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Sample records for clostridium acetobutylicum genome

  1. Annotation of the Clostridium Acetobutylicum Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, M. J.

    2004-06-09

    The genome sequence of the solvent producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC824, has been determined by the shotgun approach. The genome consists of a 3.94 Mb chromosome and a 192 kb megaplasmid that contains the majority of genes responsible for solvent production. Comparison of C. acetobutylicum to Bacillus subtilis reveals significant local conservation of gene order, which has not been seen in comparisons of other genomes with similar, or, in some cases, closer, phylogenetic proximity. This conservation allows the prediction of many previously undetected operons in both bacteria.

  2. Single Crossover-Mediated Markerless Genome Engineering in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Hyun Ju; Shin, Yong-An; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Sang Jun

    2016-04-28

    A novel genome-engineering tool in Clostridium acetobutylicum was developed based on singlecrossover homologous recombination. A small-sized non-replicable plasmid, pHKO1, was designed for efficient integration into the C. acetobutylicum genome. The integrated pHKO1 plasmid backbone, which included an antibiotic resistance gene, can be excised in vivo by Flp recombinase, leaving a single flippase recognition target sequence in the middle of the targeted gene. Since the pSHL-FLP plasmid, the carrier of the Flp recombinase gene, employed the segregationally unstable pAMβ1 replicon, the plasmid was rapidly cured from the mutant C. acetobutylicum. Consequently, our method makes it easier to engineer C. acetobutylicum.

  3. CRISPR-based genome editing and expression control systems in Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Chen, Jun; Minton, Nigel P; Zhang, Ying; Wen, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jinle; Yang, Haifeng; Zeng, Zhe; Ren, Xiaodan; Yang, Junjie; Gu, Yang; Jiang, Weihong; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Solventogenic clostridia are important industrial microorganisms that produce various chemicals and fuels. Effective genetic tools would facilitate physiological studies aimed both at improving our understanding of metabolism and optimizing solvent productivity through metabolic engineering. Here we have developed an all-in-one, CRISPR-based genome editing plasmid, pNICKclos, that can be used to achieve successive rounds of gene editing in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 with efficiencies varying from 6.7% to 100% and 18.8% to 100%, respectively. The plasmid specifies the requisite target-specific guide RNA, the gene encoding the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 nickase and the genome editing template encompassing the gene-specific homology arms. It can be used to create single target mutants within three days, with a further two days required for the curing of the pNICKclos plasmid ready for a second round of mutagenesis. A S. pyogenes dCas9-mediated gene regulation control system, pdCASclos, was also developed and used in a CRISPRi strategy to successfully repress the expression of spo0A in C. acetobutylicum and C. beijerinckii. The combined application of the established high efficiency CRISPR-Cas9 based genome editing and regulation control systems will greatly accelerate future progress in the understanding and manipulation of metabolism in solventogenic clostridia. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Genome Sequence and Comparative Analysis of the Solvent-Producing Bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Nölling, Jörk; Breton, Gary; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Makarova, Kira S.; Zeng, Qiandong; Gibson, Rene; Lee, Hong Mei; Dubois, JoAnn; Qiu, Dayong; Hitti, Joseph; Wolf, Yuri I.; Tatusov, Roman L.; Sabathe, Fabrice; Doucette-Stamm, Lynn; Soucaille, Philippe; Daly, Michael J.; Bennett, George N.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Smith, Douglas R.

    2001-01-01

    The genome sequence of the solvent-producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 has been determined by the shotgun approach. The genome consists of a 3.94-Mb chromosome and a 192-kb megaplasmid that contains the majority of genes responsible for solvent production. Comparison of C. acetobutylicum to Bacillus subtilis reveals significant local conservation of gene order, which has not been seen in comparisons of other genomes with similar, or, in some cases closer, phylogenetic proximity. This conservation allows the prediction of many previously undetected operons in both bacteria. However, the C. acetobutylicum genome also contains a significant number of predicted operons that are shared with distantly related bacteria and archaea but not with B. subtilis. Phylogenetic analysis is compatible with the dissemination of such operons by horizontal transfer. The enzymes of the solventogenesis pathway and of the cellulosome of C. acetobutylicum comprise a new set of metabolic capacities not previously represented in the collection of complete genomes. These enzymes show a complex pattern of evolutionary affinities, emphasizing the role of lateral gene exchange in the evolution of the unique metabolic profile of the bacterium. Many of the sporulation genes identified in B. subtilis are missing in C. acetobutylicum, which suggests major differences in the sporulation process. Thus, comparative analysis reveals both significant conservation of the genome organization and pronounced differences in many systems that reflect unique adaptive strategies of the two gram-positive bacteria. PMID:11466286

  5. Genome analysis of a hyper acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) producing Clostridium acetobutylicum BKM19.

    PubMed

    Cho, Changhee; Choe, Donghui; Jang, Yu-Sin; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Won Jun; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Papoutsakis, E Terry; Bennett, George N; Seung, Do Young; Lee, Sang Yup

    2017-02-01

    Previously the development of a hyper acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) producing Clostridium acetobutylicum BKM19 strain capable of producing 30.5% more total solvent by random mutagenesis of its parental strain PJC4BK, which is a buk mutant C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 strain is reported. Here, BKM19 and PJC4BK strains are re-sequenced by a high-throughput sequencing technique to understand the mutations responsible for enhanced solvent production. In comparison with the C. acetobutylicum PJC4BK, 13 single nucleotide variants (SNVs), one deletion and one back mutation SNV are identified in the C. acetobutylicum BKM19 genome. Except for one SNV found in the megaplasmid, all mutations are found in the chromosome of BKM19. Among them, a mutation in the thlA gene encoding thiolase is further studied with respect to enzyme activity and butanol production. The mutant thiolase (thlA(V5A) ) is showed a 32% higher activity than that of the wild-type thiolase (thlA(WT) ). In batch fermentation, butanol production is increased by 26% and 23% when the thlA(V5A) gene is overexpressed in the wild-type C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and in its derivative, the thlA-knockdown TKW-A strain, respectively. Based on structural analysis, the mutation in thiolase does not have a direct effect on the regulatory determinant region (RDR). However, the mutation at the 5(th) residue seems to influence the stability of the RDR, and thus, increases the enzymatic activity and enhances solvent production in the BKM19 strain. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A two-plasmid inducible CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing tool for Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Wasels, François; Jean-Marie, Jennifer; Collas, Florent; López-Contreras, Ana M; Lopes Ferreira, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    CRISPR/Cas-based genetic engineering has revolutionised molecular biology in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Several tools dedicated to the genomic transformation of the Clostridium genus of Gram-positive bacteria have been described in the literature; however, the integration of large DNA fragments still remains relatively limited. In this study, a CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing tool using a two-plasmid strategy was developed for the solventogenic strain Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Codon-optimised cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes was placed under the control of an anhydrotetracycline-inducible promoter on one plasmid, while the gRNA expression cassettes and editing templates were located on a second plasmid. Through the sequential introduction of these vectors into the cell, we achieved highly accurate genome modifications, including nucleotide substitution, gene deletion and cassette insertion up to 3.6kb. To demonstrate its potential, this genome editing tool was used to generate a marker-free mutant of ATCC 824 that produced an isopropanol-butanol-ethanol mixture. Whole-genome sequencing confirmed that no off-target modifications were present in the mutants. Such a tool is a prerequisite for efficient metabolic engineering in this solventogenic strain and provides an alternative editing strategy that might be applicable to other Clostridium strains. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhanced butanol production from cassava with Clostridium acetobutylicum by genome shuffling.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Bo; Qian, Yi; Liang, Zheng-Wu; Guo, Yuan; Zhao, Mou-Ming; Pang, Zong-Wen

    2016-04-01

    To obtain strains exhibiting high levels of solvent tolerance and butanol production, wild type strains of Clostridium acetobutylicum butanol-producing strain GX01 and Lactobacillus mucosae butanol-tolerant strain M26 were subjected to mutagenesis combining N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine induction with genome shuffling. After four successive rounds of genome shuffling, the C. acetobutylicum shuffled strain GS4-3 showing greater levels of fermentation performances (such as secreting a higher level of amylase, improving the thermal stability, and possessing greater environmental robustness) compared to the wild type strains was isolated. As a result, after optimization of culture conditions, mutant GS4-3 produced 32.6 g/L of total solvent, 20.1 g/L of butanol production, and 0.35 g/L/h of butanol productivity, which were, respectively, increased by 23.5, 23.3, and 40.0 % than the wild-type strain GX01, in a 10 L bioreactor. The enhanced production of butanol and tolerance of solvent of mutant associated with GS4-3 make it promising for acetone/butanol/ethanol fermentation from cassava (Manihot esculenta).

  8. Comparative genomic and transcriptomic analysis revealed genetic characteristics related to solvent formation and xylose utilization in Clostridium acetobutylicum EA 2018

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clostridium acetobutylicum, a gram-positive and spore-forming anaerobe, is a major strain for the fermentative production of acetone, butanol and ethanol. But a previously isolated hyper-butanol producing strain C. acetobutylicum EA 2018 does not produce spores and has greater capability of solvent production, especially for butanol, than the type strain C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Results Complete genome of C. acetobutylicum EA 2018 was sequenced using Roche 454 pyrosequencing. Genomic comparison with ATCC 824 identified many variations which may contribute to the hyper-butanol producing characteristics in the EA 2018 strain, including a total of 46 deletion sites and 26 insertion sites. In addition, transcriptomic profiling of gene expression in EA 2018 relative to that of ATCC824 revealed expression-level changes of several key genes related to solvent formation. For example, spo0A and adhEII have higher expression level, and most of the acid formation related genes have lower expression level in EA 2018. Interestingly, the results also showed that the variation in CEA_G2622 (CAC2613 in ATCC 824), a putative transcriptional regulator involved in xylose utilization, might accelerate utilization of substrate xylose. Conclusions Comparative analysis of C. acetobutylicum hyper-butanol producing strain EA 2018 and type strain ATCC 824 at both genomic and transcriptomic levels, for the first time, provides molecular-level understanding of non-sporulation, higher solvent production and enhanced xylose utilization in the mutant EA 2018. The information could be valuable for further genetic modification of C. acetobutylicum for more effective butanol production. PMID:21284892

  9. Capturing the response of Clostridium acetobutylicum to chemical stressors using a regulated genome-scale metabolic model

    DOE PAGES

    Dash, Satyakam; Mueller, Thomas J.; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P.; ...

    2014-10-14

    Clostridia are anaerobic Gram-positive Firmicutes containing broad and flexible systems for substrate utilization, which have been used successfully to produce a range of industrial compounds. Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used to produce butanol on an industrial scale through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. A genome-scale metabolic (GSM) model is a powerful tool for understanding the metabolic capacities of an organism and developing metabolic engineering strategies for strain development. The integration of stress related specific transcriptomics information with the GSM model provides opportunities for elucidating the focal points of regulation.

  10. Genome shuffling of Clostridium acetobutylicum CICC 8012 for improved production of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE).

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Hai; Zhang, Guohua; He, Kaize; Jin, Yanling

    2012-08-01

    Genome shuffling was applied to increase ABE production of the strict anaerobe C. acetobutylicum CICC 8012. By using physical and chemical mutagenesis, strains with superior streptomycin sulfate, 2-deoxy-D-glucose and butanol tolerance levels were isolated. These strains were used for genome shuffling. The best performing strain F2-GA was screened after two rounds of genome shuffling. With 55 g glucose/l as carbon source, F2-GA produced 22.21 g ABE/l in 72 h and ABE yield reached 0.42 g/g which was about 34.53 % improvement compared to the wild type. Fermentation parameters and gene expression of several key enzymes in ABE metabolic pathways were varied significantly between F2-GA and the wild type. These results demonstrated the potential use of genome shuffling to microbial breeding which were difficult to deal with traditional methods.

  11. Ribulokinase and Transcriptional Regulation of Arabinose Metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Leyn, Semen A.; Gu, Yang; Jiang, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor AraR controls utilization of l-arabinose in Bacillus subtilis. In this study, we combined a comparative genomic reconstruction of AraR regulons in nine Clostridium species with detailed experimental characterization of AraR-mediated regulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum. Based on the reconstructed AraR regulons, a novel ribulokinase, AraK, present in all analyzed Clostridium species was identified, which was a nonorthologous replacement of previously characterized ribulokinases. The predicted function of the araK gene was confirmed by inactivation of the araK gene in C. acetobutylicum and biochemical assays using purified recombinant AraK. In addition to the genes involved in arabinose utilization and arabinoside degradation, extension of the AraR regulon to the pentose phosphate pathway genes in several Clostridium species was revealed. The predicted AraR-binding sites in the C. acetobutylicum genome and the negative effect of l-arabinose on DNA-regulator complex formation were verified by in vitro binding assays. The predicted AraR-controlled genes in C. acetobutylicum were experimentally validated by testing gene expression patterns in both wild-type and araR-inactivated mutant strains during growth in the absence or presence of l-arabinose. PMID:22194461

  12. Ribulokinase and transcriptional regulation of arabinose metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Leyn, Semen A; Gu, Yang; Jiang, Weihong; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Yang, Chen

    2012-03-01

    The transcription factor AraR controls utilization of L-arabinose in Bacillus subtilis. In this study, we combined a comparative genomic reconstruction of AraR regulons in nine Clostridium species with detailed experimental characterization of AraR-mediated regulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum. Based on the reconstructed AraR regulons, a novel ribulokinase, AraK, present in all analyzed Clostridium species was identified, which was a nonorthologous replacement of previously characterized ribulokinases. The predicted function of the araK gene was confirmed by inactivation of the araK gene in C. acetobutylicum and biochemical assays using purified recombinant AraK. In addition to the genes involved in arabinose utilization and arabinoside degradation, extension of the AraR regulon to the pentose phosphate pathway genes in several Clostridium species was revealed. The predicted AraR-binding sites in the C. acetobutylicum genome and the negative effect of L-arabinose on DNA-regulator complex formation were verified by in vitro binding assays. The predicted AraR-controlled genes in C. acetobutylicum were experimentally validated by testing gene expression patterns in both wild-type and araR-inactivated mutant strains during growth in the absence or presence of L-arabinose.

  13. Cellulolytic Activity of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Lee, S F; Forsberg, C W; Gibbins, L N

    1985-08-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum NRRL B527 and ATCC 824 exhibited extracellular and cell-bound endoglucanase and cellobiase activities during growth in a chemically defined medium with cellobiose as the sole source of carbohydrate. For both strains, the endoglucanase was found to be mainly extracellular (70 to 90%) during growth in continuous or batch cultures with the pH maintained at 5.2, whereas the cellobiase was mainly cell associated (60 to 90%). During continuous cultivation of strain B527 with cellobiose as the limiting nutrient, maximum production of the endoglucanase and cellobiase occurred at pH values of 5.2 and 4.8, respectively. In the carbon-limited continuous cultures, strain 824 produced similar levels of endoglucanase, cellobiosidase, and cellobiase activities regardless of the carbon source used. However, in ammonium- or phosphate-limited cultures, with an excess of glucose, only 1/10 of the endoglucanase was produced, and neither cellobiosidase nor cellobiase activities were detectable. A crude extracellular enzyme preparation from strain B527 hydrolyzed carboxymethylcellulose and phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose readily and microcrystalline cellulose (A vicel) to a lesser extent. Glucose accounted for more than 90% of the reducing sugar produced by the hydrolysis of acid-swollen cellulose and Avicel. Strain B527 did not grow in medium with acid-swollen cellulose as the sole source of carbohydrate, although it grew readily on the products obtained by hydrolyzing the cellulose in vitro with a preparation of extracellular cellulase derived from the same organism.

  14. Capturing the response of Clostridium acetobutylicum to chemical stressors using a regulated genome-scale metabolic model

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, Satyakam; Mueller, Thomas J.; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2014-10-14

    Clostridia are anaerobic Gram-positive Firmicutes containing broad and flexible systems for substrate utilization, which have been used successfully to produce a range of industrial compounds. Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used to produce butanol on an industrial scale through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. A genome-scale metabolic (GSM) model is a powerful tool for understanding the metabolic capacities of an organism and developing metabolic engineering strategies for strain development. The integration of stress related specific transcriptomics information with the GSM model provides opportunities for elucidating the focal points of regulation.

  15. Construction of a restriction-less, marker-less mutant useful for functional genomic and metabolic engineering of the biofuel producer Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Croux, Christian; Nguyen, Ngoc-Phuong-Thao; Lee, Jieun; Raynaud, Céline; Saint-Prix, Florence; Gonzalez-Pajuelo, Maria; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Soucaille, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is a gram-positive, spore-forming, anaerobic bacterium capable of converting various sugars and polysaccharides into solvents (acetone, butanol, and ethanol). The sequencing of its genome has prompted new approaches to genetic analysis, functional genomics, and metabolic engineering to develop industrial strains for the production of biofuels and bulk chemicals. The method used in this paper to knock-out or knock-in genes in C. acetobutylicum combines the use of an antibiotic-resistance gene for the deletion or replacement of the target gene, the subsequent elimination of the antibiotic-resistance gene with the flippase recombinase system from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and a C. acetobutylicum strain that lacks upp, which encodes uracil phosphoribosyl-transferase, for subsequent use as a counter-selectable marker. A replicative vector containing (1) a pIMP13 origin of replication from Bacillus subtilis that is functional in Clostridia, (2) a replacement cassette consisting of an antibiotic resistance gene (MLS (R) ) flanked by two FRT sequences, and (3) two sequences homologous to selected regions around target DNA sequence was first constructed. This vector was successfully used to consecutively delete the Cac824I restriction endonuclease encoding gene (CA_C1502) and the upp gene (CA_C2879) in the C. acetobutylicum ATCC824 chromosome. The resulting C. acetobutylicum Δcac1502Δupp strain is marker-less, readily transformable without any previous plasmid methylation and can serve as the host for the "marker-less" genetic exchange system. The third gene, CA_C3535, shown in this study to encode for a type II restriction enzyme (Cac824II) that recognizes the CTGAAG sequence, was deleted using an upp/5-FU counter-selection strategy to improve the efficiency of the method. The restriction-less marker-less strain and the method was successfully used to delete two genes (ctfAB) on the pSOL1 megaplasmid and one gene (ldhA) on the chromosome to get

  16. Comparative genomic and proteomic analyses of Clostridium acetobutylicum Rh8 and its parent strain DSM 1731 revealed new understandings on butanol tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bao, Guanhui; Dong, Hongjun; Zhu, Yan; Mao, Shaoming; Zhang, Tianrui; Zhang, Yanping; Chen, Zugen; Li, Yin

    2014-08-08

    Clostridium acetobutylicum strain Rh8 is a butanol-tolerant mutant which can tolerate up to 19g/L butanol, 46% higher than that of its parent strain DSM 1731. We previously performed comparative cytoplasm- and membrane-proteomic analyses to understand the mechanism underlying the improved butanol tolerance of strain Rh8. In this work, we further extended this comparison to the genomic level. Compared with the genome of the parent strain DSM 1731, two insertion sites, four deletion sites, and 67 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) are distributed throughout the genome of strain Rh8. Among the 67 SNVs, 16 SNVs are located in the predicted promoters and intergenic regions; while 29 SNVs are located in the coding sequence, affecting a total of 21 proteins involved in transport, cell structure, DNA replication, and protein translation. The remaining 22 SNVs are located in the ribosomal genes, affecting a total of 12 rRNA genes in different operons. Analysis of previous comparative proteomic data indicated that none of the differentially expressed proteins have mutations in its corresponding genes. Rchange Algorithms analysis indicated that the mutations occurred in the ribosomal genes might change the ribosome RNA thermodynamic characteristics, thus affect the translation strength of these proteins. Take together, the improved butanol tolerance of C. acetobutylicum strain Rh8 might be acquired through regulating the translational process to achieve different expression strength of genes involved in butanol tolerance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum biofilm and planktonic cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Xu, Jiahui; Wang, Yanyan; Chen, Yong; Shen, Xiaoning; Niu, Huanqing; Guo, Ting; Ying, Hanjie

    2016-01-20

    Biofilm-based immobilization of solventogenic Clostridia has been extensively exploited to overcome traditional bottlenecks in biobutanol production like solvent toxicity and low productivities. However, the molecular basis of solventogenic Clostridia biofilm is rarely explored. Here, for the first time, we report DNA array-based study of Clostridium acetobutylicum biofilm cells to elucidate the transcriptional modulation. Results showed that 16.2% of the C. acetobutylicum genome genes within the biofilm cells were differentially expressed, with most genes being up-regulated. The most dramatic changes occurred with amino acid biosynthesis, with sulfur uptake and cysteine biosynthesis being the most up-regulated and histidine biosynthesis being the most down-regulated in the biofilm cells. It was demonstrated that C. acetobutylicum biofilm cells increased metabolic activities probably by up-regulating iron and sulfur uptake and Fe-S cluster biosynthesis genes as well as glycolysis genes. Furthermore, genes involved in sporulation, granulose formation, extracellular polymer degradation, pentose catabolisms, and various other processes were also notably regulated, indicating that the biofilm mode of growth rendered the cells a distinct phenotype. This study provides valuable insights into the transcriptional regulation in C. acetobutylicum biofilm cells and should be highly useful for understanding and developing the biofilm-based processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of butanol on Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, L K; Ellefson, W L

    1985-01-01

    The internal pH of Clostridium acetobutylicum was determined at various stages during the growth of the organism. Even in the presence of significant quantities of acetic, butyric, and lactic acids, an internal pH of 6.2 was maintained. Experiments using N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide indicated that a functioning H+-ATPase is necessary for internal pH control. Butanol, one of the end products of the fermentation, had numerous harmful effects on C. acetobutylicum. At a concentration high enough to inhibit growth, butanol destroyed the ability of the cell to maintain internal pH, lowered the intracellular level of ATP, and inhibited glucose uptake. Experiments done at two different external pH values suggested that the butanol-mediated decrease in ATP concentration was independent of the drop in internal pH. Glucose uptake was not affected by arsenate, suggesting that uptake was not ATP dependent. The effects of butanol on C. acetobutylicum are complex, inhibiting several interrelated membrane processes. PMID:2868690

  19. Engineering Clostridium acetobutylicum for alcohol production.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaohu; Peng, Wanfeng; Xiong, Lian; Huang, Chao; Chen, Xuefang; Chen, Xinde; Zhang, Weiguo

    2013-06-20

    While Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used for large-scale butanol production (ABE fermentation), its by-product acetone cannot be used as a biofuel. In this study, C. acetobutylicum was engineered for alcohol titers (butanol plus ethanol). The adc gene was inactivated to eliminate acetone production, and glutathione biosynthetic capability was introduced into C. acetobutylicum to improve the strain's robustness by expressing Escherichia coli's gshAB genes in the adc locus. Acetone production was reduced from 2.64±0.22 g/L to 0.15±0.08 g/L in the engineered strain 824adc::gsh, whereas butanol production was increased from 5.17±0.26 g/L to 8.27±0.27 g/L. To further improve the alcohol titers, the metabolic flux in the alcohol biosynthesis pathways was enhanced. Overlapping PCR was used to generate expression cassette EC, which expresses the hbd, thl, crt, and bcd genes, and the Sol operon was amplified to express the adhE and ctfAB genes. Butanol and alcohol production reached 14.86±0.26 g/L and 18.11±0.66 g/L, respectively, in 824adc::gsh Sol-EC. Furthermore, the butanol and alcohol yields were 0.336 g/g and 0.409 g/g, respectively, in 824adc::gsh Sol-EC. This study provided a combined strategy for enhancing alcohol production in C. acetobutylicum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative genomic and proteomic analyses of Clostridium acetobutylicum Rh8 and its parent strain DSM 1731 revealed new understandings on butanol tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Guanhui; Dong, Hongjun; Zhu, Yan; Mao, Shaoming; Zhang, Tianrui; Zhang, Yanping; Chen, Zugen; Li, Yin

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Genomes of a butanol tolerant strain and its parent strain were deciphered. • Comparative genomic and proteomic was applied to understand butanol tolerance. • None differentially expressed proteins have mutations in its corresponding genes. • Mutations in ribosome might be responsible for the global difference of proteomics. - Abstract: Clostridium acetobutylicum strain Rh8 is a butanol-tolerant mutant which can tolerate up to 19 g/L butanol, 46% higher than that of its parent strain DSM 1731. We previously performed comparative cytoplasm- and membrane-proteomic analyses to understand the mechanism underlying the improved butanol tolerance of strain Rh8. In this work, we further extended this comparison to the genomic level. Compared with the genome of the parent strain DSM 1731, two insertion sites, four deletion sites, and 67 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) are distributed throughout the genome of strain Rh8. Among the 67 SNVs, 16 SNVs are located in the predicted promoters and intergenic regions; while 29 SNVs are located in the coding sequence, affecting a total of 21 proteins involved in transport, cell structure, DNA replication, and protein translation. The remaining 22 SNVs are located in the ribosomal genes, affecting a total of 12 rRNA genes in different operons. Analysis of previous comparative proteomic data indicated that none of the differentially expressed proteins have mutations in its corresponding genes. Rchange Algorithms analysis indicated that the mutations occurred in the ribosomal genes might change the ribosome RNA thermodynamic characteristics, thus affect the translation strength of these proteins. Take together, the improved butanol tolerance of C. acetobutylicum strain Rh8 might be acquired through regulating the translational process to achieve different expression strength of genes involved in butanol tolerance.

  1. Metabolite Analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum: Fermentation in a Microbial Fuel Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Metabolite analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum : Fermentation in a microbial fuel cell Amethist S. Finch, Timothy D. Mackie, Christian J. Sund...Fermentation products Clostridium acetobutylicum Current generation a b s t r a c t Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were used to monitor metabolism...changes in Clostridium acetobutylicum fer- mentations. When MFCs were inoculated with C. acetobutylicum , they generated a unique voltage output pattern

  2. Genome-Scale Model for Clostridium acetobutylicum: Part II. Development of Specific Proton Flux States and Numerically Determined Sub-Systems

    PubMed Central

    Senger, Ryan S.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    2009-01-01

    A regulated genome-scale model for Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was developed based on its metabolic network reconstruction. To aid model convergence and limit the number of flux-vector possible solutions (the size of the phenotypic solution space), modeling strategies were developed to impose a new type of constraint at the endo–exo-metabolome interface. This constraint is termed the specific proton flux state, and its use enabled accurate prediction of the extracellular medium pH during vegetative growth of batch cultures. The specific proton flux refers to the influx or efflux of free protons (per unit biomass) across the cell membrane. A specific proton flux state encompasses a defined range of specific proton fluxes and includes all metabolic flux distributions resulting in a specific proton flux within this range. Effective simulation of time-course batch fermentation required the use of independent flux balance solutions from an optimum set of specific proton flux states. Using a real-coded genetic algorithm to optimize temporal bounds of specific proton flux states, we show that six separate specific proton flux states are required to model vegetative-growth metabolism and accurately predict the extracellular medium pH. Further, we define the apparent proton flux stoichiometry per weak acids efflux and show that this value decreases from ~3.5 mol of protons secreted per mole of weak acids at the start of the culture to ~0 at the end of vegetative growth. Calculations revealed that when specific weak acids production is maximized in vegetative growth, the net proton exchange between the cell and environment occurs primarily through weak acids efflux (apparent proton flux stoichiometry is 1). However, proton efflux through cation channels during the early stages of acidogenesis was found to be significant. We have also developed the concept of numerically determined sub-systems of genome-scale metabolic networks here as a sub-network with a one

  3. Redox-responsive repressor Rex modulates alcohol production and oxidative stress tolerance in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Nie, Xiaoqun; Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Sheng, Jia; Gu, Yang; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong; Yang, Chen

    2014-11-01

    Rex, a transcriptional repressor that modulates its DNA-binding activity in response to NADH/NAD(+) ratio, has recently been found to play a role in the solventogenic shift of Clostridium acetobutylicum. Here, we combined a comparative genomic reconstruction of Rex regulons in 11 diverse clostridial species with detailed experimental characterization of Rex-mediated regulation in C. acetobutylicum. The reconstructed Rex regulons in clostridia included the genes involved in fermentation, hydrogen production, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, NAD biosynthesis, nitrate and sulfite reduction, and CO2/CO fixation. The predicted Rex-binding sites in the genomes of Clostridium spp. were verified by in vitro binding assays with purified Rex protein. Novel members of the C. acetobutylicum Rex regulon were identified and experimentally validated by comparing the transcript levels between the wild-type and rex-inactivated mutant strains. Furthermore, the effects of exposure to methyl viologen or H2O2 on intracellular NADH and NAD(+) concentrations, expression of Rex regulon genes, and physiology of the wild type and rex-inactivated mutant were comparatively analyzed. Our results indicate that Rex responds to NADH/NAD(+) ratio in vivo to regulate gene expression and modulates fermentation product formation and oxidative stress tolerance in C. acetobutylicum. It is suggested that Rex plays an important role in maintaining NADH/NAD(+) homeostasis in clostridia. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Redox-Responsive Repressor Rex Modulates Alcohol Production and Oxidative Stress Tolerance in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Nie, Xiaoqun; Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Sheng, Jia; Gu, Yang; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong

    2014-01-01

    Rex, a transcriptional repressor that modulates its DNA-binding activity in response to NADH/NAD+ ratio, has recently been found to play a role in the solventogenic shift of Clostridium acetobutylicum. Here, we combined a comparative genomic reconstruction of Rex regulons in 11 diverse clostridial species with detailed experimental characterization of Rex-mediated regulation in C. acetobutylicum. The reconstructed Rex regulons in clostridia included the genes involved in fermentation, hydrogen production, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, NAD biosynthesis, nitrate and sulfite reduction, and CO2/CO fixation. The predicted Rex-binding sites in the genomes of Clostridium spp. were verified by in vitro binding assays with purified Rex protein. Novel members of the C. acetobutylicum Rex regulon were identified and experimentally validated by comparing the transcript levels between the wild-type and rex-inactivated mutant strains. Furthermore, the effects of exposure to methyl viologen or H2O2 on intracellular NADH and NAD+ concentrations, expression of Rex regulon genes, and physiology of the wild type and rex-inactivated mutant were comparatively analyzed. Our results indicate that Rex responds to NADH/NAD+ ratio in vivo to regulate gene expression and modulates fermentation product formation and oxidative stress tolerance in C. acetobutylicum. It is suggested that Rex plays an important role in maintaining NADH/NAD+ homeostasis in clostridia. PMID:25182496

  5. Comparative transcriptome analysis between csrA-disruption Clostridium acetobutylicum and its parent strain.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yang; Liu, Zi-Yong; Liu, Zhen; Zheng, Hua-Jun; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-05-01

    The genome of Clostridium acetobutylicum contains the gene encoding CsrA, a carbon storage regulator. We investigated the function of CsrA in C. acetobutylicum by insertionally inactivating the encoding gene, CA_C2209 using the ClosTron. Disruption of csrA obviously decreases the growth of the organism and reduces the yield of acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABEs). Like the csrA in Escherichia coli, RNA-seq and β-galactosidase analysis revealed that csrA in C. acetobutylicum was closely involved in regulating multiple pathways including flagella assembly, oligopeptide transporting, iron uptake, and central carbon metabolism. It has also been newly demonstrated that csrA in C. acetobutylicum is related to the regulation of pathways involved in the phosphotransferase transporting systems, synthesis of riboflavin, and stage III sporulation. This research represented the first investigation of global regulation by CsrA in the strain belonging to Gram-positive bacteria through transcriptome analysis and provided the important theoretical evidence for improving solvent production by transcriptor engineering in C. acetobutylicum.

  6. A New Shuttle Plasmid That Stably Replicates in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kwon, Min-A; Choi, Sunwha; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Shin, Yong-An; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a new shuttle plasmid, designated as pLK1-MCS that can replicate in both Clostridium acetobutylicum and Escherichia coli, by combining the pUB110 and pUC19 plasmids. Plasmid pLK1-MCS replicated more stably than previously reported plasmids containing either the pIM13 or the pAMβ1 replicon in the absence of antibiotic selective pressure. The transfer frequency of pLK1-MCS into C. acetobutylicum was similar to the transfer frequency of other shuttle plasmids. We complemented C. acetobutylicum ML1 (that does not produce solvents such as acetone, butanol, and ethanol owing to loss of the megaplasmid pSOL1 harboring the adhE1-ctfAB-adc operon) by introducing pLK1-MCS carrying the adhE1-ctfAB-adc operon into C. acetobutylicum ML1. The transformed cells were able to resume anaerobic solvent production, indicating that the new shuttle plasmid has the potential for practical use in microbial biotechnology.

  7. Purification and Characterization of an Autolysin from Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Jocelyn R.; Reid, Sharon J.; Jones, David T.; Woods, David R.

    1981-01-01

    A proteinaceous substance with antibiotic-like activity, resembling that of a bacteriocin, was isolated from an industrial-scale acetone-butanol fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum. The substance, purified by acetone precipitation, diethylaminoethyl cellulose chromatography, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was characterized as a glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 28,000. The glycoprotein was partially inactivated by certain protease enzymes. It had no effect on deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, or protein synthesis, and it did not result in the loss of intracellular adenosine triphosphate. The glycoprotein lysed sodium dodecyl sulfate-treated cells and cell wall preparations, and therefore it is referred to as an autolysin. The autolysin gene appeared to be chromosomal since plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid was not detected in the C. acetobutylicum strain. PMID:16345710

  8. Cellulose fermentation by a coculture of a mesophilic cellulolytic Clostridium and Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Fond, O.; Petitdemange, E.; Petitdemange, H.; Engasser, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    A coculture of a mesophilic cellulolytic Clostridium with Clostridium acetobutylicum can yield a direct conversion of cellulose into chemicals. In 13 days 30 g/l Solka Floc is degraded and fermented into 14 g/l butyric acid, 4 g/l acetic acid, 3 g/l ethanol, and 1 g/l butanol. A four times higher rate of cellulose hydrolysis than in pure culture of the cellulolytic Clostridium is thus obtained. Fed-batch fermentations of C. acetobutylicum at different glucose feeding rate show that solvents are only produced at a sufficient high rate of glucose supply to the medium. Acids are thus the main products of the coculture because of the limited rate of cellulolysis by the mesophilic strain. 7 references, 5 figures.

  9. Metronidazole activation and isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum electron transport genes.

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, J D; Jones, D T; Woods, D R

    1991-01-01

    An Escherichia coli F19 recA, nitrate reductase-deficient mutant was constructed by transposon mutagenesis and shown to be resistant to metronidazole. This mutant was a most suitable host for the isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum genes on recombinant plasmids, which activated metronidazole and rendered the E. coli F19 strain sensitive to metronidazole. Twenty-five E. coli F19 clones containing different recombinant plasmids were isolated and classified into five groups on the basis of their sensitivity to metronidazole. The clones were tested for nitrate reductase, pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and hydrogenase activities. DNA hybridization and restriction endonuclease mapping revealed that four of the C. acetobutylicum insert DNA fragments on recombinant plasmids were linked in an 11.1-kb chromosomal fragment. DNA sequencing and amino acid homology studies indicated that this DNA fragment contained a flavodoxin gene which encoded a protein of 160 amino acids that activated metronidazole and made the E. coli F19 mutant very sensitive to metronidazole. The flavodoxin and hydrogenase genes which are involved in electron transfer systems were linked on the 11.1-kb DNA fragment from C. acetobutylicum. Images PMID:1991710

  10. Redox-switch regulatory mechanism of thiolase from Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangwoo; Jang, Yu-Sin; Ha, Sung-Chul; Ahn, Jae-Woo; Kim, Eun-Jung; Hong Lim, Jae; Cho, Changhee; Shin Ryu, Yong; Kuk Lee, Sung; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Thiolase is the first enzyme catalysing the condensation of two acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) molecules to form acetoacetyl-CoA in a dedicated pathway towards the biosynthesis of n-butanol, an important solvent and biofuel. Here we elucidate the crystal structure of Clostridium acetobutylicum thiolase (CaTHL) in its reduced/oxidized states. CaTHL, unlike those from other aerobic bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Zoogloea ramegera, is regulated by the redox-switch modulation through reversible disulfide bond formation between two catalytic cysteine residues, Cys88 and Cys378. When CaTHL is overexpressed in wild-type C. acetobutylicum, butanol production is reduced due to the disturbance of acidogenic to solventogenic shift. The CaTHLV77Q/N153Y/A286K mutant, which is not able to form disulfide bonds, exhibits higher activity than wild-type CaTHL, and enhances butanol production upon overexpression. On the basis of these results, we suggest that CaTHL functions as a key enzyme in the regulation of the main metabolism of C. acetobutylicum through a redox-switch regulatory mechanism. PMID:26391388

  11. Redox-switch regulatory mechanism of thiolase from Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangwoo; Jang, Yu-Sin; Ha, Sung-Chul; Ahn, Jae-Woo; Kim, Eun-Jung; Lim, Jae Hong; Cho, Changhee; Ryu, Yong Shin; Lee, Sung Kuk; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2015-09-22

    Thiolase is the first enzyme catalysing the condensation of two acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) molecules to form acetoacetyl-CoA in a dedicated pathway towards the biosynthesis of n-butanol, an important solvent and biofuel. Here we elucidate the crystal structure of Clostridium acetobutylicum thiolase (CaTHL) in its reduced/oxidized states. CaTHL, unlike those from other aerobic bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Zoogloea ramegera, is regulated by the redox-switch modulation through reversible disulfide bond formation between two catalytic cysteine residues, Cys88 and Cys378. When CaTHL is overexpressed in wild-type C. acetobutylicum, butanol production is reduced due to the disturbance of acidogenic to solventogenic shift. The CaTHL(V77Q/N153Y/A286K) mutant, which is not able to form disulfide bonds, exhibits higher activity than wild-type CaTHL, and enhances butanol production upon overexpression. On the basis of these results, we suggest that CaTHL functions as a key enzyme in the regulation of the main metabolism of C. acetobutylicum through a redox-switch regulatory mechanism.

  12. Cap0037, a Novel Global Regulator of Clostridium acetobutylicum Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Phuong-Thao; Linder, Sonja; Flitsch, Stefanie K; Schiel-Bengelsdorf, Bettina; Dürre, Peter; Soucaille, Philippe

    2016-10-04

    An operon comprising two genes, CA_P0037 and CA_P0036, that encode proteins of unknown function that were previously shown to be highly expressed in acidogenic cells and repressed in solventogenic and alcohologenic cells is located on the pSOL1 megaplasmid of Clostridium acetobutylicum upstream of adhE2 A CA_P0037::int (189/190s) mutant in which an intron was inserted at position 189/190 in the sense strand of CA_P0037 was successfully generated by the Targetron technique. The resultant mutant showed significantly different metabolic flux patterns in acidogenic (producing mainly lactate, butyrate, and butanol) and alcohologenic (producing mainly butyrate, acetate, and lactate) chemostat cultures but not in solventogenic or batch cultures. Transcriptomic investigation of the CA_P0037::int (189/190s) mutant showed that inactivation of CA_P0037 significantly affected the expression of more than 258 genes under acidogenic conditions. Surprisingly, genes belonging to the Fur regulon, involved in iron transport (CA_C1029-CA_C1032), or coding for the main flavodoxin (CA_C0587) were the most significantly expressed genes under all conditions, whereas fur (coding for the ferric uptake regulator) gene expression remained unchanged. Furthermore, most of the genes of the Rex regulon, such as the adhE2 and ldhA genes, and of the PerR regulon, such as rbr3A-rbr3B and dfx, were overexpressed in the mutant. In addition, the whole CA_P0037-CA_P0036 operon was highly expressed under all conditions in the CA_P0037::int (189/190s) mutant, suggesting a self-regulated expression mechanism. Cap0037 was shown to bind to the CA_P0037-CA_P0036 operon, sol operon, and adc promoters, and the binding sites were determined by DNA footprinting. Finally, a putative Cap0037 regulon was generated using a bioinformatic approach. Clostridium acetobutylicum is well-known for its ability to produce solvents, especially n-butanol. Understanding the regulatory network of C. acetobutylicum will be

  13. Pervaporative butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum B18

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Q.; Park, C.H. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering)

    1994-04-15

    Extractive acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was carried out successfully using pervaporation and a low-acid-producing Clostridium acetobutylicum B18. A pervaporation module with 0.17 m[sup 2] of surface area was made of silicone membrane of 240 [mu]m thickness. Pervaporation experiments using make-up solutions showed that butanol and acetone fluxes increased linearly with their concentrations in the aqueous phase. Fickian diffusion coefficients were constants for fixed air flow rates, and increased at higher sweep air flow rates. During batch and fed-batch fermentation, pervaporation at an air flow rate of 8 L/min removed butanol and acetone efficiently. Butanol concentration was maintained below 4.5 g/L even though Clostridium acetobutylicum B18 produced butanol steadily. Pervaporation could not remove organic acids efficiently, but organic acids did not accumulate because strain B18 produced little organic acid and recycled added organic acids efficiently. With pervaporation, glucose consumption rate increased compared to without pervaporation, and up to 160 g/L of glucose was consumed during 80 h. Cell growth was not inhibited by possible salt accumulation or oxygen diffusion through the silicone tubing. The culture volume was maintained relatively constant during fed-batch operation because of an offsetting effect of water and product removal by pervaporation and addition of nutrient supplements.

  14. Analysis of Redox Responses During TNT Transformation by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and Mutants Exhibiting Altered Metabolism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    relevant for bioremediation studies, and various Clostridium species have been reported to degrade TNT through alternative routes (Ahmad and Hughes 2000...REPORT Analysis of redox responses during TNT transformation by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and mutants exhibiting altered metabolism 14...ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The transformation of trinitrotoluene (TNT) by several mutant strains of Clostridium acetobutylicum has been

  15. In silico analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 metabolic response to an external electron supply.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Roberto; Acevedo, Alejandro; Quintero, Julián; Paredes, Ivan; Conejeros, Raúl; Aroca, Germán

    2016-02-01

    The biological production of butanol has become an important research field and thanks to genome sequencing and annotation; genome-scale metabolic reconstructions have been developed for several Clostridium species. This work makes use of the iCAC490 model of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 to analyze its metabolic capabilities and response to an external electron supply through a constraint-based approach using the Constraint-Based Reconstruction Analysis Toolbox. Several analyses were conducted, which included sensitivity, production envelope, and phenotypic phase planes. The model showed that the use of an external electron supply, which acts as co-reducing agent along with glucose-derived reducing power (electrofermentation), results in an increase in the butanol-specific productivity. However, a proportional increase in the butyrate uptake flux is required. Besides, the uptake of external butyrate leads to the coupling of butanol production and growth, which coincides with results reported in literature. Phenotypic phase planes showed that the reducing capacity becomes more limiting for growth at high butyrate uptake fluxes. An electron uptake flux allows the metabolism to reach the growth optimality line. Although the maximum butanol flux does not coincide with the growth optimality line, a butyrate uptake combined with an electron uptake flux would result in an increased butanol volumetric productivity, being a potential strategy to optimize the production of butanol by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

  16. Engineering Clostridium acetobutylicum with a histidine kinase knockout for enhanced n-butanol tolerance and production.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mengmeng; Zhao, Jingbo; Yu, Le; Tang, I-Ching; Xue, Chuang; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum JB200, a mutant strain of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 55025 obtained through strain evolution in a fibrous bed bioreactor, had high butanol tolerance and produced up to ~21 g/L butanol from glucose in batch fermentation, an improvement of ~67 % over the parental strain (~12.6 g/L). Comparative genomic analysis revealed a single-base deletion in the cac3319 gene leading to C-terminal truncation in its encoding histidine kinase (HK) in JB200. To study the effects of cac3319 mutation on cell growth and fermentation, the cac3319 gene in ATCC 55025 was disrupted using the ClosTron group II intron-based gene inactivation system. Compared to ATCC 55025, the cac3319 HK knockout mutant, HKKO, produced 44.4 % more butanol (18.2 ± 1.3 vs. 12.6 ± 0.2 g/L) with a 90 % higher productivity (0.38 ± 0.03 vs. 0.20 ± 0.02 g/L h) due to increased butanol tolerance, confirming, for the first time, that cac3319 plays an important role in regulating solvent production and tolerance in C. acetobutylicum. This work also provides a novel metabolic engineering strategy for generating high-butanol-tolerant and high-butanol-producing strains for industrial applications.

  17. Fermentation of oxidized hexose derivatives by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Servinsky, Matthew D; Liu, Sanchao; Gerlach, Elliot S; Germane, Katherine L; Sund, Christian J

    2014-09-18

    Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentations are promising for production of commodity chemicals from heterogeneous biomass due to the wide range of substrates the organism can metabolize. Much work has been done to elucidate the pathways for utilization of aldoses, but little is known about metabolism of more oxidized substrates. Two oxidized hexose derivatives, gluconate and galacturonate, are present in low cost feedstocks, and their metabolism will contribute to overall metabolic output of these substrates. A complete metabolic network for glucose, gluconate, and galacturonate utilization was generated using online databases, previous studies, genomic context, and experimental data. Gluconate appears to be metabolized via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, and is likely dehydrated to 2-keto-3-deoxy-gluconate before phosphorylation to 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-P-gluconate. Galacturonate appears to be processed via the Ashwell pathway, converging on a common metabolite for gluconate and galacturonate metabolism, 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate. As expected, increasingly oxidized substrates resulted in increasingly oxidized products with galacturonate fermentations being nearly homoacetic. Calculations of expected ATP and reducing equivalent yields and experimental data suggested galacturonate fermentations were reductant limited. Galacturonate fermentation was incomplete, which was not due solely to product inhibition or the inability to utilize low concentrations of galacturonate. Removal of H2 and CO2 by agitation resulted in faster growth, higher cell densities, formation of relatively more oxidized products, and higher product yields for cultures grown on glucose or gluconate. In contrast, cells grown on galacturonate showed reduced growth rates upon agitation, which was likely due to loss in reductant in the form of H2. The growth advantage seen on agitated glucose or gluconate cultures could not be solely attributed to improved ATP economics, thereby indicating other factors are

  18. Spontaneous large-scale autolysis in Clostridium acetobutylicum contributes to generation of more spores

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Qiao, Kai; Tian, Lei; Zhang, Quan; Liu, Zi-Yong; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-01-01

    Autolysis is a widespread phenomenon in bacteria. In batch fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, there is a spontaneous large-scale autolysis phenomenon with significant decrease of cell density immediately after exponential phase. To unravel the role of autolysis, an autolysin-coding gene, CA_C0554, was disrupted by using ClosTron system to obtain the mutant C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72). The lower final cell density and faster cell density decrease rate of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 than those of C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72) indicates that CA_C0554 was an important but not the sole autolysin-coding gene responding for the large-scale autolysis. Similar glucose utilization and solvents production but obvious lower cell density of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 comparing to C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72) suggests that lysed C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 cells were metabolic inactive. On the contrary, the spore density of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 is 26.1% higher than that of C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72) in the final culture broth of batch fermentation. We speculated that spontaneous autolysis of metabolic-inactive cells provided nutrients for the sporulating cells. The present study suggests that one important biological role of spontaneous large-scale autolysis in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 batch fermentation is contributing to generation of more spores during sporulation. PMID:26441884

  19. Spontaneous large-scale autolysis in Clostridium acetobutylicum contributes to generation of more spores.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Qiao, Kai; Tian, Lei; Zhang, Quan; Liu, Zi-Yong; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-01-01

    Autolysis is a widespread phenomenon in bacteria. In batch fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, there is a spontaneous large-scale autolysis phenomenon with significant decrease of cell density immediately after exponential phase. To unravel the role of autolysis, an autolysin-coding gene, CA_C0554, was disrupted by using ClosTron system to obtain the mutant C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72). The lower final cell density and faster cell density decrease rate of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 than those of C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72) indicates that CA_C0554 was an important but not the sole autolysin-coding gene responding for the large-scale autolysis. Similar glucose utilization and solvents production but obvious lower cell density of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 comparing to C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72) suggests that lysed C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 cells were metabolic inactive. On the contrary, the spore density of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 is 26.1% higher than that of C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72) in the final culture broth of batch fermentation. We speculated that spontaneous autolysis of metabolic-inactive cells provided nutrients for the sporulating cells. The present study suggests that one important biological role of spontaneous large-scale autolysis in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 batch fermentation is contributing to generation of more spores during sporulation.

  20. Hierarchy in pentose sugar metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Aristilde, Ludmilla; Lewis, Ian A; Park, Junyoung O; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial metabolism of polysaccharides from plant detritus into acids and solvents is an essential component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Understanding the underlying metabolic pathways can also contribute to improved production of biofuels. Using a metabolomics approach involving liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we investigated the metabolism of mixtures of the cellulosic hexose sugar (glucose) and hemicellulosic pentose sugars (xylose and arabinose) in the anaerobic soil bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum. Simultaneous feeding of stable isotope-labeled glucose and unlabeled xylose or arabinose revealed that,as expected, glucose was preferentially used as the carbon source. Assimilated pentose sugars accumulated in pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) intermediates with minimal flux into glycolysis. Simultaneous feeding of xylose and arabinose revealed an unexpected hierarchy among the pentose sugars, with arabinose utilized preferentially over xylose. The phosphoketolase pathway (PKP) provides an alternative route of pentose catabolism in C. acetobutylicum that directly converts xylulose-5-phosphate into acetyl-phosphate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, bypassing most of the PPP. When feeding the mixture of pentose sugars, the labeling patterns of lower glycolytic intermediates indicated more flux through the PKP than through the PPP and upper glycolysis, and this was confirmed by quantitative flux modeling. Consistent with direct acetyl-phosphate production from the PKP, growth on the pentose mixture resulted in enhanced acetate excretion. Taken collectively, these findings reveal two hierarchies in clostridial pentose metabolism: xylose is subordinate to arabinose, and the PPP is used less than the PKP.

  1. Hierarchy in Pentose Sugar Metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Ian A.; Park, Junyoung O.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial metabolism of polysaccharides from plant detritus into acids and solvents is an essential component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Understanding the underlying metabolic pathways can also contribute to improved production of biofuels. Using a metabolomics approach involving liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we investigated the metabolism of mixtures of the cellulosic hexose sugar (glucose) and hemicellulosic pentose sugars (xylose and arabinose) in the anaerobic soil bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum. Simultaneous feeding of stable isotope-labeled glucose and unlabeled xylose or arabinose revealed that, as expected, glucose was preferentially used as the carbon source. Assimilated pentose sugars accumulated in pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) intermediates with minimal flux into glycolysis. Simultaneous feeding of xylose and arabinose revealed an unexpected hierarchy among the pentose sugars, with arabinose utilized preferentially over xylose. The phosphoketolase pathway (PKP) provides an alternative route of pentose catabolism in C. acetobutylicum that directly converts xylulose-5-phosphate into acetyl-phosphate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, bypassing most of the PPP. When feeding the mixture of pentose sugars, the labeling patterns of lower glycolytic intermediates indicated more flux through the PKP than through the PPP and upper glycolysis, and this was confirmed by quantitative flux modeling. Consistent with direct acetyl-phosphate production from the PKP, growth on the pentose mixture resulted in enhanced acetate excretion. Taken collectively, these findings reveal two hierarchies in clostridial pentose metabolism: xylose is subordinate to arabinose, and the PPP is used less than the PKP. PMID:25527534

  2. Systems Biology of Clostridium Acetobutylicum: Sugar Metabolism and TNT Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Margaret; Sund, Christian; Servinsky, Matthew

    2010-03-01

    Rapid advancements in biotechnology are expected to impact multiple areas of interest to the Army, including decontamination, degradation of toxic chemicals and biofuels. This project is a joint experimental/computational effort to map out the metabolic pathways in Clostridium acetobutylicum, and use this information to develop a systems biology model of this system. This organism has been chosen specifically due to the fact that it has potential application to both biofuel production and nitroaromatic degradation. It is hoped that a systems biology model may provide key information to enhance both of these processes. Details will be presented of a first-generation model of central carbon metabolism in C. Acet., developed upon gene expression data accumulated from bacteria grown on different carbohydrate sources. Additional work will discuss the effect of TNT exposure and potential relevant enhancements of the model.

  3. Shotgun proteomic monitoring of Clostridium acetobutylicum during stationary phase of butanol fermentation using xylose and comparison with the exponential phase

    SciTech Connect

    Sivagnanam, Kumaran; Raghavan, Vijaya G. S.; Shah, Manesh B; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Lefsrud, Mark G

    2012-01-01

    Economically viable production of solvents through acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) fermentation requires a detailed understanding of Clostridium acetobutylicum. This study focuses on the proteomic profiling of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from the stationary phase of ABE fermentation using xylose and compares with the exponential growth by shotgun proteomics approach. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed 22.9% of the C. acetobutylicum genome and 18.6% was found to be common in both exponential and stationary phases. The proteomic profile of C. acetobutylicum changed during the ABE fermentation such that 17 proteins were significantly differentially expressed between the two phases. Specifically, the expression of five proteins namely, CAC2873, CAP0164, CAP0165, CAC3298, and CAC1742 involved in the solvent production pathway were found to be significantly lower in the stationary phase compared to the exponential growth. Similarly, the expression of fucose isomerase (CAC2610), xylulose kinase (CAC2612), and a putative uncharacterized protein (CAC2611) involved in the xylose utilization pathway were also significantly lower in the stationary phase. These findings provide an insight into the metabolic behavior of C. acetobutylicum between different phases of ABE fermentation using xylose.

  4. Shotgun proteomic monitoring of Clostridium acetobutylicum during stationary phase of butanol fermentation using xylose and comparison with the exponential phase.

    PubMed

    Sivagnanam, Kumaran; Raghavan, Vijaya G S; Shah, Manesh; Hettich, Robert L; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Lefsrud, Mark G

    2012-06-01

    Economically viable production of solvents through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation requires a detailed understanding of Clostridium acetobutylicum. This study focuses on the proteomic profiling of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from the stationary phase of ABE fermentation using xylose and compares with the exponential growth by shotgun proteomics approach. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed 22.9% of the C. acetobutylicum genome and 18.6% was found to be common in both exponential and stationary phases. The proteomic profile of C. acetobutylicum changed during the ABE fermentation such that 17 proteins were significantly differentially expressed between the two phases. Specifically, the expression of five proteins namely, CAC2873, CAP0164, CAP0165, CAC3298, and CAC1742 involved in the solvent production pathway were found to be significantly lower in the stationary phase compared to the exponential growth. Similarly, the expression of fucose isomerase (CAC2610), xylulose kinase (CAC2612), and a putative uncharacterized protein (CAC2611) involved in the xylose utilization pathway were also significantly lower in the stationary phase. These findings provide an insight into the metabolic behavior of C. acetobutylicum between different phases of ABE fermentation using xylose.

  5. A Quantitative System-Scale Characterization of the Metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Minyeong; Bestel-Corre, Gwenaelle; Croux, Christian; Riviere, Antoine; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Soucaille, Philippe

    2015-11-24

    Engineering industrial microorganisms for ambitious applications, for example, the production of second-generation biofuels such as butanol, is impeded by a lack of knowledge of primary metabolism and its regulation. A quantitative system-scale analysis was applied to the biofuel-producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum, a microorganism used for the industrial production of solvent. An improved genome-scale model, iCac967, was first developed based on thorough biochemical characterizations of 15 key metabolic enzymes and on extensive literature analysis to acquire accurate fluxomic data. In parallel, quantitative transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were performed to assess the number of mRNA molecules per cell for all genes under acidogenic, solventogenic, and alcohologenic steady-state conditions as well as the number of cytosolic protein molecules per cell for approximately 700 genes under at least one of the three steady-state conditions. A complete fluxomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analysis applied to different metabolic states allowed us to better understand the regulation of primary metabolism. Moreover, this analysis enabled the functional characterization of numerous enzymes involved in primary metabolism, including (i) the enzymes involved in the two different butanol pathways and their cofactor specificities, (ii) the primary hydrogenase and its redox partner, (iii) the major butyryl coenzyme A (butyryl-CoA) dehydrogenase, and (iv) the major glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. This study provides important information for further metabolic engineering of C. acetobutylicum to develop a commercial process for the production of n-butanol. Currently, there is a resurgence of interest in Clostridium acetobutylicum, the biocatalyst of the historical Weizmann process, to produce n-butanol for use both as a bulk chemical and as a renewable alternative transportation fuel. To develop a commercial process for the production of n-butanol via a

  6. An agr Quorum Sensing System That Regulates Granulose Formation and Sporulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Elisabeth; Scott, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-positive, anaerobic, endospore-forming bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum has considerable biotechnological potential due to its ability to produce solvents as fermentation products, in particular the biofuel butanol. Its genome contains a putative agr locus, agrBDCA, known in staphylococci to constitute a cyclic peptide-based quorum sensing system. In staphylococci, agrBD is required for the generation of a peptide signal that, upon extracellular accumulation, is sensed by an agrCA-encoded two-component system. Using ClosTron technology, agrB, agrC, and agrA mutants of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 were generated and phenotypically characterized. Mutants and wild type displayed similar growth kinetics and no apparent differences in solvent formation under the conditions tested. However, the number of heat-resistant endospores formed by the mutants in liquid culture was reduced by about one order of magnitude. On agar-solidified medium, spore formation was more strongly affected, particularly in agrA and agrC mutants. Similarly, accumulation of the starch-like storage compound granulose was almost undetectable in colonies of agrB, agrA, and agrC mutants. Importantly, these defects could be genetically complemented, demonstrating that they were directly linked to agr inactivation. A diffusible factor produced by agrBD-expressing strains was found to restore granulose and spore formation in the agrB mutant. Furthermore, a synthetic cyclic peptide, designed on the basis of the C. acetobutylicum AgrD sequence, was also capable of complementing the defects of the agrB mutant when added exogenously to the culture. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that agr-dependent quorum sensing is involved in the regulation of sporulation and granulose formation in C. acetobutylicum. PMID:22179241

  7. An agr quorum sensing system that regulates granulose formation and sporulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Elisabeth; Scott, Jamie; Minton, Nigel P; Winzer, Klaus

    2012-02-01

    The Gram-positive, anaerobic, endospore-forming bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum has considerable biotechnological potential due to its ability to produce solvents as fermentation products, in particular the biofuel butanol. Its genome contains a putative agr locus, agrBDCA, known in staphylococci to constitute a cyclic peptide-based quorum sensing system. In staphylococci, agrBD is required for the generation of a peptide signal that, upon extracellular accumulation, is sensed by an agrCA-encoded two-component system. Using ClosTron technology, agrB, agrC, and agrA mutants of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 were generated and phenotypically characterized. Mutants and wild type displayed similar growth kinetics and no apparent differences in solvent formation under the conditions tested. However, the number of heat-resistant endospores formed by the mutants in liquid culture was reduced by about one order of magnitude. On agar-solidified medium, spore formation was more strongly affected, particularly in agrA and agrC mutants. Similarly, accumulation of the starch-like storage compound granulose was almost undetectable in colonies of agrB, agrA, and agrC mutants. Importantly, these defects could be genetically complemented, demonstrating that they were directly linked to agr inactivation. A diffusible factor produced by agrBD-expressing strains was found to restore granulose and spore formation in the agrB mutant. Furthermore, a synthetic cyclic peptide, designed on the basis of the C. acetobutylicum AgrD sequence, was also capable of complementing the defects of the agrB mutant when added exogenously to the culture. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that agr-dependent quorum sensing is involved in the regulation of sporulation and granulose formation in C. acetobutylicum.

  8. Metabolic flexibility of a butyrate pathway mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Minyeong; Croux, Christian; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Soucaille, Philippe

    2017-01-31

    Clostridium acetobutylicum possesses two homologous buk genes, buk (or buk1) and buk2, which encode butyrate kinases involved in the last step of butyrate formation. To investigate the contribution of buk in detail, an in-frame deletion mutant was constructed. However, in all the Δbuk mutants obtained, partial deletions of the upstream ptb gene were observed, and low phosphotransbutyrylase and butyrate kinase activities were measured. This demonstrates that i) buk (CA_C3075) is the key butyrate kinase-encoding gene and that buk2 (CA_C1660) that is poorly transcribed only plays a minor role; and ii) strongly suggests that a Δbuk mutant is not viable if the ptb gene is not also inactivated, probably due to the accumulation of butyryl-phosphate, which might be toxic for the cell. One of the ΔbukΔptb mutants was subjected to quantitative transcriptomic (mRNA molecules/cell) and fluxomic analyses in acidogenic, solventogenic and alcohologenic chemostat cultures. In addition to the low butyrate production, drastic changes in metabolic fluxes were also observed for the mutant: i) under acidogenic conditions, the primary metabolite was butanol and a new metabolite, 2-hydroxy-valerate, was produced ii) under solventogenesis, 58% increased butanol production was obtained compared to the control strain under the same conditions, and a very high yield of butanol formation (0.3gg(-1)) was reached; and iii) under alcohologenesis, the major product was lactate. Furthermore, at the transcriptional level, adhE2, which encodes an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase and is known to be a gene specifically expressed in alcohologenesis, was surprisingly highly expressed in all metabolic states in the mutant. The results presented here not only support the key roles of buk and ptb in butyrate formation but also highlight the metabolic flexibility of C. acetobutylicum in response to genetic alteration of its primary metabolism.

  9. Improving the Clostridium acetobutylicum butanol fermentation by engineering the strain for co-production of riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xianpeng; Bennett, George N

    2011-08-01

    Solvent-producing clostridia are well known for their capacity to use a wide variety of renewable biomass and agricultural waste materials for biobutanol production. To investigate the possibility of co-production of a high value chemical during biobutanol production, the Clostridium acetobutylicum riboflavin operon ribGBAH was over-expressed in C. acetobutylicum on Escherichia coli-Clostridium shuttle vector pJIR750. Constructs that either maintained the original C. acetobutylicum translational start codon or modified the start codons of ribG and ribB from TTG to ATG were designed. Riboflavin was successfully produced in both E. coli and C. acetobutylicum using these plasmids, and riboflavin could accumulate up to 27 mg/l in Clostridium culture. Furthermore, the C. acetobutylicum purine pathway was modified by over-expression of the Clostridium purF gene, which encodes the enzyme PRPP amidotransferase. The function of the plasmid pJaF bearing C. acetobutylicum purF was verified by its ability to complement an E. coli purF mutation. However, co-production of riboflavin with biobutanol by use of the purF over-expression plasmid was not improved under the experimental conditions examined. Further rational mutation of the purF gene was conducted by replacement of amino acid codons D302 V and K325Q to make it similar to the feedback-resistant enzymes of other species. However, the co-expression of ribGBAH and purFC in C. acetobutylicum also did not improve riboflavin production. By buffering the culture pH, C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824(pJpGN) could accumulate more than 70 mg/l riboflavin while producing 190 mM butanol in static cultures. Riboflavin production was shown to exert no effect on solvent production at these levels.

  10. Systems-level metabolic flux profiling elucidates a complete, bifurcated tricarboxylic acid cycle in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Fan, Jing; Roquet, Nathaniel; Rabitz, Herschel; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2010-09-01

    Obligatory anaerobic bacteria are major contributors to the overall metabolism of soil and the human gut. The metabolic pathways of these bacteria remain, however, poorly understood. Using isotope tracers, mass spectrometry, and quantitative flux modeling, here we directly map the metabolic pathways of Clostridium acetobutylicum, a soil bacterium whose major fermentation products include the biofuels butanol and hydrogen. While genome annotation suggests the absence of most tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes, our results demonstrate that this bacterium has a complete, albeit bifurcated, TCA cycle; oxaloacetate flows to succinate both through citrate/alpha-ketoglutarate and via malate/fumarate. Our investigations also yielded insights into the pathways utilized for glucose catabolism and amino acid biosynthesis and revealed that the organism's one-carbon metabolism is distinct from that of model microbes, involving reversible pyruvate decarboxylation and the use of pyruvate as the one-carbon donor for biosynthetic reactions. This study represents the first in vivo characterization of the TCA cycle and central metabolism of C. acetobutylicum. Our results establish a role for the full TCA cycle in an obligatory anaerobic organism and demonstrate the importance of complementing genome annotation with isotope tracer studies for determining the metabolic pathways of diverse microbes.

  11. Sequences affecting the regulation of solvent production in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Scotcher, Miles C; Huang, Ke-xue; Harrison, Mary L; Rudolph, Frederick B; Bennett, George N

    2003-07-01

    The high solvent phenotype of Clostridium acetobutylicum mutants B and H was complemented by the introduction of a plasmid that contains either an intact or partially-deleted copy of solR, restoring acetone and butanol production to wild-type levels. This demonstrates that the solR open reading frame on pSOLThi is not required to restore solvent levels. The promoter region upstream of alcohol dehydrogense E (adhE) was examined in efforts to identify sites that play major roles in the control of expression. A series of adhE promoter fragments was constructed and the expression of each in acid- and solvent-phases of growth was analyzed using a chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase reporter system. Our results show that a region beyond the 0A box is needed for full induction of the promoter. Additionally, we show that the presence of sequences around a possible processing site designated S2 may have a negative role in the regulation of adhE expression.

  12. Control of butanol formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum by transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Thormann, Kai; Feustel, Lothar; Lorenz, Karin; Nakotte, Stephan; Dürre, Peter

    2002-04-01

    The sol operon of Clostridium acetobutylicum is the essential transcription unit for formation of the solvents butanol and acetone. The recent proposal that transcriptional regulation of this operon is controlled by the repressor Orf5/SolR (R. V. Nair, E. M. Green, D. E. Watson, G. N. Bennett, and E. T. Papoutsakis, J. Bacteriol. 181:319-330, 1999) was found to be incorrect. Instead, regulation depends on activation, most probably by the multivalent transcription factor Spo0A. The operon is transcribed from a single promoter. A second signal identified in primer extension studies results from mRNA processing and can be observed only in the natural host, not in a heterologous host. The first structural gene in the operon (adhE, encoding a bifunctional butyraldehyde/butanol dehydrogenase) is translated into two different proteins, the mature AdhE enzyme and the separate butanol dehydrogenase domain. The promoter of the sol operon is preceded by three imperfect repeats and a putative Spo0A-binding motif, which partially overlaps with repeat 3 (R3). Reporter gene analysis performed with the lacZ gene of Thermoanaerobacterium thermosulfurigenes and targeted mutations of the regulatory region revealed that the putative Spo0A-binding motif, R3, and R1 are essential for control. The data obtained also indicate that an additional activator protein is involved.

  13. Expression and Characterization of Levansucrase from Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Qi, Xianghui; Hart, Darren J; Gao, Herui; An, Yingfeng

    2017-02-01

    The Clostridium acetobutylicum gene Ca-SacB encoding levansucrase was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Ca-SacB is composed of 1287 bp and encodes 428 amino acid residues, which could convert 150 mmol/L sucrose to levan with the liberation of glucose. The optimum pH and temperature of this enzyme for levan formation were pH 6 and 60 °C, respectively. Levansucrase activity of Ca-SacB was completely abolished by 5 mmol/L Ag(+) and Hg(2+). The Km and Vmax values for levansucrase were calculated to be 64 mmol/L and 190 μmol/min/mg, respectively. Interestingly, Ca-SacB was found to have high product specificity, and no fructooligosaccharide was identified in the product, indicating that Ca-SacB may be valuable for industrial production of levan. In addition, Ca-SacB is the first characterized levansucrase isolated from an anaerobic bacterium, which should be valuable for exploring new enzyme resources and deepening the understanding of the catalytic mechanisms of levansucrases.

  14. Genetic and biochemical analysis of solvent formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.N.; Rudolph, F.B.

    1998-05-01

    The anaerobic organism Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used for commercial production of important organic solvents due to its ability to convert a wide variety of crude substrates to acids and alcohols. Current knowledge concerning the molecular genetics, cell regulation and metabolic engineering of this organism is still rather limited. The objectives are to improve the knowledge of the molecular genetics and enzymology of Clostridia in order to make genetic alterations which will more effectively channel cell metabolism toward production of desired products. Two factors that limit butanol production in continuous cultures are: (1) The degeneration of the culture, with an increase in the proportion of cells which are incapable of solvent production. Currently isolated degenerate strains are being evaluated to analyze the molecular mechanism of degeneration to determine if it is due to a genetic loss of solvent related genes, loss of a regulatory element, or an increase in general mutagenesis. Recent studies show two general types of degenerates, one which seems to have lost essential solvent pathway genes and another which has not completely lost all solvent production capability and retains the DNA bearing solvent pathway genes. (2) The production of hydrogen which uses up reducing equivalents in the cell. If the reducing power were more fully directed to the reduction reactions involved in butanol production, the process would be more efficient. The authors have studied oxidation reduction systems related to this process. These studies focus on ferredoxin and rubredoxin and their oxidoreductases.

  15. Microbiological production of acetone-butanol by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zeid, A A; Fouad, M; Yassein, M

    1978-01-01

    Trials succeeded in raising the efficiencies of the fermentation medium, used in the fermentative production of acetone-butanol by Clostridium acetobutylicum. Egyptian black strap molasses (50.0% sugars) was suitable as carbon source in the fermentation medium, and (NH4)2SO4 was utilized with great success as inorganic nitrogen source. 140.0 g/l black strap molasses (about 7.0% sugars) and 3.0 g/l (NH4)2SO4 were the optimum concentrations for obtaining good yields of acetone and butanol. Molasses and (NH4)2SO4 were preferred because they are cheaper than the other carbon and organic nitrogen sources, used in the fermentative production of acetone-butanol. The percentage increase of the total solvents produced in the fermentation (production medium) was increased by 64.0. The slop (by-product of the acetone-butanol fermentation after distillation) was re-used in the fermentation medium as organic nitrogen source and supported the microorganisms for a good production of acetone and butanol, while when stillage was used in the production medium, the total solvents output was less than that produced in the medium containing slop.

  16. A Quantitative System-Scale Characterization of the Metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Minyeong; Bestel-Corre, Gwenaelle; Croux, Christian; Riviere, Antoine; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Engineering industrial microorganisms for ambitious applications, for example, the production of second-generation biofuels such as butanol, is impeded by a lack of knowledge of primary metabolism and its regulation. A quantitative system-scale analysis was applied to the biofuel-producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum, a microorganism used for the industrial production of solvent. An improved genome-scale model, iCac967, was first developed based on thorough biochemical characterizations of 15 key metabolic enzymes and on extensive literature analysis to acquire accurate fluxomic data. In parallel, quantitative transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were performed to assess the number of mRNA molecules per cell for all genes under acidogenic, solventogenic, and alcohologenic steady-state conditions as well as the number of cytosolic protein molecules per cell for approximately 700 genes under at least one of the three steady-state conditions. A complete fluxomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analysis applied to different metabolic states allowed us to better understand the regulation of primary metabolism. Moreover, this analysis enabled the functional characterization of numerous enzymes involved in primary metabolism, including (i) the enzymes involved in the two different butanol pathways and their cofactor specificities, (ii) the primary hydrogenase and its redox partner, (iii) the major butyryl coenzyme A (butyryl-CoA) dehydrogenase, and (iv) the major glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. This study provides important information for further metabolic engineering of C. acetobutylicum to develop a commercial process for the production of n-butanol. PMID:26604256

  17. Orf5/SolR: a transcriptional repressor of the sol operon of Clostridium acetobutylicum?

    PubMed

    Thormann, K; Dürre, P

    2001-11-01

    The gene of Orf5 (SolR) of Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792 was subcloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The protein was purified with Ni-NTA agarose and used for DNA binding assays. No DNA binding of Orf5 to regions upstream of the sol operon from C. acetobutylicum was observed. Overexpression of Orf5 in C. acetobutylicum led to a change in the organism's pattern of glycosylated exoproteins. The Orf5 protein was localized in the cell membrane fraction and to a small extent in the supernatant medium. Based on these results Orf5 (SolR) appears not to act as a transcriptional repressor in C. acetobutylicum, but instead may be an enzyme involved in glycosylation or deglycosylation.

