinct post-transcriptional events associate with different steady-state temperatures and also with plants undergoing temperature transitions leading us to propose that temperature-associated AS is an additional mechanism involved in the operation and control of the plant circadian clock. Here we show that temperature associated AS also extends to REVEILLE 8 (RVE8), demonstrating a hitherto unrecognized link between the expression of this clock associated gene and temperature. Finally we discuss our observations of the plastic nature of clock gene expression at the post-transcriptional level in the context of the ongoing fascination of how plants respond to temperature. PMID:22902701

  3. VLBI clock synchronization. [for atomic clock rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counselman, C. C., III; Shapiro, I. I.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Hinteregger, H. F.; Knight, C. A.; Whitney, A. R.; Clark, T. A.

    1977-01-01

    The potential accuracy of VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) for clock epoch and rate comparisons was demonstrated by results from long- and short-baseline experiments. It was found that atomic clocks at widely separated sites (several thousand kilometers apart) can be synchronized to within several nanoseconds from a few minutes of VLBI observations and to within one nanosecond from several hours of observations.

  4. Reciprocal Interaction of the Circadian Clock with the Iron Homeostasis Network in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sunghyun; Kim, Sun A.; Guerinot, Mary Lou; McClung, C. Robertson

    2013-01-01

    In plants, iron (Fe) uptake and homeostasis are critical for survival, and these processes are tightly regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillating mechanisms that allow an organism to anticipate environmental changes to coordinate biological processes both with one another and with the environmental day/night cycle. The plant circadian clock controls many physiological processes through rhythmic expression of transcripts. In this study, we examined the expression of three Fe homeostasis genes (IRON REGULATED TRANSPORTER1 [IRT1], BASIC HELIX LOOP HELIX39, and FERRITIN1) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using promoter:LUCIFERASE transgenic lines. Each of these promoters showed circadian regulation of transcription. The circadian clock monitors a number of clock outputs and uses these outputs as inputs to modulate clock function. We show that this is also true for Fe status. Fe deficiency results in a lengthened circadian period. We interrogated mutants impaired in the Fe homeostasis response, including irt1-1, which lacks the major high-affinity Fe transporter, and fit-2, which lacks Fe deficiency-induced TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor necessary for induction of the Fe deficiency response. Both mutants exhibit symptoms of Fe deficiency, including lengthened circadian period. To determine which components are involved in this cross talk between the circadian and Fe homeostasis networks, we tested clock- or Fe homeostasis-related mutants. Mutants defective in specific clock gene components were resistant to the change in period length under different Fe conditions observed in the wild type, suggesting that these mutants are impaired in cross talk between Fe homeostasis and the circadian clock. PMID:23250624

  5. CRY Drives Cyclic CK2-Mediated BMAL1 Phosphorylation to Control the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Tamaru, Teruya; Hattori, Mitsuru; Honda, Kousuke; Nakahata, Yasukazu; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Ozawa, Takeaki; Takamatsu, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular circadian clocks, composed of clock genes that act in transcription-translation feedback loops, drive global rhythmic expression of the mammalian transcriptome and allow an organism to anticipate to the momentum of the day. Using a novel clock-perturbing peptide, we established a pivotal role for casein kinase (CK)-2-mediated circadian BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation (BMAL1-P) in regulating central and peripheral core clocks. Subsequent analysis of the underlying mechanism showed a novel role of CRY as a repressor for protein kinase. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and real-time monitoring of protein–protein interactions revealed that CRY-mediated periodic binding of CK2β to BMAL1 inhibits BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation by CK2α. The FAD binding domain of CRY1, two C-terminal BMAL1 domains, and particularly BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation/deacetylation by CLOCK/SIRT1, were shown to be critical for CRY-mediated BMAL1–CK2β binding. Reciprocally, BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation is prerequisite for BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation. We propose a dual negative-feedback model in which a CRY-dependent CK2-driven posttranslational BMAL1–P-BMAL1 loop is an integral part of the core clock oscillator. PMID:26562092