  18. Direct selection of Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentation mutants by a proton suicide method

    SciTech Connect

    Cueto, P.H.; Mendez, B.S. )

    1990-02-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 10132 mutants altered in acetic acid synthesis or in the shift to solventogenesis were directly selected by a proton suicide method after mutagenic treatment, by using bromide and bromate as selective agents. The mutants were characterized according to their solvent and acid production. On the selection plates they differed in colony phenotype from the parent strain.

  19. Direct Selection of Clostridium acetobutylicum Fermentation Mutants by a Proton Suicide Method.

    PubMed

    Cueto, P H; Méndez, B S

    1990-02-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 10132 mutants altered in acetic acid synthesis or in the shift to solventogenesis were directly selected by a proton suicide method after mutagenic treatment, by using bromide and bromate as selective agents. The mutants were characterized according to their solvent and acid production. On the selection plates they differed in colony phenotype from the parent strain.

  20. Direct Selection of Clostridium acetobutylicum Fermentation Mutants by a Proton Suicide Method

    PubMed Central

    Cueto, Pablo H.; Méndez, Beatriz S.

    1990-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 10132 mutants altered in acetic acid synthesis or in the shift to solventogenesis were directly selected by a proton suicide method after mutagenic treatment, by using bromide and bromate as selective agents. The mutants were characterized according to their solvent and acid production. On the selection plates they differed in colony phenotype from the parent strain. PMID:16348133

  1. Antisense RNA Strategies for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Ruchir P.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of antisense RNA (as RNA) strategies for metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum. Strain ATCC 824(pRD4) was developed to produce a 102-nucleotide asRNA with 87% complementarity to the butyrate kinase (BK) gene. Strain ATCC 824(pRD4) exhibited 85 to 90% lower BK and acetate kinase specific activities than the control strain. Strain ATCC 824(pRD4) also exhibited 45 to 50% lower phosphotransbutyrylase (PTB) and phosphotransacetylase specific activities than the control strain. This strain exhibited earlier induction of solventogenesis, which resulted in 50 and 35% higher final concentrations of acetone and butanol, respectively, than the concentrations in the control. Strain ATCC 824(pRD1) was developed to putatively produce a 698-nucleotide asRNA with 96% complementarity to the PTB gene. Strain ATCC 824(pRD1) exhibited 70 and 80% lower PTB and BK activities, respectively, than the control exhibited. It also exhibited 300% higher levels of a lactate dehydrogenase activity than the control exhibited. The growth yields of ATCC 824(pRD1) were 28% less than the growth yields of the control. While the levels of acids were not affected in ATCC 824(pRD1) fermentations, the acetone and butanol concentrations were 96 and 75% lower, respectively, than the concentrations in the control fermentations. The lower level of solvent production by ATCC 824(pRD1) was compensated for by ∼100-fold higher levels of lactate production. The lack of any significant impact on butyrate formation fluxes by the lower PTB and BK levels suggests that butyrate formation fluxes are not controlled by the levels of the butyrate formation enzymes. PMID:10049845

  2. Effect of iron limitation and fur gene inactivation on the transcriptional profile of the strict anaerobe Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Vasileva, Delyana; Janssen, Holger; Hönicke, Daniel; Ehrenreich, Armin; Bahl, Hubert

    2012-07-01

    Iron is a nutrient of critical importance for the strict anaerobe Clostridium acetobutylicum, as it is involved in numerous basic cellular functions and metabolic pathways. A gene encoding a putative ferric uptake regulator (Fur) has been identified in the genome of C. acetobutylicum. In this work, we inactivated the fur gene by using insertional mutagenesis. The resultant mutant showed a slow-growing phenotype and enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress, but essentially no dramatic change in its fermentation pattern. A unique feature of its physiology was the overflowing production of riboflavin. To gain further insights into the role of the Fur protein and the mechanisms for establishment of iron balance in C. acetobutylicum, we characterized and compared the gene-expression profile of the fur mutant and the iron-limitation stimulon of the parental strain. Not surprisingly, a repertoire of iron-transport systems was upregulated in both microarray datasets, suggesting that they are regulated by Fur according to the availability of iron. In addition, iron limitation and inactivation of fur affected the expression of several genes involved in energy metabolism. Among them, two genes, encoding a lactate dehydrogenase and a flavodoxin, were highly induced. In order to support the function of the latter, the ribDBAH operon responsible for riboflavin biosynthesis was also upregulated significantly. Furthermore, the iron-starvation response of C. acetobutylicum involved transcriptional modifications that were not detected in the fur mutant, suggesting that there exist additional mechanisms for adaptation to low-iron environments. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the strict anaerobe C. acetobutylicum senses and responds to availability of iron on multiple levels using a sophisticated system, and that Fur plays an important role in this process.

  3. Secretion and assembly of functional mini-cellulosomes from synthetic chromosomal operons in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) is reliant on the simultaneous enzyme production, saccharification of biomass, and fermentation of released sugars into valuable products such as butanol. Clostridial species that produce butanol are, however, unable to grow on crystalline cellulose. In contrast, those saccharolytic species that produce predominantly ethanol, such as Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium cellulolyticum, degrade crystalline cellulose with high efficiency due to their possession of a multienzyme complex termed the cellulosome. This has led to studies directed at endowing butanol-producing species with the genetic potential to produce a cellulosome, albeit by localising the necessary transgenes to unstable autonomous plasmids. Here we have explored the potential of our previously described Allele-Coupled Exchange (ACE) technology for creating strains of the butanol producing species Clostridium acetobutylicum in which the genes encoding the various cellulosome components are stably integrated into the genome. Results We used BioBrick2 (BB2) standardised parts to assemble a range of synthetic genes encoding C. thermocellum cellulosomal scaffoldin proteins (CipA variants) and glycoside hydrolases (GHs, Cel8A, Cel9B, Cel48S and Cel9K) as well as synthetic cellulosomal operons that direct the synthesis of Cel8A, Cel9B and a truncated form of CipA. All synthetic genes and operons were integrated into the C. acetobutylicum genome using the recently developed ACE technology. Heterologous protein expression levels and mini-cellulosome self-assembly were assayed by western blot and native PAGE analysis. Conclusions We demonstrate the successful expression, secretion and self-assembly of cellulosomal subunits by the recombinant C. acetobutylicum strains, providing a platform for the construction of novel cellulosomes. PMID:23962085

  4. Production of 1,3-propanediol from glycerol by Clostridium acetobutylicum and other Clostridium species

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1987-04-01

    Glycerol was fermented with the production of 1,3-propanediol as the major fermentation product by four strains of Clostridium acetobutylicum, six of C. butylicum, two of C. beijerinckii, one of C. kainantoi, and three of C. butylicum. 1,3-Propanediol was identified by its retention times in gas chromatography and high-pressure liquid chromatography and by its mass spectrum. During growth of C. butylicum B593 in a chemostat culture at pH 6.5, 61% of the glycerol fermented was converted to 1,3-propanediol. When the pH was decreased to 4.9, growth and 1,3-propanediol production were substantially reduced.

  5. Pleiotropic functions of catabolite control protein CcpA in Butanol-producing Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used to produce butanol in industry. Catabolite control protein A (CcpA), known to mediate carbon catabolite repression (CCR) in low GC gram-positive bacteria, has been identified and characterized in C. acetobutylicum by our previous work (Ren, C. et al. 2010, Metab Eng 12:446–54). To further dissect its regulatory function in C. acetobutylicum, CcpA was investigated using DNA microarray followed by phenotypic, genetic and biochemical validation. Results CcpA controls not only genes in carbon metabolism, but also those genes in solvent production and sporulation of the life cycle in C. acetobutylicum: i) CcpA directly repressed transcription of genes related to transport and metabolism of non-preferred carbon sources such as d-xylose and l-arabinose, and activated expression of genes responsible for d-glucose PTS system; ii) CcpA is involved in positive regulation of the key solventogenic operon sol (adhE1-ctfA-ctfB) and negative regulation of acidogenic gene bukII; and iii) transcriptional alterations were observed for several sporulation-related genes upon ccpA inactivation, which may account for the lower sporulation efficiency in the mutant, suggesting CcpA may be necessary for efficient sporulation of C. acetobutylicum, an important trait adversely affecting the solvent productivity. Conclusions This study provided insights to the pleiotropic functions that CcpA displayed in butanol-producing C. acetobutylicum. The information could be valuable for further dissecting its pleiotropic regulatory mechanism in C. acetobutylicum, and for genetic modification in order to obtain more effective butanol-producing Clostridium strains. PMID:22846451

  6. Pleiotropic functions of catabolite control protein CcpA in Butanol-producing Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Ren, Cong; Gu, Yang; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Weiwen; Yang, Chen; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong

    2012-07-30

    Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used to produce butanol in industry. Catabolite control protein A (CcpA), known to mediate carbon catabolite repression (CCR) in low GC gram-positive bacteria, has been identified and characterized in C. acetobutylicum by our previous work (Ren, C. et al. 2010, Metab Eng 12:446-54). To further dissect its regulatory function in C. acetobutylicum, CcpA was investigated using DNA microarray followed by phenotypic, genetic and biochemical validation. CcpA controls not only genes in carbon metabolism, but also those genes in solvent production and sporulation of the life cycle in C. acetobutylicum: i) CcpA directly repressed transcription of genes related to transport and metabolism of non-preferred carbon sources such as d-xylose and l-arabinose, and activated expression of genes responsible for d-glucose PTS system; ii) CcpA is involved in positive regulation of the key solventogenic operon sol (adhE1-ctfA-ctfB) and negative regulation of acidogenic gene bukII; and iii) transcriptional alterations were observed for several sporulation-related genes upon ccpA inactivation, which may account for the lower sporulation efficiency in the mutant, suggesting CcpA may be necessary for efficient sporulation of C. acetobutylicum, an important trait adversely affecting the solvent productivity. This study provided insights to the pleiotropic functions that CcpA displayed in butanol-producing C. acetobutylicum. The information could be valuable for further dissecting its pleiotropic regulatory mechanism in C. acetobutylicum, and for genetic modification in order to obtain more effective butanol-producing Clostridium strains.

  7. Butanol production under microaerobic conditions with a symbiotic system of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pengfei; Wang, Genyu; Wang, Gehua; Børresen, Børre Tore; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jianan

    2016-01-14

    One major problem of ABE (acetone, butanol and ethanol) fermentation is high oxygen sensitivity of Clostridium acetobutylicum. Currently, no single strain has been isolated or genetically engineered to produce butanol effectively under aerobic conditions. In our previous work, a symbiotic system TSH06 has been developed successfully by our group, and two strains, C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and Bacillus cereus TSH2, were isolated from TSH06. Compared with single culture, TSH06 showed promotion on cell growth and solvent accumulation under microaerobic conditions. To simulate TSH06, a new symbiotic system was successfully re-constructed by adding living cells of B. cereus TSH2 into C. acetobutylicum TSH1 cultures. During the fermentation process, the function of B. cereus TSH2 was found to deplete oxygen and provide anaerobic environment for C. acetobutylicum TSH1. Furthermore, inoculation ratio of C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and B. cereus TSH2 affected butanol production. In a batch fermentation with optimized inoculation ratio of 5 % C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and 0.5 % B. cereus TSH2, 11.0 g/L butanol and 18.1 g/L ABE were produced under microaerobic static condition. In contrast to the single culture of C. acetobutylicum TSH1, the symbiotic system became more aerotolerant and was able to produce 11.2 g/L butanol in a 5 L bioreactor even with continuous 0.15 L/min air sparging. In addition, qPCR assay demonstrated that the abundance of B. cereus TSH2 increased quickly at first and then decreased sharply to lower than 1 %, whereas C. acetobutylicum TSH1 accounted for more than 99 % of the whole population in solventogenic phase. The characterization of a novel symbiotic system on butanol fermentation was studied. The new symbiotic system re-constructed by co-culture of C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and B. cereus TSH2 showed excellent performance on butanol production under microaerobic conditions. B. cereus TSH2 was a good partner for C. acetobutylicum TSH1 by providing an anaerobic

  8. Regulation and localization of amylolytic enzymes in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824

    SciTech Connect

    Annous, B.A.; Blaschek, H.P. )

    1990-08-01

    Amylolytic activity was primarily cell associated when Clostridium acetobutylicum was grown on glucose or maltose and primarily extracellular when grown on dextrin or starch. Total amylolytic activity decreased with increasing glucose concentration. When this microorganism was grown in P2 medium containing starch, the intracellular amylolytic activity was 90% membrane bound and 10% cytoplasmic in nature. The addition of 1% glucose to 2% starch-based P2 medium at different stages of growth indicated that this carbohydrate repressed the synthesis of C. acetobutylicum amylolytic enzymes at the level of transcription.

  9. Cap0037, a Novel Global Regulator of Clostridium acetobutylicum Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Phuong-Thao; Linder, Sonja; Flitsch, Stefanie K.; Schiel-Bengelsdorf, Bettina; Dürre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An operon comprising two genes, CA_P0037 and CA_P0036, that encode proteins of unknown function that were previously shown to be highly expressed in acidogenic cells and repressed in solventogenic and alcohologenic cells is located on the pSOL1 megaplasmid of Clostridium acetobutylicum upstream of adhE2. A CA_P0037::int (189/190s) mutant in which an intron was inserted at position 189/190 in the sense strand of CA_P0037 was successfully generated by the Targetron technique. The resultant mutant showed significantly different metabolic flux patterns in acidogenic (producing mainly lactate, butyrate, and butanol) and alcohologenic (producing mainly butyrate, acetate, and lactate) chemostat cultures but not in solventogenic or batch cultures. Transcriptomic investigation of the CA_P0037::int (189/190s) mutant showed that inactivation of CA_P0037 significantly affected the expression of more than 258 genes under acidogenic conditions. Surprisingly, genes belonging to the Fur regulon, involved in iron transport (CA_C1029-CA_C1032), or coding for the main flavodoxin (CA_C0587) were the most significantly expressed genes under all conditions, whereas fur (coding for the ferric uptake regulator) gene expression remained unchanged. Furthermore, most of the genes of the Rex regulon, such as the adhE2 and ldhA genes, and of the PerR regulon, such as rbr3A-rbr3B and dfx, were overexpressed in the mutant. In addition, the whole CA_P0037-CA_P0036 operon was highly expressed under all conditions in the CA_P0037::int (189/190s) mutant, suggesting a self-regulated expression mechanism. Cap0037 was shown to bind to the CA_P0037-CA_P0036 operon, sol operon, and adc promoters, and the binding sites were determined by DNA footprinting. Finally, a putative Cap0037 regulon was generated using a bioinformatic approach. PMID:27703070

  10. Recent advances and state-of-the-art strategies in strain and process engineering for biobutanol production by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chuang; Zhao, Jingbo; Chen, Lijie; Yang, Shang-Tian; Bai, Fengwu

    Butanol as an advanced biofuel has gained great attention due to its environmental benefits and superior properties compared to ethanol. However, the cost of biobutanol production via conventional acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum is not economically competitive, which has hampered its industrial application. The strain performance and downstream process greatly impact the economics of biobutanol production. Although various engineered strains with carefully orchestrated metabolic and sporulation-specific pathways have been developed, none of them is ideal for industrial biobutanol production. For further strain improvement, it is necessary to develop advanced genome editing tools and a deep understanding of cellular functioning of genes in metabolic and regulatory pathways. Processes with integrated product recovery can increase fermentation productivity by continuously removing inhibitory products while generating butanol (ABE) in a concentrated solution. In this review, we provide an overview of recent advances in C. acetobutylicum strain engineering and process development focusing on in situ product recovery. With deep understanding of systematic cellular bioinformatics, the exploration of state-of-the-art genome editing tools such as CRISPR-Cas for targeted gene knock-out and knock-in would play a vital role in Clostridium cell engineering for biobutanol production. Developing advanced hybrid separation processes for in situ butanol recovery, which will be discussed with a detailed comparison of advantages and disadvantages of various recovery techniques, is also imperative to the economical development of biobutanol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 13C metabolic flux analysis in Clostridium acetobutylicum during growth on L-arabinose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Margaret; Sund, Christian; Liu, Sanchao; Germane, Katherine; Servinsky, Matthew; Gerlach, Elliot

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum's metabolic pathways have been studied for decades due to its metabolic diversity and industrial value, yet many details of its metabolism are continuing to emerge. To elucidate the role of xylulose-5-P/fructose-6-P phosphoketolase (XFP), and the recently discovered Pentose Phosphate Pathway (PKP) in C. acetobutylicum, experimental and computational metabolic isotope analysis was performed under growth on glucose, xylose, and arabinose. Results indicate that PKP utilization increased with increasing xylose concentration and this trend was further pronounced during growth on arabinose. This was confirmed by mutation of the gene encoding XFP, which almost completely abolished flux through the PKP during growth on arabinose and resulted in decreased acetate:butyrate ratios. We discuss these experimental and computational results here, and the implications for our understanding of sugar metabolism in C. acetobutylicum.

  12. Biological butanol production from microalgae-based biodiesel residues by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hai-Hsuan; Whang, Liang-Ming; Chan, Kun-Chi; Chung, Man-Chien; Wu, Shu-Hsien; Liu, Cheng-Pin; Tien, Shih-Yuan; Chen, Shan-Yuan; Chang, Jo-Shu; Lee, Wen-Jhy

    2015-05-01

    This study conducted batch experiments to evaluate the potential of butanol production from microalgae biodiesel residues by Clostridium acetobutylicum. The results indicated that with 90 g/L of glucose as the sole substrate the highest butanol yield of 0.2 g/g-glucose was found, but the addition of butyrate significantly enhanced the butanol yield. The highest butanol yield of 0.4 g/g-glucose was found with 60 g/L of glucose and 18 g/L of butyrate. Using microalgae biodiesel residues as substrate, C. acetobutylicum produced 3.86 g/L of butanol and achieved butanol yield of 0.13 g/g-carbohydrate via ABE fermentation, but the results indicated that approximately one third of carbohydrate was not utilized by C. acetobutylicum. Biological butanol production from microalgae biodiesel residues can be possible, but further research on fermentation strategies are required to improve production yield.

  13. Comparative shotgun proteomic analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum from butanol fermentation using glucose and xylose

    SciTech Connect

    Sivagnanam, Kumaran; Raghavan, Vijaya G. S.; Shah, Manesh B; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Lefsrud, Mark G

    2011-01-01

    Background: Butanol is a second generation biofuel produced by Clostridium acetobutylicum through acetonebutanol- ethanol (ABE) fermentation process. Shotgun proteomics provides a direct approach to study the whole proteome of an organism in depth. This paper focuses on shotgun proteomic profiling of C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation using glucose and xylose to understand the functional mechanisms of C. acetobutylicum proteins involved in butanol production. Results: We identified 894 different proteins in C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation process by two dimensional - liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) method. This includes 717 proteins from glucose and 826 proteins from the xylose substrate. A total of 649 proteins were found to be common and 22 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified between glucose and xylose substrates. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that flagellar proteins are highly up-regulated with glucose compared to xylose substrate during ABE fermentation. Chemotactic activity was also found to be lost with the xylose substrate due to the absence of CheW and CheV proteins. This is the first report on the shotgun proteomic analysis of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 in ABE fermentation between glucose and xylose substrate from a single time data point and the number of proteins identified here is more than any other study performed on this organism up to this report.

  14. Fermentation of residual glycerol by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 in pure and mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Dams, Rosemeri I; Guilherme, Alexandre A; Vale, Maria S; Nunes, Vanja F; Leitão, Renato C; Santaella, Sandra T

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this research was to estimate the production of hydrogen, organic acids and alcohols by the strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 using residual glycerol as a carbon source. The experiments were carried out in pure and mixed cultures in batch experiments. Three different sources of inocula for mixed culture were used. Ruminal liquid from goats and sludge collected from two upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors treating municipal wastewater and brewery effluent were tested for hydrogen, organic acids and alcohols production with or without C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The main detected end-products from the glycerol fermentation were hydrogen, organic acids (acetic, propionic, butyric and caproic) and alcohol (ethanol and 1,3-propanediol - 1,3PD). High hydrogen (0.44 mol H2/mol glycerol consumed) and 1,3PD (0.32 mol 1,3PD/mol glycerol consumed) yields were obtained when the strain C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was bioaugmented into the sludge from municipal wastewater using 5 g/L of glycerol. Significant concentrations of n-caproic acid were detected in the ruminal liquid when amended with C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The results suggest that glycerol can be used for the generation of H2, 1,3PD and n-caproic acid using C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 as agent in pure or mixed cultures.

  15. Comparative shotgun proteomic analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum from butanol fermentation using glucose and xylose

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Butanol is a second generation biofuel produced by Clostridium acetobutylicum through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process. Shotgun proteomics provides a direct approach to study the whole proteome of an organism in depth. This paper focuses on shotgun proteomic profiling of C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation using glucose and xylose to understand the functional mechanisms of C. acetobutylicum proteins involved in butanol production. Results We identified 894 different proteins in C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation process by two dimensional - liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) method. This includes 717 proteins from glucose and 826 proteins from the xylose substrate. A total of 649 proteins were found to be common and 22 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified between glucose and xylose substrates. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that flagellar proteins are highly up-regulated with glucose compared to xylose substrate during ABE fermentation. Chemotactic activity was also found to be lost with the xylose substrate due to the absence of CheW and CheV proteins. This is the first report on the shotgun proteomic analysis of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 in ABE fermentation between glucose and xylose substrate from a single time data point and the number of proteins identified here is more than any other study performed on this organism up to this report. PMID:22008648

  16. Expression of the Klebsiella pneumoniae CG21 acetoin reductase gene in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed

    Wardwell, S A; Yang, Y T; Chang, H Y; San, K Y; Rudolph, F B; Bennett, G N

    2001-10-01

    Acetoin reductase catalyzes the production of 2,3-butanediol from acetoin. The gene encoding the acetoin reductase of Klebsiella pneumoniae CG21 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the enzyme was determined to be 768 bp long. Expression of the K. pneumoniae acetoin reductase gene in E. coli revealed that the enzyme has a molecular mass of about 31,000 Da based on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. The K. pneumoniae acetoin reductase gene was cloned into a clostridial/E. coli shuttle vector, and expression of the gene resulted in detectable levels of acetoin reductase activity in both E. coli and C. acetobutylicum. While acetoin, the natural substrate of acetoin reductase, is a typical product of fermentation by C. acetobutylicum, 2,3-butanediol is not. Analysis of culture supernatants by gas chromatography revealed that introduction of the K. pneumoniae acetoin reductase gene into C. acetobutylicum was not sufficient for 2,3-butanediol production even though the cultures were producing acetoin. 2,3-Butanediol was produced by cultures of C. acetobutylicum containing the gene only when commercial acetoin was added.

  17. pH-induced gene regulation of solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture: Parameter estimation and sporulation modelling

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, Graeme J.; King, John R.; Jabbari, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The acetone–butanol (AB) fermentation process in the anaerobic endospore-forming Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum is useful as a producer of biofuels, particularly butanol. Recent work has concentrated on trying to improve the efficiency of the fermentation method, either through changes in the environmental conditions or by modifying the genome to selectively favour the production of one particular solvent over others. Fermentation of glucose by C. acetobutylicum occurs in two stages: initially the acids acetate and butyrate are produced and excreted and then, as the external pH falls, acetate and butyrate are ingested and further metabolised into the solvents acetone, butanol and ethanol. In order to optimise butanol production, it is important to understand how pH affects the enzyme-controlled reactions in the metabolism process. We adapt an ordinary differential equation model of the metabolic network with regulation at the genetic level for the required enzymes; parametrising the model using experimental data generated from continuous culture, we improve on previous point predictions (S. Haus, S. Jabbari, T. Millat, H. Janssen, R.-J. Fisher, H. Bahl, J. R. King, O. Wolkenhauer, A systems biology approach to investigate the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture, BMC Systems Biology 5 (2011)) [1] both by using a different optimisation approach and by computing confidence intervals and correlation coefficients. We find in particular that the parameters are ill-determined from the data and that two separate clusters of parameters appear correlated, reflecting the importance of two metabolic intermediates. We extend the model further to include another aspect of the clostridial survival mechanism, sporulation, and by computation of the Akaike Information Criterion values find that the there is some evidence for the presence of sporulation during the shift. PMID:23201580

  18. pH-induced gene regulation of solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture: parameter estimation and sporulation modelling.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Graeme J; King, John R; Jabbari, Sara

    2013-02-01

    The acetone-butanol (AB) fermentation process in the anaerobic endospore-forming Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum is useful as a producer of biofuels, particularly butanol. Recent work has concentrated on trying to improve the efficiency of the fermentation method, either through changes in the environmental conditions or by modifying the genome to selectively favour the production of one particular solvent over others. Fermentation of glucose by C. acetobutylicum occurs in two stages: initially the acids acetate and butyrate are produced and excreted and then, as the external pH falls, acetate and butyrate are ingested and further metabolised into the solvents acetone, butanol and ethanol. In order to optimise butanol production, it is important to understand how pH affects the enzyme-controlled reactions in the metabolism process. We adapt an ordinary differential equation model of the metabolic network with regulation at the genetic level for the required enzymes; parametrising the model using experimental data generated from continuous culture, we improve on previous point predictions (S. Haus, S. Jabbari, T. Millat, H. Janssen, R.-J. Fisher, H. Bahl, J. R. King, O. Wolkenhauer, A systems biology approach to investigate the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture, BMC Systems Biology 5 (2011)) [1] both by using a different optimisation approach and by computing confidence intervals and correlation coefficients. We find in particular that the parameters are ill-determined from the data and that two separate clusters of parameters appear correlated, reflecting the importance of two metabolic intermediates. We extend the model further to include another aspect of the clostridial survival mechanism, sporulation, and by computation of the Akaike Information Criterion values find that the there is some evidence for the presence of sporulation during the shift. Copyright © 2012

  19. Phosphotransferase activity in Clostridium acetobutylicum from acidogenic and solventogenic phases of growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hutkins, R.W.; Kashket, E.R.

    1986-05-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum cells, when energized with fructose, transported and phosphorylated the glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose by a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase (PT) system. Butanol up to 2% did not inhibit PT activity, although its chaotropic effect on the cell membrane caused cellular phosphoenolpyruvate and the 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate to leak out. Cells harvested from the solventogenic phase of batch growth had a significantly lower PT activity than did cells from the acidogenic phase.

  20. Intracellular metabolic changes of Clostridium acetobutylicum and promotion to butanol tolerance during biobutanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Feng; Tian, Juan; Ji, Zhi-Hua; Song, Mao-Yong; Li, Hao

    2016-09-01

    During the fermentation process, Clostridium acetobutylicum cells are often inhibited by the accumulated butanol. However, the mechanism underlying response of C. acetobutylicum to butanol stress remains poorly understood. This study was performed to clarify such mechanism through investigating the butanol stress-associated intracellular biochemical changes at acidogenesis phase (i.e., middle exponential phase) and solventogenesis phase (i.e., early stationary phase) by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics strategy. With the aid of partial least-squares-discriminant analysis, a pairwise discrimination between control group and butanol-treated groups was revealed, and 27 metabolites with variable importance in the projection value greater than 1 were identified. Under butanol stress, the glycolysis might be inhibited while TCA cycle might be promoted. Moreover, changes of lipids and fatty acids compositions, amino acid metabolism and osmoregulator concentrations might be the key factors involved in C. acetobutylicum metabolic response to butanol stress. It was suggested that C. acetobutylicum cells might change the levels of long acyl chain saturated fatty acids and branched-chain amino acids to maintain the integrity of cell membrane through adjusting membrane fluidity under butanol stress. The increased level of glycerol was considered to be correlated with osmoregulation and regulating redox balance. In addition, increased levels of some amino acids (i.e., threonine, glycine, alanine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, aspartate and glutamate) might also confer butanol tolerance to C. acetobutylicum. These results highlighted our knowledge about the response or adaptation of C. acetobutylicum to butanol stress, and would contribute to the construction of feasible butanologenic strains with higher butanol tolerance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcription factors and genetic circuits orchestrating the complex, multilayered response of Clostridium acetobutylicum to butanol and butyrate stress

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Organisms of the genus Clostridium are Gram-positive endospore formers of great importance to the carbon cycle, human normo- and pathophysiology, but also in biofuel and biorefinery applications. Exposure of Clostridium organisms to chemical and in particular toxic metabolite stress is ubiquitous in both natural (such as in the human microbiome) and engineered environments, engaging both the general stress response as well as specialized programs. Yet, despite its fundamental and applied significance, it remains largely unexplored at the systems level. Results We generated a total of 96 individual sets of microarray data examining the transcriptional changes in C. acetobutylicum, a model Clostridium organism, in response to three levels of chemical stress from the native metabolites, butanol and butyrate. We identified 164 significantly differentially expressed transcriptional regulators and detailed the cellular programs associated with general and stressor-specific responses, many previously unexplored. Pattern-based, comparative genomic analyses enabled us, for the first time, to construct a detailed picture of the genetic circuitry underlying the stress response. Notably, a list of the regulons and DNA binding motifs of the stress-related transcription factors were identified: two heat-shock response regulators, HrcA and CtsR; the SOS response regulator LexA; the redox sensor Rex; and the peroxide sensor PerR. Moreover, several transcriptional regulators controlling stress-responsive amino acid and purine metabolism and their regulons were also identified, including ArgR (arginine biosynthesis and catabolism regulator), HisR (histidine biosynthesis regulator), CymR (cysteine metabolism repressor) and PurR (purine metabolism repressor). Conclusions Using an exceptionally large set of temporal transcriptional data and regulon analyses, we successfully built a STRING-based stress response network model integrating important players for the general and

  2. Transcription factors and genetic circuits orchestrating the complex, multilayered response of Clostridium acetobutylicum to butanol and butyrate stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinghua; Venkataramanan, Keerthi Prasad; Huang, Hongzhan; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T; Wu, Cathy H

    2013-11-06

    Organisms of the genus Clostridium are Gram-positive endospore formers of great importance to the carbon cycle, human normo- and pathophysiology, but also in biofuel and biorefinery applications. Exposure of Clostridium organisms to chemical and in particular toxic metabolite stress is ubiquitous in both natural (such as in the human microbiome) and engineered environments, engaging both the general stress response as well as specialized programs. Yet, despite its fundamental and applied significance, it remains largely unexplored at the systems level. We generated a total of 96 individual sets of microarray data examining the transcriptional changes in C. acetobutylicum, a model Clostridium organism, in response to three levels of chemical stress from the native metabolites, butanol and butyrate. We identified 164 significantly differentially expressed transcriptional regulators and detailed the cellular programs associated with general and stressor-specific responses, many previously unexplored. Pattern-based, comparative genomic analyses enabled us, for the first time, to construct a detailed picture of the genetic circuitry underlying the stress response. Notably, a list of the regulons and DNA binding motifs of the stress-related transcription factors were identified: two heat-shock response regulators, HrcA and CtsR; the SOS response regulator LexA; the redox sensor Rex; and the peroxide sensor PerR. Moreover, several transcriptional regulators controlling stress-responsive amino acid and purine metabolism and their regulons were also identified, including ArgR (arginine biosynthesis and catabolism regulator), HisR (histidine biosynthesis regulator), CymR (cysteine metabolism repressor) and PurR (purine metabolism repressor). Using an exceptionally large set of temporal transcriptional data and regulon analyses, we successfully built a STRING-based stress response network model integrating important players for the general and specialized metabolite stress

  3. Effects of nutritional enrichment on the production of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung Jun; Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Park, Jin Hwan; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, In Ho

    2012-12-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is an industrially important organism that produces acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE). The main objective of this study was to characterize the effects of increased cell density on the production of ABE during the phase transition from acidogenesis to solventogenesis in C. acetobutylicum. The increased ABE productivity of C. acetobutylicum was obtained by increasing the cell density using a newly designed medium (designated C. a cetobutylicum medium 1; CAM1). The maximum OD(600) value of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 strain obtained with CAM1 was 19.7, which is 1.8 times higher than that obtained with clostridial growth medium (CGM). The overall ABE productivity obtained in the CAM1-fermetation of the ATCC 824 strain was 0.83 g/L/h, which is 1.5 times higher than that (0.55 g/L/h) obtained with CGM. However, the increased productivity obtained with CAM1 did not result in an increase in the final ABE titer, because phase transition occurred at a high titer of acids.

  4. The redox-sensing protein Rex, a transcriptional regulator of solventogenesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Wietzke, Mandy; Bahl, Hubert

    2012-11-01

    Solventogenic clostridia are characterised by their biphasic fermentative metabolism, and the main final product n-butanol is of particular industrial interest because it can be used as a superior biofuel. During exponential growth, Clostridium acetobutylicum synthesises acetic and butyric acids which are accompanied by the formation of molecular hydrogen and carbon dioxide. During the stationary phase, the solvents acetone, butanol and ethanol are produced. However, the molecular mechanisms of this metabolic switch are largely unknown so far. In this study, in silico, in vitro and in vivo analyses were performed to elucidate the function of the CAC2713-encoded redox-sensing transcriptional repressor Rex and its role in the solventogenic shift of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that Rex controls the expression of butanol biosynthetic genes as a response to the cellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio. Interestingly, the Rex-negative mutant C. acetobutylicum rex::int(95) produced high amounts of ethanol and butanol, while hydrogen and acetone production were significantly reduced. Both ethanol and butanol (but not acetone) formation started clearly earlier than in the wild type. In addition, the rex mutant showed a de-repression of the bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase 2 encoded by the adhE2 gene (CAP0035) as demonstrated by increased adhE2 expression as well as high NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase activities. The results presented here clearly indicated that Rex is involved in the redox-dependent solventogenic shift of C. acetobutylicum.

  5. Phosphoketolase Pathway for Xylose Catabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum Revealed by 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lixia; Zhang, Lei; Tang, Wei; Gu, Yang; Hua, Qiang; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Solvent-producing clostridia are capable of utilizing pentose sugars, including xylose and arabinose; however, little is known about how pentose sugars are catabolized through the metabolic pathways in clostridia. In this study, we identified the xylose catabolic pathways and quantified their fluxes in Clostridium acetobutylicum based on [1-13C]xylose labeling experiments. The phosphoketolase pathway was found to be active, which contributed up to 40% of the xylose catabolic flux in C. acetobutylicum. The split ratio of the phosphoketolase pathway to the pentose phosphate pathway was markedly increased when the xylose concentration in the culture medium was increased from 10 to 20 g liter−1. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the in vivo activity of the phosphoketolase pathway in clostridia has been revealed. A phosphoketolase from C. acetobutylicum was purified and characterized, and its activity with xylulose-5-P was verified. The phosphoketolase was overexpressed in C. acetobutylicum, which resulted in slightly increased xylose consumption rates during the exponential growth phase and a high level of acetate accumulation. PMID:22865845

  6. Phosphoketolase pathway for xylose catabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum revealed by 13C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lixia; Zhang, Lei; Tang, Wei; Gu, Yang; Hua, Qiang; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong; Yang, Chen

    2012-10-01

    Solvent-producing clostridia are capable of utilizing pentose sugars, including xylose and arabinose; however, little is known about how pentose sugars are catabolized through the metabolic pathways in clostridia. In this study, we identified the xylose catabolic pathways and quantified their fluxes in Clostridium acetobutylicum based on [1-(13)C]xylose labeling experiments. The phosphoketolase pathway was found to be active, which contributed up to 40% of the xylose catabolic flux in C. acetobutylicum. The split ratio of the phosphoketolase pathway to the pentose phosphate pathway was markedly increased when the xylose concentration in the culture medium was increased from 10 to 20 g liter(-1). To our knowledge, this is the first time that the in vivo activity of the phosphoketolase pathway in clostridia has been revealed. A phosphoketolase from C. acetobutylicum was purified and characterized, and its activity with xylulose-5-P was verified. The phosphoketolase was overexpressed in C. acetobutylicum, which resulted in slightly increased xylose consumption rates during the exponential growth phase and a high level of acetate accumulation.

  7. Identification of PTS(Fru) as the major fructose uptake system of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Christine; Bahl, Hubert; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg

    2014-08-01

    As a member of the saccharolytic clostridia, a variety of different carbohydrates like glucose, fructose, or mannose can be used as carbon and energy source by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Thirteen phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTS) have been identified in C. acetobutylicum, which are likely to be responsible for the uptake of hexoses, hexitols, or disaccharides. Here, we focus on three PTS which are expected to be involved in the uptake of fructose, PTS(Fru), PTS(ManI), and PTS(ManII). To analyze their individual functions, each PTS was inactivated via homologous recombination or insertional mutagenesis. Standardized comparative batch fermentations in a synthetic medium with glucose, fructose, or mannose as sole carbon source identified PTS(Fru) as primary uptake system for fructose, whereas growth with fructose was not impaired in PTS(ManI) and slightly altered in PTS(ManII)-deficient strains of C. acetobutylicum. The inactivation of PTS(ManI) resulted in slower growth on mannose whereas the loss of PTS(ManII) revealed no phenotype during growth on mannose. This is the first time that it has been shown that PTS(Fru) and PTS(ManI) of C. acetobutylicum are directly involved in fructose and mannose uptake, respectively. Moreover, comprehensive comparison of the fermentation products revealed that the loss of PTS(Fru) prevents the solvent shift as no butanol and only basic levels of acetone and ethanol could be determined.

  8. Phosphoketolase flux in Clostridium acetobutylicum during growth on L-arabinose.

    PubMed

    Sund, Christian J; Liu, Sanchao; Germane, Katherine L; Servinsky, Matthew D; Gerlach, Elliot S; Hurley, Margaret M

    2015-02-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum's metabolic pathways have been studied for decades due to its metabolic diversity and industrial value, yet many details of its metabolism continue to emerge. The flux through the recently discovered pentose phosphoketolase pathway (PKP) in C. acetobutylicum has been determined for growth on xylose but transcriptional analysis indicated the pathway may have a greater contribution to arabinose metabolism. To elucidate the role of xylulose-5-phosphate/fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase (XFP), and the PKP in C. acetobutylicum, experimental and computational metabolic isotope analyses were performed under growth conditions of glucose or varying concentrations of xylose and arabinose. A positional bias in labelling between carbons 2 and 4 of butyrate was found and posited to be due to an enzyme isotope effect of the thiolase enzyme. A correction for the positional bias was applied, which resulted in reduction of residual error. Comparisons between model solutions with low residual error indicated flux through each of the two XFP reactions was variable, while the combined flux of the reactions remained relatively constant. PKP utilization increased with increasing xylose concentration and this trend was further pronounced during growth on arabinose. Mutation of the gene encoding XFP almost completely abolished flux through the PKP during growth on arabinose and resulted in decreased acetate/butyrate ratios. Greater flux through the PKP during growth on arabinose when compared with xylose indicated the pathway's primary role in C. acetobutylicum is arabinose metabolism.

  9. Mechanisms of microbial oil recovery by Clostridium acetobutylicum and Bacillus strain JF-2

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, T.L.; Zhang, X.; Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Sharma, P.K.; Jackson, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    Core displacement experiments at elevated pressures were conducted to determine whether microbial processes are effective under conditions that simulate those found in an actual oil reservoir. The in-situ growth of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Bacillus strain JF-2 resulted in the recovery of residual oil. About 21 and 23% of the residual oil was recovered by C. acetobutylicum and Bacillus strain JF-2, respectively. Flooding cores with cell-free culture fluids of C. acetobutylicum with and without the addition of 50 mM acetone and 100 mM butanol did not result in the recovery of residual oil. Mathematical simulations showed that the amount of gas produced by the clostridial fermentation was not showed that the amount of gas produced by the clostridial fermentation was not sufficient to recover residual oil. Oil recovery by Bacillus strain JF-2 was highly correlated to surfactant production. A biosurfactant-deficient mutant of strain JF-2 was not capable of recovering residual oil. These data show that surfactant production is an important mechanism for microbially enhanced oil recovery. The mechanism for oil recovery by C. acetobutylicum is not understood at this time, but the production of acids, solvents, or gases alone cannot explain the observed increases in oil recovery by this organism.

  10. Biotransformation of furfural and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 during butanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Han, Bei; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2012-02-15

    The ability of fermenting microorganisms to tolerate furan aldehyde inhibitors (furfural and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF)) will enhance efficient bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates to fuels and chemicals. The effect of furfural and HMF on butanol production by Clostridium acetobutylicum 824 was investigated. Whereas specific growth rates, μ, of C. acetobutylicum in the presence of furfural and HMF were in the range of 15-85% and 23-78%, respectively, of the uninhibited Control, μ increased by 8-15% and 23-38% following exhaustion of furfural and HMF in the bioreactor. Using high performance liquid chromatography and spectrophotometric assays, batch fermentations revealed that furfural and HMF were converted to furfuryl alcohol and 2,5-bis-hydroxymethylfuran, respectively, with specific conversion rates of 2.13g furfural and 0.50g HMF per g (biomass) per hour, by exponentially growing C. acetobutylicum. Biotransformation of these furans to lesser inhibitory compounds by C. acetobutylicum will probably enhance overall fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to butanol. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 for Isopropanol-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Choi, Sung Jun; Im, Jung Ae; Song, Hyohak; Cho, Jung Hee; Seung, Do Young; Papoutsakis, E. Terry; Bennett, George N.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum naturally produces acetone as well as butanol and ethanol. Since acetone cannot be used as a biofuel, its production needs to be minimized or suppressed by cell or bioreactor engineering. Thus, there have been attempts to disrupt or inactivate the acetone formation pathway. Here we present another approach, namely, converting acetone to isopropanol by metabolic engineering. Since isopropanol can be used as a fuel additive, the mixture of isopropanol, butanol, and ethanol (IBE) produced by engineered C. acetobutylicum can be directly used as a biofuel. IBE production is achieved by the expression of a primary/secondary alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B-593 (i.e., adhB-593) in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. To increase the total alcohol titer, a synthetic acetone operon (act operon; adc-ctfA-ctfB) was constructed and expressed to increase the flux toward isopropanol formation. When this engineering strategy was applied to the PJC4BK strain lacking in the buk gene (encoding butyrate kinase), a significantly higher titer and yield of IBE could be achieved. The resulting PJC4BK(pIPA3-Cm2) strain produced 20.4 g/liter of total alcohol. Fermentation could be prolonged by in situ removal of solvents by gas stripping, and 35.6 g/liter of the IBE mixture could be produced in 45 h. PMID:22210214

  12. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 for isopropanol-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Choi, Sung Jun; Im, Jung Ae; Song, Hyohak; Cho, Jung Hee; Seung, Do Young; Papoutsakis, E Terry; Bennett, George N; Lee, Sang Yup

    2012-03-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum naturally produces acetone as well as butanol and ethanol. Since acetone cannot be used as a biofuel, its production needs to be minimized or suppressed by cell or bioreactor engineering. Thus, there have been attempts to disrupt or inactivate the acetone formation pathway. Here we present another approach, namely, converting acetone to isopropanol by metabolic engineering. Since isopropanol can be used as a fuel additive, the mixture of isopropanol, butanol, and ethanol (IBE) produced by engineered C. acetobutylicum can be directly used as a biofuel. IBE production is achieved by the expression of a primary/secondary alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B-593 (i.e., adh(B-593)) in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. To increase the total alcohol titer, a synthetic acetone operon (act operon; adc-ctfA-ctfB) was constructed and expressed to increase the flux toward isopropanol formation. When this engineering strategy was applied to the PJC4BK strain lacking in the buk gene (encoding butyrate kinase), a significantly higher titer and yield of IBE could be achieved. The resulting PJC4BK(pIPA3-Cm2) strain produced 20.4 g/liter of total alcohol. Fermentation could be prolonged by in situ removal of solvents by gas stripping, and 35.6 g/liter of the IBE mixture could be produced in 45 h.

  13. Targeted mutagenesis of the Clostridium acetobutylicum acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation pathway.

    PubMed

    Cooksley, Clare M; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Hengzheng; Redl, Stephanie; Winzer, Klaus; Minton, Nigel P

    2012-11-01

    The production of the chemical solvents acetone and butanol by the bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum was one of the first large-scale industrial processes to be developed, and in the first part of the last century ranked second in importance only to ethanol production. After a steep decline in its industrial use, there has been a recent resurgence of interest in the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process, with a particular emphasis on butanol production. In order to generate strains suitable for efficient use on an industrial scale, metabolic engineering is required to alter the AB ratio in favour of butanol, and eradicate the production of unwanted products of fermentation. Using ClosTron technology, a large-scale targeted mutagenesis in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was carried out, generating a set of 10 mutants, defective in alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (adhE1, adhE2), butanol dehydrogenases A and B (bdhA, bdhB), phosphotransbutyrylase (ptb), acetate kinase (ack), acetoacetate decarboxylase (adc), CoA transferase (ctfA/ctfB), and a previously uncharacterised putative alcohol dehydrogenase (CAP0059). However, inactivation of the main hydrogenase (hydA) and thiolase (thl) could not be achieved. Constructing such a series of mutants is paramount for the acquisition of information on the mechanism of solvent production in this organism, and the subsequent development of industrial solvent producing strains. Unexpectedly, bdhA and bdhB mutants did not affect solvent production, whereas inactivation of the previously uncharacterised gene CAP0059 resulted in increased acetone, butanol, and ethanol formation. Other mutants showed predicted phenotypes, including a lack of acetone formation (adc, ctfA, and ctfB mutants), an inability to take up acids (ctfA and ctfB mutants), and a much reduced acetate formation (ack mutant). The adhE1 mutant in particular produced very little solvents, demonstrating that this gene was indeed the main contributor to

  14. Stable Escherichia coli-Clostridium acetobutylicum shuttle vector for secretion of murine tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Theys, J; Nuyts, S; Landuyt, W; Van Mellaert, L; Dillen, C; Böhringer, M; Dürre, P; Lambin, P; Anné, J

    1999-10-01

    Recombinant plasmids were constructed to secrete mouse tumor necrosis factor alpha (mTNF-alpha) from Clostridium acetobutylicum. The shuttle plasmids contained the clostridial endo-beta1, 4-glucanase (eglA) promoter and signal sequence that was fused in frame to the mTNF-alpha cDNA. The construction was first tested in Escherichia coli and then introduced in C. acetobutylicum DSM792 by electroporation. Controls confirmed the presence and stability of the recombinant plasmids in this organism. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and an in vitro cytotoxic assay were used to monitor expression and secretion of mTNF-alpha during growth. Significant levels of biologically active mTNF-alpha were measured in both lysates and supernatants. The present report deals with investigations on the elaboration of a gene transfer system for cancer treatment using anaerobic bacteria.

  15. Biobutanol production by a new local isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shorgani, Najeeb Kaid; Tibin, El Mubarak; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid; Yusoff, Wan Mohtar Wan; Hamid, Aidil Abdul

    2014-09-01

    Increasing demand of energy and awareness about environmental pollution has led to increase interest in alternative, clean and renewable energy sources. Biobutanol is considered as the candidate liquid biofuel to replace gasoline. In this study, the capability of a newly isolated strain of local Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1 was tested to produce biobutanol in batch fermentation. Various culture conditions including glucose concentration, initial pH, incubation temperature and inoculum size were investigated for their effects on production of biobutanol using strain YM1. The results showed that the optimal biobutanol production was obtained at glucose concentration 50 g/L, initial pH 6.2, temperature 30°C and inoculum size 10%. These results show that C. acetobutylicum YM1 as a mesophilic bacterium is a potential candidate for biobutanol production.

  16. Identification and Characterization of Two Functionally Unknown Genes Involved in Butanol Tolerance of Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Kaizhi; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2012-01-01

    Solvents toxicity is a major limiting factor hampering the cost-effective biotechnological production of chemicals. In Clostridium acetobutylicum, a functionally unknown protein (encoded by SMB_G1518) with a hypothetical alcohol interacting domain was identified. Disruption of SMB_G1518 and/or its downstream gene SMB_G1519 resulted in increased butanol tolerance, while overexpression of SMB_G1518-1519 decreased butanol tolerance. In addition, SMB_G1518-1519 also influences the production of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and flagellar protein hag, the maintenance of cell motility. We conclude that the system of SMB_G1518-1519 protein plays a role in the butanol sensitivity/tolerance phenotype of C. acetobutylicum, and can be considered as potential targets for engineering alcohol tolerance. PMID:22768047

  17. Efficient gene knockdown in Clostridium acetobutylicum by synthetic small regulatory RNAs.

    PubMed

    Cho, Changhee; Lee, Sang Yup

    2017-02-01

    Clostridium is considered a promising microbial host for the production of valuable industrial chemicals. However, Clostridium is notorious for the difficulty of genetic manipulations, and consequently metabolic engineering. Thus, much effort has been exerted to develop novel tools for genetic and metabolic engineering of Clostridium strains. Here, we report the development of a synthetic small regulatory RNA (sRNA)-based system for controlled gene expression in Clostridium acetobutylicum, consisting of a target recognition site, MicC sRNA scaffold, and an RNA chaperone Hfq. To examine the functional operation of sRNA system in C. acetobutylicum, expression control was first examined with the Evoglow fluorescent protein as a model protein. Initially, a C. acetobutylicum protein annotated as Hfq was combined with the synthetic sRNA based on the Escherichia coli MicC scaffold to knockdown Evoglow expression. However, C. acetobutylicum Hfq did not bind to E. coli MicC, while MicC scaffold-based synthetic sRNA itself was able to knockdown the expression of Evoglow. When E. coli hfq gene was introduced, the knockdown efficiency assessed by measuring fluorescence intensity, could be much enhanced. Then, this E. coli MicC scaffold-Hfq system was used to knock down adhE1 gene expression in C. acetobutylicum. Knocking down the adhE1 gene expression using the synthetic sRNA led to a 40% decrease in butanol production (2.5 g/L), compared to that (4.5 g/L) produced by the wild-type strain harboring an empty vector. The sRNA system was further extended to knock down the pta gene expression in the buk mutant C. acetobutylicum strain PJC4BK for enhanced butanol production. The PJC4BK (pPta-Hfq(Eco) ) strain, which has the pta gene expression knocked down, was able to produce 16.9 g/L of butanol, which is higher than that (14.9 g/L) produced by the PJC4BK strain, mainly due to reduced acetic acid production. Fed-batch culture of PJC4BK (pPta-Hfq(Eco) ) strain coupled with

  18. Development of an inducible transposon system for efficient random mutagenesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Xu, Shu; Chai, Changsheng; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong; Minton, Nigel P.; Gu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is an industrially important Gram-positive organism, which is capable of producing economically important chemicals in the ABE (Acetone, Butanol and Ethanol) fermentation process. Renewed interests in the ABE process necessitate the availability of additional genetics tools to facilitate the derivation of a greater understanding of the underlying metabolic and regulatory control processes in operation through forward genetic strategies. In this study, a xylose inducible, mariner-based, transposon system was developed and shown to allow high-efficient random mutagenesis in the model strain ATCC 824. Of the thiamphenicol resistant colonies obtained, 91.9% were shown to be due to successful transposition of the catP-based mini-transposon element. Phenotypic screening of 200 transposon clones revealed a sporulation-defective clone with an insertion in spo0A, thereby demonstrating that this inducible transposon system can be used for forward genetic studies in C. acetobutylicum. PMID:27001972

  19. Parallel labeling experiments validate Clostridium acetobutylicum metabolic network model for (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Au, Jennifer; Choi, Jungik; Jones, Shawn W; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we provide new insights into the metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 obtained using a systematic approach for quantifying fluxes based on parallel labeling experiments and (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA). Here, cells were grown in parallel cultures with [1-(13)C]glucose and [U-(13)C]glucose as tracers and (13)C-MFA was used to quantify intracellular metabolic fluxes. Several metabolic network models were compared: an initial model based on current knowledge, and extended network models that included additional reactions that improved the fits of experimental data. While the initial network model did not produce a statistically acceptable fit of (13)C-labeling data, an extended network model with five additional reactions was able to fit all data with 292 redundant measurements. The model was subsequently trimmed to produce a minimal network model of C. acetobutylicum for (13)C-MFA, which could still reproduce all of the experimental data. The flux results provided valuable new insights into the metabolism of C. acetobutylicum. First, we found that TCA cycle was effectively incomplete, as there was no measurable flux between α-ketoglutarate and succinyl-CoA, succinate and fumarate, and malate and oxaloacetate. Second, an active pathway was identified from pyruvate to fumarate via aspartate. Third, we found that isoleucine was produced exclusively through the citramalate synthase pathway in C. acetobutylicum and that CAC3174 was likely responsible for citramalate synthase activity. These model predictions were confirmed in several follow-up tracer experiments. The validated metabolic network model established in this study can be used in future investigations for unbiased (13)C-flux measurements in C. acetobutylicum. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum for butyric acid production with high butyric acid selectivity.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Im, Jung Ae; Choi, So Young; Lee, Jung Im; Lee, Sang Yup

    2014-05-01

    A typical characteristic of the butyric acid-producing Clostridium is coproduction of both butyric and acetic acids. Increasing the butyric acid selectivity important for economical butyric acid production has been rather difficult in clostridia due to their complex metabolic pathways. In this work, Clostridium acetobutylicum was metabolically engineered for highly selective butyric acid production. For this purpose, the second butyrate kinase of C. acetobutylicum encoded by the bukII gene instead of butyrate kinase I encoded by the buk gene was employed. Furthermore, metabolic pathways were engineered to further enhance the NADH-driving force. Batch fermentation of the metabolically engineered C. acetobutylicum strain HCBEKW (pta(-), buk(-), ctfB(-) and adhE1(-)) at pH 6.0 resulted in the production of 32.5g/L of butyric acid with a butyric-to-acetic acid ratio (BA/AA ratio) of 31.3g/g from 83.3g/L of glucose. By further knocking out the hydA gene (encoding hydrogenase) in the HCBEKW strain, the butyric acid titer was not further improved in batch fermentation. However, the BA/AA ratio (28.5g/g) obtained with the HYCBEKW strain (pta(-), buk(-), ctfB(-), adhE1(-) and hydA(-)) was 1.6 times higher than that (18.2g/g) obtained with the HCBEKW strain at pH 5.0, while no improvement was observed at pH 6.0. These results suggested that the buk gene knockout was essential to get a high butyric acid selectivity to acetic acid in C. acetobutylicum. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Multiple orphan histidine kinases interact directly with Spo0A to control the initiation of endospore formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Elisabeth; Dago, Angel E.; Young, Danielle I.; Heap, John T.; Minton, Nigel P.; Hoch, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The phosphorylated Spo0A transcription factor controls the initiation of endospore formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, but genes encoding key phosphorelay components, Spo0F and Spo0B, are missing in the genome. We hypothesized that the five orphan histidine kinases of C. acetobutylicum interact directly with Spo0A to control its phosphorylation state. Sequential targeted gene disruption and gene expression profiling provided evidence for two pathways for Spo0A activation, one dependent on a histidine kinase encoded by cac0323, the other on both histidine kinases encoded by cac0903 and cac3319. Purified Cac0903 and Cac3319 kinases autophosphorylated and transferred phosphoryl groups to Spo0A in vitro, confirming their role in Spo0A activation in vivo. A cac0437 mutant hyper-sporulated, suggesting that Cac0437 is a modulator that prevents sporulation and maintains cellular Spo0A~P homeostasis during growth. Accordingly, Cac0437 has apparently lost the ability to autophosphorylate in vitro; instead it catalyses the ATP-dependent dephosphorylation of Spo0A~P releasing inorganic phosphate. Direct phosphorylation of Spo0A by histidine kinases and dephosphorylation by kinase-like proteins may be a common feature of the clostridia that may represent the ancestral state before the great oxygen event some 2.4 billion years ago, after which additional phosphorelay proteins were recruited in the evolutionary lineage that led to the bacilli. PMID:21401736

  2. Altered Electron Flow in Continuous Cultures of Clostridium acetobutylicum Induced by Viologen Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Govind; Mutharasan, R.

    1987-01-01

    The physiological response of Clostridium acetobutylicum to methyl and benzyl viologen was investigated. Viologen dyes at low concentrations (at levels of parts per million [micrograms per milliliter]) caused significant metabolic shifts. Altered electron flow appeared to direct carbon flow from acid to alcohol production accompanied by decreased hydrogen evolution. Reducing equivalents normally released as free hydrogen were directed toward formation of NADH which, in turn, resulted in increased alcohol production. In addition, it was shown that solvent production can take place at pH 6.3. Contrary to previous reports, butanol production appears to be independent of high levels of acetate-butyrate and glucose. PMID:16347357

  3. Reaction engineering studies of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation with Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Michael; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2012-05-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum has been extensively studied in recent years because the organism is recognized as an excellent butanol producer. A parallel bioreactor system with 48 stirred-tank bioreactors on a 12 mL scale was evaluated for batch cultivations of the strictly anaerobic, butanol-producing C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Continuous gassing with nitrogen gas was applied to control anaerobic conditions. Process performances of ABE batch fermentations on a milliliter scale were identical to the liter-scale stirred-tank reactor if reaction conditions were identical on the different scales (e.g., initial medium, pH, temperature, specific evaporation rates, specific power input by the stirrers). The effects of varying initial ammonia concentrations (0.1-4.4 g L(-1) ) were studied in parallel with respect to glucose consumption and butanol production of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 as a first application example. The highest butanol yield of 33% (mol mol(-1) ) was observed at initial ammonia concentrations of 0.5 and 1.1 g L(-1) . This is the first report on the successful application of a 48 parallel stirred-tank bioreactor system for reaction engineering studies of strictly anaerobic microorganisms at the milliliter scale. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Roles of three AbrBs in regulating two-phase Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qiong; Yang, Yunpeng; Chen, Jun; Chen, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong; Gu, Yang

    2016-11-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is an important industrial microorganism for n-butanol bioproduction, and its transcription factor AbrB0310 regulates various important cellular processes. However, the roles of two abrB homologues, abrB1941 and abrB3647, have not been determined because they appear inactive during transcription. Here, we performed a detailed investigation into the function of abrB1941 and abrB3647 in C. acetobutylicum. Interestingly, we observed that AbrB3647 exerts an important influence on biphasic fermentation that opposes the influence of AbrB0310, while AbrB1941 might not be essential. When abrB3647 was disrupted using the Targetron system, a greatly improved cellular growth occurred. The following analysis shows that all three AbrBs participated in metabolically regulating acidogenesis, solventogenesis, and a two-phase transition in C. acetobutylicum, but the AbrB0310 and AbrB3647 functions were the most important. Moreover, the target genes subject to AbrB0310 and AbrB3647 regulation closely overlap. Based on these results, we will better understand the roles of the three AbrBs in regulating solventogenic clostridia cell physiology.

  5. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum for enhanced production of butyric acid.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Woo, Hee Moon; Im, Jung Ae; Kim, In Ho; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-11-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum has been considered as an attractive platform host for biorefinery due to its metabolic diversity. Considering its capability to overproduce butanol through butyrate, it was thought that butyric acid can also be efficiently produced by this bacterium through metabolic engineering. The pta-ctfB-deficient C. acetobutylicum CEKW, in which genes encoding phosphotransacetylase and CoA-transferase were knocked out, was assessed for its potential as a butyric acid producer in fermentations with four controlled pH values at 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, and 6.4. Butyric acid could be best produced by fermentation of the CEKW at pH 6.0, resulting in the highest titer of 26.6 g/l, which is 6.4 times higher than that obtained with the wild type. However, due to the remaining solventogenic ability of the CEKW, 3.6 g/l solvents were also produced. Thus, the CEKW was further engineered by knocking out the adhE1-encoding aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase to prevent solvent production. Batch fermentation of the resulting C. acetobutylicum HCEKW at pH 6.0 showed increased butyric acid production to 30.8 g/l with a ratio of butyric-to-acetic acid (BA/AA) of 6.6 g/g and a productivity of 0.72 g/l/h from 86.9 g/l glucose, while negligible solvent (0.8 g/l ethanol only) was produced. The butyric acid titer, BA/AA ratio, and productivity obtained in this study were the highest values reported for C. acetobutylicum, and the BA/AA ratio and productivity were also comparable to those of native butyric acid producer Clostridium tyrobutyricum. These results suggested that the simultaneous deletion of the pta-ctfB-adhE1 in C. acetobutylicum resulted in metabolic switch from biphasic to acidogenic fermentation, which enhanced butyric acid production.

  6. Genomics of Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Chapeton-Montes, Diana; Plourde, Lucile; Speck, Denis; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-05-01

    Genomic information about Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of the tetanus disease, is scarce. The genome of strain E88, a strain used in vaccine production, was sequenced about 10 years ago. One additional genome (strain 12124569) has recently been released. Here we report three new genomes of C. tetani and describe major differences among all five C. tetani genomes. They all harbor tetanus-toxin-encoding plasmids that contain highly conserved genes for TeNT (tetanus toxin), TetR (transcriptional regulator of TeNT) and ColT (collagenase), but substantially differ in other plasmid regions. The chromosomes share a large core genome that contains about 85% of all genes of a given chromosome. The non-core chromosome comprises mainly prophage-like genomic regions and genes encoding environmental interaction and defense functions (e.g. surface proteins, restriction-modification systems, toxin-antitoxin systems, CRISPR/Cas systems) and other fitness functions (e.g. transport systems, metabolic activities). This new genome information will help to assess the level of genome plasticity of the species C. tetani and provide the basis for detailed comparative studies.

  7. Transformation of heat-treated Clostridium acetobutylicum protoplasts with pUB110 plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.L.; Blaschek, H.P.

    1984-10-01

    Heat treatment of Clostridium acetobutylicum SA-1 protoplasts at 55/sup 0/C for 15 min before transformation resulted in expression in this microorganism of the kanamycin resistance determinant associated with plasmid pUB110. No heat treatment, or heat treatment at 65 or 44/sup 0/C for various time intervals, resulted in no kanamycin resistance transformants being recovered on selective kanamycin-containing regeneration medium. DNase plate assay indicated that treatment at 55/sup 0/C for 15 min completely inactivated the DNase activity associated with SA-1 protoplasts. Treatment of protoplasts at 65 or 55/sup 0/C for various periods under simulated transformation conditions had an inhibitory effect, although prolonged treatment at 55 or 44/sup 0/C appeared to stimulate DNase activity. Inactivation of protoplast-associated DNase activity by heat treatment at 55/sup 0/C for 15 min correlated with successful expression of kanamycin resistance and suggests that an extremely active, heat-sensitive, protoplast-associated DNase may be a factor in the polyethylene glycol-induced transformation of C. acetobutylicum SA-1 protoplasts. Plasmid pUB110 DNA was isolated from C. acetobutylicum SA-1 kanamycin-resistant (Km/sup r/) transformant cultures by a modification of the procedure used for C. perfringens plasmids. Detection of pUB110 DNA was possible only when diethyl pyrocarbonate was incorporated into isolation protocols to inactivate DNase activity. Restriction studies further verified the presence of pUB110 DNA in C. acetobutylicum SA-1 Km/sup r/ transformants. 36 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  8. Production of biofuels from pretreated microalgae biomass by anaerobic fermentation with immobilized Clostridium acetobutylicum cells.

    PubMed

    Efremenko, E N; Nikolskaya, A B; Lyagin, I V; Senko, O V; Makhlis, T A; Stepanov, N A; Maslova, O V; Mamedova, F; Varfolomeev, S D

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the possible use of pretreated biomass of various microalgae and cyanobacteria as substrates for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum cells immobilized into poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel. To this end, the biochemical composition of photosynthetic microorganisms cultivated under various conditions was studied. The most efficient technique for pretreating microalgal biomass for its subsequent conversion into biofuels appeared to be thermal decomposition at 108 °C. For the first time the maximum productivity of the ABE fermentation in terms of hydrogen (8.5 mmol/L medium/day) was obtained using pretreated biomass of Nannochloropsis sp. Maximum yields of butanol and ethanol were observed with Arthrospira platensis biomass used as the substrate. Immobilized Clostridium cells were demonstrated to be suitable for multiple reuses (for a minimum of five cycles) in ABE fermentation for producing biofuels from pretreated microalgal biomass. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhancement of butanol tolerance and butanol yield in Clostridium acetobutylicum mutant NT642 obtained by nitrogen ion beam implantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Bo; Gu, Qiu-Ya; Yu, Xiao-Bin; Luo, Wei

    2012-12-01

    As a promising alternative biofuel, biobutanol can be produced through acetone/butanol/ethanol (ABE) fermentation. Currently, ABE fermentation is still a small-scale industry due to its low production and high input cost. Moreover, butanol toxicity to the Clostridium fermentation host limits the accumulation of butanol in the fermentation broth. The wild-type Clostridium acetobutylicum D64 can only produce about 13 g butanol/L and tolerates less than 2% (v/v) butanol. To improve the tolerance of C. acetobutylicum D64 for enhancing the production of butanol, nitrogen ion beam implantation was employed and finally five mutants with enhanced butanol tolerance were obtained. Among these, the most butanol tolerant mutant C. acetobutylicum NT642 can tolerate above 3% (v/v) butanol while the wide-type strain can only withstand 2% (v/v). In batch fermentation, the production of butanol and ABE yield of C. acetobutylicum NT642 was 15.4 g/L and 22.3 g/L, respectively, which were both higher than those of its parental strain and the other mutants using corn or cassava as substrate. Enhancing butanol tolerance is a great precondition for obtaining a hyper-yield producer. Nitrogen ion beam implantation could be a promising biotechnology to improve butanol tolerance and production of the host strain C. acetobutylicum.

  10. The Issue of Secretion in Heterologous Expression of Clostridium cellulolyticum Cellulase-Encoding Genes in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824▿

    PubMed Central

    Mingardon, Florence; Chanal, Angélique; Tardif, Chantal; Fierobe, Henri-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The genes encoding the cellulases Cel5A, Cel8C, Cel9E, Cel48F, Cel9G, and Cel9M from Clostridium cellulolyticum were cloned in the C. acetobutylicum expression vector pSOS952 under the control of a Gram-positive constitutive promoter. The DNA encoding the native leader peptide of the heterologous cellulases was maintained. The transformation of the solventogenic bacterium with the corresponding vectors generated clones in the cases of Cel5A, Cel8C, and Cel9M. Analyses of the recombinant strains indicated that the three cellulases are secreted in an active form to the medium. A large fraction of the secreted cellulases, however, lost the C-terminal dockerin module. In contrast, with the plasmids pSOS952-cel9E, pSOS952-cel48F, and pSOS952-cel9G no colonies were obtained, suggesting that the expression of these genes has an inhibitory effect on growth. The deletion of the DNA encoding the leader peptide of Cel48F in pSOS952-cel48F, however, generated strains of C. acetobutylicum in which mature Cel48F accumulates in the cytoplasm. Thus, the growth inhibition observed when the wild-type cel48F gene is expressed seems related to the secretion of the cellulase. The weakening of the promoter, the coexpression of miniscaffoldin-encoding genes, or the replacement of the native signal sequence of Cel48F by that of secreted heterologous or endogenous proteins failed to generate strains secreting Cel48F. Taken together, our data suggest that a specific chaperone(s) involved in the secretion of the key family 48 cellulase, and probably Cel9G and Cel9E, is missing or insufficiently synthesized in C. acetobutylicum. PMID:21378034

  11. Molecular characterization of an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed Central

    Nair, R V; Bennett, G N; Papoutsakis, E T

    1994-01-01

    A gene (aad) coding for an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) was identified immediately upstream of the previously cloned ctfA (J. W. Cary, D. J. Petersen, E. T. Papoutsakis, and G. N. Bennett, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 56:1576-1583, 1990) of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and sequenced. The 2,619-bp aad codes for a 96,517-Da protein. Primer extension analysis identified two transcriptional start sites 83 and 243 bp upstream of the aad start codon. The N-terminal section of AAD shows homology to aldehyde dehydrogenases of bacterial, fungal, mammalian, and plant origin, while the C-terminal section shows homology to alcohol dehydrogenases of bacterial (which includes three clostridial alcohol dehydrogenases) and yeast origin. AAD exhibits considerable amino acid homology (56% identity) over its entire sequence to the trifunctional protein encoded by adhE from Escherichia coli. Expression of aad from a plasmid in C. acetobutylicum showed that AAD, which appears as a approximately 96-kDa band in denaturing protein gels, provides elevated activities of NADH-dependent butanol dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and butyraldehyde dehydrogenase, and a small increase in NADH-dependent ethanol dehydrogenase. A 957-bp open reading frame that could potentially encode a 36,704-Da protein was identified upstream of aad. Images PMID:8300540

  12. Integrated, systems metabolic picture of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen; Seo, Seung-Oh; Celik, Venhar; Liu, Huaiwei; Kong, Wentao; Wang, Yi; Blaschek, Hans; Jin, Yong-Su; Lu, Ting

    2015-07-07

    Microbial metabolism involves complex, system-level processes implemented via the orchestration of metabolic reactions, gene regulation, and environmental cues. One canonical example of such processes is acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum, during which cells convert carbon sources to organic acids that are later reassimilated to produce solvents as a strategy for cellular survival. The complexity and systems nature of the process have been largely underappreciated, rendering challenges in understanding and optimizing solvent production. Here, we present a system-level computational framework for ABE fermentation that combines metabolic reactions, gene regulation, and environmental cues. We developed the framework by decomposing the entire system into three modules, building each module separately, and then assembling them back into an integrated system. During the model construction, a bottom-up approach was used to link molecular events at the single-cell level into the events at the population level. The integrated model was able to successfully reproduce ABE fermentations of the WT C. acetobutylicum (ATCC 824), as well as its mutants, using data obtained from our own experiments and from literature. Furthermore, the model confers successful predictions of the fermentations with various network perturbations across metabolic, genetic, and environmental aspects. From foundation to applications, the framework advances our understanding of complex clostridial metabolism and physiology and also facilitates the development of systems engineering strategies for the production of advanced biofuels.

  13. Integrated, systems metabolic picture of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chen; Seo, Seung-Oh; Celik, Venhar; Liu, Huaiwei; Kong, Wentao; Wang, Yi; Blaschek, Hans; Jin, Yong-Su; Lu, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Microbial metabolism involves complex, system-level processes implemented via the orchestration of metabolic reactions, gene regulation, and environmental cues. One canonical example of such processes is acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum, during which cells convert carbon sources to organic acids that are later reassimilated to produce solvents as a strategy for cellular survival. The complexity and systems nature of the process have been largely underappreciated, rendering challenges in understanding and optimizing solvent production. Here, we present a system-level computational framework for ABE fermentation that combines metabolic reactions, gene regulation, and environmental cues. We developed the framework by decomposing the entire system into three modules, building each module separately, and then assembling them back into an integrated system. During the model construction, a bottom-up approach was used to link molecular events at the single-cell level into the events at the population level. The integrated model was able to successfully reproduce ABE fermentations of the WT C. acetobutylicum (ATCC 824), as well as its mutants, using data obtained from our own experiments and from literature. Furthermore, the model confers successful predictions of the fermentations with various network perturbations across metabolic, genetic, and environmental aspects. From foundation to applications, the framework advances our understanding of complex clostridial metabolism and physiology and also facilitates the development of systems engineering strategies for the production of advanced biofuels. PMID:26100881

  14. Cell growth behaviors of Clostridium acetobutylicum in a pervaporation membrane bioreactor for butanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Peina; Xiao, Zeyi; Chen, Chunyan; Li, Weijia; Deng, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation using Clostridium acetobutylicum was studied in the continuous and closed-circulating fermentation (CCCF) system. The experiment lasting for 192 H was carried out by integrating fermentation with in situ pervaporation. In the entire process, the cell growth profile took place in the following two phases: the logarithmic phase during early 28 H and the linear phase from 130 to 150 H. This was a unique characteristic compared with the curve of traditional fermentation, and the fitting equations of two growth phases were obtained by Origin software according to the kinetic model of cell growth. Besides, the kinetic parameters that include the butanol yield, maximum specific growth rate, average specific formation rate, and volumetric productivity of butanol were measured as 0.19 g g(-1) , 0.345 H(-1) , 0.134 H(-1) and 0.23 g L(-1)  H(-1) , respectively. The C. acetobutylicum in the CCCF system showed good adaptability and fermentation performance, and the prolonged fermentation period and high production were also the main advantages of CCCF technology. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. High-Level Butanol Production from Cassava Starch by a Newly Isolated Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Li, Shubo; Guo, Yuan; Lu, Fuzhi; Huang, Jiajian; Pang, Zongwen

    2015-10-01

    A new Clostridium acetobutylicum strain, exhibiting the ability to resist butanol stress and produce butanol, was identified and named GX01. Strain GX01 can use a wide variety of carbohydrates, especially cassava starch, to produce butanol. After the optimization of culture conditions, C. acetobutylicum GX01 could produce 27.3 g/L solvent, including 17.1 g/L butanol, 7.9 g/L acetone, and 2.3 g/L ethanol, from 100 g/L cassava flour and 3 g/L soybean meal. Furthermore, when its acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was performed in 10- and 30-L bioreactors, the production of total solvent and butanol reached 29.2 and 18.3 g/L, respectively, and 28.8 and 18.8 g/L, respectively. Thus, the high level and stability of butanol production make strain GX01 a promising candidate for ABE fermentation using the low-cost cassava starch.

  16. Simultaneous production of butanol and acetoin by metabolically engineered Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Chen, Yong; Ding, Fengying; Guo, Ting; Xie, Jingjing; Zhuang, Wei; Niu, Haunqing; Shi, Xinchi; Zhu, Chenjie; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-01-01

    Biobutanol is a potential fuel substitute and has been receiving increased attention in recent years. However, the economics of biobutanol production have been hampered by a number of bottlenecks such as high cost of raw material and low yield of solvent. Co-production of value-added products is a possible way to improve the economics of biobutanol production. Here, we present metabolic engineering strategies to substitute the major by-product acetone for a value-added product acetoin during butanol fermentation. By overexpressing the α-acetolactate decarboxylase gene alsD in Clostridium acetobutylicum B3, the acetoin yield was markedly increased while acetone formation was reduced. Subsequent disruption of adc gene effectively abolished acetone formation and further increased acetoin yield. After optimization of fermentation conditions, the alsD-overexpressing adc mutant generated butanol (13.8g/L), acetoin (4.3g/L), and ethanol (3.9g/L), but no acetone. Thus, acetone was completely substituted for acetoin, and both mass yield and product value were improved. This study provides valuable insights into the regulation of acetoin synthesis and should be highly useful for the development of acetoin-derived products like 2,3-butanediol and 2-butanol in C. acetobutylicum. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Disruption of the acetate kinase (ack) gene of Clostridium acetobutylicum results in delayed acetate production.

    PubMed

    Kuit, Wouter; Minton, Nigel P; López-Contreras, Ana M; Eggink, Gerrit

    2012-05-01

    In microorganisms, the enzyme acetate kinase (AK) catalyses the formation of ATP from ADP by de-phosphorylation of acetyl phosphate into acetic acid. A mutant strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum lacking acetate kinase activity is expected to have reduced acetate and acetone production compared to the wild type. In this work, a C. acetobutylicum mutant strain with a selectively disrupted ack gene, encoding AK, was constructed and genetically and physiologically characterized. The ack (-) strain showed a reduction in acetate kinase activity of more than 97% compared to the wild type. The fermentation profiles of the ack (-) and wild-type strain were compared using two different fermentation media, CGM and CM1. The latter contains acetate and has a higher iron and magnesium content than CGM. In general, fermentations by the mutant strain showed a clear shift in the timing of peak acetate production relative to butyrate and had increased acid uptake after the onset of solvent formation. Specifically, in acetate containing CM1 medium, acetate production was reduced by more than 80% compared to the wild type under the same conditions, but both strains produced similar final amounts of solvents. Fermentations in CGM showed similar peak acetate and butyrate levels, but increased acetoin (60%), ethanol (63%) and butanol (16%) production and reduced lactate (-50%) formation by the mutant compared to the wild type. These findings are in agreement with the proposed regulatory function of butyryl phosphate as opposed to acetyl phosphate in the metabolic switch of solventogenic clostridia.

  18. Clostridium acetobutylicum Mutants That Produce Butyraldehyde and Altered Quantities of Solvents.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P; Palosaari, N

    1987-12-01

    Spontaneous mutants of Clostridium acetobutylicum NRRL B643 that were resistant to allyl alcohol (AA) were selected and characterized. These mutants contained 10- to 100-fold reduced activities of butanol and ethanol alcohol dehydrogenase. The AA mutants formed two groups and produced no ethanol. Type 1 AA mutants produced significant amounts of a new solvent, butyraldehyde, and contained normal levels of the coenzyme A-dependent butyraldehyde dehydrogenase (BAD). Type 2 AA mutants produced no significant butyraldehyde and lower levels of all solvents, and they contained 45- to 100-fold lower activity levels of BAD. Following ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis, low-acid-producing (Acid) mutants were selected and characterized as superinduced solvent producers, yielding more than 99% of theoretical glucose carbon as solvents and only small amounts of acetate and butyrate. Following ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis, 13 sporulation-negative (Spo) mutants were characterized; and 3 were found to produce only butyrate and acetate, a minor amount of acetone, and no alcohols. These Spo mutants contained reduced butanol dehydrogenase activity and no BAD enzyme activity. The data support the view that the type 2 AA, the Acid, and the Spo mutants somehow alter normal regulated expression of the solvent pathway in C. acetobutylicum.

  19. Novel substrate specificity of glutathione synthesis enzymes from Streptococcus agalactiae and Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, Kuniki . E-mail: kkino@waseda.jp; Kuratsu, Shoko; Noguchi, Atsushi; Kokubo, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Yuji; Arai, Toshinobu; Yagasaki, Makoto; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2007-01-12

    Glutathione (GSH) is synthesized by {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS) and glutathione synthetase (GS) in living organisms. Recently, bifunctional fusion protein, termed {gamma}-GCS-GS catalyzing both {gamma}-GCS and GS reactions from gram-positive firmicutes Streptococcus agalactiae, has been reported. We revealed that in the {gamma}-GCS activity, S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS had different substrate specificities from those of Escherichia coli {gamma}-GCS. Furthermore, S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS synthesized several kinds of {gamma}-glutamyltripeptide, {gamma}-Glu-X{sub aa}-Gly, from free three amino acids. In Clostridium acetobutylicum, the genes encoding {gamma}-GCS and putative GS were found to be immediately adjacent by BLAST search, and had amino acid sequence homology with S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS, respectively. We confirmed that the proteins expressed from each gene showed {gamma}-GCS and GS activity, respectively. C. acetobutylicum GS had broad substrate specificities and synthesized several kinds of {gamma}-glutamyltripeptide, {gamma}-Glu-Cys-X{sub aa}. Whereas the substrate specificities of {gamma}-GCS domain protein and GS domain protein of S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS were the same as those of S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS.

  20. Continuous xylose fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum--kinetics and energetics issues under acidogenesis conditions.

    PubMed

    Procentese, Alessandra; Raganati, Francesca; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Russo, Maria Elena; Salatino, Piero; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The paper reports the assessment of the growth kinetics of Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792 adopting xylose as carbon source. Xylose is the fundamental component of hemicellulose hydrolysis, a relevant fraction of lignocellulosic feedstocks for biofuel production. Tests were carried out in a CSTR operated under controlled pH. The effects of acids (acetic and butyric) and solvents (acetone, ethanol and butanol) on the fermentation were investigated. The conversion process was characterized under steady-state conditions in terms of concentration of xylose, cells, acids, and pH. The growth kinetics was expressed by means of a multiple product inhibition and it was able to predict microorganism growth rate under a broad interval of operating conditions, even those typical of solvents production. The mass fractional yield of biomass and products were expressed as a function of the specific growth rate taking into account the Pirt model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The mechanism of switching from an acidogenic to butanol-acetone fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, P.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to elucidate the detailed mechanism by which solvent-forming bacteria such as Clostridium acetobutylicum regulate the well-known shift in fermentation pathway between alcohol-acetone and organic acid production. It is desired to eventually isolate and describe: (1) the regulatory genes and protein elements that determine induction of synthesis of the solvent-pathway enzymes; and (2) how this regulation system interacts with the sporulatin induction and development program and with related pathways such as granulse and exopolysaccharide formation in clostridia. A working model forhow clostridial control systems work can be derived from recent research on stress systems in E. coli and sporulation in Bacillus subtilis.

  2. Continuous lactose fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum--assessment of acidogenesis kinetics.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Fabio; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Russo, Maria Elena; Marzocchella, Antonio; Salatino, Piero

    2011-01-01

    An assessment of the growth kinetics of acidogenic cells of Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792 is reported in the paper. Tests were carried out in a continuous stirred tank reactor under controlled conditions adopting a complex medium supplemented with lactose as carbon source to mimic cheese whey. The effects of acids (acetic and butyric), solvents (acetone, ethanol and butanol) and pH on the growth rate of acidogenic cells were assessed. The conversion process was characterized under steady-state conditions in terms of concentration of lactose, cells, acids, total organic carbon and pH. The growth kinetics was expressed by means of a multiple product inhibition and interacting model including a novel formulation to account for the role of pH. The model has the potential to predict microorganism growth rate under a broad interval of operating conditions, even those typical of solvents production.

  3. Reduction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene by Clostridium acetobutylicum through hydroxylamino-nitrotoluene intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, J.B.; Wang, C.Y.; Bhadra, R.; Richardson, A.; Bennett, G.N.; Rudolph, F.B.

    1998-03-01

    Studies were conducted to isolate and identify intermediates of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) transformation by Clostridium acetobutylicum and to quantify their concentrations in active whole cell cultures. Only two intermediates of TNT reduction were detected in cell cultures and were identified as 4-hydroxylamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene and 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene. Structures were confirmed with {sup 1}H-NMR, {sup 13}C-NMR, and desorption chemical ionization mass spectroscopy. When cells were suspended in a non-growth saline medium, both hydroxylamine forms accumulated. In media capable of supporting cell growth, the 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene accumulated with concentrations of 4-hydroxylamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene remaining near detection limits. Studies using purified 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene confirmed that its biotransformation rate in active cultures greatly exceeded abiotic decomposition in aqueous medium.

  4. Nutritional factors affecting the ratio of solvents produced by Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Bahl, H.; Gottwald, M.; Kuhn, A.; Rale, V.; Andersch, W.; Gottschalk, G.

    1986-07-01

    Fermentation of whey by Clostridium acetobutylicum yielded butanol and acetone in a ratio of approximately 100:1. This ratio amounted to only 2:1 in synthetic media with glucose, lactose, or glucose plus galactose as substrates. Removal of citrate from whey and addition of minerals resulted in an increase in the amount of acetone produced. Experiments carried out in a chemostat with a low-phosphate synthetic medium revealed that the butanol/acetone ratio could be increased from 2:1 to 3.8:1 by cofermentation of L-lactate and from 2:1 to 8:1 by iron limitation. The performance of the fermentation in a low-iron glucose medium above pH 5.1 yielded L-lactate as the main product. 42 references.

  5. Nutritional Factors Affecting the Ratio of Solvents Produced by Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Bahl, H.; Gottwald, M.; Kuhn, A.; Rale, V.; Andersch, W.; Gottschalk, G.

    1986-01-01

    Fermentation of whey by Clostridium acetobutylicum yielded butanol and acetone in a ratio of approximately 100:1. This ratio amounted to only 2:1 in synthetic media with glucose, lactose, or glucose plus galactose as substrates. Removal of citrate from whey and addition of minerals resulted in an increase in the amount of acetone produced. Experiments carried out in a chemostat with a low-phosphate synthetic medium revealed that the butanol/acetone ratio could be increased from 2:1 to 3.8:1 by cofermentation of l-lactate and from 2:1 to 8:1 by iron limitation. The performance of the fermentation in a low-iron glucose medium above pH 5.1 yielded l-lactate as the main product. PMID:16347104

  6. In situ hydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from oleaginous fungal biomass.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Elhagag Ahmed; Abd-Alla, Mohamed Hemida; Bagy, Magdy Mohamed Khalil; Morsy, Fatthy Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    An in situ batch fermentation technique was employed for biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production from oleaginous fungal biomass using the anaerobic fermentative bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Oleaginous fungal Cunninghamella echinulata biomass which has ability to accumulate up to 71% cellular lipid was used as the substrate carbon source. The maximum cumulative hydrogen by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from crude C. echinulata biomass was 260 ml H2 l(-1), hydrogen production efficiency was 0.32 mol H2 mole(-1) glucose and the hydrogen production rate was 5.2 ml H2 h(-1). Subsequently, the produced acids (acetic and butyric acids) during acidogenesis phase are re-utilized by ABE-producing clostridia and converted into acetone, butanol, and ethanol. The total ABE produced by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 during batch fermentation was 3.6 g l(-1) from crude fungal biomass including acetone (1.05 g l(-1)), butanol (2.19 g l(-1)) and ethanol (0.36 g l(-1)). C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 has ability to produce lipolytic enzymes with a specific activity 5.59 U/mg protein to hydrolyze ester containing substrates. The lipolytic potential of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was used as a biocatalyst for a lipase transesterification process using the produced ethanol from ABE fermentation for microdiesel production. The fatty acid ethyl esters (microdiesel) generated from the lipase transesterification of crude C. echinulata dry mass was analyzed by GC/MS as 15.4% of total FAEEs. The gross energy content of biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and biodiesel generated through C. acetobutylicum fermentation from crude C. echinulata dry mass was 3113.14 kJ mol(-1). These results suggest a possibility of integrating biohydrogen, acetone, butanol and ethanol production technology by C. acetobutylicum with microdiesel production from crude C. echinulata dry mass and therefore improve the feasibility and commercialization of bioenergy production

  7. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the enhanced production of isopropanol-butanol-ethanol fuel mixture.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Malaviya, Alok; Lee, Joungmin; Im, Jung Ae; Lee, Sang Yup; Lee, Julia; Eom, Moon-Ho; Cho, Jung-Hee; Seung, Do Young

    2013-01-01

    Butanol is considered as a superior biofuel, which is conventionally produced by clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. Among ABE, only butanol and ethanol can be used as fuel alternatives. Coproduction of acetone thus causes lower yield of fuel alcohols. Thus, this study aimed at developing an improved Clostridium acetobutylicum strain possessing enhanced fuel alcohol production capability. For this, we previously developed a hyper ABE producing BKM19 strain was further engineered to convert acetone into isopropanol. The BKM19 strain was transformed with the plasmid pIPA100 containing the sadh (primary/secondary alcohol dehydrogenase) and hydG (putative electron transfer protein) genes from the Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B593 cloned under the control of the thiolase promoter. The resulting BKM19 (pIPA100) strain produced 27.9 g/l isopropanol-butanol-ethanol (IBE) as a fuel alcohols with negligible amount of acetone (0.4 g/l) from 97.8 g/l glucose in lab-scale (2 l) batch fermentation. Thus, this metabolically engineered strain was able to produce 99% of total solvent produced as fuel alcohols. The scalability and stability of BKM19 (pIPA100) were evaluated at 200 l pilot-scale fermentation, which showed that the fuel alcohol yield could be improved to 0.37 g/g as compared to 0.29 g/g obtained at lab-scale fermentation, while attaining a similar titer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest titer of IBE achieved and the first report on the large scale fermentation of C. acetobutylicum for IBE production. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  8. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the influence of lignin on biofuel production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed

    Raut, Mahendra P; Couto, Narciso; Pham, Trong K; Evans, Caroline; Noirel, Josselin; Wright, Phillip C

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum has been a focus of research because of its ability to produce high-value compounds that can be used as biofuels. Lignocellulose is a promising feedstock, but the lignin-cellulose-hemicellulose biomass complex requires chemical pre-treatment to yield fermentable saccharides, including cellulose-derived cellobiose, prior to bioproduction of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) and hydrogen. Fermentation capability is limited by lignin and thus process optimization requires knowledge of lignin inhibition. The effects of lignin on cellular metabolism were evaluated for C. acetobutylicum grown on medium containing either cellobiose only or cellobiose plus lignin. Microscopy, gas chromatography and 8-plex iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic technologies were applied to interrogate the effect of lignin on cellular morphology, fermentation and the proteome. Our results demonstrate that C. acetobutylicum has reduced performance for solvent production when lignin is present in the medium. Medium supplemented with 1 g L(-1) of lignin led to delay and decreased solvents production (ethanol; 0.47 g L(-1) for cellobiose and 0.27 g L(-1) for cellobiose plus lignin and butanol; 0.13 g L(-1) for cellobiose and 0.04 g L(-1) for cellobiose plus lignin) at 20 and 48 h, respectively, resulting in the accumulation of acetic acid and butyric acid. Of 583 identified proteins (FDR < 1 %), 328 proteins were quantified with at least two unique peptides. Up- or down-regulation of protein expression was determined by comparison of exponential and stationary phases of cellobiose in the presence and absence of lignin. Of relevance, glycolysis and fermentative pathways were mostly down-regulated, during exponential and stationary growth phases in presence of lignin. Moreover, proteins involved in DNA repair, transcription/translation and GTP/ATP-dependent activities were also significantly affected and these changes were associated with altered cell morphology

  9. Engineering Clostridium acetobutylicum for production of kerosene and diesel blendstock precursors.

    PubMed

    Bormann, Sebastian; Baer, Zachary C; Sreekumar, Sanil; Kuchenreuther, Jon M; Dean Toste, F; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2014-09-01

    Processes for the biotechnological production of kerosene and diesel blendstocks are often economically unattractive due to low yields and product titers. Recently, Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentation products acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) were shown to serve as precursors for catalytic upgrading to higher chain-length molecules that can be used as fuel substitutes. To produce suitable kerosene and diesel blendstocks, the butanol:acetone ratio of fermentation products needs to be increased to 2-2.5:1, while ethanol production is minimized. Here we show that the overexpression of selected proteins changes the ratio of ABE products relative to the wild type ATCC 824 strain. Overexpression of the native alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase (AAD) has been reported to primarily increase ethanol formation in C. acetobutylicum. We found that overexpression of the AAD(D485G) variant increased ethanol titers by 294%. Catalytic upgrading of the 824(aad(D485G)) ABE products resulted in a blend with nearly 50wt%≤C9 products, which are unsuitable for diesel. To selectively increase butanol production, C. beijerinckii aldehyde dehydrogenase and C. ljungdhalii butanol dehydrogenase were co-expressed (strain designate 824(Cb ald-Cl bdh)), which increased butanol titers by 27% to 16.9gL(-1) while acetone and ethanol titers remained essentially unaffected. The solvent ratio from 824(Cb ald-Cl bdh) resulted in more than 80wt% of catalysis products having a carbon chain length≥C11 which amounts to 9.8gL(-1) of products suitable as kerosene or diesel blendstock based on fermentation volume. To further increase solvent production, we investigated expression of both native and heterologous chaperones in C. acetobutylicum. Expression of a heat shock protein (HSP33) from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus increased the total solvent titer by 22%. Co-expression of HSP33 and aldehyde/butanol dehydrogenases further increased ABE formation as well as acetone and butanol yields. HSP33 was

  10. Production of a functional cell wall-anchored minicellulosome by recombinant Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed

    Willson, Benjamin J; Kovács, Katalin; Wilding-Steele, Tom; Markus, Robert; Winzer, Klaus; Minton, Nigel P

    2016-01-01

    The use of fossil fuels is no longer tenable. Not only are they a finite resource, their use is damaging the environment through pollution and global warming. Alternative, environmentally friendly, renewable sources of chemicals and fuels are required. To date, the focus has been on using lignocellulose as a feedstock for microbial fermentation. However, its recalcitrance to deconstruction is making the development of economic processes extremely challenging. One solution is the generation of an organism suitable for use in consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), i.e. one able to both hydrolyse lignocellulose and ferment the released sugars, and this represents an important goal for synthetic biology. We aim to use synthetic biology to develop the solventogenic bacterium C. acetobutylicum as a CBP organism through the introduction of a cellulosome, a complex of cellulolytic enzymes bound to a scaffold protein called a scaffoldin. In previous work, we were able to demonstrate the in vivo production of a C. thermocellum-derived minicellulosome by recombinant strains of C. acetobutylicum, and aim to develop on this success, addressing potential issues with the previous strategy. The genes for the cellulosomal enzymes Cel9G, Cel48F, and Xyn10A from C. cellulolyticum were integrated into the C. acetobutylicum genome using Allele-Coupled Exchange (ACE) technology, along with a miniscaffoldin derived from C. cellulolyticum CipC. The possibility of anchoring the recombinant cellulosome to the cell surface using the native sortase system was assessed, and the cellulolytic properties of the recombinant strains were assayed via plate growth, batch fermentation and sugar release assays. We have been able to demonstrate the synthesis and in vivo assembly of a four-component minicellulosome by recombinant C. acetobutylicum strains. Furthermore, we have been able to anchor a minicellulosome to the C. acetobutylicum cell wall by the use of the native sortase system. The recombinant

  11. Elimination of carbon catabolite repression in Clostridium acetobutylicum--a journey toward simultaneous use of xylose and glucose.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Mark; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A; Chou, C Perry

    2015-09-01

    The industrial Gram-positive anaerobe Clostridium acetobutylicum is a valued acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) solvent producer that is able to utilize a vast array of carbon sources in fermentation. When glucose is present in the growth medium, however, C. acetobutylicum, like many Gram-positive organisms, exhibits biphasic growth characteristics in which glucose is used preferentially over secondary carbon sources, a phenomenon known as carbon catabolite repression (CCR). The secondary carbon source is only utilized when the supply of glucose is exhausted, resulting in inefficient use of complex carbon sources. As biofuel production is sought from cheap feedstock, attention has turned to lignocellulosic biomass. Growth of C. acetobutylicum on lignocellulose, however, can be limited by CCR. Here, we present a method to relieve the inhibitory effect of CCR and allow simultaneous utilization of the lignocellulosic sugars of glucose and xylose by C. acetobutylicum. First, we utilized an in vivo gene reporter assay to demonstrate that an identified 14-nucleotide catabolite responsive element (CRE) sequence was sufficient to introduce CCR-mediated transcriptional inhibition, while subsequent mutation of the CRE sequence relieved the inhibitory effect. Next, we demonstrated that C. acetobutylicum harboring a CRE-less plasmid-borne xylose and pentose phosphate pathway operon afforded a 7.5-fold increase in xylose utilization in the presence of glucose as compared to a wild-type CRE plasmid-borne operon, effectively overcoming native CCR effects. The methodology presented here should translate to other members of Clostridium that exhibit CCR to enable simultaneous utilization of a vast array of carbon sources.

  12. Enhanced butanol production obtained by reinforcing the direct butanol-forming route in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Joungmin; Park, Jin Hwan; Im, Jung Ae; Eom, Moon-Ho; Lee, Julia; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Song, Hyohak; Cho, Jung-Hee; Seung, Do Young; Lee, Sang Yup

    2012-10-23

    Butanol is an important industrial solvent and advanced biofuel that can be produced by biphasic fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. It has been known that acetate and butyrate first formed during the acidogenic phase are reassimilated to form acetone-butanol-ethanol (cold channel). Butanol can also be formed directly from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) through butyryl-CoA (hot channel). However, little is known about the relative contributions of the two butanol-forming pathways. Here we report that the direct butanol-forming pathway is a better channel to optimize for butanol production through metabolic flux and mass balance analyses. Butanol production through the hot channel was maximized by simultaneous disruption of the pta and buk genes, encoding phosphotransacetylase and butyrate kinase, while the adhE1(D485G) gene, encoding a mutated aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase, was overexpressed. The ratio of butanol produced through the hot channel to that produced through the cold channel increased from 2.0 in the wild type to 18.8 in the engineered BEKW(pPthlAAD(**)) strain. By reinforcing the direct butanol-forming flux in C. acetobutylicum, 18.9 g/liter of butanol was produced, with a yield of 0.71 mol butanol/mol glucose by batch fermentation, levels which are 160% and 245% higher than those obtained with the wild type. By fed-batch culture of this engineered strain with in situ recovery, 585.3 g of butanol was produced from 1,861.9 g of glucose, with the yield of 0.76 mol butanol/mol glucose and productivity of 1.32 g/liter/h. Studies of two butanol-forming routes and their effects on butanol production in C. acetobutylicum described here will serve as a basis for further metabolic engineering of clostridia aimed toward developing a superior butanol producer. IMPORTANCE Renewable biofuel is one of the answers to solving the energy crisis and climate change problems. Butanol produced naturally by clostridia has superior liquid fuel characteristics and thus has

  13. Expression of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 Genes in Escherichia coli for Acetone Production and Acetate Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Lourdes L.; Welker, Neil E.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    1998-01-01

    A synthetic acetone operon (ace4) composed of four Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 genes (adc, ctfAB, and thl, coding for the acetoacetate decarboxylase, coenzyme A transferase, and thiolase, respectively) under the control of the thl promoter was constructed and was introduced into Escherichia coli on vector pACT. Acetone production demonstrated that ace4 is expressed in E. coli and resulted in the reduction of acetic acid levels in the fermentation broth. Since different E. coli strains vary significantly in their growth characteristics and acetate metabolism, ace4 was expressed in three E. coli strains: ER2275, ATCC 11303, and MC1060. Shake flask cultures of MC1060(pACT) produced ca. 2 mM acetone, while both strains ER2275(pACT) and ATCC 11303(pACT) produced ca. 40 mM acetone. Glucose-fed cultures of strain ATCC 11303(pACT) resulted in a 150% increase in acetone titers compared to those of batch shake flask cultures. External addition of sodium acetate to glucose-fed cultures of ATCC 11303(pACT) resulted in further increased acetone titers. In bioreactor studies, acidic conditions (pH 5.5 versus 6.5) improved acetone production. Despite the substantial acetone evaporation due to aeration and agitation in the bioreactor, 125 to 154 mM acetone accumulated in ATCC 11303(pACT) fermentations. These acetone titers are equal to or higher than those produced by wild-type C. acetobutylicum. This is the first study to demonstrate the ability to use clostridial genes in nonclostridial hosts for solvent production. In addition, acetone-producing E. coli strains may be useful hosts for recombinant protein production in that detrimental acetate accumulation can be avoided. PMID:9501448

  14. Structural Variation in Bacterial Glyoxalase I Enzymes: Investigation of the Metalloenzyme Glyoxalase I from Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Suttisansanee U.; Swaminathan S.; Lau, K.; Lagishetty, S.; Rao, K. N.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Honek, J. F.

    2011-11-04

    The glyoxalase system catalyzes the conversion of toxic, metabolically produced {alpha}-ketoaldehydes, such as methylglyoxal, into their corresponding nontoxic 2-hydroxycarboxylic acids, leading to detoxification of these cellular metabolites. Previous studies on the first enzyme in the glyoxalase system, glyoxalase I (GlxI), from yeast, protozoa, animals, humans, plants, and Gram-negative bacteria, have suggested two metal activation classes, Zn{sup 2+} and non-Zn{sup 2+} activation. Here, we report a biochemical and structural investigation of the GlxI from Clostridium acetobutylicum, which is the first GlxI enzyme from Gram-positive bacteria that has been fully characterized as to its three-dimensional structure and its detailed metal specificity. It is a Ni{sup 2+}/Co{sup 2+}-activated enzyme, in which the active site geometry forms an octahedral coordination with one metal atom, two water molecules, and four metal-binding ligands, although its inactive Zn{sup 2+}-bound form possesses a trigonal bipyramidal geometry with only one water molecule liganded to the metal center. This enzyme also possesses a unique dimeric molecular structure. Unlike other small homodimeric GlxI where two active sites are located at the dimeric interface, the C. acetobutylicum dimeric GlxI enzyme also forms two active sites but each within single subunits. Interestingly, even though this enzyme possesses a different dimeric structure from previously studied GlxI, its metal activation characteristics are consistent with properties of other GlxI. These findings indicate that metal activation profiles in this class of enzyme hold true across diverse quaternary structure arrangements.

  15. Purification and characterization of the extracellular. alpha. -amylase from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824

    SciTech Connect

    Paquet, V.; Croux, C.; Goma, G.; Soucaille, P. )

    1991-01-01

    The extracellular {alpha}-amylase (1,4-{alpha}-D-glucanglucanohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.1) from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography (Mono Q) and gel filtration (Superose 12). The enzyme had an isoelectric point of 4.7 and a molecular weight of 84,000, as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It was a monomeric protein, the 19-amino-acid N terminus of which displayed 42% homology with the Bacillus subtilis saccharifying {alpha}-amylase. The amino acid composition of the enzyme showed a high number of acidic and hydrophobic residues and only one cysteine residue per mole. The activity of the {alpha}-amylase was not stimulated by calcium ions (or other metal ions) or inhibited by EDTA, although the enzyme contained seven calcium atoms per molecule. {alpha}-Amylase activity on soluble starch was optimal at pH 5.6 and 45{degree}C. The {alpha}-amylase was stable at an acidic pH but very sensitive to thermal inactivation. It hydrolyzed soluble starch, with a K{sub m} of 3.6 g {center dot} liter{sup {minus}1} and a K{sub cat} of 122 mol of reducing sugars {center dot} s{sup {minus}1} {center dot} mol{sup {minus}1}. The {alpha}-amylase showed greater activity with high-molecular-weight substrates than with low-molecular-weight maltooligosaccharides, hydrolyzed glycogen and pullulan slowly, but did not hydrolyze dextran or cyclodextrins. The major end products of maltohexaose degradation were glucose, maltose, and maltotriose; maltotetraose and maltopentaose were formed as intermediate products. Twenty seven percent of the glucoamylase activity generally detected in the culture supernatant of C. acetobutylicum can be attributed to the {alpha}-amylase.

  16. Enhanced Butanol Production Obtained by Reinforcing the Direct Butanol-Forming Route in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Joungmin; Park, Jin Hwan; Im, Jung Ae; Eom, Moon-Ho; Lee, Julia; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Song, Hyohak; Cho, Jung-Hee; Seung, Do Young; Lee, Sang Yup

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Butanol is an important industrial solvent and advanced biofuel that can be produced by biphasic fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. It has been known that acetate and butyrate first formed during the acidogenic phase are reassimilated to form acetone-butanol-ethanol (cold channel). Butanol can also be formed directly from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) through butyryl-CoA (hot channel). However, little is known about the relative contributions of the two butanol-forming pathways. Here we report that the direct butanol-forming pathway is a better channel to optimize for butanol production through metabolic flux and mass balance analyses. Butanol production through the hot channel was maximized by simultaneous disruption of the pta and buk genes, encoding phosphotransacetylase and butyrate kinase, while the adhE1D485G gene, encoding a mutated aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase, was overexpressed. The ratio of butanol produced through the hot channel to that produced through the cold channel increased from 2.0 in the wild type to 18.8 in the engineered BEKW(pPthlAAD**) strain. By reinforcing the direct butanol-forming flux in C. acetobutylicum, 18.9 g/liter of butanol was produced, with a yield of 0.71 mol butanol/mol glucose by batch fermentation, levels which are 160% and 245% higher than those obtained with the wild type. By fed-batch culture of this engineered strain with in situ recovery, 585.3 g of butanol was produced from 1,861.9 g of glucose, with the yield of 0.76 mol butanol/mol glucose and productivity of 1.32 g/liter/h. Studies of two butanol-forming routes and their effects on butanol production in C. acetobutylicum described here will serve as a basis for further metabolic engineering of clostridia aimed toward developing a superior butanol producer. PMID:23093384

  17. Solvents Production from a Mixture of Glucose and Xylose by Mixed Fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Qi, Gao-Xiang; Xiong, Lian; Huang, Chao; Chen, Xue-Fang; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Xin-De

    2015-10-01

    To overcome the xylose utilization defect in ethanol fermentation by wide-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae and alleviate the carbon catabolite repression (CCR) in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum, a novel mixed fermentation of S. cerevisiae and C. acetobutylicum was developed. When S. cerevisiae was inoculated 24 h earlier than C. acetobutylicum CH02, a higher solvents yield was achieved with 0.41 g/g, compared to 0.38 g/g in ABE fermentation, and when S. cerevisiae and C. acetobutylicum CH02 were inoculated simultaneously, a higher productivity was achieved with 0.32 g/L/h, compared to 0.15 g/L/h in ABE fermentation. The total solvents yield was improved by the high ethanol yield from glucose. The CCR in mixed fermentation was alleviated when glucose was utilized quickly by S. cerevisiae, and therefore, the productivity was improved. This study suggests that mixed fermentation is an effective solvents production method from a mixture of glucose and xylose.

  18. Combined overexpression of genes involved in pentose phosphate pathway enables enhanced D-xylose utilization by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lin; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Liwen; Yang, Chen; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong; Gu, Yang

    2014-03-10

    D-Xylose utilization by Clostridium acetobutylicum, an important industrial microorganism used in ABE (Acetone, Butanol and Ethanol) production, has attracted increasing interests. We demonstrated previously that co-overexpression of genes, encoding d-xylose symporter, D-xylose isomerase and xylulokinase, improved D-xylose utilization by C. acetobutylicum (Xiao, H., et al., 2011. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 77, 7886-7895). Here, we further identified genes involved in PPP (Pentose Phosphate Pathway) in C. acetobutylicum and evaluated their contribution to d-xylose utilization. Among all the candidate genes, the CAC1347, CAC1348, CAC1730 and CAC2880 were validated to encode genes tal, tkl, rpe and rpi, four key genes involved in PPP, respectively. The following combined overexpression of these genes conferred a significantly improved xylose-utilizing ability to the recombinant strain, reaching a solvent titer 42% higher than that of the wild-type strain. This finding offers a useful strategy to optimize d-xylose utilization by C. acetobutylicum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Extending CRISPR-Cas9 Technology from Genome Editing to Transcriptional Engineering in the Genus Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Mark R; Pyne, Michael E; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A; Chou, C Perry

    2016-10-15

    The discovery and exploitation of the prokaryotic adaptive immunity system based on clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins have revolutionized genetic engineering. CRISPR-Cas tools have enabled extensive genome editing as well as efficient modulation of the transcriptional program in a multitude of organisms. Progress in the development of genetic engineering tools for the genus Clostridium has lagged behind that of many other prokaryotes, presenting the CRISPR-Cas technology an opportunity to resolve a long-existing issue. Here, we applied the Streptococcus pyogenes type II CRISPR-Cas9 (SpCRISPR-Cas9) system for genome editing in Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM792. We further explored the utility of the SpCRISPR-Cas9 machinery for gene-specific transcriptional repression. For proof-of-concept demonstration, a plasmid-encoded fluorescent protein gene was used for transcriptional repression in C. acetobutylicum Subsequently, we targeted the carbon catabolite repression (CCR) system of C. acetobutylicum through transcriptional repression of the hprK gene encoding HPr kinase/phosphorylase, leading to the coutilization of glucose and xylose, which are two abundant carbon sources from lignocellulosic feedstocks. Similar approaches based on SpCRISPR-Cas9 for genome editing and transcriptional repression were also demonstrated in Clostridium pasteurianum ATCC 6013. As such, this work lays a foundation for the derivation of clostridial strains for industrial purposes.

  20. d-2,3-Butanediol Production Due to Heterologous Expression of an Acetoin Reductase in Clostridium acetobutylicum ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Siemerink, Marco A. J.; Kuit, Wouter; López Contreras, Ana M.; Eggink, Gerrit; van der Oost, John; Kengen, Servé W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Acetoin reductase (ACR) catalyzes the conversion of acetoin to 2,3-butanediol. Under certain conditions, Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (and strains derived from it) generates both d- and l-stereoisomers of acetoin, but because of the absence of an ACR enzyme, it does not produce 2,3-butanediol. A gene encoding ACR from Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 was functionally expressed in C. acetobutylicum under the control of two strong promoters, the constitutive thl promoter and the late exponential adc promoter. Both ACR-overproducing strains were grown in batch cultures, during which 89 to 90% of the natively produced acetoin was converted to 20 to 22 mM d-2,3-butanediol. The addition of a racemic mixture of acetoin led to the production of both d-2,3-butanediol and meso-2,3-butanediol. A metabolic network that is in agreement with the experimental data is proposed. Native 2,3-butanediol production is a first step toward a potential homofermentative 2-butanol-producing strain of C. acetobutylicum. PMID:21335380

  1. D-2,3-butanediol production due to heterologous expression of an acetoin reductase in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Siemerink, Marco A J; Kuit, Wouter; López Contreras, Ana M; Eggink, Gerrit; van der Oost, John; Kengen, Servé W M

    2011-04-01

    Acetoin reductase (ACR) catalyzes the conversion of acetoin to 2,3-butanediol. Under certain conditions, Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (and strains derived from it) generates both d- and l-stereoisomers of acetoin, but because of the absence of an ACR enzyme, it does not produce 2,3-butanediol. A gene encoding ACR from Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 was functionally expressed in C. acetobutylicum under the control of two strong promoters, the constitutive thl promoter and the late exponential adc promoter. Both ACR-overproducing strains were grown in batch cultures, during which 89 to 90% of the natively produced acetoin was converted to 20 to 22 mM d-2,3-butanediol. The addition of a racemic mixture of acetoin led to the production of both d-2,3-butanediol and meso-2,3-butanediol. A metabolic network that is in agreement with the experimental data is proposed. Native 2,3-butanediol production is a first step toward a potential homofermentative 2-butanol-producing strain of C. acetobutylicum.

  2. Development of real-time PCR primer and probe sets for detecting degenerated and non-degenerated forms of the butanol-producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Cho, Min Ok; Um, Youngsoon; Sang, Byoung-In

    2010-05-01

    Degeneration is one of the limiting factors in butanol fermentation, and it must be monitored and prevented for stable butanol production. In Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, the most well-known butanol-producing microorganism, degeneration is caused by the loss of the pSOL1 plasmid that carries essential genes involved in solvent production. In this study, we designed two specific primer and probe sets for real-time qPCR (RT-qPCR) detection of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (the C. aceto set) and pSOL1-possessing C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (the DGS set). Specific primer and probe sets were designed on the basis of the 16S rDNA sequence and pSOL1 sequence. The number of degenerated C. acetobutylicum could be quantified by subtracting the number of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 containing pSOL1 from the total number of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The primer and probe sets permitted the specific detection and quantification of degenerated C. acetobutylicum and total butanol-producing C. acetobutylicum by RT-qPCR.

  3. Extending CRISPR-Cas9 Technology from Genome Editing to Transcriptional Engineering in the Genus Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    Bruder, Mark R.; Pyne, Michael E.; Moo-Young, Murray

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The discovery and exploitation of the prokaryotic adaptive immunity system based on clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins have revolutionized genetic engineering. CRISPR-Cas tools have enabled extensive genome editing as well as efficient modulation of the transcriptional program in a multitude of organisms. Progress in the development of genetic engineering tools for the genus Clostridium has lagged behind that of many other prokaryotes, presenting the CRISPR-Cas technology an opportunity to resolve a long-existing issue. Here, we applied the Streptococcus pyogenes type II CRISPR-Cas9 (SpCRISPR-Cas9) system for genome editing in Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM792. We further explored the utility of the SpCRISPR-Cas9 machinery for gene-specific transcriptional repression. For proof-of-concept demonstration, a plasmid-encoded fluorescent protein gene was used for transcriptional repression in C. acetobutylicum. Subsequently, we targeted the carbon catabolite repression (CCR) system of C. acetobutylicum through transcriptional repression of the hprK gene encoding HPr kinase/phosphorylase, leading to the coutilization of glucose and xylose, which are two abundant carbon sources from lignocellulosic feedstocks. Similar approaches based on SpCRISPR-Cas9 for genome editing and transcriptional repression were also demonstrated in Clostridium pasteurianum ATCC 6013. As such, this work lays a foundation for the derivation of clostridial strains for industrial purposes. IMPORTANCE After recognizing the industrial potential of Clostridium for decades, methods for the genetic manipulation of these anaerobic bacteria are still underdeveloped. This study reports the implementation of CRISPR-Cas technology for genome editing and transcriptional regulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, which is arguably the most common industrial clostridial strain. The developed genetic tools enable simpler, more reliable

  4. Expression and nucleotide sequence of the Clostridium acetobutylicum beta-galactosidase gene cloned in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, K R; Rockman, E; Young, C A; Pearce, L; Maddox, I S; Scott, D B

    1991-01-01

    A gene library for Clostridium acetobutylicum NCIB 2951 was constructed in the broad-host-range cosmid pLAFR1, and cosmids containing the beta-galactosidase gene were isolated by direct selection for enzyme activity on X-Gal (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactoside) plates after conjugal transfer of the library to a lac deletion derivative of Escherichia coli. Analysis of various pSUP202 subclones of the lac cosmids on X-Gal plates localized the beta-galactosidase gene to a 5.1-kb EcoRI fragment. Expression of the Clostridium beta-galactosidase gene in E. coli was not subject to glucose repression. By using transposon Tn5 mutagenesis, two gene loci, cbgA (locus I) and cbgR (locus II), were identified as necessary for beta-galactosidase expression in E. coli. DNA sequence analysis of the entire 5.1-kb fragment identified open reading frames of 2,691 and 303 bp, corresponding to locus I and locus II, respectively, and in addition a third truncated open reading frame of 825 bp. The predicted gene product of locus I, CbgA (molecular size, 105 kDa), showed extensive amino acid sequence homology with E. coli LacZ, E. coli EbgA, and Klebsiella pneumoniae LacZ and was in agreement with the size of a polypeptide synthesized in maxicells containing the cloned 5.1-kb fragment. The predicted gene product of locus II, CbgR (molecular size, 11 kDa) shares no significant homology with any other sequence in the current DNA and protein sequence data bases, but Tn5 insertions in this gene prevent the synthesis of CbgA. Complementation experiments indicate that the gene product of cbgR is required in cis with cbgA for expression of beta-galactosidase in E. coli. Images PMID:1850729

  5. Purification and characterization of acidolysin, an acidic metalloprotease produced by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed Central

    Croux, C; Paquet, V; Goma, G; Soucaille, P

    1990-01-01

    Acidolysin an extracellular protease produced by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography with a recovery of 91%. The enzyme was a monomeric protein with a molecular weight of 44,000 as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and an acidic isoelectric point of 3.3. Acidolysin was very sensitive to metal-chelating agents and phosphoramidon and was unaffected by sulfhydryl reagents. It was shown to be a calcium- and zinc-containing protease. It exhibited optimal activity against Azocoll at pH 5 and 45 degrees C. It was stable at low pH and heat labile above 50 degrees C. It exhibited specificity toward peptide bonds formed by the amino group of hydrophobic amino acids (isoleucine, leucine, and phenylalanine) and its NH2-terminal amino acid sequence showed a high degree of similarity with that of Bacillus subtilis neutral metalloprotease A. Acidolysin is the first phosphoramidon-sensitive, acidic zinc metalloprotease reported. Images PMID:2082818

  6. Promotion of the Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 growth and acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Xia, Menglei; Zhang, Lianhua; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-07-01

    An unexpected promotion effect of Ginkgo leaf on the growth of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was investigated. Component analysis of Ginkgo leaf was carried out and flavonoids were determined as the potential key metabolites. Then the flavonoids feeding experiments were carried out. Results showed that addition of only 10 mg/L flavonoids to the fermentation broth can promote butanol and ABE titre up to 14.5 and 17.8 g/L after 5 days of fermentation, that is, 74 and 68% higher than the control. A 2.2-fold biomass also has been achieved. Furthermore, by employing such novel founding, we easily exploited flavonoids from soybean and some agriculture wastes as the wide-distributed and economic feasible ABE fermentation promoter. The mechanism of the above effects was investigated from the perspective of oxidation-reduction potential. This work opens a new way in the efforts to increase the titer of butanol.

  7. Enhanced butanol fermentation using metabolically engineered Clostridium acetobutylicum with ex situ recovery of butanol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jung Yeon; Cheong, Nam Yong; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2016-10-01

    In this study, metabolic target reactions for strain engineering were searched via intracellular coenzyme A (CoA) metabolite analysis. The metabolic reactions catalyzed by thiolase (AtoB) and aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE1) were considered potential rate-limiting steps. In addition, CoA transferase (CtfAB) was highlighted as being important for the assimilation of organic acids, in order to achieve high butanol production. Based on this quantitative analysis, the BEKW_E1AB-atoB strain was constructed by overexpressing the thl (atoB), adhE1, and ctfAB genes in Clostridium acetobutylicum strain BEKW, which has the phosphotransacetylase (pta) and butyrate kinase (buk) genes knocked out. After 100h of continuous fermentation coupled with adsorptive ex situ butanol recovery, the concentrations found after considering desorption, yield, and productivity for the BEKW_E1AB-atoB strain were 55.7g/L, 0.38g/g, and 2.64g/L/h, respectively. The level of butanol production achieved (2.64g/L/h) represents the highest reported value obtained after adsorptive, long-term fermentation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of H2 and electrochemical reducing power on metabolite production by Clostridium acetobutylicum KCTC1037.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Boyoung; Yi, Junyeong; Park, Doohyun

    2014-01-01

    A conventional fermenter (CF), a single-cathode fermenter (SCF), and a double-cathode fermenter (DCF) were employed to evaluate and compare the effects of H2 and electrochemical reducing power on metabolite production by Clostridium acetobutylicum KCTC1037. The source of the external reducing power for CF was H2, for the SCF was electrochemically reduced neutral red-modified graphite felt electrode (NR-GF), and for the DCF was electrochemically reduced combination of NR-GF and platinum plate electrodes (NR-GF/PtP). The metabolites produced from glucose or CO2 by strain KCTC1037 cultivated in the DCF were butyrate, ethanol, and butanol, but ethanol and butanol were not produced from glucose or CO2 by strain KCTC1037 cultivated in the CF and SCF. It is possible that electrochemically reduced NR-GF/PtP is a more effective source of internal and external reducing power than H2 or NR-GF for strain KCTC1037 to produce metabolites from glucose and CO2. This research might prove useful in developing fermentation technology to actualize direct bioalcohol production of fermentation bacteria from CO2.

  9. Butanol production from hexoses and pentoses by fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Raganati, Francesca; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Götz, Peter; Marzocchella, Antonio; Salatino, Piero

    2015-08-01

    The present paper reports the characterization of ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) production by Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792 for sugars representative of hydrolysed lignocellulosic biomass (glucose, mannose, arabinose, xylose). The attention was focused on: the selection of an optimal medium for the simultaneous conversion of the investigated sugars; the assessment of interference-synergistic effects during the fermentation of mixtures of the investigated sugars. The synthetic medium was optimised in terms of nutritional factors: the KH2PO4-K2HPO4 concentration was increased up to 5 g/L; the MgSO4 concentration was increased up to 2 g/L; the MnSO4 concentration was increased up to 0.1 g/L; the FeSO4 concentration ranged between 0.002 and 0.01 g/L); the CaCO3 concentration was increased up to 10 g/L. The optimal concentration of the investigated factors was assessed and it varied from one sugar to another. The batch fermentations of a mixture of the four sugars highlighted their synergistic effects. Once set the initial concentration of the sugars (60 g/L), the butanol and solvent concentration increased up to 14.6 and 20.6 g/L, respectively, when the four sugars were present. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Continuous lactose fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum--assessment of solventogenic kinetics.

    PubMed

    Procentese, Alessandra; Raganati, Francesca; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Russo, Maria Elena; Salatino, Piero; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    This work reports the results of a series of tests on the specific butanol production rate by Clostridium acetobutylicum continuous cultures. The tests were carried out using lactose as carbon source to mimic cheese-whey. A continuous stirred tank reactor equipped with a microfiltration unit was used. The dilution rate (D) ranged between 0.02 and 0.15h(-1) and the ratio R of the permeate stream rate to the stream fed to the reactor ranged between 14% and 95%. For each set of D and R values, the continuous cultures were characterized in terms of concentration of cells, acids and solvents. Results were processed to assess the concentration of acidogenic cells, solventogenic cells, spores and the specific butanol production rate. The max butanol productivity was 0.5gL(-1)h(-1) at D=0.1h(-1) and R=95%. The butanol productivity referred to solventogenic cells was expressed as a function of concentration of lactose, acids and butanol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Workflow for quantitative proteomic analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 using iTRAQ tags.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shuyu; Jones, Shawn W; Choe, Leila H; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T; Lee, Kelvin H

    2013-06-15

    Clostridium acetobutylicum (Cac) is an anaerobic, endospore-forming, Gram-positive bacterium with tremendous promise for use as a biocatalyst for the production of fuels and solvents. Cac proteomic sample preparation for shotgun analysis typically involves a multitude of reagents for harsh lysis conditions and to maintain protein solubility. We describe a protein extraction and preparation method for Cac that is compatible with proteomic shotgun analysis using isobaric labeling approaches. The method is applied to the analysis of Cac grown under butanol stress and labeled using iTRAQ 4-plex reagents. This method relies on the use of calcium carbonate to facilitate lysis by sonication and a commercially available kit to remove detergents prior to labeling. This workflow resulted in the identification and quantitation of 566 unique proteins using ProteinPilot software with a false discovery rate of 0.01% for peptide matches and 0.70% for protein matches. Ninety-five proteins were found to have statistically higher expression levels in butanol-stressed Cac as compared to non-stressed Cac. Sixty-one proteins were found to have statistically lower expression levels in stressed versus non-stressed cells. This method may be applicable to other Gram-positive organisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Immobilization of Clostridium acetobutylicum onto natural textiles and its fermentation properties.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Wei; Liu, Xiaojing; Yang, Jing; Wu, Jinglan; Zhou, Jingwei; Chen, Yong; Liu, Dong; Ying, Hanjie

    2017-03-01

    Immobilized fermentation has several advantages over traditional suspended fermentation, including simple and continuous operation, improved fermentation performance and reduced cost. Carrier is the most adjustable element among three elements of immobilized fermentation, including carrier, bacteria and environment. In this study, we characterized carrier roughness and surface properties of four types of natural fibres, including linen, cotton, bamboo fibre and silk, to assess their effects on cell immobilization, fermentation performance and stability. Linen with higher specific surface area and roughness could adsorb more bacteria during immobilized fermentation, thereby improving fermentation performance; thus, linen was selected as a suitable carrier and was applied for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. To further improve fermentation performance, we also found that microbes of Clostridium acetobutylicum were negatively charged surfaces during fermentation. Therefore, we then modified linen with polyetherimide (PEI) and steric acid (SA) to increase surface positive charge and improve surface property. During ABE fermentation, the adhesion between modified linen and bacteria was increased, adsorption was increased about twofold compared with that of unmodified linen, and butanol productivity was increased 8.16% and 6.80% with PEI- and SA-modified linen as carriers respectively. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Continuous xylose fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum--Assessment of solventogenic kinetics.

    PubMed

    Procentese, Alessandra; Raganati, Francesca; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Russo, Maria Elena; Salatino, Piero; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    This work deals with the specific butanol production rate of Clostridium acetobutylicum using xylose--a relevant fraction of lignocellulosic feedstock for biofuel production--as carbon source. The tests were carried out in a CSTR equipped with a microfiltration unit. The dilution rate (D) ranged between 0.02 and 0.22 h(-1) and the ratio R between the permeate stream rate and the stream fed to the reactor ranged between 14% and 88%. The biomass present in the broth was identified as a heterogeneous cell population consisting of: acidogenic cells, solventogenic cells and spores. The results were processed to assess the concentration of acidogenic cells, solventogenic cells and spores. The specific butanol production rate was also assessed. The max butanol productivity was 1.3 g L(-1) h(-1) at D = 0.17 h(-1) and R = 30%. A comparison between the results reported in a previous work carried out with lactose was made. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Integrated intracellular metabolic profiling and pathway analysis approaches reveal complex metabolic regulation by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanhuan; Huang, Di; Wen, Jianping

    2016-02-15

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is one of the most important butanol producing strains. However, environmental stress in the fermentation process usually leads to a lower yield, seriously hampering its industrialization. In order to systematically investigate the key intracellular metabolites that influence the strain growth and butanol production, and find out the critical regulation nodes, an integrated analysis approach has been carried out in this study. Based on the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technology, the partial least square discriminant analysis and the pathway analysis, 40 metabolic pathways linked with 43 key metabolic nodes were identified. In-depth analysis showed that lots of amino acids metabolism promoted cell growth but exerted slight influence on butanol production, while sugar metabolism was favorable for cell growth but unfavorable for butanol synthesis. Besides, both lysine and succinic acid metabolism generated a complex effect on the whole metabolic network. Dicarboxylate metabolism exerted an indispensable role on cell growth and butanol production. Subsequently, rational feeding strategies were proposed to verify these conclusions and facilitate the butanol biosynthesis. Feeding amino acids, especially glycine and serine, could obviously improve cell growth while yeast extract, citric acid and ethylene glycol could significantly enhance both growth and butanol production. The feeding experiment confirmed that metabolic profiling combined with pathway analysis provided an accurate, reasonable and practical approach to explore the cellular metabolic activity and supplied a basis for improving butanol production. These strategies can also be extended for the production of other important bio-chemical compounds.

  15. Enhanced production of butanol and acetoin by heterologous expression of an acetolactate decarboxylase in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaoning; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yanyan; Xu, Jiahui; Yang, Zhengjiao; Guo, Ting; Niu, Huanqing; Ying, Hanjie

    2016-09-01

    Butanol is an important industrial chemical and an attractive transportation fuel. However, the deficiency of reducing equivalents NAD(P)H in butanol fermentation results in a large quantity of oxidation products, which is a major problem limiting the atom economy and economic viability of bio-butanol processes. Here, we integrated the butanol fermentation process with a NADH-generating, acetoin biosynthesis process to improve the butanol production. By overexpressing the α-acetolactate decarboxylase gene alsD from Bacillus subtilis in Clostridium acetobutylicum, acetoin yield was significantly increased at the cost of acetone. After optimization of fermentation conditions, butanol (12.9g/L), acetoin (6.5g/L), and ethanol (1.9g/L) were generated by the recombinant strain, with acetone no more than 1.8g/L. Thus, both mass yield and product value were greatly improved. This study demonstrates that reducing power compensation is effective to improve the atom economy of butanol fermentation, and provides a novel approach to improve the economic viability of bio-butanol production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sustainable biobutanol production from pineapple waste by using Clostridium acetobutylicum B 527: Drying kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Khedkar, Manisha A; Nimbalkar, Pranhita R; Gaikwad, Shashank G; Chavan, Prakash V; Bankar, Sandip B

    2017-02-01

    Present investigation explores the use of pineapple peel, a food industry waste, for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production using Clostridium acetobutylicum B 527. Proximate analysis of pineapple peel shows that it contains 35% cellulose, 19% hemicellulose, and 16% lignin on dry basis. Drying experiments on pineapple peel waste were carried out in the temperature range of 60-120°C and experimental drying data was modeled using moisture diffusion control model to study its effect on ABE production. The production of ABE was further accomplished via acid hydrolysis, detoxification, and fermentation process. Maximum total sugar release obtained by using acid hydrolysis was 97g/L with 95-97% and 10-50% removal of phenolics and acetic acid, respectively during detoxification process. The maximum ABE titer obtained was 5.23g/L with 55.6% substrate consumption when samples dried at 120°C were used as a substrate (after detoxification). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Acetone-butanol-ethanol production with high productivity using Clostridium acetobutylicum BKM19.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Malaviya, Alok; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-06-01

    Conventional acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation is severely limited by low solvent titer and productivities. Thus, this study aims at developing an improved Clostridium acetobutylicum strain possessing enhanced ABE production capability followed by process optimization for high ABE productivity. Random mutagenesis of C. acetobutylicum PJC4BK was performed by screening cells on fluoroacetate plates to isolate a mutant strain, BKM19, which exhibited the total solvent production capability 30.5% higher than the parent strain. The BKM19 produced 32.5 g L(-1) of ABE (17.6 g L(-1) butanol, 10.5 g L(-1) ethanol, and 4.4 g L(-1) acetone) from 85.2 g L(-1) glucose in batch fermentation. A high cell density continuous ABE fermentation of the BKM19 in membrane cell-recycle bioreactor was studied and optimized for improved solvent volumetric productivity. Different dilution rates were examined to find the optimal condition giving highest butanol and ABE productivities. The maximum butanol and ABE productivities of 9.6 and 20.0 g L(-1)  h(-1) , respectively, could be achieved at the dilution rate of 0.85 h(-1) . Further cell recycling experiments were carried out with controlled cell-bleeding at two different bleeding rates. The maximum solvent productivities were obtained when the fermenter was operated at a dilution rate of 0.86 h(-1) with the bleeding rate of 0.04 h(-1) . Under the optimal operational condition, butanol and ABE could be produced with the volumetric productivities of 10.7 and 21.1 g L(-1)  h(-1) , and the yields of 0.17 and 0.34 g g(-1) , respectively. The obtained butanol and ABE volumetric productivities are the highest reported productivities obtained from all known-processes. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Structural analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 glycoside hydrolase from CAZy family GH105

    SciTech Connect

    Germane, Katherine L.; Servinsky, Matthew D.; Gerlach, Elliot S.; Sund, Christian J.; Hurley, Margaret M.

    2015-07-29

    The crystal structure of the protein product of the C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 gene CA-C0359 is structurally similar to YteR, an unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase from B. subtilis strain 168. Substrate modeling and electrostatic studies of the active site of the structure of CA-C0359 suggests that the protein can now be considered to be part of CAZy glycoside hydrolase family 105. Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 gene CA-C0359 encodes a putative unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase (URH) with distant amino-acid sequence homology to YteR of Bacillus subtilis strain 168. YteR, like other URHs, has core structural homology to unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolases, but hydrolyzes the unsaturated disaccharide derivative of rhamnogalacturonan I. The crystal structure of the recombinant CA-C0359 protein was solved to 1.6 Å resolution by molecular replacement using the phase information of the previously reported structure of YteR (PDB entry (http://scripts.iucr.org/cgi-bin/cr.cgi?rm)) from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. The YteR-like protein is a six-α-hairpin barrel with two β-sheet strands and a small helix overlaying the end of the hairpins next to the active site. The protein has low primary protein sequence identity to YteR but is structurally similar. The two tertiary structures align with a root-mean-square deviation of 1.4 Å and contain a highly conserved active pocket. There is a conserved aspartic acid residue in both structures, which has been shown to be important for hydration of the C=C bond during the release of unsaturated galacturonic acid by YteR. A surface electrostatic potential comparison of CA-C0359 and proteins from CAZy families GH88 and GH105 reveals the make-up of the active site to be a combination of the unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase and the unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. Structural and electrostatic comparisons suggests that the protein may have a slightly different substrate

  19. Increased productivity of Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentation of acetone, butanol, and ethanol by pervaporation through supported ionic liquid membrane.

    PubMed

    Izák, Pavel; Schwarz, Katrin; Ruth, Wolfgang; Bahl, Hubert; Kragl, Udo

    2008-03-01

    Pervaporation proved to be one of the best methods to remove solvents out of a solvent producing Clostridium acetobutylicum culture. By using an ionic liquid (IL)-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) ultrafiltration membrane (pore size 60 nm), we could guarantee high stability and selectivity during all measurements carried out at 37 degrees C. Overall solvent productivity of fermentation connected with continuous product removal by pervaporation was 2.34 g l(-1) h(-1). The supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) was impregnated with 15 wt% of a novel ionic liquid (tetrapropylammonium tetracyano-borate) and 85 wt% of polydimethylsiloxane. Pervaporation, accomplished with the optimized SILM, led to stable and efficient removal of the solvents butan-1-ol and acetone out of a C. acetobutylicum culture. By pervaporation through SILM, we removed more butan-1-ol than C. acetobutylicum was able to produce. Therefore, we added an extra dose of butan-1-ol to run fermentation on limiting values where the bacteria would still be able to survive its lethal concentration (15.82 g/l). After pervaporation was switched off, the bacteria died from high concentration of butan-1-ol, which they produced.

  20. Predictive modeling in Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentations employing Raman spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis for real-time culture monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Theresah N. K.; Liu, Sanchao; Germane, Katherine L.; Servinsky, Matthew D.; Gerlach, Elliot S.; Mackie, David M.; Sund, Christian J.

    2016-05-01

    The coupling of optical fibers with Raman instrumentation has proven to be effective for real-time monitoring of chemical reactions and fermentations when combined with multivariate statistical data analysis. Raman spectroscopy is relatively fast, with little interference from the water peak present in fermentation media. Medical research has explored this technique for analysis of mammalian cultures for potential diagnosis of some cancers. Other organisms studied via this route include Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and some Bacillus sp., though very little work has been performed on Clostridium acetobutylicum cultures. C. acetobutylicum is a gram-positive anaerobic bacterium, which is highly sought after due to its ability to use a broad spectrum of substrates and produce useful byproducts through the well-known Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) fermentation. In this work, real-time Raman data was acquired from C. acetobutylicum cultures grown on glucose. Samples were collected concurrently for comparative off-line product analysis. Partial-least squares (PLS) models were built both for agitated cultures and for static cultures from both datasets. Media components and metabolites monitored include glucose, butyric acid, acetic acid, and butanol. Models were cross-validated with independent datasets. Experiments with agitation were more favorable for modeling with goodness of fit (QY) values of 0.99 and goodness of prediction (Q2Y) values of 0.98. Static experiments did not model as well as agitated experiments. Raman results showed the static experiments were chaotic, especially during and shortly after manual sampling.

  1. Regulation of nitrogen metabolism, starch utilisation and the beta-hbd-adh1 gene cluster in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Woods, D R; Reid, S J

    1995-10-01

    The successful genetic manipulation of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the increased production of solvents will depend on an understanding of gene structure and regulation in the bacterium. The glutamine synthetase (glnA) gene is regulated by antisense RNA, transcribed from a downstream promoter, in the opposite direction to the glnA gene. An open reading frame (ORF) was detected downstream of the glnA gene, which has sequence homology to response regulators with anti-termination activity and may be involved in sensing nitrogen conditions. The expression of the linked beta-hbd, adh1 and fixB genes was investigated throughout the bacterial growth cycle by RNA hybridisation techniques. The adh1 gene was independently expressed as a 2.4-kb transcript which peaked at 12 h, immediately prior to the solventogenic phase. The beta-hbd and fixB genes were transcribed throughout the acidogenic and solventogenic phases. A regulator gene, regA, which complements a Bacillus subtilis ccpA mutant, has been identified and sequenced from C. acetobutylicum P262. The regA gene repressed the degradation of starch by an uncharacterised C. acetobutylicum gene, and may therefore play a role in the utilisation of carbohydrate substrates in this organism.

  2. Atmospheric vs. anaerobic processing of metabolome samples for the metabolite profiling of a strict anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Sooah; Kwon, Min-A; Jung, Young Hoon; Shin, Yong-An; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2014-12-01

    Well-established metabolome sample preparation is a prerequisite for reliable metabolomic data. For metabolome sampling of a Gram-positive strict anaerobe, Clostridium acetobutylicum, fast filtration and metabolite extraction with acetonitrile/methanol/water (2:2:1, v/v) at -20°C under anaerobic conditions has been commonly used. This anaerobic metabolite processing method is laborious and time-consuming since it is conducted in an anaerobic chamber. Also, there have not been any systematic method evaluation and development of metabolome sample preparation for strict anaerobes and Gram-positive bacteria. In this study, metabolome sampling and extraction methods were rigorously evaluated and optimized for C. acetobutylicum by using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, in which a total of 116 metabolites were identified. When comparing the atmospheric (i.e., in air) and anaerobic (i.e., in an anaerobic chamber) processing of metabolome sample preparation, there was no significant difference in the quality and quantity of the metabolomic data. For metabolite extraction, pure methanol at -20°C was a better solvent than acetonitrile/methanol/water (2:2:1, v/v/v) at -20°C that is frequently used for C. acetobutylicum, and metabolite profiles were significantly different depending on extraction solvents. This is the first evaluation of metabolite sample preparation under aerobic processing conditions for an anaerobe. This method could be applied conveniently, efficiently, and reliably to metabolome analysis for strict anaerobes in air.

  3. Structural analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 glycoside hydrolase from CAZy family GH105

    PubMed Central

    Germane, Katherine L.; Servinsky, Matthew D.; Gerlach, Elliot S.; Sund, Christian J.; Hurley, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 gene CA_C0359 encodes a putative unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase (URH) with distant amino-acid sequence homology to YteR of Bacillus subtilis strain 168. YteR, like other URHs, has core structural homology to unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolases, but hydrolyzes the unsaturated disaccharide derivative of rhamnogalacturonan I. The crystal structure of the recombinant CA_C0359 protein was solved to 1.6 Å resolution by molecular replacement using the phase information of the previously reported structure of YteR (PDB entry 1nc5) from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. The YteR-like protein is a six-α-hairpin barrel with two β-sheet strands and a small helix overlaying the end of the hairpins next to the active site. The protein has low primary protein sequence identity to YteR but is structurally similar. The two tertiary structures align with a root-mean-square deviation of 1.4 Å and contain a highly conserved active pocket. There is a conserved aspartic acid residue in both structures, which has been shown to be important for hydration of the C=C bond during the release of unsaturated galacturonic acid by YteR. A surface electrostatic potential comparison of CA_C0359 and proteins from CAZy families GH88 and GH105 reveals the make-up of the active site to be a combination of the unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase and the unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. Structural and electrostatic comparisons suggests that the protein may have a slightly different substrate specificity from that of YteR. PMID:26249707

  4. Effect of zinc supplementation on acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Wu, You-Duo; Xue, Chuang; Chen, Li-Jie; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2013-05-10

    In this article, effect of zinc supplementation on acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum was studied. It was found that when 0.001 g/L ZnSO4·7H2O was supplemented into the medium, solventogenesis was initiated earlier, with 21.0 g/L ABE (12.6 g/L butanol, 6.7 g/L acetone and 1.7 g/L ethanol) produced with a fermentation time of 40 h, compared to 19.4 g/L ABE (11.7 g/L butanol, 6.4 g/L acetone and 1.3g/L ethanol) produced with a fermentation time of 64 h in the control without zinc supplementation, and correspondingly ABE and butanol productivities were increased to 0.53 and 0.32 g/L/h from 0.30 and 0.18 g/L/h, increases of 76.7% and 77.8%, respectively, but their yields were not compromised. The reason for this phenomenon was attributed to rapid acids re-assimilation for more efficient ABE production, which was in accordance with relatively high pH and ORP levels maintained during the fermentation process. The maximum cell density increased by 23.8%, indicating that zinc supplementation stimulated cell growth, and consequently facilitated glucose utilization. However, more zinc supplementation exhibited an inhibitory effect, indicating that zinc supplementation at very low levels such as 0.001 g/L ZnSO4·7H2O will be an economically competitive strategy for improving butanol production.

  5. Global transcriptional changes of Clostridium acetobutylicum cultures with increased butanol:acetone ratios.

    PubMed

    Hönicke, Daniel; Janssen, Holger; Grimmler, Christina; Ehrenreich, Armin; Lütke-Eversloh, Tina

    2012-05-15

    Artificial electron carriers have been widely used to shift the solvent ratio toward butanol in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation of solventogenic clostridia according to decreased hydrogen production. In this study, first insights on the molecular level were gained to explore the effect of methyl viologen addition to cultures of Clostridium acetobutylicum. Employing batch fermentation in mineral salts medium, the butanol:acetone ratio was successively increased from 2.3 to 12.4 on a 100-ml scale in serum bottles and from 1.4 to 16.5 on a 1300-ml scale in bioreactors, respectively. The latter cultures were used for DNA microarray analyses to provide new information on the transcriptional changes referring to methyl viologen exposure and thus, exhibit gene expression patterns according to the manipulation of the cellular redox balance. Methyl viologen-exposed cultures revealed lower expression levels of the sol operon (CAP0162-0164) and the adjacent adc gene (CAP0165) responsible for solvent formation as well as iron and sulfate transporters and the CAC0105-encoded ferredoxin. On the contrary, genes for riboflavin biosynthesis, for the butyrate/butanol metabolic pathway and genes coding for sugar transport systems were induced. Interestingly, the adhE2-encoded bifunctional NADH-dependent aldhehyde/alcohol-dehydrogenase (CAP0035) was upregulated up to more than 100-fold expression levels as compared to the control culture without methyl viologen addition. The data presented here indicate a transcriptional regulation for decreased acetone biosynthesis and the redox-dependent substitution of adhE1 (CAP0162) by adhE2.

  6. Structural analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 glycoside hydrolase from CAZy family GH105.

    PubMed

    Germane, Katherine L; Servinsky, Matthew D; Gerlach, Elliot S; Sund, Christian J; Hurley, Margaret M

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 gene CA_C0359 encodes a putative unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase (URH) with distant amino-acid sequence homology to YteR of Bacillus subtilis strain 168. YteR, like other URHs, has core structural homology to unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolases, but hydrolyzes the unsaturated disaccharide derivative of rhamnogalacturonan I. The crystal structure of the recombinant CA_C0359 protein was solved to 1.6 Å resolution by molecular replacement using the phase information of the previously reported structure of YteR (PDB entry 1nc5) from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. The YteR-like protein is a six-α-hairpin barrel with two β-sheet strands and a small helix overlaying the end of the hairpins next to the active site. The protein has low primary protein sequence identity to YteR but is structurally similar. The two tertiary structures align with a root-mean-square deviation of 1.4 Å and contain a highly conserved active pocket. There is a conserved aspartic acid residue in both structures, which has been shown to be important for hydration of the C=C bond during the release of unsaturated galacturonic acid by YteR. A surface electrostatic potential comparison of CA_C0359 and proteins from CAZy families GH88 and GH105 reveals the make-up of the active site to be a combination of the unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase and the unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. Structural and electrostatic comparisons suggests that the protein may have a slightly different substrate specificity from that of YteR.

  7. Green synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles effect on fermentative hydrogen production by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Mohanraj, Sundaresan; Kodhaiyolii, Shanmugam; Rengasamy, Mookan; Pugalenthi, Velan

    2014-05-01

    A green synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles (FeNPs) was developed using Murraya koenigii leaf extract as reducing and stabilizing agent. UV-vis spectra show that the absorption band centred at a wavelength of 277 nm which corresponds to the surface plasmon resonances of synthesized FeNPs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrum exhibits that the characteristic band at 580 cm(-1) is assigned to Fe-O of γ-Fe2O3. Transmission electron microscopy image confirms that the spherical with irregular shaped aggregates and average size of nanoparticles was found to be ∼59 nm. The effect of synthesized FeNPs on fermentative hydrogen production was evaluated from glucose by Clostridium acetobutylicum NCIM 2337. The hydrogen yield in control experiment was obtained as 1.74 ± 0.08 mol H2/mol glucose whereas the highest hydrogen yield in FeNPs supplemented experiment was achieved as 2.33 ± 0.09 mol H2/mol glucose at 175 mg/L of FeNPs. In addition, the hydrogen content and hydrogen production rate were also increased from 34 ± 0.8 to 52 ± 0.8 % and 23 to 25.3 mL/h, respectively. The effect of FeNPs was compared with supplementation of FeSO4 on fermentative process. The supplementation of FeNPs enhanced the hydrogen production in comparison with control and FeSO4. The supplementation of FeNPs led to the change of the metabolic pathway towards high hydrogen production due to the enhancement of ferredoxin activity. The fermentation type was shifted from butyrate to acetate/butyrate fermentation type at the addition of FeNPs.