  6. Gigabit Ethernet Asynchronous Clock Compensation FIFO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duhachek, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Clock compensation for Gigabit Ethernet is necessary because the clock recovered from the 1.25 Gb/s serial data stream has the potential to be 200 ppm slower or faster than the system clock. The serial data is converted to 10-bit parallel data at a 125 MHz rate on a clock recovered from the serial data stream. This recovered data needs to be processed by a system clock that is also running at a nominal rate of 125 MHz, but not synchronous to the recovered clock. To cross clock domains, an asynchronous FIFO (first-in-first-out) is used, with the write pointer (wprt) in the recovered clock domain and the read pointer (rptr) in the system clock domain. Because the clocks are generated from separate sources, there is potential for FIFO overflow or underflow. Clock compensation in Gigabit Ethernet is possible by taking advantage of the protocol data stream features. There are two distinct data streams that occur in Gigabit Ethernet where identical data is transmitted for a period of time. The first is configuration, which happens during auto-negotiation. The second is idle, which occurs at the end of auto-negotiation and between every packet. The identical data in the FIFO can be repeated by decrementing the read pointer, thus compensating for a FIFO that is draining too fast. The identical data in the FIFO can also be skipped by incrementing the read pointer, which compensates for a FIFO draining too slowly. The unique and novel features of this FIFO are that it works in both the idle stream and the configuration streams. The increment or decrement of the read pointer is different in the idle and compensation streams to preserve disparity. Another unique feature is that the read pointer to write pointer difference range changes between compensation and idle to minimize FIFO latency during packet transmission.

  7. The Ozone-Iodine-Chlorate Clock Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T. P.; Monteiro, Emily V.; Pereira, Juliano R. T.; Faria, Roberto B.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new clock reaction based on ozone, iodine, and chlorate that differs from the known chlorate-iodine clock reaction because it does not require UV light. The induction period for this new clock reaction depends inversely on the initial concentrations of ozone, chlorate, and perchloric acid but is independent of the initial iodine concentration. The proposed mechanism considers the reaction of ozone and iodide to form HOI, which is a key species for producing non-linear autocatalytic behavior. The novelty of this system lies in the presence of ozone, whose participation has never been observed in complex systems such as clock or oscillating reactions. Thus, the autocatalysis demonstrated in this new clock reaction should open the possibility for a new family of oscillating reactions. PMID:24386257

  8. The ozone-iodine-chlorate clock reaction.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T P; Monteiro, Emily V; Pereira, Juliano R T; Faria, Roberto B

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new clock reaction based on ozone, iodine, and chlorate that differs from the known chlorate-iodine clock reaction because it does not require UV light. The induction period for this new clock reaction depends inversely on the initial concentrations of ozone, chlorate, and perchloric acid but is independent of the initial iodine concentration. The proposed mechanism considers the reaction of ozone and iodide to form HOI, which is a key species for producing non-linear autocatalytic behavior. The novelty of this system lies in the presence of ozone, whose participation has never been observed in complex systems such as clock or oscillating reactions. Thus, the autocatalysis demonstrated in this new clock reaction should open the possibility for a new family of oscillating reactions. PMID:24386257

  9. The ozone-iodine-chlorate clock reaction.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T P; Monteiro, Emily V; Pereira, Juliano R T; Faria, Roberto B

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new clock reaction based on ozone, iodine, and chlorate that differs from the known chlorate-iodine clock reaction because it does not require UV light. The induction period for this new clock reaction depends inversely on the initial concentrations of ozone, chlorate, and perchloric acid but is independent of the initial iodine concentration. The proposed mechanism considers the reaction of ozone and iodide to form HOI, which is a key species for producing non-linear autocatalytic behavior. The novelty of this system lies in the presence of ozone, whose participation has never been observed in complex systems such as clock or oscillating reactions. Thus, the autocatalysis demonstrated in this new clock reaction should open the possibility for a new family of oscillating reactions.