  8. Biobutanol production in a Clostridium acetobutylicum biofilm reactor integrated with simultaneous product recovery by adsorption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium acetobutylicum can propagate on fibrous matrices and form biofilms that have improved butanol tolerance and a high fermentation rate and can be repeatedly used. Previously, a novel macroporous resin, KA-I, was synthesized in our laboratory and was demonstrated to be a good adsorbent with high selectivity and capacity for butanol recovery from a model solution. Based on these results, we aimed to develop a process integrating a biofilm reactor with simultaneous product recovery using the KA-I resin to maximize the production efficiency of biobutanol. Results KA-I showed great affinity for butanol and butyrate and could selectively enhance acetoin production at the expense of acetone during the fermentation. The biofilm reactor exhibited high productivity with considerably low broth turbidity during repeated batch fermentations. By maintaining the butanol level above 6.5 g/L in the biofilm reactor, butyrate adsorption by the KA-I resin was effectively reduced. Co-adsorption of acetone by the resin improved the fermentation performance. By redox modulation with methyl viologen (MV), the butanol-acetone ratio and the total product yield increased. An equivalent solvent titer of 96.5 to 130.7 g/L was achieved with a productivity of 1.0 to 1.5 g · L-1 · h-1. The solvent concentration and productivity increased by 4 to 6-fold and 3 to 5-fold, respectively, compared to traditional batch fermentation using planktonic culture. Conclusions Compared to the conventional process, the integrated process dramatically improved the productivity and reduced the energy consumption as well as water usage in biobutanol production. While genetic engineering focuses on strain improvement to enhance butanol production, process development can fully exploit the productivity of a strain and maximize the production efficiency. PMID:24401161

  9. The influence of the pentose's pathway of the Clostridium Acetobutylicum on the production of butanol: Insights from mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Rafael Ferreira; da Silva, Fabrício Alves Barbosa; Guimarães, Ana Carolina Ramos; Caffarena, Ernesto Raul

    2016-12-01

    This work is a pilot study for further analysis of the organism Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) and the influences of the Pentose's Pathway on the parasite Clostridium acetobutylicum, already cataloged in the database of OptFlux program. We used the approach parcimonius Flux Balance Analysis (pFBA) to simulate the wild type organism and the mutant with an inhibition of the R_01056 reaction in pentose's pathway. Results showed a reduction of approximately 1/3 of the biomass and 2/3 of the butanol production. This reduction shows the direct influence of the Pentose's Pathway on the primary production of metabolites and the biomass generation from the Clostridium metabolites. This information prompted us to build in the future an SBML parameter file to represent the flow of T.cruzi pathways, which will be essential for the development of new drugs against.

  10. Enhancing Butanol Production under the Stress Environments of Co-Culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae Integrated with Exogenous Butyrate Addition

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hongzhen; Ge, Laibing; Zhang, Jingshu; Zhao, Yanli; Ding, Jian; Li, Zhigang; He, Zhenni; Chen, Rui; Shi, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation strategy integrating Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-culturing system with exogenous butyrate addition, was proposed and experimentally conducted. In solventogenic phase, by adding 0.2 g-DCW/L-broth viable S. cerevisiae cells and 4.0 g/L-broth concentrated butyrate solution into C. acetobutylicum culture broth, final butanol concentration and butanol/acetone ratio in a 7 L anaerobic fermentor reached the highest levels of 15.74 g/L and 2.83 respectively, with the increments of 35% and 43% as compared with those of control. Theoretical and experimental analysis revealed that, the proposed strategy could, 1) extensively induce secretion of amino acids particularly lysine, which are favorable for both C. acetobutylicum survival and butanol synthesis under high butanol concentration environment; 2) enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and over-produce intracellular NADH for butanol synthesis in C. acetobutylicum metabolism simultaneously; 3) direct most of extra consumed glucose into butanol synthesis route. The synergetic actions of effective amino acids assimilation, high rates of substrate consumption and NADH regeneration yielded highest butanol concentration and butanol ratio in C. acetobutylicum under this stress environment. The proposed method supplies an alternative way to improve ABE fermentation performance by traditional fermentation technology. PMID:26489085

  11. Development of an anhydrotetracycline-inducible gene expression system for solvent-producing Clostridium acetobutylicum: A useful tool for strain engineering.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongjun; Tao, Wenwen; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is an important solvent (acetone-butanol-ethanol) producing bacterium. However, a stringent, effective, and convenient-to-use inducible gene expression system that can be used for regulating the gene expression strength in C. acetobutylicum is currently not available. Here, we report an anhydrotetracycline-inducible gene expression system for solvent-producing bacterium C. acetobutylicum. This system consists of a functional chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene promoter containing tet operators (tetO), Pthl promoter (thiolase gene promoter from C. acetobutylicum) controlling TetR repressor expression cassette, and the chemical inducer anhydrotetracycline (aTc). The optimized system, designated as pGusA2-2tetO1, allows gene regulation in an inducer aTc concentration-dependent way, with an inducibility of over two orders of magnitude. The stringency of TetR repression supports the introduction of the genes encoding counterselective marker into C. acetobutylicum, which can be used to increase the mutant screening efficiency. This aTc-inducible gene expression system will thus increase the genetic manipulation capability for engineering C. acetobutylicum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhancing Butanol Production under the Stress Environments of Co-Culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae Integrated with Exogenous Butyrate Addition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongzhen; Ge, Laibing; Zhang, Jingshu; Zhao, Yanli; Ding, Jian; Li, Zhigang; He, Zhenni; Chen, Rui; Shi, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation strategy integrating Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-culturing system with exogenous butyrate addition, was proposed and experimentally conducted. In solventogenic phase, by adding 0.2 g-DCW/L-broth viable S. cerevisiae cells and 4.0 g/L-broth concentrated butyrate solution into C. acetobutylicum culture broth, final butanol concentration and butanol/acetone ratio in a 7 L anaerobic fermentor reached the highest levels of 15.74 g/L and 2.83 respectively, with the increments of 35% and 43% as compared with those of control. Theoretical and experimental analysis revealed that, the proposed strategy could, 1) extensively induce secretion of amino acids particularly lysine, which are favorable for both C. acetobutylicum survival and butanol synthesis under high butanol concentration environment; 2) enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and over-produce intracellular NADH for butanol synthesis in C. acetobutylicum metabolism simultaneously; 3) direct most of extra consumed glucose into butanol synthesis route. The synergetic actions of effective amino acids assimilation, high rates of substrate consumption and NADH regeneration yielded highest butanol concentration and butanol ratio in C. acetobutylicum under this stress environment. The proposed method supplies an alternative way to improve ABE fermentation performance by traditional fermentation technology.

  13. Molecular modulation of pleiotropic regulator CcpA for glucose and xylose coutilization by solvent-producing Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Yang, Yunpeng; Ren, Cong; Yang, Chen; Yang, Sheng; Gu, Yang; Jiang, Weihong

    2015-03-01

    Efficient cofermentation of hexose and pentose sugars is essential for ABE (Acetone, Butanol and Ethanol) solvents production from lignocellulosic hydrolysates by Clostridium acetobutylicum, an important industrial microorganism. However, utilization of xylose, the predominant pentose present in lignocellulosic feedstocks, by this anaerobe is limited by CCR (Carbon Catabolite Repression) that is mediated by the catabolite control protein A (CcpA). Here, we reported a novel engineering strategy based on CcpA molecular modulation to overcome the defect. Through CcpA mutagenesis and screening, an amino acid residue, valine 302, was shown to be essential for CcpA-dependent CCR in C. acetobutylicum. When this residue was replaced by asparagine (V302N mutation), CCR could be alleviated and a greatly improved xylose utilization was realized. Transcriptional and DNA binding analysis was then used to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism. Furthermore, the sol genes (ctfA, ctfB and adhE1) were overexpressed, upon the V302N mutation, to accelerate sugar consumption and solvents formation. The resulting strain (824ccpA-V302N-sol) was capable of using over 90% of the total xylose within 72 h when fermenting a mixture of glucose and xylose (30 g/L glucose and 15 g/L xylose), which was much higher than that (30%) of the control strain 824ccpA-ccpA(C). This is the first report that offered an optimized C. acetobutylicum CcpA with alleviated repression on xylose metabolism, yielding a valuable platform host toward ABE solvents production from lignocellulosic biomass. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Proteomic analyses of the phase transition from acidogenesis to solventogenesis using solventogenic and non-solventogenic Clostridium acetobutylicum strains.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Han, Mee-Jung; Lee, Joungmin; Im, Jung Ae; Lee, Yu Hyun; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios Terry; Bennett, George; Lee, Sang Yup

    2014-06-01

    The fermentation carried out by the solvent-producing bacterium, Clostridium acetobutylicum, is characterized by two distinct phases: acidogenic and solventogenic phases. Understanding the cellular physiological changes occurring during the phase transition in clostridial fermentation is important for the enhanced production of solvents. To identify protein changes upon entry to stationary phase where solvents are typically produced, we herein analyzed the proteomic profiles of the parental wild type C. acetobutylicum strains, ATCC 824, the non-solventogenic strain, M5 that has lost the solventogenic megaplasmid pSOL1, and the synthetic simplified alcohol forming strain, M5 (pIMP1E1AB) expressing plasmid-based CoA-transferase (CtfAB) and aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE1). A total of 68 protein spots, corresponding to 56 unique proteins, were unambiguously identified as being differentially present after the phase transitions in the three C. acetobutylicum strains. In addition to changes in proteins known to be involved in solventogenesis (AdhE1 and CtfB), we identified significant alterations in enzymes involved in sugar transport and metabolism, fermentative pathway, heat shock proteins, translation, and amino acid biosynthesis upon entry into the stationary phase. Of these, four increased proteins (AdhE1, CAC0233, CtfB and phosphocarrier protein HPr) and six decreased proteins (butyrate kinase, ferredoxin:pyruvate oxidoreductase, phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase, adenylosuccinate synthase, pyruvate kinase and valyl-tRNA synthetase) showed similar patterns in the two strains capable of butanol formation. Interestingly, significant changes of several proteins by post-translational modifications were observed in the solventogenic phase. The proteomic data from this study will improve our understanding on how cell physiology is affected through protein levels patterns in clostridia.

  15. Chemostat cultivation and transcriptional analyses of Clostridium acetobutylicum mutants with defects in the acid and acetone biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hönicke, Daniel; Lütke-Eversloh, Tina; Liu, Ziyong; Lehmann, Dörte; Liebl, Wolfgang; Ehrenreich, Armin

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is a model organism for the biotechnologically important acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. With the objective to rationally develop strains with improved butanol production, detailed insights into the physiological and genetic mechanisms of solvent production are required. Therefore, pH-controlled phosphate-limited chemostat cultivation and DNA microarray technology were employed for an in-depth analysis of knockout mutants with defects in the central fermentative metabolism. The set of studied mutants included strains with inactivated phosphotransacetylase (pta), phosphotransbutyrylase (ptb), and acetoacetate decarboxylase (adc) encoding genes, as well as an adc/pta double knockout mutant. A comprehensive physiological characterization of the mutants was performed by continuous cultivation, allowing for a well-defined separation of acidogenic and solventogenic growth, combined with the advantage of the high reproducibility of steady-state conditions. The ptb-negative strain C. acetobutylicum ptb::int(87) exhibited the most striking metabolite profile: Sizable amounts of butanol (29 ± 1.3 mM) were already produced during acidogenic growth. The product patterns of the mutants as well as accompanying transcriptomic data are presented and discussed.

  16. Modifying the product pattern of Clostridium acetobutylicum: physiological effects of disrupting the acetate and acetone formation pathways.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Dörte; Hönicke, Daniel; Ehrenreich, Armin; Schmidt, Michael; Weuster-Botz, Dirk; Bahl, Hubert; Lütke-Eversloh, Tina

    2012-05-01

    Clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation is a natural source for microbial n-butanol production and regained much interest in academia and industry in the past years. Due to the difficult genetic accessibility of Clostridium acetobutylicum and other solventogenic clostridia, successful metabolic engineering approaches are still rare. In this study, a set of five knock-out mutants with defects in the central fermentative metabolism were generated using the ClosTron technology, including the construction of targeted double knock-out mutants of C. acetobtuylicum ATCC 824. While disruption of the acetate biosynthetic pathway had no significant impact on the metabolite distribution, mutants with defects in the acetone pathway, including both acetoacetate decarboxylase (Adc)-negative and acetoacetyl-CoA:acyl-CoA transferase (CtfAB)-negative mutants, exhibited high amounts of acetate in the fermentation broth. Distinct butyrate increase and decrease patterns during the course of fermentations provided experimental evidence that butyrate, but not acetate, is re-assimilated via an Adc/CtfAB-independent pathway in C. acetobutylicum. Interestingly, combining the adc and ctfA mutations with a knock-out of the phosphotransacetylase (Pta)-encoding gene, acetate production was drastically reduced, resulting in an increased flux towards butyrate. Except for the Pta-negative single mutant, all mutants exhibited a significantly reduced solvent production.

  17. Synergistic effect of calcium and zinc on glucose/xylose utilization and butanol tolerance of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Youduo; Xue, Chuang; Chen, Lijie; Yuan, Wenjie; Bai, Fengwu

    2016-03-01

    Biobutanol outperforms bioethanol as an advanced biofuel, but is not economically competitive in terms of its titer, yield and productivity associated with feedstocks and energy cost. In this work, the synergistic effect of calcium and zinc was investigated in the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum using glucose, xylose and glucose/xylose mixtures as carbon source(s). Significant improvements associated with enhanced glucose/xylose utilization, cell growth, acids re-assimilation and butanol biosynthesis were achieved. Especially, the maximum butanol and ABE production of 16.1 and 25.9 g L(-1) were achieved from 69.3 g L(-1) glucose with butanol/ABE productivities of 0.40 and 0.65 g L(-1) h(-1) compared to those of 11.7 and 19.4 g/L with 0.18 and 0.30 g L(-1) h(-1) obtained in the control respectively without any supplement. More importantly, zinc was significantly involved in the butanol tolerance based on the improved xylose utilization under various butanol-shock conditions (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 g L(-1) butanol). Under the same conditions, calcium and zinc co-supplementation led to the best xylose utilization and butanol production. These results suggested that calcium and zinc could play synergistic roles improving ABE fermentation by C. acetobutylicum. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Production of an acetone-butanol-ethanol mixture from Clostridium acetobutylicum and its conversion to high-value biofuels.

    PubMed

    Sreekumar, Sanil; Baer, Zachary C; Pazhamalai, Anbarasan; Gunbas, Gorkem; Grippo, Adam; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S; Toste, F Dean

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is a bacterial species that ferments sugar to a mixture of organic solvents (acetone, butanol and ethanol). This protocol delineates a methodology to combine solventogenic clostridial fermentation and chemical catalysis via extractive fermentation for the production of biofuel blendstocks. Extractive fermentation of C. acetobutylicum is operated in fed-batch mode with a concentrated feed solution (500 grams per liter glucose and 50 grams per liter yeast extract) for 60 h, producing in excess of 40 g of solvents (acetone, butanol and ethanol) between the completely immiscible extractant and aqueous phases of the bioreactor. After distillation of the extractant phase, the acetone, butanol and ethanol mixture is upgraded to long-chain ketones over a palladium-hydrotalcite (Pd-HT) catalyst. This reaction is generally carried out in batch with a high-pressure Q-tube for 20 h at 250 °C. Following this protocol enables the production of ∼0.5 g of high-value biofuel precursors from a 1.7-g portion of fermentation solvents.

  19. Metabolite labelling reveals hierarchies in Clostridium acetobutylicum that selectively channel carbons from sugar mixtures towards biofuel precursors.

    PubMed

    Aristilde, Ludmilla

    2017-01-01

    Clostridial fermentation of cellulose and hemicellulose relies on the cellular physiology controlling the metabolism of the cellulosic hexose sugar (glucose) with respect to the hemicellulosic pentose sugars (xylose and arabinose) and the hemicellulosic hexose sugars (galactose and mannose). Here, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and stable isotope tracers in Clostridium acetobutylicum were applied to investigate the metabolic hierarchy of glucose relative to the different hemicellulosic sugars towards two important biofuel precursors, acetyl-coenzyme A and butyryl-coenzyme A. The findings revealed constitutive metabolic hierarchies in C. acetobutylicum that facilitate (i) selective investment of hemicellulosic pentoses towards ribonucleotide biosynthesis without substantial investment into biofuel production and (ii) selective contribution of hemicellulosic hexoses through the glycolytic pathway towards biofuel precursors. Long-term isotopic enrichment demonstrated incorporation of both pentose sugars into pentose-phosphates and ribonucleotides in the presence of glucose. Kinetic labelling data, however, showed that xylose was not routed towards the biofuel precursors but there was minor contribution from arabinose. Glucose hierarchy over the hemicellulosic hexoses was substrate-dependent. Kinetic labelling of hexose-phosphates and triose-phosphates indicated that mannose was assimilated but not galactose. Labelling of both biofuel precursors confirmed this metabolic preference. These results highlight important metabolic considerations in the accounting of clostridial mixed-sugar utilization. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Transcriptional analysis of micronutrient zinc-associated response for enhanced carbohydrate utilization and earlier solventogenesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Wu, You-Duo; Xue, Chuang; Chen, Li-Jie; Wan, Hui-Hui; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2015-11-20

    The micronutrient zinc plays vital roles in ABE fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. In order to elucidate the zinc-associated response for enhanced glucose utilization and earlier solventogenesis, transcriptional analysis was performed on cells grown in glucose medium at the exponential growth phase of 16 h without/with supplementary zinc. Correspondingly, the gene glcG (CAC0570) encoding a glucose-specific PTS was significantly upregulated accompanied with the other two genes CAC1353 and CAC1354 for glucose transport in the presence of zinc. Additionally, genes involved in the metabolisms of six other carbohydrates (maltose, cellobiose, fructose, mannose, xylose and arabinose) were differentially expressed, indicating that the regulatory effect of micronutrient zinc is carbohydrate-specific with respects to the improved/inhibited carbohydrate utilization. More importantly, multiple genes responsible for glycolysis (glcK and pykA), acidogenesis (thlA, crt, etfA, etfB and bcd) and solventogenesis (ctfB and bdhA) of C. acetobutylicum prominently responded to the supplementary zinc at differential expression levels. Comparative analysis of intracellular metabolites revealed that the branch node intermediates such as acetyl-CoA, acetoacetyl-CoA, butyl-CoA, and reducing power NADH remained relatively lower whereas more ATP was generated due to enhanced glycolysis pathway and earlier initiation of solventogenesis, suggesting that the micronutrient zinc-associated response for the selected intracellular metabolisms is significantly pleiotropic.

  1. Carbon 13-Metabolic Flux Analysis derived constraint-based metabolic modelling of Clostridium acetobutylicum in stressed chemostat conditions.

    PubMed

    Wallenius, Janne; Maaheimo, Hannu; Eerikäinen, Tero

    2016-11-01

    The metabolism of butanol producing bacteria Clostridium acetobutylicum was studied in chemostat with glucose limited conditions, butanol stimulus, and as a reference cultivation. COnstraint-Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) was applied using additional constraints from (13)C Metabolic Flux Analysis ((13)C-MFA) and experimental measurement results. A model consisting of 451 metabolites and 604 reactions was utilized in flux balance analysis (FBA). The stringency of the flux spaces considering different optimization objectives, i.e. growth rate maximization, ATP maintenance, and NADH/NADPH formation, for flux variance analysis (FVA) was studied in the different modelled conditions. Also a previously uncharacterized exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by C. acetobutylicum was characterized on monosaccharide level. The major monosaccharide components of the EPS were 40n-% rhamnose, 34n-% glucose, 13n-% mannose, 10n-% galactose, and 2n-% arabinose. The EPS was studied to have butanol adsorbing property, 70(butanol)mg(EPS)g(-1) at 37°C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Two-Component System PhoPR of Clostridium acetobutylicum Is Involved in Phosphate-Dependent Gene Regulation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Tomas; Mix, Maren; Meyer, Uta; Mikkat, Stefan; Glocker, Michael O.; Bahl, Hubert; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg

    2008-01-01

    The phoPR gene locus of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 comprises two genes, phoP and phoR. Deduced proteins are predicted to represent a response regulator and sensor kinase of a phosphate-dependent two-component regulatory system. We analyzed the expression patterns of phoPR in Pi-limited chemostat cultures and in response to Pi pulses. A basic transcription level under high-phosphate conditions was shown, and a significant increase in mRNA transcript levels was found when external Pi concentrations dropped below 0.3 mM. In two-dimensional gel electrophoresis experiments, a 2.5-fold increase in PhoP was observed under Pi-limiting growth conditions compared to growth with an excess of Pi. At least three different transcription start points for phoP were determined by primer extension analyses. Proteins PhoP and an N-terminally truncated *PhoR were individually expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and purified. Autophosphorylation of *PhoR and phosphorylation of PhoP were shown in vitro. Electromobility shift assays proved that there was a specific binding of PhoP to the promoter region of the phosphate-regulated pst operon of C. acetobutylicum. PMID:18689481

  3. Transcriptional analysis of micronutrient zinc-associated response for enhanced carbohydrate utilization and earlier solventogenesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Wu, You-Duo; Xue, Chuang; Chen, Li-Jie; Wan, Hui-Hui; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2015-01-01

    The micronutrient zinc plays vital roles in ABE fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. In order to elucidate the zinc-associated response for enhanced glucose utilization and earlier solventogenesis, transcriptional analysis was performed on cells grown in glucose medium at the exponential growth phase of 16 h without/with supplementary zinc. Correspondingly, the gene glcG (CAC0570) encoding a glucose-specific PTS was significantly upregulated accompanied with the other two genes CAC1353 and CAC1354 for glucose transport in the presence of zinc. Additionally, genes involved in the metabolisms of six other carbohydrates (maltose, cellobiose, fructose, mannose, xylose and arabinose) were differentially expressed, indicating that the regulatory effect of micronutrient zinc is carbohydrate-specific with respects to the improved/inhibited carbohydrate utilization. More importantly, multiple genes responsible for glycolysis (glcK and pykA), acidogenesis (thlA, crt, etfA, etfB and bcd) and solventogenesis (ctfB and bdhA) of C. acetobutylicum prominently responded to the supplementary zinc at differential expression levels. Comparative analysis of intracellular metabolites revealed that the branch node intermediates such as acetyl-CoA, acetoacetyl-CoA, butyl-CoA, and reducing power NADH remained relatively lower whereas more ATP was generated due to enhanced glycolysis pathway and earlier initiation of solventogenesis, suggesting that the micronutrient zinc-associated response for the selected intracellular metabolisms is significantly pleiotropic. PMID:26586044

  4. Stable and enhanced gene expression in Clostridium acetobutylicum using synthetic untranslated regions with a stem-loop.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-07-20

    Gene overexpression is one of the most basic strategies in metabolic engineering, but the factors determining gene expression levels have been poorly studied in Clostridium species. In this study, we found that a short single-stranded 5' untranslated region (UTR) sequence led to decreased gene expression in Clostridium acetobutylicum. Using an in vitro enzyme assay and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, we found that addition of a small stem-loop at the 5' end of mRNA increased mRNA levels and thereby protein expression levels up to 4.6-fold, possibly protecting mRNA from exonuclease attack. Gene-expression levels were apparently independent of the stability of the added stem-loop; the existence of a stem-loop itself appears to be more important. Our results indicate that efficient expression cassettes can be designed by taking the 5' UTR into consideration, as the expression levels can vary even though the same promoter and RBS are used. These findings will be useful for developing a more reliable gene expression system for metabolic engineering of Clostridium strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fermentation characterization and flux analysis of recombinant strains of Clostridium acetobutylicum with an inactivated solR gene.

    PubMed

    Harris, L M; Blank, L; Desai, R P; Welker, N E; Papoutsakis, E T

    2001-11-01

    The effect of solR inactivation on the metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum was examined using fermentation characterization and metabolic flux analysis. The solR-inactivated strain (SolRH) of this study had a higher rate of glucose utilization and produced higher solvent concentrations (by 25%, 14%, and 81%, respectively, for butanol, acetone, and ethanol) compared to the wild type. Strain SolRH(pTAAD), carrying a plasmid-encoded copy of the bifunctional alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (aad) used in butanol production, produced even higher concentrations of solvents (by 21%, 45%, and 62%, respectively, for butanol, acetone, and ethanol) than strain SolRH. Clarithromycin used for strain SolRH maintenance during SolRH(pTAAD) fermentations did not alter product formation; however, tetracycline used for pTAAD maintenance resulted in 90% lower solvent production.

  6. Assessment of morphological changes of Clostridium acetobutylicum by flow cytometry during acetone/butanol/ethanol extractive fermentation.

    PubMed

    González-Peñas, Helena; Lu-Chau, Thelmo Alejandro; Moreira, Maria Teresa; Lema, Juan Manuel

    2015-03-01

    Acetone/butanol/ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum was investigated in extractive fed-batch experiments. In conventional fermentations, metabolic activity ceases when a critical threshold products concentration is reached (~21.6 g solvents l(-1)). Solvents production was increased up to 36.6 and 37.2 g l(-1), respectively, using 2-butyl-1-octanol (aqueous to organic ratio: 1:0.25 v/v) and pomace olive oil (1:1 v/v) as extraction solvents. The morphological changes of different cell types were monitored and quantified using flow cytometry. Butanol production in extractive fermentations with pomace olive oil was achieved mainly by vegetative cells, whereas the percentage of sporulating cells was lower than 10%.

  7. Anaerobic biotransformation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene by Clostridium acetobutylicum: A pathway through dihydroxylamino intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, J.B.; Wang, C.Y.; Zhang, C.

    1999-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to isolate and identify the intermediates and products of 2,4-dinitrotoluene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene metabolism by Clostridium acetobutylicum. Transformation of both dinitrotoluenes initially resulted in the formation of hydroxylaminonitrotoluenes. Subsequent transformation favored the formation of dihydroxylaminotoluenes, with a limited reduction to aminonitrotoluene isomers. In cell cultures, metabolism beyond the level of dihydroxylaminotoluene was not observed. In cell extracts, where activity could be maintained for periods in excess of those in cell cultures, further transformation yielded aminohydroxylaminotoluenes and eventually diaminotoluenes. These findings further demonstrate the potential for hydroxylamines to be significant intermediates of nitroaromatic transformation under anaerobic fermentative conditions. Interestingly, the rearrangement of dihydroxylaminotoluenes was not observed, as was the case in previous studies of 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene metabolism. Dihydroxylaminotoluenes were found to be quite unstable, decomposing rapidly upon exposure to oxygen, complicating the assessment of their fate in remediation processes.

  8. Effect of pH and lactose concentration on solvent production from whey permeate using Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, B.M.; Maddox, I.S.

    1987-02-20

    A study was performed to optimize the production of solvents from whey permeate in batch fermentation using Clostridium acetobutylicum P262. Fermentations performed at relatively low pH values resulted in high solvent yields and productivities, but lactose utilization was incomplete. At higher pH values, lactose-utilization was improved but acid production dominated over solvent production. When operating at the higher pH values, an increase in the initial lactose concentration of the whey permeate resulted in lower rates of lactose utilization, and this was accompanied by increased solvent production and decreased acid production. Analysis of data from several experiments revealed a strong inverse relationship between solvent yield and lactose utilization rate. Thus, conditions which minimize the lactose utilization rate such as low culture pH values or high initial lactose concentrations, favor solventogenesis at the expense of acid production. 12 references.

  9. A systems biology approach to investigate the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Haus, Sylvia; Jabbari, Sara; Millat, Thomas; Janssen, Holger; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Bahl, Hubert; King, John R; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2011-01-19

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is an anaerobic bacterium which is known for its solvent-producing capabilities, namely regarding the bulk chemicals acetone and butanol, the latter being a highly efficient biofuel. For butanol production by C. acetobutylicum to be optimized and exploited on an industrial scale, the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by C. acetobutylicum in continuous culture must be understood as fully as possible. We present an ordinary differential equation model combining the metabolic network governing solvent production with regulation at the genetic level of the enzymes required for this process. Parameterizing the model with experimental data from continuous culture, we demonstrate the influence of pH upon fermentation products: at high pH (pH 5.7) acids are the dominant product while at low pH (pH 4.5) this switches to solvents. Through steady-state analyses of the model we focus our investigations on how alteration in gene expression of C. acetobutylicum could be exploited to increase butanol yield in a continuous culture fermentation. Incorporating gene regulation into the model of solvent production by C. acetobutylicum enables an accurate representation of the pH-induced switch to solvent production to be obtained and theoretical investigations of possible synthetic-biology approaches to be pursued. Steady-state analyses suggest that, to increase butanol yield, alterations in the expression of single solvent-associated genes are insufficient; a more complex approach targeting two or more genes is required.

  10. Improving cellular robustness and butanol titers of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC824 by introducing heat shock proteins from an extremophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhengping; Zhang, Yanan; Luo, Sheng; Suo, Yukai; Zhang, Shaozhi; Wang, Jufang

    2017-06-20

    In recent years, increasing concerns over environment, energy and climate have renewed interest in biotechnological production of butanol. However, growth inhibition by fermentation products and inhibitory components from raw biomass has hindered the development of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. Improving the cellular robustness of Clostridium acetobutylicum is of great importance for efficient ABE production. In this study, we attempted to improve the robustness and butanol titers of C. acetobutylicum ATCC824 by overexpressing GroESL and DnaK from the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus wulumuqiensis R12 and from C. acetobutylicum ATCC824 itself. Three recombinant strains were obtained and designated 824(dnaK R12), 824(groESL R12) and 824(groESL824). These three recombinants were found to have significantly improved tolerances to stresses including butanol, furfural, oxidation and acid. Meanwhile, the butanol titers increased to 13.0g/L, 11.2g/L and 10.7g/L, which were 49.4%, 28.7% and 23.0% higher than that from the wild-type strain (8.7g/L), respectively. For 824(dnaK R12), the production of acetic and butyric acids decreased by 97.1% (1.4g/L vs. 0.04g/L) and 100% (0.3g/L vs. 0g/L), respectively, compared with the wild-type strain. Overexpressing GroESL and DnaK from D. wulumuqiensis R12 also resulted in better growth and ABE production than the wild-type strain on fermentation in the presence of 2.5g/L furfural. Strain 824(groESL R12) was superior to 824(groESL 824) in diverse types of stress-tolerance and butanol titer, indicating that GroESL from the extremophilic bacterium could perform its function more efficiently in the heterologous host than native GroESL. Our study provides evidence that extremophilic bacteria can be excellent resources for engineering C. acetobutylicum to improve its robustness and butanol titer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. PTS regulation domain-containing transcriptional activator CelR and sigma factor σ(54) control cellobiose utilization in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiaoqun; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Lei; Gu, Yang; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong; Yang, Chen

    2016-04-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) regulation domain (PRD)-containing enhancer binding proteins (EBPs) are an important class of σ(54) -interacting transcriptional activators. Although PRD-containing EBPs are present in many Firmicutes, most of their regulatory functions remain unclear. In this study, the transcriptional regulons of about 50 PRD-containing EBPs in diverse Firmicutes species are reconstructed by using a comparative genomic approach, which contain the genes associated with utilization of β-glucosides, fructose/levan, mannose/glucose, pentitols, and glucosamine/fructosamine. We then present experimental evidence that the cel operon involved in cellobiose utilization is directly regulated by CelR and σ(54) (SigL) in Clostridium acetobutylicum. The predicted three CelR-binding sites and σ(54) promoter elements upstream of the cel operon are verified by in vitro binding assays. We show that CelR has an ATPase activity, which is strongly stimulated by the presence of DNA containing the CelR-binding sites. Moreover, mutations in any one of the three CelR-binding sites significantly decreased the cel promoter activity probably due to the need for all three DNA sites for maximal ATPase activity of CelR. It is suggested that CelR is regulated by PTS-mediated phosphorylation at His-551 and His-829, which exerts a positive effect and an inhibitory effect, respectively, on the CelR activity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Deciphering Clostridium tyrobutyricum Metabolism Based on the Whole-Genome Sequence and Proteome Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Han, Mee-Jung; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium tyrobutyricum is a Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium that efficiently produces butyric acid and is considered a promising host for anaerobic production of bulk chemicals. Due to limited knowledge on the genetic and metabolic characteristics of this strain, however, little progress has been made in metabolic engineering of this strain. Here we report the complete genome sequence of C. tyrobutyricum KCTC 5387 (ATCC 25755), which consists of a 3.07-Mbp chromosome and a 63-kbp plasmid. The results of genomic analyses suggested that C. tyrobutyricum produces butyrate from butyryl-coenzyme A (butyryl-CoA) through acetate reassimilation by CoA transferase, differently from Clostridium acetobutylicum, which uses the phosphotransbutyrylase-butyrate kinase pathway; this was validated by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of related genes, protein expression levels, in vitro CoA transferase assay, and fed-batch fermentation. In addition, the changes in protein expression levels during the course of batch fermentations on glucose were examined by shotgun proteomics. Unlike C. acetobutylicum, the expression levels of proteins involved in glycolytic and fermentative pathways in C. tyrobutyricum did not decrease even at the stationary phase. Proteins related to energy conservation mechanisms, including Rnf complex, NfnAB, and pyruvate-phosphate dikinase that are absent in C. acetobutylicum, were identified. Such features explain why this organism can produce butyric acid to a much higher titer and better tolerate toxic metabolites. This study presenting the complete genome sequence, global protein expression profiles, and genome-based metabolic characteristics during the batch fermentation of C. tyrobutyricum will be valuable in designing strategies for metabolic engineering of this strain. PMID:27302759

  13. Effect of cocultures on the production of butanol by Clostridium sp. [C. butyricum, C. pasteurianum, C. butylicum, and C. acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstrom, S.L.; Foutch, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    One of the problems with the production of butanol by fermentation is that a mixture of other solvents, primarily acetone and ethanol, are also produced. The ratio of butanol to acetone to ethanol is approximately 6:3:1. If the metabolism of the Clostridium can be shifted away from acetone and ethanol, then a higher percentage of the sugar carbon can be converted to butanol. This study examines the effects that cocultures of Clostridium have on the yield of butanol from glucose. C. butyricum and C. pasteurianum produced high concentrations of butyric acid from these sugars. C. butylicum and C. acetobutylicum are capable of utilizing this butyric acid for energy, resulting in butanol production. By using combinations of these strains in coculture a higher initial conversion to butyric acid would be expected followed by a higher overall yield of butanol. This coculture would not be expected to have an increased tolerance for butanol in the fermentation broth. 6 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  14. An improved kinetic model for the acetone-butanol-ethanol pathway of Clostridium acetobutylicum and model-based perturbation analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Comprehensive kinetic models of microbial metabolism can enhance the understanding of system dynamics and regulatory mechanisms, which is helpful in optimizing microbial production of industrial chemicals. Clostridium acetobutylicum produces solvents (acetone-butanol–ethanol, ABE) through the ABE pathway. To systematically assess the potential of increased production of solvents, kinetic modeling has been applied to analyze the dynamics of this pathway and make predictive simulations. Up to date, only one kinetic model for C. acetobutylicum supported by experiment has been reported as far as we know. But this model did not integrate the metabolic regulatory effects of transcriptional control and other complex factors. It also left out the information of some key intermediates (e.g. butyryl-phosphate). Results We have developed an improved kinetic model featured with the incorporation of butyryl-phosphate, inclusion of net effects of complex metabolic regulations, and quantification of endogenous enzyme activity variations caused by these regulations. The simulation results of our model are more consistent with published experimental data than the previous model, especially in terms of reflecting the kinetics of butyryl-phosphate and butyrate. Through parameter perturbation analysis, it was found that butyrate kinase has large and positive influence on butanol production while CoA transferase has negative effect on butanol production, suggesting that butyrate kinase has more efficiency in converting butyrate to butanol than CoA transferase. Conclusions Our improved kinetic model of the ABE process has more capacity in approaching real circumstances, providing much more insight in the regulatory mechanisms and potential key points for optimization of solvent productions. Moreover, the modeling strategy can be extended to other biological processes. PMID:21689471

  15. A transcriptional study of acidogenic chemostat cells of Clostridium acetobutylicum--cellular behavior in adaptation to n-butanol.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Katrin M; Kuit, Wouter; Grimmler, Christina; Ehrenreich, Armin; Kengen, Servé W M

    2012-10-31

    To gain more insight into the butanol stress response of Clostridium acetobutylicum the transcriptional response of a steady state acidogenic culture to different levels of n-butanol (0.25-1%) was investigated. No effect was observed on the fermentation pattern and expression of typical solvent genes (aad, ctfA/B, adc, bdhA/B, ptb, buk). Elevated levels of butanol mainly affected class I heat-shock genes (hrcA, grpE, dnaK, dnaJ, groES, groEL, hsp90), which were upregulated in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and genes encoding proteins involved in the membrane composition (fab and fad or glycerophospholipid related genes) and various ABC-transporters of unknown specificity. Interestingly, fab and fad genes were embedded in a large, entirely repressed cluster (CAC1988-CAC2019), which inter alia encoded an iron-specific ABC-transporter and molybdenum-cofactor synthesis proteins. Of the glycerophospholipid metabolism, the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (glpA) gene was highly upregulated, whereas a glycerophosphodiester ABC-transporter (ugpAEBC) and a phosphodiesterase (ugpC) were repressed. On the megaplasmid, only a few genes showed differential expression, e.g. a rare lipoprotein (CAP0058, repressed) and a membrane protein (CAP0102, upregulated) gene. Observed transcriptional responses suggest that C. acetobutylicum reacts to butanol stress by induction of the general stress response and changing its cell envelope and transporter composition, but leaving the central catabolism unaffected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Elucidating the contributions of multiple aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases to butanol and ethanol production in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zongjie; Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol and butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum share common aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases. However, little is known about the relative contributions of these multiple dehydrogenases to ethanol and butanol production respectively. The contributions of six aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases of C. acetobutylicum on butanol and ethanol production were evaluated through inactivation of the corresponding genes respectively. For butanol production, the relative contributions from these enzymes were: AdhE1 > BdhB > BdhA ≈ YqhD > SMB_P058 > AdhE2. For ethanol production, the contributions were: AdhE1 > BdhB > YqhD > SMB_P058 > AdhE2 > BdhA. AdhE1 and BdhB are two essential enzymes for butanol and ethanol production. AdhE1 was relatively specific for butanol production over ethanol, while BdhB, YqhD, and SMB_P058 favor ethanol production over butanol. Butanol synthesis was increased in the adhE2 mutant, which had a higher butanol/ethanol ratio (8.15:1) compared with wild type strain (6.65:1). Both the SMB_P058 mutant and yqhD mutant produced less ethanol without loss of butanol formation, which led to higher butanol/ethanol ratio, 10.12:1 and 10.17:1, respectively. To engineer a more efficient butanol-producing strain, adhE1 could be overexpressed, furthermore, adhE2, SMB_P058, yqhD are promising gene inactivation targets. This work provides useful information guiding future strain improvement for butanol production. PMID:27321949

  17. Coenzyme A-transferase-independent butyrate re-assimilation in Clostridium acetobutylicum-evidence from a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Millat, Thomas; Voigt, Christine; Janssen, Holger; Cooksley, Clare M; Winzer, Klaus; Minton, Nigel P; Bahl, Hubert; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2014-11-01

    The hetero-dimeric CoA-transferase CtfA/B is believed to be crucial for the metabolic transition from acidogenesis to solventogenesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum as part of the industrial-relevant acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. Here, the enzyme is assumed to mediate re-assimilation of acetate and butyrate during a pH-induced metabolic shift and to faciliate the first step of acetone formation from acetoacetyl-CoA. However, recent investigations using phosphate-limited continuous cultures have questioned this common dogma. To address the emerging experimental discrepancies, we investigated the mutant strain Cac-ctfA398s::CT using chemostat cultures. As a consequence of this mutation, the cells are unable to express functional ctfA and are thus lacking CoA-transferase activity. A mathematical model of the pH-induced metabolic shift, which was recently developed for the wild type, is used to analyse the observed behaviour of the mutant strain with a focus on re-assimilation activities for the two produced acids. Our theoretical analysis reveals that the ctfA mutant still re-assimilates butyrate, but not acetate. Based upon this finding, we conclude that C. acetobutylicum possesses a CoA-tranferase-independent butyrate uptake mechanism that is activated by decreasing pH levels. Furthermore, we observe that butanol formation is not inhibited under our experimental conditions, as suggested by previous batch culture experiments. In concordance with recent batch experiments, acetone formation is abolished in chemostat cultures using the ctfa mutant.

  18. An improved kinetic model for the acetone-butanol-ethanol pathway of Clostridium acetobutylicum and model-based perturbation analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ru-Dong; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Lu, Ling-Yi; Ren, Cong; Li, Yi-Xue; Liu, Lei

    2011-06-20

    Comprehensive kinetic models of microbial metabolism can enhance the understanding of system dynamics and regulatory mechanisms, which is helpful in optimizing microbial production of industrial chemicals. Clostridium acetobutylicum produces solvents (acetone-butanol-ethanol, ABE) through the ABE pathway. To systematically assess the potential of increased production of solvents, kinetic modeling has been applied to analyze the dynamics of this pathway and make predictive simulations. Up to date, only one kinetic model for C. acetobutylicum supported by experiment has been reported as far as we know. But this model did not integrate the metabolic regulatory effects of transcriptional control and other complex factors. It also left out the information of some key intermediates (e.g. butyryl-phosphate). We have developed an improved kinetic model featured with the incorporation of butyryl-phosphate, inclusion of net effects of complex metabolic regulations, and quantification of endogenous enzyme activity variations caused by these regulations. The simulation results of our model are more consistent with published experimental data than the previous model, especially in terms of reflecting the kinetics of butyryl-phosphate and butyrate. Through parameter perturbation analysis, it was found that butyrate kinase has large and positive influence on butanol production while CoA transferase has negative effect on butanol production, suggesting that butyrate kinase has more efficiency in converting butyrate to butanol than CoA transferase. Our improved kinetic model of the ABE process has more capacity in approaching real circumstances, providing much more insight in the regulatory mechanisms and potential key points for optimization of solvent productions. Moreover, the modeling strategy can be extended to other biological processes.

  19. Transcriptional Analysis of spo0A Overexpression in Clostridium acetobutylicum and Its Effect on the Cell's Response to Butanol Stress

    PubMed Central

    Alsaker, Keith V.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    2004-01-01

    Spo0A is the regulator of stationary-phase events and is required for transcription of solvent formation genes in Clostridium acetobutylicum. In order to elucidate the role of spo0A in differentiation, we performed transcriptional analysis of 824(pMSPOA) (a spo0A-overexpressing C. acetobutylicum strain with enhanced sporulation) against a plasmid control strain. DNA microarray data were contrasted to data from a spo0A knockout strain (SKO1) that neither sporulates nor produces solvents. Transcripts of fatty acid metabolism genes, motility and chemotaxis genes, heat shock protein genes, and genes encoding the Fts family of cell division proteins were differentially expressed in the two strains, suggesting that these genes play roles in sporulation and the solvent stress response. 824(pMSPOA) alone showed significant downregulation of many glycolytic genes in stationary phase, which is consistent with metabolic flux analysis data. Surprisingly, spo0A overexpression resulted in only nominal transcriptional changes of regulatory genes (abrB and sigF) whose expression was significantly altered in SKO1. Overexpression of spo0A imparted increased tolerance and prolonged metabolism in response to butanol stress. While most of the differentially expressed genes appear to be part of a general stress response (similar to patterns in two plasmid control strains and a groESL-overexpressing strain), several genes were expressed at higher levels at early time points after butanol challenge only in 824(pMSPOA). Most of these genes were related to butyryl coenzyme A and butyrate formation and/or assimilation, but they also included the cell division gene ftsX, the gyrase subunit-encoding genes gyrB and gyrA, DNA synthesis and repair genes, and fatty acid synthesis genes, all of which might play a role in the immediate butanol stress response, and thus in enhanced butanol tolerance. PMID:15028679

  20. Control of Carbon and Electron Flow in Clostridium acetobutylicum Fermentations: Utilization of Carbon Monoxide to Inhibit Hydrogen Production and to Enhance Butanol Yields

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Hong; Bellows, Para; Datta, Rathin; Zeikus, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Extracts prepared from non-solvent-producing cells of Clostridium acetobutylicum contained methyl viologen-linked hydrogenase activity (20 U/mg of protein at 37°C) but did not display carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity. CO addition readily inhibited the hydrogenase activity of cell extracts or of viable metabolizing cells. Increasing the partial pressure of CO (2 to 10%) in unshaken anaerobic culture tube headspaces significantly inhibited (90% inhibition at 10% CO) both growth and hydrogen production by C. acetobutylicum. Growth was not sensitive to low partial pressures of CO (i.e., up to 15%) in pH-controlled fermentors (pH 4.5) that were continuously gassed and mixed. CO addition dramatically altered the glucose fermentation balance of C. acetobutylicum by diverting carbon and electrons away from H2, CO2, acetate, and butyrate production and towards production of ethanol and butanol. The butanol concentration was increased from 65 to 106 mM and the butanol productivity (i.e., the ratio of butanol produced/total acids and solvents produced) was increased by 31% when glucose fermentations maintained at pH 4.5 were continuously gassed with 85% N2-15% CO versus N2 alone. The results are discussed in terms of metabolic regulation of C. acetobutylicum saccharide fermentations to achieve maximal butanol or solvent yield. PMID:16346643

  1. A transcriptional study of acidogenic chemostat cells of Clostridium acetobutylicum--solvent stress caused by a transient n-butanol pulse.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Holger; Grimmler, Christina; Ehrenreich, Armin; Bahl, Hubert; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg

    2012-10-31

    The main product of the anaerobic fermentative bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum is n-butanol, an organic solvent with severe toxic effects on the cells. Therefore, the identification of the molecular factors related to n-butanol stress constitutes a major strategy for furthering the understanding of the biotechnological production of n-butanol, an important industrial biofuel. Previous reports concerning n-butanol stress in C. acetobutylicum dealt exclusively with batch cultures. In this study, for the first time a comprehensive transcriptional analysis of n-butanol-stressed C. acetobutylicum was conducted using stable steady state acidogenic chemostat cultures. A total of 358 differentially expressed genes were significantly affected by n-butanol stress. Similarities, such as the upregulation of general stress genes, and differences in gene expression were compared in detail with earlier DNA microarrays performed in batch cultivation experiments. The main result of this analysis was the observation that genes involved in amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis, as well as genes for specific transport systems were upregulated by n-butanol. Our results exclude any transcriptional response triggered by exogenous pH changes or solventogenic n-butanol formation. Finally, our data suggest that metabolic flux through the glycerolipid biosynthetic pathway increases, confirming that C. acetobutylicum modifies the cytoplasmic membrane composition in response to n-butanol stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A systems biology approach to investigate the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clostridium acetobutylicum is an anaerobic bacterium which is known for its solvent-producing capabilities, namely regarding the bulk chemicals acetone and butanol, the latter being a highly efficient biofuel. For butanol production by C. acetobutylicum to be optimized and exploited on an industrial scale, the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by C. acetobutylicum in continuous culture must be understood as fully as possible. Results We present an ordinary differential equation model combining the metabolic network governing solvent production with regulation at the genetic level of the enzymes required for this process. Parameterizing the model with experimental data from continuous culture, we demonstrate the influence of pH upon fermentation products: at high pH (pH 5.7) acids are the dominant product while at low pH (pH 4.5) this switches to solvents. Through steady-state analyses of the model we focus our investigations on how alteration in gene expression of C. acetobutylicum could be exploited to increase butanol yield in a continuous culture fermentation. Conclusions Incorporating gene regulation into the model of solvent production by C. acetobutylicum enables an accurate representation of the pH-induced switch to solvent production to be obtained and theoretical investigations of possible synthetic-biology approaches to be pursued. Steady-state analyses suggest that, to increase butanol yield, alterations in the expression of single solvent-associated genes are insufficient; a more complex approach targeting two or more genes is required. PMID:21247470

  3. Crystal structure of Clostridium acetobutylicum Aspartate kinase (CaAK): An important allosteric enzyme for amino acids production.

    PubMed

    Manjasetty, Babu A; Chance, Mark R; Burley, Stephen K; Panjikar, Santosh; Almo, Steven C

    2014-09-01

    Aspartate kinase (AK) is an enzyme which is tightly regulated through feedback control and responsible for the synthesis of 4-phospho-L-aspartate from L-aspartate. This intermediate step is at an important branch point where one path leads to the synthesis of lysine and the other to threonine, methionine and isoleucine. Concerted feedback inhibition of AK is mediated by threonine and lysine and varies between the species. The crystal structure of biotechnologically important Clostridium acetobutylicum aspartate kinase (CaAK; E.C. 2.7.2.4; Mw=48,030Da; 437aa; SwissProt: Q97MC0) has been determined to 3Å resolution. CaAK acquires a protein fold similar to the other known structures of AKs despite the low sequence identity (<30%). It is composed of two domains: an N-terminal catalytic domain (kinase) domain and a C-terminal regulatory domain further comprised of two small domains belonging to the ACT domain family. Pairwise comparison of 12 molecules in the asymmetric unit helped to identify the bending regions which are in the vicinity of ATP binding site involved in domain movements between the catalytic and regulatory domains. All 12 CaAK molecules adopt fully open T-state conformation leading to the formation of three tetramers unique among other similar AK structures. On the basis of comparative structural analysis, we discuss tetramer formation based on the large conformational changes in the catalytic domain associated with the lysine binding at the regulatory domains. The structure described herein is homologous to a target in wide-spread pathogenic (toxin producing) bacteria such as Clostridium tetani (64% sequence identity) suggesting the potential of the structure solved here to be applied for modeling drug interactions. CaAK structure may serve as a guide to better understand and engineer lysine biosynthesis for the biotechnology industry.

  4. Crystal structure of Clostridium acetobutylicum Aspartate kinase (CaAK): An important allosteric enzyme for amino acids production

    PubMed Central

    Manjasetty, Babu A.; Chance, Mark R.; Burley, Stephen K.; Panjikar, Santosh; Almo, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Aspartate kinase (AK) is an enzyme which is tightly regulated through feedback control and responsible for the synthesis of 4-phospho-L-aspartate from L-aspartate. This intermediate step is at an important branch point where one path leads to the synthesis of lysine and the other to threonine, methionine and isoleucine. Concerted feedback inhibition of AK is mediated by threonine and lysine and varies between the species. The crystal structure of biotechnologically important Clostridium acetobutylicum aspartate kinase (CaAK; E.C. 2.7.2.4; Mw=48,030Da; 437aa; SwissProt: Q97MC0) has been determined to 3Å resolution. CaAK acquires a protein fold similar to the other known structures of AKs despite the low sequence identity (<30%). It is composed of two domains: an N-terminal catalytic domain (kinase) domain and a C-terminal regulatory domain further comprised of two small domains belonging to the ACT domain family. Pairwise comparison of 12 molecules in the asymmetric unit helped to identify the bending regions which are in the vicinity of ATP binding site involved in domain movements between the catalytic and regulatory domains. All 12 CaAK molecules adopt fully open T-state conformation leading to the formation of three tetramers unique among other similar AK structures. On the basis of comparative structural analysis, we discuss tetramer formation based on the large conformational changes in the catalytic domain associated with the lysine binding at the regulatory domains. The structure described herein is homologous to a target in wide-spread pathogenic (toxin producing) bacteria such as Clostridium tetani (64% sequence identity) suggesting the potential of the structure solved here to be applied for modeling drug interactions. CaAK structure may serve as a guide to better understand and engineer lysine biosynthesis for the biotechnology industry. PMID:25170437

  5. Small acid-soluble spore proteins of Clostridium acetobutylicum are able to protect DNA in vitro and are specifically cleaved by germination protease GPR and spore protease YyaC.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Daniela; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg

    2015-11-01

    Small acid-soluble proteins (SASPs) play an important role in protection of DNA in dormant bacterial endospores against damage by heat, UV radiation or enzymic degradation. In the genome of the strict anaerobe Clostridium acetobutylicum, five genes encoding SASPs have been annotated and here a further sixth candidate is suggested. The ssp genes are expressed in parallel dependent upon Spo0A, a master regulator of sporulation. Analysis of the transcription start points revealed a σG or a σF consensus promoter upstream of each ssp gene, confirming a forespore-specific gene expression. SASPs were termed SspA (Cac2365), SspB (Cac1522), SspD (Cac1620), SspF (Cac2372), SspH (Cac1663) and Tlp (Cac1487). Here it is shown that with the exception of Tlp, every purified recombinant SASP is able to bind DNA in vitro thereby protecting it against enzymic degradation by DNase I. Moreover, SspB and SspD were specifically cleaved by the two germination-specific proteases GPR (Cac1275) and YyaC (Cac2857), which were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and activated by an autocleavage reaction. Thus, for the first time to our knowledge, GPR-like activity and SASP specificity could be demonstrated for a YyaC-like protein. Collectively, the results assign SspA, SspB, SspD, SspF and SspH of C. acetobutylicum as members of α/β-type SASPs, whereas Tlp seems to be a non-DNA-binding spore protein of unknown function. In acetic acid-extracted proteins of dormant spores of C. acetobutylicum, SspA was identified almost exclusively, indicating its dominant biological role as a major α/β-type SASP in vivo.

  6. Integrated bioprocess for long-term continuous cultivation of Clostridium acetobutylicum coupled to pervaporation with PDMS composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Van Hecke, Wouter; Vandezande, Pieter; Claes, Stan; Vangeel, Silvia; Beckers, Herman; Diels, Ludo; De Wever, Heleen

    2012-05-01

    A continuous cultivation of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 is described using a two-stage design to mimic the two phases of batch culture growth of the organism. A hydrophobic pervaporation unit was coupled to the second fermentor containing the highest solvent titers. This in situ product recovery technology efficiently decreased butanol toxicity in the fermentor while the permeate was enriched to 57-195 g L(-1) total solvents depending on the solvent concentrations in the fermentor. By the alleviation of product inhibition, the glucose concentration could be increased from 60 to 126 g L(-1) while the productivity increased concomitantly from 0.13 to 0.30 g L(-1)h(-1). The continuous fermentation was conducted for 1172 h during which the pervaporation was coupled to the second fermentor for 475 h with an average flux of 367 g m(-2)h(-1). The energy consumption was calculated for a 2 wt.% n-butanol fermentation broth and compared with the conventional process.

  7. A Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for the preparation of intra- and extracellular proteins of Clostridium acetobutylicum for proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Katrin; Fiedler, Tomas; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Bahl, Hubert

    2007-02-01

    We report on the development of a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for extraction and handling of intra- and extracellular protein fractions of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 for reproducible high quality two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analyses. Standardized cells from a phosphate-limited chemostat were used to evaluate different protein preparation methods. For the preparation of the secretome, a dialysis/ultrafiltration procedure resulted in higher protein yields and proved to be more reliable compared to different precipitation methods using TCA, DOC-TCA, acetone, and PEG 6000. Sonication was found to be the most efficient method among different tested techniques of cell disruption for the analysis of the intracellular proteome. Furthermore, the effect of protease inhibitors and sample storage conditions were tested for both intra- and extracellular protein samples. Significant changes in the protein pattern were observed depending on the addition of protease inhibitors. 2-DE gels with a pH gradient from 4 to 7 prepared according to the developed SOP contained at least 736 intracellular and 324 extracellular protein spots.

  8. Continuous two stage acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation with integrated solvent removal using Clostridium acetobutylicum B 5313.

    PubMed

    Bankar, Sandip B; Survase, Shrikant A; Singhal, Rekha S; Granström, Tom

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize continuous acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation using a two stage chemostat system integrated with liquid-liquid extraction of solvents produced in the first stage. This minimized end product inhibition by butanol and subsequently enhanced glucose utilization and solvent production in continuous cultures of Clostridium acetobutylicum B 5313. During continuous two-stage ABE fermentation, sugarcane bagasse was used as the cell holding material for the both stages and liquid-liquid extraction was performed using an oleyl alcohol and decanol mixture. An overall solvent production of 25.32g/L (acetone 5.93g/L, butanol 16.90g/L and ethanol 2.48g/L) was observed as compared to 15.98g/L in the single stage chemostat with highest solvent productivity and solvent yield of 2.5g/Lh and of 0.35g/g, respectively. Maximum glucose utilization (83.21%) at a dilution rate of 0.051/h was observed as compared to 54.38% in the single stage chemostat.

  9. Efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol production (ABE) by Clostridium acetobutylicum XY16 immobilized on chemically modified sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangping; He, Aiyong; Zhao, Jie; Wu, Hao; Jiang, Min

    2015-07-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was chemically modified by polyethylenimine (PEI) and glutaraldehyde (GA) and then used as a support to immobilize Clostridium acetobutylicum XY16 in the process of butanol production. Compared with batch fermentation using unmodified sugarcane bagasse, 22.3 g/L total solvents were produced by cells immobilized on 4 g/L PEI treated sugarcane bagasse with high solvent productivity of 0.62 g/(L h) and glucose consumption rate of 1.67 g/(L h). Improvement of 14, 43, and 37 % in total solvent titer, solvent productivity and glucose consumption rate was observed, respectively. Enhanced solvent production of 25.14 g/L was obtained when using a high concentration of glucose of 80 g/L. Continuous fermentation was studied using PEI/GA modified sugarcane bagasse as immobilization support with a range of dilution which rates from 0.2 to 2.5 to find an optimal condition. The maximum solvent productivity of 11.32 g/(L h) was obtained at a high dilution rate of 2.0 h(-1).

  10. Butanol production by immobilised Clostridium acetobutylicum in repeated batch, fed-batch, and continuous modes of fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dolejš, Igor; Krasňan, Vladimír; Stloukal, Radek; Rosenberg, Michal; Rebroš, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum immobilised in polyvinylalcohol, lens-shaped hydrogel capsules (LentiKats(®)) was studied for production of butanol and other products of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation. After optimising the immobilisation protocol for anaerobic bacteria, continuous, repeated batch, and fed-batch fermentations in repeated batch mode were performed. Using glucose as a substrate, butanol productivity of 0.41 g/L/h and solvent productivity of 0.63 g/L/h were observed at a dilution rate of 0.05 h(-1) during continuous fermentation with a concentrated substrate (60 g/L). Through the process of repeated batch fermentation, the duration of fermentation was reduced from 27.8h (free-cell fermentation) to 3.3h (immobilised cells) with a solvent productivity of 0.77 g/L/h (butanol 0.57 g/L/h). The highest butanol and solvent productivities of 1.21 and 1.91 g/L/h were observed during fed-batch fermentation operated in repeated batch mode with yields of butanol (0.15 g/g) and solvents (0.24 g/g), respectively, produced per gram of glucose. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhanced butanol production by solvent tolerance Clostridium acetobutylicum SE25 from cassava flour in a fibrous bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Han-Guang; Ma, Xing-Xing; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Luo, Wei; Wu, Ya-Qing; Li, Xun-Hang

    2016-12-01

    To enhance the butanol productivity and reduce the material cost, acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum SE25 was investigated using batch, repeated-batch and continuous cultures in a fibrous bed bioreactor, where cassava flour was used as the substrate. With periodical nutrient supplementation, stable butanol production was maintained for about 360h in a 6-cycle repeated-batch fermentation with an average butanol productivity of 0.28g/L/h and butanol yield of 0.32g/g-starch. In addition, the highest butanol productivity of 0.63g/L/h and butanol yield of 0.36g/g-starch were achieved when the dilution rate were investigated in continuous production of acetone, butanol, and ethanol using a fibrous bed bioreactor, which were 231.6% and 28.6% higher than those of the free-cell fermentation. On the other hand, this study also successfully comfirmed that the biofilm can provide an effective protection for the microbial cells which are growing in stressful environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sequence of the lyc gene encoding the autolytic lysozyme of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC824: comparison with other lytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Croux, C; García, J L

    1991-07-31

    The lyc gene, encoding an autolytic lysozyme from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC824, has been cloned. The nucleotide sequence of the lyc gene has been determined and found to encode a protein of 324 amino acids (aa) with a deduced Mr of 34,939. The lyc gene is preceded by two open reading frames with unknown functions, suggesting that this gene is part of an operon. Comparison between the deduced aa sequence of the lyc gene and the directly determined N-terminal sequence of the extracellular clostridial lysozyme suggests that the enzyme is synthesized without a cleavable signal peptide. Moreover, the comparative analyses between the clostridial lysozyme and other known cell-wall lytic enzymes revealed a significant similarity with the N-terminal portion of the lysozymes of Streptomyces globisporus, the fungus Chalaropsis, the Lactobacillus bulgaricus bacteriophage mv1, and the Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteriophages of the Cp family (CPL lysozymes). In addition, the analyses showed that the C-terminal half of the clostridial lysozyme was homologous to the N-terminal domain of the muramoyl-pentapeptide-carboxypeptidase of Streptomyces albus, suggesting a role in substrate binding. The existence of five putative repeated motifs in the C-terminal region of the autolytic lysozyme suggests that this region could play a role in the recognition of the polymeric substrate.

  13. Enhanced butanol production by Clostridium acetobutylicum NCIMB 13357 grown on date fruit as carbon source in P2 medium.

    PubMed

    Khamaiseh, Emran I; Abdul Hamid, Aidil; Abdeshahian, Peyman; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid

    2014-01-01

    The production of biobutanol was studied by the cultivation of Clostridium acetobutylicum NCIMB 13557 in P2 medium including date fruit as the sole substrate. The effect of P2 medium and the effect of different concentrations of date fruit ranging from 10 to 100 g/L on biobutanol production were investigated. Anaerobic batch culture was carried out at 35 °C incubation temperature and pH 7.0 ± 0.2 for 72 h. Experimental results showed that the lowest yield of biobutanol and acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) was 0.32 and 0.35 gram per gram of carbohydrate consumed (g/g), respectively, when an initial date fruit concentration of 10 g/L was utilized. At this fruit date concentration a biobutanol production value of 1.56 g/L was obtained. On the other hand, the maximum yield of biobutanol (0.48 g/g) and ABE (0.63 g/g) was produced at 50 g/L date fruit concentration with a biobutanol production value as high as 11 g/L. However, when a higher initial date fruit concentration was used, biobutanol and ABE production decreased to reach the yield of 0.22 g/g and 0.35 g/g, respectively, where 100 g/L date fruit was used. Similar results also revealed that 10.03 g/L biobutanol was produced using 100 g/L date fruit.

  14. The genome sequence of Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of tetanus disease.

    PubMed

    Bruggemann, Holger; Baumer, Sebastian; Fricke, Wolfgang Florian; Wiezer, Arnim; Liesegang, Heiko; Decker, Iwona; Herzberg, Christina; Martinez-Arias, Rosa; Merkl, Rainer; Henne, Anke; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    2003-02-04

    Tetanus disease is one of the most dramatic and globally prevalent diseases of humans and vertebrate animals, and has been reported for over 24 centuries. The manifestation of the disease, spastic paralysis, is caused by the second most poisonous substance known, the tetanus toxin, with a human lethal dose of approximately 1 ng/kg. Fortunately, this disease is successfully controlled through immunization with tetanus toxoid; nevertheless, according to the World Health Organization, an estimated 400,000 cases still occur each year, mainly of neonatal tetanus. The causative agent of tetanus disease is Clostridium tetani, an anaerobic spore-forming bacterium, whose natural habitat is soil, dust, and intestinal tracts of various animals. Here we report the complete genome sequence of toxigenic C. tetani E88, a variant of strain Massachusetts. The genome consists of a 2,799,250-bp chromosome encoding 2,372 ORFs. The tetanus toxin and a collagenase are encoded on a 74,082-bp plasmid, containing 61 ORFs. Additional virulence-related factors could be identified, such as an array of surface-layer and adhesion proteins (35 ORFs), some of them unique to C. tetani. Comparative genomics with the genomes of Clostridium perfringens, the causative agent of gas gangrene, and Clostridium acetobutylicum, a nonpathogenic solvent producer, revealed a remarkable capacity of C. tetani: The organism can rely on an extensive sodium ion bioenergetics. Additional candidate genes involved in the establishment and maintenance of a pathogenic lifestyle of C. tetani are presented.

  15. The genome sequence of Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of tetanus disease

    PubMed Central

    Brüggemann, Holger; Bäumer, Sebastian; Fricke, Wolfgang Florian; Wiezer, Arnim; Liesegang, Heiko; Decker, Iwona; Herzberg, Christina; Martínez-Arias, Rosa; Merkl, Rainer; Henne, Anke; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    Tetanus disease is one of the most dramatic and globally prevalent diseases of humans and vertebrate animals, and has been reported for over 24 centuries. The manifestation of the disease, spastic paralysis, is caused by the second most poisonous substance known, the tetanus toxin, with a human lethal dose of ≈1 ng/kg. Fortunately, this disease is successfully controlled through immunization with tetanus toxoid; nevertheless, according to the World Health Organization, an estimated 400,000 cases still occur each year, mainly of neonatal tetanus. The causative agent of tetanus disease is Clostridium tetani, an anaerobic spore-forming bacterium, whose natural habitat is soil, dust, and intestinal tracts of various animals. Here we report the complete genome sequence of toxigenic C. tetani E88, a variant of strain Massachusetts. The genome consists of a 2,799,250-bp chromosome encoding 2,372 ORFs. The tetanus toxin and a collagenase are encoded on a 74,082-bp plasmid, containing 61 ORFs. Additional virulence-related factors could be identified, such as an array of surface-layer and adhesion proteins (35 ORFs), some of them unique to C. tetani. Comparative genomics with the genomes of Clostridium perfringens, the causative agent of gas gangrene, and Clostridium acetobutylicum, a nonpathogenic solvent producer, revealed a remarkable capacity of C. tetani: The organism can rely on an extensive sodium ion bioenergetics. Additional candidate genes involved in the establishment and maintenance of a pathogenic lifestyle of C. tetani are presented. PMID:12552129

  16. The mechanism of switching from an acidogenic to butanol-acetone fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. Technical progress report, July 1990--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, P.

    1994-11-01

    The overall objective of this project was to elucidate the detailed mechanism by which solvent-forming bacteria such as Clostridium acetobutylicum regulate the well-known shift in fermentation pathway between alcohol-acetone and organic acid production. We eventually want to isolate and describe: (1) the regulatory genes and protein elements that determine induction of synthesis of the solvent-pathway enzymes; and (2) how this regulation system interacts with the sporulation induction and development program and with related pathways such as granulose and exopolysaccharide formation in clostridia. A working model for how clostridial control systems work can be derived from recent research on stress systems in E. coli and sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. This research was centered upon the technique of employing transposable elements that create gene fusions and mutations due to insertion in the chromosome of gram positive bacteria. Our approach was based on recent demonstration in our laboratory and by others of transconjugation of Tn916 into C. acetobutylicum and its insertion into the chromosome. A panel of strains with Tn916 inserts that are also solvent-negative and/or asporogenic were used to identify specific regulatory genes. A second approach was based upon electroporative transformation of plasmid PTV1 DNA carrying transposon Tn917 into C. acetobutylicum. Insertion of Tn917 lac to report activity of genes and functions in vegetative and stationary or slow-growing cells will be investigated.

  17. Enhancing acetone biosynthesis and acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation performance by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae integrated with exogenous acetate addition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongzhen; Ge, Laibing; Zhang, Jingshu; Ding, Jian; Chen, Rui; Shi, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Acetone is the major by-product in ABE fermentations, most researches focused on increasing butanol/acetone ratio by decreasing acetone biosynthesis. However, economics of ABE fermentation industry strongly relies on evaluating acetone as a valuable platform chemical. Therefore, a novel ABE fermentation strategy focusing on bio-acetone production by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae with exogenous acetate addition was proposed. Experimental and theoretical analysis revealed the strategy could, enhance C. acetobutylicum survival oriented amino acids assimilation in the cells; control NADH regeneration rate at moderately lower level to enhance acetone synthesis but without sacrificing butanol production; enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and direct most of extra consumed glucose into acetone/butanol synthesis routes. By implementing the strategy using synthetic or acetate fermentative supernatant, acetone concentrations increased to 8.27-8.55g/L from 5.86g/L of the control, while butanol concentrations also elevated to the higher levels of 13.91-14.23g/L from 11.63g/L simultaneously.

  18. Feasibility of installing and maintaining anaerobiosis using Escherichia coli HD701 as a facultative anaerobe for hydrogen production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from various carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sedky H A; Morsy, Fatthy Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    Using Escherichia coli for installing and maintaining anaerobiosis for hydrogen production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 is a cost-effective approach for industrial hydrogen production, as it does not require reducing agents or sparging with inert gases. This study was devoted for investigating the feasibility for installing and maintaining anaerobiosis of hydrogen production by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 when using E. coli HD701 utilizable versus non utilizable sugars as a-carbon source. Using E. coli HD701 for installing anaerobiosis showed a comparable hydrogen production yield and efficiency to the use of reducing agents and nitrogen sparging in case of hydrogen production from the E. coli HD701 non utilizable sugars. In contrast, using E. coli HD701 for installing anaerobiosis showed a lower hydrogen production yield and efficiency than the use of reducing agents and nitrogen sparging in case of using glucose as a substrate. This is possibly because E. coli HD701 when using glucose compensate for the substrate, and produce hydrogen with lower efficiency than C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. These results indicated that the use of E. coli HD701 for installing anaerobiosis would not be economically feasible when using E. coli HD701 utilizable sugars as a carbon source. In contrast, the use of this approach for installing anaerobiosis for hydrogen production from sucrose and starch would have a high potency for industrial applications.

  19. Synergistic dark and photo-fermentation continuous system for hydrogen production from molasses by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Fatthy Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated synergistic dark and photo-fermentation using continuous fermentation system (CFS). The system relies on connecting several fermenters from bottom of one to top culture level of the next in a manner that allows for delaying movement of the substrate and thus for its full consumption. While H2 was collected, CFS allowed for moving liquid byproducts toward the outlet and hence continuous productivity. CFS could be efficiently used for: (1) Continuous dark and photo-fermentation H2 production by Clostridium acetobutylicum and Rhodobacter capsulatus producing 5.65moleH2mole(-1) hexose; (2) Continuous dark-fermentation synergistic H2, acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) production by C. acetobutylicum which produced per mole hexose, 2.43mol H2 along with 73.08g ABE (3) Continuous H2 and methane production by C. acetobutylicum and bacterial sludge producing, per mole hexose, 1.64mol pure H2 and 2.56mol CH4 mixed with 0.37mol H2·The hydraulic retention time (HRT) for whole system was short where organic acids produced in dark-fermentation in first fermenter were synergistically utilized for H2 production by R. capsulatus in subsequent fermenters. CFS is suitable for fast-digestible sugars but not lignocelluloses or other hard-digestible organics, requiring prolonged HRT, unless such polymeric organics were hydrolyzed prior to fermentation.