  10. Modeling circadian clock-cell cycle interaction effects on cell population growth rates.

    PubMed

    El Cheikh, R; Bernard, S; El Khatib, N

    2014-12-21

    The circadian clock and the cell cycle are two tightly coupled oscillators. Recent analytical studies have shown counter-intuitive effects of circadian gating of the cell cycle on growth rates of proliferating cells which cannot be explained by a molecular model or a population model alone. In this work, we present a combined molecular-population model that studies how coupling the circadian clock to the cell cycle, through the protein WEE1, affects a proliferating cell population. We show that the cell cycle can entrain to the circadian clock with different rational period ratios and characterize multiple domains of entrainment. We show that coupling increases the growth rate for autonomous periods of the cell cycle around 24 h and above 48 h. We study the effect of mutation of circadian genes on the growth rate of cells and show that disruption of the circadian clock can lead to abnormal proliferation. Particularly, we show that Cry 1, Cry 2 mutations decrease the growth rate of cells, Per 2 mutation enhances it and Bmal 1 knockout increases it for autonomous periods of the cell cycle less than 21 h and decreases it elsewhere. Combining a molecular model to a population model offers new insight on the influence of the circadian clock on the growth of a cell population. This can help chronotherapy which takes benefits of physiological rhythms to improve anti-cancer efficacy and tolerance to drugs by administering treatments at a specific time of the day.

  11. Palmitate alters the rhythmic expression of molecular clock genes and orexigenic neuropeptide Y mRNA levels within immortalized, hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Fick, Laura J; Fick, Gordon H; Belsham, Denise D

    2011-09-30

    The control of energy homeostasis within the hypothalamus is under the regulated control of homeostatic hormones, nutrients and the expression of neuropeptides that alter feeding behavior. Elevated levels of palmitate, a predominant saturated fatty acid in diet and fatty acid biosynthesis, alter cellular function. For instance, a key mechanism involved in the development of insulin resistance is lipotoxicity, through increased circulating saturated fatty acids. Although many studies have begun to determine the underlying mechanisms of lipotoxicity in peripheral tissues, little is known about the effects of excess lipids in the brain. To determine these mechanisms we used an immortalized, clonal, hypothalamic cell line, mHypoE-44, to demonstrate that palmitate directly alters the expression of molecular clock components, by increasing Bmal1 and Clock, or by decreasing Per2, and Rev-erbα, their mRNA levels and altering their rhythmic period within individual neurons. We found that these neurons endogenously express the orexigenic neuropeptides NPY and AgRP, thus we determined that palmitate administration alters the mRNA expression of these neuropeptides as well. Palmitate treatment causes a significant increase in NPY mRNA levels and significantly alters the phase of rhythmic expression. We explored the link between AMPK and the expression of neuropeptide Y using the AMPK inhibitor compound C and the AMP analog AICAR. AMPK inhibition decreased NPY mRNA. AICAR also elevated basal NPY, but prevented the palmitate-mediated increase in NPY mRNA levels. We postulate that this palmitate-mediated increase in NPY and AgRP synthesis may initiate a detrimental positive feedback loop leading to increased energy consumption.

  12. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a new model system for studying the molecular basis of the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Takuya; Ishiura, Masahiro

    2011-05-20

    The genome of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has both plant-like and animal-like genes. It is of interest to know which types of clock genes this alga has. Recent forward and reverse genetic studies have revealed that its clock has both plant-like and algal clock components. In addition, since C. reinhardtii is a useful model organism also called "green yeast", the identification of clock genes will make C. reinhardtii a powerful model for studying the molecular basis of the eukaryotic circadian clock. In this review, we describe our forward genetic approach in C. reinhardtii and discuss some recent findings about its circadian clock.

  13. Entrainment in solution of an oscillating NADH oxidase activity from the bovine milk fat globule membrane with a temperature-compensated period length suggestive of an ultradian time-keeping (clock) function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Lawler, Juliana; Wang, Sui; Keenan, Thomas W.; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2002-01-01

    Entrainment in solution of an oscillating activity with a temperature compensated period of 24 min is described for a NADH oxidase (NOX) activity of the bovine milk fat globule membrane, a derivative of the mammary epithelial cell plasma membrane. The period of 24 min remained unchanged at 17 degrees C, 27 degrees C and 37 degrees C whereas the amplitude approximately doubled with each 10 degree C rise in temperature (Q(10)congruent with 2). The periodicity was observed with both intact milk fat globule membranes and with detergent-solubilized membranes, demonstrating that the oscillations did not require an association with membranes. The periodicity was not the result of instrument variation or of chemical interactions among reactants in solution. Preparations with different periodicities entrained (autosynchronized) when mixed. Upon mixing, the preparations exhibited two oscillatory patterns but eventually a single pattern representing the mean of the farthest separated maxima of the two preparations analyzed separately emerged. The cell surface NOX protein is the first reported example of an entrainable biochemical entity with a temperature-compensated periodicity potentially capable of functioning as an ultradian or circadian clock driver.