  20. Simultaneous production of isopropanol, butanol, ethanol and 2,3-butanediol by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 engineered strains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Isopropanol represents a widely-used commercial alcohol which is currently produced from petroleum. In nature, isopropanol is excreted by some strains of Clostridium beijerinckii, simultaneously with butanol and ethanol during the isopropanol butanol ethanol (IBE) fermentation. In order to increase isopropanol production, the gene encoding the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme from C. beijerinckii NRRL B593 (adh) which catalyzes the reduction of acetone to isopropanol, was cloned into the acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE)-producing strain C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The transformants showed high capacity for conversion of acetone into isopropanol (> 95%). To increase isopropanol production levels in ATCC 824, polycistronic transcription units containing, in addition to the adh gene, homologous genes of the acetoacetate decarboxylase (adc), and/or the acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA transferase subunits A and B (ctfA and ctfB) were constructed and introduced into the wild-type strain. Combined overexpression of the ctfA and ctfB genes resulted in enhanced solvent production. In non-pH-controlled batch cultures, the total solvents excreted by the transformant overexpressing the adh, ctfA, ctfB and adc genes were 24.4 g/L IBE (including 8.8 g/L isopropanol), while the control strain harbouring an empty plasmid produced only 20.2 g/L ABE (including 7.6 g/L acetone). The overexpression of the adc gene had limited effect on IBE production. Interestingly, all transformants with the adh gene converted acetoin (a minor fermentation product) into 2,3-butanediol, highlighting the wide metabolic versatility of solvent-producing Clostridia. PMID:22909015

  1. Modelling the role of CtfA/B in reverse shift continuous culture experiments of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Graeme J; King, John R

    2016-06-01

    In continuous phosphate-limited conditions, under pH control from high pH (pH ≳ 5.2) to low pH (pH ≲ 5.2), the metabolism of the Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum,switches from acid to solvent production. Three main enzymes are responsible for the shift, acetoacetate decarboxylase (Adc), alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE1/2) and a CoA-transferase (CtfA/B), which are produced in increased quantities during solventogenesis. A two-population model, Millat et al. (2013) and fitted to such 'forward'-shift data, can explain this, as well as observed changes in optical density immediately following the shift: an acidogenic subpopulation is washed out and a solventogenic subpopulation grows in its place, each with distinct physiologies and proteomes. We fit this model to a 'reverse'-shift experiment, where the pH is increased from solventogenic to acidogenic conditions. We find corresponding changes in reaction rates, with AdhE1 and Adc production falling, as in the 'forward' experiments; however, for CtfA/B, the best fit surprisingly arises from the same level of production in both conditions. We propose experiments that would test whether this is a model artefact or accurately reflects cultures shifted in this reverse direction, and, if true, may suggest that over-expressing CtfA/B in both solventogenic and acidogenic conditions could improve the efficiency of fermentation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Clostridium acetobutylicum 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase (Ogg) Differs from Eukaryotic Oggs with Respect to Opposite Base Discrimination†

    PubMed Central

    Robey-Bond, Susan M.; Barrantes-Reynolds, Ramiro; Bond, Jeffrey P.; Wallace, Susan S.; Bandaru, Viswanath

    2008-01-01

    During repair of damaged DNA, the oxidized base 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is removed by 8-oxoguanine—DNA glycosylase (Ogg) in eukaryotes and most archaea, whereas in most bacteria it is removed by formamidopyrimidine—DNA glycosylase (Fpg). We report the first characterization of a bacterial Ogg, Clostridium acetobutylicum Ogg (CacOgg). Like human OGG1 and Escherichia coli Fpg (EcoFpg), CacOgg excised 8-oxoguanine. However, unlike hOGG1 and EcoFpg, CacOgg showed little preference for the base opposite the damage during base excision and removed 8-oxoguanine from single-stranded DNA. Thus, our results showed unambiguous qualitative functional differences in vitro between CacOgg and both hOGG1 and EcoFpg. CacOgg differs in sequence from the eukaryotic enzymes at two sequence positions, M132 and F179, which align with amino acids (R154 and Y203) in human OGG1 (hOGG1) found to be involved in opposite base interaction. To address the sequence basis for functional differences with respect to opposite base interactions, we prepared three CacOgg variants, M132R, F179Y, and M132R/F179Y. All three variants showed a substantial increase in specificity for 8-oxoG·C relative to 8-oxoG·A. While we were unable to definitively associate these qualitative functional differences with differences in selective pressure between eukaryotes, Clostridia, and other bacteria, our results are consistent with the idea that evolution of Ogg function is based on kinetic control of repair. PMID:18578506

  3. Structural Characterization of Clostridium acetobutylicum 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase in Its Apo Form and in Complex with 8-Oxodeoxyguanosine

    SciTech Connect

    Faucher, Frédérick; Robey-Bond, Susan M.; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie

    2009-06-30

    DNA is subject to a multitude of oxidative damages generated by oxidizing agents from metabolism and exogenous sources and by ionizing radiation. Guanine is particularly vulnerable to oxidation, and the most common oxidative product 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is the most prevalent lesion observed in DNA molecules. 8-OxoG can form a normal Watson-Crick pair with cytosine (8-oxoG:C), but it can also form a stable Hoogsteen pair with adenine (8-oxoG:A), leading to a G:C {yields} T:A transversion after replication. Fortunately, 8-oxoG is recognized and excised by either of two DNA glycosylases of the base excision repair pathway: formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (Ogg). While Clostridium acetobutylicum Ogg (CacOgg) DNA glycosylase can specifically recognize and remove 8-oxoG, it displays little preference for the base opposite the lesion, which is unusual for a member of the Ogg1 family. This work describes the crystal structures of CacOgg in its apo form and in complex with 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine. A structural comparison between the apo form and the liganded form of the enzyme reveals a structural reorganization of the C-terminal domain upon binding of 8-oxoG, similar to that reported for human OGG1. A structural comparison of CacOgg with human OGG1, in complex with 8-oxoG containing DNA, provides a structural rationale for the lack of opposite base specificity displayed by CacOgg.

  4. Introducing a single secondary alcohol dehydrogenase into butanol-tolerant Clostridium acetobutylicum Rh8 switches ABE fermentation to high level IBE fermentation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previously we have developed a butanol tolerant mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum Rh8, from the wild type strain DSM 1731. Strain Rh8 can tolerate up to 19 g/L butanol, with solvent titer improved accordingly, thus exhibiting industrial application potential. To test if strain Rh8 can be used for production of high level mixed alcohols, a single secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B593 was overexpressed in strain Rh8 under the control of thl promoter. Results The heterogenous gene sADH was functionally expressed in C. acetobutylicum Rh8. This simple, one-step engineering approach switched the traditional ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation to IBE (isopropanol-butanol-ethanol) fermentation. The total alcohol titer reached 23.88 g/l (7.6 g/l isopropanol, 15 g/l butanol, and 1.28 g/l ethanol) with a yield to glucose of 31.42%. The acid (butyrate and acetate) assimilation rate in isopropanol producing strain Rh8(psADH) was increased. Conclusions The improved butanol tolerance and the enhanced solvent biosynthesis machinery in strain Rh8 is beneficial for production of high concentration of mixed alcohols. Strain Rh8 can thus be considered as a good host for further engineering of solvent/alcohol production. PMID:22742819

  5. Heterologous Expression of the Clostridium carboxidivorans CO Dehydrogenase Alone or Together with the Acetyl Coenzyme A Synthase Enables both Reduction of CO2 and Oxidation of CO by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Ellinor D; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2017-08-15

    With recent advances in synthetic biology, CO2 could be utilized as a carbon feedstock by native or engineered organisms, assuming the availability of electrons. Two key enzymes used in autotrophic CO2 fixation are the CO dehydrogenase (CODH) and acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) synthase (ACS), which form a bifunctional heterotetrameric complex. The CODH/ACS complex can reversibly catalyze CO2 to CO, effectively enabling a biological water-gas shift reaction at ambient temperatures and pressures. The CODH/ACS complex is part of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway (WLP) used by acetogens to fix CO2, and it has been well characterized in native hosts. So far, only a few recombinant CODH/ACS complexes have been expressed in heterologous hosts, none of which demonstrated in vivo CO2 reduction. Here, functional expression of the Clostridium carboxidivorans CODH/ACS complex is demonstrated in the solventogen Clostridium acetobutylicum, which was engineered to express CODH alone or together with the ACS. Both strains exhibited CO2 reduction and CO oxidation activities. The CODH reactions were interrogated using isotopic labeling, thus verifying that CO was a direct product of CO2 reduction, and vice versa. CODH apparently uses a native C. acetobutylicum ferredoxin as an electron carrier for CO2 reduction. Heterologous CODH activity depended on actively growing cells and required the addition of nickel, which is inserted into CODH without the need to express the native Ni insertase protein. Increasing CO concentrations in the gas phase inhibited CODH activity and altered the metabolite profile of the CODH-expressing cells. This work provides the foundation for engineering a complete and functional WLP in nonnative host organisms.IMPORTANCE Functional expression of CO dehydrogenase (CODH) from Clostridium carboxidivorans was demonstrated in C. acetobutylicum, which is natively incapable of CO2 fixation. The expression of CODH, alone or together with the C. carboxidivorans acetyl

  6. Mutant strain of C. acetobutylicum and process for making butanol

    DOEpatents

    Jain, Mahendra K.; Beacom, Daniel; Datta, Rathin

    1993-01-01

    A biologically pure asporogenic mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum is produced by growing sporogenic C. acetobutylicum ATCC 4259 and treating the parent strain with ethane methane sulfonate. The mutant which as been designated C. acetobutylicum ATCC 55025 is useful in an improved ABE fermentation process, and produces high concentrations of butanol and total solvents.

  7. Transcription of the pst Operon of Clostridium acetobutylicum Is Dependent on Phosphate Concentration and pH

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Oehmcke, Sonja; Meyer, Uta; Mix, Maren; Schwarz, Katrin; Fiedler, Tomas; Bahl, Hubert

    2006-01-01

    The pst operon of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 comprises five genes, pstS, pstC, pstA, pstB, and phoU, and shows a gene architecture identical to that of Escherichia coli. Deduced proteins are predicted to represent a high-affinity phosphate-specific ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transport system (Pst) and a protein homologous to PhoU, a negative phosphate regulon regulator. We analyzed the expression patterns of the pst operon in Pi-limited chemostat cultures during acid production at pH 5.8 or solvent production at pH 4.5 and in response to Pi pulses. Specific mRNA transcripts were found only when external Pi concentrations had dropped below 0.2 mM. Two specific transcripts were detected, a 4.7-kb polycistronic mRNA spanning the whole operon and a quantitatively dominating 1.2-kb mRNA representing the first gene, pstS. The mRNA levels clearly differed depending on the external pH. The amounts of the full-length mRNA detected were about two times higher at pH 5.8 than at pH 4.5. The level of pstS mRNA increased by a factor of at least 8 at pH 5.8 compared to pH 4.5 results. Primer extension experiments revealed only one putative transcription start point 80 nucleotides upstream of pstS. Thus, additional regulatory sites are proposed in the promoter region, integrating two different extracellular signals, namely, depletion of inorganic phosphate and the pH of the environment. After phosphate pulses were applied to a phosphate-limited chemostat we observed faster phosphate consumption at pH 5.8 than at pH 4.5, although higher optical densities were recorded at pH 4.5. PMID:16855236

  8. Northern, morphological, and fermentation analysis of spo0A inactivation and overexpression in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed

    Harris, Latonia M; Welker, Neil E; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2002-07-01

    The Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 spo0A gene was cloned, and two recombinant strains were generated, an spo0A inactivation strain (SKO1) and an spo0A overexpression strain [824(pMPSOA)]. SKO1 was developed by targeted gene inactivation with a replicative plasmid capable of double-crossover chromosomal integration--a technique never used before with solventogenic clostridia. SKO1 was severely deficient in solvent formation: it produced only 2 mM acetone and 13 mM butanol, compared to the 92 mM acetone and 172 mM butanol produced by the parental strain. After 72 h of growth on solid media, SKO1 formed long filaments of rod-shaped cells that failed to septate. SKO1 cells never achieved the swollen clostridial form typical of the parental strain and did not form endospores. No spo0A transcripts were detected in SKO1, while transcription of two solvent formation operons (aad-ctfA-ctfB and adc; both containing 0A boxes in their promoter regions) was limited. Strain 824(pMSPOA) produced higher butanol concentrations than the control strain [824(pIMP1)] and dramatically elevated spo0A transcript levels and displayed a bimodal pattern of spo0A transcription similar to that of B. subtilis. Microscopic studies indicated that sporulation was both enhanced and accelerated due to spo0A overexpression compared to that of both the 824(pIMP1) and parental strains. Consistent with that, expression of the key solvent formation genes (aad-ctfA-ctfB and adc) and three sporulation-specific genes (spoIIGA, sigE, and sigG) was observed earlier in strain 824(pMSPOA) than in the plasmid control. These data support the hypothesis that Spo0A is a transcriptional regulator that positively controls sporulation and solvent production. Its effect on solvent formation is a balancing act in regulating sporulation versus solvent gene expression: its overexpression apparently tips the balance in favor of accelerated and enhanced sporulation at the expense of overall solvent production.

  9. Cloning and expression of clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 acetoacetyl-coenzyme A:acetate/butyrate:coenzyme A-transferase in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J.W.; Petersen, D.J.; Bennett, G.N. ); Papoutsakis, E.T. )

    1990-06-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferase (acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA-transferase (butyrate-acetoacetate CoA-transferase) (EC 2.8.3.9)) of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 is an important enzyme in the metabolic shift between the acid-producing and solvent-forming states of this organism. The genes encoding the two subunits of this enzyme have been cloned and subsequent subcloning experiments established the position of the structural genes for CoA-transferase. Complementation of Escherichia coli ato mutants with the recombinant plasmid pCoAT4 (pUC19 carrying a 1.8-kilobase insert of C. acetobutylicum DNA encoding CoA-transferase activity) enabled the transformants to grow on butyrate as a sole carbon source. Despite the ability of CoA-transferase to complement the ato defect in E. coli mutants, Southern blot and Western blot (immunoblot) analyses showed showed that neither the C. acetobutylicum genes encoding CoA-transferase nor the enzyme itself shared any apparent homology with its E. coli counterpart. Polypeptides of M{sub r} of the purified CoA-transferase subunits were observed by Western blot and maxicell analysis of whole-cell extracts of E.coli harboring pCoAT4. The proximity and orientation of the genes suggest that the genes encoding the two subunits of CoA-transferase may form an operon similar to that found in E. coli. In the plasmid, however, transcription appears to be primarily from the lac promoter of the vector.

  10. Integrative modelling of pH-dependent enzyme activity and transcriptomic regulation of the acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Millat, Thomas; Janssen, Holger; Bahl, Hubert; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2013-09-01

    In a continuous culture under phosphate limitation the metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum depends on the external pH level. By comparing seven steady-state conditions between pH 5.7 and pH 4.5 we show that the switch from acidogenesis to solventogenesis occurs between pH 5.3 and pH 5.0 with an intermediate state at pH 5.1. Here, an integrative study is presented investigating how a changing external pH level affects the clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation pathway. This is of particular interest as the biotechnological production of n-butanol as biofuel has recently returned into the focus of industrial applications. One prerequisite is the furthering of the knowledge of the factors determining the solvent production and their integrative regulations. We have mathematically analysed the influence of pH-dependent specific enzyme activities of branch points of the metabolism on the product formation. This kinetic regulation was compared with transcriptomic regulation regarding gene transcription and the proteomic profile. Furthermore, both regulatory mechanisms were combined yielding a detailed projection of their individual and joint effects on the product formation. The resulting model represents an important platform for future developments of industrial butanol production based on C. acetobutylicum.

  11. Regulation of the sol locus genes for butanol and acetone formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 by a putative transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Nair, R V; Green, E M; Watson, D E; Bennett, G N; Papoutsakis, E T

    1999-01-01

    A gene (orf1, now designated solR) previously identified upstream of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase gene aad (R. V. Nair, G. N. Bennett, and E. T. Papoutsakis, J. Bacteriol. 176:871-885, 1994) was found to encode a repressor of the sol locus (aad, ctfA, ctfB and adc) genes for butanol and acetone formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Primer extension analysis identified a transcriptional start site 35 bp upstream of the solR start codon. Amino acid comparisons of SolR identified a potential helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif in the C-terminal half towards the center of the protein, suggesting a regulatory role. Overexpression of SolR in strain ATCC 824(pCO1) resulted in a solvent-negative phenotype owing to its deleterious effect on the transcription of the sol locus genes. Inactivation of solR in C. acetobutylicum via homologous recombination yielded mutants B and H (ATCC 824 solR::pO1X) which exhibited deregulated solvent production characterized by increased flux towards butanol and acetone formation, earlier induction of aad, lower overall acid production, markedly improved yields of solvents on glucose, a prolonged solvent production phase, and increased biomass accumulation compared to those of the wild-type strain.

  12. Integrative modelling of pH-dependent enzyme activity and transcriptomic regulation of the acetone–butanol–ethanol fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture

    PubMed Central

    Millat, Thomas; Janssen, Holger; Bahl, Hubert; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Summary In a continuous culture under phosphate limitation the metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum depends on the external pH level. By comparing seven steady-state conditions between pH 5.7 and pH 4.5 we show that the switch from acidogenesis to solventogenesis occurs between pH 5.3 and pH 5.0 with an intermediate state at pH 5.1. Here, an integrative study is presented investigating how a changing external pH level affects the clostridial acetone–butanol–ethanol (ABE) fermentation pathway. This is of particular interest as the biotechnological production of n-butanol as biofuel has recently returned into the focus of industrial applications. One prerequisite is the furthering of the knowledge of the factors determining the solvent production and their integrative regulations. We have mathematically analysed the influence of pH-dependent specific enzyme activities of branch points of the metabolism on the product formation. This kinetic regulation was compared with transcriptomic regulation regarding gene transcription and the proteomic profile. Furthermore, both regulatory mechanisms were combined yielding a detailed projection of their individual and joint effects on the product formation. The resulting model represents an important platform for future developments of industrial butanol production based on C. acetobutylicum. PMID:23332010

  13. Regulation of the sol Locus Genes for Butanol and Acetone Formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 by a Putative Transcriptional Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ramesh V.; Green, Edward M.; Watson, David E.; Bennett, George N.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    1999-01-01

    A gene (orf1, now designated solR) previously identified upstream of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase gene aad (R. V. Nair, G. N. Bennett, and E. T. Papoutsakis, J. Bacteriol. 176:871–885, 1994) was found to encode a repressor of the sol locus (aad, ctfA, ctfB and adc) genes for butanol and acetone formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Primer extension analysis identified a transcriptional start site 35 bp upstream of the solR start codon. Amino acid comparisons of SolR identified a potential helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif in the C-terminal half towards the center of the protein, suggesting a regulatory role. Overexpression of SolR in strain ATCC 824(pCO1) resulted in a solvent-negative phenotype owing to its deleterious effect on the transcription of the sol locus genes. Inactivation of solR in C. acetobutylicum via homologous recombination yielded mutants B and H (ATCC 824 solR::pO1X) which exhibited deregulated solvent production characterized by increased flux towards butanol and acetone formation, earlier induction of aad, lower overall acid production, markedly improved yields of solvents on glucose, a prolonged solvent production phase, and increased biomass accumulation compared to those of the wild-type strain. PMID:9864345

  14. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 for the high-yield production of a biofuel composed of an isopropanol/butanol/ethanol mixture.

    PubMed

    Dusséaux, Simon; Croux, Christian; Soucaille, Philippe; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle

    2013-07-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum was metabolically engineered to produce a biofuel consisting of an isopropanol/butanol/ethanol mixture. For this purpose, different synthetic isopropanol operons were constructed and introduced on plasmids in a butyrate minus mutant strain (C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 Δcac15ΔuppΔbuk). The best strain expressing the isopropanol operon from the thl promoter was selected from batch experiments at pH 5. By further optimizing the pH of the culture, a biofuel mixture with almost no by-products was produced at a titer, a yield and productivity never reached before, opening the opportunities to develop an industrial process for alternative biofuels with Clostridial species. Furthermore, by performing in vivo and in vitro flux analysis of the synthetic isopropanol pathway, this flux was identified to be limited by the [acetate](int) and the high Km of CoA-transferase for acetate. Decreasing the Km of this enzyme using a protein engineering approach would be a good target for improving isopropanol production and avoiding acetate accumulation in the culture medium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Combination of RNA sequencing and metabolite data to elucidate improved toxic compound tolerance and butanol fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum from wheat straw hydrolysate by supplying sodium sulfide.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yanling; Fang, Yang; Huang, Mengjun; Sun, Jiaolong; Huang, Yuhong; Gao, Xiaofeng; Li, Renqiang; He, Kaize; Zhao, Hai

    2015-12-01

    Sodium sulfide (SS) was added to the non-detoxified wheat straw hydrolysate for ABE fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum CICC8012. Biochemical measurements demonstrated that supplementation with SS promoted earlier and enhanced conversion of acid to ABE and led to a 27.48% improvement in sugar consumption, a 20.48% improvement in the sugar-based ABE yield, a 47.63% improvement in the butanol titer, and a 53.50% improvement in the ABE concentration. The response of C. acetobutylicum CICC8012 at the mRNA level was examined by a transcriptional analysis performed with RNA sequencing. The expression of genes involved in the membrane transport of carbohydrates, glycolysis, and ABE formation increased following SS-supplemented fermentation, whereas the expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in acid formation decreased, which indicates that supplemental SS affected the central fermentative pathway, down-regulated the metabolic flux toward the acid formation branches, and up-regulated the metabolic flux toward the ABE formation branches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. High-efficient n-butanol production by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae integrated with butyrate fermentative supernatant addition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongzhen; Zeng, Qingwei; Han, Shuo; Wang, Zhaoyu; Dong, Qing; Bi, Yanhong; Zhao, Yuping

    2017-04-01

    Butanol is not only an important chemical intermediate and solvent in pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries, but also considered as an advanced biofuel. Although species of the natural host Clostridium have been engineered, butanol titers in the anaerobe seem to be limited by its intolerance to butanol less than 13 g/L. Here we aimed to develop a technology for enhancing butanol production by a co-culture system with butyrate fermentative supernatant addition. First, when adding 4.0 g/L butyrate into the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation broth with single-shot at 24 h, the "acid crash" phenomenon occurred and the ABE fermentation performance deteriorated. Subsequently, we found that adding certain amino acids could effectively enhance butyrate re-assimilation, butanol tolerance and titer (from 11.1 to 14.8 g/L). Additionally, in order to decrease the raw material cost, butyrate fermentative supernatant produced by Clostridium tyrobutyricum was applied to butanol production in the Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-culture system, instead of adding synthetic butyrate. Final butanol and total ABE concentrations reached higher levels of 16.3 and 24.8 g/L with increments of 46.8 and 37.8%, respectively. These results show that the proposed fermentation strategy has great potential for efficiently butanol production with an economic approach.

  17. The mechanism of switching from an acidogenic to butanol-acetone fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. Technical progress report, July 1990--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, P.

    1992-12-31

    The overall objective of this project is to elucidate the detailed mechanism by which solvent-forming bacteria such as Clostridium acetobutylicum regulate the well-known shift in fermentation pathway between alcohol-acetone and organic acid production. It is desired to eventually isolate and describe: (1) the regulatory genes and protein elements that determine induction of synthesis of the solvent-pathway enzymes; and (2) how this regulation system interacts with the sporulatin induction and development program and with related pathways such as granulse and exopolysaccharide formation in clostridia. A working model forhow clostridial control systems work can be derived from recent research on stress systems in E. coli and sporulation in Bacillus subtilis.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium clariflavum DSM 19732

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Lynne A.; Davenport, Karen W.; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Han, James; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Amy; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Liolios, Konstantinos; Woyke, Tanja; Lynd, Lee R

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium clariflavum is a Cluster III Clostridium within the family Clostridiaceae isolated from thermophilic anaerobic sludge (Shiratori et al, 2009). This species is of interest because of its similarity to the model cellulolytic organism Clostridium thermocellum and for the ability of environmental isolates to break down cellulose and hemicellulose. Here we describe features of the 4,897,678 bp long genome and its annotation, consisting of 4,131 proteincoding and 98 RNA genes, for the type strain DSM 19732.

  19. Molecular Characterization and Transcriptional Analysis of adhE2, the Gene Encoding the NADH-Dependent Aldehyde/Alcohol Dehydrogenase Responsible for Butanol Production in Alcohologenic Cultures of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Lisa; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Girbal, Laurence; Yang, Xinghong; Croux, Christian; Soucaille, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    The adhE2 gene of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, coding for an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AADH), was characterized from molecular and biochemical points of view. The 2,577-bp adhE2 codes for a 94.4-kDa protein. adhE2 is expressed, as a monocistronic operon, in alcohologenic cultures and not in solventogenic cultures. Primer extension analysis identified two transcriptional start sites 160 and 215 bp upstream of the adhE2 start codon. The expression of adhE2 from a plasmid in the DG1 mutant of C. acetobutylicum, a mutant cured of the pSOL1 megaplasmid, restored butanol production and provided elevated activities of NADH-dependent butyraldehyde and butanol dehydrogenases. The recombinant AdhE2 protein expressed in E. coli as a Strep-tag fusion protein and purified to homogeneity also demonstrated NADH-dependent butyraldehyde and butanol dehydrogenase activities. This is the second AADH identified in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824, and to our knowledge this is the first example of a bacterium with two AADHs. It is noteworthy that the two corresponding genes, adhE and adhE2, are carried by the pSOL1 megaplasmid of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. PMID:11790753

  20. Direct fermentation of gelatinized cassava starch to acetone, butanol, and ethanol using Clostridium acetobutylicum mutant obtained by atmospheric and room temperature plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, Han-guang; Luo, Wei; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Xiao-bin

    2014-04-01

    The mutant strain designated as ART18, obtained from the wild-type strain Clostridium acetobutylicum PW12 treated by atmospheric and room temperature plasma, showed higher solvent tolerance and butanol production than that of the wild-type strain. The production of butanol was 11.3 ± 0.5 g/L, 31 % higher than that of the wild-type strain when it was used for acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation in P2 medium. Furthermore, the effects of cassava flour concentration, pH regulators, and vitamins on the ABE production were also investigated. The highest butanol production of 15.8 ± 0.8 g/L and butanol yield (0.31 g/g) were achieved after the above factors were optimized. When acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation by ART18 was carried out in a 15-L bioreactor, the butanol production, the productivity of butanol, and the total solvent were 16.3 ± 0.9, 0.19, and 0.28 g/L(/)h, respectively. These results indicate that ART18 is a promising industrial producer in ABE fermentation.

  1. Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation using Clostridium acetobutylicum XY16 and in situ recovery by PDMS/ceramic composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Chen, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Gong-Ping; Jiang, Min; Guo, Ting; Jin, Wan-Qin; Wei, Ping; Zhu, Da-Wei

    2012-09-01

    PDMS/ceramic composite membrane was directly integrated with acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation using Clostridium acetobutylicum XY16 at 37 °C and in situ removing ABE from fermentation broth. The membrane was integrated with batch fermentation, and approximately 46 % solvent was extracted. The solvent in permeates was 118 g/L, and solvent productivity was 0.303 g/(L/h), which was approximately 33 % higher compared with the batch fermentation without in situ recovery. The fed-batch fermentation with in situ recovery by pervaporation continued for more than 200 h, 61 % solvent was extracted, and the solvent in penetration was 96.2 g/L. The total flux ranged from 0.338 to 0.847 kg/(m(2)/h) and the separation factor of butanol ranged from 5.1 to 27.1 in this process. The membrane was fouled by the active fermentation broth, nevertheless the separation performances were partially recovered by offline membrane cleaning, and the solvent productivity was increased to 0.252 g/(L/h), which was 19 % higher compared with that in situ recovery process without membrane cleaning.

  2. Stable high-titer n-butanol production from sucrose and sugarcane juice by Clostridium acetobutylicum JB200 in repeated batch fermentations.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenyan; Zhao, Jingbo; Wang, Zhongqiang; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2014-07-01

    The production of n-butanol, a widely used industrial chemical and promising transportation fuel, from abundant, low-cost substrates, such as sugarcane juice, in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was studied with Clostridium acetobutylicum JB200, a mutant with high butanol tolerance and capable of producing high-titer (>20 g/L) n-butanol from glucose. Although JB200 is a favorable host for industrial bio-butanol production, its fermentation performance with sucrose and sugarcane juice as substrates has not been well studied. In this study, the long-term n-butanol production from sucrose by JB200 was evaluated with cells immobilized in a fibrous-bed bioreactor (FBB), showing stable performance with high titer (16-20 g/L), yield (∼ 0.21 g/g sucrose) and productivity (∼ 0.32 g/Lh) for 16 consecutive batches over 800 h. Sugarcane thick juice as low-cost substrate was then tested in 3 consecutive batches, which gave similar n-butanol production, demonstrating that JB200 is a robust and promising strain for industrial ABE fermentation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fermentative hydrogen production in an up-flow anaerobic biofilm reactor inoculated with a co-culture of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Barca, Cristian; Ranava, David; Bauzan, Marielle; Ferrasse, Jean-Henry; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Soric, Audrey

    2016-12-01

    Dark fermentation systems often show low H2 yields and unstable H2 production, as the result of the variability of microbial dynamics and metabolic pathways. Recent batch investigations have demonstrated that an artificial consortium of two anaerobic bacteria, Clostridium acetobutylicum and Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, may redirect metabolic fluxes and improve H2 yields. This study aimed at evaluating the scale-up from batch to continuous H2 production in an up-flow anaerobic packed-bed reactor (APBR) continuously fed with a glucose-medium. The effects of various parameters, including void hydraulic retention time (HRTv), pH, and alkalinity, on H2 production performances and metabolic pathways were investigated. The results demonstrated that a stable H2 production was reached after 3-4days of operation. H2 production rates increased significantly with decreasing HRTv from 4 to 2h. Instead, H2 yields remained almost stable despite the change in HRTv, indicating that the decrease in HRTv did not affect the global metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Purine-Utilizing Bacterium Clostridium acidurici 9a: A Genome-Guided Metabolic Reconsideration

    PubMed Central

    Hartwich, Katrin; Poehlein, Anja; Daniel, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium acidurici is an anaerobic, homoacetogenic bacterium, which is able to use purines such as uric acid as sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. Together with the two other known purinolytic clostridia C. cylindrosporum and C. purinilyticum, C. acidurici serves as a model organism for investigation of purine fermentation. Here, we present the first complete sequence and analysis of a genome derived from a purinolytic Clostridium. The genome of C. acidurici 9a consists of one chromosome (3,105,335 bp) and one small circular plasmid (2,913 bp). The lack of candidate genes encoding glycine reductase indicates that C. acidurici 9a uses the energetically less favorable glycine-serine-pyruvate pathway for glycine degradation. In accordance with the specialized lifestyle and the corresponding narrow substrate spectrum of C. acidurici 9a, the number of genes involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism is significantly lower than in other clostridia such as C. acetobutylicum, C. saccharolyticum, and C. beijerinckii. The only amino acid that can be degraded by C. acidurici is glycine but growth on glycine only occurs in the presence of a fermentable purine. Nevertheless, the addition of glycine resulted in increased transcription levels of genes encoding enzymes involved in the glycine-serine-pyruvate pathway such as serine hydroxymethyltransferase and acetate kinase, whereas the transcription levels of formate dehydrogenase-encoding genes decreased. Sugars could not be utilized by C. acidurici but the full genetic repertoire for glycolysis was detected. In addition, genes encoding enzymes that mediate resistance against several antimicrobials and metals were identified. High resistance of C. acidurici towards bacitracin, acriflavine and azaleucine was experimentally confirmed. PMID:23240052

  5. Genome of a chronic osteitis-causing Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P-E; Levy, P-Y; Million, M; Croce, O; Blanc-Tailleur, C; Brouqui, P; Raoult, D

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced the genome of a Clostridium tetani strain that caused chronic tibial osteitis without any clinical sign of tetanus in a 26-year-old man previously vaccinated against this disease. The genome contained a plasmid that harboured the tetX-tetR tetanospasmin operon, and was highly similar to that of a tetanus-causing strain.

  6. Genome of a chronic osteitis-causing Clostridium tetani

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, P-E; Levy, P-Y; Million, M; Croce, O; Blanc-Tailleur, C; Brouqui, P; Raoult, D

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced the genome of a Clostridium tetani strain that caused chronic tibial osteitis without any clinical sign of tetanus in a 26-year-old man previously vaccinated against this disease. The genome contained a plasmid that harboured the tetX-tetR tetanospasmin operon, and was highly similar to that of a tetanus-causing strain. PMID:25356334

  7. σK of Clostridium acetobutylicum is the first known sporulation-specific sigma factor with two developmentally separated roles, one early and one late in sporulation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A; Jones, Shawn W; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2014-01-01

    Sporulation in the model endospore-forming organism Bacillus subtilis proceeds via the sequential and stage-specific activation of the sporulation-specific sigma factors, σ(H) (early), σ(F), σ(E), σ(G), and σ(K) (late). Here we show that the Clostridium acetobutylicum σ(K) acts both early, prior to Spo0A expression, and late, past σ(G) activation, thus departing from the B. subtilis model. The C. acetobutylicum sigK deletion (ΔsigK) mutant was unable to sporulate, and solventogenesis, the characteristic stationary-phase phenomenon for this organism, was severely diminished. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the ΔsigK mutant does not develop an asymmetric septum and produces no granulose. Complementation of sigK restored sporulation and solventogenesis to wild-type levels. Spo0A and σ(G) proteins were not detectable by Western analysis, while σ(F) protein levels were significantly reduced in the ΔsigK mutant. spo0A, sigF, sigE, sigG, spoIIE, and adhE1 transcript levels were all downregulated in the ΔsigK mutant, while those of the sigH transcript were unaffected during the exponential and transitional phases of culture. These data show that σ(K) is necessary for sporulation prior to spo0A expression. Plasmid-based expression of spo0A in the ΔsigK mutant from a nonnative promoter restored solventogenesis and the production of Spo0A, σ(F), σ(E), and σ(G), but not sporulation, which was blocked past the σ(G) stage of development, thus demonstrating that σ(K) is also necessary in late sporulation. sigK is expressed very early at low levels in exponential phase but is strongly upregulated during the middle to late stationary phase. This is the first sporulation-specific sigma factor shown to have two developmentally separated roles.

  8. σK of Clostridium acetobutylicum Is the First Known Sporulation-Specific Sigma Factor with Two Developmentally Separated Roles, One Early and One Late in Sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A.; Jones, Shawn W.

    2014-01-01

    Sporulation in the model endospore-forming organism Bacillus subtilis proceeds via the sequential and stage-specific activation of the sporulation-specific sigma factors, σH (early), σF, σE, σG, and σK (late). Here we show that the Clostridium acetobutylicum σK acts both early, prior to Spo0A expression, and late, past σG activation, thus departing from the B. subtilis model. The C. acetobutylicum sigK deletion (ΔsigK) mutant was unable to sporulate, and solventogenesis, the characteristic stationary-phase phenomenon for this organism, was severely diminished. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the ΔsigK mutant does not develop an asymmetric septum and produces no granulose. Complementation of sigK restored sporulation and solventogenesis to wild-type levels. Spo0A and σG proteins were not detectable by Western analysis, while σF protein levels were significantly reduced in the ΔsigK mutant. spo0A, sigF, sigE, sigG, spoIIE, and adhE1 transcript levels were all downregulated in the ΔsigK mutant, while those of the sigH transcript were unaffected during the exponential and transitional phases of culture. These data show that σK is necessary for sporulation prior to spo0A expression. Plasmid-based expression of spo0A in the ΔsigK mutant from a nonnative promoter restored solventogenesis and the production of Spo0A, σF, σE, and σG, but not sporulation, which was blocked past the σG stage of development, thus demonstrating that σK is also necessary in late sporulation. sigK is expressed very early at low levels in exponential phase but is strongly upregulated during the middle to late stationary phase. This is the first sporulation-specific sigma factor shown to have two developmentally separated roles. PMID:24187083

  9. Lytic Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage 39-O Genomic

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Screening for bacteriophages lytic for Clostridium perfringens was completed utilizing filtered samples obtained from poultry (intestinal material), soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water. Following limit dilution cloning and three rounds of plaque purification lytic phage preparations ...

  10. Biology and genomic analysis of Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Peck, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    The ability to form botulinum neurotoxin is restricted to six phylogenetically and physiologically distinct bacteria (Clostridium botulinum Groups I-IV and some strains of C. baratii and C. butyricum). The botulinum neurotoxin is the most potent toxin known, with as little as 30-100 ng potentially fatal, and is responsible for botulism, a severe neuroparalytic disease that affects humans, animals, and birds. In order to minimize the hazards presented by the botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is necessary to extend understanding of the biology of these bacteria. Analyses of recently available genome sequences in conjunction with studies of bacterial physiology are beginning to reveal new and exciting information on the biology of these dangerous bacteria. At the whole organism level, substantial differences between the six botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia have been reported. For example, the genomes of proteolytic C. botulinum (C. botulinum Group I) and non-proteolytic C. botulinum (C. botulinum Group II) are highly diverged and show neither synteny nor homology. It has also emerged that the botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia are not overtly pathogenic (unlike C. difficile), but saprophytic bacteria that use the neurotoxin to kill a host and create a source of nutrients. One important feature that has contributed to the success of botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia is their ability to form highly resistant endospores. The spores, however, also present an opportunity to control these bacteria if escape from lag phase (and hence growth) can be prevented. This is dependent on extending understanding of the biology of these processes. Differences in the genetics and physiology of spore germination in proteolytic C. botulinum and non-proteolytic C. botulinum have been identified. The biological variability in lag phase and its stages has been described for individual spores, and it has been shown that various adverse treatments extend different

  11. The metabolic network of Clostridium acetobutylicum: Comparison of the approximate Bayesian computation via sequential Monte Carlo (ABC-SMC) and profile likelihood estimation (PLE) methods for determinability analysis.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Graeme J; King, John R

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum is an anaerobic endospore-forming species which produces acetone, butanol and ethanol via the acetone-butanol (AB) fermentation process, leading to biofuels including butanol. In previous work we looked to estimate the parameters in an ordinary differential equation model of the glucose metabolism network using data from pH-controlled continuous culture experiments. Here we combine two approaches, namely the approximate Bayesian computation via an existing sequential Monte Carlo (ABC-SMC) method (to compute credible intervals for the parameters), and the profile likelihood estimation (PLE) (to improve the calculation of confidence intervals for the same parameters), the parameters in both cases being derived from experimental data from forward shift experiments. We also apply the ABC-SMC method to investigate which of the models introduced previously (one non-sporulation and four sporulation models) have the greatest strength of evidence. We find that the joint approximate posterior distribution of the parameters determines the same parameters as previously, including all of the basal and increased enzyme production rates and enzyme reaction activity parameters, as well as the Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters for glucose ingestion, while other parameters are not as well-determined, particularly those connected with the internal metabolites acetyl-CoA, acetoacetyl-CoA and butyryl-CoA. We also find that the approximate posterior is strongly non-Gaussian, indicating that our previous assumption of elliptical contours of the distribution is not valid, which has the effect of reducing the numbers of pairs of parameters that are (linearly) correlated with each other. Calculations of confidence intervals using the PLE method back this up. Finally, we find that all five of our models are equally likely, given the data available at present. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Insights in metabolism and toxin production from the complete genome sequence of Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    2004-04-01

    The decryption of prokaryotic genome sequences progresses rapidly and provides the scientific community with an enormous amount of information. Clostridial genome sequencing projects have been finished only recently, starting with the genome of the solvent-producing Clostridium acetobutylicum in 2001. A lot of attention has been devoted to the genomes of pathogenic clostridia. In 2002, the genome sequence of C. perfringens, the causative agent of gas gangrene, has been released. Currently in the finishing stage and prior to publication are the genomes of the foodborne botulism-causing C. botulinum and of C. difficile, the causative agent of a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Our team sequenced the genome of neuropathogenic C. tetani, a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium predominantly found in the soil. In deep wound infections it occasionally causes spastic paralysis in humans and vertebrate animals, known as tetanus disease, by the secretion of potent neurotoxin, designated tetanus toxin. The toxin blocks the release of neurotransmitters from presynaptic membranes of interneurons of the spinal cord and the brainstem, thus preventing muscle relaxation. Fortunately, this disease is successfully controlled through immunization with tetanus toxoid, a formaldehyde-treated tetanus toxin, but nevertheless, an estimated 400,000 cases still occur each year, mainly of neonatal tetanus. The World Health Organization has stated that neonatal tetanus is the second leading cause of death from vaccine preventable diseases among children worldwide. This minireview focuses on an analysis of the genome sequence of C. tetani E88, a vaccine production strain, which is a toxigenic non-sporulating variant of strain Massachusetts. The genome consists of a 2,799,250 bp chromosome encoding 2618 open reading frames. The tetanus toxin is encoded on a 74,082 kb plasmid, containing 61 genes. Additional virulence-related factors as well as an

  13. Insights from the complete genome sequence of Clostridium tyrobutyricum provide a platform for biotechnological and industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Liu, Tingting; Zhu, Liying; Huang, He; Jiang, Ling

    2017-08-01

    Genetic research enables the evolution of novel biochemical reactions for the production of valuable chemicals from environmentally-friendly raw materials. However, the choice of appropriate microorganisms to support these reactions, which must have strong robustness and be capable of a significant product output, is a major difficulty. In the present study, the complete genome of the Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain CCTCC W428, a hydrogen- and butyric acid-producing bacterium with increased oxidative tolerance was analyzed. A total length of 3,011,209 bp of the C. tyrobutyricum genome with a GC content of 31.04% was assembled, and 3038 genes were discovered. Furthermore, a comparative clustering of proteins from C. tyrobutyricum CCTCC W428, C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824, and C. butyricum KNU-L09 was conducted. The results of genomic analysis indicate that butyric acid is produced by CCTCC W428 from butyryl-CoA through acetate reassimilation via CoA transferase, instead of the well-established phosphotransbutyrylase-butyrate kinase pathway. In addition, we identified ten proteins putatively involved in hydrogen production and 21 proteins associated with CRISPR systems, together with 358 ORFs related to ABC transporters and transcriptional regulators. Enzymes, such as oxidoreductases, HNH endonucleases, and catalase, were also found in this species. The genome sequence illustrates that C. tyrobutyricum has several desirable traits, and is expected to be suitable as a platform for the high-level production of bulk chemicals as well as bioenergy.

  14. Finished Whole-Genome Sequences of Clostridium butyricum Toxin Subtype E4 and Clostridium baratii Toxin Subtype F7 Strains.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Jessica L; Hill, Karen; Johnson, Shannon L; Bruce, David Carlton; Shirey, T Brian; Dykes, Janet K; Lúquez, Carolina

    2017-07-20

    Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium baratii species have been known to produce botulinum toxin types E and F, respectively, which can cause botulism, a rare but serious neuroparalytic disease. Here, we present finished genome sequences for two of these clinically relevant strains. Copyright © 2017 Halpin et al.

  15. ClosTron-mediated engineering of Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Kuehne, Sarah A; Heap, John T; Cooksley, Clare M; Cartman, Stephen T; Minton, Nigel P

    2011-01-01

    The genus Clostridium is a diverse assemblage of Gram positive, anaerobic, endospore-forming bacteria. Whilst certain species have achieved notoriety as important animal and human pathogens (e.g. Clostridium difficile, Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium tetani, and Clostridium perfringens), the vast majority of the genus are entirely benign, and are able to undertake all manner of useful biotransformations. Prominent amongst them are those species able to produce the biofuels, butanol and ethanol from biomass-derived residues, such as Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinkii, Clostridium thermocellum, and Clostridium phytofermentans. The prominence of the genus in disease and biotechnology has led to the need for more effective means of genetic modification. The historical absence of methods based on conventional strategies for "knock-in" and "knock-out" in Clostridium has led to the adoption of recombination-independent procedures, typified by ClosTron technology. The ClosTron uses a retargeted group II intron and a retro-transposition-activated marker to selectively insert DNA into defined sites within the genome, to bring about gene inactivation and/or cargo DNA delivery. The procedure is extremely efficient, rapid, and requires minimal effort by the operator.

  16. High-titer n-butanol production by clostridium acetobutylicum JB200 in fed-batch fermentation with intermittent gas stripping.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chuang; Zhao, Jingbo; Lu, Congcong; Yang, Shang-Tian; Bai, Fengwu; Tang, I-Ching

    2012-11-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation with a hyper-butanol producing Clostridium acetobutylicum JB200 was studied for its potential to produce a high titer of butanol that can be readily recovered with gas stripping. In batch fermentation without gas stripping, a final butanol concentration of 19.1 g/L was produced from 86.4 g/L glucose consumed in 78 h, and butanol productivity and yield were 0.24 g/L h and 0.21 g/g, respectively. In contrast, when gas stripping was applied intermittently in fed-batch fermentation, 172 g/L ABE (113.3 g/L butanol, 49.2 g/L acetone, 9.7 g/L ethanol) were produced from 474.9 g/L glucose in six feeding cycles over 326 h. The overall productivity and yield were 0.53 g/L h and 0.36 g/g for ABE and 0.35 g/L h and 0.24 g/g for butanol, respectively. The higher productivity was attributed to the reduced butanol concentration in the fermentation broth by gas stripping that alleviated butanol inhibition, whereas the increased butanol yield could be attributed to the reduced acids accumulation as most acids produced in acidogenesis were reassimilated by cells for ABE production. The intermittent gas stripping produced a highly concentrated condensate containing 195.9 g/L ABE or 150.5 g/L butanol that far exceeded butanol solubility in water. After liquid-liquid demixing or phase separation, a final product containing ~610 g/L butanol, ~40 g/L acetone, ~10 g/L ethanol, and no acids was obtained. Compared to conventional ABE fermentation, the fed-batch fermentation with intermittent gas stripping has the potential to reduce at least 90% of energy consumption and water usage in n-butanol production from glucose. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Inactivation of σF in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 Blocks Sporulation Prior to Asymmetric Division and Abolishes σE and σG Protein Expression but Does Not Block Solvent Formation ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Shawn W.; Tracy, Bryan P.; Gaida, Stefan M.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is both a model organism for the understanding of sporulation in solventogenic clostridia and its relationship to solvent formation and an industrial organism for anaerobic acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. How solvent production is coupled to endospore formation—both stationary-phase events—remains incompletely understood at the molecular level. Specifically, it is unclear how sporulation-specific sigma factors affect solvent formation. Here the sigF gene in C. acetobutylicum was successfully disrupted and silenced. Not only σF but also the sigma factors σE and σG were not detected in the sigF mutant (FKO1), and differentiation was stopped prior to asymmetric division. Since plasmid expression of the spoIIA operon (spoIIAA-spoIIAB-sigF) failed to complement FKO1, the operon was integrated into the FKO1 chromosome to generate strain FKO1-C. In FKO1-C, σF expression was restored along with sporulation and σE and σG protein expression. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis of a select set of genes (csfB, gpr, spoIIP, sigG, lonB, and spoIIR) that could be controlled by σF, based on the Bacillus subtilis model, indicated that sigG may be under the control of σF, but spoIIR, an important activator of σE in B. subtilis, is not, and neither are the rest of the genes investigated. FKO1 produced solvents at a level similar to that of the parent strain, but solvent levels were dependent on the physiological state of the inoculum. Finally, the complementation strain FKO1-C is the first reported instance of purposeful integration of multiple functional genes into a clostridial chromosome—here, the C. acetobutylicum chromosome—with the aim of altering cell metabolism and differentiation. PMID:21421765

  18. A quantitative metabolomics study of high sodium response in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinhe; Condruz, Stefan; Chen, Jingkui; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Hemicellulose hydrolysates, sugar-rich feedstocks used in biobutanol refinery, are normally obtained by adding sodium hydroxide in the hydrolyze process. However, the resulting high sodium concentration in the hydrolysate inhibits ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation, and thus limits the use of these low-cost feedstocks. We have thus studied the effect of high sodium on the metabolic behavior of Clostridium acetobutyricum ATCC 824, with xylose as the carbon source. At a threshold sodium concentration of 200 mM, a decrease of the maximum cell dry weight (−19.50 ± 0.85%) and of ABE yield (−35.14 ± 3.50% acetone, −33.37 ± 0.74% butanol, −22.95 ± 1.81% ethanol) were observed compared to control culture. However, solvents specific productivities were not affected by supplementing sodium. The main effects of high sodium on cell metabolism were observed in acidogenesis, during which we observed the accumulation of ATP and NADH, and the inhibition of the pentose phosphate (PPP) and the glycolytic pathways with up to 80.73 ± 1.47% and 68.84 ± 3.42% decrease of the associated metabolic intermediates, respectively. However, the NADP+-to-NADPH ratio was constant for the whole culture duration, a phenomenon explaining the robustness of solvents specific productivities. Therefore, high sodium, which inhibited biomass growth through coordinated metabolic effects, interestingly triggered cell robustness on solvents specific productivity. PMID:27321153

  19. Genomics of Clostridium botulinum group III strains.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Oguma, Keiji

    2015-05-01

    In Clostridium botulinum, the characteristics of type C and D strains are quite different from other types, and they are classified as group III. They produce C2 binary toxin and C3 exoenzyme in addition to type C and D neurotoxins. Two different phages and many plasmids are identified in the organisms. The genes of neurotoxin and C3 exoenzyme are converted from toxigenic strains to non-toxigenic strains by the specific bacteriophages (phages), whereas, the C2 toxin gene is carried by large or small plasmids. Classification of type C and D strains has been in confusion because 1) antigenicity of type C and D neurotoxins is complex, 2) the cells produce two types of toxins, neurotoxin and C2 toxin, and 3) some non-toxigenic strains can be converted to produce C or D neurotoxin by the infection with phages. Until now, entire nucleotide sequences of cell chromosomes, phages, and plasmids have been determined. Since both genetic and protein-chemical analyses have been clarifying the above confusions, these data are reviewed historically.

  20. Genome Sequence of Clostridium tunisiense TJ, Isolated from Drain Sediment from a Pesticide Factory

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lili; Wang, Yu; Yu, Chunyan; Zhao, Yongqin

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium tunisiense is a Gram-positive, obligate anaerobe that was first isolated in an anaerobic evironment under eutrophication. Here we report the first genome sequence of the Clostridium tunisiense TJ isolated from drain sediment of a pesticide factory in Tianjin, China. The genome is of great importance for both basic and application research. PMID:23209212

  1. Genome sequence of Clostridium tunisiense TJ, isolated from drain sediment from a pesticide factory.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lili; Wang, Yu; Yu, Chunyan; Zhao, Yongqin; Gan, Yinbo

    2012-12-01

    Clostridium tunisiense is a Gram-positive, obligate anaerobe that was first isolated in an anaerobic environment under eutrophication. Here we report the first genome sequence of the Clostridium tunisiense TJ isolated from drain sediment of a pesticide factory in Tianjin, China. The genome is of great importance for both basic and application research.

  2. Genomic characterization of Italian Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Francesco; Fillo, Silvia; Anselmo, Anna; Palozzi, Anna Maria; Fortunato, Antonella; Gentile, Bernardina; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Ciammaruconi, Andrea; Spagnolo, Ferdinando; Pittiglio, Valentina; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; De Medici, Dario; Lista, Florigio

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a gram-positive bacterium capable of producing the botulinum neurotoxin, a powerful poison that causes botulism, a severe neuroparalytic disease. Its genome has been sequenced entirely and its gene content has been analyzed. To date, 19 full genomes and 64 draft genomes are available. The geographical origin of these genomes is predominantly from the US. In the present study, 10 Italian genomes of C. botulinum group I were analyzed and compared with previously sequenced group I genomes, in order to genetically characterize the Italian population of C. botulinum group I and to investigate the phylogenetic relationships among different lineages. Using the suites of software ClonalFrame and ClonalOrigin to perform genomic analysis, we demonstrated that Italian C. botulinum group I population is phylogenetically heterogeneous encompassing different and distant lineages including overseas strains, too. Moreover, a high recombination rate was demonstrated in the evolution of C. botulinum group I species. Finally, genome sequencing of the strain 357 led us to identify a novel botulinum neurotoxin subtype, F8.

  3. Comparative genomics of four closely related Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages reveals variable rates of evolution within a core genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Biotechnological uses of bacteriophage gene products as alternatives to conventional antibiotics will require a thorough understanding of their genomic context. We sequenced and analyzed the genomes of four closely related phages isolated from Clostridium perfringens, an important agricu...

  4. Comparative genomics of Clostridium bolteae and Clostridium clostridioforme reveals species-specific genomic properties and numerous putative antibiotic resistance determinants.

    PubMed

    Dehoux, Pierre; Marvaud, Jean Christophe; Abouelleil, Amr; Earl, Ashlee M; Lambert, Thierry; Dauga, Catherine

    2016-10-21

    Clostridium bolteae and Clostridium clostridioforme, previously included in the complex C. clostridioforme in the group Clostridium XIVa, remain difficult to distinguish by phenotypic methods. These bacteria, prevailing in the human intestinal microbiota, are opportunistic pathogens with various drug susceptibility patterns. In order to better characterize the two species and to obtain information on their antibiotic resistance genes, we analyzed the genomes of six strains of C. bolteae and six strains of C. clostridioforme, isolated from human infection. The genome length of C. bolteae varied from 6159 to 6398 kb, and 5719 to 6059 CDSs were detected. The genomes of C. clostridioforme were smaller, between 5467 and 5927 kb, and contained 5231 to 5916 CDSs. The two species display different metabolic pathways. The genomes of C. bolteae contained lactose operons involving PTS system and complex regulation, which contribute to phenotypic differentiation from C. clostridioforme. The Acetyl-CoA pathway, similar to that of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a major butyrate producer in the human gut, was only found in C. clostridioforme. The two species have also developed diverse flagella mobility systems contributing to gut colonization. Their genomes harboured many CDSs involved in resistance to beta-lactams, glycopeptides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, lincosamides, rifampin, linezolid, bacitracin, aminoglycosides and tetracyclines. Overall antimicrobial resistance genes were similar within a species, but strain-specific resistance genes were found. We discovered a new group of genes coding for rifampin resistance in C. bolteae. C. bolteae 90B3 was resistant to phenicols and linezolide in producing a 23S rRNA methyltransferase. C. clostridioforme 90A8 contained the VanB-type Tn1549 operon conferring vancomycin resistance. We also detected numerous genes encoding proteins related to efflux pump systems. Genomic comparison of C. bolteae and C. clostridiofrome revealed

  5. Physical Characterization of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    Clostridium sporogenes 52 2.3 An Expression System for Clostridium acetobutylicum 58 2.4 Attempted Expression of BoNT/A Hc-encoding Fragments 74 2.5 Status... Clostridium / E. coli shuttle vector pMTL500ET 56 15. The C. acetobutylicum expression vector pMTL500F 59 16. Inducible expression of a cat gene using...expression system, developed in this laboratory independently of this contract, for Clostridium acetobutylicum . Although the promoter in question (fac) is

  6. Physical Characterization of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-17

    Attention was switched to employing Clostridium acetobutylicum NCIB 8052 as the recombinant host and efforts focused on obtaining regulated...Transfer in Clostridium sporogenes 41 2.3 An Expression System for Clostridium acetobutylicum 47 CONCLUSIONS 57- 58 REFERENCES 59-64 CONTENTS Page Number...A[lac-pro] supE thi hsdDS/ F’- traD36 proA+ Br lacP lacZAM15) and 168 trpC, respectively. The Clostridium acetobutylicum strain employed was NCIB

  7. Genome Sequence of Clostridium paraputrificum 373-A1 Isolated in Chile from a Patient Infected with Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Araya, Enzo; Plaza-Garrido, Angela; Díaz-Yañez, Fernando; Pizaro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Valenzuela, Sandro L; Meneses, Claudio; Gil, Fernando; Castro-Nallar, Eduardo; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2016-11-03

    Clostridium paraputrificum is a gut microbiota member reported in several cases of bacteremia and coinfections. So far, only one genome sequence of a C. paraputrificum (AGR2156) isolate is available. Here, we present the draft genome of C. paraputrificum strain 373-A1, isolated from stools from a patient with C. difficile infection.

  8. Genome Sequence of Clostridium paraputrificum 373-A1 Isolated in Chile from a Patient Infected with Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Araya, Enzo; Plaza-Garrido, Angela; Díaz-Yañez, Fernando; Pizaro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Valenzuela, Sandro L.; Meneses, Claudio; Gil, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium paraputrificum is a gut microbiota member reported in several cases of bacteremia and coinfections. So far, only one genome sequence of a C. paraputrificum (AGR2156) isolate is available. Here, we present the draft genome of C. paraputrificum strain 373-A1, isolated from stools from a patient with C. difficile infection. PMID:27811092

  9. Improvement of the butanol production selectivity and butanol to acetone ratio (B:A) by addition of electron carriers in the batch culture of a new local isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1.

    PubMed

    Nasser Al-Shorgani, Najeeb Kaid; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar; Shukor, Hafiza; Hamid, Aidil Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Improvement in the butanol production selectivity or enhanced butanol:acetone ratio (B:A) is desirable in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium strains. In this study, artificial electron carriers were added to the fermentation medium of a new isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1 in order to improve the butanol yield and B:A ratio. The results revealed that medium supplementation with electron carriers changed the metabolism flux of electron and carbon in ABE fermentation by YM1. A decrease in acetone production, which subsequently improved the B:A ratio, was observed. Further improvement in the butanol production and B:A ratios were obtained when the fermentation medium was supplemented with butyric acid. The maximum butanol production (18.20 ± 1.38 g/L) was gained when a combination of methyl red and butyric acid was added. Although the addition of benzyl viologen (0.1 mM) and butyric acid resulted in high a B:A ratio of 16:1 (800% increment compared with the conventional 2:1 ratio), the addition of benzyl viologen to the culture after 4 h resulted in the production of 18.05 g/L butanol. Manipulating the metabolic flux to butanol through the addition of electron carriers could become an alternative strategy to achieve higher butanol productivity and improve the B:A ratio.

  10. The complete genome sequence of Clostridium indolis DSM 755T

    PubMed Central

    Leschine, Susan; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Schaumberg, Andrew; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Lobos, Elizabeth; Goodwin, Lynne; Nordberg, Henrik P.; Cantor, Michael N.; Hua, Susan X.; Woyke, Tanja; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium indolis DSM 755T is a bacterium commonly found in soils and the feces of birds and mammals. Despite its prevalence, little is known about the ecology or physiology of this species. However, close relatives, C. saccharolyticum and C. hathewayi, have demonstrated interesting metabolic potentials related to plant degradation and human health. The genome of C. indolis DSM 755T reveals an abundance of genes in functional groups associated with the transport and utilization of carbohydrates, as well as citrate, lactate, and aromatics. Ecologically relevant gene clusters related to nitrogen fixation and a unique type of bacterial microcompartment, the CoAT BMC, are also detected. Our genome analysis suggests hypotheses to be tested in future culture based work to better understand the physiology of this poorly described species. PMID:25197485

  11. The complete genome sequence of Clostridium indolis DSM 755(T.).

    PubMed

    Biddle, Amy S; Leschine, Susan; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Schaumberg, Andrew; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Lobos, Elizabeth; Goodwin, Lynne; Nordberg, Henrik P; Cantor, Michael N; Hua, Susan X; Woyke, Tanja; Blanchard, Jeffrey L

    2014-06-15

    Clostridium indolis DSM 755(T) is a bacterium commonly found in soils and the feces of birds and mammals. Despite its prevalence, little is known about the ecology or physiology of this species. However, close relatives, C. saccharolyticum and C. hathewayi, have demonstrated interesting metabolic potentials related to plant degradation and human health. The genome of C. indolis DSM 755(T) reveals an abundance of genes in functional groups associated with the transport and utilization of carbohydrates, as well as citrate, lactate, and aromatics. Ecologically relevant gene clusters related to nitrogen fixation and a unique type of bacterial microcompartment, the CoAT BMC, are also detected. Our genome analysis suggests hypotheses to be tested in future culture based work to better understand the physiology of this poorly described species.

  12. Microevolutionary analysis of Clostridium difficile genomes to investigate transmission

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The control of Clostridium difficile infection is a major international healthcare priority, hindered by a limited understanding of transmission epidemiology for these bacteria. However, transmission studies of bacterial pathogens are rapidly being transformed by the advent of next generation sequencing. Results Here we sequence whole C. difficile genomes from 486 cases arising over four years in Oxfordshire. We show that we can estimate the times back to common ancestors of bacterial lineages with sufficient resolution to distinguish whether direct transmission is plausible or not. Time depths were inferred using a within-host evolutionary rate that we estimated at 1.4 mutations per genome per year based on serially isolated genomes. The subset of plausible transmissions was found to be highly associated with pairs of patients sharing time and space in hospital. Conversely, the large majority of pairs of genomes matched by conventional typing and isolated from patients within a month of each other were too distantly related to be direct transmissions. Conclusions Our results confirm that nosocomial transmission between symptomatic C. difficile cases contributes far less to current rates of infection than has been widely assumed, which clarifies the importance of future research into other transmission routes, such as from asymptomatic carriers. With the costs of DNA sequencing rapidly falling and its use becoming more and more widespread, genomics will revolutionize our understanding of the transmission of bacterial pathogens. PMID:23259504

  13. Engineering Clostridium Strain to Accept Unmethylated DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Dai, Zongjie; Li, Yin

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to genetically manipulate the medically and biotechnologically important genus Clostridium due to the existence of the restriction and modification (RM) systems. We identified and engineered the RM system of a model clostridial species, C. acetobutylicum, with the aim to allow the host to accept the unmethylated DNA efficiently. A gene CAC1502 putatively encoding the type II restriction endonuclease Cac824I was identified from the genome of C. acetobutylicum DSM1731, and disrupted using the ClosTron system based on group II intron insertion. The resulting strain SMB009 lost the type II restriction endonuclease activity, and can be transformed with unmethylated DNA as efficiently as with methylated DNA. The strategy reported here makes it easy to genetically modify the clostridial species using unmethylated DNA, which will help to advance the understanding of the clostridial physiology from the molecular level. PMID:20161730

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium sporogenes Strain UC9000 Isolated from Raw Milk

    PubMed Central

    La Torre, Angela; Zotta, Teresa; Orrù, Luigi; Lamontanara, Antonella; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium sporogenes is a causative agent of food spoilage and is often used as the nontoxigenic surrogate for Clostridium botulinum. Here, we described the draft genome sequence and annotation of C. sporogenes strain UC9000 isolated from raw milk. PMID:27081128

  15. Application of long sequence reads to improve genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7

    DOE PAGES

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Bayer, Edward A.; Borovok, Ilya; ...

    2016-09-29

    Here, we and others have shown the utility of long sequence reads to improve genome assembly quality. In this study, we generated PacBio DNA sequence data to improve the assemblies of draft genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7.

  16. Application of Long Sequence Reads To Improve Genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7.

    PubMed

    Utturkar, Sagar M; Bayer, Edward A; Borovok, Ilya; Lamed, Raphael; Hurt, Richard A; Land, Miriam L; Klingeman, Dawn M; Elias, Dwayne; Zhou, Jizhong; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Brown, Steven D

    2016-09-29

    We and others have shown the utility of long sequence reads to improve genome assembly quality. In this study, we generated PacBio DNA sequence data to improve the assemblies of draft genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7.

  17. Application of Long Sequence Reads To Improve Genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7

    PubMed Central

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Bayer, Edward A.; Borovok, Ilya; Lamed, Raphael; Hurt, Richard A.; Land, Miriam L.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    We and others have shown the utility of long sequence reads to improve genome assembly quality. In this study, we generated PacBio DNA sequence data to improve the assemblies of draft genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7. PMID:27688341

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium mangenotii TR, Isolated from the Fecal Material of a Timber Rattlesnake

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Philip A.; Dowd, Scot E.; Andersen, Kylie; Anderson, Nichole; Brennan, Rachel; Brook, Nicole; Callaway, Tracie; Diamante, Kimberly; Duberstine, Annie; Fitch, Karla; Freiheit, Heidi; Godlewski, Chantel; Gorman, Kelly; Haubrich, Mark; Hernandez, Mercedes; Hirtreiter, Amber; Ivanoski, Beth; Jaminet, Xochitl; Kirkpatrick, Travis; Kratowicz, Jennifer; Latus, Casey; Leable, Tiegen; Lingafelt, Nicole; Lowe, DeAnna; Lowrance, Holly; Malsack, Latiffa; Mazurkiewicz, Julie; Merlos, Persida; Messley, Jamie; Montemurro, Dawn; Nakitare, Samora; Nelson, Christine; Nye, Amber; Pazera, Valerie; Pierangeli, Gina; Rellora, Ashley; Reyes, Angelica; Roberts, Jennifer; Robins, Shadara; Robinson, Jeshannah; Schultz, Alissa; Seifert, Sara; Sigler, Elona; Spangler, Julie; Swift, Ebony; TenCate, Rebecca; Thurber, Jessica; Vallee, Kristin; Wamboldt, Jennifer; Whitten, Shannon; Woods, De’andrea; Wright, Amanda; Yankunas, Darin

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium mangenotii strain TR, which was isolated from the fecal material of a timber rattlesnake. This bacterium is nonpathogenic but contains 68 genes involved in virulence, disease, and defense. PMID:24407632

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium mangenotii TR, Isolated from the Fecal Material of a Timber Rattlesnake.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Richard W; Cochran, Philip A; Dowd, Scot E; Andersen, Kylie; Anderson, Nichole; Brennan, Rachel; Brook, Nicole; Callaway, Tracie; Diamante, Kimberly; Duberstine, Annie; Fitch, Karla; Freiheit, Heidi; Godlewski, Chantel; Gorman, Kelly; Haubrich, Mark; Hernandez, Mercedes; Hirtreiter, Amber; Ivanoski, Beth; Jaminet, Xochitl; Kirkpatrick, Travis; Kratowicz, Jennifer; Latus, Casey; Leable, Tiegen; Lingafelt, Nicole; Lowe, Deanna; Lowrance, Holly; Malsack, Latiffa; Mazurkiewicz, Julie; Merlos, Persida; Messley, Jamie; Montemurro, Dawn; Nakitare, Samora; Nelson, Christine; Nye, Amber; Pazera, Valerie; Pierangeli, Gina; Rellora, Ashley; Reyes, Angelica; Roberts, Jennifer; Robins, Shadara; Robinson, Jeshannah; Schultz, Alissa; Seifert, Sara; Sigler, Elona; Spangler, Julie; Swift, Ebony; Tencate, Rebecca; Thurber, Jessica; Vallee, Kristin; Wamboldt, Jennifer; Whitten, Shannon; Woods, De'andrea; Wright, Amanda; Yankunas, Darin

    2014-01-09

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium mangenotii strain TR, which was isolated from the fecal material of a timber rattlesnake. This bacterium is nonpathogenic but contains 68 genes involved in virulence, disease, and defense.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Thermophile Clostridium clariflavum Strain 4-2a.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Elise A; Rowe, Kenneth T; Guseva, Anna; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James K; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor M; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Liolios, Konstantinos; Nordberg, Henrik P; Cantor, Michael N; Hua, Susan X; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Lynd, Lee R; Izquierdo, Javier A

    2015-07-23

    Clostridium clariflavum strain 4-2a, a novel strain isolated from a thermophilic biocompost pile, has demonstrated an extensive capability to utilize both cellulose and hemicellulose under thermophilic anaerobic conditions. Here, we report the draft genome of this strain.

  1. The Complete Genome Sequence of Moorella thermoacetica (f. Clostridium thermoaceticum)

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Elizabeth; Xie, Gary; Barabote, Ravi D.; Saunders, Elizabeth; Han, Cliff S.; Detter, John C.; Richardson, Paul; Brettin, Thomas S.; Das, Amaresh; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    Summary This paper describes the genome sequence of M. thermoacetica (f. Clostridium thermoaceticum), which is the model acetogenic bacterium that has been widely used for elucidating the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of CO and CO2 fixation. This pathway, which is also known as the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway, allows acetogenic (often called homoacetogenic) bacteria to convert glucose stoichiometrically into three mol of acetate and to grow autotrophically using H2 and CO as electron donors and CO2 as an electron acceptor. Methanogenic archaea use this pathway in reverse to grow by converting acetate into methane and CO2. Acetogenic bacteria also couple the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway to a variety of other pathways to allow the metabolism of a wide variety of carbon sources and electron donors (sugars, carboxylic acids, alcohols, and aromatic compounds) and electron acceptors (CO2, nitrate, nitrite, thiosulfate, dimethylsulfoxide, and aromatic carboxyl groups). The genome consists of a single circular 2628784 bp chromosome encoding 2615 open reading frames, which includes 2523 predicted protein-encoding genes. Of these, 1834 genes (70.13%) have been assigned tentative functions, 665 (25.43%) matched genes of unknown function, and the remaining 24 (0.92%) had no database match. Two thousand three hundred eighty-four (91.17%) of the ORFs in the M. thermoacetica genome can be grouped in ortholog clusters. This first genome sequence of an acetogenic bacterium provides important information related to how acetogens engage their extreme metabolic diversity by switching among different carbon substrates and electron donors/acceptors and how they conserve energy by anaerobic respiration. Our genome analysis indicates that the key genetic trait for homoacetogenesis is the core acs gene cluster of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. PMID:18631365

  2. Butanol production employing fed-batch fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum GX01 using alkali-pretreated sugarcane bagasse hydrolysed by enzymes from Thermoascus aurantiacus QS 7-2-4.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zong-Wen; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Hui; Liang, Zheng-Wu; Liang, Jing-Juan; Du, Liang-Wei; Duan, Cheng-Jie; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2016-07-01

    Sugarcane bagasse (SB) is a potential feedstock for butanol production. However, biological production of butanol from SB is less economically viable. In this study, evaluation of eight pretreatments on SB showed that alkali pretreatment efficiently removed lignin from SB while retaining the intact native structure of the released microfibrils. In total, 99% of cellulose and 100% of hemicellulose in alkali-pretreated SB were hydrolysed by enzymes from Thermoascus aurantiacus. The hydrolysate was used to produce butanol in a fed-batch fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. At 60h, 14.17 and 21.11gL(-1) of butanol and acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) were produced from 68.89gL(-1) of total sugars, respectively, yielding 0.22 and 0.33gg(-1) of sugars. The maximum yield of butanol and ABE reached 15.4g and 22.9g per 100g raw SB, respectively. This established process may have potential application for butanol production from SB.