  14. The epigenetic language of circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Sahar, Saurabh; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic control, which includes DNA methylation and histone modifications, leads to chromatin remodeling and regulated gene expression. Remodeling of chromatin constitutes a critical interface of transducing signals, such as light or nutrient availability, and how these are interpreted by the cell to generate permissive or silenced states for transcription. CLOCK-BMAL1-mediated activation of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) is coupled to circadian changes in histone modification at their promoters. Several chromatin modifiers, such as the deacetylases SIRT1 and HDAC3 or methyltransferase MLL1, have been shown to be recruited to the promoters of the CCGs in a circadian manner. Interestingly, the central element of the core clock machinery, the transcription factor CLOCK, also possesses histone acetyltransferase activity. Rhythmic expression of the CCGs is abolished in the absence of these chromatin modifiers. Here we will discuss the evidence demonstrating that chromatin remodeling is at the crossroads of circadian rhythms and regulation of metabolism and cellular proliferation. PMID:23604474

  15. Fluoxetine normalizes disrupted light-induced entrainment, fragmented ultradian rhythms and altered hippocampal clock gene expression in an animal model of high trait anxiety- and depression-related behavior

    PubMed Central

    Schaufler, Jörg; Ronovsky, Marianne; Savalli, Giorgia; Cabatic, Maureen; Sartori, Simone B.; Singewald, Nicolas; Pollak, Daniela D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction Disturbances of circadian rhythms are a key symptom of mood and anxiety disorders. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) - commonly used antidepressant drugs – also modulate aspects of circadian rhythmicity. However, their potential to restore circadian disturbances in depression remains to be investigated. Materials and methods The effects of the SSRI fluoxetine on genetically based, depression-related circadian disruptions at the behavioral and molecular level were examined using mice selectively bred for high anxiety-related and co-segregating depression-like behavior (HAB) and normal anxiety/depression behavior mice (NAB). Results The length of the circadian period was increased in fluoxetine-treated HAB as compared to NAB mice while the number of activity bouts and light-induced entrainment were comparable. No difference in hippocampal Cry2 expression, previously reported to be dysbalanced in untreated HAB mice, was observed, while Per2 and Per3 mRNA levels were higher in HAB mice under fluoxetine treatment. Discussion The present findings provide evidence that fluoxetine treatment normalizes disrupted circadian locomotor activity and clock gene expression in a genetic mouse model of high trait anxiety and depression. An interaction between the molecular mechanisms mediating the antidepressant response to fluoxetine and the endogenous regulation of circadian rhythms in genetically based mood and anxiety disorders is proposed. PMID:26679264

  16. Gender disparity of hepatic lipid homoeostasis regulated by the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Esterly, Noriko; Klaassen, Curtis D; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2009-05-01

    The mammalian clock regulates major aspects of energy metabolism, including glucose and lipid homoeostasis as well as mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. This study is to identify specific patterns of circadian rhythms for lipid homoeostasis in both female and male mouse livers, and to clarify gender disparity in coupling the peripheral circadian clock to lipid metabolic outputs by nuclear receptors. To achieve this, profiling the diurnal hepatic expression of genes encoding circadian clocks, nuclear receptors and lipid metabolic enzymes was performed. Hepatic lipid levels including cholesterol, triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) were monitored over a 24-h period. The cosinor analysis revealed that several genes encoding nuclear receptors and enzymes involved in the lipid metabolic pathway were rhythmically expressed in liver in phase with the peripheral clocks, which were correlated with the diurnal changes of hepatic lipid levels. Gender disparity was observed for circadian characteristics including mesor and amplitude values, accompanied with advances in acrophases in female mouse livers. Accordingly, gender differences were also observed in diurnal lipid homoeostasis. The identification of cycling patterns for lipid metabolic pathways in both female and male mouse livers may shed light on the development of gender-based treatment for human diseases related to the coordination of the cellular clock and control of lipid homoeostasis.