  3. Diversity and Evolution in the Genome of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Daniel R.; Elliott, Briony; Chang, Barbara J.; Perkins, Timothy T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of antimicrobial and health care-associated diarrhea in humans, presenting a significant burden to global health care systems. In the last 2 decades, PCR- and sequence-based techniques, particularly whole-genome sequencing (WGS), have significantly furthered our knowledge of the genetic diversity, evolution, epidemiology, and pathogenicity of this once enigmatic pathogen. C. difficile is taxonomically distinct from many other well-known clostridia, with a diverse population structure comprising hundreds of strain types spread across at least 6 phylogenetic clades. The C. difficile species is defined by a large diverse pangenome with extreme levels of evolutionary plasticity that has been shaped over long time periods by gene flux and recombination, often between divergent lineages. These evolutionary events are in response to environmental and anthropogenic activities and have led to the rapid emergence and worldwide dissemination of virulent clonal lineages. Moreover, genome analysis of large clinically relevant data sets has improved our understanding of CDI outbreaks, transmission, and recurrence. The epidemiology of CDI has changed dramatically over the last 15 years, and CDI may have a foodborne or zoonotic etiology. The WGS era promises to continue to redefine our view of this significant pathogen. PMID:26085550

  4. First report of two complete Clostridium chauvoei genome sequences and detailed in silico genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Prasad; Semmler, Torsten; Eichhorn, Inga; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Werckenthin, Christiane; Abdel-Glil, Mostafa Y; Wieler, Lothar H; Neubauer, Heinrich; Seyboldt, Christian

    2017-10-01

    Clostridium (C.) chauvoei is a Gram-positive, spore forming, anaerobic bacterium. It causes black leg in ruminants, a typically fatal histotoxic myonecrosis. High quality circular genome sequences were generated for the C. chauvoei type strain DSM 7528(T) (ATCC 10092(T)) and a field strain 12S0467 isolated in Germany. The origin of replication (oriC) was comparable to that of Bacillus subtilis in structure with two regions containing DnaA boxes. Similar prophages were identified in the genomes of both C. chauvoei strains which also harbored hemolysin and bacterial spore formation genes. A CRISPR type I-B system with limited variations in the repeat number was identified. Sporulation and germination process related genes were homologous to that of the Clostridia cluster I group but novel variations for regulatory genes were identified indicative for strain specific control of regulatory events. Phylogenomics showed a higher relatedness to C. septicum than to other so far sequenced genomes of species belonging to the genus Clostridium. Comparative genome analysis of three C. chauvoei circular genome sequences revealed the presence of few inversions and translocations in locally collinear blocks (LCBs). The species genome also shows a large number of genes involved in proteolysis, genes for glycosyl hydrolases and metal iron transportation genes which are presumably involved in virulence and survival in the host. Three conserved flagellar genes (fliC) were identified in each of the circular genomes. In conclusion this is the first comparative analysis of circular genomes for the species C. chauvoei, enabling insights into genome composition and virulence factor variation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Genomic analyses of Clostridium perfringens isolates from five toxinotypes.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Karl A; Elbourne, Liam D H; Tetu, Sasha G; Melville, Stephen B; Rood, Julian I; Paulsen, Ian T

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens can be isolated from a range of environments, including soil, marine and fresh water sediments, and the gastrointestinal tracts of animals and humans. Some C. perfringens strains have attractive industrial applications, e.g., in the degradation of waste products or the production of useful chemicals. However, C. perfringens has been most studied as the causative agent of a range of enteric and soft tissue infections of varying severities in humans and animals. Host preference and disease type in C. perfringens are intimately linked to the production of key extracellular toxins and on this basis toxigenic C. perfringens strains have been classified into five toxinotypes (A-E). To date, twelve genome sequences have been generated for a diverse collection of C. perfringens isolates, including strains associated with human and animal infections, a human commensal strain, and a strain with potential industrial utility. Most of the sequenced strains are classified as toxinotype A. However, genome sequences of representative strains from each of the other four toxinotypes have also been determined. Analysis of this collection of sequences has highlighted a lack of features differentiating toxinotype A strains from the other isolates, indicating that the primary defining characteristic of toxinotype A strains is their lack of key plasmid-encoded extracellular toxin genes associated with toxinotype B to E strains. The representative B-E strains sequenced to date each harbour many unique genes. Additional genome sequences are needed to determine if these genes are characteristic of their respective toxinotypes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. Clostridium botulinum in the post-genomic era.

    PubMed

    Peck, Michael W; Stringer, Sandra C; Carter, Andrew T

    2011-04-01

    Foodborne botulism is a severe neuroparalytic disease caused by consumption of botulinum neurotoxin formed by strains of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum and non-proteolytic C. botulinum during their growth in food. The botulinum neurotoxin is the most potent substance known, with as little as 30-100 ng potentially fatal, and consumption of just a few milligrams of neurotoxin-containing food is likely to be sufficient to cause illness and potentially death. In order to minimise the foodborne botulism hazard, it is necessary to extend understanding of the biology of these bacteria. This process has been recently advanced by genome sequencing and subsequent analysis. In addition to neurotoxin formation, endospore formation is also critical to the success of proteolytic C. botulinum and non-proteolytic C. botulinum as foodborne pathogens. The endospores are highly resistant, and enable survival of adverse treatments such as heating. To better control the botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is important to understand spore resistance mechanisms, and the physiological processes involved in germination and lag phase during recovery from this dormant state.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Virulent Clostridium chauvoei Reference Strain JF4335

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Copete, Sandra P.; Frey, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the etiological agent of blackleg, a disease of cattle and sheep with high mortality rates, causing severe economic losses in livestock production. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the virulent C. chauvoei strain JF4335 (2.8 Mbp and 28% G+C content) and the annotation of the genome. PMID:23950118

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Virulent Clostridium chauvoei Reference Strain JF4335.

    PubMed

    Falquet, Laurent; Calderon-Copete, Sandra P; Frey, Joachim

    2013-08-15

    Clostridium chauvoei is the etiological agent of blackleg, a disease of cattle and sheep with high mortality rates, causing severe economic losses in livestock production. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the virulent C. chauvoei strain JF4335 (2.8 Mbp and 28% G+C content) and the annotation of the genome.

  9. Exploring the Genome of a Butyric Acid Producer, Clostridium butyricum INCQS635

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Fernanda Gomes; Tschoeke, Diogo Antonio; Miranda, Milene; Pereira, Nei; Valle, Rogério; Thompson, Cristiane C.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Clostridium butyricum INCQS635 was obtained by means of ion sequencing. The genome provides further insight into the genetic repertoire involved with metabolic pathways related to the fermentation of different compounds and organic solvents synthesis (i.e., butyric acid) with biofuel applications. PMID:25414496

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium ultunense Strain Esp, a Syntrophic Acetate-Oxidizing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Shahid; Müller, Bettina; Niazi, Adnan; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Schnürer, Anna

    2013-03-28

    Clostridium ultunense strain Esp belongs to the functional group of syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria (SAOB), which have been identified as key organisms for efficient biogas production from protein-rich materials. Genome analysis and comparative genomics might aid us to define physiological features that are essential for maintaining this particular syntrophic lifestyle.

  11. Draft genome sequences of clostridium strains native to Colombia with the potential to produce solvents.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Morales, Juan Pablo; Perez-Mancilla, Ximena; López-Kleine, Liliana; Montoya Castaño, Dolly; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio

    2015-05-21

    Genomes from four Clostridium sp. strains considered to be mesophilic anaerobic bacteria, isolated from crop soil in Colombia, with a strong potential to produce alcohols like 1,3-propanediol, were analyzed. We present the draft genome of these strains, which will be useful for developing genetic engineering strategies.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Clostridium sp. strain BNL1100, a cellulolytic mesophile isolated from corn stover.

    PubMed

    Li, Luen-Luen; Taghavi, Safiyh; Izquierdo, Javier A; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    We present the full genome sequence of Clostridium sp. strain BNL1100, a Gram-positive, endospore-forming, lignocellulolytic bacterium isolated from a corn stover enrichment culture. The 4,613,747-bp genome of strain BNL1100 contains 4,025 putative protein-coding genes, of which 103 are glycoside hydrolases, the highest detected number in cluster III clostridia.

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Clostridium Strains Native to Colombia with the Potential To Produce Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Morales, Juan Pablo; Perez-Mancilla, Ximena; López-Kleine, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Genomes from four Clostridium sp. strains considered to be mesophilic anaerobic bacteria, isolated from crop soil in Colombia, with a strong potential to produce alcohols like 1,3-propanediol, were analyzed. We present the draft genome of these strains, which will be useful for developing genetic engineering strategies. PMID:25999575

  14. Genome Resequencing of the Virulent and Multidrug-Resistant Reference Strain Clostridium difficile 630

    PubMed Central

    Bunk, Boyke; Thürmer, Andrea; Spröer, Cathrin; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Abt, Birte; Gronow, Sabine; Liesegang, Heiko; Daniel, Rolf; Overmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    We resequenced the complete genome of the virulent and multidrug-resistant pathogen Clostridium difficile strain 630. A combination of single-molecule real-time and Illumina sequencing technology revealed the presence of an additional rRNA gene cluster, additional tRNAs, and the absence of a transposon in comparison to the published and reannotated genome sequence. PMID:25858846

  15. Harnessing heterologous and endogenous CRISPR-Cas machineries for efficient markerless genome editing in Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, Michael E.; Bruder, Mark R.; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A.; Chou, C. Perry

    2016-01-01

    Application of CRISPR-Cas9 systems has revolutionized genome editing across all domains of life. Here we report implementation of the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system in Clostridium pasteurianum for markerless genome editing. Since 74% of species harbor CRISPR-Cas loci in Clostridium, we also explored the prospect of co-opting host-encoded CRISPR-Cas machinery for genome editing. Motivation for this work was bolstered from the observation that plasmids expressing heterologous cas9 result in poor transformation of Clostridium. To address this barrier and establish proof-of-concept, we focus on characterization and exploitation of the C. pasteurianum Type I-B CRISPR-Cas system. In silico spacer analysis and in vivo interference assays revealed three protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences required for site-specific nucleolytic attack. Introduction of a synthetic CRISPR array and cpaAIR gene deletion template yielded an editing efficiency of 100%. In contrast, the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system generated only 25% of the total yield of edited cells, suggesting that native machinery provides a superior foundation for genome editing by precluding expression of cas9 in trans. To broaden our approach, we also identified putative PAM sequences in three key species of Clostridium. This is the first report of genome editing through harnessing native CRISPR-Cas machinery in Clostridium. PMID:27157668

  16. Harnessing heterologous and endogenous CRISPR-Cas machineries for efficient markerless genome editing in Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Michael E; Bruder, Mark R; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A; Chou, C Perry

    2016-05-09

    Application of CRISPR-Cas9 systems has revolutionized genome editing across all domains of life. Here we report implementation of the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system in Clostridium pasteurianum for markerless genome editing. Since 74% of species harbor CRISPR-Cas loci in Clostridium, we also explored the prospect of co-opting host-encoded CRISPR-Cas machinery for genome editing. Motivation for this work was bolstered from the observation that plasmids expressing heterologous cas9 result in poor transformation of Clostridium. To address this barrier and establish proof-of-concept, we focus on characterization and exploitation of the C. pasteurianum Type I-B CRISPR-Cas system. In silico spacer analysis and in vivo interference assays revealed three protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences required for site-specific nucleolytic attack. Introduction of a synthetic CRISPR array and cpaAIR gene deletion template yielded an editing efficiency of 100%. In contrast, the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system generated only 25% of the total yield of edited cells, suggesting that native machinery provides a superior foundation for genome editing by precluding expression of cas9 in trans. To broaden our approach, we also identified putative PAM sequences in three key species of Clostridium. This is the first report of genome editing through harnessing native CRISPR-Cas machinery in Clostridium.

  17. Comparison of the mesophilic cellulosome-producing Clostridium cellulovorans genome with other cellulosome-related clostridial genomes.

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Yutaka; Miyake, Hideo; Kuroda, Kouichi; Nakanishi, Akihito; Matsushima, Chiyuki; Doi, Roy H; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium cellulovorans, an anaerobic and mesophilic bacterium, degrades native substrates in soft biomass such as corn fibre and rice straw efficiently by producing an extracellular enzyme complex called the cellulosome. Recently, we have reported the whole-genome sequence of C. cellulovorans comprising 4220 predicted genes in 5.10 Mbp [Y. Tamaru et al., (2010) J. Bacteriol., 192: 901–902]. As a result, the genome size of C. cellulovorans was about 1 Mbp larger than that of other cellulosome-producing clostridia, mesophilic C. cellulolyticum and thermophilic C. thermocellum. A total of 57 cellulosomal genes were found in the C. cellulovorans genome, and they coded for not only carbohydrate-degrading enzymes but also a lipase, peptidases and proteinase inhibitors. Interestingly, two novel genes encoding scaffolding proteins were found in the genome. According to KEGG metabolic pathways and their comparison with 11 Clostridial genomes, gene expansion in the C. cellulovorans genome indicated mainly non-cellulosomal genes encoding hemicellulases and pectin-degrading enzymes. Thus, by examining genome sequences from multiple Clostridium species, comparative genomics offers new insight into genome evolution and the way natural selection moulds functional DNA sequence evolution. Our analysis, coupled with the genome sequence data, provides a roadmap for constructing enhanced cellulosome-producing Clostridium strains for industrial applications such as biofuel production.

  18. Comparison of the mesophilic cellulosome‐producing Clostridium cellulovorans genome with other cellulosome‐related clostridial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tamaru, Yutaka; Miyake, Hideo; Kuroda, Kouichi; Nakanishi, Akihito; Matsushima, Chiyuki; Doi, Roy H.; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Summary Clostridium cellulovorans, an anaerobic and mesophilic bacterium, degrades native substrates in soft biomass such as corn fibre and rice straw efficiently by producing an extracellular enzyme complex called the cellulosome. Recently, we have reported the whole‐genome sequence of C. cellulovorans comprising 4220 predicted genes in 5.10 Mbp [Y. Tamaru et al., (2010) J. Bacteriol., 192: 901–902]. As a result, the genome size of C. cellulovorans was about 1 Mbp larger than that of other cellulosome‐producing clostridia, mesophilic C. cellulolyticum and thermophilic C. thermocellum. A total of 57 cellulosomal genes were found in the C. cellulovorans genome, and they coded for not only carbohydrate‐degrading enzymes but also a lipase, peptidases and proteinase inhibitors. Interestingly, two novel genes encoding scaffolding proteins were found in the genome. According to KEGG metabolic pathways and their comparison with 11 Clostridial genomes, gene expansion in the C. cellulovorans genome indicated mainly non‐cellulosomal genes encoding hemicellulases and pectin‐degrading enzymes. Thus, by examining genome sequences from multiple Clostridium species, comparative genomics offers new insight into genome evolution and the way natural selection moulds functional DNA sequence evolution. Our analysis, coupled with the genome sequence data, provides a roadmap for constructing enhanced cellulosome‐producing Clostridium strains for industrial applications such as biofuel production. PMID:21255373

  19. The Clostridium Sporulation Programs: Diversity and Preservation of Endospore Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A.; Jones, Shawn W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacillus and Clostridium organisms initiate the sporulation process when unfavorable conditions are detected. The sporulation process is a carefully orchestrated cascade of events at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels involving a multitude of sigma factors, transcription factors, proteases, and phosphatases. Like Bacillus genomes, sequenced Clostridium genomes contain genes for all major sporulation-specific transcription and sigma factors (spo0A, sigH, sigF, sigE, sigG, and sigK) that orchestrate the sporulation program. However, recent studies have shown that there are substantial differences in the sporulation programs between the two genera as well as among different Clostridium species. First, in the absence of a Bacillus-like phosphorelay system, activation of Spo0A in Clostridium organisms is carried out by a number of orphan histidine kinases. Second, downstream of Spo0A, the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of the canonical set of four sporulation-specific sigma factors (σF, σE, σG, and σK) display different patterns, not only compared to Bacillus but also among Clostridium organisms. Finally, recent studies demonstrated that σK, the last sigma factor to be activated according to the Bacillus subtilis model, is involved in the very early stages of sporulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. perfringens, and C. botulinum as well as in the very late stages of spore maturation in C. acetobutylicum. Despite profound differences in initiation, propagation, and orchestration of expression of spore morphogenetic components, these findings demonstrate not only the robustness of the endospore sporulation program but also the plasticity of the program to generate different complex phenotypes, some apparently regulated at the epigenetic level. PMID:25631287

  20. The Clostridium sporulation programs: diversity and preservation of endospore differentiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A; Jones, Shawn W; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2015-03-01

    Bacillus and Clostridium organisms initiate the sporulation process when unfavorable conditions are detected. The sporulation process is a carefully orchestrated cascade of events at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels involving a multitude of sigma factors, transcription factors, proteases, and phosphatases. Like Bacillus genomes, sequenced Clostridium genomes contain genes for all major sporulation-specific transcription and sigma factors (spo0A, sigH, sigF, sigE, sigG, and sigK) that orchestrate the sporulation program. However, recent studies have shown that there are substantial differences in the sporulation programs between the two genera as well as among different Clostridium species. First, in the absence of a Bacillus-like phosphorelay system, activation of Spo0A in Clostridium organisms is carried out by a number of orphan histidine kinases. Second, downstream of Spo0A, the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of the canonical set of four sporulation-specific sigma factors (σ(F), σ(E), σ(G), and σ(K)) display different patterns, not only compared to Bacillus but also among Clostridium organisms. Finally, recent studies demonstrated that σ(K), the last sigma factor to be activated according to the Bacillus subtilis model, is involved in the very early stages of sporulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. perfringens, and C. botulinum as well as in the very late stages of spore maturation in C. acetobutylicum. Despite profound differences in initiation, propagation, and orchestration of expression of spore morphogenetic components, these findings demonstrate not only the robustness of the endospore sporulation program but also the plasticity of the program to generate different complex phenotypes, some apparently regulated at the epigenetic level. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Clostridium pasteurianum NRRL B-598, a non-type strain producing butanol.

    PubMed

    Sedlar, Karel; Kolek, Jan; Skutkova, Helena; Branska, Barbora; Provaznik, Ivo; Patakova, Petra

    2015-11-20

    The strain Clostridium pasteurianum NRRL B-598 is non-type, oxygen tolerant, spore-forming, mesophilic and heterofermentative strain with high hydrogen production and ability of acetone-butanol fermentation (ethanol production being negligible). Here, we present the annotated complete genome sequence of this bacterium, replacing the previous draft genome assembly. The genome consisting of a single circular 6,186,879 bp chromosome with no plasmid was determined using PacBio RSII and Roche 454 sequencing.

  2. Manual curation and reannotation of the genomes of Clostridium difficile 630Δerm and Clostridium difficile 630.

    PubMed

    Dannheim, Henning; Riedel, Thomas; Neumann-Schaal, Meina; Bunk, Boyke; Schober, Isabel; Spröer, Cathrin; Chibani, Cynthia Maria; Gronow, Sabine; Liesegang, Heiko; Overmann, Jörg; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2017-01-09

    We resequenced the genome of Clostridium difficile 630Δerm (DSM 28645), a model strain commonly used for the generation of insertion mutants. The genome sequence was obtained by a combination of single-molecule real-time (SMRT) and Illumina sequencing technology. Detailed manual curation and comparison to the previously published genomic sequence revealed sequence differences including inverted regions and the presence of plasmid pCD630. Manual curation of our previously deposited genome sequence of the parental strain 630 (DSM 27543) led to an improved genome sequence. In addition, the sequence of the transposon Tn5397 was completely identified. We manually revised the current manual annotation of the initial sequence of strain 630 and modified either gene names, gene product names or assigned EC numbers of 57 % of genes. The number of hypothetical and conserved hypothetical proteins was reduced by 152. This annotation was used as a template to annotate the most recent genome sequences of the strains 630Δerm and 630. Based on the genomic analysis, several new metabolic features of C. difficile are proposed and could be supported by literature and subsequent experiments.

  3. Genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I and Group II.

    PubMed

    Carter, Andrew T; Peck, Michael W

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in whole genome sequencing have made a substantial contribution to understanding the genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I (proteolytic C. botulinum) and C. botulinum Group II (non-proteolytic C. botulinum). Two different approaches are used to study genomics in these bacteria; comparative whole genome microarrays and direct comparison of complete genome DNA sequences. The properties of the different types of neurotoxin formed, and different neurotoxin gene clusters found in C. botulinum Groups I and II are explored. Specific examples of botulinum neurotoxin genes are chosen for an in-depth discussion of neurotoxin gene evolution. The most recent cases of foodborne botulism are summarised.

  4. Genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I and Group II

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T.; Peck, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in whole genome sequencing have made a substantial contribution to understanding the genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I (proteolytic C. botulinum) and C. botulinum Group II (non-proteolytic C. botulinum). Two different approaches are used to study genomics in these bacteria; comparative whole genome microarrays and direct comparison of complete genome DNA sequences. The properties of the different types of neurotoxin formed, and different neurotoxin gene clusters found in C. botulinum Groups I and II are explored. Specific examples of botulinum neurotoxin genes are chosen for an in-depth discussion of neurotoxin gene evolution. The most recent cases of foodborne botulism are summarised. PMID:25445012

  5. Genome Sequence of a Toxin-Positive Clostridium difficile Strain Isolated from Murine Feces

    PubMed Central

    Chassaing, Benoit; Adekunle, Oluwaseyi; Mattei, Lisa M.; Edwards, Adrianne N.; McBride, Shonna M.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Gewirtz, Andrew T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herein, we report the genome sequence of a Clostridium difficile strain isolated from the feces of antibiotic-treated C57BL/6 mice. We have named this strain, which differs considerably from those of the previously sequenced C. difficile strains, LEM1. PMID:28385835

  6. Near complete genome sequence of Clostridium paradoxum strain JW-YL-7

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, Andrew; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Poole, Farris; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Elias, Dwayne A.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Brown, Steven D.

    2016-05-05

    Clostridium paradoxum strain JW-YL-7 is a moderately thermophilic anaerobic alkaliphile isolated from the municipal sewage treatment plant in Athens, GA. We report the near-complete genome sequence of C. paradoxum strain JW-YL-7 obtained by using PacBio DNA sequencing and Pilon for sequence assembly refinement with Illumina data.

  7. First Insights into the Genome of the Amino Acid-Metabolizing Bacterium Clostridium litorale DSM 5388

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Alghaithi, Hamed S.; Chandran, Lenin; Chibani, Cynthia M.; Davydova, Elena; Dhamotharan, Karthikeyan; Ge, Wanwan; Gutierrez-Gutierrez, David A.; Jagirdar, Advait; Khonsari, Bahar; Nair, Kamal Prakash P. R.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium litorale is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, and spore-forming bacterium, which is able to use amino acids such as glycine, sarcosine, proline, and betaine as single carbon and energy sources via Stickland reactions. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (3.41 Mb) and a circular plasmid (27 kb). PMID:25081264

  8. Near complete genome sequence of Clostridium paradoxum strain JW-YL-7

    DOE PAGES

    Lancaster, Andrew; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Poole, Farris; ...

    2016-05-05

    Clostridium paradoxum strain JW-YL-7 is a moderately thermophilic anaerobic alkaliphile isolated from the municipal sewage treatment plant in Athens, GA. We report the near-complete genome sequence of C. paradoxum strain JW-YL-7 obtained by using PacBio DNA sequencing and Pilon for sequence assembly refinement with Illumina data.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of the Cellulolytic Thermophile Clostridium thermocellum DSM1313

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, Lawrence F; Foden, Justine; Barrett, Trisha; Davenport, Karen W.; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Argyros, Aaron; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Hogsett, David; Caiazza, Nicky

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum DSM1313 is a thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium with some of the highest rates of cellulose hydrolysis reported. The complete genome sequence reveals a suite of carbohydrate-active enzymes and demonstrates a level of diversity at the species level distinguishing it from the type strain ATCC27405.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the Clostridium difficile Type Strain DSM 1296T

    PubMed Central

    Bunk, Boyke; Wittmann, Johannes; Thürmer, Andrea; Spröer, Cathrin; Gronow, Sabine; Liesegang, Heiko; Daniel, Rolf; Overmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we sequenced the complete genome of the Clostridium difficile type strain DSM 1296T. A combination of single-molecule real-time (SMRT) and Illumina sequencing technology revealed the presence of one chromosome and two extrachromosomal elements, the bacteriophage phiCDIF1296T and a putative plasmid-like structure harboring genes of another bacteriophage. PMID:26450746

  11. First Insights into the Draft Genome of Clostridium colicanis DSM 13634, Isolated from Canine Feces

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Schilling, Tobias; Bhaskar Sathya Narayanan, Udhaya

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium colicanis DSM 13634 is a strictly anaerobic, rod-shaped, and spore-forming bacterium. It produces acids from common sugars such as glucose and fructose. The draft genome consists of one chromosome (2.6 Mbp) and contains 2,159 predicted protein-encoding genes. PMID:27198021

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Thermophile Clostridium clariflavum Strain 4-2a

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Elise A.; Rowe, Kenneth T.; Guseva, Anna; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James K.; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor M.; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Liolios, Konstantinos; Nordberg, Henrik P.; Cantor, Michael N.; Hua, Susan X.; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Lynd, Lee R.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium clariflavum strain 4-2a, a novel strain isolated from a thermophilic biocompost pile, has demonstrated an extensive capability to utilize both cellulose and hemicellulose under thermophilic anaerobic conditions. Here, we report the draft genome of this strain. PMID:26205857

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium difficile Belonging to Ribotype 018 and Sequence Type 17

    PubMed Central

    Riccobono, E.; Di Pilato, V.; Della Malva, N.; Meini, S.; Ciraolo, F.; Torricelli, F.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, belonging to ribotype 018 (RT018), is one of the most prevalent genotypes circulating in hospital settings in Italy. Here, we report the draft genome of C. difficile CD8-15 belonging to RT018, isolated from a patient with fatal C. difficile-associated infection. PMID:27587821

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium difficile Belonging to Ribotype 018 and Sequence Type 17.

    PubMed

    Riccobono, E; Di Pilato, V; Della Malva, N; Meini, S; Ciraolo, F; Torricelli, F; Rossolini, G M

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium difficile, belonging to ribotype 018 (RT018), is one of the most prevalent genotypes circulating in hospital settings in Italy. Here, we report the draft genome of C. difficile CD8-15 belonging to RT018, isolated from a patient with fatal C. difficile-associated infection. Copyright © 2016 Riccobono et al.

  15. Genome Sequence of the Solvent-Producing Bacterium Clostridium carboxidivorans Strain P7T▿

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Debarati; Austin, Frank W.; Arick, Tony; Bridges, Susan M.; Burgess, Shane C.; Dandass, Yoginder S.; Lawrence, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium carboxidivorans strain P7T is a strictly anaerobic acetogenic bacterium that produces acetate, ethanol, butanol, and butyrate. The C. carboxidivorans genome contains all the genes for the carbonyl branch of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for CO2 fixation, and it encodes enzymes for conversion of acetyl coenzyme A into butanol and butyrate. PMID:20729368

  16. Comparative genomic and phenomic analysis of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium sordellii, two related pathogens with differing host tissue preference.

    PubMed

    Scaria, Joy; Suzuki, Haruo; Ptak, Christopher P; Chen, Jenn-Wei; Zhu, Yongzhang; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2015-06-10

    Clostridium difficile and C. sordellii are two anaerobic, spore forming, gram positive pathogens with a broad host range and the ability to cause lethal infections. Despite strong similarities between the two Clostridial strains, differences in their host tissue preference place C. difficile infections in the gastrointestinal tract and C. sordellii infections in soft tissues. In this study, to improve our understanding of C. sordellii and C. difficile virulence and pathogenesis, we have performed a comparative genomic and phenomic analysis of the two. The global phenomes of C. difficile and C. sordellii were compared using Biolog Phenotype microarrays. When compared to C. difficile, C. sordellii was found to better utilize more complex sources of carbon and nitrogen, including peptides. Phenotype microarray comparison also revealed that C. sordellii was better able to grow in acidic pH conditions. Using next generation sequencing technology, we determined the draft genome of C. sordellii strain 8483 and performed comparative genome analysis with C. difficile and other Clostridial genomes. Comparative genome analysis revealed the presence of several enzymes, including the urease gene cluster, specific to the C. sordellii genome that confer the ability of expanded peptide utilization and survival in acidic pH. The identified phenotypes of C. sordellii might be important in causing wound and vaginal infections respectively. Proteins involved in the metabolic differences between C. sordellii and C. difficile should be targets for further studies aimed at understanding C. difficile and C. sordellii infection site specificity and pathogenesis.

  17. Optimized Protocol for Simple Extraction of High-Quality Genomic DNA from Clostridium difficile for Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sim, James Heng Chiak; Anikst, Victoria; Lohith, Akshar; Pourmand, Nader; Banaei, Niaz

    2015-07-01

    Successful sequencing of the Clostridium difficile genome requires high-quality genomic DNA (gDNA) as the starting material. gDNA extraction using conventional methods is laborious. We describe here an optimized method for the simple extraction of C. difficile gDNA using the QIAamp DNA minikit, which yielded high-quality sequence reads on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the Novel Temperate Clostridium difficile Phage phiCDIF1296T

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Johannes; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Gronow, Sabine; Overmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile contains many integrated and extrachromosomal genetic elements. In this study, we determined, annotated, and analyzed the complete genome of the C. difficile bacteriophage phiCDIF1296T using single-molecule real-time sequencing technology. To our knowledge, this represents the largest genome (131 kb) of a temperate C. difficile phage recognized so far. PMID:26294621

  19. Implications of Genome-Based Discrimination between Clostridium botulinum Group I and Clostridium sporogenes Strains for Bacterial Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Michael R.; Pena-Gonzalez, Angela; Shirey, Timothy B.; Broeker, Robin G.; Ishaq, Maliha K.; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.

    2015-01-01

    Taxonomic classification of Clostridium botulinum is based on the production of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), while closely related, nontoxic organisms are classified as Clostridium sporogenes. However, this taxonomic organization does not accurately mirror phylogenetic relationships between these species. A phylogenetic reconstruction using 2,016 orthologous genes shared among strains of C. botulinum group I and C. sporogenes clearly separated these two species into discrete clades which showed ∼93% average nucleotide identity (ANI) between them. Clustering of strains based on the presence of variable orthologs revealed 143 C. sporogenes clade-specific genetic signatures, a subset of which were further evaluated for their ability to correctly classify a panel of presumptive C. sporogenes strains by PCR. Genome sequencing of several C. sporogenes strains lacking these signatures confirmed that they clustered with C. botulinum strains in a core genome phylogenetic tree. Our analysis also identified C. botulinum strains that contained C. sporogenes clade-specific signatures and phylogenetically clustered with C. sporogenes strains. The genome sequences of two bont/B2-containing strains belonging to the C. sporogenes clade contained regions with similarity to a bont-bearing plasmid (pCLD), while two different strains belonging to the C. botulinum clade carried bont/B2 on the chromosome. These results indicate that bont/B2 was likely acquired by C. sporogenes strains through horizontal gene transfer. The genome-based classification of these species used to identify candidate genes for the development of rapid assays for molecular identification may be applicable to additional bacterial species that are challenging with respect to their classification. PMID:26048939

  20. Implications of Genome-Based Discrimination between Clostridium botulinum Group I and Clostridium sporogenes Strains for Bacterial Taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Weigand, Michael R; Pena-Gonzalez, Angela; Shirey, Timothy B; Broeker, Robin G; Ishaq, Maliha K; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Raphael, Brian H

    2015-08-15

    Taxonomic classification of Clostridium botulinum is based on the production of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), while closely related, nontoxic organisms are classified as Clostridium sporogenes. However, this taxonomic organization does not accurately mirror phylogenetic relationships between these species. A phylogenetic reconstruction using 2,016 orthologous genes shared among strains of C. botulinum group I and C. sporogenes clearly separated these two species into discrete clades which showed ∼93% average nucleotide identity (ANI) between them. Clustering of strains based on the presence of variable orthologs revealed 143 C. sporogenes clade-specific genetic signatures, a subset of which were further evaluated for their ability to correctly classify a panel of presumptive C. sporogenes strains by PCR. Genome sequencing of several C. sporogenes strains lacking these signatures confirmed that they clustered with C. botulinum strains in a core genome phylogenetic tree. Our analysis also identified C. botulinum strains that contained C. sporogenes clade-specific signatures and phylogenetically clustered with C. sporogenes strains. The genome sequences of two bont/B2-containing strains belonging to the C. sporogenes clade contained regions with similarity to a bont-bearing plasmid (pCLD), while two different strains belonging to the C. botulinum clade carried bont/B2 on the chromosome. These results indicate that bont/B2 was likely acquired by C. sporogenes strains through horizontal gene transfer. The genome-based classification of these species used to identify candidate genes for the development of rapid assays for molecular identification may be applicable to additional bacterial species that are challenging with respect to their classification. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. A roadmap for gene system development in Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Minton, Nigel P; Ehsaan, Muhammad; Humphreys, Christopher M; Little, Gareth T; Baker, Jonathan; Henstra, Anne M; Liew, Fungmin; Kelly, Michelle L; Sheng, Lili; Schwarz, Katrin; Zhang, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium species are both heroes and villains. Some cause serious human and animal diseases, those present in the gut microbiota generally contribute to health and wellbeing, while others represent useful industrial chassis for the production of chemicals and fuels. To understand, counter or exploit, there is a fundamental requirement for effective systems that may be used for directed or random genome modifications. We have formulated a simple roadmap whereby the necessary gene systems maybe developed and deployed. At its heart is the use of 'pseudo-suicide' vectors and the creation of a pyrE mutant (a uracil auxotroph), initially aided by ClosTron technology, but ultimately made using a special form of allelic exchange termed ACE (Allele-Coupled Exchange). All mutants, regardless of the mutagen employed, are made in this host. This is because through the use of ACE vectors, mutants can be rapidly complemented concomitant with correction of the pyrE allele and restoration of uracil prototrophy. This avoids the phenotypic effects frequently observed with high copy number plasmids and dispenses with the need to add antibiotic to ensure plasmid retention. Once available, the pyrE host may be used to stably insert all manner of application specific modules. Examples include, a sigma factor to allow deployment of a mariner transposon, hydrolases involved in biomass deconstruction and therapeutic genes in cancer delivery vehicles. To date, provided DNA transfer is obtained, we have not encountered any clostridial species where this technology cannot be applied. These include, Clostridium difficile, Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium sporogenes, Clostridium pasteurianum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Clostridium autoethanogenum and even Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium sp. Ne2, Clostridia from an Enrichment Culture Obtained from Australian Subterranean Termite, Nasutitermes exitiosus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Lin, Hai; Tran-Dinh, Nai; Li, Dongmei; Greenfield, Paul; Midgley, David J

    2015-04-23

    The draft genome sequence of Clostridium sp. Ne2 was reconstructed from a metagenome of a hydrogenogenic microbial consortium. The organism is most closely related to Clostridium magnum and is a strict anaerobe that is predicted to ferment a range of simple sugars. Copyright © 2015 Wang et al.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium sp. Ne2, Clostridia from an Enrichment Culture Obtained from Australian Subterranean Termite, Nasutitermes exitiosus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hai; Tran-Dinh, Nai; Li, Dongmei; Greenfield, Paul; Midgley, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Clostridium sp. Ne2 was reconstructed from a metagenome of a hydrogenogenic microbial consortium. The organism is most closely related to Clostridium magnum and is a strict anaerobe that is predicted to ferment a range of simple sugars. PMID:25908129

  4. Small RNAs in the genus Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yili; Indurthi, Dinesh C; Jones, Shawn W; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2011-01-25

    The genus Clostridium includes major human pathogens and species important to cellulose degradation, the carbon cycle, and biotechnology. Small RNAs (sRNAs) are emerging as crucial regulatory molecules in all organisms, but they have not been investigated in clostridia. Research on sRNAs in clostridia is hindered by the absence of a systematic method to identify sRNA candidates, thus delegating clostridial sRNA research to a hit-and-miss process. Thus, we wanted to develop a method to identify potential sRNAs in the Clostridium genus to open up the field of sRNA research in clostridia. Using comparative genomics analyses combined with predictions of rho-independent terminators and promoters, we predicted sRNAs in 21 clostridial genomes: Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. beijerinckii, C. botulinum (eight strains), C. cellulolyticum, C. difficile, C. kluyveri (two strains), C. novyi, C. perfringens (three strains), C. phytofermentans, C. tetani, and C. thermocellum. Although more than one-third of predicted sRNAs have Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences, only one-sixth have a start codon downstream of SD sequences; thus, most of the predicted sRNAs are noncoding RNAs. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) and Northern analysis were employed to test the presence of a randomly chosen set of sRNAs in C. acetobutylicum and several C. botulinum strains, leading to the confirmation of a large fraction of the tested sRNAs. We identified a conserved, novel sRNA which, together with the downstream gene coding for an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene, responds to the antibiotic clindamycin. The number of predicted sRNAs correlated with the physiological function of the species (high for pathogens, low for cellulolytic, and intermediate for solventogenic), but not with 16S rRNA-based phylogeny.

  5. Non contiguous-finished genome sequence and description of Clostridium jeddahense sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Bibi, Fehmida; Ramasamy, Dhamodharan; Azhar, Esam I.; Robert, Catherine; Yasir, Muhammad; Jiman-Fatani, Asif A.; Alshali, Khalid Z.; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium jeddahense strain JCDT (= CSUR P693 = DSM 27834) is the type strain of C. jeddahense sp. nov. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from the fecal flora of an obese 24 year-old Saudian male (BMI=52 kg/m2). Clostridium jeddahense strain JCDT is an obligate Gram-positive bacillus. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,613,503 bp long genome (1 chromosome, no plasmid) exhibits a G+C content of 51.95% and contains 3,462 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes, including 4 rRNA genes. PMID:25197479

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium bifermentans Strain WYM, a Promising Biohydrogen Producer Isolated from Landfill Leachate Sludge.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y M; Juan, J C; Gan, H M; Austin, C M

    2014-03-06

    Clostridium bifermentans strain WYM is an effective biohydrogen producer isolated from landfill leachate sludge. Here, we present the assembly and annotation of its genome, which may provide further insights into the metabolic pathways involved in efficient biohydrogen production.

  7. Draft genome sequence of Clostridium celerecrescens 152B isolated from sub-seafloor methane hydrate deposits.

    PubMed

    Honkalas, Varsha S; Dabir, Ashwini P; Arora, Preeti; Ranade, Dilip R; Dhakephalkar, Prashant K

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium celerecrescens 152B is an obligate anaerobic, Gram positive rod shaped bacterium isolated from sub-seafloor methane hydrate sediments of Krishna Godavari basin, India. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of C. celerecrescens 152B, which comprises 5,050,495bp in 92 contigs with the G+C content of 43.5%. The whole genome of C. celerecrescens 152B was sequenced for further biotechnological exploitation of its genome features especially regarding the production of secondary metabolites as well as for environmental bioremediation and production of industrially valuable enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence and description of Clostridium saudii sp. nov

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium saudii strain JCCT sp. nov. is the type strain of C. saudii sp. nov., a new species within the genus Clostridia. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from a fecal sample collected from an obese 24-year-old (body mass index 52 kg/m2) man living in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. C. saudii is a Gram-positive, anaerobic bacillus. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,653,762 bp long genome contains 3,452 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes, including 4 rRNA genes. PMID:25780501

  9. Genome sequence of a proteolytic (Group I) Clostridium botulinum strain Hall A and comparative analysis of the clostridial genomes.

    PubMed

    Sebaihia, Mohammed; Peck, Michael W; Minton, Nigel P; Thomson, Nicholas R; Holden, Matthew T G; Mitchell, Wilfrid J; Carter, Andrew T; Bentley, Stephen D; Mason, David R; Crossman, Lisa; Paul, Catherine J; Ivens, Alasdair; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J; Davis, Ian J; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana M; Churcher, Carol; Quail, Michael A; Chillingworth, Tracey; Feltwell, Theresa; Fraser, Audrey; Goodhead, Ian; Hance, Zahra; Jagels, Kay; Larke, Natasha; Maddison, Mark; Moule, Sharon; Mungall, Karen; Norbertczak, Halina; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Sanders, Mandy; Simmonds, Mark; White, Brian; Whithead, Sally; Parkhill, Julian

    2007-07-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a heterogeneous Gram-positive species that comprises four genetically and physiologically distinct groups of bacteria that share the ability to produce botulinum neurotoxin, the most poisonous toxin known to man, and the causative agent of botulism, a severe disease of humans and animals. We report here the complete genome sequence of a representative of Group I (proteolytic) C. botulinum (strain Hall A, ATCC 3502). The genome consists of a chromosome (3,886,916 bp) and a plasmid (16,344 bp), which carry 3650 and 19 predicted genes, respectively. Consistent with the proteolytic phenotype of this strain, the genome harbors a large number of genes encoding secreted proteases and enzymes involved in uptake and metabolism of amino acids. The genome also reveals a hitherto unknown ability of C. botulinum to degrade chitin. There is a significant lack of recently acquired DNA, indicating a stable genomic content, in strong contrast to the fluid genome of Clostridium difficile, which can form longer-term relationships with its host. Overall, the genome indicates that C. botulinum is adapted to a saprophytic lifestyle both in soil and aquatic environments. This pathogen relies on its toxin to rapidly kill a wide range of prey species, and to gain access to nutrient sources, it releases a large number of extracellular enzymes to soften and destroy rotting or decayed tissues.

  10. Genome sequence of a proteolytic (Group I) Clostridium botulinum strain Hall A and comparative analysis of the clostridial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Sebaihia, Mohammed; Peck, Michael W.; Minton, Nigel P.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Holden, Matthew T.G.; Mitchell, Wilfrid J.; Carter, Andrew T.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Mason, David R.; Crossman, Lisa; Paul, Catherine J.; Ivens, Alasdair; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H.J.; Davis, Ian J.; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana M.; Churcher, Carol; Quail, Michael A.; Chillingworth, Tracey; Feltwell, Theresa; Fraser, Audrey; Goodhead, Ian; Hance, Zahra; Jagels, Kay; Larke, Natasha; Maddison, Mark; Moule, Sharon; Mungall, Karen; Norbertczak, Halina; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Sanders, Mandy; Simmonds, Mark; White, Brian; Whithead, Sally; Parkhill, Julian

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a heterogeneous Gram-positive species that comprises four genetically and physiologically distinct groups of bacteria that share the ability to produce botulinum neurotoxin, the most poisonous toxin known to man, and the causative agent of botulism, a severe disease of humans and animals. We report here the complete genome sequence of a representative of Group I (proteolytic) C. botulinum (strain Hall A, ATCC 3502). The genome consists of a chromosome (3,886,916 bp) and a plasmid (16,344 bp), which carry 3650 and 19 predicted genes, respectively. Consistent with the proteolytic phenotype of this strain, the genome harbors a large number of genes encoding secreted proteases and enzymes involved in uptake and metabolism of amino acids. The genome also reveals a hitherto unknown ability of C. botulinum to degrade chitin. There is a significant lack of recently acquired DNA, indicating a stable genomic content, in strong contrast to the fluid genome of Clostridium difficile, which can form longer-term relationships with its host. Overall, the genome indicates that C. botulinum is adapted to a saprophytic lifestyle both in soil and aquatic environments. This pathogen relies on its toxin to rapidly kill a wide range of prey species, and to gain access to nutrient sources, it releases a large number of extracellular enzymes to soften and destroy rotting or decayed tissues. PMID:17519437

  11. Application of long sequence reads to improve genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7

    SciTech Connect

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Bayer, Edward A.; Borovok, Ilya; Lamed, Raphael; Hurt, Richard A.; Land, Miriam L.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Elias, Dwayne; Zhou, Jizhong; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Brown, Steven D.

    2016-09-29

    Here, we and others have shown the utility of long sequence reads to improve genome assembly quality. In this study, we generated PacBio DNA sequence data to improve the assemblies of draft genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7.

  12. Genomic approach to studying nutritional requirements of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and other Clostridia causing late blowing defects.

    PubMed

    Storari, Michelangelo; Kulli, Sandra; Wüthrich, Daniel; Bruggmann, Rémy; Berthoud, Hélène; Arias-Roth, Emmanuelle

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum is the main microorganism responsible for the late blowing defect in hard and semi-hard cheeses, causing considerable economic losses to the cheese industry. Deeper knowledge of the metabolic requirements of this microorganism can lead to the development of more effective control approaches. In this work, the amino acids and B vitamins essential for sustaining the growth of C. tyrobutyricum were investigated using a genomic approach. As the first step, the genomes of four C. tyrobutyricum strains were analyzed for the presence of genes putatively involved in the biosynthesis of amino acids and B vitamins. Metabolic pathways could be reconstructed for all amino acids and B vitamins with the exception of biotin (vitamin B7) and folate (vitamin B9). The biotin pathway was missing the enzyme amino-7-oxononanoate synthase that catalyzes the condensation of pimeloyl-ACP and l-alanine to 8-amino-7-oxononanoate. In the folate pathway, the missing genes were those coding for para-aminobenzoate synthase and aminodeoxychorismate lyase enzymes. These enzymes are responsible for the conversion of chorismate into para-aminobenzoate (PABA). Two C. tyrobutyircum strains whose genome was analyzed in silico as well as other 10 strains isolated from cheese were tested in liquid media to confirm these observations. 11 strains showed growth in a defined liquid medium containing biotin and PABA after 6-8 days of incubation. No strain showed growth when only one or none of these compounds were added, confirming the observations obtained in silico. Furthermore, the genome analysis was extended to genomes of single strains of other Clostridium species potentially causing late blowing, namely Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium sporogenes and Clostridium butyricum. Only the biotin biosynthesis pathway was incomplete for C. butyricum and C. beijerincki. In contrast, C. sporogenes showed missing enzymes in biosynthesis pathways of several amino acids as well

  13. Investigation of sporulation in the Desulfotomaculum genus: a genomic comparison with the genera Bacillus and Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Dalla Vecchia, Elena; Visser, Michael; Stams, Alfons J M; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2014-12-01

    The genus Desulfotomaculum, belonging to the Firmicutes, comprises strictly anaerobic and endospore-forming bacteria capable of dissimilatory sulfate reduction. These microorganisms are metabolically versatile and are widely distributed in the environment. Spore formation allows them to survive prolonged environmental stress. Information on the mechanism of sporulation in Desulfotomaculum species is scarce. Herein, this process was probed from a genomic standpoint, using the Bacillus subtilis model system as a reference and clostridial sporulation for comparison. Desulfotomaculum falls somewhere in between the Bacillus and Clostridium in terms of conservation of sporulation proteins. Furthermore, it showcased the conservation of a core regulatory cascade throughout genera, while uncovering variability in the initiation of sporulation and the structural characteristics of spores from different genera. In particular, while in Clostridium species sporulation is not initiated by a phosphorelay, Desulfotomaculum species harbour homologues of the B. subtilis proteins involved in this process. Conversely, both Clostridium and Desulfotomaculum species conserve very few B. subtilis structural proteins, particularly those found in the outer layers of the spore. Desulfotomaculum species seem to share greater similarity to the outer layers of Clostridium difficile. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium septicum Strain CSUR P1044, Isolated from the Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Benamar, Samia; Cassir, Nadim; Caputo, Aurélia; Cadoret, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium septicum is one of the first pathogenic anaerobes to be identified. Here, we announce the genome draft sequence of C. septicum strain CSUR P1044 isolated from the gut of a healthy adult. Its chromosome genome consists of 3.2 Mbp with a plasmid of 32 Kbp. C. septicum strain CSUR P1044 has a G+C content of 27.5%, and is composed of 3,125 protein-coding genes together with 103 RNA genes, including 22 rRNA genes. PMID:27609912

  15. Clostridium sordellii genome analysis reveals plasmid localized toxin genes encoded within pathogenicity loci.

    PubMed

    Couchman, Edward C; Browne, Hilary P; Dunn, Matt; Lawley, Trevor D; Songer, J Glenn; Hall, Val; Petrovska, Liljana; Vidor, Callum; Awad, Milena; Lyras, Dena; Fairweather, Neil F

    2015-05-16

    Clostridium sordellii can cause severe infections in animals and humans, the latter associated with trauma, toxic shock and often-fatal gynaecological infections. Strains can produce two large clostridial cytotoxins (LCCs), TcsL and TcsH, related to those produced by Clostridium difficile, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium perfringens, but the genetic basis of toxin production remains uncharacterised. Phylogenetic analysis of the genome sequences of 44 strains isolated from human and animal infections in the UK, US and Australia placed the species into four clades. Although all strains originated from animal or clinical disease, only 5 strains contained LCC genes: 4 strains contain tcsL alone and one strain contains tcsL and tcsH. Four toxin-positive strains were found within one clade. Where present, tcsL and tcsH were localised in a pathogenicity locus, similar to but distinct from that present in C. difficile. In contrast to C. difficile, where the LCCs are chromosomally localised, the C. sordellii tcsL and tcsH genes are localised on plasmids. Our data suggest gain and loss of entire toxigenic plasmids in addition to horizontal transfer of the pathogenicity locus. A high quality, annotated sequence of ATCC9714 reveals many putative virulence factors including neuraminidase, phospholipase C and the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin sordellilysin that are highly conserved between all strains studied. Genome analysis of C. sordellii reveals that the LCCs, the major virulence factors, are localised on plasmids. Many strains do not contain the LCC genes; it is probable that in several of these cases the plasmid has been lost upon laboratory subculture. Our data are consistent with LCCs being the primary virulence factors in the majority of infections, but LCC-negative strains may precipitate certain categories of infection. A high quality genome sequence reveals putative virulence factors whose role in virulence can be investigated.

  16. Cloning, expression, and purification of glutamine synthetase from Clostridum acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Usdin, K.P.; Zappe, H.; Jones, D.T.; Woods, D.R.

    1986-09-01

    A glutamine synthetase (GS) gene, glnA, from the gram-positive obligate anaerobe Clostridium acetobutylicum was cloned on recombinant plasmid pHZ200 and enabled Escherichia coli glnA deletion mutants to utilize (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/ as a sole source of nitrogen. The cloned C. acetobutylicum gene was expressed from a regulatory region contained within the cloned DNA fragment. glnA expression was subject to nitrogen regulation in E. coli. This cloned glnA DNA did not enable an E. coli glnA ntrB ntrC deletion mutant to utilize arginine or low levels of glutamine as sole nitrogen sources, and failed to activate histidase activity in this strain which contained the Klebsiella aerogenes hut operon. The GS produced by pHZ200 was purified and had an apparent subunit molecular weight of approximately 59,000. There was no DNA or protein homology between the cloned C. acetobutylicum glnA gene and GS and the corresponding gene and GS from E. coli. The C. acetobutylicum GS was inhibited by Mg/sup 2 +/ in the ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase assay, but there was no evidence that the GS was adenylylated.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium estertheticum DSM 8809, a Microbe Identified in Spoiled Vacuum Packed Beef

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhongyi; Gunn, Lynda; Brennan, Evan; Reid, Rachael; Wall, Patrick G.; Gaora, Peadar Ó.; Hurley, Daniel; Bolton, Declan; Fanning, Séamus

    2016-01-01

    Blown pack spoilage (BPS) is a major issue for the beef industry. Etiological agents of BPS involve members of a group of Clostridium species, including Clostridium estertheticum which has the ability to produce gas, mostly carbon dioxide, under anaerobic psychotrophic growth conditions. This spore-forming bacterium grows slowly under laboratory conditions, and it can take up to 3 months to produce a workable culture. These characteristics have limited the study of this commercially challenging bacterium. Consequently information on this bacterium is limited and no effective controls are currently available to confidently detect and manage this production risk. In this study the complete genome of C. estertheticum DSM 8809 was determined by SMRT® sequencing. The genome consists of a circular chromosome of 4.7 Mbp along with a single plasmid carrying a potential tellurite resistance gene tehB and a Tn3-like resolvase-encoding gene tnpR. The genome sequence was searched for central metabolic pathways that would support its biochemical profile and several enzymes contributing to this phenotype were identified. Several putative antibiotic/biocide/metal resistance-encoding genes and virulence factors were also identified in the genome, a feature that requires further research. The availability of the genome sequence will provide a basic blueprint from which to develop valuable biomarkers that could support and improve the detection and control of this bacterium along the beef production chain. PMID:27891116

  18. Genome sequence of Clostridium sporogenes DSM 795(T), an amino acid-degrading, nontoxic surrogate of neurotoxin-producing Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Poehlein, Anja; Riegel, Karin; König, Sandra M; Leimbach, Andreas; Daniel, Rolf; Dürre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium sporogenes DSM 795 is the type strain of the species Clostridium sporogenes, first described by Metchnikoff in 1908. It is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, anaerobic bacterium isolated from human faeces and belongs to the proteolytic branch of clostridia. C. sporogenes attracts special interest because of its potential use in a bacterial therapy for certain cancer types. Genome sequencing and annotation revealed several gene clusters coding for proteins involved in anaerobic degradation of amino acids, such as glycine and betaine via Stickland reaction. Genome comparison showed that C. sporogenes is closely related to C. botulinum. The genome of C. sporogenes DSM 795 consists of a circular chromosome of 4.1 Mb with an overall GC content of 27.81 mol% harboring 3,744 protein-coding genes, and 80 RNAs.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium straminisolvens Strain JCM 21531T, Isolated from a Cellulose-Degrading Bacterial Community

    PubMed Central

    Yuki, Masahiro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Suda, Wataru; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Kitamura, Keiko; Iida, Toshiya; Hattori, Masahira

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a fibrolytic bacterium, Clostridium straminisolvens JCM 21531T, isolated from a cellulose-degrading bacterial community. The genome information of this strain will be useful for studies on the degradation enzymes and functional interactions with other members in the community. PMID:24558248

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium straminisolvens Strain JCM 21531T, Isolated from a Cellulose-Degrading Bacterial Community.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Masahiro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Suda, Wataru; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Kitamura, Keiko; Iida, Toshiya; Hattori, Masahira; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2014-02-20

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a fibrolytic bacterium, Clostridium straminisolvens JCM 21531(T), isolated from a cellulose-degrading bacterial community. The genome information of this strain will be useful for studies on the degradation enzymes and functional interactions with other members in the community.

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Five Enterococcus Species Isolated from the Gut of Patients with Suspected Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Castro-Nallar, Eduardo; Valenzuela, Sandro L; Baquedano, Sebastián; Sánchez, Carolina; Fernández, Fabiola; Trombert, Annette N

    2017-05-18

    We present draft genome sequences of five Enterococcus species from patients suspected of Clostridium difficile infection. Genome completeness was confirmed by presence of bacterial orthologs (97%). Gene searches using Hidden-Markov models revealed that the isolates harbor between seven and 11 genes involved in antibiotic resistance to tetracyclines, beta-lactams, and vancomycin. Copyright © 2017 Castro-Nallar et al.

  2. Comparative Genomics of Core Metabolism Genes of Cellulolytic and Non-cellulolytic Clostridium Species.

    PubMed

    Lal, Sadhana; Levin, David B

    Microbial production of fuels such as ethanol, butanol, hydrogen (H2), and methane (CH4) from waste biomass has the potential to provide sustainable energy systems that can displace fossil fuel consumption. Screening for microbial diversity and genome sequencing of a wide-range of microorganisms can identify organisms with natural abilities to synthesize these alternative fuels and/or other biotechnological applications. Clostridium species are the most widely studied strict anaerobes capable of fermentative synthesis of ethanol, butanol, or hydrogen directly from waste biomass. Clostridium termitidis CT1112 is a mesophilic, cellulolytic species capable of direct cellulose fermentation to ethanol and organic acids, with concomitant synthesis of H2 and CO2. On the basis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and chaperonin 60 (cpn60) gene sequence data, phylogenetic analyses revealed a close relationship between C. termitidis and C. cellobioparum. Comparative bioinformatic analyses of the C. termitidis genome with 18 cellulolytic and 10 non-cellulolytic Clostridium species confirmed this relationship, and further revealed that the majority of core metabolic pathway genes in C. termitidis and C. cellobioparum share more than 90% amino acid sequence identity. The gene loci and corresponding amino acid sequences of the encoded enzymes for each pathway were correlated by percentage identity, higher score (better alignment), and lowest e-value (most significant "hit"). In addition, the function of each enzyme was proposed by conserved domain analysis. In this chapter we discuss the comparative analysis of metabolic pathways involved in synthesis of various useful products by cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic biofuel and solvent producing Clostridium species. This study has generated valuable information concerning the core metabolism genes and pathways of C. termitidis CT1112, which is helpful in developing metabolic engineering strategies to enhance its natural capacity for better

  3. Genome and Transcriptome of Clostridium phytofermentans, Catalyst for the Direct Conversion of Plant Feedstocks to Fuels

    DOE PAGES

    Petit, Elsa; Coppi, Maddalena V.; Hayes, James C.; ...

    2015-06-02

    Clostridium phytofermentans was isolated from forest soil and is distinguished by its capacity to directly ferment plant cell wall polysaccharides into ethanol as the primary product, suggesting that it possesses unusual catabolic pathways. The objective of our present study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomass conversion to ethanol in a single organism, Clostridium phytofermentans, by analyzing its complete genome and transcriptome during growth on plant carbohydrates. The saccharolytic versatility of C. phytofermentans is reflected in a diversity of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sugar transporters and glycoside hydrolases, many of which may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer.more » These genes are frequently organized as operons that may be controlled individually by the many transcriptional regulators identified in the genome. Preferential ethanol production may be due to high levels of expression of multiple ethanol dehydrogenases and additional pathways maximizing ethanol yield. The genome also encodes three different proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments with the capacity to compartmentalize pathways that divert fermentation intermediates to various products. Lastly, these characteristics make C. phytofermentans an attractive resource for improving the efficiency and speed of biomass conversion to biofuels.« less

  4. Genome and Transcriptome of Clostridium phytofermentans, Catalyst for the Direct Conversion of Plant Feedstocks to Fuels

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Elsa; Coppi, Maddalena V.; Hayes, James C.; Tolonen, Andrew C.; Warnick, Thomas; Latouf, William G.; Amisano, Danielle; Biddle, Amy; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; Lykidis, Athanassios; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos; Henrissat, Bernard; Lau, Joanne; Schnell, Danny J.; Church, George M.; Leschine, Susan B.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium phytofermentans was isolated from forest soil and is distinguished by its capacity to directly ferment plant cell wall polysaccharides into ethanol as the primary product, suggesting that it possesses unusual catabolic pathways. The objective of the present study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomass conversion to ethanol in a single organism, Clostridium phytofermentans, by analyzing its complete genome and transcriptome during growth on plant carbohydrates. The saccharolytic versatility of C. phytofermentans is reflected in a diversity of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sugar transporters and glycoside hydrolases, many of which may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. These genes are frequently organized as operons that may be controlled individually by the many transcriptional regulators identified in the genome. Preferential ethanol production may be due to high levels of expression of multiple ethanol dehydrogenases and additional pathways maximizing ethanol yield. The genome also encodes three different proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments with the capacity to compartmentalize pathways that divert fermentation intermediates to various products. These characteristics make C. phytofermentans an attractive resource for improving the efficiency and speed of biomass conversion to biofuels. PMID:26035711

  5. Genome and Transcriptome of Clostridium phytofermentans, Catalyst for the Direct Conversion of Plant Feedstocks to Fuels.

    PubMed

    Petit, Elsa; Coppi, Maddalena V; Hayes, James C; Tolonen, Andrew C; Warnick, Thomas; Latouf, William G; Amisano, Danielle; Biddle, Amy; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; Lykidis, Athanassios; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos; Henrissat, Bernard; Lau, Joanne; Schnell, Danny J; Church, George M; Leschine, Susan B; Blanchard, Jeffrey L

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium phytofermentans was isolated from forest soil and is distinguished by its capacity to directly ferment plant cell wall polysaccharides into ethanol as the primary product, suggesting that it possesses unusual catabolic pathways. The objective of the present study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomass conversion to ethanol in a single organism, Clostridium phytofermentans, by analyzing its complete genome and transcriptome during growth on plant carbohydrates. The saccharolytic versatility of C. phytofermentans is reflected in a diversity of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sugar transporters and glycoside hydrolases, many of which may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. These genes are frequently organized as operons that may be controlled individually by the many transcriptional regulators identified in the genome. Preferential ethanol production may be due to high levels of expression of multiple ethanol dehydrogenases and additional pathways maximizing ethanol yield. The genome also encodes three different proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments with the capacity to compartmentalize pathways that divert fermentation intermediates to various products. These characteristics make C. phytofermentans an attractive resource for improving the efficiency and speed of biomass conversion to biofuels.

  6. Genome and Transcriptome of Clostridium phytofermentans, Catalyst for the Direct Conversion of Plant Feedstocks to Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Elsa; Coppi, Maddalena V.; Hayes, James C.; Tolonen, Andrew C.; Warnick, Thomas; Latouf, William G.; Amisano, Danielle; Biddle, Amy; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; Lykidis, Athanassios; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos; Henrissat, Bernard; Lau, Joanne; Schnell, Danny J.; Church, George M.; Leschine, Susan B.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2015-06-02

    Clostridium phytofermentans was isolated from forest soil and is distinguished by its capacity to directly ferment plant cell wall polysaccharides into ethanol as the primary product, suggesting that it possesses unusual catabolic pathways. The objective of our present study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomass conversion to ethanol in a single organism, Clostridium phytofermentans, by analyzing its complete genome and transcriptome during growth on plant carbohydrates. The saccharolytic versatility of C. phytofermentans is reflected in a diversity of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sugar transporters and glycoside hydrolases, many of which may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. These genes are frequently organized as operons that may be controlled individually by the many transcriptional regulators identified in the genome. Preferential ethanol production may be due to high levels of expression of multiple ethanol dehydrogenases and additional pathways maximizing ethanol yield. The genome also encodes three different proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments with the capacity to compartmentalize pathways that divert fermentation intermediates to various products. Lastly, these characteristics make C. phytofermentans an attractive resource for improving the efficiency and speed of biomass conversion to biofuels.

  7. Mobile genetic elements in Clostridium difficile and their role in genome function

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, Peter; Allan, Elaine; Roberts, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 11% the Clostridium difficile genome is made up of mobile genetic elements which have a profound effect on the biology of the organism. This includes transfer of antibiotic resistance and other factors that allow the organism to survive challenging environments, modulation of toxin gene expression, transfer of the toxin genes themselves and the conversion of non-toxigenic strains to toxin producers. Mobile genetic elements have also been adapted by investigators to probe the biology of the organism and the various ways in which these have been used are reviewed. PMID:25576774

  8. Efficient Genome Editing in Clostridium cellulolyticum via CRISPR-Cas9 Nickase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Li, Yongchao; Shi, Zhou; Hemme, Christopher L.; Li, Yuan; Zhu, Yonghua; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; He, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 system is a powerful and revolutionary genome-editing tool for eukaryotic genomes, but its use in bacterial genomes is very limited. Here, we investigated the use of the Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR-Cas9 system in editing the genome of Clostridium cellulolyticum, a model microorganism for bioenergy research. Wild-type Cas9-induced double-strand breaks were lethal to C. cellulolyticum due to the minimal expression of nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) components in this strain. To circumvent this lethality, Cas9 nickase was applied to develop a single-nick-triggered homologous recombination strategy, which allows precise one-step editing at intended genomic loci by transforming a single vector. This strategy has a high editing efficiency (>95%) even using short homologous arms (0.2 kb), is able to deliver foreign genes into the genome in a single step without a marker, enables precise editing even at two very similar target sites differing by two bases preceding the seed region, and has a very high target site density (median interval distance of 9 bp and 95.7% gene coverage in C. cellulolyticum). Together, these results establish a simple and robust methodology for genome editing in NHEJ-ineffective prokaryotes. PMID:25911483

  9. Whole-genome single-nucleotide-polymorphism analysis for discrimination of Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Timme, Ruth; Raphael, Brian H; Zink, Donald; Sharma, Shashi K

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a genetically diverse Gram-positive bacterium producing extremely potent neurotoxins (botulinum neurotoxins A through G [BoNT/A-G]). The complete genome sequences of three strains harboring only the BoNT/A1 nucleotide sequence are publicly available. Although these strains contain a toxin cluster (HA(+) OrfX(-)) associated with hemagglutinin genes, little is known about the genomes of subtype A1 strains (termed HA(-) OrfX(+)) that lack hemagglutinin genes in the toxin gene cluster. We sequenced the genomes of three BoNT/A1-producing C. botulinum strains: two strains with the HA(+) OrfX(-) cluster (69A and 32A) and one strain with the HA(-) OrfX(+) cluster (CDC297). Whole-genome phylogenic single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP) analysis of these strains along with other publicly available C. botulinum group I strains revealed five distinct lineages. Strains 69A and 32A clustered with the C. botulinum type A1 Hall group, and strain CDC297 clustered with the C. botulinum type Ba4 strain 657. This study reports the use of whole-genome SNP sequence analysis for discrimination of C. botulinum group I strains and demonstrates the utility of this analysis in quickly differentiating C. botulinum strains harboring identical toxin gene subtypes. This analysis further supports previous work showing that strains CDC297 and 657 likely evolved from a common ancestor and independently acquired separate BoNT/A1 toxin gene clusters at distinct genomic locations.

  10. Comparison of assembled Clostridium botulinum A1 genomes revealed their evolutionary relationship.

    PubMed

    Ng, Virginia; Lin, Wei-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum encompasses bacteria that produce at least one of the seven serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT/A-G). The availability of genome sequences of four closely related Type A1 or A1(B) strains, as well as the A1-specific microarray, allowed the analysis of their genomic organizations and evolutionary relationship. The four genomes share >90% core genes and >96% functional groups. Phylogenetic analysis based on COG shows closer relations of the A1(B) strain, NCTC 2916, to B1 and F1 than A1 strains. Alignment of the genomes of the three A1 strains revealed a highly similar chromosomal structure with three small gaps in the genome of ATCC 19397 and one additional gap in the genome of Hall A, suggesting ATCC 19379 as an evolutionary intermediate between Hall A and ATCC 3502. Analyses of the four gap regions indicated potential horizontal gene transfer and recombination events important for the evolution of A1 strains.

  11. The genome and transcriptomes of the anti-tumor agent Clostridium novyi-NT.

    PubMed

    Bettegowda, Chetan; Huang, Xin; Lin, Jimmy; Cheong, Ian; Kohli, Manu; Szabo, Stephen A; Zhang, Xiaosong; Diaz, Luis A; Velculescu, Victor E; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2006-12-01

    Bacteriolytic anti-cancer therapies employ attenuated bacterial strains that selectively proliferate within tumors. Clostridium novyi-NT spores represent one of the most promising of these agents, as they generate potent anti-tumor effects in experimental animals. We have determined the 2.55-Mb genomic sequence of C. novyi-NT, identifying a new type of transposition and 139 genes that do not have homologs in other bacteria. The genomic sequence was used to facilitate the detection of transcripts expressed at various stages of the life cycle of this bacterium in vitro as well as in infections of tumors in vivo. Through this analysis, we found that C. novyi-NT spores contained mRNA and that the spore transcripts were distinct from those in vegetative forms of the bacterium.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium botulinum Type B Strain Osaka05, Isolated from an Infant Patient with Botulism in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hosomi, Koji; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Umeda, Kaoru; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Kohda, Tomoko; Mukamoto, Masafumi; Misawa, Naoaki; Matsuzaki, Shigenobu; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kozaki, Shunji

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum strain Osaka05, which has been isolated from an infant patient with botulism in Japan, is the first strain producing botulinum neurotoxin subtype B6. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of C. botulinum Osaka05. PMID:24459252

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium beijerinckii Ne1, Clostridia from an Enrichment Culture Obtained from Australian Subterranean Termite, Nasutitermes exitiosus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Lin, Hai; Tran-Dinh, Nai; Li, Dongmei; Greenfield, Paul; Midgley, David J

    2015-04-23

    The draft genome of Clostridium beijerinckii strain Ne1 was reconstructed from the metagenomic sequence of a mixed-microbial consortium that produced commercially significant quantities of hydrogen from xylan as a sole feedstock. The organism possesses relatively limited hemicellulolytic capacity and likely requires the action of other organisms to completely degrade xylan. Copyright © 2015 Wang et al.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium beijerinckii Ne1, Clostridia from an Enrichment Culture Obtained from Australian Subterranean Termite, Nasutitermes exitiosus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hai; Tran-Dinh, Nai; Li, Dongmei; Greenfield, Paul; Midgley, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome of Clostridium beijerinckii strain Ne1 was reconstructed from the metagenomic sequence of a mixed-microbial consortium that produced commercially significant quantities of hydrogen from xylan as a sole feedstock. The organism possesses relatively limited hemicellulolytic capacity and likely requires the action of other organisms to completely degrade xylan. PMID:25908128

  15. Genome-scale modeling using flux ratio constraints to enable metabolic engineering of clostridial metabolism in silico

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome-scale metabolic networks and flux models are an effective platform for linking an organism genotype to its phenotype. However, few modeling approaches offer predictive capabilities to evaluate potential metabolic engineering strategies in silico. Results A new method called “flux balance analysis with flux ratios (FBrAtio)” was developed in this research and applied to a new genome-scale model of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (iCAC490) that contains 707 metabolites and 794 reactions. FBrAtio was used to model wild-type metabolism and metabolically engineered strains of C. acetobutylicum where only flux ratio constraints and thermodynamic reversibility of reactions were required. The FBrAtio approach allowed solutions to be found through standard linear programming. Five flux ratio constraints were required to achieve a qualitative picture of wild-type metabolism for C. acetobutylicum for the production of: (i) acetate, (ii) lactate, (iii) butyrate, (iv) acetone, (v) butanol, (vi) ethanol, (vii) CO2 and (viii) H2. Results of this simulation study coincide with published experimental results and show the knockdown of the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase increases butanol to acetone selectivity, while the simultaneous over-expression of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase greatly increases ethanol production. Conclusions FBrAtio is a promising new method for constraining genome-scale models using internal flux ratios. The method was effective for modeling wild-type and engineered strains of C. acetobutylicum. PMID:22583864

  16. Genome Wide Analysis for Searching Novel Markers to Rapidly Identify Clostridium Strains.

    PubMed

    Kekre, Anay; Bhushan, Ashish; Kumar, Prasun; Kalia, Vipin Chandra

    2015-09-01

    Microbial classification is based largely on the 16S rRNA (rrs) gene sequence, which is conserved throughout the prokaryotic domain. The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) has become a reference point for almost all practical purposes. The use of this gene is limited by the fact that it can be used to identify only to the extent to what has been known and is available in the RDP. In order to identify an organism whose rrs is not present in the RDP database, we need to generate novel markers to place the unknown on the evolutionary map. Here, sequenced genomes of 27 Clostridium strains belonging to 9 species have been used to identify two sets of genes: (1) common to most of the species, and (2) unique to a species. Combinations of genes (recN, dnaJ, secA, mutS, and/or grpE) and their unique restriction endonuclease digestion (AluI, BfaI and/or Tru9I) patterns have been established to rapidly identify Clostridium species. This strategy for identifying novel markers can be extended to all other organisms and diagnostic applications.

  17. Acetone, isopropanol, and butanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii (syn. Clostridium butylicum) and Clostridium aurantibutyricum

    SciTech Connect

    George, H.A.; Johnson, J.L.; Moore, W.E.C.; Holdeman, L.V.; Chen, J.S.

    1983-03-01

    Thirty-four strains representing 15 species of anaerobic bacteria were screened for acetone, isopropanol, and n-butanol (solvent) production. Under our culture conditions, several strains of Clostridium beijerinckii and C. aurantibutyricum produced at least 40 mM n-butanol (C. acetobutylicum strains produced up to 41 mM n-butanol under similar conditions). Both solvent-producing and non-solvent-producing strains of C. beijerinckii have high DNA homology with a reference strain of C. beijerinckii. Strains labeled ''Clostridium butylicum'' are phenotypically similar to C. beijerinckii and showed at least 78% DNA homology to a reference strain of C. beijerinckii. Therefore, these ''C. butylicum'' strains are members of C. beijerinckii. An earlier DNA homology study has shown that C. beijerinckii, C. aurantibutyricum, and C. acetobutylicum are distinct species.

  18. Clostridium botulinum Group II Isolate Phylogenomic Profiling Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Weedmark, K A; Mabon, P; Hayden, K L; Lambert, D; Van Domselaar, G; Austin, J W; Corbett, C R

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium botulinum group II isolates (n = 163) from different geographic regions, outbreaks, and neurotoxin types and subtypes were characterized in silico using whole-genome sequence data. Two clusters representing a variety of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types and subtypes were identified by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and core single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. While one cluster included BoNT/B4/F6/E9 and nontoxigenic members, the other comprised a wide variety of different BoNT/E subtype isolates and a nontoxigenic strain. In silico MLST and core SNP methods were consistent in terms of clade-level isolate classification; however, core SNP analysis showed higher resolution capability. Furthermore, core SNP analysis correctly distinguished isolates by outbreak and location. This study illustrated the utility of next-generation sequence-based typing approaches for isolate characterization and source attribution and identified discrete SNP loci and MLST alleles for isolate comparison.

  19. Clostridium botulinum Group II Isolate Phylogenomic Profiling Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Weedmark, K. A.; Mabon, P.; Hayden, K. L.; Lambert, D.; Van Domselaar, G.; Austin, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum group II isolates (n = 163) from different geographic regions, outbreaks, and neurotoxin types and subtypes were characterized in silico using whole-genome sequence data. Two clusters representing a variety of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types and subtypes were identified by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and core single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. While one cluster included BoNT/B4/F6/E9 and nontoxigenic members, the other comprised a wide variety of different BoNT/E subtype isolates and a nontoxigenic strain. In silico MLST and core SNP methods were consistent in terms of clade-level isolate classification; however, core SNP analysis showed higher resolution capability. Furthermore, core SNP analysis correctly distinguished isolates by outbreak and location. This study illustrated the utility of next-generation sequence-based typing approaches for isolate characterization and source attribution and identified discrete SNP loci and MLST alleles for isolate comparison. PMID:26116673

  20. Small RNAs in the Genus Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yili; Indurthi, Dinesh C.; Jones, Shawn W.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    2011-01-01

    The genus Clostridium includes major human pathogens and species important to cellulose degradation, the carbon cycle, and biotechnology. Small RNAs (sRNAs) are emerging as crucial regulatory molecules in all organisms, but they have not been investigated in clostridia. Research on sRNAs in clostridia is hindered by the absence of a systematic method to identify sRNA candidates, thus delegating clostridial sRNA research to a hit-and-miss process. Thus, we wanted to develop a method to identify potential sRNAs in the Clostridium genus to open up the field of sRNA research in clostridia. Using comparative genomics analyses combined with predictions of rho-independent terminators and promoters, we predicted sRNAs in 21 clostridial genomes: Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. beijerinckii, C. botulinum (eight strains), C. cellulolyticum, C. difficile, C. kluyveri (two strains), C. novyi, C. perfringens (three strains), C. phytofermentans, C. tetani, and C. thermocellum. Although more than one-third of predicted sRNAs have Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences, only one-sixth have a start codon downstream of SD sequences; thus, most of the predicted sRNAs are noncoding RNAs. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) and Northern analysis were employed to test the presence of a randomly chosen set of sRNAs in C. acetobutylicum and several C. botulinum strains, leading to the confirmation of a large fraction of the tested sRNAs. We identified a conserved, novel sRNA which, together with the downstream gene coding for an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene, responds to the antibiotic clindamycin. The number of predicted sRNAs correlated with the physiological function of the species (high for pathogens, low for cellulolytic, and intermediate for solventogenic), but not with 16S rRNA-based phylogeny. PMID:21264064

  1. Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium thermocellum for Biofuel Production (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, Adam

    2013-03-01

    Adam Guss of Oak Ridge National Lab on "Metabolic engineering of Clostridium thermocellum for biofuel production" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  2. Whole genome sequences of three Clade 3 Clostridium difficile strains carrying binary toxin genes in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Feng, Yu; Wang, Xiaohui; Yang, Jingyu; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Lü, Xiaoju; Zong, Zhiyong

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile consists of six clades but studies on Clade 3 are limited. Here, we report genome sequences of three Clade 3 C. difficile strains carrying genes encoding toxin A and B and the binary toxin. Isolates 103 and 133 (both of ST5) and isolate 106 (ST285) were recovered from three ICU patients. Whole genome sequencing using HiSeq 2500 revealed 4.1-Mb genomes with 28–29% GC content. There were ≥1,104 SNP between the isolates, suggesting they were not of a single clone. The toxin A and B gene-carrying pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) of the three isolates were identical and had the insertion of the transposon Tn6218. The genetic components of PaLoc among Clade 3 strains were the same with only a few nucleotide mutations and deletions/insertions, suggesting that the Tn6218 insertion might have occurred before the divergence within Clade 3. The binary toxin-genes carrying CDT locus (CdtLoc) of the three isolates were identical and were highly similar to those of other Clade 3 strains, but were more divergent from those of other clades. In conclusion, Clade 3 has an unusual clade-specific PaLoc characteristic of a Tn6218 insertion which appears to be the main feature to distinguish Clade 3 from other C. difficile. PMID:28262711

  3. Whole genome sequences of three Clade 3 Clostridium difficile strains carrying binary toxin genes in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Feng, Yu; Wang, Xiaohui; Yang, Jingyu; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Lü, Xiaoju; Zong, Zhiyong

    2017-03-06

    Clostridium difficile consists of six clades but studies on Clade 3 are limited. Here, we report genome sequences of three Clade 3 C. difficile strains carrying genes encoding toxin A and B and the binary toxin. Isolates 103 and 133 (both of ST5) and isolate 106 (ST285) were recovered from three ICU patients. Whole genome sequencing using HiSeq 2500 revealed 4.1-Mb genomes with 28-29% GC content. There were ≥1,104 SNP between the isolates, suggesting they were not of a single clone. The toxin A and B gene-carrying pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) of the three isolates were identical and had the insertion of the transposon Tn6218. The genetic components of PaLoc among Clade 3 strains were the same with only a few nucleotide mutations and deletions/insertions, suggesting that the Tn6218 insertion might have occurred before the divergence within Clade 3. The binary toxin-genes carrying CDT locus (CdtLoc) of the three isolates were identical and were highly similar to those of other Clade 3 strains, but were more divergent from those of other clades. In conclusion, Clade 3 has an unusual clade-specific PaLoc characteristic of a Tn6218 insertion which appears to be the main feature to distinguish Clade 3 from other C. difficile.

  4. Construction and evaluation of a Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven David; Raman, Babu; McKeown, Catherine K; Kale, Shubhangi P; He, Zhili; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2007-04-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is an anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium that can directly convert cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Microarray technology is a powerful tool to gain insights into cellular processes by examining gene expression under various physiological states. Oligonucleotide microarray probes were designed for 96.7% of the 3163 C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 candidate protein-encoding genes and then a partial-genome microarray containing 70 C. thermocellum specific probes was constructed and evaluated. We detected a signal-to-noise ratio of three with as little as 1.0 ng of genomic DNA and only low signals from negative control probes (nonclostridial DNA), indicating the probes were sensitive and specific. In order to further test the specificity of the array we amplified and hybridized 10 C. thermocellum polymerase chain reaction products that represented different genes and found gene specific hybridization in each case. We also constructed a whole-genome microarray and prepared total cellular RNA from the same point in early-logarithmic growth phase from two technical replicates during cellobiose fermentation. The reliability of the microarray data was assessed by cohybridization of labeled complementary DNA from the cellobiose fermentation samples and the pattern of hybridization revealed a linear correlation. These results taken together suggest that our oligonucleotide probe set can be used for sensitive and specific C. thermocellum transcriptomic studies in the future.

  5. Genome shuffling in Clostridium diolis DSM 15410 for improved 1,3-propanediol production.

    PubMed

    Otte, Burkhard; Grunwaldt, Eike; Mahmoud, Osama; Jennewein, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    Several microorganisms are known for their efficient anaerobic conversion of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol, with Clostridium diolis DSM 15410 as one of the better performers in terms of molar yield and volumetric productivity. However, this performance is still insufficient to compete with established chemical processes. Previous studies have shown that high concentrations of 1,3-propanediol, glycerol, and fermentation side products can limit the productivity of C. diolis DSM 15410. Here, we describe the use of genome shuffling for improved 1,3-propanediol fermentation by the strict anaerobe C. diolis DSM 15410. By using chemical mutagenesis, strains with superior substrate and product tolerance levels were isolated and higher product yields were obtained. These superior strains were then used for genome shuffling and selection for 1,3-propanediol and organic acid tolerance. After four rounds of genome shuffling and selection, significant improvements were observed, with one strain attaining a 1,3-propanediol volumetric yield of 85 g/liter. This result represents an 80% improvement compared to the yield from the parental wild-type strain.

  6. Molecular analysis of three Clostridium difficile strain genomes isolated from pig farm-related samples.

    PubMed

    Martín-Burriel, I; Andrés-Lasheras, S; Harders, F; Mainar-Jaime, R C; Ranera, B; Zaragoza, P; Falceto, V; Bolea, Y; Kuijper, E; Bolea, R; Bossers, A; Chirino-Trejo, M

    2017-09-18

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic spore-forming bacillus that usually causes gastrointestinal disorders in man and other animal species. Most of the strains isolated from animals are toxigenic being the virulent ribotype (RT) 078 predominant in several animal species. Although C. difficile is pathogenic to both humans and animals, there is no direct evidence of zoonosis. Deep genome sequencing provides sufficient resolution to analyse which strains found in animals might be related to human pathogens. So far, there are only a few fully sequenced genomes of C. difficile strains isolated from domestic and wild animals. Using Illumina technology, we have sequenced the genome of three isolates; a strain isolated from the vagina of a sow (5754), one from rat (Rattus spp) intestinal content (RC10) and a third one isolated from environmental rat faeces (RF17). Both, rat and rat faeces were sampled in fattening pig farms. Our study reveals a close genetic relationship of two of these isolates with the virulent strain M120 (RT078) isolated from a human patient. The analysis of the sequences has revealed the presence of antibiotic resistance genes, mobile elements, including the transposon linked with virulence Tn6164, and the similarity of virulence factors between these isolates and human strains. This is the first study focused on the sequencing of C. difficile genomes obtained from wild animals like rats, which can be considered as potential reservoirs for humans and other animal species. This study can help to understand the genome composition and epidemiology of this bacterium species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The genome sequence and proteome of bacteriophage ΦCPV1 virulent for Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Volozhantsev, Nikolay V; Verevkin, Vladimir V; Bannov, Vasily A; Krasilnikova, Valentina M; Myakinina, Vera P; Zhilenkov, Eugeni L; Svetoch, Edward A; Stern, Norman J; Oakley, Brian B; Seal, Bruce S

    2011-02-01

    Application of bacteriophages and their lytic enzymes to control Clostridium perfringens is one potential approach to reduce the pathogen on poultry farms and in poultry-processing facilities. Bacteriophages lytic for C. perfringens were isolated from sewage, feces and broiler intestinal contents and ΦCPV1, a virulent bacteriophage, was classified in the family Podoviridae. The purified virus had an icosahedral head and collar of approximately 42nm and 23nm in diameter, respectively, with a structurally complex tail of 37nm lengthwise and a basal plate of 30nm. The ΦCPV1 double-stranded DNA genome was 16,747 base pairs with a GC composition of 30.5%. Twenty-two open reading frames (ORFs) coding for putative peptides containing 30 or more amino acid residues were identified and analyzed in the genome. Amino acid sequences of the predicted proteins from the ΦCPV1 genome ORFs were compared with those from the NCBI database and potential functions of 12 proteins were predicted by sequence homology. Three putative proteins were similar to hypothetical proteins with unknown functions, whereas seven proteins did not have similarity with any known bacteriophage or bacterial proteins. Identified ORFs formed at least four genomic clusters that accounted for predicted proteins involved with replication of the viral DNA, its folding, production of structural components and lytic properties. One bacteriophage genome encoded lysin was predicted to share homology with N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases and a second structural lysin was predicted to be a lysozyme-endopeptidase. These enzymes digest peptidoglycan of the bacterial cell wall and could be considered potential therapeutics to control C. perfringens. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. A Genomic Analysis of Clostridium difficile Infections in Blunt Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Efron, Philip Alexander; Liu, Huazhi; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Cuenca, Alex Gervacio; Gentile, Lori Filichia; Miggins, Makesha Vernee; Bihorac, Azra; Baker, Henry V.; Moore, Frederick Alan; Moldawer, Lyle Linc; Ang, Darwin N

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence demonstrates that susceptibility to Clostridium difficile infection (C. diff. ) is related as much to host risk factors as bacterial potency. Using blood leukocyte genome-wide expression patterns of severe blunt trauma patients obtained by the NIGMS sponsored Glue Grant “Inflammation and the Host Response to Injury” we examined C. diff. patients’ leukocyte genomic profiles to determine pre- and post-infection gene expression changes. Methods The genomic responses of 21 severe trauma patients were analyzed (5 C. diff. 16 controls matched for age and severity of injury). After elimination of probe sets whose expression was below baseline or were unchanged, remaining probe sets underwent hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis. Molecular pathways were generated through Ingenuity Pathways Analysis ®. Results Supervised analysis demonstrated 118 genes whose expression in C. diff. patients varied before and after their infection. Supervised analysis comparing C. diff. to matched non-C. diff. patients prior to infection suggested that the expression of 501 genes were different in the two groups with up to 87% class prediction (p<0.05). Many of these genes are related to cell-mediated immune responses, signaling and interaction. Conclusions Genomic analysis of severe blunt trauma patients reveals a distinct leukocyte expression profile of C. diff. both prior to and after infection. We conclude that an association may exist between a severe trauma patient’s leukocyte genomic expression profile and subsequent susceptibility to C. diff. Further prospective expression analysis of this C. diff. population may reveal potential therapeutic interventions and allow early identification of C. diff. susceptible patients. Level of Evidence Level III prognostic/diagnostic study. PMID:23271108

  9. Comparative genomics of the mesophilic cellulosome-producing Clostridium cellulovorans and its application to biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Yutaka; Miyake, Hideo; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Doi, Roy H

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium cellulovorans is an anaerobic, mesophilic bacterium that efficiently degrades native substrates in soft biomass such as corn fibre and rice straw by producing an extracellular enzyme complex called the cellulosomes. By examining genome sequences from multiple Clostridium species, comparative genomics offers new insight into genome evolution and the way natural selection moulds functional DNA sequence evolution. Recently, we reported the whole genome sequence of C. cellulovorans. A total of 57 cellulosomal genes were found in the C. cellulovorans genome and coded for not only carbohydrate-active enzymes but also lipase, peptidase and proteinase inhibitors, in addition to two novel genes encoding scaffolding proteins CbpB and CbpC. Interestingly, the genome size of C. cellulovorans was about 1 Mbp larger than that of other cellulosome-producing clostridia: mesophilic C. cellulolyticum and thermophilic C. thermocellum. Since the C. cellulovorans genome included not only cellulosomal genes but also a large number of genes encoding non-cellulosomal enzymes, the genome expansion of C. cellulovorans included genes more related to degradation of polysaccharides, such as hemicelluloses and pectins, than to cellulose. In this review, we propose a strategy for industrial applications such as biofuel production using enhanced mesophilic cellulosome- and solvent-producing clostridia.

  10. Genome-Based Infection Tracking Reveals Dynamics of Clostridium difficile Transmission and Disease Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nitin; Miyajima, Fabio; He, Miao; Roberts, Paul; Swale, Andrew; Ellison, Louise; Pickard, Derek; Smith, Godfrey; Molyneux, Rebecca; Dougan, Gordon; Parkhill, Julian; Wren, Brendan W.; Parry, Christopher M.; Pirmohamed, Munir; Lawley, Trevor D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Accurate tracking of Clostridium difficile transmission within healthcare settings is key to its containment but is hindered by the lack of discriminatory power of standard genotyping methods. We describe a whole-genome phylogenetic-based method to track the transmission of individual clones in infected hospital patients from the epidemic C. difficile 027/ST1 lineage, and to distinguish between the 2 causes of recurrent disease, relapse (same strain), or reinfection (different strain). Methods. We monitored patients with C. difficile infection in a UK hospital over a 2-year period. We performed whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 108 strains isolated from symptomatic patients. High-resolution phylogeny was integrated with in-hospital transfers and contact data to create an infection network linking individual patients and specific hospital wards. Results. Epidemic C. difficile 027/ST1 caused the majority of infections during our sampling period. Integration of whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) phylogenetic analysis, which accurately discriminated between 27 distinct SNP genotypes, with patient movement and contact data identified 32 plausible transmission events, including ward-based contamination (66%) or direct donor–recipient contact (34%). Highly contagious donors were identified who contributed to the persistence of clones within distinct hospital wards and the spread of clones between wards, especially in areas of intense turnover. Recurrent cases were identified between 4 and 26 weeks, highlighting the limitation of the standard <8-week cutoff used for patient diagnosis and management. Conclusions. Genome-based infection tracking to monitor the persistence and spread of C. difficile within healthcare facilities could inform infection control and patient management. PMID:26683317

  11. New Insights into the Genetic Diversity of Clostridium botulinum Group III through Extensive Genome Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Woudstra, Cédric; Le Maréchal, Caroline; Souillard, Rozenn; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Mermoud, Isabelle; Desoutter, Denise; Fach, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Animal botulism is caused by group III Clostridium botulinum strains producing type C and D toxins, or their chimeric forms C/D and D/C. Animal botulism is considered an emerging disease in Europe, notably in poultry production. Before our study, 14 genomes from different countries were available in the public database, but none were from France. In order to investigate the genetic relationship of French strains with different geographical areas and find new potential typing targets, 17 strains of C. botulinum group III were sequenced (16 from France and one from New Caledonia). Fourteen were type C/D strains isolated from chickens, ducks, guinea fowl and turkeys and three were type D/C strains isolated from cattle. The New Caledonian strain was a type D/C strain. Whole genome sequence analysis showed the French strains to be closely related to European strains from C. botulinum group III lineages Ia and Ib. The investigation of CRISPR sequences as genetic targets for differentiating strains in group III proved to be irrelevant for type C/D due to a deficient CRISPR/Cas mechanism, but not for type D/C. Conversely, the extrachromosomal elements of type C/D strains could be used to generate a genetic ID card. The highest level of discrimination was achieved with SNP core phylogeny, which allowed differentiation up to strain level and provide the most relevant information for genetic epidemiology studies and discrimination. PMID:27242769

  12. Functional genomics reveals that Clostridium difficile Spo0A coordinates sporulation, virulence and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Laura J; Browne, Hilary P; Yu, Lu; Smits, Wiep Klaas; Fagan, Robert P; Barquist, Lars; Martin, Melissa J; Goulding, David; Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J; Dougan, Gordon; Choudhary, Jyoti S; Lawley, Trevor D

    2014-02-25

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium that can reside as a commensal within the intestinal microbiota of healthy individuals or cause life-threatening antibiotic-associated diarrhea in immunocompromised hosts. C. difficile can also form highly resistant spores that are excreted facilitating host-to-host transmission. The C. difficile spo0A gene encodes a highly conserved transcriptional regulator of sporulation that is required for relapsing disease and transmission in mice. Here we describe a genome-wide approach using a combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis to identify Spo0A regulated genes. Our results validate Spo0A as a positive regulator of putative and novel sporulation genes as well as components of the mature spore proteome. We also show that Spo0A regulates a number of virulence-associated factors such as flagella and metabolic pathways including glucose fermentation leading to butyrate production. The C. difficile spo0A gene is a global transcriptional regulator that controls diverse sporulation, virulence and metabolic phenotypes coordinating pathogen adaptation to a wide range of host interactions. Additionally, the rich breadth of functional data allowed us to significantly update the annotation of the C. difficile 630 reference genome which will facilitate basic and applied research on this emerging pathogen.

  13. Functional genomics reveals that Clostridium difficile Spo0A coordinates sporulation, virulence and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium that can reside as a commensal within the intestinal microbiota of healthy individuals or cause life-threatening antibiotic-associated diarrhea in immunocompromised hosts. C. difficile can also form highly resistant spores that are excreted facilitating host-to-host transmission. The C. difficile spo0A gene encodes a highly conserved transcriptional regulator of sporulation that is required for relapsing disease and transmission in mice. Results Here we describe a genome-wide approach using a combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis to identify Spo0A regulated genes. Our results validate Spo0A as a positive regulator of putative and novel sporulation genes as well as components of the mature spore proteome. We also show that Spo0A regulates a number of virulence-associated factors such as flagella and metabolic pathways including glucose fermentation leading to butyrate production. Conclusions The C. difficile spo0A gene is a global transcriptional regulator that controls diverse sporulation, virulence and metabolic phenotypes coordinating pathogen adaptation to a wide range of host interactions. Additionally, the rich breadth of functional data allowed us to significantly update the annotation of the C. difficile 630 reference genome which will facilitate basic and applied research on this emerging pathogen. PMID:24568651

  14. Large number of phosphotransferase genes in the Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 genome and the study on their evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clostridium beijerinckii is a valuable bacteria species which has the ability of ABE (acetone, butanol and ethanol) production. It has been shown that Phosphotransferase (PTS) is an important and common system for both carbohydrate uptake and phosphorylation in bacteria, but detailed study of the system, especially its fructose/mannose/sorbose family is scant. Results In the genome of Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052, a model strain recently sequenced, there are large number of PTS genes, among them 9 complete sets belong to the fructose/mannose/sorbose family of its enzyme II complex. Our study, based on evidences provided by phylogenetic relationship, analyses of gene contents and clusters, as well as synteny examination, indicates that it is possible to further classify this PTS family into three sub-groups, which are corresponding to the three sugar substrates. Furthermore, we proposed a model how these PTS systems are evolved in bacteria. Conclusion This work may explain the experimental result that Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 can better utilize fructose as substrate, thus could lead to a better understanding of the ABE-producing mechanism in Clostridium beijerinckii and other microbial species. It may help to illustrate a higher butanol-productivity future. PMID:21172059

  15. Reconstruction of Acetogenesis Pathway Using Short-Read Sequencing of Clostridium aceticum Genome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sooin; Song, Yoseb; Choe, Donghui; Cho, Suhyung; Yu, Seok Jong; Cho, Yongseong; Kim, Sun Chang; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium aceticum is an anaerobic homoacetogen, able to reduce CO2 to multi-carbon products using the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. This unique ability to use CO2 or CO makes the microbe a potential platform for the biotech industry. However, the development of genetically engineered homoacetogen for the large-scale production of commodity chemicals is hampered by the limited amount of their genetic and metabolic information. Here we exploited next-generation sequencing to reveal C. aceticum genome. The short-read sequencing produced 44,871,196 high quality reads with an average length of 248 bases. Following sequence trimming step, 30,256,976 reads were assembled into 12,563 contigs with 168-fold coverage and 1,971 bases in length using de Bruijn graph algorithm. Since the k-mer hash length in the algorithm is an important factor for the quality of output contigs, a window of k-mers (k-51 to k-201) was tested to obtain high quality contigs. In addition to the assembly metrics, the functional annotation of the contigs was investigated to select the k-mer optimum. Metabolic pathway mapping using the functional annotation identified the majority of central metabolic pathways, such as the glycolysis and TCA cycle. Further, these analyses elucidated the enzymes consisting of Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, in which CO2 is fixed into acetyl-CoA. Thus, the metabolic reconstruction based on the draft genome assembly provides a foundation for the functional genomics required to engineer C. aceticum.

  16. Draft genome sequence of Clostridium sulfidigenes 113A isolated from sub-seafloor sediments associated with methane hydrate deposits.

    PubMed

    Honkalas, Varsha S; Dabir, Ashwini P; Arora, Preeti; Ranade, Dilip R; Dhakephalkar, Prashant K

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium sulfidigenes 113A is a strictly anaerobic, rod shaped, gram positive bacterium isolated from sub-seafloor sediments associated with methane hydrates. Here, we report the first draft genome of C. sulfidigenes strain 113A, which comprises 3,717,420 bp in 96 contigs with the G+C content of 30.1%. A total of 3148 protein coding sequences were predicted. The genome annotation revealed that 113A could play an important role in biogeochemical cycles and have potential biotechnological applications such as production of organic acids and butanol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genomic and physiological variability within Group II (non-proteolytic) Clostridium botulinum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clostridium botulinum is a group of four physiologically and phylogenetically distinct bacteria that produce botulinum neurotoxin. While studies have characterised variability between strains of Group I (proteolytic) C. botulinum, the genetic and physiological variability and relationships between strains within Group II (non-proteolytic) C. botulinum are not well understood. In this study the genome of Group II strain C. botulinum Eklund 17B (NRP) was sequenced and used to construct a whole genome DNA microarray. This was used in a comparative genomic indexing study to compare the relatedness of 43 strains of Group II C. botulinum (14 type B, 24 type E and 5 type F). These results were compared with characteristics determined from physiological tests. Results Whole genome indexing showed that strains of Group II C. botulinum isolated from a wide variety of environments over more than 75 years clustered together indicating the genetic background of Group II C. botulinum is stable. Further analysis showed that strains forming type B or type F toxin are closely related with only toxin cluster genes targets being unique to either type. Strains producing type E toxin formed a separate subset. Carbohydrate fermentation tests supported the observation that type B and F strains form a separate subset to type E strains. All the type F strains and most of type B strains produced acid from amylopectin, amylose and glycogen whereas type E strains did not. However, these two subsets did not differ strongly in minimum growth temperature or maximum NaCl concentration for growth. No relationship was found between tellurite resistance and toxin type despite all the tested type B and type F strains carrying tehB, while the sequence was absent or diverged in all type E strains. Conclusions Although Group II C. botulinum form a tight genetic group, genomic and physiological analysis indicates there are two distinct subsets within this group. All type B strains and type F

  18. Genome editing in Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 using CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaohua; Dong, Sheng; Wang, Pixiang; Tao, Yong; Wang, Yi

    2017-03-03

    Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 is well known as a hyper-butanol-producing strain. However, the lack of genetic engineering tools hinders further elucidation of its solvent production mechanism and development of more robust strains. In this study, we set out to develop an efficient genome engineering system for this microorganism based on the CRISPR-Cas9 system. First, the functionality of the CRISPR-Cas9 system previously customized for C. beijerinckii was evaluated in C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum by targeting on pta and buk, two essential genes for acetate and butyrate production, respectively. The pta, buk single deletion, and the pta and buk double deletion mutants were successfully obtained based on this system. However, the genome engineering efficiency was rather low (the mutation rate is < 20%). Therefore, the efficiency was further optimized by evaluating various promoters for the gRNA expression. With promoter P J23119 , we achieved a mutation rate of 75% for pta deletion without serial subculturing as suggested previously for C. beijerinckii Thus, this developed CRISPR-Cas9 system is highly desirable for efficient genome editing in C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum Batch fermentation results revealed that both the acid and solvent production profiles were altered due to the disruption of acid production pathways, however neither acetate nor butyrate production was eliminated with the deletion of the corresponding gene. The butanol production, yield and selectivity were improved in mutants dependent on the fermentation medium. In the pta-buk double deletion mutant, the butanol production reached 19.0 g/l in P2 medium, which is one of the highest among the ever reported from batch fermentations.IMPORTANCE An efficient CRISPR-Cas9 genome engineering system was developed for C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. This paves the way for elucidating the solvent production mechanism in this hyper-butanol-producing microorganism and developing strains

  19. Comparative genomics of VirR regulons in Clostridium perfringens strains

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium causing severe diseases such as gas gangrene and pseudomembranosus colitis, that are generally due to the secretion of powerful extracellular toxins. The expression of toxin genes is mainly regulated by VirR, the response regulator of a two-component system. Up to now few targets only are known for this regulator and mainly in one strain (Strain 13). Due to the high genomic and phenotypic variability in toxin production by different strains, the development of effective strategies to counteract C. perfringens infections requires methodologies to reconstruct the VirR regulon from genome sequences. Results We implemented a two step computational strategy allowing to consider available information concerning VirR binding sites in a few species to scan all genomes of the same species, assuming the VirR targets are at least partially conserved across these strains. Results obtained are in agreement with previous works where experimental validation of the promoters have been performed and showed the presence of a core and an accessory regulon of VirR in C. perfringens strains with three target genes also located on plasmids. Moreover, the type E strain JGS1987 has the largest predicted regulon with as many as 10 VirR targets not found in the other genomes. Conclusions In this work we exploited available experimental information concerning the targets of the VirR toxin regulator in one C. perfringens strain to obtain plausible predictions concerning target genes in genomes and plasmids of nearby strains. Our predictions are available for wet-lab researchers working on less characterized C. perfringens strains that can thus design focused experiments reducing the search space of their experiments and increasing the probability of characterizing positive targets with less efforts. Main result was that the VirR regulon is variable in different C. perfringens strains with 4 genes controlled in all but

  20. A Universal Mariner Transposon System for Forward Genetic Studies in the Genus Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Grosse-Honebrink, Alexander; Minton, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA transposons represent an essential tool in the armoury of the molecular microbiologist. We previously developed a catP-based mini transposon system for Clostridium difficile in which the expression of the transposase gene was dependent on a sigma factor unique to C. difficile, TcdR. Here we have shown that the host range of the transposon is easily extended through the rapid chromosomal insertion of the tcdR gene at the pyrE locus of the intended clostridial target using Allele-Coupled Exchange (ACE). To increase the effectiveness of the system, a novel replicon conditional for plasmid maintenance was developed, which no longer supports the effective retention of the transposon delivery vehicle in the presence of the inducer isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). As a consequence, those thiamphenicol resistant colonies that arise in clostridial recipients, following plating on agar medium supplemented with IPTG, are almost exclusively due to insertion of the mini transposon into the genome. The system has been exemplified in both Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium sporogenes, where transposon insertion has been shown to be entirely random. Moreover, appropriate screening of both libraries resulted in the isolation of auxotrophic mutants as well as cells deficient in spore formation/germination. This strategy is capable of being implemented in any Clostridium species. PMID:25836262

  1. A universal mariner transposon system for forward genetic studies in the genus Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Grosse-Honebrink, Alexander; Minton, Nigel P

    2015-01-01

    DNA transposons represent an essential tool in the armoury of the molecular microbiologist. We previously developed a catP-based mini transposon system for Clostridium difficile in which the expression of the transposase gene was dependent on a sigma factor unique to C. difficile, TcdR. Here we have shown that the host range of the transposon is easily extended through the rapid chromosomal insertion of the tcdR gene at the pyrE locus of the intended clostridial target using Allele-Coupled Exchange (ACE). To increase the effectiveness of the system, a novel replicon conditional for plasmid maintenance was developed, which no longer supports the effective retention of the transposon delivery vehicle in the presence of the inducer isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). As a consequence, those thiamphenicol resistant colonies that arise in clostridial recipients, following plating on agar medium supplemented with IPTG, are almost exclusively due to insertion of the mini transposon into the genome. The system has been exemplified in both Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium sporogenes, where transposon insertion has been shown to be entirely random. Moreover, appropriate screening of both libraries resulted in the isolation of auxotrophic mutants as well as cells deficient in spore formation/germination. This strategy is capable of being implemented in any Clostridium species.

  2. Fermentation and genomic analysis of acetone-uncoupled butanol production by Clostridium tetanomorphum.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fuyu; Bao, Guanhui; Zhao, Chunhua; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin; Dong, Hongjun

    2016-02-01

    In typical acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, acetone is the main by-product (50 % of butanol mass) of butanol production, resulting in a low yield of butanol. It is known that some Clostridium tetanomorphum strains are able to produce butanol without acetone in nature. Here, we described that C. tetanomorphum strain DSM665 can produce 4.16 g/L butanol and 4.98 g/L ethanol at pH 6.0, and 9.81 g/L butanol and 1.01 g/L ethanol when adding 1 mM methyl viologen. Butyrate and acetate could be reassimilated and no acetone was produced. Further analysis indicated that the activity of the acetate/butyrate:acetoacetyl-CoA transferase responsible for acetone production is lost in C. tetanomorphum DSM665. The genome of C. tetanomorphum DSM665 was sequenced and deposited in DDBJ, EMBL, and GenBank under the accession no. APJS00000000. Sequence analysis indicated that there are no typical genes (ctfA/B and adc) that are typically parts of an acetone synthesis pathway in C. tetanomorphum DSM665. This work provides new insights in the mechanism of clostridial butanol production and should prove useful for the design of a high-butanol-producing strain.

  3. Physiology, Genomics, and Pathway Engineering of an Ethanol-Tolerant Strain of Clostridium phytofermentans.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Andrew C; Zuroff, Trevor R; Ramya, Mohandass; Boutard, Magali; Cerisy, Tristan; Curtis, Wayne R

    2015-08-15

    Novel processing strategies for hydrolysis and fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass in a single reactor offer large potential cost savings for production of biocommodities and biofuels. One critical challenge is retaining high enzyme production in the presence of elevated product titers. Toward this goal, the cellulolytic, ethanol-producing bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans was adapted to increased ethanol concentrations. The resulting ethanol-tolerant (ET) strain has nearly doubled ethanol tolerance relative to the wild-type level but also reduced ethanol yield and growth at low ethanol concentrations. The genome of the ET strain has coding changes in proteins involved in membrane biosynthesis, the Rnf complex, cation homeostasis, gene regulation, and ethanol production. In particular, purification of the mutant bifunctional acetaldehyde coenzyme A (CoA)/alcohol dehydrogenase showed that a G609D variant abolished its activities, including ethanol formation. Heterologous expression of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase in the ET strain increased cellulose consumption and restored ethanol production, demonstrating how metabolic engineering can be used to overcome disadvantageous mutations incurred during adaptation to ethanol. We discuss how genetic changes in the ET strain reveal novel potential strategies for improving microbial solvent tolerance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Physiology, Genomics, and Pathway Engineering of an Ethanol-Tolerant Strain of Clostridium phytofermentans

    PubMed Central

    Zuroff, Trevor R.; Ramya, Mohandass; Boutard, Magali; Cerisy, Tristan; Curtis, Wayne R.

    2015-01-01

    Novel processing strategies for hydrolysis and fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass in a single reactor offer large potential cost savings for production of biocommodities and biofuels. One critical challenge is retaining high enzyme production in the presence of elevated product titers. Toward this goal, the cellulolytic, ethanol-producing bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans was adapted to increased ethanol concentrations. The resulting ethanol-tolerant (ET) strain has nearly doubled ethanol tolerance relative to the wild-type level but also reduced ethanol yield and growth at low ethanol concentrations. The genome of the ET strain has coding changes in proteins involved in membrane biosynthesis, the Rnf complex, cation homeostasis, gene regulation, and ethanol production. In particular, purification of the mutant bifunctional acetaldehyde coenzyme A (CoA)/alcohol dehydrogenase showed that a G609D variant abolished its activities, including ethanol formation. Heterologous expression of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase in the ET strain increased cellulose consumption and restored ethanol production, demonstrating how metabolic engineering can be used to overcome disadvantageous mutations incurred during adaptation to ethanol. We discuss how genetic changes in the ET strain reveal novel potential strategies for improving microbial solvent tolerance. PMID:26048945

  5. The genome of Clostridium kluyveri, a strict anaerobe with unique metabolic features

    PubMed Central

    Seedorf, Henning; Fricke, W. Florian; Veith, Birgit; Brüggemann, Holger; Liesegang, Heiko; Strittmatter, Axel; Miethke, Marcus; Buckel, Wolfgang; Hinderberger, Julia; Li, Fuli; Hagemeier, Christoph; Thauer, Rudolf K.; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium kluyveri is unique among the clostridia; it grows anaerobically on ethanol and acetate as sole energy sources. Fermentation products are butyrate, caproate, and H2. We report here the genome sequence of C. kluyveri, which revealed new insights into the metabolic capabilities of this well studied organism. A membrane-bound energy-converting NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (RnfCDGEAB) and a cytoplasmic butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase complex (Bcd/EtfAB) coupling the reduction of crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA with the reduction of ferredoxin represent a new energy-conserving module in anaerobes. The genes for NAD-dependent ethanol dehydrogenase and NAD(P)-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase are located next to genes for microcompartment proteins, suggesting that the two enzymes, which are isolated together in a macromolecular complex, form a carboxysome-like structure. Unique for a strict anaerobe, C. kluyveri harbors three sets of genes predicted to encode for polyketide/nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrides and one set for a nonribosomal peptide synthetase. The latter is predicted to catalyze the synthesis of a new siderophore, which is formed under iron-deficient growth conditions. PMID:18218779

  6. Characterizing acetogenic metabolism using a genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The metabolic capabilities of acetogens to ferment a wide range of sugars, to grow autotrophically on H2/CO2, and more importantly on synthesis gas (H2/CO/CO2) make them very attractive candidates as production hosts for biofuels and biocommodities. Acetogenic metabolism is considered one of the earliest modes of bacterial metabolism. A thorough understanding of various factors governing the metabolism, in particular energy conservation mechanisms, is critical for metabolic engineering of acetogens for targeted production of desired chemicals. Results Here, we present the genome-scale metabolic network of Clostridium ljungdahlii, the first such model for an acetogen. This genome-scale model (iHN637) consisting of 637 genes, 785 reactions, and 698 metabolites captures all the major central metabolic and biosynthetic pathways, in particular pathways involved in carbon fixation and energy conservation. A combination of metabolic modeling, with physiological and transcriptomic data provided insights into autotrophic metabolism as well as aided the characterization of a nitrate reduction pathway in C. ljungdahlii. Analysis of the iHN637 metabolic model revealed that flavin based electron bifurcation played a key role in energy conservation during autotrophic growth and helped identify genes for some of the critical steps in this mechanism. Conclusions iHN637 represents a predictive model that recapitulates experimental data, and provides valuable insights into the metabolic response of C. ljungdahlii to genetic perturbations under various growth conditions. Thus, the model will be instrumental in guiding metabolic engineering of C. ljungdahlii for the industrial production of biocommodities and biofuels. PMID:24274140

  7. Characterizing acetogenic metabolism using a genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarajan, H; Sahin, M; Nogales, J; Latif, H; Lovley, DR; Ebrahim, A; Zengler, K

    2013-11-25

    Background: The metabolic capabilities of acetogens to ferment a wide range of sugars, to grow autotrophically on H-2/CO2, and more importantly on synthesis gas (H-2/CO/CO2) make them very attractive candidates as production hosts for biofuels and biocommodities. Acetogenic metabolism is considered one of the earliest modes of bacterial metabolism. A thorough understanding of various factors governing the metabolism, in particular energy conservation mechanisms, is critical for metabolic engineering of acetogens for targeted production of desired chemicals. Results: Here, we present the genome-scale metabolic network of Clostridium ljungdahlii, the first such model for an acetogen. This genome-scale model (iHN637) consisting of 637 genes, 785 reactions, and 698 metabolites captures all the major central metabolic and biosynthetic pathways, in particular pathways involved in carbon fixation and energy conservation. A combination of metabolic modeling, with physiological and transcriptomic data provided insights into autotrophic metabolism as well as aided the characterization of a nitrate reduction pathway in C. ljungdahlii. Analysis of the iHN637 metabolic model revealed that flavin based electron bifurcation played a key role in energy conservation during autotrophic growth and helped identify genes for some of the critical steps in this mechanism. Conclusions: iHN637 represents a predictive model that recapitulates experimental data, and provides valuable insights into the metabolic response of C. ljungdahlii to genetic perturbations under various growth conditions. Thus, the model will be instrumental in guiding metabolic engineering of C. ljungdahlii for the industrial production of biocommodities and biofuels.

  8. Genomic and expression analysis of the vanG-like gene cluster of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Johann; Courtin, Pascal; El Meouche, Imane; Catel-Ferreira, Manuella; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Lemée, Ludovic; Pons, Jean-Louis

    2013-07-01

    Primary antibiotic treatment of Clostridium difficile intestinal diseases requires metronidazole or vancomycin therapy. A cluster of genes homologous to enterococcal glycopeptides resistance vanG genes was found in the genome of C. difficile 630, although this strain remains sensitive to vancomycin. This vanG-like gene cluster was found to consist of five ORFs: the regulatory region consisting of vanR and vanS and the effector region consisting of vanG, vanXY and vanT. We found that 57 out of 83 C. difficile strains, representative of the main lineages of the species, harbour this vanG-like cluster. The cluster is expressed as an operon and, when present, is found at the same genomic location in all strains. The vanG, vanXY and vanT homologues in C. difficile 630 are co-transcribed and expressed to a low level throughout the growth phases in the absence of vancomycin. Conversely, the expression of these genes is strongly induced in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of vancomycin, indicating that the vanG-like operon is functional at the transcriptional level in C. difficile. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC-HPLC) and MS analysis of cytoplasmic peptidoglycan precursors of C. difficile 630 grown without vancomycin revealed the exclusive presence of a UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide with an alanine at the C terminus. UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide [d-Ala] was also the only peptidoglycan precursor detected in C. difficile grown in the presence of vancomycin, corroborating the lack of vancomycin resistance. Peptidoglycan structures of a vanG-like mutant strain and of a strain lacking the vanG-like cluster did not differ from the C. difficile 630 strain, indicating that the vanG-like cluster also has no impact on cell-wall composition.

  9. Clostridium sticklandii, a specialist in amino acid degradation:revisiting its metabolism through its genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clostridium sticklandii belongs to a cluster of non-pathogenic proteolytic clostridia which utilize amino acids as carbon and energy sources. Isolated by T.C. Stadtman in 1954, it has been generally regarded as a "gold mine" for novel biochemical reactions and is used as a model organism for studying metabolic aspects such as the Stickland reaction, coenzyme-B12- and selenium-dependent reactions of amino acids. With the goal of revisiting its carbon, nitrogen, and energy metabolism, and comparing studies with other clostridia, its genome has been sequenced and analyzed. Results C. sticklandii is one of the best biochemically studied proteolytic clostridial species. Useful additional information has been obtained from the sequencing and annotation of its genome, which is presented in this paper. Besides, experimental procedures reveal that C. sticklandii degrades amino acids in a preferential and sequential way. The organism prefers threonine, arginine, serine, cysteine, proline, and glycine, whereas glutamate, aspartate and alanine are excreted. Energy conservation is primarily obtained by substrate-level phosphorylation in fermentative pathways. The reactions catalyzed by different ferredoxin oxidoreductases and the exergonic NADH-dependent reduction of crotonyl-CoA point to a possible chemiosmotic energy conservation via the Rnf complex. C. sticklandii possesses both the F-type and V-type ATPases. The discovery of an as yet unrecognized selenoprotein in the D-proline reductase operon suggests a more detailed mechanism for NADH-dependent D-proline reduction. A rather unusual metabolic feature is the presence of genes for all the enzymes involved in two different CO2-fixation pathways: C. sticklandii harbours both the glycine synthase/glycine reductase and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathways. This unusual pathway combination has retrospectively been observed in only four other sequenced microorganisms. Conclusions Analysis of the C. sticklandii genome and

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium sp. Strain W14A Isolated from a Cellulose-Degrading Biofilm in a Landfill Leachate Microcosm

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome of Clostridium sp. strain W14A, isolated from the anaerobic, cellulolytic biofilm of a cotton string sample incubated in a landfill leachate microcosm. The draft genome comprises 131 contigs, 3,823,510 bp, 51.5% G+C content, and 4,119 predicted coding domain sequences. PMID:27660778

  11. Transcriptional Analysis of Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 and the Hyper-Butanol-Producing Mutant BA101 during the Shift from Acidogenesis to Solventogenesis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhen; Blaschek, Hans P.

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium beijerinckii is an anaerobic bacterium used for the fermentative production of acetone and butanol. The recent availability of genomic sequence information for C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 has allowed for an examination of gene expression during the shift from acidogenesis to solventogenesis over the time course of a batch fermentation using a ca. 500-gene set DNA microarray. The microarray was constructed using a collection of genes which are orthologs of members of gene families previously found to be important to the physiology of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Similar to the onset of solventogenesis in C. acetobutylicum 824, the onset of solventogenesis in C. beijerinckii 8052 was concurrent with the initiation of sporulation. However, forespores and endospores developed more rapidly in C. beijerinckii 8052 than in C. acetobutylicum 824, consistent with the accelerated expression of the sigE- and sigG-regulated genes in C. beijerinckii 8052. The comparison of gene expression patterns and morphological changes in C. beijerinckii 8052 and the hyper-butanol-producing C. beijerinckii strain BA101 indicated that BA101 was less efficient in sporulation and phosphotransferase system-mediated sugar transport than 8052 but that it exhibited elevated expression of several primary metabolic genes and chemotaxis/motility genes. PMID:18849451

  12. Genomic study of the Type IVC secretion system in Clostridium difficile: understanding C. difficile evolution via horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Cheng, Ying; Du, Pengcheng; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jia, Hongbing; Li, Xianping; Wang, Jing; Han, Na; Qiang, Yujun; Chen, Chen; Lu, Jinxing

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, the etiological agent of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), is a gram-positive, spore-forming bacillus that is responsible for ∼20% of antibiotic-related cases of diarrhea and nearly all cases of pseudomembranous colitis. Previous data have shown that a substantial proportion (11%) of the C. difficile genome consists of mobile genetic elements, including seven conjugative transposons. However, the mechanism underlying the formation of a mosaic genome in C. difficile is unknown. The type-IV secretion system (T4SS) is the only secretion system known to transfer DNA segments among bacteria. We searched genome databases to identify a candidate T4SS in C. difficile that could transfer DNA among different C. difficile strains. All T4SS gene clusters in C. difficile are located within genomic islands (GIs), which have variable lengths and structures and are all conjugative transposons. During the horizontal-transfer process of T4SS GIs within the C. difficile population, the excision sites were altered, resulting in different short-tandem repeat sequences among the T4SS GIs, as well as different chromosomal insertion sites and additional regions in the GIs.

  13. Evaluation of hydrogen production by clostridium strains on beet molasses.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ayşe; Kiliç, Nur Koçberber; Dönmez, Gönöl; Dönmez, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792, C. acetobutylicum DSM 1731 and two newly isolated bacteria defined as the members of genus Clostridium - based on the 16S rRNA analysis and biochemical traits - were characterized with regard to their hydrogen production in media containing increasing beet molasses concentrations. The highest hydrogen yield was observed for C. acetobutylicum DSM 792 with a yield of 2.8 mol H2 mol-1 hexose in medium including 60 g L-1 molasses. This bacterium also produced the maximum amount of hydrogen (5908.8 mL L-1) at the same molasses concentration. A slightly lower hydrogen yield was measured for C. acetobutylicum DSM 1731 (2.5 mol H2 mol-1 hexose) when grown on 40 g L-1 molasses. The new isolates Clostridium roseum C and Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum PF produced hydrogen with yields of 2.0 mol H2 mol-1 hexose at 40 and 60 g L-1 molasses and 2.1 mol H2 mol-1 hexose at 40 gL-1 molasses, respectively.

  14. Comparison of Control of Clostridium difficile Infection in Six English Hospitals Using Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Eyre, David W; Fawley, Warren N; Rajgopal, Anu; Settle, Christopher; Mortimer, Kalani; Goldenberg, Simon D; Dawson, Susan; Crook, Derrick W; Peto, Tim E A; Walker, A Sarah; Wilcox, Mark H

    2017-08-01

    Variation in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) rates between healthcare institutions suggests overall incidence could be reduced if the lowest rates could be achieved more widely. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of consecutive C. difficile isolates from 6 English hospitals over 1 year (2013-14) to compare infection control performance. Fecal samples with a positive initial screen for C. difficile were sequenced. Within each hospital, we estimated the proportion of cases plausibly acquired from previous cases. Overall, 851/971 (87.6%) sequenced samples contained toxin genes, and 451 (46.4%) were fecal-toxin-positive. Of 652 potentially toxigenic isolates >90-days after the study started, 128 (20%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 17-23%) were genetically linked (within ≤2 single nucleotide polymorphisms) to a prior patient's isolate from the previous 90 days. Hospital 2 had the fewest linked isolates, 7/105 (7%, 3-13%), hospital 1, 9/70 (13%, 6-23%), and hospitals 3-6 had similar proportions of linked isolates (22-26%) (P ≤ .002 comparing hospital-2 vs 3-6). Results were similar adjusting for locally circulating ribotypes. Adjusting for hospital, ribotype-027 had the highest proportion of linked isolates (57%, 95% CI 29-81%). Fecal-toxin-positive and toxin-negative patients were similarly likely to be a potential transmission donor, OR = 1.01 (0.68-1.49). There was no association between the estimated proportion of linked cases and testing rates. WGS can be used as a novel surveillance tool to identify varying rates of C. difficile transmission between institutions and therefore to allow targeted efforts to reduce CDI incidence.

  15. Genome-Wide Identification of Regulatory RNAs in the Human Pathogen Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Soutourina, Olga A.; Monot, Marc; Boudry, Pierre; Saujet, Laure; Pichon, Christophe; Sismeiro, Odile; Semenova, Ekaterina; Severinov, Konstantin; Le Bouguenec, Chantal; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Dupuy, Bruno; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emergent pathogen, and the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. In an effort to understand the role of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) in C. difficile physiology and pathogenesis, we used an in silico approach to identify 511 sRNA candidates in both intergenic and coding regions. In parallel, RNA–seq and differential 5′-end RNA–seq were used for global identification of C. difficile sRNAs and their transcriptional start sites at three different growth conditions (exponential growth phase, stationary phase, and starvation). This global experimental approach identified 251 putative regulatory sRNAs including 94 potential trans riboregulators located in intergenic regions, 91 cis-antisense RNAs, and 66 riboswitches. Expression of 35 sRNAs was confirmed by gene-specific experimental approaches. Some sRNAs, including an antisense RNA that may be involved in control of C. difficile autolytic activity, showed growth phase-dependent expression profiles. Expression of each of 16 predicted c-di-GMP-responsive riboswitches was observed, and experimental evidence for their regulatory role in coordinated control of motility and biofilm formation was obtained. Finally, we detected abundant sRNAs encoded by multiple C. difficile CRISPR loci. These RNAs may be important for C. difficile survival in bacteriophage-rich gut communities. Altogether, this first experimental genome-wide identification of C. difficile sRNAs provides a firm basis for future RNome characterization and identification of molecular mechanisms of sRNA–based regulation of gene expression in this emergent enteropathogen. PMID:23675309

  16. Complete genome sequence of Clostridium butyricum JKY6D1 isolated from the pit mud of a Chinese flavor liquor-making factory.

    PubMed

    Li, Changrun; Wang, Yansheng; Xie, Guopai; Peng, Bing; Zhang, Baonian; Chen, Wei; Huang, Xunduan; Wu, Hang; Zhang, Buchang

    2016-02-20

    Clostridium butyricum is an important fragrance-producing bacterium in the traditional Chinese flavor liquor-making industry. Here the complete genome sequence of C. butyricum JKY6D1 isolated from the pit mud of a Chinese flavor liquor-making factory is presented. The genome is 4,618,327bp with the GC content of 28.74% and a plasmid of 8060bp. This is the first complete genome sequence of C. butyricum strains available so far.

  17. Transcriptomic and genomic analysis of cellulose fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, Babu; McKeown, Catherine K; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Brown, Steven D; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 wild-type strain to hydrolyze cellulose and ferment the degradation products directly to ethanol and other metabolic byproducts makes it an attractive candidate for consolidated bioprocessing of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. In this study, whole-genome microarrays were used to investigate the expression of C. thermocellum mRNA during growth on crystalline cellulose in controlled replicate batch fermentations. A time-series analysis of gene expression revealed changes in transcript levels of {approx}40% of genes ({approx}1300 out of 3198 ORFs encoded in the genome) during transition from early-exponential to late-stationary phase. K-means clustering of genes with statistically significant changes in transcript levels identified six distinct clusters of temporal expression. Broadly, genes involved in energy production, translation, glycolysis and amino acid, nucleotide and coenzyme metabolism displayed a decreasing trend in gene expression as cells entered stationary phase. In comparison, genes involved in cell structure and motility, chemotaxis, signal transduction and transcription showed an increasing trend in gene expression. Hierarchical clustering of cellulosome-related genes highlighted temporal changes in composition of this multi-enzyme complex during batch growth on crystalline cellulose, with increased expression of several genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes involved in degradation of non-cellulosic substrates in stationary phase. Overall, the results suggest that under low substrate availability, growth slows due to decreased metabolic potential and C. thermocellum alters its gene expression to (i) modulate the composition of cellulosomes that are released into the environment with an increased proportion of enzymes than can efficiently degrade plant polysaccharides other than cellulose, (ii) enhance signal transduction and chemotaxis mechanisms perhaps to sense the oligosaccharide hydrolysis products

  18. Comparative phenotypic analysis and genome sequence of Clostridium beijerinckii SA-1, an offspring of NCIMB 8052.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Espinola, Walter J; Makwana, Satya T; Chinn, Mari S; Thon, Michael R; Azcárate-Peril, M Andrea; Bruno-Bárcena, José M

    2013-12-01

    Production of butanol by solventogenic clostridia is controlled through metabolic regulation of the carbon flow and limited by its toxic effects. To overcome cell sensitivity to solvents, stress-directed evolution methodology was used three decades ago on Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 that spawned the SA-1 strain. Here, we evaluated SA-1 solventogenic capabilities when growing on a previously validated medium containing, as carbon- and energy-limiting substrates, sucrose and the products of its hydrolysis d-glucose and d-fructose and only d-fructose. Comparative small-scale batch fermentations with controlled pH (pH 6.5) showed that SA-1 is a solvent hyper-producing strain capable of generating up to 16.1 g l(-1) of butanol and 26.3 g l(-1) of total solvents, 62.3 % and 63 % more than NCIMB 8052, respectively. This corresponds to butanol and solvent yields of 0.3 and 0.49 g g(-1), respectively (63 % and 65 % increase compared with NCIMB 8052). SA-1 showed a deficiency in d-fructose transport as suggested by its 7 h generation time compared with 1 h for NCIMB 8052. To potentially correlate physiological behaviour with genetic mutations, the whole genome of SA-1 was sequenced using the Illumina GA IIx platform. PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed to analyse the putative variations. As a result, four errors were confirmed and validated in the reference genome of NCIMB 8052 and a total of 10 genetic polymorphisms in SA-1. The genetic polymorphisms included eight single nucleotide variants, one small deletion and one large insertion that it is an additional copy of the insertion sequence ISCb1. Two of the genetic polymorphisms, the serine threonine phosphatase cbs_4400 and the solute binding protein cbs_0769, may possibly explain some of the observed physiological behaviour, such as rerouting of the metabolic carbon flow, deregulation of the d-fructose phosphotransferase transport system and delayed sporulation.

  19. The genome sequence of Clostridium botulinum type C neurotoxin-converting phage and the molecular mechanisms of unstable lysogeny.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kurokawa, Ken; Nakayama, Keisuke; Oshima, Kenshiro; Fujinaga, Yukako; Ohnishi, Makoto; Ohtsubo, Eiichi; Hattori, Masahira; Oguma, Keiji

    2005-11-29

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTXs) produced by Clostridium botulinum are among the most poisonous substances known. Of the seven types of BoNTXs, genes for type C1 and D toxins (BoNTX/C1 and D) are carried by bacteriophages. The gene for exoenzyme C3 also resides on these phages. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of c-st, a representative of BoNTX/C1-converting phages. The genome is a linear double-stranded DNA of 185,682 bp with 404-bp terminal direct repeats, the largest known temperate phage genome. We identified 198 potential protein-coding regions, including the genes for production of BoNTX/C1 and exoenzyme C3. Very exceptionally, as a viable bacteriophage, a number of insertion sequences were found on the c-st genome. By analyzing the molecular structure of the c-st genome in lysogens, we also found that it exists as a circular plasmid prophage. These features account for the unstable lysogeny of BoNTX phages, which has historically been called "pseudolysogeny." The PCR scanning analysis of other BoNTX/C1 and D phages based on the c-st sequence further revealed that BoNTX phages comprise a divergent phage family, probably generated by exchanging genomic segments among BoNTX phages and their relatives.

  20. The genome sequence of Clostridium botulinum type C neurotoxin-converting phage and the molecular mechanisms of unstable lysogeny

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kurokawa, Ken; Nakayama, Keisuke; Oshima, Kenshiro; Fujinaga, Yukako; Ohnishi, Makoto; Ohtsubo, Eiichi; Hattori, Masahira; Oguma, Keiji

    2005-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTXs) produced by Clostridium botulinum are among the most poisonous substances known. Of the seven types of BoNTXs, genes for type C1 and D toxins (BoNTX/C1 and D) are carried by bacteriophages. The gene for exoenzyme C3 also resides on these phages. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of c-st, a representative of BoNTX/C1-converting phages. The genome is a linear double-stranded DNA of 185,682 bp with 404-bp terminal direct repeats, the largest known temperate phage genome. We identified 198 potential protein-coding regions, including the genes for production of BoNTX/C1 and exoenzyme C3. Very exceptionally, as a viable bacteriophage, a number of insertion sequences were found on the c-st genome. By analyzing the molecular structure of the c-st genome in lysogens, we also found that it exists as a circular plasmid prophage. These features account for the unstable lysogeny of BoNTX phages, which has historically been called “pseudolysogeny.” The PCR scanning analysis of other BoNTX/C1 and D phages based on the c-st sequence further revealed that BoNTX phages comprise a divergent phage family, probably generated by exchanging genomic segments among BoNTX phages and their relatives. PMID:16287978

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of an Oxalate-Degrading Strain of Clostridium sporogenes from the Gastrointestinal Tract of the White-Throated Woodrat (Neotoma albigula).

    PubMed

    Oakeson, Kelly F; Miller, Aaron; Dale, Colin; Dearing, Denise

    2016-05-19

    The gastrointestinal tract of the white-throated woodrat Neotoma albigula harbors a diverse microbial population that functions in the degradation of ingested plant secondary compounds. Here, we present the draft genome sequence and annotation of Clostridium sporogenes strain 8-O, a novel oxalate-degrading bacterium isolated from the feces of N. albigula. Copyright © 2016 Oakeson et al.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of an Oxalate-Degrading Strain of Clostridium sporogenes from the Gastrointestinal Tract of the White-Throated Woodrat (Neotoma albigula)

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron; Dale, Colin; Dearing, Denise

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract of the white-throated woodrat Neotoma albigula harbors a diverse microbial population that functions in the degradation of ingested plant secondary compounds. Here, we present the draft genome sequence and annotation of Clostridium sporogenes strain 8-O, a novel oxalate-degrading bacterium isolated from the feces of N. albigula. PMID:27198026

  3. Draft Genome Sequences for Clostridium thermocellum Wild-Type Strain YS and Derived Cellulose Adhesion-Defective Mutant Strain AD2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Lamed, Raphael; Morag, Ely; Borovok, Ilya; Shoham, Yuval; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Yang, Zamin; Land, Miriam L; Utturkar, Sagar M; Keller, Martin; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum wild-type strain YS is an anaerobic, thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium capable of directly converting cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Strain YS and a derived cellulose adhesion-defective mutant strain AD2 played pivotal roles in describing the original cellulosome concept. We present their draft genome sequences.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cellulolytic Strain Clostridium sp. Bc-iso-3 Isolated from an Industrial-Scale Anaerobic Digester

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium sp. Bc-iso-3 is a cellulolytic strain isolated from a Swedish industrial-scale biogas digester. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of four contigs with a total length of 4,327,139 bp and an average coverage of 312.97×. PMID:27789641

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium sp. Strain Ade.TY, a New Biohydrogen- and Biochemical-Producing Bacterium Isolated from Landfill Leachate Sludge.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y M; Juan, J C; Ting, Adeline; Wu, T Y; Gan, H M; Austin, C M

    2014-03-06

    Clostridium sp. strain Ade.TY is potentially a new biohydrogen-producing species isolated from landfill leachate sludge. Here we present the assembly and annotation of its genome, which may provide further insights into its gene interactions for efficient biohydrogen production.

  6. Whole-Genome Sequence of Clostridium botulinum A2B3 87, a Highly Virulent Strain Involved in a Fatal Case of Foodborne Botulism in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Giordani, Francesco; Fillo, Silvia; Anselmo, Anna; Palozzi, Anna Maria; Fortunato, Antonella; Gentile, Bernardina; Pittiglio, Valentina; Spagnolo, Ferdinando; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Fiore, Alfonsina; Auricchio, Bruna; De Medici, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence of a rare bivalent strain of Clostridium botulinum, A2B3 87. The strain was isolated from a foodborne botulism case that occurred in Italy in 1995. The case was characterized by rapid evolution of the illness and failure of conventional treatments. PMID:25814616

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Novel Clostridium Isolates from Northern Iraq.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Srwa R J; Clokie, Martha R J; Millard, Andrew D

    2016-02-25

    Three Clostridium sp. strains were isolated from soil and sediment collected from the Kurdistan region of Iraq. All three isolates were found to harbor putative prophages, with a CRISPR-Cas system found in strains C105KSO13 and C105KSO14. Copyright © 2016 Rashid et al.

  8. The Genome Sequence of Bacteriophage CPV1 Virulent for Clostridium perfringens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Application of bacteriophages and their lytic enzymes to control Clostridium perfringens is one potential approach to reduce the pathogen on poultry farms and in poultry-processing facilities. Bacteriophages lytic for C. perfringens were isolated from sewage, feces and broiler intestinal contents. P...

  9. THE GENOME SEQUENCE OF BACTERIOPHAGE CpV1 LYTIC FOR CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Application of bacteriophages and their lytic enzymes to control Clostri-dium perfringens is one potential approach to reduce the pathogen on poultry farms and in poultry-processing facilities. We have established a collection of 30 bacteriophages lytic for C. perfringens. These were isolated from s...

  10. Complete genome sequence of the podoviral bacteriophage CP24R virulent for Clostridium perfringens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacteriophage 'CP24R was isolated from raw sewage of a waste treatment plant and lytic activity was observed against a type C Clostridium perfringens isolate. Electron microscopy revealed a small virion (44nm diameter icosahedral capsid) with a short, non-contractile tail, indicative of the family ...

  11. Comparative genomic analysis of single-molecule sequencing and hybrid approaches for finishing the Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1 strain DSM 10061 genome

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Nagaraju, Shilpa; Utturkar, Sagar M; De Tissera, Sashini; Segovia, Simón; Mitchell, Wayne; Land, Miriam L; Dassanayake, Asela; Köpke, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium autoethanogenum strain JA1-1 (DSM 10061) is an acetogen capable of fermenting CO, CO2 and H2 (e.g. from syngas or waste gases) into biofuel ethanol and commodity chemicals such as 2,3-butanediol. A draft genome sequence consisting of 100 contigs has been published. Results A closed, high-quality genome sequence for C. autoethanogenum DSM10061 was generated using only the latest single-molecule DNA sequencing technology and without the need for manual finishing. It is assigned to the most complex genome classification based upon genome features such as repeats, prophage, nine copies of the rRNA gene operons. It has a low G + C content of 31.1%. Illumina, 454, Illumina/454 hybrid assemblies were generated and then compared to the draft and PacBio assemblies using summary statistics, CGAL, QUAST and REAPR bioinformatics tools and comparative genomic approaches. Assemblies based upon shorter read DNA technologies were confounded by the large number repeats and their size, which in the case of the rRNA gene operons were ~5 kb. CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Paloindromic Repeats) systems among biotechnologically relevant Clostridia were classified and related to plasmid content and prophages. Potential associations between plasmid content and CRISPR systems may have implications for historical industrial scale Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) fermentation failures and future large scale bacterial fermentations. While C. autoethanogenum contains an active CRISPR system, no such system is present in the closely related Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528. A common prophage inserted into the Arg-tRNA shared between the strains suggests a common ancestor. However, C. ljungdahlii contains several additional putative prophages and it has more than double the amount of prophage DNA compared to C. autoethanogenum. Other differences include important metabolic genes for central metabolism (as an additional hydrogenase and the absence of a

  12. Whole genome sequencing reveals potential spread of Clostridium difficile between humans and farm animals in the Netherlands, 2002 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Knetsch, C W; Connor, T R; Mutreja, A; van Dorp, S M; Sanders, I M; Browne, H P; Harris, D; Lipman, L; Keessen, E C; Corver, J; Kuijper, E J; Lawley, T D

    2014-11-13

    Farm animals are a potential reservoir for human Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), particularly PCR ribotype 078 which is frequently found in animals and humans. Here, whole genome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was used to study the evolutionary relatedness of C. difficile 078 isolated from humans and animals on Dutch pig farms. All sequenced genomes were surveyed for potential antimicrobial resistance determinants and linked to an antimicrobial resistance phenotype. We sequenced the whole genome of 65 C. difficile 078 isolates collected between 2002 and 2011 from pigs (n = 19), asymptomatic farmers (n = 15) and hospitalised patients (n = 31) in the Netherlands. The collection included 12 pairs of human and pig isolates from 2011 collected at 12 different pig farms. A mutation rate of 1.1 SNPs per genome per year was determined for C. difficile 078. Importantly, we demonstrate that farmers and pigs were colonised with identical (no SNP differences) and nearly identical (less than two SNP differences) C. difficile clones. Identical tetracycline and streptomycin resistance determinants were present in human and animal C. difficile 078 isolates. Our observation that farmers and pigs share identical C. difficile strains suggests transmission between these populations, although we cannot exclude the possibility of transmission from a common environmental source.

  13. Whole genome sequencing reveals potential spread of Clostridium difficile between humans and farm animals in the Netherlands, 2002 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Knetsch, C W; Connor, T R; Mutreja, A; van Dorp, S M; Sanders, I M; Browne, H P; Harris, D; Lipman, L; Keessen, E C; Corver, J; Kuijper, E J; Lawley, T D

    2015-01-01

    Farm animals are a potential reservoir for human Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), particularly PCR ribotype 078 which is frequently found in animals and humans. Here, whole genome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was used to study the evolutionary relatedness of C. difficile 078 isolated from humans and animals on Dutch pig farms. All sequenced genomes were surveyed for potential antimicrobial resistance determinants and linked to an antimicrobial resistance phenotype. We sequenced the whole genome of 65 C. difficile 078 isolates collected between 2002 and 2011 from pigs (n = 19), asymptomatic farmers (n = 15) and hospitalised patients (n = 31) in the Netherlands. The collection included 12 pairs of human and pig isolates from 2011 collected at 12 different pig farms. A mutation rate of 1.1 SNPs per genome per year was determined for C. difficile 078. Importantly, we demonstrate that farmers and pigs were colonised with identical (no SNP differences) and nearly identical (less than two SNP differences) C. difficile clones. Identical tetracycline and streptomycin resistance determinants were present in human and animal C. difficile 078 isolates. Our observation that farmers and pigs share identical C. difficile strains suggests transmission between these populations, although we cannot exclude the possibility of transmission from a common environmental source. PMID:25411691

  14. Genomic Analysis of Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage φ3626, Which Integrates into guaA and Possibly Affects Sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Markus; Scherer, Siegfried; Loessner, Martin J.

    2002-01-01

    Two temperate viruses, φ3626 and φ8533, have been isolated from lysogenic Clostridium perfringens strains. Phage φ3626 was chosen for detailed analysis and was inspected by electron microscopy, protein profiling, and host range determination. For the first time, the nucleotide sequence of a bacteriophage infecting Clostridium species was determined. The virus belongs to the Siphoviridae family of the tailed phages, the order Caudovirales. Its genome consists of a linear double-stranded DNA molecule of 33,507 nucleotides, with invariable 3′-protruding cohesive ends of nine residues. Fifty open reading frames were identified, which are organized in three major life cycle-specific gene clusters. The genes required for lytic development show an opposite orientation and arrangement compared to the lysogeny control region. A function could be assigned to 19 gene products, based upon bioinformatic analyses, N-terminal amino acid sequencing, or experimental evidence. These include DNA-packaging proteins, structural components, a dual lysis system, a putative lysogeny switch, and proteins that are involved in replication, recombination, and modification of phage DNA. The presence of genes encoding a putative sigma factor related to sporulation-dependent sigma factors and a putative sporulation-dependent transcription regulator suggests a possible interaction of φ3626 with onset of sporulation in C. perfringens. We found that the φ3626 attachment site attP lies in a noncoding region immediately downstream of int. Integration of the viral genome occurs into the bacterial attachment site attB, which is located within the 3′ end of a guaA homologue. This essential housekeeping gene is functionally independent of the integration status, due to reconstitution of its terminal codons by phage sequence. PMID:12142405

  15. FT-IR spectroscopic analysis for studying Clostridium cell response to conversion of enzymatically hydrolyzed hay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grube, Mara; Gavare, Marita; Nescerecka, Alina; Tihomirova, Kristina; Mezule, Linda; Juhna, Talis

    2013-07-01

    Grass hay is one of assailable cellulose containing non-food agricultural wastes that can be used as a carbohydrate source by microorganisms producing biofuels. In this study three Clostridium strains Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium tetanomorphum, capable of producing acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) were adapted to convert enzymatically hydrolyzed hay used as a growth media additive. The results of growth curves, substrate degradation kinetics and FT-IR analyses of bacterial biomass macromolecular composition showed diverse strain-specific cell response to the growth medium composition.

  16. Genome-directed analysis of prophage excision, host defence systems, and central fermentative metabolism in Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Michael E; Liu, Xuejia; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A; Chou, C Perry

    2016-09-19

    Clostridium pasteurianum is emerging as a prospective host for the production of biofuels and chemicals, and has recently been shown to directly consume electric current. Despite this growing biotechnological appeal, the organism's genetics and central metabolism remain poorly understood. Here we present a concurrent genome sequence for the C. pasteurianum type strain and provide extensive genomic analysis of the organism's defence mechanisms and central fermentative metabolism. Next generation genome sequencing produced reads corresponding to spontaneous excision of a novel phage, designated φ6013, which could be induced using mitomycin C and detected using PCR and transmission electron microscopy. Methylome analysis of sequencing reads provided a near-complete glimpse into the organism's restriction-modification systems. We also unveiled the chief C. pasteurianum Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) locus, which was found to exemplify a Type I-B system. Finally, we show that C. pasteurianum possesses a highly complex fermentative metabolism whereby the metabolic pathways enlisted by the cell is governed by the degree of reductance of the substrate. Four distinct fermentation profiles, ranging from exclusively acidogenic to predominantly alcohologenic, were observed through redox consideration of the substrate. A detailed discussion of the organism's central metabolism within the context of metabolic engineering is provided.