  17. The regulation of central and peripheral circadian clocks in humans.

    PubMed

    Cermakian, N; Boivin, D B

    2009-11-01

    Many circadian rhythms are controlled by the central clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, as well as clocks located in other brain regions and most peripheral tissues. These central and peripheral clocks are based on clock genes and their protein products. In recent years, the expression of clock genes has started to be investigated in human samples, primarily white blood cells, but also skin, oral mucosa, colon cells, adipose tissue as well as post-mortem brain tissue. The expression of clock genes in those peripheral tissues offers a way to monitor human peripheral clocks and to compare their function and regulation with those of the central clock, which is followed by markers such as melatonin, cortisol and core body temperature. We have recently used such an approach to compare central and peripheral rhythms in subjects under different lighting conditions. In particular, we have monitored the entrainment of the clock of blood cells in subjects undergoing a simulated night shift protocol with bright light treatment, known to efficiently reset the central clock. This line of research will be helpful for learning more about the human circadian system and to find ways to alleviate health problems of shift workers, and other populations experiencing altered circadian rhythms. PMID:19849799

  18. The Neurospora circadian clock: simple or complex?

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Pedersen, D; Crosthwaite, S K; Lakin-Thomas, P L; Merrow, M; Økland, M

    2001-01-01

    The fungus Neurospora crassa is being used by a number of research groups as a model organism to investigate circadian (daily) rhythmicity. In this review we concentrate on recent work relating to the complexity of the circadian system in this organism. We discuss: the advantages of Neurospora as a model system for clock studies; the frequency (frq), white collar-1 and white collar-2 genes and their roles in rhythmicity; the phenomenon of rhythmicity in null frq mutants and its implications for clock mechanisms; the study of output pathways using clock-controlled genes; other rhythms in fungi; mathematical modelling of the Neurospora circadian system; and the application of new technologies to the study of Neurospora rhythmicity. We conclude that there may be many gene products involved in the clock mechanism, there may be multiple interacting oscillators comprising the clock mechanism, there may be feedback from output pathways onto the oscillator(s) and from the oscillator(s) onto input pathways, and there may be several independent clocks coexisting in one organism. Thus even a relatively simple lower eukaryote can be used to address questions about a complex, networked circadian system. PMID:11710976

  19. Modeling light adaptation in circadian clock: prediction of the response that stabilizes entrainment.

    PubMed

    Tsumoto, Kunichika; Kurosawa, Gen; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Periods of biological clocks are close to but often different from the rotation period of the earth. Thus, the clocks of organisms must be adjusted to synchronize with day-night cycles. The primary signal that adjusts the clocks is light. In Neurospora, light transiently up-regulates the expression of specific clock genes. This molecular response to light is called light adaptation. Does light adaptation occur in other organisms? Using published experimental data, we first estimated the time course of the up-regulation rate of gene expression by light. Intriguingly, the estimated up-regulation rate was transient during light period in mice as well as Neurospora. Next, we constructed a computational model to consider how light adaptation had an effect on the entrainment of circadian oscillation to 24-h light-dark cycles. We found that cellular oscillations are more likely to be destabilized without light adaption especially when light intensity is very high. From the present results, we predict that the instability of circadian oscillations under 24-h light-dark cycles can be experimentally observed if light adaptation is altered. We conclude that the functional consequence of light adaptation is to increase the adjustability to 24-h light-dark cycles and then adapt to fluctuating environments in nature.

  20. Microgravity influences circadian clock oscillation in human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri, Danilo; Cucina, Alessandra; Bizzarri, Mariano; Alimandi, Maurizio; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity and sudden changes of gravitational forces exert numerous effects on tissues, organs and apparatus. Responses to these forces variably applied to cells indicate the existence of mechanotransduction pathways able to modulate transcription. Oscillation of circadian clocks similarly influences many cellular and metabolic processes. Here we hypothesized that signals derived from changes of gravitational forces applied to epidermal cells might influence their physiology in harmony with the oscillation of the molecular clock. In this study, we describe amplified oscillations of Bmal1 circadian clock gene in human keratinocytes exposed to short simulated microgravity and to rapid variation of gravitational forces. We found that exposure to microgravity enhances the amplitude of the Bmal1 feedback loop sustained by an apparently lower variability of Rev-erbα transcription, while recovery from microgravity is characterized by increased amplitude of Bmal1 expression and elongation of the oscillatory periods of Bmal1 and Rev-erbα. These data highlight the existence of integrated signaling network connecting mechanosensitive pathways to circadian gene regulation. PMID:26448904