  17. Genome-directed analysis of prophage excision, host defence systems, and central fermentative metabolism in Clostridium pasteurianum

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, Michael E.; Liu, Xuejia; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A.; Chou, C. Perry

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium pasteurianum is emerging as a prospective host for the production of biofuels and chemicals, and has recently been shown to directly consume electric current. Despite this growing biotechnological appeal, the organism’s genetics and central metabolism remain poorly understood. Here we present a concurrent genome sequence for the C. pasteurianum type strain and provide extensive genomic analysis of the organism’s defence mechanisms and central fermentative metabolism. Next generation genome sequencing produced reads corresponding to spontaneous excision of a novel phage, designated φ6013, which could be induced using mitomycin C and detected using PCR and transmission electron microscopy. Methylome analysis of sequencing reads provided a near-complete glimpse into the organism’s restriction-modification systems. We also unveiled the chief C. pasteurianum Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) locus, which was found to exemplify a Type I-B system. Finally, we show that C. pasteurianum possesses a highly complex fermentative metabolism whereby the metabolic pathways enlisted by the cell is governed by the degree of reductance of the substrate. Four distinct fermentation profiles, ranging from exclusively acidogenic to predominantly alcohologenic, were observed through redox consideration of the substrate. A detailed discussion of the organism’s central metabolism within the context of metabolic engineering is provided. PMID:27641836

  18. Comparative genome and phenotypic analysis of Clostridium difficile 027 strains provides insight into the evolution of a hypervirulent bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Stabler, Richard A; He, Miao; Dawson, Lisa; Martin, Melissa; Valiente, Esmeralda; Corton, Craig; Lawley, Trevor D; Sebaihia, Mohammed; Quail, Michael A; Rose, Graham; Gerding, Dale N; Gibert, Maryse; Popoff, Michel R; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon; Wren, Brendan W

    2009-01-01

    Background The continued rise of Clostridium difficile infections worldwide has been accompanied by the rapid emergence of a highly virulent clone designated PCR-ribotype 027. To understand more about the evolution of this virulent clone, we made a three-way genomic and phenotypic comparison of an 'historic' non-epidemic 027 C. difficile (CD196), a recent epidemic and hypervirulent 027 (R20291) and a previously sequenced PCR-ribotype 012 strain (630). Results Although the genomes are highly conserved, the 027 genomes have 234 additional genes compared to 630, which may contribute to the distinct phenotypic differences we observe between these strains relating to motility, antibiotic resistance and toxicity. The epidemic 027 strain has five unique genetic regions, absent from both the non-epidemic 027 and strain 630, which include a novel phage island, a two component regulatory system and transcriptional regulators. Conclusions A comparison of a series of 027 isolates showed that some of these genes appeared to have been gained by 027 strains over the past two decades. This study provides genetic markers for the identification of 027 strains and offers a unique opportunity to explain the recent emergence of a hypervirulent bacterium. PMID:19781061

  19. Comparison of GenomEra C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile as confirmatory tests in a multistep algorithm for diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, Luis; Reigadas, Elena; Marín, Mercedes; Fernández-Chico, Antonia; Catalán, Pilar; Bouza, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    We compared two multistep diagnostic algorithms based on C. Diff Quik Chek Complete and, as confirmatory tests, GenomEra C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 87.2%, 99.7%, 97.1%, and 98.3%, respectively, for the GenomEra-based algorithm and 89.7%, 99.4%, 95.5%, and 98.6%, respectively, for the Xpert-based algorithm. GenomEra represents an alternative to Xpert as a confirmatory test of a multistep algorithm for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) diagnosis.

  20. MLST analysis reveals a highly conserved core genome among poultry isolates of Clostridium septicum.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Anthony P; Rehberger, Thomas G

    2009-06-01

    Clostridium septicum is a highly virulent, anaerobic bacterium capable of establishing necrotizing tissue infections and forming heat resistant endospores. Disease is primarily facilitated by secretion of numerous toxic products including a lethal pore-forming cytolysin. Spontaneously occurring clostridial myonecrosis involving C. septicum has recently reemerged as a concern for many poultry producers. However, despite its increasing prevalence, the epidemiology of infection and population structure of C. septicum remains largely unknown. In this study a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) approach was utilized to examine evolutionary relationships within a diverse collection of C. septicum isolates recovered from poultry flocks experiencing episodes of gangrenous dermatitis. The 109 isolates examined represented 42 turkey flocks and 24 different flocks of broiler chickens as well as C. septicum type strain, ATCC 12464. Isolates were recovered predominantly from gangrenous lesions although isolates from livers, gastrointestinal tracts, spleens and blood were included. The loci analyzed were csa, the major lethal toxin produced by C. septicum, and the housekeeping genes gyrA, groEL, dnaK, recA, tpi, ddl, colA and glpK. These loci were included in part because of their previous use in MLST analysis of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile. Results indicated a high level of conservation present within these housekeeping gene fragments when compared to what has been previously reported for the aforementioned clostridia. Of the 5352 bp of sequence data examined for each isolate, 99.7% (5335/5352) was absolutely conserved among the 109 isolates. Only one of the ten unique sequence types, or allelic profiles, identified among the isolates was recovered from both turkeys and broiler chickens suggesting some host species preference. Phylogenetic analyses identified two unique clusters, or clonal complexes, among these poultry isolates which may have important

  1. Molecular and Genomic Analysis of Genes Encoding Surface-Anchored Proteins from Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Karjalainen, Tuomo; Waligora-Dupriet, Anne-Judith; Cerquetti, Marina; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Maggioni, Andrea; Mauri, Pierluigi; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2001-01-01

    The gene slpA, encoding the S-layer precursor protein in the virulent Clostridium difficile strains C253 and 79–685, was identified. The precursor protein carries a C-terminal highly conserved anchoring domain, similar to the one found in the Cwp66 adhesin (previously characterized in strain 79–685), an SLH domain, and a variable N-terminal domain mediating cell adherence. The genes encoding the S-layer precursor proteins and the Cwp66 adhesin are present in a genetic locus carrying 17 open reading frames, 11 of which encode a similar two-domain architecture, likely to include surface-anchored proteins. PMID:11292772

  2. Sequence Similarity of Clostridium difficile Strains by Analysis of Conserved Genes and Genome Content Is Reflected by Their Ribotype Affiliation

    PubMed Central

    Kurka, Hedwig; Ehrenreich, Armin; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Monot, Marc; Rupnik, Maja; Barbut, Frederic; Indra, Alexander; Dupuy, Bruno; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    PCR-ribotyping is a broadly used method for the classification of isolates of Clostridium difficile, an emerging intestinal pathogen, causing infections with increased disease severity and incidence in several European and North American countries. We have now carried out clustering analysis with selected genes of numerous C. difficile strains as well as gene content comparisons of their genomes in order to broaden our view of the relatedness of strains assigned to different ribotypes. We analyzed the genomic content of 48 C. difficile strains representing 21 different ribotypes. The calculation of distance matrix-based dendrograms using the neighbor joining method for 14 conserved genes (standard phylogenetic marker genes) from the genomes of the C. difficile strains demonstrated that the genes from strains with the same ribotype generally clustered together. Further, certain ribotypes always clustered together and formed ribotype groups, i.e. ribotypes 078, 033 and 126, as well as ribotypes 002 and 017, indicating their relatedness. Comparisons of the gene contents of the genomes of ribotypes that clustered according to the conserved gene analysis revealed that the number of common genes of the ribotypes belonging to each of these three ribotype groups were very similar for the 078/033/126 group (at most 69 specific genes between the different strains with the same ribotype) but less similar for the 002/017 group (86 genes difference). It appears that the ribotype is indicative not only of a specific pattern of the amplified 16S–23S rRNA intergenic spacer but also reflects specific differences in the nucleotide sequences of the conserved genes studied here. It can be anticipated that the sequence deviations of more genes of C. difficile strains are correlated with their PCR-ribotype. In conclusion, the results of this study corroborate and extend the concept of clonal C. difficile lineages, which correlate with ribotypes affiliation. PMID:24482682

  3. The Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium aceticum: a Missing Link between Rnf- and Cytochrome-Containing Autotrophic Acetogens

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Cebulla, Martin; Ilg, Marcus M.; Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Schiel-Bengelsdorf, Bettina; Whited, Gregg; Andreesen, Jan R.; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium aceticum was the first isolated autotrophic acetogen, converting CO2 plus H2 or syngas to acetate. Its genome has now been completely sequenced and consists of a 4.2-Mbp chromosome and a small circular plasmid of 5.7 kbp. Sequence analysis revealed major differences from other autotrophic acetogens. C. aceticum contains an Rnf complex for energy conservation (via pumping protons or sodium ions). Such systems have also been found in C. ljungdahlii and Acetobacterium woodii. However, C. aceticum also contains a cytochrome, as does Moorella thermoacetica, which has been proposed to be involved in the generation of a proton gradient. Thus, C. aceticum seems to represent a link between Rnf- and cytochrome-containing autotrophic acetogens. In C. aceticum, however, the cytochrome is probably not involved in an electron transport chain that leads to proton translocation, as no genes for quinone biosynthesis are present in the genome. PMID:26350967

  4. Genomic Epidemiology of Clostridium botulinum Isolates from Temporally Related Cases of Infant Botulism in New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    McCallum, Nadine; Gray, Timothy J; Wang, Qinning; Ng, Jimmy; Hicks, Leanne; Nguyen, Trang; Yuen, Marion; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2015-09-01

    Infant botulism is a potentially life-threatening paralytic disease that can be associated with prolonged morbidity if not rapidly diagnosed and treated. Four infants were diagnosed and treated for infant botulism in NSW, Australia, between May 2011 and August 2013. Despite the temporal relationship between the cases, there was no close geographical clustering or other epidemiological links. Clostridium botulinum isolates, three of which produced botulism neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) and one BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), were characterized using whole-genome sequencing (WGS). In silico multilocus sequence typing (MLST) found that two of the BoNT/A-producing isolates shared an identical novel sequence type, ST84. The other two isolates were single-locus variants of this sequence type (ST85 and ST86). All BoNT/A-producing isolates contained the same chromosomally integrated BoNT/A2 neurotoxin gene cluster. The BoNT/B-producing isolate carried a single plasmid-borne bont/B gene cluster, encoding BoNT subtype B6. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based typing results corresponded well with MLST; however, the extra resolution provided by the whole-genome SNP comparisons showed that the isolates differed from each other by >3,500 SNPs. WGS analyses indicated that the four infant botulism cases were caused by genomically distinct strains of C. botulinum that were unlikely to have originated from a common environmental source. The isolates did, however, cluster together, compared with international isolates, suggesting that C. botulinum from environmental reservoirs throughout NSW have descended from a common ancestor. Analyses showed that the high resolution of WGS provided important phylogenetic information that would not be captured by standard seven-loci MLST.

  5. Genomic Epidemiology of Clostridium botulinum Isolates from Temporally Related Cases of Infant Botulism in New South Wales, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Timothy J.; Wang, Qinning; Ng, Jimmy; Hicks, Leanne; Nguyen, Trang; Yuen, Marion; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2015-01-01

    Infant botulism is a potentially life-threatening paralytic disease that can be associated with prolonged morbidity if not rapidly diagnosed and treated. Four infants were diagnosed and treated for infant botulism in NSW, Australia, between May 2011 and August 2013. Despite the temporal relationship between the cases, there was no close geographical clustering or other epidemiological links. Clostridium botulinum isolates, three of which produced botulism neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) and one BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), were characterized using whole-genome sequencing (WGS). In silico multilocus sequence typing (MLST) found that two of the BoNT/A-producing isolates shared an identical novel sequence type, ST84. The other two isolates were single-locus variants of this sequence type (ST85 and ST86). All BoNT/A-producing isolates contained the same chromosomally integrated BoNT/A2 neurotoxin gene cluster. The BoNT/B-producing isolate carried a single plasmid-borne bont/B gene cluster, encoding BoNT subtype B6. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based typing results corresponded well with MLST; however, the extra resolution provided by the whole-genome SNP comparisons showed that the isolates differed from each other by >3,500 SNPs. WGS analyses indicated that the four infant botulism cases were caused by genomically distinct strains of C. botulinum that were unlikely to have originated from a common environmental source. The isolates did, however, cluster together, compared with international isolates, suggesting that C. botulinum from environmental reservoirs throughout NSW have descended from a common ancestor. Analyses showed that the high resolution of WGS provided important phylogenetic information that would not be captured by standard seven-loci MLST. PMID:26109442

  6. Novel System for Efficient Isolation of Clostridium Double-Crossover Allelic Exchange Mutants Enabling Markerless Chromosomal Gene Deletions and DNA Integration

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A.; Fast, Alan G.

    2012-01-01

    Isolation of Clostridium mutants based on gene replacement via allelic exchange remains a major limitation for this important genus. Use of a heterologous counterselection marker can facilitate the identification of the generally rare allelic exchange events. We report on the development of an inducible counterselection marker and describe its utility and broad potential in quickly and efficiently generating markerless DNA deletions and integrations at any genomic locus without the need for auxotrophic mutants or the use of the mobile group II introns. This system is based on a codon-optimized mazF toxin gene from Escherichia coli under the control of a lactose-inducible promoter from Clostridium perfringens. This system is potentially applicable to almost all members of the genus Clostridium due to their similarly low genomic GC content and comparable codon usage. We isolated all allelic-exchange-based gene deletions (ca_p0167, sigF, and sigK) or disruptions (ca_p0157 and sigF) we attempted and integrated a 3.6-kb heterologous DNA sequence (made up of a Clostridium ljungdahlii 2.1-kb formate dehydrogenase [fdh] gene plus a FLP recombination target [FRT]-flanked thiamphenicol resistance marker) into the Clostridium acetobutylicum chromosome. Furthermore, we report on the development of a plasmid system with inducible segregational instability, thus enabling efficient deployment of the FLP-FRT system to generate markerless deletion or integration mutants. This enabled expeditious deletion of the thiamphenicol resistance marker from the fdh integrant strain as well as the sigK deletion strain. More generally, our system can potentially be applied to other organisms with underdeveloped genetic tools. PMID:22983967

  7. Comparative genomic analysis of a neurotoxigenic Clostridium species using partial genome sequence: Phylogenetic analysis of a few conserved proteins involved in cellular processes and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Dixit, Aparna; Tomar, Arvind; Singh, Lokendra

    2010-04-01

    Clostridial organisms produce neurotoxins, which are generally regarded as the most potent toxic substances of biological origin and potential biological warfare agents. Clostridium tetani produces tetanus neurotoxin and is responsible for the fatal tetanus disease. In spite of the extensive immunization regimen, the disease is an important cause of death especially among neonates. Strains of C. tetani have not been genetically characterized except the complete genome sequencing of strain E88. The present study reports the genetic makeup and phylogenetic affiliations of an environmental strain of this bacterium with respect to C. tetani E88 and other clostridia. A shot gun library was constructed from the genomic DNA of C. tetani drde, isolated from decaying fish sample. Unique clones were sequenced and sequences compared with its closest relative C. tetani E88. A total of 275 clones were obtained and 32,457 bases of non-redundant sequence were generated. A total of 150 base changes were observed over the entire length of sequence obtained, including, additions, deletions and base substitutions. Of the total 120 ORFs detected, 48 exhibited closest similarity to E88 proteins of which three are hypothetical proteins. Eight of the ORFs exhibited similarity with hypothetical proteins from other organisms and 10 aligned with other proteins from unrelated organisms. There is an overall conservation of protein sequences among the two strains of C. tetani and. Selected ORFs involved in cellular processes and metabolism were subjected to phylogenetic analysis.

  8. Proteomic and genomic characterization of highly infectious Clostridium difficile 630 spores.

    PubMed

    Lawley, Trevor D; Croucher, Nicholas J; Yu, Lu; Clare, Simon; Sebaihia, Mohammed; Goulding, David; Pickard, Derek J; Parkhill, Julian; Choudhary, Jyoti; Dougan, Gordon

    2009-09-01

    Clostridium difficile, a major cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, produces highly resistant spores that contaminate hospital environments and facilitate efficient disease transmission. We purified C. difficile spores using a novel method and show that they exhibit significant resistance to harsh physical or chemical treatments and are also highly infectious, with <7 environmental spores per cm(2) reproducibly establishing a persistent infection in exposed mice. Mass spectrometric analysis identified approximately 336 spore-associated polypeptides, with a significant proportion linked to translation, sporulation/germination, and protein stabilization/degradation. In addition, proteins from several distinct metabolic pathways associated with energy production were identified. Comparison of the C. difficile spore proteome to those of other clostridial species defined 88 proteins as the clostridial spore "core" and 29 proteins as C. difficile spore specific, including proteins that could contribute to spore-host interactions. Thus, our results provide the first molecular definition of C. difficile spores, opening up new opportunities for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  9. Genomic diversity of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from food and human sources

    PubMed Central

    Afshari, A.; Jamshidi, A.; Razmyar, J.; Rad, M.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a serious pathogen which causes enteric diseases in domestic animals and food poisoning in humans. Spores can survive cooking processes and play an important role in the possible onset of disease. In this study, RAPD-PCR and REP-PCR were used to examine the genetic diversity of 49 isolates of C. perfringens type A from three different sources. The results of RAPD-PCR revealed the most genetic diversity among poultry isolates, while human isolates showed the least genetic diversity. Cluster analysis obtained from RAPD-PCR and based on the genetic distances split the 49 strains into five distinct major clusters (A, B, C, D, and E). Cluster A and C were composed of isolates from poultry meat, cluster B was composed of isolates from human stool, cluster D was composed of isolates from minced meat, poultry meat and human stool and cluster E was composed of isolates from minced meat. Further characterization of these strains by using (GTG) 5 fingerprint repetitive sequence-based PCR analysis did not show further differentiation between various types of strains. In conclusion, RAPD-PCR method seems to be very promising for contamination source tracking in the field of food hygiene. PMID:27822244

  10. Proteomic and Genomic Characterization of Highly Infectious Clostridium difficile 630 Spores▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Trevor D.; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Yu, Lu; Clare, Simon; Sebaihia, Mohammed; Goulding, David; Pickard, Derek J.; Parkhill, Julian; Choudhary, Jyoti; Dougan, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, a major cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, produces highly resistant spores that contaminate hospital environments and facilitate efficient disease transmission. We purified C. difficile spores using a novel method and show that they exhibit significant resistance to harsh physical or chemical treatments and are also highly infectious, with <7 environmental spores per cm2 reproducibly establishing a persistent infection in exposed mice. Mass spectrometric analysis identified ∼336 spore-associated polypeptides, with a significant proportion linked to translation, sporulation/germination, and protein stabilization/degradation. In addition, proteins from several distinct metabolic pathways associated with energy production were identified. Comparison of the C. difficile spore proteome to those of other clostridial species defined 88 proteins as the clostridial spore “core” and 29 proteins as C. difficile spore specific, including proteins that could contribute to spore-host interactions. Thus, our results provide the first molecular definition of C. difficile spores, opening up new opportunities for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:19542279

  11. Butanol Production from Crystalline Cellulose by Cocultured Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Shunichi; Kiyoshi, Keiji; Kadokura, Toshimori; Nakazato, Atsumi

    2011-01-01

    We investigated butanol production from crystalline cellulose by cocultured cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum and the butanol-producing strain, Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum (strain N1-4). Butanol was produced from Avicel cellulose after it was incubated with C. thermocellum for at least 24 h at 60°C before the addition of strain N1-4. Butanol produced by strain N1-4 on 4% Avicel cellulose peaked (7.9 g/liter) after 9 days of incubation at 30°C, and acetone was undetectable in this coculture system. Less butanol was produced by cocultured Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii than by strain N1-4, indicating that strain N1-4 was the optimal strain for producing butanol from crystalline cellulose in this coculture system. PMID:21764954

  12. Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages FCP39O and FCP26F: genomic organization and proteomic analysis of the virions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Initial screening for bacteriophages lytic for Clostridium perfringens was performed utilizing filtered samples obtained from poultry (intestinal material), soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water. Lytic phage preparations were initially characterized by transmission electron microscopy ...

  13. Genome Sequencing and Analysis of a Type A Clostridium perfringens Isolate from a Case of Bovine Clostridial Abomasitis

    PubMed Central

    Nowell, Victoria J.; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Songer, J. Glenn; MacInnes, Janet I.; Parreira, Valeria R.; Prescott, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a common inhabitant of the avian and mammalian gastrointestinal tracts and can behave commensally or pathogenically. Some enteric diseases caused by type A C. perfringens, including bovine clostridial abomasitis, remain poorly understood. To investigate the potential basis of virulence in strains causing this disease, we sequenced the genome of a type A C. perfringens isolate (strain F262) from a case of bovine clostridial abomasitis. The ∼3.34 Mbp chromosome of C. perfringens F262 is predicted to contain 3163 protein-coding genes, 76 tRNA genes, and an integrated plasmid sequence, Cfrag (∼18 kb). In addition, sequences of two complete circular plasmids, pF262C (4.8 kb) and pF262D (9.1 kb), and two incomplete plasmid fragments, pF262A (48.5 kb) and pF262B (50.0 kb), were identified. Comparison of the chromosome sequence of C. perfringens F262 to complete C. perfringens chromosomes, plasmids and phages revealed 261 unique genes. No novel toxin genes related to previously described clostridial toxins were identified: 60% of the 261 unique genes were hypothetical proteins. There was a two base pair deletion in virS, a gene reported to encode the main sensor kinase involved in virulence gene activation. Despite this frameshift mutation, C. perfringens F262 expressed perfringolysin O, alpha-toxin and the beta2-toxin, suggesting that another regulation system might contribute to the pathogenicity of this strain. Two complete plasmids, pF262C (4.8 kb) and pF262D (9.1 kb), unique to this strain of C. perfringens were identified. PMID:22412860

  14. Detection of mixed infection from bacterial whole genome sequence data allows assessment of its role in Clostridium difficile transmission.

    PubMed

    Eyre, David W; Cule, Madeleine L; Griffiths, David; Crook, Derrick W; Peto, Tim E A; Walker, A Sarah; Wilson, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequencing offers the prospect of rapid and high precision investigation of infectious disease outbreaks. Close genetic relationships between microorganisms isolated from different infected cases suggest transmission is a strong possibility, whereas transmission between cases with genetically distinct bacterial isolates can be excluded. However, undetected mixed infections-infection with ≥2 unrelated strains of the same species where only one is sequenced-potentially impairs exclusion of transmission with certainty, and may therefore limit the utility of this technique. We investigated the problem by developing a computationally efficient method for detecting mixed infection without the need for resource-intensive independent sequencing of multiple bacterial colonies. Given the relatively low density of single nucleotide polymorphisms within bacterial sequence data, direct reconstruction of mixed infection haplotypes from current short-read sequence data is not consistently possible. We therefore use a two-step maximum likelihood-based approach, assuming each sample contains up to two infecting strains. We jointly estimate the proportion of the infection arising from the dominant and minor strains, and the sequence divergence between these strains. In cases where mixed infection is confirmed, the dominant and minor haplotypes are then matched to a database of previously sequenced local isolates. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithm with in silico and in vitro mixed infection experiments, and apply it to transmission of an important healthcare-associated pathogen, Clostridium difficile. Using hospital ward movement data in a previously described stochastic transmission model, 15 pairs of cases enriched for likely transmission events associated with mixed infection were selected. Our method identified four previously undetected mixed infections, and a previously undetected transmission event, but no direct transmission between the

  15. Detection of Mixed Infection from Bacterial Whole Genome Sequence Data Allows Assessment of Its Role in Clostridium difficile Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, David W.; Cule, Madeleine L.; Griffiths, David; Crook, Derrick W.; Peto, Tim E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequencing offers the prospect of rapid and high precision investigation of infectious disease outbreaks. Close genetic relationships between microorganisms isolated from different infected cases suggest transmission is a strong possibility, whereas transmission between cases with genetically distinct bacterial isolates can be excluded. However, undetected mixed infections—infection with ≥2 unrelated strains of the same species where only one is sequenced—potentially impairs exclusion of transmission with certainty, and may therefore limit the utility of this technique. We investigated the problem by developing a computationally efficient method for detecting mixed infection without the need for resource-intensive independent sequencing of multiple bacterial colonies. Given the relatively low density of single nucleotide polymorphisms within bacterial sequence data, direct reconstruction of mixed infection haplotypes from current short-read sequence data is not consistently possible. We therefore use a two-step maximum likelihood-based approach, assuming each sample contains up to two infecting strains. We jointly estimate the proportion of the infection arising from the dominant and minor strains, and the sequence divergence between these strains. In cases where mixed infection is confirmed, the dominant and minor haplotypes are then matched to a database of previously sequenced local isolates. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithm with in silico and in vitro mixed infection experiments, and apply it to transmission of an important healthcare-associated pathogen, Clostridium difficile. Using hospital ward movement data in a previously described stochastic transmission model, 15 pairs of cases enriched for likely transmission events associated with mixed infection were selected. Our method identified four previously undetected mixed infections, and a previously undetected transmission event, but no direct transmission between

  16. Complete genome analysis of Clostridium bornimense strain M2/40(T): A new acidogenic Clostridium species isolated from a mesophilic two-phase laboratory-scale biogas reactor.

    PubMed

    Tomazetto, Geizecler; Hahnke, Sarah; Koeck, Daniela E; Wibberg, Daniel; Maus, Irena; Pühler, Alfred; Klocke, Michael; Schlüter, Andreas

    2016-08-20

    Taxonomic and functional profiling based on metagenome analyses frequently revealed that members of the class Clostridia dominate biogas reactor communities and perform different essential metabolic pathways in the biogas fermentation process. Clostridium bornimense strain M2/40(T) was recently isolated from a mesophilic two-phase lab-scale biogas reactor continuously fed with maize silage and wheat straw. The genome of the strain was completely sequenced and manually annotated to reconstruct its metabolic potential regarding carbohydrate active enzyme production and fermentation of organic compounds for consolidated biofuel production from biomass. The C. bornimense M2/40(T) genome consists of a chromosome (2,917,864bp in size) containing 2613 protein coding sequences, and a 699,161bp chromid (secondary replicon) harboring 680 coding sequences. Both replicons feature very similar GC-contents of approximately 29%. The complex genome comprises three prophage regions, two CRISPR-cas systems and a putative cellulosomal gene cluster that is located on the second replicon (chromid) of the strain. The overexpressed glycosyl hydrolases (GH) CelK (GH9) and CelA (GH48) encoded in the cellulosomal gene cluster were shown to be active on the substrates xylan and xyloglucan whereas XghA (GH74) is highly active on xyloglucan. Reconstruction of fermentation pathways from genome sequence data revealed that strain M2/40(T) encodes all enzymes for hydrogen, acetate, formate, lactate, butyrate, and ethanol production, leading to the classification of the isolate as acidogenic bacterium. Phylogenetic analyses uncovered that the closest characterized relative of C. bornimense is C. cellulovorans. Comparative analyses of the C. bornimense and C. cellulovorans genomes revealed considerable rearrangements within their chromosomes suggesting that both species evolved separately for a relatively long period of time and adapted to specific tasks within microbial consortia responsible for

  17. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis suggests hydrogenase- and nitrogenase-mediated hydrogen production in Clostridium butyricum CWBI 1009.

    PubMed

    Calusinska, Magdalena; Hamilton, Christopher; Monsieurs, Pieter; Mathy, Gregory; Leys, Natalie; Franck, Fabrice; Joris, Bernard; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Wilmotte, Annick

    2015-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen, given its pollution-free combustion, has great potential to replace fossil fuels in future transportation and energy production. However, current industrial hydrogen production processes, such as steam reforming of methane, contribute significantly to the greenhouse effect. Therefore alternative methods, in particular the use of fermentative microorganisms, have attracted scientific interest in recent years. However the low overall yield obtained is a major challenge in biological H2 production. Thus, a thorough and detailed understanding of the relationships between genome content, gene expression patterns, pathway utilisation and metabolite synthesis is required to optimise the yield of biohydrogen production pathways. In this study transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the hydrogen-producing bacterium Clostridium butyricum CWBI 1009 were carried out to provide a biomolecular overview of the changes that occur when the metabolism shifts to H2 production. The growth, H2-production, and glucose-fermentation profiles were monitored in 20 L batch bioreactors under unregulated-pH and fixed-pH conditions (pH 7.3 and 5.2). Conspicuous differences were observed in the bioreactor performances and cellular metabolisms for all the tested metabolites, and they were pH dependent. During unregulated-pH glucose fermentation increased H2 production was associated with concurrent strong up-regulation of the nitrogenase coding genes. However, no such concurrent up-regulation of the [FeFe] hydrogenase genes was observed. During the fixed pH 5.2 fermentation, by contrast, the expression levels for the [FeFe] hydrogenase coding genes were higher than during the unregulated-pH fermentation, while the nitrogenase transcripts were less abundant. The overall results suggest, for the first time, that environmental factors may determine whether H2 production in C. butyricum CWBI 1009 is mediated by the hydrogenases and/or the nitrogenase. This work, contributing to

  18. Comparative genomic analysis of toxin-negative strains of Clostridium difficile from humans and animals with symptoms of gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Roy Chowdhury, Piklu; DeMaere, Matthew; Chapman, Toni; Worden, Paul; Charles, Ian G; Darling, Aaron E; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2016-03-12

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are a significant health problem to humans and food animals. Clostridial toxins ToxA and ToxB encoded by genes tcdA and tcdB are located on a pathogenicity locus known as the PaLoc and are the major virulence factors of C. difficile. While toxin-negative strains of C. difficile are often isolated from faeces of animals and patients suffering from CDI, they are not considered to play a role in disease. Toxin-negative strains of C. difficile have been used successfully to treat recurring CDI but their propensity to acquire the PaLoc via lateral gene transfer and express clinically relevant levels of toxins has reinforced the need to characterise them genetically. In addition, further studies that examine the pathogenic potential of toxin-negative strains of C. difficile and the frequency by which toxin-negative strains may acquire the PaLoc are needed. We undertook a comparative genomic analysis of five Australian toxin-negative isolates of C. difficile that lack tcdA, tcdB and both binary toxin genes cdtA and cdtB that were recovered from humans and farm animals with symptoms of gastrointestinal disease. Our analyses show that the five C. difficile isolates cluster closely with virulent toxigenic strains of C. difficile belonging to the same sequence type (ST) and have virulence gene profiles akin to those in toxigenic strains. Furthermore, phage acquisition appears to have played a key role in the evolution of C. difficile. Our results are consistent with the C. difficile global population structure comprising six clades each containing both toxin-positive and toxin-negative strains. Our data also suggests that toxin-negative strains of C. difficile encode a repertoire of putative virulence factors that are similar to those found in toxigenic strains of C. difficile, raising the possibility that acquisition of PaLoc by toxin-negative strains poses a threat to human health. Studies in appropriate animal models are needed to

  19. Short-Term Genome Stability of Serial Clostridium difficile Ribotype 027 Isolates in an Experimental Gut Model and Recurrent Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, David W.; Walker, A. Sarah; Freeman, Jane; Baines, Simon D.; Fawley, Warren N.; Chilton, Caroline H.; Griffiths, David; Vaughan, Alison; Crook, Derrick W.; Peto, Tim E. A.; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile whole genome sequencing has the potential to identify related isolates, even among otherwise indistinguishable strains, but interpretation depends on understanding genomic variation within isolates and individuals. Methods Serial isolates from two scenarios were whole genome sequenced. Firstly, 62 isolates from 29 timepoints from three in vitro gut models, inoculated with a NAP1/027 strain. Secondly, 122 isolates from 44 patients (2–8 samples/patient) with mostly recurrent/on-going symptomatic NAP-1/027 C. difficile infection. Reference-based mapping was used to identify single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Results Across three gut model inductions, two with antibiotic treatment, total 137 days, only two new SNVs became established. Pre-existing minority SNVs became dominant in two models. Several SNVs were detected, only present in the minority of colonies at one/two timepoints. The median (inter-quartile range) [range] time between patients’ first and last samples was 60 (29.5–118.5) [0–561] days. Within-patient C. difficile evolution was 0.45 SNVs/called genome/year (95%CI 0.00–1.28) and within-host diversity was 0.28 SNVs/called genome (0.05–0.53). 26/28 gut model and patient SNVs were non-synonymous, affecting a range of gene targets. Conclusions The consistency of whole genome sequencing data from gut model C. difficile isolates, and the high stability of genomic sequences in isolates from patients, supports the use of whole genome sequencing in detailed transmission investigations. PMID:23691061

  20. An unexpected negative influence of light intensity on hydrogen production by dark fermentative bacteria Clostridium beijerinckii.

    PubMed

    Zagrodnik, R; Laniecki, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of light intensity on biohydrogen production from glucose by Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium acetobutylicum, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides was studied to evaluate the performance and possible application in co-culture fermentation system. The applied source of light had spectrum similar to the solar radiation. The influence of light intensity on hydrogen production in dark process by C. acetobutylicum was negligible. In contrast, dark fermentation by C. beijerinckii bacteria showed a significant decrease (83%) in produced hydrogen at light intensity of 540W/m(2). Here, the redirection of metabolism from acetic and butyric acid formation towards lactic acid was observed. This not yet reported effect was probably caused by irradiation of these bacteria by light within UVA range, which is an important component of the solar radiation. The excessive illumination with light of intensity higher than 200W/m(2) resulted in decrease in hydrogen production with photofermentative bacteria as well.

  1. Genomics of Clostridium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Mark Joseph; Johnson, Eric A.

    The clostridia have a rich history and contemporary importance in industrial, environmental, and medical microbiology. Due to their ability to form endospores, clostridia are ubiquitous in nature and are found in many environments, especially in soils and the intestinal tract of animals including humans. Many clostridia cause devastating diseases of humans and animals, such as botulism, tetanus, and gas gangrene, through the production of protein toxins. The clostridia produce more protein toxins that are lethal for humans and animals than any other bacterial genus (Johnson, 2005; Van Heyningen, 1950). Other species are important in the formation of solvents and organic acids by anaerobic fermentations or as a source of unique enzymes for biocatalysis (Bradshaw and Johnson, 2010; Hatheway and Johnson, 1998).

  2. Expanding the Repertoire of Gene Tools for Precise Manipulation of the Clostridium difficile Genome: Allelic Exchange Using pyrE Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Sheryl; Collery, Mark M.; Janoir, Clare; Collignon, Anne; Cartman, Stephen T.; Minton, Nigel P.

    2013-01-01

    Sophisticated genetic tools to modify essential biological processes at the molecular level are pivotal in elucidating the molecular pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile, a major cause of healthcare associated disease. Here we have developed an efficient procedure for making precise alterations to the C. difficile genome by pyrE-based allelic exchange. The robustness and reliability of the method was demonstrated through the creation of in-frame deletions in three genes (spo0A, cwp84, and mtlD) in the non-epidemic strain 630Δerm and two genes (spo0A and cwp84) in the epidemic PCR Ribotype 027 strain, R20291. The system is reliant on the initial creation of a pyrE deletion mutant, using Allele Coupled Exchange (ACE), that is auxotrophic for uracil and resistant to fluoroorotic acid (FOA). This enables the subsequent modification of target genes by allelic exchange using a heterologous pyrE allele from Clostridium sporogenes as a counter-/negative-selection marker in the presence of FOA. Following modification of the target gene, the strain created is rapidly returned to uracil prototrophy using ACE, allowing mutant phenotypes to be characterised in a PyrE proficient background. Crucially, wild-type copies of the inactivated gene may be introduced into the genome using ACE concomitant with correction of the pyrE allele. This allows complementation studies to be undertaken at an appropriate gene dosage, as opposed to the use of multicopy autonomous plasmids. The rapidity of the ‘correction’ method (5–7 days) makes pyrE− strains attractive hosts for mutagenesis studies. PMID:23405251

  3. Complementation of a Clostridium perfringens spo0A mutant with wild-type spo0A from other Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Huang, I-Hsiu; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2006-09-01

    To evaluate whether C. perfringens can be used as a model organism for studying the sporulation process in other clostridia, C. perfringens spo0A mutant IH101 was complemented with wild-type spo0A from four different Clostridium species. Wild-type spo0A from C. acetobutylicum or C. tetani, but not from C. botulinum or C. difficile, restored sporulation and enterotoxin production in IH101. The ability of spo0A from C. botulinum or C. difficile to complement the lack of spore formation in IH101 might be due, at least in part, to the low levels of spo0A transcription and Spo0A production.

  4. As Clear as Mud? Determining the Diversity and Prevalence of Prophages in the Draft Genomes of Estuarine Isolates of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Katherine R; Otieno, James R; Thanki, Anisha; Blades, Matthew J; Millard, Andrew D; Browne, Hilary P; Lawley, Trevor D; Clokie, Martha R J

    2015-05-27

    The bacterium Clostridium difficile is a significant cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. The pathogenic success of this organism can be attributed to its flexible genome which is characterized by the exchange of mobile genetic elements, and by ongoing genome evolution. Despite its pathogenic status, C. difficile can also be carried asymptomatically, and has been isolated from natural environments such as water and sediments where multiple strain types (ribotypes) are found in close proximity. These include ribotypes which are associated with disease, as well as those that are less commonly isolated from patients. Little is known about the genomic content of strains in such reservoirs in the natural environment. In this study, draft genomes have been generated for 13 C. difficile isolates from estuarine sediments including clinically relevant and environmental associated types. To identify the genetic diversity within this strain collection, whole-genome comparisons were performed using the assemblies. The strains are highly genetically diverse with regards to the C. difficile "mobilome," which includes transposons and prophage elements. We identified a novel transposon-like element in two R078 isolates. Multiple, related and unrelated, prophages were detected in isolates across ribotype groups, including two novel prophage elements and those related to the transducing phage φC2. The susceptibility of these isolates to lytic phage infection was tested using a panel of characterized phages found from the same locality. In conclusion, estuarine sediments are a source of genetically diverse C. difficile strains with a complex network of prophages, which could contribute to the emergence of new strains in clinics.

  5. Genome Analysis of Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotype 014 Lineage in Australian Pigs and Humans Reveals a Diverse Genetic Repertoire and Signatures of Long-Range Interspecies Transmission.

    PubMed

    Knight, Daniel R; Squire, Michele M; Collins, Deirdre A; Riley, Thomas V

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype (RT) 014 is well-established in both human and porcine populations in Australia, raising the possibility that C. difficile infection (CDI) may have a zoonotic or foodborne etiology. Here, whole genome sequencing and high-resolution core genome phylogenetics were performed on a contemporaneous collection of 40 Australian RT014 isolates of human and porcine origin. Phylogenies based on MLST (7 loci, STs 2, 13, and 49) and core orthologous genes (1260 loci) showed clustering of human and porcine strains indicative of very recent shared ancestry. Core genome single nucleotide variant (SNV) analysis found 42% of human strains showed a clonal relationship (separated by ≤2 SNVs in their core genome) with one or more porcine strains, consistent with recent inter-host transmission. Clones were spread over a vast geographic area with 50% of the human cases occurring without recent healthcare exposure. These findings suggest a persistent community reservoir with long-range dissemination, potentially due to agricultural recycling of piggery effluent. We also provide the first pan-genome analysis for this lineage, characterizing its resistome, prophage content, and in silico virulence potential. The RT014 is defined by a large "open" pan-genome (7587 genes) comprising a core genome of 2296 genes (30.3% of the total gene repertoire) and an accessory genome of 5291 genes. Antimicrobial resistance genotypes and phenotypes varied across host populations and ST lineages and were characterized by resistance to tetracycline [tetM, tetA(P), tetB(P) and tetW], clindamycin/erythromycin (ermB), and aminoglycosides (aph3-III-Sat4A-ant6-Ia). Resistance was mediated by clinically important mobile genetic elements, most notably Tn6194 (harboring ermB) and a novel variant of Tn5397 (harboring tetM). Numerous clinically important prophages (Siphoviridae and Myoviridae) were identified as well as an uncommon accessory gene regulator locus (agr3). Conservation

  6. Genome Analysis of Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotype 014 Lineage in Australian Pigs and Humans Reveals a Diverse Genetic Repertoire and Signatures of Long-Range Interspecies Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Daniel R.; Squire, Michele M.; Collins, Deirdre A.; Riley, Thomas V.

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype (RT) 014 is well-established in both human and porcine populations in Australia, raising the possibility that C. difficile infection (CDI) may have a zoonotic or foodborne etiology. Here, whole genome sequencing and high-resolution core genome phylogenetics were performed on a contemporaneous collection of 40 Australian RT014 isolates of human and porcine origin. Phylogenies based on MLST (7 loci, STs 2, 13, and 49) and core orthologous genes (1260 loci) showed clustering of human and porcine strains indicative of very recent shared ancestry. Core genome single nucleotide variant (SNV) analysis found 42% of human strains showed a clonal relationship (separated by ≤2 SNVs in their core genome) with one or more porcine strains, consistent with recent inter-host transmission. Clones were spread over a vast geographic area with 50% of the human cases occurring without recent healthcare exposure. These findings suggest a persistent community reservoir with long-range dissemination, potentially due to agricultural recycling of piggery effluent. We also provide the first pan-genome analysis for this lineage, characterizing its resistome, prophage content, and in silico virulence potential. The RT014 is defined by a large “open” pan-genome (7587 genes) comprising a core genome of 2296 genes (30.3% of the total gene repertoire) and an accessory genome of 5291 genes. Antimicrobial resistance genotypes and phenotypes varied across host populations and ST lineages and were characterized by resistance to tetracycline [tetM, tetA(P), tetB(P) and tetW], clindamycin/erythromycin (ermB), and aminoglycosides (aph3-III-Sat4A-ant6-Ia). Resistance was mediated by clinically important mobile genetic elements, most notably Tn6194 (harboring ermB) and a novel variant of Tn5397 (harboring tetM). Numerous clinically important prophages (Siphoviridae and Myoviridae) were identified as well as an uncommon accessory gene regulator locus (agr3

  7. Genome characterization of a novel binary toxin-positive strain of Clostridium difficile and comparison with the epidemic 027 and 078 strains.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhong; Liu, Sidi; Meng, Xiujuan; Liang, Wan; Xu, Zhuofei; Tang, Biao; Wang, Yuanguo; Duan, Juping; Fu, Chenchao; Wu, Bin; Wu, Anhua; Li, Chunhui

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic Gram-positive spore-forming gut pathogen that causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea worldwide. A small number of C. difficile strains express the binary toxin (CDT), which is generally found in C. difficile 027 (ST1) and/or 078 (ST11) in clinic. However, we isolated a binary toxin-positive non-027, non-078 C. difficile LC693 that is associated with severe diarrhea in China. The genotype of this strain was determined as ST201. To understand the pathogenesis-basis of C. difficile ST201, the strain LC693 was chosen for whole genome sequencing, and its genome sequence was analyzed together with the other two ST201 strains VL-0104 and VL-0391 and compared to the epidemic 027/ST1 and 078/ST11 strains. The project finally generated an estimated genome size of approximately 4.07 Mbp for strain LC693. Genome size of the three ST201 strains ranged from 4.07 to 4.16 Mb, with an average GC content between 28.5 and 28.9%. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the ST201 strains belonged to clade 3. The ST201 genomes contained more than 40 antibiotic resistance genes and 15 of them were predicted to be associated with vancomycin-resistance. The ST201 strains contained a larger PaLoc with a Tn6218 element inserted than the 027/ST1 and 078/ST11 strains, and encoded a truncated TcdC. In addition, the ST201 strains contained intact binary toxin coding and regulation genes which are highly homologous to the 027/ST1 strain. Genome comparison of the ST201 strains with the epidemic 027 and 078 strain identified 641 genes specific for C. difficile ST201, and a number of them were predicted as fitness and virulence associated genes. The presence of those genes also contributes to the pathogenesis of the ST201 strains. In this study, the genomic characterization of three binary toxin-positive C. difficile ST201 strains in clade 3 was discussed and compared to the genomes of the epidemic 027 and the 078 strains. Our analysis identified a number

  8. Biotechnological potential of Clostridium butyricum bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Szymanowska-Powałowska, Daria; Orczyk, Dorota; Leja, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    In response to demand from industry for microorganisms with auspicious biotechnological potential, a worldwide interest has developed in bacteria and fungi isolation. Microorganisms of interesting metabolic properties include non-pathogenic bacteria of the genus Clostridium, particularly C. acetobutylicum, C. butyricum and C. pasteurianum. A well-known property of C. butyricum is their ability to produce butyric acid, as well as effectively convert glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (38.2 g/L). A conversion rate of 0.66 mol 1,3-propanediol/mol of glycerol has been obtained. Results of the studies described in the present paper broaden our knowledge of characteristic features of C. butyricum specific isolates in terms of their phylogenetic affiliation, fermentation capacity and antibacterial properties. PMID:25477923

  9. Genome-scale metabolic modeling of a clostridial co-culture for consolidated bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Fahimeh; Zhuang, Kai; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2010-07-01

    An alternative consolidated bioprocessing approach is the use of a co-culture containing cellulolytic and solventogenic clostridia. It has been demonstrated that the rate of cellulose utilization in the co-culture of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium cellulolyticum is improved compared to the mono-culture of C. cellulolyticum, suggesting the presence of syntrophy between these two species. However, the metabolic interactions in the co-culture are not well understood. To understand the metabolic interactions in the co-culture, we developed a genome-scale metabolic model of C. cellulolyticum comprising of 431 genes, 621 reactions, and 603 metabolites. The C. cellulolyticum model can successfully predict the chemostat growth and byproduct secretion with cellulose as the substrate. However, a growth arrest phenomenon, which occurs in batch cultures of C. cellulolyticum at cellulose concentrations higher than 6.7 g/L, cannot be predicted by dynamic flux balance analysis due to the lack of understanding of the underlying mechanism. These genome-scale metabolic models of the pure cultures have also been integrated using a community modeling framework to develop a dynamic model of metabolic interactions in the co-culture. Co-culture simulations suggest that cellobiose inhibition cannot be the main factor that is responsible for improved cellulose utilization relative to mono-culture of C. cellulolyticum.

  10. Selective medium for isolation of Clostridium butyricum from human feces.

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, M R

    1984-01-01

    A selective medium, Clostridium butyricum isolation medium (BIM), is described for the isolation of C. butyricum from human feces. The BIM is a synthetic minimal medium and contains trimethoprim (16 micrograms/ml), D-cycloserine (10 micrograms/ml), and polymyxin B sulfate (20 micrograms/ml) as selective inhibitory agents. Qualitative tests indicated that C. butyricum and other butyric acid-producing clostridia grew on BIM, Clostridium sphenoides and Bacillus cereus produced small colonies, and other clostridia and other obligate anaerobic or facultatively anerobic bacteria were inhibited. Quantitative recovery of C. butyricum from cultures or seeded fecal samples was comparable with BIM and with complex medium, but the quantitative recovery of the other butyric acid-producing clostridia tested (C. beijerinckii, C. acetobutylicum) was lower with BIM than with complex medium. The BIM should aid the rapid isolation of C. butyricum from fecal samples and should be useful for bacteriological investigation of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis. PMID:6490827

  11. Two Novel Toxin Variants Revealed by Whole-Genome Sequencing of 175 Clostridium botulinum Type E Strains

    PubMed Central

    Weedmark, K. A.; Lambert, D. L.; Mabon, P.; Hayden, K. L.; Urfano, C. J.; Leclair, D.; Van Domselaar, G.; Austin, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced 175 Clostridium botulinum type E strains isolated from food, clinical, and environmental sources from northern Canada and analyzed their botulinum neurotoxin (bont) coding sequences (CDSs). In addition to bont/E1 and bont/E3 variant types, neurotoxin sequence analysis identified two novel BoNT type E variants termed E10 and E11. Strains producing type E10 were found along the eastern coastlines of Hudson Bay and the shores of Ungava Bay, while strains producing type E11 were only found in the Koksoak River region of Nunavik. Strains producing BoNT/E3 were widespread throughout northern Canada, with the exception of the coast of eastern Hudson Bay. PMID:25107978

  12. Physiology and Sporulation in Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Dürre, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Clostridia are Gram-positive, anaerobic, endospore-forming bacteria, incapable of dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Comprising approximately 180 species, the genus Clostridium is one of the largest bacterial genera. Physiology is mostly devoted to acid production. Numerous pathways are known, such as the homoacetate fermentation by acetogens, the propionate fermentation by Clostridium propionicum, and the butyrate/butanol fermentation by C. acetobutylicum, a well-known solvent producer. Clostridia degrade sugars, alcohols, amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, and polymers such as starch and cellulose. Energy conservation can be performed by substrate-level phosphorylation as well as by the generation of ion gradients. Endospore formation resembles the mechanism elucidated in Bacillus. Morphology, contents, and properties of spores are very similar to bacilli endospores. Sporulating clostridia usually form swollen mother cells and accumulate the storage substance granulose. However, clostridial sporulation differs by not employing the so-called phosphorelay. Initiation starts by direct phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A. The cascade of sporulation-specific sigma factors is again identical to what is known from Bacillus. The onset of sporulation is coupled in some species to either solvent (acetone, butanol) or toxin (e.g., C. perfringens enterotoxin) formation. The germination of spores is often induced by various amino acids, often in combination with phosphate and sodium ions. In medical applications, C. butyricum spores are used as a C. difficile prophylaxis and as treatment against diarrhea. Recombinant spores are currently under investigation and testing as antitumor agents, because they germinate only in hypoxic tissues (i.e., tumor tissue), allowing precise targeting and direct killing of tumor cells.

  13. Whole genome sequence of Clostridium bornimense strain M2/40 isolated from a lab-scale mesophilic two-phase biogas reactor digesting maize silage and wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Hahnke, Sarah; Wibberg, Daniel; Tomazetto, Geizecler; Pühler, Alfred; Klocke, Michael; Schlüter, Andreas

    2014-08-20

    The bacterium Clostridium bornimense M2/40 is a mesophilic, anaerobic bacterium isolated from a two-phase biogas reactor continuously fed with maize silage and 5% wheat straw. Grown on glucose, it produced H2, CO2, formiate, lactate and propionate as the main fermentation products, of which some compounds serve as substrates for methanogenic Archaea to form methane. Here, the whole genome sequence of the bacterium consisting of two circular replicons is reported. This genome information provides the basis for further studies addressing metabolic features of the isolate and its role in anaerobic biomass degradation.

  14. Clostridium difficile

    MedlinePlus

    ... 18-21yrs. Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & ... Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention ... Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Abdominal > Clostridium difficile Health Issues ...

  15. Comparative Genome Analysis and Global Phylogeny of the Toxin Variant Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotype 017 Reveals the Evolution of Two Independent Sublineages.

    PubMed

    Cairns, M D; Preston, M D; Hall, C L; Gerding, D N; Hawkey, P M; Kato, H; Kim, H; Kuijper, E J; Lawley, T D; Pituch, H; Reid, S; Kullin, B; Riley, T V; Solomon, K; Tsai, P J; Weese, J S; Stabler, R A; Wren, B W

    2017-03-01

    The diarrheal pathogen Clostridium difficile consists of at least six distinct evolutionary lineages. The RT017 lineage is anomalous, as strains only express toxin B, compared to strains from other lineages that produce toxins A and B and, occasionally, binary toxin. Historically, RT017 initially was reported in Asia but now has been reported worldwide. We used whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis to investigate the patterns of global spread and population structure of 277 RT017 isolates from animal and human origins from six continents, isolated between 1990 and 2013. We reveal two distinct evenly split sublineages (SL1 and SL2) of C. difficile RT017 that contain multiple independent clonal expansions. All 24 animal isolates were contained within SL1 along with human isolates, suggesting potential transmission between animals and humans. Genetic analyses revealed an overrepresentation of antibiotic resistance genes. Phylogeographic analyses show a North American origin for RT017, as has been found for the recently emerged epidemic RT027 lineage. Despite having only one toxin, RT017 strains have evolved in parallel from at least two independent sources and can readily transmit between continents. Copyright © 2017 Cairns et al.

  16. Comparative Genome Analysis and Global Phylogeny of the Toxin Variant Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotype 017 Reveals the Evolution of Two Independent Sublineages

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, M. D.; Preston, M. D.; Hall, C. L.; Gerding, D. N.; Hawkey, P. M.; Kato, H.; Kim, H.; Kuijper, E. J.; Lawley, T. D.; Pituch, H.; Reid, S.; Kullin, B.; Riley, T. V.; Solomon, K.; Tsai, P. J.; Weese, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The diarrheal pathogen Clostridium difficile consists of at least six distinct evolutionary lineages. The RT017 lineage is anomalous, as strains only express toxin B, compared to strains from other lineages that produce toxins A and B and, occasionally, binary toxin. Historically, RT017 initially was reported in Asia but now has been reported worldwide. We used whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis to investigate the patterns of global spread and population structure of 277 RT017 isolates from animal and human origins from six continents, isolated between 1990 and 2013. We reveal two distinct evenly split sublineages (SL1 and SL2) of C. difficile RT017 that contain multiple independent clonal expansions. All 24 animal isolates were contained within SL1 along with human isolates, suggesting potential transmission between animals and humans. Genetic analyses revealed an overrepresentation of antibiotic resistance genes. Phylogeographic analyses show a North American origin for RT017, as has been found for the recently emerged epidemic RT027 lineage. Despite having only one toxin, RT017 strains have evolved in parallel from at least two independent sources and can readily transmit between continents. PMID:28031436

  17. Characterization of two novel butanol dehydrogenases involved in butanol degradation in syngas-utilizing bacterium Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yang; Liu, Juanjuan; Liu, Zhen; Li, Fuli

    2014-09-01

    Syngas utilizing bacterium Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528 is a promising platform organism for a whole variety of different biofuels and biochemicals production from syngas. During syngas fermentation, C. ljungdahlii DSM 13528 could convert butanol into butyrate, which significantly reduces productivity of butanol. However, there has been no any enzyme involved in the degradation of butanol characterized in C. ljungdahlii DSM 13528. In this study two genes, CLJU_c24880 and CLJU_c39950, encoding putative butanol dehydrogenase (designated as BDH1 and BDH2) were identified in the genome of C. ljungdahlii DSM 13528 and qRT-PCR analysis showed the expression of bdh1 and bdh2 was significantly upregulated in the presence of 0.25% butanol. And the deduced amino acid sequence for BDH1 and BDH2 showed 69.85 and 68.04% identity with Clostridium acetobutylicum ADH1, respectively. Both BDH1 and BDH2 were oxygen-sensitive and preferred NADP(+) as cofactor and butanol as optimal substrate. The optimal temperature and pH for BDH1 were at 55 °C and pH 7.5 and specific activity was 18.07 ± 0.01 µmol min(-1)  mg(-1) . BDH2 was a thermoactive dehydrogenase with maximum activity at 65 °C and at pH 7.0. The specific activity for BDH2 was 11.21 ± 0.02 µmol min(-1)  mg(-1) . This study provided important information for understanding the molecular mechanism of butanol degradation and determining the targets for gene knockout to improve the productivity of butanol from syngas in C. ljungdahlii DSM 13528 in future.

  18. Clostridium difficile Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) Infection Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) Infection Condition Family HealthSeniors Share ...

  19. Comparison of Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis and Whole-Genome Sequencing for Investigation of Clostridium difficile Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Fawley, W. N.; Best, E. L.; Griffiths, D.; Stoesser, N. E.; Crook, D. W.; Peto, T. E. A.; Walker, A. S.; Wilcox, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    No study to date has compared multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) and whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in an investigation of the transmission of Clostridium difficile infection. Isolates from 61 adults with ongoing and/or recurrent C. difficile infections and 17 asymptomatic carriage episodes in children (201 samples), as well as from 61 suspected outbreaks affecting 2 to 41 patients in 31 hospitals in the United Kingdom (300 samples), underwent 7-locus MLVA and WGS in parallel. When the first and last samples from the same individual taken for a median (interquartile range [IQR]) of 63 days (43 to 105 days) apart were compared, the estimated rates of the evolution of single nucleotide variants (SNVs), summed tandem-repeat differences (STRDs), and locus variants (LVs) were 0.79 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.00 to 1.75), 1.63 (95% CI, 0.00 to 3.59), and 1.21 (95% CI, 0.00 to 2.67)/called genome/year, respectively. Differences of >2 SNVs and >10 STRDs have been used to exclude direct case-to-case transmission. With the first serial sample per individual being used to assess discriminatory power, across all pairs of samples sharing a PCR ribotype, 192/283 (68%) differed by >10 STRDs and 217/283 (77%) by >2 SNVs. Among all pairs of cases from the same suspected outbreak, 1,190/1,488 (80%) pairs had concordant results using >2 SNVs and >10 STRDs to exclude transmission. For the discordant pairs, 229 (15%) had ≥2 SNVs but ≤10 STRDs, and 69 (5%) had ≤2 SNVs but ≥10 STRDs. Discordant pairs had higher numbers of LVs than concordant pairs, supporting the more diverse measure in each type of discordant pair. Conclusions on whether the potential outbreaks were confirmed were concordant in 58/61 (95%) investigations. Overall findings using MLVA and WGS were very similar despite the fact that they analyzed different parts of the bacterial genome. With improvements in WGS technology, it is likely that MLVA locus data will be available from WGS in the

  20. [Preliminary identification of clinically significant Clostridium species].

    PubMed

    Balejová, Magda

    2010-06-01

    Preliminary identification of clinically significant Clostridium spp. is based on evaluating their microscopic and macroscopic morphology, Gram staining (Gram stain-positive structure of the bacterial wall), positive production of lecithinase, lipase and proteolytic activity on egg yolk agar, and simple chemical tests. If this preliminary identification is not sufficient, biochemical identification is performed, along with 16S-rRNA sequencing of the bacterial genome. The article comments on options of preliminary identification of clinically significant Clostridium spp.

  1. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiling of Clostridium perfringens SM101 during Sporulation Extends the Core of Putative Sporulation Genes and Genes Determining Spore Properties and Germination Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinghua; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Abee, Tjakko; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H. J.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of bacterial spores is a highly regulated process and the ultimate properties of the spores are determined during sporulation and subsequent maturation. A wide variety of genes that are expressed during sporulation determine spore properties such as resistance to heat and other adverse environmental conditions, dormancy and germination responses. In this study we characterized the sporulation phases of C. perfringens enterotoxic strain SM101 based on morphological characteristics, biomass accumulation (OD600), the total viable counts of cells plus spores, the viable count of heat resistant spores alone, the pH of the supernatant, enterotoxin production and dipicolinic acid accumulation. Subsequently, whole-genome expression profiling during key phases of the sporulation process was performed using DNA microarrays, and genes were clustered based on their time-course expression profiles during sporulation. The majority of previously characterized C. perfringens germination genes showed upregulated expression profiles in time during sporulation and belonged to two main clusters of genes. These clusters with up-regulated genes contained a large number of C. perfringens genes which are homologs of Bacillus genes with roles in sporulation and germination; this study therefore suggests that those homologs are functional in C. perfringens. A comprehensive homology search revealed that approximately half of the upregulated genes in the two clusters are conserved within a broad range of sporeforming Firmicutes. Another 30% of upregulated genes in the two clusters were found only in Clostridium species, while the remaining 20% appeared to be specific for C. perfringens. These newly identified genes may add to the repertoire of genes with roles in sporulation and determining spore properties including germination behavior. Their exact roles remain to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:25978838

  2. Metabolic network reconstruction and genome-scale model of butanol-producing strain Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Solventogenic clostridia offer a sustainable alternative to petroleum-based production of butanol--an important chemical feedstock and potential fuel additive or replacement. C. beijerinckii is an attractive microorganism for strain design to improve butanol production because it (i) naturally produces the highest recorded butanol concentrations as a byproduct of fermentation; and (ii) can co-ferment pentose and hexose sugars (the primary products from lignocellulosic hydrolysis). Interrogating C. beijerinckii metabolism from a systems viewpoint using constraint-based modeling allows for simulation of the global effect of genetic modifications. Results We present the first genome-scale metabolic model (iCM925) for C. beijerinckii, containing 925 genes, 938 reactions, and 881 metabolites. To build the model we employed a semi-automated procedure that integrated genome annotation information from KEGG, BioCyc, and The SEED, and utilized computational algorithms with manual curation to improve model completeness. Interestingly, we found only a 34% overlap in reactions collected from the three databases--highlighting the importance of evaluating the predictive accuracy of the resulting genome-scale model. To validate iCM925, we conducted fermentation experiments using the NCIMB 8052 strain, and evaluated the ability of the model to simulate measured substrate uptake and product production rates. Experimentally observed fermentation profiles were found to lie within the solution space of the model; however, under an optimal growth objective, additional constraints were needed to reproduce the observed profiles--suggesting the existence of selective pressures other than optimal growth. Notably, a significantly enriched fraction of actively utilized reactions in simulations--constrained to reflect experimental rates--originated from the set of reactions that overlapped between all three databases (P = 3.52 × 10-9, Fisher's exact test). Inhibition of the

  3. Acetone-butanol-ethanol production from substandard and surplus dates by Egyptian native Clostridium strains.

    PubMed

    Abd-Alla, Mohamed Hemida; Zohri, Abdel-Naser Ahmed; El-Enany, Abdel-Wahab Elsadek; Ali, Shimaa Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    One hundred and seven mesophilic isolates of Clostridium were isolated from agricultural soils cultivated with different plants in Assuit Governorate, Egypt. Eighty isolates (out of 107) showed the ability to produce ABE (Acetone, butanol and ethanol) on T6 medium ranging from 0.036 to 31.89 g/L. The highest numbers of ABE producing isolates were obtained from soil samples of potato contributing 27 isolates, followed by 18 isolates from wheat and 10 isolates from onion. On the other hand, there were three native isolates that produced ABE more than those produced by the reference isolate Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (11.543 g/L). The three isolates were identified based on phenotypic and gene encoding 16S rRNA as Clostridium beijerinckii ASU10 (KF372577), Clostridium chauvoei ASU55 (KF372580) and Clostridium roseum ASU58 (KF372581). The highest ABE level from substandard and surplus dates was produced by C. beijerinckii ASU10 (24.07 g/L) comprising butanol 67.15% (16.16 g/L), acetone 30.73% (7.4 g/L) and ethanol 2.12% (0.51 g/L), while C. roseum ASU58 and C. chauvoei ASU55 produced ABE contributing 20.20 and 13.79 g/L, respectively. ABE production by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was 15.01 g/L. This study proved that the native strains C. beijerinckii ASU10 and C. roseum ASU58 have high competitive efficacy on ABE production from economical substrate as substandard and surplus date fruits. Additionally, using this substrate without any nutritional components is considered to be a commercial substrate for desired ABE production.

  4. Clostridium guangxiense sp. nov. and Clostridium neuense sp. nov., two phylogenetically closely related hydrogen-producing species isolated from lake sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Li, Danyang; Xu, Shuhong; Guo, Zhanghao; Zhang, Yan; Man, Lin; Jiang, Binhui; Hu, Xiaomin

    2017-03-01

    Two novel anaerobic, mesophilic, biohydrogen-producing bacteria, designated strains ZGM211T and G1T, were isolated from lake sediment. 16S rRNA and ATP synthase beta subunit (atpD) gene sequences and phylogenetic analysis of strains ZGM211T and G1T revealed an affiliation to the genus Clostridium sensu stricto (cluster I of the clostridia), with Clostridium acetobutylicum as the closest characterized species, showing the same sequence similarity of 96.4 % to the type strain (98.9 % between the two isolates). Cells of the two strains were rod shaped. Growth occurred at 20-45 °C, pH 4.0-8.0 and NaCl concentrations up to 2 % (w/v). Grown on glucose, the main fermentation products were H2, CO2, acetate and butyrate. The major fatty acids were C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. The DNA G+C contents of strains ZGM211T and G1T were 40.7 and 41.5 mol%, respectively. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic differences, strains ZGM211T (=CICC 24070T=BCRC 80950T) and G1T (=CICC 24069T=BCRC 80949T) are proposed as the type strains of novel species of the genus Clostridium with the names Clostridium guangxiense sp. nov. and Clostridium neuense sp. nov., respectively.

  5. Genome wide transcriptomic analysis identifies pathways affected by the infusion of Clostridium perfringens culture supernatant in the duodenum of broilers in situ.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadou, S; Russell, K M; Kaiser, P; Kanellos, T; Burgess, S T G; Mitchell, M; Clutton, E; Naylor, S W; Low, C J; Hutchings, M R; Sparks, N

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A is the main etiological factor for necrotic enteritis, a multifactorial enteric disease that penalizes performance, health, and welfare of poultry. Lack of knowledge of host responses and disease pathogenesis is slowing down progress on developing therapies for disease control. A combined genomewide and targeted gene approach was used to investigate pathways and biological functions affected by the infusion of C. perfringens culture supernatant in the duodenum of broilers in 2 experiments. An in situ isolated loop of duodenum was prepared in anesthetized broilers of 3 wk of age (Exp. 1) and was infused either with crude C. perfringens culture supernatant (n = 7; treated), positive for necrotic enteritis B-like toxin (NetB) as determined by a cytotoxicity assay, or with a control preparation (n = 6; control). Birds were maintained alive for 1 h and then euthanized for tissue recovery. The use of the Affymetrix chicken genome array on RNA samples from loop tissue showed top biological functions affected by culture supernatant infusion included cell morphology, immune cell trafficking, and cell death; pathways affected included death receptor signaling, inflammatory response, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling. In a second in situ study (Exp. 2), broilers were maintained alive for 4 h to monitor temporal expression patterns of targeted genes. Duodenal tissue was removed at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h post-infusion with culture supernatant (n = 9) or a control preparation (n = 5) for histology and gene expression analysis. Genes encoding proinflammatory cytokines, such as interferon γ (IFNγ), cell trafficking, such as neuroblastoma 1 (NBL1) and B cell CLL/Lymphoma 6 (BCL6), and cell death, such as Fas cell surface death receptor (FAS) and GTPase IMAP family member 8 (GIMAP8), were differentially expressed in the duodenum of treated and control broilers (P < 0.05). We have demonstrated that C. perfringens culture supernatant (NetB positive

  6. Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Scott R.

    2017-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) have emerged as one of the principal threats to the health of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. Nucleic acid testing for C. difficile toxin genes has eclipsed traditional clinical diagnostics for CDI in sensitivity and is now widespread in clinical use, but preliminary evidence suggests that this may have come at a cost of substantially reduced positive predictive value. The importance of C. difficile colonization is increasingly recognized not only as a source for false positive clinical testing but also as a source of new infections within hospitals and other healthcare environments. In the last five years, several new treatment strategies that capitalize on the increasing understanding of the altered microbiome and host defenses in CDI patients have completed clinical trials, including fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). This article highlights the changing epidemiology, laboratory diagnostics, pathogenesis, and treatment of CDI. PMID:20513554

  7. Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is used to treat Dupuytren's contracture (a painless thickening and tightening of tissue [cord] beneath ... of tissue can be felt upon examination. Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is also used to treat Peyronie's ...

  8. Expression of a Clostridium perfringens genome-encoded putative N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase as a potential antimicrobial to control the bacterium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a substantial role in non-foodborne human, animal and avian diseases as well as human foodborne disease. Previously discovered C. perfringens bacteriophage lytic enzyme amino acid sequences were utilized to iden...

  9. Comparison of the prevalence and genomic characteristics of Clostridium difficile isolated from various production groups in a vertically integrated swine operation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006. Isolation of C. difficile was performed utilizing an enrichment technique and restrictive media. Prelim...

  10. Complementation of a Clostridium perfringens spo0A Mutant with Wild-Type spo0A from Other Clostridium Species

    PubMed Central

    Huang, I-Hsiu; Sarker, Mahfuzur R.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate whether C. perfringens can be used as a model organism for studying the sporulation process in other clostridia, C. perfringens spo0A mutant IH101 was complemented with wild-type spo0A from four different Clostridium species. Wild-type spo0A from C. acetobutylicum or C. tetani, but not from C. botulinum or C. difficile, restored sporulation and enterotoxin production in IH101. The ability of spo0A from C. botulinum or C. difficile to complement the lack of spore formation in IH101 might be due, at least in part, to the low levels of spo0A transcription and Spo0A production. PMID:16957268

  11. Deriving metabolic engineering strategies from genome-scale modeling with flux ratio constraints.

    PubMed

    Yen, Jiun Y; Nazem-Bokaee, Hadi; Freedman, Benjamin G; Athamneh, Ahmad I M; Senger, Ryan S

    2013-05-01

    Optimized production of bio-based fuels and chemicals from microbial cell factories is a central goal of systems metabolic engineering. To achieve this goal, a new computational method of using flux balance analysis with flux ratios (FBrAtio) was further developed in this research and applied to five case studies to evaluate and design metabolic engineering strategies. The approach was implemented using publicly available genome-scale metabolic flux models. Synthetic pathways were added to these models along with flux ratio constraints by FBrAtio to achieve increased (i) cellulose production from Arabidopsis thaliana; (ii) isobutanol production from Saccharomyces cerevisiae; (iii) acetone production from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803; (iv) H2 production from Escherichia coli MG1655; and (v) isopropanol, butanol, and ethanol (IBE) production from engineered Clostridium acetobutylicum. The FBrAtio approach was applied to each case to simulate a metabolic engineering strategy already implemented experimentally, and flux ratios were continually adjusted to find (i) the end-limit of increased production using the existing strategy, (ii) new potential strategies to increase production, and (iii) the impact of these metabolic engineering strategies on product yield and culture growth. The FBrAtio approach has the potential to design "fine-tuned" metabolic engineering strategies in silico that can be implemented directly with available genomic tools. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Resolving cell composition through simple measurements, genome-scale modeling, and a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Senger, Ryan S; Nazem-Bokaee, Hadi

    2013-01-01

    The biochemical composition of a cell is very complex and dynamic. It varies greatly among different organisms and environmental conditions. Inclusion of proper cell composition data is critical for accurate genome-scale metabolic flux modeling using flux balance analysis (FBA). However, determining cell composition experimentally is currently time-consuming and resource intensive. In this chapter, a method for predicting cell composition using a genome-scale model and "easy to measure" culture data (e.g., glucose uptake rate, and specific growth rate) is presented. The method makes use of a genetic algorithm for nonlinear optimization of a biomass equation (a mathematical description of cell composition). As a case study, the method was used to optimize a biomass equation for Escherichia coli MG1655 under multiple growth environments. The availability of experimentally determined (13)C flux data allowed a direct comparison with FBA predicted fluxes through the TCA cycle. Results showed dramatic improvement upon optimization of the biomass equation. In a second case study, biomass equation optimization was also applied to Clostridium acetobutylicum, an organism with less available biochemical cell composition data in the literature. The method produced a biomass equation highly similar to one determined experimentally for the closely related Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis.

  13. Variability in DPA and Calcium Content in the Spores of Clostridium Species.

    PubMed

    Jamroskovic, Jan; Chromikova, Zuzana; List, Cornelia; Bartova, Barbora; Barak, Imrich; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-01-01

    Spores of a number of clostridial species, and their resistance to thermal treatment is a major concern for the food industry. Spore resistance to wet heat is related to the level of spore hydration, which is inversely correlated with the content of calcium and dipicolinic acid (DPA) in the spore core. It is widely believed that the accumulation of DPA and calcium in the spore core is a fundamental component of the sporulation process for all endospore forming species. We have noticed heterogeneity in the heat resistance capacity and overall DPA/calcium content among the spores of several species belonging to Clostridium sensu stricto group: two C. acetobutylicum strains (DSM 792 and 1731), two C. beijerinckii strains (DSM 791 and NCIMB 8052), and a C. collagenovorans strain (DSM 3089). A C. beijerinckii strain (DSM 791) and a C. acetobutylicum strain (DSM 792) display low Ca and DPA levels. In addition, these two species, with the lowest average Ca/DPA content amongst the strains considered, also exhibit minimal heat resistance. There appears to be no correlation between the Ca/DPA content and the phylogenetic distribution of the C. acetobutylicum and C. beijerinckii species based either on the 16S rRNA or the spoVA gene. This finding suggests that a subset of Clostridium sensu stricto species produce spores with low resistance to wet heat. Additionally, analysis of individual spores using STEM-EDS and STXM revealed that DPA and calcium levels can also vary amongst individual spores in a single spore population.

  14. Variability in DPA and Calcium Conte